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Sample records for hla-identical sibling donor

  1. Current outcome of HLA identical sibling versus unrelated donor transplants in severe aplastic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Socié, Gerard; Hamladji, Rose Marie

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed 1448 patients with acquired aplastic anemia grafted between 2005 and 2009, and compared outcome of identical sibling (n=940) versus unrelated donor (n=508) transplants. When compared to the latter, sibling transplants were less likely to be performed beyond 180 days from diagnosis.......04). In conclusion, in multivariate analysis, the outcome of unrelated donor transplants for acquired aplastic anemia, is currently not statistically inferior when compared to sibling transplants, although patients are at greater risk of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The use of peripheral blood grafts...

  2. Combined umbilical cord blood and bone marrow from HLA-identical sibling donors for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sandeep; Boulad, Farid; Cowan, Morton J; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Dahake, Jueeli; Edwards, Sandie; Walters, Mark C

    2014-09-01

    It is well established that umbilical cord blood and bone marrow are biologically different stem cell sources. We analyzed the feasibility and outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 13 children (median age 5.9 years) with hemoglobinopathies after the co- infusion of cord blood (CB) and bone marrow (BM) from the same human leucocyte antigen (HLA) identical sibling donor. We also compared outcomes of children with co-transplantation to outcomes in children with hemoglobinopathies who had received a BM (n = 21) or CB (n = 22) transplant alone. Compared to CB transplant (CBT) recipients, the co-transplant group had more rapid neutrophil (17 vs. 25 days, P = 0.013) and platelet (29 vs. 48 days, P = 0.009) recovery and less transplant related mortality. Patients who received a co-transplant had a lower incidence of ≥ grade II acute (0% vs. 26.3%) and chronic (0% vs. 21%) graft versus host disease (GVHD) compared to BM transplant (BMT) recipients (P = 0.055 and 0.045, respectively). With a median follow-up of >60 months in each treatment group, the 5-year probability of event free survival (EFS) was 100% in the co-transplant group, 90% after BMT and 86% after CBT (P = 0.42). Co-transplantation of CB and BM from HLA-identical sibling donors appears to be a feasible and effective strategy to further optimize outcomes of HSCT for hemoglobinopathies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Improved survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients of HLA-A3/11 absent for donor KIR3DL2 after non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cells transplantation

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    farhad shahsavar

    2011-08-01

    Conclusion: These data indicate that the absence of HLA class I ligand in the recipient for donor-inhibitory KIR can be a prognostic factor for transplantation outcomes in non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation and that the lack of HLA-A3/11 for donor KIR3DL2 can contribute to improved survival for patients with ALL.

  4. Donor-reactive cytokine profiles after HLA-identical living-related kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Gerrits (Jeroen); J. van de Wetering (Jacqueline); J.J. Drabbels (Jos); F.H.J. Claas (Frans); W. Weimar (Willem); N.M. van Besouw (Nicole)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. After HLA-identical living-related (LR) kidney transplantation, only non-HLA antigen mismatches between donor and recipient may exist. We questioned whether donor-reactive responses against non-HLA antigens could be found after HLA-identical LR kidney transplantation, and

  5. Results of a HOVON/SAKK donor versus no-donor analysis of myeloablative HLA-identical sibling stem cell transplantation in first remission acute myeloid leukemia in young and middle-aged adults : benefits for whom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Jan J.; van Putten, Wim L. J.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Theobald, Matthias; Jacky, Emanuel; Daenen, Simon M. G.; Kooy, Marinus van Marwijk; Wijermans, Pierre; Schouten, Harry; Huijgens, Peter C.; van der Lelie, Hans; Fey, Martin; Ferrant, Augustin; Maertens, Johan; Gratwohl, Alois; Lowenberg, Bob

    2007-01-01

    The Dutch-Belgian Hemato-Oncology Cooperative Group and the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (HOVON-SAKK) collaborative study group evaluated outcome of patients (pts) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first remission (CR1) entered in 3 consecutive studies according to a donor versus

  6. Results of a HOVON/SAKK donor versus no-donor analysis of myeloablative HLA-identical sibling stem cell transplantation in first remission acute myeloid leukemia in young and middle-aged adults: benefits for whom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Jan J.; van Putten, Wim L. J.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Theobald, Matthias; Jacky, Emanuel; Daenen, Simon M. G.; van Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Wijermans, Pierre; Schouten, Harry; Huijgens, Peter C.; van der Lelie, Hans; Fey, Martin; Ferrant, Augustin; Maertens, Johan; Gratwohl, Alois; Lowenberg, Bob

    2007-01-01

    The Dutch-Belgian Hemato-Oncology Cooperative Group and the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (HOVON-SAKK) collaborative study group evaluated outcome of patients (pts) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first remission (CR1) entered in 3 consecutive studies according to a donor versus

  7. The impact of chronic GVHD on survival of Patients with acute myeloid leukemia after non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling peripheral blood stem cells transplantation

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    farhad Shahsavar

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: These data indicate that the occurrence of cGVHD is an important predictor of outcome of non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling allogeneic PBSCT, in those AML patients who develope cGVHD have a high chance of survival.

  8. Graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic transplantation from HLA-identical sibling with antithymocyte globulin-based reduced-intensity preparative regimen.

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    Mohty, Mohamad; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Faucher, Catherine; Choufi, Bachra; Bilger, Karin; Tournilhac, Olivier; Vey, Norbert; Stoppa, Anne-Marie; Coso, Diane; Chabannon, Christian; Viens, Patrice; Maraninchi, Dominique; Blaise, Didier

    2003-07-15

    Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens are increasingly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). RIC has been shown to allow engraftment with minimal early transplantation-related mortality (TRM). However, in the context of RIC, predictive factors for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD and cGVHD, respectively) and their effect on outcome remain unknown. In this report, we analyzed the outcome of 101 high-risk patients (70 hematologic and 31 nonhematologic malignancies) who received an HLA-identical sibling allo-SCT after RIC, including fludarabine, busulfan, and antithymocyte globulin (ATG). The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD was 36% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27%-45%), whereas the cumulative incidence of cGVHD at 2 years was 43% (95% CI, 33%-53%). In multivariate analysis, the incidence of aGVHD was significantly associated with the ATG dose infused during conditioning (P =.0005), whereas peripheral blood as stem cell source was the only predictive factor for the development of cGVHD (P =.0007). The 1-year cumulative incidences of disease progression or relapse in patients with (n = 69) and without (n = 31) GVHD (whatever its form or grade) were 30% (95% CI, 19%-41%) and 55% (95% CI, 37%-72%), respectively (P =.02), suggesting that a potent graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect can be achieved in high-risk patients following RIC. Moreover, the GVT effect was closely associated with GVHD without an increased risk of TRM (cumulative incidence of TRM, 18% [95% CI, 10%-25%]). Collectively, these results provide a framework for the refinement of RIC approaches designed to enhance the GVT effect with an acceptable risk of GVHD.

  9. Mobilized peripheral blood stem cells compared with bone marrow from HLA-identical siblings for reduced-intensity conditioning transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Arnon; Labopin, Myriam; Shimoni, Avichai

    2012-01-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC)-alloSCT is increasingly used for acute myelogenous leukemia. Limited data are available for the comparison of peripheral blood stem cells with bone marrow for RIC-alloSCT. We used the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) ALWP data...... to compare the outcome of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) (n = 1430) vs. bone marrow (BM) (n = 107) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients with complete remission that underwent RIC-alloSCT from compatible sibling donors. The leukemia features, the disease status, and the time from......-IV) and chronic GVHD did not differ between the groups. leukemia-free survival (LFS), relapse, and non-relapsed mortality (NRM) were 51 ± 2%, 32 ± 1%, and 17 ± 1% vs. 50 ± 6%, 38 ± 6%, and 12 ± 3% for the PBSC and BM groups, respectively. Our results indicate faster engraftment, but no difference in GVHD, LFS...

  10. Using EasyMatch® to anticipate the identification of an HLA identical unrelated donor: A validated efficient time and cost saving method.

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    Dubois, Valérie; Detrait, Marie; Sobh, Mohamad; Morisset, Stéphane; Labussière, Hélène; Giannoli, Catherine; Nicolini, Franck; Moskovtchenko, Philippe; Mialou, Valérie; Ducastelle, Sophie; Rey, Sylvie; Thomas, Xavier; Barraco, Fiorenza; Tedone, Nathalie; Marry, Evelyne; Garnier, Federico; Bertrand, Yves; Michallet, Mauricette

    2016-11-01

    In the absence of an HLA matched familial donor, a search for an unrelated donor or cord blood unit is initiated through worldwide registries. Although a first look-up on available HLA information of donors in the "book" at BMDW (Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide) can provide a good estimation of the number of compatible donors, the variety of resolution typing levels requires confirmatory typing (CT) which are expensive and time consuming. In order to help recipient centers in their work. The French donor registry (France Greffe de Moelle/Agence de la Biomedecine) has recently developed a software program called "EasyMatch®" that uses haplotype frequencies to compute the likelihood of phenotypic match in donors according to various typing resolution levels. The goal of our study is to report a single monocentric user-experience with EasyMatch®, demonstrating that its routine use reduced the cost and the delay of the donor search in our center, allowing the definition of a new strategy to search compatible unrelated donors. The strategy was first established on a retrospective cohort of 217 recipients (185 adults and 32 children=before score) and then validated on a prospective cohort of 171 recipients (160 adults and 11 children=after score). For all patients, we calculated the delay between the registration day and the donor identification day, and the number of CT requested to the donor centre. Considering both groups, we could observe a significant decrease of the number of CT from 8 to 2 (p<0,001), and a significant decrease of the median delay to identify a suitable donor from 43 to 31days (p<0.0001). EasyMatch® estimates the number of potentially identical donors, but doesn't foresee availability of the donors. It provides us an easy tracking of mismatches, an estimation of the number of potential donors, the selection of population following ethnic origin of patients and a high prediction when probability is high or low. It affords a new approach of donor

  11. Donor lymphocyte count and thymic activity predict lymphocyte recovery and outcomes after matched-sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

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    McIver, Zachariah; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; Wu, Colin; Grim, Andrew; Ito, Sawa; Cho, Irene; Hensel, Nancy; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, Austin John

    2013-03-01

    Delayed immune recovery is a characteristic feature of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult recipients. Although recipient thymic T-cell neogenesis contributes to T-cell regeneration after transplantation, thymic recovery in the transplant recipient decreases with increasing age, and is diminished by intensive preconditioning regimens and graft-versus-host disease. In adult recipients, most events that determine transplant success or failure occur during the period when the majority of circulating T cells is derived from the donor's post thymic T-cell repertoire. As a result, the make-up of the donor lymphocyte compartment may strongly influence immune recovery and transplant outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine donor lymphocyte counts in a series of patients undergoing an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant to identify the potential contribution of donor regulatory and conventional T lymphocyte populations to immune recovery and transplant outcomes. We examined donor lymphocyte subset counts in relation to post-transplant lymphocyte recovery and transplant events in 220 consecutive myeloablative, T-cell-depleted, HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with hematologic malignancies. In a multivariate analysis, absolute numbers of donor CD4(+) recent thymic emigrants were associated with overall survival (P=0.032). The donors' absolute lymphocyte count and thymic production of regulatory T cells were both associated with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (P=0.002 and P=0.022, respectively). In conclusion, these results identify donor immune characteristics that are associated with lymphocyte recovery, extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease, and survival in the recipient following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study reported here was performed using peripheral blood samples drawn from donors and patients enrolled in the ClinicalTrials.gov-registered trials

  12. Infusion of Sibling Marrow in a Patient with Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase Deficiency Leads to Split Mixed Donor Chimerism and Normal Immunity

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    Laura Yeates

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP deficiency, a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease causes combined immunodeficiency and developmental delay, hypotonia, and spasticity. Patients present with recurrent infections associated with T-lymphocytopenia, characteristically presenting later than patients with classical severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. PNP, with adenosine deaminase (ADA, is part of the purine salvage pathway. The only curative therapy is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Myeloablative conditioning is recommended to prevent rejection caused by residual immune function. However, HLA-identical sibling stem cell infusions in ADA-SCID result in some donor stem cell engraftment and long-term thymopoiesis. We report a patient with PNP deficiency, who received HLA-identical sibling marrow without chemotherapy because of disseminated cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. The patient presented at 14 months of age following recurrent infections, from early infancy, with persistent irritability, developmental delay, and hypotonia. She had neutropenia, pan-lymphocytopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia with low plasma urate and erythrocyte PNP activity. Diagnosis was confirmed with a homozygous mutation in PNP. The patient was viremic with CMV detected in blood and CSF by PCR. Dual antiviral therapy improved the clinical condition and reduced the viral load. In view of the disseminated CMV infection, the decision was made to infuse stem cells without any pre-conditioning chemotherapy. She received a matched sibling donor unconditioned stem cell infusion at 16 months of age. The post-transplant course was uneventful. Blood PCR became negative for CMV. Global hypotonia persisted, although with significant improvement in irritability. At 4 years of age and 29 months post-transplant, the patient demonstrated normal T-lymphocyte and natural killer cell numbers. Recent thymic emigrants represented 12% of the total T

  13. Improving Outcome of Aplastic Anaemia with HLA-Matched Sibling Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: An Experience of Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute (GCRI).

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    Raut, Shreeniwas S; Shah, Sandip A; Patel, Kinnari A; Shah, Kamlesh M; Anand, Asha S; Talati, Shailesh S; Panchal, Harsha P; Patel, Apurva A; Parikh, Sonia K; Parekh, Bhavesh B; Shukla, Shilin N

    2015-03-01

    Fifteen patients, with a median age of 19 years having severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) underwent human leucocyte antigen (HLA) identical sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using conditioning regimens containing cyclophosphamide with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or a combination of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide with or without ATG during December 2007 to May 2013. Cyclosporine and mini methotrexate were used as graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Graft source included peripheral blood stem cells in 11, bone marrow in 3 and both in 1. One patient had primary graft failure while 14 patients were engrafted with a median neutrophil and platelet engraftment time of 13.5 days. One patient had secondary graft rejection. Acute GVHD occurred in 3 patients and chronic GVHD in 4. One year death rate in engrafted patients was 14.28 %. At a mean follow-up of 21.2 months, 12 (80 %) are alive and well. One of the donors was a patient of haemophilia but the disease did not occur in the recipient. The graft was successful and the recipient is alive till date.

  14. The Genotype of the Donor for the (GT)n Polymorphism in the Promoter/Enhancer of FOXP3 Is Associated with the Development of Severe Acute GVHD but Does Not Affect the GVL Effect after Myeloablative HLA-Identical Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

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    Buces, Elena; Pion, Marjorie; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Martín-Antonio, Beatriz; Guillem, Vicent; Bosch-Vizcaya, Anna; Bento, Leyre; González-Rivera, Milagros; Balsalobre, Pascual; Kwon, Mi; Serrano, David; Gayoso, Jorge; de la Cámara, Rafael; Brunet, Salut; Rojas-Contreras, Rafael; Nieto, José B.; Martínez, Carmen; Gónzalez, Marcos; Espigado, Ildefonso; Vallejo, Juan C.; Sampol, Antonia; Jiménez-Velasco, Antonio; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Solano, Carlos; Gallardo, David; Díez-Martín, José L.; Buño, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    The FOXP3 gene encodes for a protein (Foxp3) involved in the development and functional activity of regulatory T cells (CD4+/CD25+/Foxp3+), which exert regulatory and suppressive roles over the immune system. After allogeneic stem cell transplantation, regulatory T cells are known to mitigate graft versus host disease while probably maintaining a graft versus leukemia effect. Short alleles (≤(GT)15) for the (GT)n polymorphism in the promoter/enhancer of FOXP3 are associated with a higher expression of FOXP3, and hypothetically with an increase of regulatory T cell activity. This polymorphism has been related to the development of auto- or alloimmune conditions including type 1 diabetes or graft rejection in renal transplant recipients. However, its impact in the allo-transplant setting has not been analyzed. In the present study, which includes 252 myeloablative HLA-identical allo-transplants, multivariate analysis revealed a lower incidence of grade III-IV acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients transplanted from donors harboring short alleles (OR = 0.26, CI 0.08–0.82, p = 0.021); without affecting chronic GVHD or graft versus leukemia effect, since cumulative incidence of relapse, event free survival and overall survival rates are similar in both groups of patients. PMID:26473355

  15. Comparative outcome of reduced intensity and myeloablative conditioning regimen in HLA identical sibling allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients older than 50 years of age with acute myeloblastic leukaemia: a retrospective survey from the Acute Leukemia Working Party (ALWP) of the European group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

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    Aoudjhane, M; Labopin, M; Gorin, N C; Shimoni, A; Ruutu, T; Kolb, H-J; Frassoni, F; Boiron, J M; Yin, J L; Finke, J; Shouten, H; Blaise, D; Falda, M; Fauser, A A; Esteve, J; Polge, E; Slavin, S; Niederwieser, D; Nagler, A; Rocha, V

    2005-12-01

    Results of reduced intensity conditioning regimen (RIC) in the HLA identical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting have not been compared to those after myeloablative (MA) regimen HSCT in patients with acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML) over 50 years of age. With this aim, outcomes of 315 RIC were compared with 407 MA HSCT recipients. The majority of RIC was fludarabine-based regimen associated to busulphan (BU) (53%) or low-dose total body irradiation (24%). Multivariate analyses of outcomes were used adjusting for differences between both groups. The median follow-up was 13 months. Cytogenetics, FAB classification, WBC count at diagnosis and status of the disease at transplant were not statistically different between the two groups. However, RIC patients were older, transplanted more recently, and more frequently with peripheral blood allogeneic stem cells as compared to MA recipients. In multivariate analysis, acute GVHD (II-IV) and transplant-related mortality were significantly decreased (P=0.01 and P<10(-4), respectively) and relapse incidence was significantly higher (P=0.003) after RIC transplantation. Leukaemia-free survival was not statistically different between the two groups. These results may set the grounds for prospective trials comparing RIC with other strategies of treatment in elderly AML.

  16. Impact of in vivo T cell depletion in HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission conditioned with a fludarabine iv-busulfan myeloablative regimen: a report from the EBMT Acute Leukemia Working Party

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    Marie Thérèse Rubio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of the use of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG in allogeneic stem cell transplantation performed with HLA-identical sibling donors following fludarabine and 4 days intravenous busulfan myeloablative conditioning regimen has been poorly explored. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 566 patients who underwent a first HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation with this conditioning regimen for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission between 2006 and 2013 and compared the outcomes of 145 (25.6% patients who received ATG (ATG group to 421 (74.4% who did not (no-ATG group. The Kaplan-Meier estimator, the cumulative incidence function, and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used where appropriate. Results Patients in the ATG group were older, received more frequently peripheral blood stem cell grafts from older donors, and were transplanted more recently. With a median follow-up of 19 months, patients in the ATG group had reduced 2-year cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD (31 vs. 52%, p = 0.0002 and of its extensive form (8 vs. 26%, p < 0.0001 but similar relapse incidence (22 vs. 27%, p = 0.23 leading to improved GVHD and relapse-free survival (GRFS (60 vs. 40%, p = 0.0001. In multivariate analyses, the addition of ATG was independently associated with lower chronic GVHD (HR = 0.46, p = 0.0001, improved leukemia-free survival (HR = 0.67, p = 0.027, overall survival (HR = 0.65, p = 0.027, and GRFS (HR = 0.51, p = 4 × 10−5. Recipient age above 50 years was the only other factor associated with worse survivals. Conclusions These results suggest that the use of ATG with fludarabine and 4 days intravenous busulfan followed by HLA-identical sibling donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia improves overall transplant outcomes due to reduced incidence of chronic GVHD without increased

  17. In patients older than 55 years with AML in first CR, should we search for a matched unrelated donor when an old sibling donor is available?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peffault de Latour, R; Labopin, M; Cornelissen, J

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation is increasingly used in patients aged 55 years or more with AML. The question of whether outcomes can be improved with an allele-level 8/8 HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) rather than an older HLA-matched sibling (MSD, more than 55 years) is still unanswe...

  18. The Human Figure Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.

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    Packman, Wendy L.; Beck, Vanessa L.; VanZutphen, Kelly H.; Long, Janet K.; Spengler, Gisele

    2003-01-01

    There is little research on the psychological impact of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on family members. This study uses the Human Figure Drawing (HFD) to measure siblings' emotional distress toward BMT. Among the siblings, feelings of isolation, anger, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem emerged as major themes. Findings indicate the…

  19. Crossing the Ts by case-story “Exploring moral distress in potential sibling stem cell donors"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer

    Crossing the Ts by Exploring moral distress in potential sibling stem cell donors [1] Mette Kjer Kaltoft, Ph.d student, MPH, RN, Health Visitor University of Southern Denmark and Sydney School of Public Health Background: Catalysts aiming to reduce the burden of malignant disease by integrating...... research and practice in oncology battle for funding by communicating expected value created across the stakeholder chain. The media mirror supply and demand for novel life-prolonging treatment but not the molecular basis of uncertainty with different affinity receptors for decision makers and evidence......-type-test’) for enhanced decision quality and reduction of harm. Methods: A *case-story of siblings of a sick brother needing live donation is presented within an interactive model for prescriptive translation using a diagram and multi-criteria decision-analytic approach. Actual or projected results: You can see each...

  20. [Partial lipodystrophy in two HLA identical sisters with hypocomplementemia and nephropathy].

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    Peces, R

    2002-01-01

    Partial lipodystrophy is a rare disorder with both autosomal recessive and familial forms. The cutaneous findings, which are often subtle, consist of gradual loss of subcutaneous fat from the face and upper body. Low levels of C3 and the presence of C3NeF help to identify these patients. Associated systemic abnormalities include the development of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, insulin resistance and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. We report here two HLA identical sisters with the typical features of partial lipodystrophy associated with recurrent infections, low levels of C3, and nephropathy. Our data suggest an autosomal recessive transmission. We discuss the genetic and molecular basis of this rare association.

  1. Donor Selection for Allogenic Hemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Clinical and Ethical Considerations

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    Irene Riezzo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is an established treatment for many diseases. Stem cells may be obtained from different sources: mobilized peripheral blood stem cells, bone marrow, and umbilical cord blood. The progress in transplantation procedures, the establishment of experienced transplant centres, and the creation of unrelated adult donor registries and cord blood banks gave those without an human leucocyte antigen- (HLA- identical sibling donor the opportunity to find a donor and cord blood units worldwide. HSCT imposes operative cautions so that the entire donation/transplantation procedure is safe for both donors and recipients; it carries with it significant clinical, moral, and ethical concerns, mostly when donors are minors. The following points have been stressed: the donation should be excluded when excessive risks for the donor are reasonable, donors must receive an accurate information regarding eventual adverse events and health burden for the donors themselves, a valid consent is required, and the recipient’s risks must be outweighed by the expected benefits. The issue of conflict of interest, when the same physician has the responsibility for both donor selection and recipient care, is highlighted as well as the need of an adequate insurance protection for all the parties involved.

  2. On new reproductive technologies and family ethics: pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for sibling donor in Israel and Germany.

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    Hashiloni-Dolev, Yael; Shkedi, Shiri

    2007-11-01

    This paper discusses the policy debate and ethical discussion surrounding pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for sibling donor (SD) in Germany and Israel. Based on an analysis of the regulations and ethical discourse concerning a unique form of new reproductive technology (NRT)--PGD for SD--we complement the scholarly discussion of NRTs in these countries, by pointing to an explanatory factor that has been so far neglected, namely the hegemonic notions regarding the ideal relationship between the generations, and the mutual obligations between different family members in Germany and Israel. We argue the fact that PGD (in general) and PGD for SD (in particular) have been banned in Germany, but were endorsed without hesitation in Israel, has to do with different perceptions of family ethics within the two societies. Furthermore, we argue that this factor contributes significantly to the more general understanding of German and Israeli policies regarding NRTs.

  3. Saving or Subordinating Life? Popular Views in Israel and Germany of Donor Siblings Created through PGD.

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    Raz, Aviad; Schües, Christina; Wilhelm, Nadja; Rehmann-Sutter, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    To explore how cultural beliefs are reflected in different popular views of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for human leukocyte antigen match (popularly known as "savior siblings"), we compare the reception and interpretations, in Germany and Israel, of the novel/film My Sister's Keeper. Qualitative analysis of reviews, commentaries and posts is used to classify and compare normative assessments of PGD for HLA and how they reproduce, negotiate or oppose the national policy and its underlying cultural and ethical premises. Four major themes emanated from the comparison: loss of self-determination and autonomy; loss of dignity through instrumentalization; eugenics and euthanasia; and saving life. In both countries, most commentaries represented a dominant position, with a few negotiated positions. We also highlight the decoding of a relatively less explored bioethical aspect of My Sister's Keeper's narrative, namely the meaning of euthanasia. We conclude by discussing how the findings relate to attempts of providing cultural explanations for the regulation of HLA-PGD.

  4. The availability of full match sibling donors and feasibility of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in Brazil

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    Eid K.A.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT in a developing country has not yet been demonstrated. Many adverse factors including social and economic limitations may reduce the overall results of this complex and expensive procedure. Our objective was to characterize the most important clinical, social and economic features of candidates for transplantation and their potential donors as well as the influence of these factors on overall survival in a retrospective and exploratory analysis at a university hospital. From July 1993 to July 2001, candidates for BMT were referred to the Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit by Hematology and Oncology Centers from several regions of Brazil. A total of 1138 patients were referred to us as candidates for alloBMT. Median age was 25 years (range: 2 months-60 years, 684 (60.1% were males and 454 (39.9% were females. The clinical indications were severe aplastic anemia and hematological malignancies. From the total of 1138 patients, 923 had HLA-typing; 497/923 (53.8% candidates had full match donors; 352/1138 (30.8% were eligible for alloBMT. Only 235 of 352 (66.7% were transplanted. Schooling was 1st to 8th grade for 123/235 (52.3%; monthly family income ranged from US$60 (7% to more than US$400 (36%. Overall survival for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, severe aplastic anemia and acute myeloid leukemia was 58, 60 and 30%, respectively. Thus, overall survival rates for the most frequent hematological diseases were similar to those reported in the International Registry, except for acute myeloid leukemia. This descriptive and exploratory analysis suggests the feasibility of alloBMT in a developing country like Brazil.

  5. Successful Outcome With Fludarabine-Based Conditioning Regimen for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation From Related Donor in Fanconi Anemia: A Single Center Experience From Turkey.

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    Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Ünal, Şule; Bayhan, Turan; Aytaç Eyüboğlu, Selin; Tavil, Betül; Çetin, Mualla; Gümrük, Fatma; Uçkan Çetinkaya, Duygu

    2016-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive (and rarely X linked) disorder, which is characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to malignancies. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only definitive treatment for the hematological manifestations in FA. Twenty-seven patients with FA underwent HSCT using fludarabine (Flu) based regimen at our center between April 2004 and May 2014. One patient who developed acute leukemia before HSCT was excluded from the study. The remaining 26 patients were included. The median age of the patients at the time of transplantation was 9.6 years (range 5.6-17.0 years) and male/female ratio was 19/7. Donors were Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling in 18 patients, HLA-identical other relatives in six patients, and HLA 1-antigen mismatched sibling in two patients. Conditioning regimen consisted of Flu, cyclophosphamide, and antithymocyte globulin. All patients engrafted but one developed poor graft function and underwent second HSCT. Acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) (≥grade 2) occurred in two patients (7.6%) and chronic GVHD in one patient (3.9%). Three patients developed venoocclusive disease (11.5%). Survival rate was 96.2% (25/26) at a median follow-up of 54 months (10-131 months) and all patients who survived were in good clinical condition. None of the patients developed secondary malignancy during the follow-up period. The present study from Turkey, a middle-income country, shows successful transplant outcome with low toxicity using Flu-based conditioning in patients with FA who underwent HSCT from HLA-related donors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Comparison of matched sibling donors versus unrelated donors in allogeneic stem cell transplantation for primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia: a study on behalf of the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eolia Brissot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia (PRF-AML is associated with a dismal prognosis. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in active disease is an alternative therapeutic strategy. The increased availability of unrelated donors together with the significant reduction in transplant-related mortality in recent years have opened the possibility for transplantation to a larger number of patients with PRF-AML. Moreover, transplant from unrelated donors may be associated with stronger graft-mediated anti-leukemic effect in comparison to transplantations from HLA-matched sibling donor, which may be of importance in the setting of PRF-AML. Methods The current study aimed to address the issue of HSCT for PRF-AML and to compare the outcomes of HSCT from matched sibling donors (n = 660 versus unrelated donors (n = 381, for patients with PRF-AML between 2000 and 2013. The Kaplan-Meier estimator, the cumulative incidence function, and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used where appropriate. Results HSCT provide patients with PRF-AML a 2-year leukemia-free survival and overall survival of about 25 and 30%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, two predictive factors, cytogenetics and time from diagnosis to transplant, were associated with lower leukemia-free survival, whereas Karnofsky performance status at transplant ≥90% was associated with better leukemia-free survival (LFS. Concerning relapse incidence, cytogenetics and time from diagnosis to transplant were associated with increased relapse. Reduced intensity conditioning regimen was the only factor associated with lower non-relapse mortality. Conclusions HSCT was able to rescue about one quarter of the patients with PRF-AML. The donor type did not have any impact on PRF patients’ outcomes. In contrast, time to transplant was a major prognostic factor for LFS. For patients with PRF-AML who do not have a matched sibling donor, HSCT from an

  7. Cytogenetic evidence for recurrence of acute myelogenous leukemia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in donor hematopoietic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfenbein, G.J.; Brogaonkar, D.S.; Bias, W.B.

    1978-09-01

    A 22-yr-old man with acute myelocytic leukemia received a bone marrow transplant from a genotypically HLA-identical female sibling after cyclophosphamide preparation. He remained in complete remission for 18 mo, when he developed a chloroma in the perineum. The chloroma was treated with local radiotherapy. The chloroma recurred 8 mo later and was treated with radiotherapy followed by combination chemotherapy. At 34 mo after transplant, marrow relapse and chloroma were documented. The first chloroma contained host cells by fluorescent Y-chromatin body analyses of interphase nuclei. All metaphase cells and karyotypes from peripheral blood and marrow samples showed no evidence of host cells from 3 wk after transplant through the time of marrow relapse. Data from autosomal and sex chromosome studies indicate that the marrow relapse occurred in cells of donor origin. A new consistent chromosome abnormality (45, X, -X, t(8;21) (q22; q22)) was observed in a majority of donor cells. The patient received a second bone marrow transplant from the same donor after preparation with busulfan and cyclophosphamide and attained a complete remission with full hematologic engraftment.

  8. Bone marrow transplantation with unrelated donors: what is the probability of identifying an HLA-A/B/Cw/DRB1/B3/B5/DQB1-matched donor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiercy, J M; Bujan-Lose, M; Chapuis, B; Gratwohl, A; Gmür, J; Seger, R; Kern, M; Morell, A; Roosnek, E

    2000-08-01

    Patients transplanted with marrow from an HLA-ABDR serologically matched unrelated donor suffer from more post-transplant complications than those who are transplanted with marrow from an HLA-identical sibling. This is most likely due to either HLA-ABDR incompatibilities not resolved by standard techniques and/or HLA polymorphisms not tested for by routine tissue typing (HLA-Cw,-DQ). By resolving these incompatibilities by molecular techniques combined with the in vitro cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor frequency (CTLpf) test, we have shown that a high degree of HLA compatibility is associated with increased patient survival. However, higher requirements for HLA matching decrease the number of available donors. We have estimated the probability of finding an HLA-A/B/Cw/DRB1/DRB3/DRB5/DQB1 compatible donor based on 104 consecutive unrelated bone marrow donor searches initiated between January 1995 and December 1997, with December 1998 as the endpoint. For 96 patients (92.3%), one or more ABDR-identical donors were listed in the Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide Registry (BMDW). After contacting the registries, we obtained at least one (mean, 5.36; range, 1-20; total, 461) blood sample for 86 patients. A highly compatible donor was identified for 33/86 patients (38.4%), after testing an average number of 4.5 donors/patients (range, 1-13). However, by accepting an HLA-DRB3 or -DQB1 or -Cw incompatibility, this number would be as high as 68.6%. Approximately half of the patients (n = 40) for whom a search had been initiated have been transplanted: 22 patients with a perfectly matched donor, 15 patients with an HLA-DRB3 or -DQB1 or -Cw mismatch and three with other mismatches. The average time needed to identify the most compatible donor was 4 months. Extremely long searches seemed to be less useful, because after testing the first seven, a more compatible donor was seldom found. These results show that even when requirements for compatibility are high, the chances of finding

  9. Total Body Irradiation-Based Myeloablative Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation Is a Safe and Effective Alternative to Unrelated Donor Transplantation in Patients Without Matched Sibling Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Scott R; Sizemore, Connie A; Sanacore, Melissa; Zhang, Xu; Brown, Stacey; Holland, H Kent; Morris, Lawrence E; Bashey, Asad

    2015-07-01

    We enrolled 30 patients on a prospective phase II trial utilizing a total body irradiation (TBI)-based myeloablative preparative regimen (fludarabine 30 mg/m2/day × 3 days and TBI 150 cGy twice per day on day -4 to -1 [total dose 1200 cGy]) followed by infusion of unmanipulated peripheral blood stem cells from a haploidentical family donor (haplo). Postgrafting immunosuppression consisted of cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg/day on days 3 and 4, mycophenolate mofetil through day 35, and tacrolimus through day 180. Median patient age was 46.5 years (range, 24 to 60). Transplantation diagnosis included acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 16), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 6), chronic myelogenous leukemia (n = 5), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 1), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 2). Using the Dana Farber/Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research/Disease Risk Index (DRI), patients were classified as low (n = 4), intermediate (n = 12), high (n = 11), and very high (n = 3) risk. All patients engrafted with a median time to neutrophil and platelet recovery of 16 and 25 days, respectively. All evaluable patients achieved sustained complete donor T cell and myeloid chimerism by day +30. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grades II to IV and III and IV was seen in 43% and 23%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 56% (severe in 10%). After a median follow-up of 24 months, the estimated 2-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), nonrelapse mortality, and relapse rate were 78%, 73%, 3%, and 24%, respectively. Two-year DFS and relapse rate in patients with low/intermediate risk disease was 100% and 0%, respectively, compared with 39% and 53% for patients with high/very high risk disease. When compared with a contemporaneously treated cohort of patients at our institution receiving myeloablative HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplantation (acute myelogenous leukemia [n = 17], acute lymphoblastic leukemia [n = 15

  10. CTLA-4 polymorphisms and haplotype correlate with survival in ALL after allogeneic stem cell transplantation from related HLA-haplotype-mismatched donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X-Y; Wang, Y; Li, G-X; Qin, Y-Z; Wang, F-R; Xu, L-P; Chen, H; Han, W; Wang, J-Z; Zhang, X-H; Chang, Y-J; Liu, K-Y; Jiang, Z-F; Huang, X-J

    2016-04-27

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has been established as an effective treatment for patients with hematological malignancies. Disease relapse remains a major cause of transplant failure. T cell homeostasis is critical to determine the potency of the GVT effect. Recent studies have shown the association of the CTLA-4 polymorphisms with the outcome after HLA-identical sibling allogeneic HSCT. In this study, we focused on four CTLA-4 polymorphisms, and analyzed the impact of donor genotypes and haplotypes on the conditions of 152 acute leukemia patients (ALL 83) after related HLA-haplotype- mismatched transplantation. The four SNP genotypes (-1661, -318, CT60 and +49) were determined by TaqMan SNP genotyping assays. ALL recipients of donors with +49 GG showed significantly lower OS (67.7 vs. 90.3 %, P = 0.015) than those with GA+AA. Multivariate analyses showed that +49 GG was an independent risk factor for OS (HR: 0.306, 95 % CI 0.111-0.842, P = 0.022) .23 ALL patients receiving mDLI showed significantly lower OS with +49 GG donor than those with GA+AA (30.0 vs. 83.1 %, P = 0.003). The haplotype analysis revealed only three haplotypes in the donor population -1661/-318/CT60/+49 i.e., ACGG, ACAA and GTGA, the frequencies were 64.1, 19.4 and 16.5 %, respectively. Donors with and without the ACGG/ACGG haplotype had the same effect on transplant outcomes as those with +49 GG and +49 GA+AA. In summary, the CTLA-4 +49 GG and the haplotype ACGG/ACGG reduced the overall survival in ALL after allo-HSCT from the related HLA-haplotype-mismatched donor, knowledge of the CTLA-4 polymorphism and haplotype may provide useful information for donor selection and individual application of immunosuppressive agents and immunotherapy.

  11. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with T cell-depleted partially matched related donors for advanced acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adults: a comparative matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, D R; Henslee-Downey, P J; Romond, E H; Harder, E J; Marciniak, E; Munn, R K; Messino, M J; Macdonald, J S; Bishop, M; Rayens, M K; Thompson, J S; Foon, K A

    1996-06-01

    Allogeneic BMT provides the best treatment currently available for long-term disease-free survival in patients with recurrent ALL. Historically, partially matched related donors provided the opportunity for treatment to a greater number of patients than matched related donors at the expense of decreased overall survival. In this study we compare the results in recurrent ALL patients transplanted with either HLA identical sibling bone marrow or partially matched related bone marrow. Thirty-two patients with relapsed ALL received partially matched bone marrows from a relative with one to three HLA, A, B and Dr antigen mismatches. Bone marrow was partially T cell-depleted with murine T10B9.1A-31 moAb. Sixteen patients with relapsed ALL received HLA-matched sibling bone marrows. All partially matched patients received additional GVHD prophylaxis with methylprednisolone in addition to anti-CD5 immunotoxin and/or CYA. All matched patients in addition to methylprednisolone received MTX and/or CYA. We observed no difference in disease-free survival between patients transplanted with partially matched bone marrow (median follow-up 1252 days, range 778-2035 days) vs those transplanted with HLA-matched bone marrow (median follow-up 1472 days, range 1165-2800 days; P = 0.48). Median survival for all patients is 38% (95% CI 24-52%) at 6 years. Patients transplanted in remission had a significant increase in disease-free survival when compared to those in relapse (P = 0.007). Our data suggest that partially matched BMTs from related donors are a comparable alternative to fully matched transplants in patients with ALL.

  12. Sibling Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Green, Mary J.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, sibling incest, a type of intrafamilial incest, has received notice from mental health professionals; however, many professionals still do not recognize the seriousness of the problem. This article reviews current research on the individual and family dynamics that allow sibling incest to occur, the effects of sibling incest on victims,…

  13. Addition of exogenous cytokines in mixed lymphocyte culture for selecting related donors for bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeane Eliete Laguila Visentainer

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Mixed lymphocyte culturing has led to conflicting opinions regarding the selection of donors for bone marrow transplantation. The association between a positive mixed lymphocyte culture and the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is unclear. The use of exogenous cytokines in mixed lymphocyte cultures could be an alternative for increasing the sensitivity of culture tests. OBJECTIVE: To increase the sensitivity of mixed lymphocyte cultures between donor and recipient human leukocyte antigen (HLA identical siblings, using exogenous cytokines, in order to predict post-transplantation GVHD and/or rejection. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective study. SETTING: Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Universidade Estadual de Campinas. PARTICIPANTS: Seventeen patients with hematological malignancies and their respective donors selected for bone marrow transplantation procedures. PROCEDURES: Standard and modified mixed lymphocyte culturing by cytokine supplementation was carried out using donor and recipient cells typed for HLA. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Autologous and allogenic responses in mixed lymphocyte cultures after the addition of IL-4 or IL-2. RESULTS: In comparison with the standard method, average responses in the modified mixed lymphocyte cultures increased by a factor of 2.0 using IL-4 (p < 0.001 and 6.4 using IL-2 (p < 0.001, for autologous donor culture responses. For donor-versus-recipient culture responses, the increase was by a factor of 1.9 using IL-4 (p < 0.001 and 4.1 using IL-2 (p < 0.001. For donor-versus-unrelated culture responses, no significant increase was observed using IL-4, and a mean response inhibition of 20% was observed using IL-2 (p < 0.001. Neither of the cytokines produced a significant difference in the unrelated control versus recipient cell responses. CONCLUSION: IL-4 supplementation was the best for increasing the mixed lymphocyte culture sensitivity. However, IL-4 also increased autologous responses, albeit less

  14. Adefovir is effective to promote development of immunity to donor origin hepatitis B virus in an allogeneic transplant recipient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaşar, D G; Suyanı, E; Özenirler, S; Sucak, G T

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis B infection is a serious health problem in endemic areas particularly among immunocompromised patients. The more profound immunosuppression in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HCT) can lead to more complicated hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related events. Despite the high risk of recipient infection allogeneic HCT donors with HBV infection are not excluded in the absence of an alternative donor. A 25 year-old man with severe aplastic anemia underwent allogeneic HCT from his HLA-identical sibling. The patient was hepatitis B naive and had normal liver function tests. However the donor had hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) positivity, and collected stem cells were positive for HBV DNA (1 × 10(4) copies/mL). Lamivudine was initiated to treat the patient prior to transplantation. Forty days after the HCT, the patient displayed hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb), and hepatitis B e antibody (HBeAb), with HBV-DNA negativity. Cyclosporine was tapered and finally stopped at day + 256. On day +368, 112 days after the cessation of cyclosporine HBV reactivation was detected with an HBV-DNA level of 10 × 10(4) copies/mL despite lamivudine. After demonstration of the YMDD mutation, adefovir dipivoxil was combined with lamivudine. The HBV-DNA became negative; AST ALT levels decreased to normal levels after a month of combination therapy. In conclusion adefovir was effective to treat lamivudine-resistant HBV infection in an allogeneic HCT recipient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Older Siblings Influence Younger Siblings' Motor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sarah E.; Nuzzo, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Evidence exists for two competing theories about the effects of having an older sibling on development. Previous research has found that having an older sibling has both advantages and disadvantages for younger siblings' development. This study examined whether and how older siblings influenced the onset of their own younger siblings' motor…

  16. Bullying among siblings

    OpenAIRE

    Wolke, Dieter; Skew, Alexandra J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parents are often concerned about repeated conflicts between their daughters and sons. However, there is little empirical research of sibling bullying.\\ud \\ud Objective: To conduct a review of existing studies of sibling bullying. Are there any associations between sibling bullying and peer bullying at school? What are the consequences of sibling bullying? Is there good justification why sibling bullying has been so neglected in research?\\ud \\ud Method: Studies of sibling relation...

  17. Bullying among siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Dieter; Skew, Alexandra J

    2012-01-01

    Parents are often concerned about repeated conflicts between their daughters and sons. However, there is little empirical research of sibling bullying. To conduct a review of existing studies of sibling bullying. Are there any associations between sibling bullying and peer bullying at school? What are the consequences of sibling bullying? Is there good justification why sibling bullying has been so neglected in research? Studies of sibling relationships were reviewed. Four quantitative studies were identified that report on both sibling and peer bullying. Sibling bullying is frequent with up to 50% involved in sibling bullying every month and between 16% and 20% involved in bullying several times a week. Experience of sibling bullying increases the risk of involvement in bullying in school. Both, bullying between siblings and school bullying make unique contributions to explaining behavioral and emotional problems. There is a clear dose-effect relationship of involvement of bullying at home and at school and behavioral or emotional problems. Those involved in both have up to 14 times increased odds of behavioral or emotional problems compared to those involved in only one context or not at all. The empirical evidence is limited and studies are mostly cross-sectional studies. Nevertheless, the review suggests that for those victimized at home and at school behavioral and emotional problems are highly increased. Sibling relationships appear to be a training ground with implications for individual well-being. Strengthening families and parenting skills and increasing sibling support is likely to reduce bullying and increase well-being.

  18. Sibling Relationships during Remarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Edward R.; Rice, Alyson M.

    1992-01-01

    In families whose parents had never divorced, families with a single mother, and families whose mother had remarried, there were (1) some differences for child gender and family type in children's behavior toward siblings; (2) few effects of gender composition of sibling dyads; and (3) a decline in the level of sibling interaction over time. (BC)

  19. Personality and Sibling Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Wyndol; Lanthier, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the role personality variables play in sibling relationships. It proposed that the characteristics of sibling relationships are influenced by: family constellation variables such as birth order, gender, and age spacing; parent-child relationships including quality of relationship and parent management of siblings; and the…

  20. The Core of Sibling Stem Cell Donation - A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, Annika M; Forsberg, Anna

    2017-01-01

    There is a lack of theoretical framework supporting stem cell transplant nurses in their assessment, judgment and caring interventions of sibling stem cell donors. The purpose of this study was to explore sibling stem cell donors' main concerns and how they deal with them before and after donation. Ten healthy sibling donors, 5 men and 5 women, with a median age of 54 years were included in this study when they were due to donate stem cells to a brother or sister. Data were collected prospectively on three occasions (before the donation and three and twelve months after it) through in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the Grounded Theory method according to Charmaz. This study describes the efforts of the ten donors to fulfil their duty as a sibling by doing what they considered necessary in order to help. Their efforts were summarised in a process wherein the grounded theory generated three main categories; Prepare, Promote and Preserve. A clear path of transition leading to fulfilment is evident, starting before the donation and continuing for one year afterwards. Being a sibling stem cell donor means doing what you have to do to fulfil your duty and if possible, saving the life of a seriously ill brother or sister. The relationship between the siblings is strengthened by the donation process. Sibling stem cell donation appears to be about fulfilment and the theoretical framework may support clinicians in their evaluation and support of donors.

  1. Adoption and Sibling Rivalry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sibling Rivalry Family Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Adoption & Sibling Rivalry Page Content Article Body Some families are composed of both adoptive and biological children. And that can sometimes create conflict, anger, and hurt feelings. Remember, all children will ...

  2. The Core of Sibling Stem Cell Donation – A Grounded Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, Annika M; Forsberg, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is a lack of theoretical framework supporting stem cell transplant nurses in their assessment, judgment and caring interventions of sibling stem cell donors. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore sibling stem cell donors’ main concerns and how they deal with them before and after donation. Method: Ten healthy sibling donors, 5 men and 5 women, with a median age of 54 years were included in this study when they were due to donate stem cells to a brother or sister. Data were collected prospectively on three occasions (before the donation and three and twelve months after it) through in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the Grounded Theory method according to Charmaz. Results: This study describes the efforts of the ten donors to fulfil their duty as a sibling by doing what they considered necessary in order to help. Their efforts were summarised in a process wherein the grounded theory generated three main categories; Prepare, Promote and Preserve. A clear path of transition leading to fulfilment is evident, starting before the donation and continuing for one year afterwards. Conclusions: Being a sibling stem cell donor means doing what you have to do to fulfil your duty and if possible, saving the life of a seriously ill brother or sister. The relationship between the siblings is strengthened by the donation process. Sibling stem cell donation appears to be about fulfilment and the theoretical framework may support clinicians in their evaluation and support of donors. PMID:28839511

  3. Six homosexual siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dank, B M

    1971-09-01

    A family consisting of several homosexual siblings is reported. All ten of the siblings in this family were to some degree homosexually experienced. Six were homosexual or predominantly homosexual, and five had a homosexual identity. The sex composition of the family was three females and seven males. Of the three females, one was homosexual, one was bisexual, and one had had some homosexual experience. There was one set of male dizygotic twins concordant for homosexuality in the family. All ten siblings were exposed to relatively similar family dynamics. The father's behavior toward the children and his wife was characterized by hostility, violence, and alcoholism. He was eventually murdered when the youngest child was 6 years old. The mother demonstrated qualities that were essentially opposite those of the father. She was described as affectionate and loving toward all the children, and she did not display violent behavior. The male homosexual sibling who was interviewed displayed a strong identification with his mother via a feminine self-identification, the adoption of the housewife role in a homosexual marriage, and the adoption of the passive role in anal intercourse. Only one other multiple homosexual sibling family has been reported in the scientific literature. This family consisted of 14 siblings, 11 male and three female. The four homosexual siblings in this family were all male and consisted of two sets of dizygotic twins. The behavior of the parents of this family was quite similar to the behavior of the parents in this study-a hostile and violent father and an affectionate and loving mother. These two multiple homosexual sibling families provide support for theories that emphasize the importance of early family relationships in the development of a homosexual adaptation. It is held that multiple homosexual sibling families can be employed as strategic data in testing various etiological theories of homosexuality.

  4. Sibling Differences in Divorced Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Susanne C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Sibling differences in family processes, such as parental monitoring, and in individual adjustment were examined for 133 pairs of 10- to 18-year-old siblings in divorced families. Found that siblings who lived apart after their parents' divorce differed more than siblings who lived together. (MDM)

  5. The Promoted Sibling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visholm, Steen

    PRESENTATION No 72 Steen Visholm Associate professor, M.Psych., Ph. D., Roskilde University Private adress: Krystalgade 6 II DK-1172 København K Denmark svisholm@ruc.dk THE PROMOTED SIBLING By their writings about sibling relations Mitchell and Coles has added fruitful complexity to the psychodyn...... and Violence. Cambridge, Polity Press. Winnicott, Donald W. (1986): “Some thoughts on the meaning of the Word ‘Democracy’”. In. Home is where we start from. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books Ltd. 1986....

  6. Psychosocial adjustment of adolescent siblings of hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Wendy; Gong, Kimberly; VanZutphen, Kelly; Shaffer, Tani; Crittenden, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a widely practiced therapy for many life-threatening childhood disorders. The authors investigated the psychosocial effects of HSCT on siblings of pediatric HSCT patients (n = 44; 21 donors, 23 nondonors, ages 6 to 18 years). Donor siblings reported significantly more anxiety and lower self-esteem than did nondonors. Nondonors showed significantly more school problems. Approximately one third of all siblings reported moderate to severe posttraumatic stress. The study drew on the developmental theory of Erik Erikson and the psychosocial model of posttraumatic stress. As part of the study, the authors used the Measures of Psychosocial Development (MPD), a self-report measure based on Eriksonian constructs. The MPD was used to assess the psychosocial adjustment of 12 siblings who were adolescents (> or =13 years) at the time the study was conducted. In this article, findings are presented from the MPD as well as salient findings from the larger study.

  7. Probabilities for Solar Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Mauri; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.; Mylläri, A.

    2015-02-01

    We have shown previously (Bobylev et al. Astron Lett 37:550-562, 2011) that some of the stars in the solar neighborhood today may have originated in the same star cluster as the Sun, and could thus be called Solar Siblings. In this work we investigate the sensitivity of this result to galactic models and to parameters of these models, and also extend the sample of orbits. There are a number of good candidates for the sibling category, but due to the long period of orbit evolution since the break-up of the birth cluster of the Sun, one can only attach probabilities of membership. We find that up to 10 % (but more likely around 1 %) of the members of the Sun's birth cluster could be still found within 100 pc from the Sun today.

  8. Trasplante alogénico de precursores hematopoyéticos en pacientes con síndrome de Wiskott-Aldrich

    OpenAIRE

    Wietstruck P,María Angélica; Zúñiga C,Pamela; Talesnik G,Eduardo; Méndez R,Cecilia; Barriga C,Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Background: Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X linked congenital disease that presents as eczema, thrombocytopenia and immune deficiency. The only curative procedure for this illness is hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), preferably from a healthy HLA identical sibling donor. Cord blood is becoming an excellent alternative as stem cell source from unrelated donors. Aim: To report our experience with HSCT in children with WAS. Patients and methods: Six boys with WAS diagnosed at 1 t...

  9. Conflict Resolution between Mexican Origin Adolescent Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoren, Sarah E.; Thayer, Shawna M.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated correlates of adolescents' sibling conflict resolution strategies in 246, two-parent Mexican origin families. Specifically, we examined links between siblings' conflict resolution strategies and sibling dyad characteristics, siblings' cultural orientations and values, and sibling relationship qualities. Data were gathered during…

  10. The evolution of altruism between siblings: Hamilton's rule revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowthorn, Robert

    2006-08-21

    This paper explores the validity of Hamilton's rule in the case of other-only altruism in which the benefits are shared by other members of the sibling group excluding the donor. It presents a model of competition between two alleles which code for different kinds of altruism. It derives a simple replicator equation for allele frequencies under conditions of strong selection. This equation does not depend on the size of the sibling group. In mathematical form, the equation is similar to Hamilton's original rule in the case of inbreeding, although the causal mechanism is different. The paper derives a simple criterion to determine whether there will be a polymorphism in which both alleles coexist permanently. Such an event is rare and victory will normally go to the allele with the higher value of 1/2b-c, where b is the total benefit which an offspring confers on its siblings and c is the cost to the donor. The paper also considers how an offspring will behave in particular circumstances. Using a specialized version of the basic model, it shows how, in the absence of polymorphism, natural selection should take the system towards the point of 50% marginal altruism. With this type of altruism, an offspring will perform any act for which the expected cost to the donor is at most half the expected benefit to its siblings. Acts which do not satisfy this criterion are not performed. This accords with Haldane's quip that he would sacrifice his own life for two of his brothers, but not for less. Numerical simulation is used to explore these issues in greater depth. The paper also examines briefly the implications of heterozygote advantage for Hamilton's rule. It concludes with a brief discussion of the connection between other-only altruism and whole-group altruism, in which the donor gains some benefit from its actions.

  11. Anxiety and decreased social support underline poorer quality of life of parent living kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pinhong; Luo, Qidong; Peng, Longkai

    2015-06-01

    A growing body of published work suggests that the parent-child relationship can be inherently coercive, such that the expectation that a living parent will not hesitate to donate a kidney to their children, makes informed consent difficult if not impossible to ascertain. The present study was designed to explore whether the emotional response and social resources have a similar effect on health-related quality of life among parent and sibling living kidney donors. This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 98 living kidney donors (60 parent donors, 38 sibling donors) completed an assessment including emotional response, social support and quality of life. Depression, anxiety, subjective social support and quality of life scores were much poorer for parent than sibling donors. Parent donors also showed more anxiety and poorer physical functioning than their counterparts in the general population. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses suggested that anxiety and decreased social support in the parent group were negatively associated with physical and mental function. In the sibling group, the main indicator of improved physical state was higher education level. Current results raised new concerns for the quality of life of parent donors as emotional response and social support differentially affected parent versus sibling quality of life. Therefore, stricter standards for physical selection, as well as emotional and supportive intervention, are needed for parent donors. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Donor Tag Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Donor Tag Game Donor Tag Game This feature requires version 6 or later of ... of Needles LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Make a ...

  13. Sibling dynamics and sport expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, M J; Farrow, D; MacMahon, C; Baker, J

    2015-10-01

    Family members are known to be highly influential in the development of sport expertise. To date, much of the research in this area has focused on parents, with less known about sibling influences on expertise. This investigation explored associations between sport expertise, sibling characteristics, and sibling participation in sport and physical activity. Athletes representing three skill levels provided details of sibling characteristics and participation in sport and physical activity via the Developmental History of Athletes Questionnaire. Elite athletes were more likely to be later-born children, while pre-elite and non-elite athletes were more likely to be first-born. Compared with siblings of non-elite athletes, siblings of elite athletes were more likely to have participated in regular physical activity and were more likely to have participated in sport at the pre-elite and elite levels. These results suggest siblings may play a key role in sport expertise development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Relative Power in Sibling Relationships across Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, Anna K.; Campione-Barr, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    During childhood, older siblings typically hold a more powerful position in their relationship with their younger siblings, but these relationships are thought to become more egalitarian during adolescence as siblings begin to prepare for their relationships as adults and as younger siblings become more socially and cognitively competent. Little…

  15. Intergenerational Solidarity and Support between Adult Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorpostel, Marieke; Blieszner, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Using a Dutch national sample containing 1,259 triads (two siblings, one parent), we examined whether practical support and emotional support between siblings are enhanced by intergenerational solidarity and how this differs for brothers and sisters. Sibling support was affected by sibling dyad characteristics and by the relationship with the…

  16. Sibling Subsystem Therapy in Family System Reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on the sibling subsystem in the period following separation/divorce and remarriage of one/both of the parents. Considers treatment of the sibling subsystem and through the sibling subsystem. Deals primarily with focusing attention on this neglected area, not on the tactics to be used with particular families or sibling subsystems.…

  17. Comparing and Contrasting Siblings: Defining the Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Frances Fuchs; Stone, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Deidentification is the phenomenon whereby siblings are defined as different or contrasting. In pathological deidentification, the natural flow of sibling conflict and reconciliation seems obstructed as one sibling is assigned the fixed identity of "devil," who constantly harasses the other, "angel," sibling. A clinical…

  18. Sibling Dependence, Uncertainty and Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilleør, Helene Bie

    investigates the effects of future income uncertainty on sibling dependence in the schooling decisions of rural households in developing countries. Schooling tends to direct skills towards future urban employment, whereas traditional rural education or on-farm learning-by-doing tends to direct skills towards...... to a three period setting. This allows me to explore the natural sequentiality in the schooling decision of older and younger siblings. The model can generate testable empirical implications, which can be taken to any standard cross-sectional data set. I find empirical evidence of negative sibling dependence...... in the educational decision, which is consistent with a human capital portfolio theory of risk diversification and which cannot be explained by sibling rivalry over scarce resources for credit constrained households. The paper thus provides a complementary explanation to why enrolment rates in developing countries...

  19. Bone Marrow Donation from the Perspective of Sibling Donors Donación de médula ósea en la perspectiva de hermanos donadores Doação de medula óssea na perspectiva de irmãos doadores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Arantes de Oliveira-Cardoso

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the sociodemographic profile of sibling bone marrow donors and to describe how they perceive the donation. This was a descriptive, exploratory and longitudinal study. Participants were 20 related bone marrow donors, between 18 and 42 years of age (mean=30.5 years, sd=7.47. Interviews were held before and immediately after the donation. Sociodemographic data were subject to descriptive statistical analysis and qualitative data to categorical content analysis. In the interviews held before the donation, stressor events were the sibling’s disease and treatment and the responsibility of being the donors. During the interviews after the donation, the following were mentioned: anxiety on the day before and on the day of the donation, pain the following day, and acknowledgement of the health team’s support as a facilitator of the donation process. In view of the findings, it is important for the team to outline intervention strategies to meet to the donors’ specific needs.Este estudio objetivó caracterizar el perfil socio demográfico y describir la percepción, de hermanos donadores de médula ósea, acerca de la donación. Se trata de estudio descriptivo, exploratorio y con recorte longitudinal. Participaron 20 donadores-relacionados de médula ósea, con edades entre 18 y 42 años (promedio=30,5 años, de=7,47. Fueron utilizadas entrevistas, aplicadas antes e inmediatamente después de la donación. Fue realizado un análisis estadístico descriptivo de los datos socio demográficos y análisis de contenido categorial de los datos cualitativos. En las entrevistas antes de la donación aparecieron como eventos causantes de estrés: el enfermarse, el tratamiento del hermano y la responsabilidad de ser los donadores. En el período posterior a la donación fue relatada ansiedad (en la víspera y en el día de la donación, dolor en el día siguiente, y reconocimiento del apoyo del equipo como elemento facilitador

  20. Grieving the Loss of a Sibling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how parents can help children cope when a sibling has cancer and how to help a child or teenager ... Additional Resources The Compassionate Friends: Grief Support for Siblings National Cancer Institute: Grief, Bereavement, and Coping with Loss (PDQ®) ...

  1. Contributors to Adult Sibling Relationships and Intention to Care of Siblings of Individuals with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuskelly, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of childhood sibling relationships to adult sibling relationships and intention to provide care was investigated in a sample in which one member of each dyad had Down syndrome. Thirty-nine adult siblings of an adult with Down syndrome who had participated in a study of sibling relationships in childhood/adolescence provided data…

  2. Life course preferences, sibling ties, and the geographical dispersion of sibling networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer, M.; Strömgren, M.; Stjernström, O.

    2013-01-01

    Using Swedish register data, we analyse how life course preferences and sibling ties are related to the geographical dispersion of siblings. We argue that life course preferences and sibling ties are influenced by siblings' sociodemographic characteristics, by similarities and differences between

  3. Sibling curves of quadratic polynomials | Wiggins | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sibling curves were demonstrated in [1, 2] as a novel way to visualize the zeroes of real valued functions. In [3] it was shown that a polynomial of degree n has n sibling curves. This paper focuses on the algebraic and geometric properites of the sibling curves of real and complex quadratic polynomials. Key words: Quadratic ...

  4. Siblings and Mental Illness: Heredity vs. Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, David C.; Elam, Patricia

    1987-01-01

    Siblings are far more likely to be different than alike in personality and psychopathology. Different genes and different environmental experiences can account for why one sibling becomes mentally ill and another is not affected. Environmental experiences play a much greater role in sibling differentiation than has been previously recognized.…

  5. Sibling Conflict Resolution Skills: Assessment and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brett W.; Roberts, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Sibling conflict can rise to the level of a clinical problem. In Phase 1 a lengthy behavioral role-play analog sampling child reactions to normal sibling conflicts was successfully shortened. In Phase 2 normal children who lacked sibling conflict resolution skills were randomly assigned to a Training or Measurement Only condition. Training…

  6. SIBLING CONFLICTS IN FULL- AND HALF-SIBLING HOUSEHOLDS IN THE UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, Antti O; Danielsbacka, Mirkka; Jokela, Markus; Rotkirch, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Sibling relations are by nature ambivalent with high levels of both altruistic helping and competition. Higher relatedness is often assumed to reduce the occurrence of conflicts between siblings, but evidence of this has been scarce and mixed. Siblings typically compete over resources and parental attention, and parental constellations vary with sibship types. Since full-siblings compete over the same two biological parents, while half-siblings have only one shared biological parent and often a higher number of parents overall, it is hypothesized that conflicts are more common between full- than half-siblings. This study tested this assumption using the British Millennium Cohort Study (n=7527 children at age 11). Conflicts were measured as children's reports of how much siblings picked on and hurt each other. Households with full-siblings only, maternal half-siblings only, and both full- and maternal half-siblings were compared. The results show that children who were living with only their full-siblings were more likely to experience sibling conflicts compared with children living with their maternal half-siblings only. This was the case also after controlling for several potentially confounding variables. The results suggest that differential access to parental resources of available biological and step-parents may explain the higher amount of sibling conflict between full- compared with maternal half-siblings.

  7. What makes siblings different? The development of sibling differences in academic achievement and interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alexander C; McHale, Susan M

    2015-06-01

    To illuminate processes that contribute to the development of sibling differences, this study examined cross-lagged links between parents' beliefs about sibling differences in academic ability and differences between siblings' grade point averages (GPAs), and cross-lagged links between differences in siblings' GPAs and sibling differences in academic interests. Data were collected from mothers, fathers, firstborn youth (M age at Time 1 = 15.71, SD = 1.07), and secondborn youth (M age at Time 1 = 13.18, SD = 1.29) from 388 European American families on 3 annual occasions. Findings revealed that, after controlling for siblings' average grades and prior differences in performance, parents' beliefs about sibling differences in academic ability predicted differences in performance such that youth rated by parents as relatively more competent than their sibling earned relatively higher grades the following year. Siblings' relative school performance, however, did not predict parents' beliefs about differences between siblings' competencies. Further, after controlling for average interests and grades, sibling differences in GPA predicted differences in siblings' interests such that youth who had better grades than their siblings reported relatively stronger academic interests the following year. Differences in interest, however, did not predict sibling differences in GPA. Findings are discussed in terms the role of sibling dynamics in family socialization. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Bullying in the family: sibling bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Dieter; Tippett, Neil; Dantchev, Slava

    2015-10-01

    Sibling relationships have a substantial and lasting effect on children's development. Many siblings experience some occasional conflict, however, up to 40% are exposed to sibling bullying every week, a repeated and harmful form of intrafamilial aggression. We review evidence on the precursors, factors relating to peer bullying, and mental health consequences of sibling bullying. Parenting quality and behaviour are the intrafamilial factors most strongly associated with bullying between siblings. Sibling bullying increases the risk of being involved in peer bullying, and is independently associated with concurrent and early adult emotional problems, including distress, depression, and self-harm. The effects appear to be cumulative, with those children bullied by both siblings and peers having highly increased emotional problems compared with those bullied by siblings or peers only, probably because they have no safe place to escape from bullying. The link between sibling and peer bullying suggests interventions need to start at home. Health professionals should ask about sibling bullying and interventions are needed for families to prevent and reduce the health burden associated with sibling bullying. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Siblings exposed to intimate partner violence: linking sibling relationship quality & child adjustment problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Caroline C; Tailor, Ketan; Cormier, Damien C

    2014-01-01

    Although the majority of families that experience intimate partner violence (IPV) have more than one child, most research to date has focused upon a single child within these families. A significant body of research has indicated siblings play an important role in children's adjustment and well-being. To address this gap, the three main goals of the present study were to compare the adjustment of older and younger siblings exposed to IPV, to describe and compare the quality of these sibling relationships from multiple perspectives, and to investigate how sibling adjustment and relationship quality influence children's adjustment. Forty-seven sibling pairs and their mothers were recruited from the community. Mothers self-reported on their violent experiences using the Conflict Tactics Scale, and also estimated the length of time their children were exposed to IPV. Mothers and children completed assessments of child adjustment and the quality of sibling relationships. Observers also assessed the quality of sibling interaction. Results indicated that adjustment between siblings was highly inter-related. On average, mothers reported sibling relationships as less positive but also as less hostile than did siblings themselves. Higher levels of sibling hostility, lower levels of sibling warmth and higher levels of disengagement each significantly predicted child adjustment; however, these effects were predicated upon the adjustment of the other sibling. The sibling relationships of children exposed to IPV made a difference in their individual adjustment, and their adjustment issues influenced how they feel about and interacted with their sibling. Sibling hostility played a stronger role in adjustment issues than sibling warmth. The nature of sibling influences and the direction of future research were discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sibling eating behaviours and parental feeding practices with siblings: similar or different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Tate, Allan D; Trofholz, Amanda; Conger, Katherine; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about whether siblings have similar or different eating behaviours or whether parents tailor their feeding practices to different siblings. The main objectives of the present study were to examine similarities and differences in child eating behaviours and parental feeding practices with siblings and to determine whether child eating behaviours and parental feeding practices differ depending on sibling concordant (i.e. both siblings overweight or healthy weight) or discordant (i.e. one sibling overweight and one sibling healthy weight) weight status. Cross-sectional, mixed-methods study. In-home visits were conducted by research staff. Surveys were conducted with parents and anthropometry was collected on parents and siblings. Children (n 88) aged 6-12 years (mean age 9 (sd 2) years), their parents (mean age 34 (sd 7) years) and near-age siblings (mean age 9 (sd 4) years) from diverse racial/ethnic and low-income households participated. Results indicated that siblings with higher BMI engaged in higher levels of emotional eating compared with siblings with lower BMI. Additionally, results indicated that when families had sibling dyads discordant on weight status, the sibling who was overweight had higher food enjoyment and lower levels of food satiety. Additionally, within siblings with discordant weight status, parents were more likely to use restrictive feeding practices with the overweight sibling and pressure-to-eat and encouragement-to-eat feeding practices with the healthy-weight sibling. Family-based childhood obesity interventions may need to assess for sibling weight status when researching the home environment and intervene with parents to avoid using restriction or pressure-to-eat feeding practices when siblings are discordant on weight status.

  11. And What About Siblings? A Longitudinal Analysis of Sibling Effects on Youth's Intergroup Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Katharina; Šerek, Jan; Noack, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Within the process of political socialization, the family is of particular importance. Apart from parents, however, little is known about the role of other close family members. The present study examined if siblings affect each other's intergroup attitudes (i.e., intolerance towards immigrants, social dominance orientation). Drawing on a sample of 362 sibling dyads (older siblings: M age  = 17.77, 53.6% female; younger siblings: M age  = 13.61, 61.3% female), the results showed that older siblings' intergroup attitudes predicted younger siblings' attitudes, but this effect was moderated by gender. Specifically, older siblings' intolerance and social dominance orientation were only found to affect their younger sisters, yet not their younger brothers. Although younger siblings' intergroup attitudes had no main effect on older siblings, a significant moderation by age indicated that younger siblings affected older siblings' social dominance orientation with increasing age. These moderation effects of age and gender were not mediated by the quality of family relationships. The findings also remained the same when parental intergroup attitudes were taken into account. While siblings were generally identified as an important agent of political socialization in youth, the results also highlight the necessity to further examine the mechanism that either facilitate or hinder sibling effects.

  12. Sibling relationships in individuals with Angelman syndrome: A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Love, V.; Richters, L.P.H.; Didden, H.C.M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Machalicek, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Investigating the impact of Angelman syndrome on the sibling relationship. Methods: This study explored differences in sibling relationships between children with a typically-developing sibling (n = 55) and children with a sibling with Angelman syndrome (n 44). Sibling relationships were

  13. Child passenger injury risk in sibling versus non-sibling teen driver crashes: a US study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Senserrick, Teresa M; Kallan, Michael J; Winston, Flaura K

    2007-01-01

    .... The objective of this research was to examine differences in injury risk to US child passengers in crashes involving sibling versus non-sibling teen drivers, and to compare outcomes with crashes involving adult drivers...

  14. Tensions among siblings in parent care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashewicz, Bonnie; Keating, Norah

    2009-06-01

    From a place of "genealogical equivalence" as children of their parents, siblings spend a lifetime developing separate identities. As parents near the end of their lives, issues of sibling equivalence are renegotiated in the face of equal obligations to provide care and equal entitlement to parent assets. In this paper, we hypothesize how unresolved issues of rivalry for parent affection/attention among siblings may be reasserted when parents need care. Data are drawn from a project about how parent care and assets are shared. In-depth interviews with three sibling groups experiencing conflict over sharing parent care and assets along with six Canadian legal case portrayals of disputes among siblings over how parent care and assets were shared are examined. Findings are that disputes occur when siblings perceive others as dominating parent care and assets through tactics such as separating the parent from other siblings and preventing other siblings from being engaged in decisions about care and assets. Discussion is focused on paradoxes faced by siblings given expectations for equity in parent relationships alongside perceived pre-eminence in care and asset decisions.

  15. The solar siblings in the Gaia era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Barbosa, C. A.; Brown, A. G. A.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2014-07-01

    We perform realistic simulations of the Sun's birth cluster in order to predict the current distribution of solar siblings in the Galaxy. We study the possibility of finding the solar siblings in the Gaia catalogue by using only positional and kinematic information. We find that the number of solar siblings predicted to be observed by Gaia will be around 100 in the most optimistic case, and that a phase space only search in the Gaia catalogue will be extremely difficult. It is therefore mandatory to combine the chemical tagging technique with phase space selection criteria in order to have any hope of finding the solar siblings.

  16. Siblings of children with life-limiting conditions: psychological adjustment and sibling relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, J M; Totsika, V; Hain, R; Hastings, R P

    2017-05-01

    This study explored psychological adjustment and sibling relationships of siblings of children with life-limiting conditions (LLCs), expanding on previous research by defining LLCs using a systematic classification of these conditions. Thirty-nine siblings participated, aged 3-16 years. Parents completed measures of siblings' emotional and behavioural difficulties, quality of life, sibling relationships and impact on families and siblings. Sibling and family adjustment and relationships were compared with population norms, where available, and to a matched comparison group of siblings of children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), as a comparable 'high risk' group. LLC siblings presented significantly higher levels of emotional and behavioural difficulties, and lower quality of life than population norms. Their difficulties were at levels comparable to siblings of children with ASD. A wider impact on the family was confirmed. Family socio-economic position, time since diagnosis, employment and accessing hospice care were factors associated with better psychological adjustment. Using a systematic classification of LLCs, the study supported earlier findings of increased levels of psychological difficulties in siblings of children with a LLC. The evidence is (i) highlighting the need to provide support to these siblings and their families, and (ii) that intervention approaches could be drawn from the ASD field. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Adjustment of siblings to childhood cancer: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, B. A.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Last, B. F.

    1999-01-01

    Studies concerning sibling adjustment to childhood cancer and published since 1980 were reviewed. Sibling distress was described in terms of emotional, socio-behavioral, academic, physical and positive reactions. Secondly, characteristics and coping resources of siblings that are related to

  18. Differences in Age between Siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsbro Lading, Åse

    Themain assumption here is that people re-enact in their relationship with others not only what they experienced in parent-child relationship but also in their original relationships with siblings, relationships that are so significant that they stand on their own. While the dyadic analytic...... relationship tends to bring out a parent-child transference, the transference relationships in the group are familial ones, the transference is horizontal. The group, offering the possibility of many transferential, “sibling” relationships, is the best therapeutic setting in which to deal with this issue....

  19. Prevalence and Correlates of Sibling Victimization Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Corinna Jenkins; Finkelhor, David; Shattuck, Anne M.; Turner, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to document the prevalence and correlates of any past year sibling victimization, including physical, property, and psychological victimization, by a co-residing juvenile sibling across the spectrum of childhood from one month to 17 years of age. Methods: The National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence…

  20. Three siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-13

    Jan 13, 2013 ... year old sibling had normal menses. Both the 19-year old and the 21-year old siblings experienced primary amenorrhoea. The patient reported a usual female gender role and female gender identity, and had strong maternal feelings. She had already adopted a child, but wanted biological children with her ...

  1. Sibling caregivers of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijung Park

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Siblings of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia are an important source of family caregiving. Unfortunately, limited information is available about sibling caregivers because existing studies have focused on other family relationships such as parents, spouses, and children. To fill the knowledge gap, the purpose of this study is to describe Korean sibling caregivers’ experience with individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. Guided by Colaizzi’s descriptive phenomenological methodology, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with eight individuals who have a sibling (1 diagnosed with schizophrenia and (2 hospitalized in an inpatient psychiatric unit. We discerned six key themes: sorrow, burnout, shame, different perspectives in life, acceptance, and responsibility. We categorized these themes into three groups: suffering, hope, and responsibility and obligation. Sibling caregivers of individuals with schizophrenia experience a mixture of several emotions. Participants loved their brother or sister with schizophrenia, but at the same time they felt shame and fear. While they were burdened by the responsibilities of caregiving, they remained loyal to their sibling with schizophrenia, continuing to help their siblings reach their full potential. Although participants were confused about the symptoms of schizophrenia, they were committed to learning more about the illness. Because we conducted the current study in Korea, the findings of this study may be unique to Korea culture. Further studies are needed to compare and contrast nuanced differences in sibling caregivers’ experience among different cultural groups.

  2. Adult Siblings Consider the Future: Emergent Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davys, Deborah; Mitchell, Duncan; Haigh, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to explore the perceptions of adult siblings regarding a future care role and compare with perceived parental wishes as family often provide a key support role in the lives of people who have an intellectual disability. Materials and Method: Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 15 adult siblings and an…

  3. Sibling curves of polynomials | Wiggins | Quaestiones Mathematicae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sibling curves were demonstrated in papers [2, 3] as a novel way to visualize the zeros of complex valued functions. In this paper, we continue the work done in those papers by focusing solely on polynomials. We proceed to prove that the number of sibling curves of a polynomial is the degree of the polynomial. Keywords: ...

  4. The Female Experience of Sibling Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Margaret M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Calls occurrence of sibling incest underrecognized. Presents four cases of females who experienced sibling incest to illustrate problem areas, including issues of enforced secrecy, interpersonal power differentials, influences on sexual development, individual after effects, disturbances in family dynamics, and gender-based differences in…

  5. Siblings' Use of Milieu Teaching at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Terry B.; Kaiser, Ann P.

    1996-01-01

    Three older siblings were taught to use two milieu teaching procedures, modeling and mand modeling, with young children who exhibited language delays. Older siblings applied the techniques while playing, and subjects learned to use the targeted utterances both as responses and spontaneously. Additionally, interactions became more positive.…

  6. Prohibitions against Mourning in Childhood Sibling Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Helen

    1985-01-01

    Presents findings from a research study on sibling loss in childhood which support the idea that the loss of a sibling in childhood may be an especially significant loss for a child, in that both internal, family, and societal influences prohibit the opportunity to mourn the loss. (Author/NRB)

  7. Caregiving and Sibling Relationships: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when one sibling is in denial over a parent’s condition. Adult children who seem unable to accept the reality of ... and needed. Keep family members informed regarding a parent’s condition. Be realistic in your expectations. Allow siblings to help in ways they are ...

  8. Sibling Relationships during the Transition to Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Katherine Jewsbury; Little, Wendy M

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has shed new light on individual development during the early adulthood years, yet few investigators have examined sibling relationships during this stage of life. These relationships undergo transformations as individuals enter adult roles and orient their lives towards friends and romantic partners and establish independence from parents and siblings. This review examines major life events and role transitions such as leaving home, completing school, obtaining employment, getting married, and having children that influence individuals and their sibling relationships. In addition, the review considers how sibling relationships may affect individuals during the transition to adulthood, and considers the context of family and culture. The article concludes with suggestions for future research on sibling relationships during early adulthood and beyond.

  9. Family Perspectives on Siblings' Conflict Goals in Middle Childhood: Links to Hierarchical and Affective Features of Sibling Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Holly E; Witwit, Ma-Ab

    2017-06-01

    This study examined parents' and children's descriptions of older and younger siblings' conflict goals in the late preschool and middle childhood years, and how these attributions were related to sibling relationship quality. Parents and 4- to 10-year-old children from 62 families were interviewed separately about siblings' motivations in two disputes and completed assessments of sibling relationship quality. Goal attributions varied across respondents in ways reflecting their family roles and positioning within disputes. Findings also revealed variations in the goals ascribed to older and younger siblings in line with hierarchical features of sibling relationships, such as younger siblings' conciliation/connectedness motives and older siblings' desires for autonomy/respect. Goal attributions were related to differences between families in the affective tenor of sibling relationships. Results demonstrate how power dynamics in sibling relationships play out in their everyday disputes, and underscore the importance of considering different family members' unique perspectives on children's sibling conflict experiences. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Alternative donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfraih, Feras; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Kassim, Adetola A

    2016-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a curative therapy for patients with hemoglobinopathies, mainly severe sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassemia (TM). However, the applicability of HSCT has been limited mainly by donor availability, with a less than 25%-30% of eligible patients having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donors. Previous outcomes using alternate donor options have been markedly inferior due to increased regimen-related toxicity, transplant-related mortality, graft failure, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Advances in transplant technology, including high-resolution HLA typing, improved GVHD prophylactic approaches with tolerance induction, and better supportive care over the last decade, are addressing these historical challenges, resulting in increasing donor options. Herein, we review alternate donor HSCT approaches for severe SCD and TM using unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood units, or related haploidentical donors. Though this is an emerging field, early results are promising and in selected patients, this may be the preferred option to mitigate against the age-related morbidity and early mortality associated with these disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Support Needs of Siblings of People with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Catherine K.; Heller, Tamar; Kramer, John

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the support needs of adult siblings of people with developmental disabilities. A survey completed by 139 siblings of people with developmental disabilities captured the needs of adult siblings through 2 open-ended questions. A grounded theory approach was used, and the sibling responses anchored the analysis,…

  12. Parental Divorce and Sibling Relationships: A Research Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poortman, Anne-Rigt; Voorpostel, Marieke

    2009-01-01

    This study examines long-term effects of parental divorce on sibling relationships in adulthood and the role of predivorce parental conflict. It used large-scale retrospective data from the Netherlands that contain reports from both siblings of the sibling dyad. Results show limited effects of parental divorce on sibling contact and relationship…

  13. Lung donor selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward; van Berkel, Victor

    2014-08-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that meets all of these criteria is quite rare. As such, many transplants have been performed where the donor does not meet these stringent criteria. Over the last decade, numerous reports have been published examining the effects of individual acceptance criteria on lung transplant survival and graft function. These studies suggest that there is little impact of the historical criteria on either short or long term outcomes. For age, donors should be within 18 to 64 years old. Gender may relay benefit to all female recipients especially in male to female transplants, although results are mixed in these studies. Race matched donor/recipients have improved outcomes and African American donors convey worse prognosis. Smoking donors may decrease recipient survival post transplant, but provide a life saving opportunity for recipients that may otherwise remain on the transplant waiting list. No specific gram stain or bronchoscopic findings are reflected in recipient outcomes. Chest radiographs are a poor indicator of lung donor function and should not adversely affect organ usage aside for concerns over malignancy. Ischemic time greater than six hours has no documented adverse effects on recipient mortality and should not limit donor retrieval distances. Brain dead donors and deceased donors have equivalent prognosis. Initial PaO2/FiO2 ratios less than 300 should not dissuade donor organ usage, although recruitment techniques should be implemented with intent to transplant.

  14. Sibling relationships in individuals with Angelman syndrome: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Victoria; Richters, Lotte; Didden, Robert; Korzilius, Hubert; Machalicek, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the impact of Angelman syndrome on the sibling relationship. This study explored differences in sibling relationships between children with a typically-developing sibling (n = 55) and children with a sibling with Angelman syndrome (n = 44). Sibling relationships were compared on four factors and 16 sub-scales of the Sibling Relationship Questionnaire-Revised. Results showed significant differences in mean scores on each of the four factors (i.e. Warmth/Closeness, Conflict, Rivalry and Dominance/Nurturance) and most of the sub-scales. ANCOVAs showed that demographic variables (number of siblings, living in a two-parent vs single parent household, gender, participant's age, place of residence) did not influence significant differences in sibling relationships between the two groups. Having a brother or sister with Angelman syndrome may influence the way in which the sibling perceives the sibling relationship. This may have important implications for family-centred intervention for this population.

  15. Information rights and donor conception: lessons from adoption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Richard

    2012-06-01

    This article reviews the Australian experience in providing information rights for people separated through adoption, and considers its relevance in adjusting the competing interests of those involved in donor conception. The Australian laws, which differ from State to State, create information rights for adults who have been adopted, and also--with more qualifications--for other family members, such as birth parents and siblings. Some laws also seek to protect privacy, notably by use of the "contact veto". The author argues that the review of the Australian laws provides strong support for the rights of donor offspring, when adult, to information about their genetic origins. It also raises important questions about the rights and interests of other family members involved in donor conception, and how they might be accommodated.

  16. A Study on Normal Siblings of Mentally Retarded Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Mihara, Hiromitsu

    1997-01-01

    This study examined how normal people perceive their mentally retarded siblings and what they see to be their future relationship. Normal siblings of mentally retarded persons were given a questionnaire regarding their relationships with their parents and mentally retarded siblings during childhood and how they introduced their mentally retarded siblings to their fiancees. In most cases, they had good relationships with their mentally retarded siblings during childhood. Most of them also inte...

  17. Child passenger injury risk in sibling versus non-sibling teen driver crashes: a US study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senserrick, Teresa M; Kallan, Michael J; Winston, Flaura K

    2007-06-01

    Several international jurisdictions allow family exemptions to graduated driver licensing passenger restrictions. The objective of this research was to examine differences in injury risk to US child passengers in crashes involving sibling versus non-sibling teen drivers, and to compare outcomes with crashes involving adult drivers. Insurance claim and telephone survey data were collected on 16 233 child passengers (representing 289 329 children) in 17 US jurisdictions. There was a trend toward higher restraint non-use by child passengers in the non-sibling group than in the sibling group (9.6% vs 4.7%; p = 0.08). Children in the sibling group had a 40% lower risk of injury than those in the non-sibling group (adjusted OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.90); however, injury risk was higher in the sibling group than in children traveling with adults (adjusted OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.26). Child passengers riding with sibling teen drivers may be safer than those riding with non-sibling teens, but not as safe as those riding with adult drivers.

  18. What Makes Siblings Different? The Development of Sibling Differences in Academic Achievement and Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alexander C.; McHale, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    To illuminate processes that contribute to the development of sibling differences, this study examined cross lagged links between parents’ beliefs about sibling differences in academic ability and differences between siblings’ grade point averages (GPAs), and cross lagged links between differences in siblings’ GPAs and sibling differences in academic interests. Data were collected from mothers, fathers, firstborn (M age at Time 1 = 15.71, SD = 1.07) and secondborn (M age at Time 1 = 13.18, SD = 1.29) youth from 388 European American Families on three annual occasions. Findings revealed that, after controlling for siblings’ average grades and prior differences in performance, parents’ beliefs about sibling differences in academic ability predicted differences in performance such that youth rated by parents as relatively more competent than their sibling earned relatively higher grades the following year. Siblings’ relative school performance, however, did not predict parents’ beliefs about differences between siblings’ competencies. Further, after controlling for average interests and grades, sibling differences in GPA predicted differences in siblings’ interests such that youth who had better grades than their siblings reported relatively stronger academic interests the following year. Differences in interest, however, did not predict sibling differences in GPA. Findings are discussed in terms the role of sibling dynamics in family socialization. PMID:26053351

  19. Child passenger injury risk in sibling versus non‐sibling teen driver crashes: a US study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senserrick, Teresa M; Kallan, Michael J; Winston, Flaura K

    2007-01-01

    Several international jurisdictions allow family exemptions to graduated driver licensing passenger restrictions. The objective of this research was to examine differences in injury risk to US child passengers in crashes involving sibling versus non‐sibling teen drivers, and to compare outcomes with crashes involving adult drivers. Insurance claim and telephone survey data were collected on 16 233 child passengers (representing 289 329 children) in 17 US jurisdictions. There was a trend toward higher restraint non‐use by child passengers in the non‐sibling group than in the sibling group (9.6% vs 4.7%; p = 0.08). Children in the sibling group had a 40% lower risk of injury than those in the non‐sibling group (adjusted OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.90); however, injury risk was higher in the sibling group than in children traveling with adults (adjusted OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.26). Child passengers riding with sibling teen drivers may be safer than those riding with non‐sibling teens, but not as safe as those riding with adult drivers. PMID:17567980

  20. Fundus flavimaculatus: polymorphic retinal change in siblings.

    OpenAIRE

    ISASHIKI, Y.; Ohba, N.

    1985-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy and an 11-year-old girl, siblings of healthy, consanguineous parents, had a bilateral retinal dystrophy with a gradual loss of vision. The brother showed a bull's eye macular change with sparse fundus flavimaculatus type flecks. The sister had numerous fleck lesions of fundus flavimaculatus throughout the posterior fundus, but there was virtually no macular change. Thus the siblings presented instances of polymorphic expressivity of fundus flavimaculatus.

  1. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Nitin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the various options for patients with end stage renal disease, kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a suitable patient. The kidney for transplantation is retrieved from either a cadaver or a live donor. Living donor nephrectomy has been developed as a method to address the shortfall in cadaveric kidneys available for transplantation. Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN, by reducing postoperative pain, shortening convalescence, and improving the cosmetic outcome of the donor nephrectomy, has shown the potential to increase the number of living kidney donations further by removing some of the disincentives inherent to donation itself. The technique of LLDN has undergone evolution at different transplant centers and many modifications have been done to improve donor safety and recipient outcome. Virtually all donors eligible for an open surgical procedure may also undergo the laparoscopic operation. Various earlier contraindications to LDN, such as right donor kidney, multiple vessels, anomalous vasculature and obesity have been overcome with increasing experience. Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy can be done transperitoneally or retroperitoneally on either side. The approach is most commonly transperitoneal, which allows adequate working space and easy dissection. A review of literature and our experience with regards to standard approach and the modifications is presented including a cost saving model for the developing countries. An assessment has been made, of the impact of LDN on the outcome of donor and the recipient.

  2. Digital subtraction angiography in 105 living renal transplant donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Ho Jong; Oh, Kyung Seung; Kim, So Sun; Huh, Jin Do; Kim, Ho Joon; Chun, Byung Hee; Joh, Young Duck [Kosin Medical College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-10-15

    In order to analyze the number and length of the renal arteries and to evaluate abnormalities of the renal parenchyma and vessel, digital subtraction angiogram images of 105 potential renal donors (45 men and 60 women aged 17-66 years) were studied retrospectively. For the entire series, 31 donors had multiple renal arteries on one side (15 on the left, 11 on the right) and 5 donors on the both sides. 89 donors were family related either parents or siblings of recipients. The estimation of the length of the renal artery was based on the mean height of the second lumbar vertebral body (L2). The right renal artery is significant longer than on the left and measured more than the height of L2 vertebral body in 84 cases on the right and 60 cases on the left. Twenty two donors underwent right nephrectomy due to presence of multiple renal arteries on the left (N=14), proximal bifurcation of left main renal artery (N=3), and young females in reproductive age (N=5). Unexpected abnormalities found with angiogram were seen in 7 cases and they include renal artery stenosis (N=2), renal cysts (N=4) and focal infarction (N=1). In cases of the renal cysts and focal infarction, there were no serious complications related to the abnormalities. It is conclude that intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography is safe and efficient method to image renal anatomy of the potential renal donors.

  3. The association between unequal parental treatment and the sibling relationship in Finland: The difference between full and half-siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsbacka, Mirkka; Tanskanen, Antti O

    2015-06-24

    Studies have shown that unequal parental treatment is associated with relationship quality between siblings. However, it is unclear how it affects the relationship between full and half-siblings. Using data from the Generational Transmissions in Finland project (n = 1,537 younger adults), we study whether those who have half-siblings perceive more unequal parental treatment than those who have full siblings only. In addition, we study how unequal parental treatment is associated with sibling relationship between full, maternal, and paternal half-siblings. First, we found that individuals who have maternal and/or paternal half-siblings are more likely to have encountered unequal maternal treatment than individuals who have full siblings only. Second, we found that unequal parental treatment impairs full as well as maternal and paternal half-sibling relations in adulthood. Third, unequal parental treatment mediates the effect of genetic relatedness on sibling relations in the case of maternal half-siblings, but not in the case of paternal half-siblings. After controlling for unequal parental treatment, the quality of maternal half-sibling relationships did not differ from that of full siblings, whereas the quality of paternal half-sibling relationships still did. Fourth, the qualitative comments (n = 206) from the same population reveal that unequal parental treatment presents itself several ways, such as differential financial, emotional, or practical support.

  4. Sibling Supporters' Experiences of Giving Support to Siblings Who Have a Brother or a Sister With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolbris, Margaretha Jenholt; Nilsson, Stefan

    Siblings of a child with a life-threatening disease, such as cancer, have a right to measures that promote their health and welfare. Siblings may find it hard to understand what is happening to the sick child with cancer and why he or she reacts as he or she does. The aim of the study was to explore sibling supporters' thoughts about the experiences they had in providing support for siblings with a brother or a sister with a life-threatening disease such as cancer. All the 12 sibling supporters currently working in Sweden participated in a qualitative, descriptive study from which 5 categories emerged, showing that the sibling supporters supported siblings from diagnosis until possible death. They enabled siblings who were in the same situation to meet each other and arranged activities suited to their ages, as well as offering an encouraging environment. To help the siblings, the sibling supporters found it necessary to interact with both the parents and the ward staff. The sibling supporters felt that their support was important and necessary in helping siblings promote their own health both when the sick child was alive and also after his or her death. The experience of the sibling supporters was that they listened to the siblings' stories and met them when they were in their crisis. The study confirms that sibling supporters should be a part of the health care team that treat and support the family when a child has cancer.

  5. Dealing with Donor Anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Mike

    1995-01-01

    Techniques that reduce donors' resistance to college fund-raising requests, either direct mail or telephone solicitations, are offered. These include: respecting the prospects' concerns about privacy; offering nonintrusive giving options; honesty and clarity of communication; reinforcing donor sense of control; connecting with prospects'…

  6. First-born siblings show better second language skills than later born siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Karin; Troesch, Larissa M; Grob, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We examined the extent to which three sibling structure variables number of siblings, birth order, and presence of an older sibling at school age are linked to the second language skills of bilingual children. The research questions were tested using an ethnically heterogeneous sample of 1209 bilingual children with German as a second language. Controlling for children's age, sex, nationality, number of children's books at home, family language and parental German language skills, hierarchical regression analyses showed an inverse relationship between the number of siblings and second language skills: the more siblings a child had, the lower was his/her second language proficiency. This relationship was mediated by attendance in early education institutions. Moreover, first-born siblings showed better second language skills than later born siblings. The current study revealed that the resource dilution model, i.e., the decrease in resources for every additional sibling, holds for second language acquisition. Moreover, the results indicate that bilingual children from families with several children benefit from access to early education institutions.

  7. Sibling Voices: The Self-Reported Mental Health of Siblings of Children with a Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallo, Rebecca; Gavidia-Payne, Susana; Minett, Belinda; Kapoor, Aparna

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is increasing interest in the experiences and well-being of siblings growing up with a brother or sister with a disability in Australia. However, research to date has primarily obtained parent reports of sibling adjustment and mental health. Therefore, the aim of the current study was threefold: (1) to report on the mental health…

  8. First-born siblings show better second language skills than later born siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin eKeller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the extent to which three sibling structure variables number of siblings, birth order and presence of an older sibling at school age are linked to the second language skills of bilingual children. The research questions were tested using an ethnically heterogeneous sample of 1209 bilingual children with German as a second language. Controlling for children’s age, sex, nationality, number of children’s books at home, family language and parental German language skills, hierarchical regression analyses showed an inverse relationship between the number of siblings and second language skills: The more siblings a child had, the lower was his/her second language proficiency. This relationship was mediated by attendance in early education institutions. Moreover, first-born siblings showed better second language skills than later born siblings.The current study revealed that the resource dilution model, i.e., the decrease in resources for every additional sibling, holds for second language acquisition. Moreover, the results indicate that bilingual children from families with several children benefit from access to early education institutions.

  9. Variance Distribution in Sibling Relationships: Advantages of Multilevel Modeling Using Full Sibling Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Karyn

    2017-03-01

    The majority of research on sibling relationships has investigated only one or two siblings in a family, but there are many theoretical and methodological limitations to this single dyadic perspective. This study uses multiple siblings (541 adults) in 184 families, where 96 of these families had all siblings complete the study, to demonstrate the value in including full sibling groups when conducting research on sibling relationships. Two scales, positivity and willingness to sacrifice, are evaluated with a multilevel model to account for the nested nature of family relationships. The distribution of variance across three levels: relationship, individual, and family are computed, and results indicate that the relationship level explains the most variance in positivity, whereas the individual level explains the majority of variance in willingness to sacrifice. These distributions are affected by gender composition and family size. The results of this study highlight an important and often overlooked element of family research: The meaning of a scale changes based on its distribution of variance at these three levels. Researchers are encouraged to be cognizant of the variance distribution of their scales when studying sibling relationships and to incorporate more full sibling groups into their research methods and study design. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  10. First-born siblings show better second language skills than later born siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Karin; Troesch, Larissa M.; Grob, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We examined the extent to which three sibling structure variables number of siblings, birth order, and presence of an older sibling at school age are linked to the second language skills of bilingual children. The research questions were tested using an ethnically heterogeneous sample of 1209 bilingual children with German as a second language. Controlling for children’s age, sex, nationality, number of children’s books at home, family language and parental German language skills, hierarchical regression analyses showed an inverse relationship between the number of siblings and second language skills: the more siblings a child had, the lower was his/her second language proficiency. This relationship was mediated by attendance in early education institutions. Moreover, first-born siblings showed better second language skills than later born siblings. The current study revealed that the resource dilution model, i.e., the decrease in resources for every additional sibling, holds for second language acquisition. Moreover, the results indicate that bilingual children from families with several children benefit from access to early education institutions. PMID:26089806

  11. Congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia in three siblings: molecular analysis of atypical clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Manish J; Pendergrass, Thomas W; Cummings, Carrie C; Ihara, Kenji; Blau, C Anthony; Drachman, Jonathan G

    2005-10-01

    An 11-year-old girl, presenting with fatigue and bruising, was found to be profoundly pancytopenic. Bone marrow exam and clinical evaluation were consistent with aplastic anemia. Family members were studied as potential stem cell donors, revealing that both younger siblings displayed significant thrombocytopenia, whereas both parents had normal blood counts. We evaluated this pedigree to understand the unusually late presentation of congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (CAMT). The coding region and the intron/exon junctions of MPL were sequenced from each family member. Vectors representing each of the mutations were constructed and tested for the ability to support growth of Baf3/Mpl(mutant) cells. All three siblings had elevated thrombopoietin levels. Analysis of genomic DNA demonstrated that each parent had mutations/polymorphisms in a single MPL allele and that each child was a compound heterozygote, having inherited both abnormal alleles. The maternal allele encoded a mutation of the donor splice-junction at the exon-3/intron-3 boundary. A mini-gene construct encoding normal vs mutant versions of the intron-3 donor-site demonstrated that physiologic splicing was significantly reduced in the mutant construct. Mutations that incompletely eliminate Mpl expression/function may result in delayed diagnosis of CAMT and confusion with aplastic anemia.

  12. Using Twins to Better Understand Sibling Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Katharine M; Pike, Alison; Latham, Rachel M; Oliver, Bonamy R

    2017-03-01

    We compared the nature of the sibling relationship in dyads of varying genetic relatedness, employing a behavioural genetic design to estimate the contribution that genes and the environment have on this familial bond. Two samples were used-the Sisters and Brothers Study consisted of 173 families with two target non-twin children (mean ages = 7.42 and 5.22 years respectively); and the Twins, Family and Behaviour study included 234 families with two target twin children (mean age = 4.70 years). Mothers and fathers reported on their children's relationship with each other, via a postal questionnaire (the Sisters and Brothers Study) or a telephone interview (the Twins, Family and Behaviour study). Contrary to expectations, no mean level differences emerged when monozygotic twin pairs, dizygotic twin pairs, and non-twin pairs were compared on their sibling relationship quality. Behavioural genetic analyses also revealed that the sibling bond was modestly to moderately influenced by the genetic propensities of the children within the dyad, and moderately to substantially influenced by the shared environment common to both siblings. In addition, for sibling negativity, we found evidence of twin-specific environmental influence-dizygotic twins showed more reciprocity than did non-twins. Our findings have repercussions for the broader application of results from future twin-based investigations.

  13. Marginal kidney donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Gopalakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for a medically eligible patient with end stage renal disease. The number of renal transplants has increased rapidly over the last two decades. However, the demand for organs has increased even more. This disparity between the availability of organs and waitlisted patients for transplants has forced many transplant centers across the world to use marginal kidneys and donors. We performed a Medline search to establish the current status of marginal kidney donors in the world. Transplant programs using marginal deceased renal grafts is well established. The focus is now on efforts to improve their results. Utilization of non-heart-beating donors is still in a plateau phase and comprises a minor percentage of deceased donations. The main concern is primary non-function of the renal graft apart from legal and ethical issues. Transplants with living donors outnumbered cadaveric transplants at many centers in the last decade. There has been an increased use of marginal living kidney donors with some acceptable medical risks. Our primary concern is the safety of the living donor. There is not enough scientific data available to quantify the risks involved for such donation. The definition of marginal living donor is still not clear and there are no uniform recommendations. The decision must be tailored to each donor who in turn should be actively involved at all levels of the decision-making process. In the current circumstances, our responsibility is very crucial in making decisions for either accepting or rejecting a marginal living donor.

  14. Should selecting saviour siblings be banned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, S; Wilkinson, S

    2004-12-01

    By using tissue typing in conjunction with preimplantation genetic diagnosis doctors are able to pick a human embryo for implantation which, if all goes well, will become a "saviour sibling", a brother or sister capable of donating life-saving tissue to an existing child. This paper addresses the question of whether this form of selection should be banned and concludes that it should not. Three main prohibitionist arguments are considered and found wanting: (a) the claim that saviour siblings would be treated as commodities; (b) a slippery slope argument, which suggests that this practice will lead to the creation of so-called "designer babies"; and (c) a child welfare argument, according to which saviour siblings will be physically and/or psychologically harmed.

  15. Deadly competition between sibling bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'Er, Avraham

    2011-03-01

    As a result of stress due to nutrient limitation or antibiotics, competing individual bacteria within a single colony may lyse sibling cells to release nutrients (cannibalism) or DNA (fratricide). However, we have recently shown that competition is not limited to individuals, but can occur at the colony level [A. Be'er et al., PNAS 106, 428 (2009); A. Be'er et al., PNAS 107, 6258 (2010).] In response to the presence of an encroaching sibling colony, Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacteria secrete a lethal protein, lysing cells at the interface between the colonies. Analysis of the proteins secreted by these competing sibling colonies, combined with a mathematical model, shows how colonies maintain their growth by self-regulating the secretion of two proteins: subtilisin (a well-known growth promoter), and Slf (a previously unknown protein, which is lethal). The results also explain why a single colony is not inhibited by its own secretions.

  16. Sibling relationships of anxiety disordered children--a research note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhout, Ingeborg E.; Boer, Frits; Markus, Monica T.; Hoogendijk, Thea H. G.; Maingay, Ragna; Borst, Sophie R.

    2003-01-01

    There is a paucity of knowledge on the role of sibling relationships in internalizing disorders. Research in nonclinical populations suggests an association between internalizing problems in children and negative sibling interactions. Further, an association is reported between internalizing

  17. Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome in two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekeler, Ensar; Ozdemir, Candan; Gokalp, Selman; Yildirim, Abdurrahman; Bas, Firdevs; Gunoz, Hulya; Acunas, Gulden

    2005-03-01

    Cases of Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome involving the upper extremities and affecting siblings have rarely been reported. We present the radiological findings of Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome in two siblings, with upper extremity involvement in one of them.

  18. Sibling Gender Composition and Preferences for STEM Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenøe, Anne Ardila

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies how sibling gender composition affects preferences for education within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). To identify the causal effect of sibling gender, I focus on a sample of firstborn children who all have a younger biological sibling. The randomness...... of the younger siblings' gender allows me to estimate the causal effect of having an opposite compared to same sex sibling. Overall, having an opposite sex sibling makes educational choices more gender-stereotypical for both genders. Having an opposite sex sibling reduces women's probability to enroll in any......-parent interactions. Parents with mixed sex children gender-specialize their parenting more and spend more quality time with their same sex child than parents with same sex children. Moreover, I show that young boys with an opposite sex sibling are exposed to more gender-stereotypical behavior within the family than...

  19. Twin birth changes DNA methylation of subsequent siblings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shuai Li; Eunae Kim; Ee Ming Wong; Ji-Hoon Eric Joo; Tuong L Nguyen; Jennifer Stone; Yun-Mi Song; Louisa B Flander; Richard Saffery; Graham G Giles; Melissa C Southey; Joohon Sung; John L Hopper

    2017-01-01

    We asked if twin birth influences the DNA methylation of subsequent siblings. We measured whole blood methylation using the HumanMethylation450 array for siblings from two twin and family studies in Australia and Korea...

  20. Caring for Siblings of Kids With Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... August 2015 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Sibling Rivalry Caring for Siblings of Seriously Ill Children Support for Parents of Kids With Special Needs Cerebral Palsy Finding Respite Care ...

  1. Meet the donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olejaz, Maria; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, gross anatomy teaching and anatomical dissection have been fundamental elements in the training of medical doctors and surgeons across the world. Anatomy education and research rely on a stable and reliable supply of bodies in order to take place. Based on qualitative in-depth inte......For centuries, gross anatomy teaching and anatomical dissection have been fundamental elements in the training of medical doctors and surgeons across the world. Anatomy education and research rely on a stable and reliable supply of bodies in order to take place. Based on qualitative in......-depth interviews with 13 whole body donors in Denmark, this article explores what donors think about donation and thus offers a supplement to previous primarily quantitative work on donor motivation. The article presents how interviewed donors relate to three topics: their body, their social relations...

  2. Progeria in siblings: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sowmiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria, also known as Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, is an extremely rare, severe genetic condition wherein symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. It is an autosomal dominant disorder. It is not seen in siblings of affected children although there are very few case reports of progeria affecting more than one child in a family. Here we are presenting two siblings, a 14-year-old male and a 13-year-old female with features of progeria, suggesting a possible autosomal recessive inheritance.

  3. Only full-sibling families evolved eusociality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Jacobus J; Beekman, Madeleine; Cornwallis, Charlie K

    2011-01-01

    that is claimed to be more fundamental and general, but which, we believe, has no practical biological meaning for the evolution of eusociality. Nowak et al. overlook the robust empirical observation that eusociality has only arisen in clades where mothers are associated with their full-sibling offspring; that is......, in families where the average relatedness of offspring to siblings is as high as to their own offspring, independent of population structure or ploidy. We believe that this omission makes the paper largely irrelevant for understanding the evolution of eusociality....

  4. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria in three siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bari Arfan Ul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital erythropoietic porphyria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents with marked skin photosensitivity, hypertrichosis, blistering, scarring, milia formation and dyspigmentation of the photo-exposed areas. Three adult siblings (two sisters and one brother are presented here with variable degree of skin manifestations. During early childhood, all the siblings started showing signs of photosensitivity with darkening of urine color followed by skin blistering over the face and hands. The oldest showed severe sclerodermiform mutilation and the youngest exhibited an initial involvement with hypertrichosis. None of them had any history of convulsions, acute abdominal pain or joint pain. Woods lamp examination and laboratory investigations confirmed the diagnosis.

  5. Sibling constellation effects on learning and career aspirations of pupils.

    OpenAIRE

    KOROTVIČKOVÁ, Blanka

    2012-01-01

    The thesis "Sibling Constellation Effects on Learning and Career Aspirations of Pupils" is aimed at the description of a relationship between birth order and personality development. It also deals with the general characteristics of sibling constellation and its historical development. It points out the importance of sibling constellation in human life and presents the personality description with regard to birth order in relation to parents, siblings, peers, education and occupation. The the...

  6. Sibling effect on atopy in children of patients with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Jansen, DF; Schouten, JP; van der Heide, S; Bleecker, ER; Meyers, DA; Postma, DS

    Background Multiple population studies have shown the presence of a sibling effect on atopic disease. However, it is unclear if the sibling effect is also of importance in subjects who are genetically at high risk for the development of atopy. Objective To study the presence of a sibling effect on

  7. Siblings, Language, and False Belief in Low-Income Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Virginia; Farrar, M. Jeffrey; Guo, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between number of siblings and false belief understanding (FBU) in 94 low-income 4-5-year-olds. Previous research with middle-income children has shown a positive association between number of siblings and FBU. However, it is unclear whether having multiple siblings in low-income families is related to better…

  8. Factors Related to Sibling Removal after a Child Maltreatment Fatality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damashek, Amy; Bonner, Barbara L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Many children who die from abuse or neglect are survived by siblings. However, little data are available about what happens to these siblings after the victim's death, such as whether they are removed from their home. Even less is known about how decisions are made regarding sibling removal following a child fatality. This study…

  9. Siblings of Oedipus: Brothers and Sisters of Incest Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Young, Mary

    1981-01-01

    Investigates the roles and problems of siblings of incest victims, describes the dynamics of the incestuous family, and identifies some behavior problems of children whose siblings were incest victims. Data from two siblings' lives are presented to illustrate points. (Author/DB)

  10. Forgotten family members: the importance of siblings in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Siann; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Wade, Darryl; McGorry, Patrick; Howie, Linsey

    2014-08-01

    This paper reviews the evidence on the significance of sibling inclusion in family interventions and support during early psychosis. This narrative review presents the current research related to the importance of family work during early psychosis, the needs and developmental significance of siblings during adolescence and early adulthood, the protective effects of sibling relationships, and the characteristics of early psychosis relevant to the sibling experience. It will also review the evidence of the sibling experience in chronic physical illness and disability, as well as long-term psychotic illness. Despite the evidence that working with families is important during early psychosis, siblings have been largely ignored. Siblings are an important reciprocal relationship of long duration. They play an important role in development during adolescence and early adulthood. These relationships may be an underutilized protective factor due to their inherent benefits and social support. Developmental theories imply that early psychosis could negatively impact the sibling relationship and their quality of life, effecting personality development and health outcomes. The evidence shows that adolescent physical illness or disability has a significantly negative impact on the sibling's quality of life and increases the risk for the onset of mental health issues. Long-term psychotic illness also results in negative experiences for siblings. Current evidence shows that siblings in early psychosis experience psychological distress and changes in functional performance. Further research using standard measures is required to understand the impact early psychosis has on the sibling relationship and their quality of life. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Review of Sibling Interventions with Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Devender R.

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen intervention studies were reviewed that included children with autism and their typical siblings. Overall, results across several studies reveal that siblings can have positive impacts on social and communication skills in children with autism. However, methodological variations and mixed results in studies that included siblings as…

  12. Negotiating Inequality among Adult Siblings: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connidis, Ingrid Arnet

    2007-01-01

    Qualitative instrumental case study analysis of adult siblings from 2 families explores how socioeconomic inequality among them affects their relationships to one another. Eight middle-aged siblings' observations of childhood, parental expectations, work and family history, lifestyle, and current sibling ties indicate that childhood…

  13. Bidirectional Associations between Sibling Relationships and Parental Support during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkman, Marleen M. S.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; van der Vorst, Haske; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Sibling relationships and parental support are important for adolescents' development and well-being, yet both are likely to change during adolescence. Since adolescents participate in both the sibling relationship and the parent-child relationship, we can expect sibling relationships and parental support to be associated with each other.…

  14. Depression and Social Adjustment in Siblings of Boys with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Nora

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-two siblings of autistic boys and 34 other siblings were compared on measures of depression, social adjustment, and family responsibilities. Results showed that siblings of autistic boys scored significantly higher on depression than the comparison group, but not on problems of social adjustment. There were no significant gender…

  15. Sibship size, sibling cognitive sensitivity, and children's receptive vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prime, Heather; Pauker, Sharon; Plamondon, André; Perlman, Michal; Jenkins, Jennifer

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between sibship size and children's vocabulary as a function of quality of sibling interactions. It was hypothesized that coming from a larger sibship (ie, 3+ children) would be related to lower receptive vocabulary in children. However, we expected this association to be moderated by the level of cognitive sensitivity shown by children's next-in-age older siblings. Data on 385 children (mean age = 3.15 years) and their next-in-age older siblings (mean age = 5.57 years) were collected and included demographic questionnaires, direct testing of children's receptive vocabulary, and videos of mother-child and sibling interactions. Sibling dyads were taped engaging in a cooperative building task and tapes were coded for the amount of cognitive sensitivity the older sibling exhibited toward the younger sibling. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted and showed an interaction between sibship size and sibling cognitive sensitivity in the prediction of children's receptive vocabulary; children exposed to large sibships whose next-in-age older sibling exhibited higher levels of cognitive sensitivity were less likely to show low vocabulary skills when compared with those children exposed to large sibships whose siblings showed lower levels of cognitive sensitivity. Children who show sensitivity to the cognitive needs of their younger siblings provide a rich environment for language development. The negative impact of large sibships on language development is moderated by the presence of an older sibling who shows high cognitive sensitivity.

  16. Parental divorce and sibling relationships : a research note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortman, A.R.; Voorpostel, M.B.J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines long-term effects of parental divorce on sibling relationships in adulthood and the role of predivorce parental conflict. It used large-scale retrospective data from the Netherlands that contain reports from both siblings of the sibling dyad. Results show limited effects of

  17. Behavioral problems of siblings of epileptic children in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: The existence of a psychosocial dysfunction in the siblings of children with chronic illness has been documented. There are very few reports on siblings of children with epilepsy. The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent the children's epilepsy has affected their healthy siblings in our ...

  18. The effects of sibling relationships on social adjustment among Japanese twins compared with singletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Mari; Fujisawa, Keiko K; Ando, Juko; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the link between sibling relationships and children's social adjustment by comparing twin siblings and siblings with different ages (singleton siblings}, and clarified the role of reciprocity in sibling relationships on children's social development. Mothers of 58 monozygotic twin pairs, 48 dizygotic twin pairs, and 86 singleton sibling pairs reported their children's sibling relationships and social adjustment.This study showed that the effects of sibling relationships on the prosocial behaviors and conduct problems of each child are stronger for twins than for singleton siblings. Moreover, positivity toward one's sibling increased peer problems only among monozygotic twins. The opposite tendency was present among dizygotic twins and singleton siblings. This study suggests the importance for children's social development of having many interactions with siblings and establishing reciprocity in sibling relationships. Moreover, our results suggest that the quality of sibling relationships among monozygotic twins may be different from those among dizygotic twins and singleton siblings.

  19. Older siblings as potential supervisors of younger siblings: sibling supervisors' recognition of injury-risk behaviours and beliefs about supervisee risk taking and potential injury outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, B A; Schell, S L; Stewart, J

    2015-07-01

    Past research has shown that increased injury risk for supervisees during sibling supervision is in part due to the supervision practices of older siblings. The current study used a photo sorting task to examine older siblings' recognition of injury-risk behaviours, their perceived likelihood of supervisees engaging in, or being injured while engaging in, these behaviours, and awareness of past risk-taking behaviours of supervisees. Mothers completed the same measures and an interview about sibling supervision in the home. Mothers reported that sibling supervision occurred most frequently in the kitchen, living room, and children's bedrooms, for approximately 39 min/day, and that the more time the children spent together in a room, the more frequently the older sibling supervised the younger one. The most common reasons mothers gave for why sibling supervision was allowed included beliefs that the older child knows about hazards and unsafe behaviours and that the child could provide adequate supervision. Photo sort results revealed that older siblings were able to correctly identify about 98% of risk behaviours, with these scores significantly higher than what mothers expected (79%). However, compared with mothers, older siblings were less aware of risk behaviours that their younger siblings had engaged in previously. In addition, mothers rated supervisees as 'fairly likely' both to engage in risk behaviours and to experience an injury if they tried these behaviours, whereas sibling supervisors rated both supervisee risk behaviour and injury outcomes as 'not likely' to occur. Older siblings showed good knowledge of hazards but failed to realize that younger children often engage in injury-risk behaviours. Efforts to improve the supervision practices of sibling supervisors need to include changing their perception of supervisees' injury vulnerability and potential injury severity, rather than targeting to increase knowledge of injury-risk behaviours per se.

  20. Deceased donor uterine transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyckt, Rebecca; Kotlyar, Alexander; Arian, Sara; Eghtesad, Bijan; Falcone, Tommaso; Tzakis, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    To share our experience in performing the first-ever deceased-donor uterine transplant in the United States. This video uses an animation and footage from a uterine transplantation procedure to review the steps and techniques involved in performing a uterine transplant. Academic, multisite medical center. A reproductive-age patient with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome. Transplantation of a viable uterus from a deceased donor. Assessment of posttransplantation uterine graft viability. This video article describes the essential steps in the uterine transplant process, including selecting an appropriate donor with no history of infertility or uterine malformations. Furthermore, a deceased donor should exhibit brain death but not cardiac death. We also review our inclusion criteria for suitable recipients. In this video we outline the key steps in a uterine transplantation procedure and demonstrate footage from an actual transplant procedure. These steps include establishing bilateral end-to-side vascular anastomoses between the donor uterine artery and vein and the recipient's external iliac vessels. Once this has been completed and reperfusion noted of the donor uterus, connection to the recipient vaginal cuff is then performed. Uterine transplantation, although currently experimental, has gained the potential to become the first true treatment for uterine factor infertility. This procedure can become a promising option for the approximately 1.5 million women worldwide for whom pregnancy is not possible because of the absence of the uterus or presence of a nonfunctional uterus. Deceased donor uterine transplantation will further serve to broaden accessibility for this procedure. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Family Perspectives on Siblings' Conflict Goals in Middle Childhood: Links to Hierarchical and Affective Features of Sibling Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Holly E.; Witwit, Ma-ab

    2017-01-01

    This study examined parents' and children's descriptions of older and younger siblings' conflict goals in the late preschool and middle childhood years, and how these attributions were related to sibling relationship quality. Parents and 4- to 10-year-old children from 62 families were interviewed separately about siblings' motivations in two…

  2. Psychological Adjustment and Sibling Relationships in Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Environmental Stressors and the Broad Autism Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petalas, Michael A.; Hastings, Richard P.; Nash, Susie; Hall, Louise M.; Joannidi, Helen; Dowey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Research with siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) suggests that they may be at increased risk for behavioural and emotional problems and relatively poor sibling relationships. This study investigated a diathesis-stress model, whereby the presence of Broad Autism Phenotype features in the typically developing siblings might…

  3. Psychosocial Adjustment and Sibling Relationships in Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Risk and Protective Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Katherine M.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared sibling adjustment and relationships in siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD-Sibs; n = 69) and siblings of children with typical development (TD-Sibs; n = 93). ASD-Sibs and TD-Sibs demonstrated similar emotional/behavioral adjustment. Older male ASD-Sibs were at increased risk for difficulties. Sibling…

  4. Siblings and children's time use in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Dunifon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eighty-two percent of children under age 18 live with at least one sibling, and the sibling relationship is typically the longest-lasting family relationship in an individual's life. Nevertheless, siblings remain understudied in the family demography literature. Objective: We ask how having a sibling structures children's time spent with others and in specific activities, and how children's time and activities with siblings vary by social class, gender, and age. Methods: We use time diary data from the US Panel Study of Income Dynamics' Child Development Supplement (PSID-CDS, comparing the time use of children with and without siblings and presenting regression-adjusted descriptive statistics on patterns among those with siblings. Results: Children with siblings spend about half of their discretionary time engaged with siblings. They spend less time alone with parents and more time in unstructured play than those without siblings. Brothers and more closely spaced siblings spend more time together and more time in unstructured play. For example, boys with at least one brother spend five more hours per week with their siblings and over three more hours per week in unstructured play than boys with no brothers. Conclusions: The presence and characteristics of siblings shape children's time use in ways that may have implications for child development. Contribution: This is the first study to use children's time diary data to examine how the presence and characteristics of siblings structure ways in which children spend their time. This contributes to our broader understanding of sibling relationships and family dynamics.

  5. Bilingual Siblings: Language Use in Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron-Hauwaert, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Taking a different perspective to traditional case studies on one bilingual child, this book discusses the whole family and the realities of life with two or more children and languages. What do we know about the language patterns of children in a growing and evolving bilingual family? Which languages do the siblings prefer to speak to each other?…

  6. Cherubism in siblings: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, D; Kothari, P; Kulkarni, B; Pawar, P

    2007-03-01

    Cherubism is a benign disease of bones affecting the jaws and giving a characteristic cherubic appearance to the patient. On radiography, the lesions exhibit bilateral multilocular radiolucent areas. Histopathology shows numerous multinucleated giant cells in the background of proliferating fibrous connective tissue. Cherubism can be a solitary case. The present report describe cherubism in two siblings and briefly review the literature on this subject.

  7. From Parents to Siblings and Peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Roskam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current research was to test the hypotheses arising from the epigenetic view of social development and from the wider perspective offered by the social network model with three interactional systems, that is, child–parent, child–sibling, and child–peer. They were tested in two prospective longitudinal studies using a multi-informant and multi-method strategy. Study 1 was conducted among 83 children and their parents and Study 2 among 190 children. Attachment security with parents was assessed when the children were 4 years of age, relationships with siblings at 5 years of age, and relationships with peers at 6 years of age. Attachment to parent was found to explain a limited part of variations in later social relationships with siblings and peers. The sibling interactional system had a consistent and enduring effect on later peer relationships. With regard to the two theoretical backgrounds under consideration, neither was able to account for equivocal findings displayed in the two studies as well as in previous research. The wonderful story of social development seems to be a very complex process for which new models are needed.

  8. Sibling Gender Configuration and Family Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, Lotte D.; Mesman, Judi; Groeneveld, Marleen G.; Endendijk, Joyce J.; van Berkel, Sheila R.; Hallers-Haalboom, Elizabeth T.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2016-01-01

    The current study focuses on the effects of sibling gender configuration on family processes during early childhood. In a sample of 369 two-parent families with two children (youngest 12 months, oldest about 2 years older), both siblings’ noncompliant and oppositional behaviors and fathers’ and

  9. Life Span Personality Stability in Sibling Statuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, B. G.

    Personality stability and change in sibling status in the one- and two-child-family are examined in this Study. Q-sort data were analyzed for the same 33 male and 34 female subjects during four periods of their lives-- early and late adolescence and early and middle adulthood. Results indicate that stability of personality was greatest during…

  10. Social development and behavioural reciprocity in young rhesus monkeys with their siblings and non-siblings

    OpenAIRE

    Janus, Magdalena Ciesielska

    1989-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of relationships with partners close in age on the development of social competence in immature monkeys. Social relationships between 28 sibling and non-sibling immature captive rhesus macaques, (Macaca mulatta), 4 to 40 months old, living in four social groups, were investigated. First, the characteristics of affiliative and agonistic aspects of those relationships were described. Then, the degree to which social behaviours were reciprocated in dyads ...

  11. Child passenger injury risk in sibling versus non‐sibling teen driver crashes: a US study

    OpenAIRE

    Senserrick, Teresa M; Kallan, Michael J.; Winston, Flaura K.

    2007-01-01

    Several international jurisdictions allow family exemptions to graduated driver licensing passenger restrictions. The objective of this research was to examine differences in injury risk to US child passengers in crashes involving sibling versus non‐sibling teen drivers, and to compare outcomes with crashes involving adult drivers. Insurance claim and telephone survey data were collected on 16 233 child passengers (representing 289 329 children) in 17 US jurisdictions. There was a trend towar...

  12. Parent & Child Perceptions of Child Health after Sibling Death

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Rosa M.; Brooten, Dorothy; Youngblut, JoAnne M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding children?s health after a sibling?s death and what factors may affect it is important for treatment and clinical care. This study compared children?s and their parents? perceptions of children?s health and identified relationships of children?s age, gender, race/ethnicity, anxiety, and depression and sibling?s cause of death to these perceptions at 2 and 4 months after sibling death. Methods 64 children and 48 parents rated the child?s health ?now? and ?now vs before?...

  13. Cooperation and Conflict. Sibling Relations in Contemporary Societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti O. Tanskanen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates sibling and “extended sibling” relations. Extended sibling relations refer to relations between nieces or nephews and aunts or uncles. Both cooperation and conflict between kin are investigated. We use an evolutionary family sociological framework for analysing kin relations in present day Finland and the UK. Cooperation is measured by kin support, emotional closeness, and contact frequency, while the outcome of sibling conflict is measured by toddlers’ unintended injuries, young adolescents’ reports of how much siblings picked and hurt each other, and adults’ self-reported disagreements with siblings. The study includes seven original articles and an introductory chapter. Article I shows that 3-year-old British children who live in the same household with their full siblings have a lower risk of unintended home injuries than do children who live with their full and half siblings or only with their half siblings. Article II finds that 11-year-old British children living with their full siblings only were more likely to report hurting or picking between siblings compared with children who live with their half siblings only. Article III describes two generations of adult Finns and shows that both younger (mean age 36 years old and older (mean age 65 years generations have more contacts with full than half siblings and more contacts with the children of full siblings than with children of half siblings. Based on article IV, older and younger Finns have more contact with their sisters’ children compared to their brothers’ children. Article V finds that childless younger women in Finland provide more childcare to their siblings’ children than do younger mothers. However, mothers and childless women provide equal amounts of support to their aunts and uncles. According to article VI, younger Finnish adults who have half siblings are more likely to have encountered unequal maternal treatment than younger adults

  14. Childhood sibling loss. A family tragedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, G H

    1986-12-01

    The loss of a significant object, the loss of a home (security, personal possessions, familiar space that has emotional meaning), the dislocation from one's home or land as occurs in wars or disasters, gives rise to stress-strain responses that may have short-term or long-term effects, eg, post-traumatic stress disorder. The hidden or neglected victims of such occurrences frequently are children--be they siblings or direct descendants. In childhood sibling loss, the effects of the loss are mediated through different members of the family. The acute stressors can give rise to later adversity unless it is recognized that there is a social context in which life and death events occur. Recognizing these individual responses in the family can lead to interventions that may prevent later difficulty. Understanding the meaning of the events to the child, appreciating the fact that events are not just single occurrences, but interact with what existed before as well as with other concomitant events, helps in our therapeutic recommendations and interventions. Sibling loss, though initially related to the death of a sibling, can now be expanded to include the loss of a sibling through chronic illness (emotional, medical, surgical, long-term hospitalization), birth injuries, disabled children (accidents or illness with body changes), chronic illness with visible as well as non-visible changes that require special parental and nursing care, medication on an ongoing basis, and restrictions in diet and activities. The impacts of these losses without death can have devastating effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Living donor liver transplantation from a donor previously treated with interferon for hepatitis C virus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakao Kazuhiko

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Selecting a marginal donor in liver transplantation (LT remains controversial but is necessary because of the small number of available donors. Case presentation A 46-year-old Japanese woman was a candidate to donate her liver to her brother, who had decompensated liver cirrhosis of unknown origin. Eight years before the donation, she had a mild liver dysfunction that was diagnosed as a hepatitis C virus (HCV infection (serotype 2. She had received anti-viral therapy with interferon α-2b three times weekly for 24 weeks and had a sustained viral response (SVR. A biopsy of her liver before the donation showed normal findings without any active hepatitis, and her serum was negative for HCV-RNA. Only 67 patients have undergone LT from a cadaveric donor in Japan. The family in this case decided to have living donor LT. A careful selection for the liver graft donation was made; however, since she was the only candidate, we approved her as a living donor. She was discharged nine days after the liver donation. Her liver function recovered immediately. A computed tomography scan showed sufficient liver regeneration one year later. Her brother also had good liver function after LT and had no HCV infection 48 months after surgery and no de novo malignancy. Neither of the siblings has developed an HCV infection. Conclusions A patient with SVR status after interferon therapy might be considered a candidate for living donor LT but only if there are no other possibilities of LT for the recipient. A careful follow-up of the donor after donation is needed. The recipient also must have a very close follow-up because it is difficult to predict what might happen to the graft with post-transplant immunosuppression.

  16. Academic Achievement in Children With Oral Clefts Versus Unaffected Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehby, George L.; Barron, Sheila; Romitti, Paul A.; Ansley, Timothy N.; Speltz, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare academic achievement in children with oral-facial clefts (OFC) with their unaffected siblings. Methods 256 children with OFC were identified from the Iowa Registry for Congenital and Inherited Disorders, and 387 unaffected siblings were identified from birth certificates. These data were linked to Iowa Testing Programs achievement data. We compared academic achievement in children with OFC with their unaffected siblings using linear regression models, adjusted for potential confounders. In post hoc analyses, we explored modifiers of siblings’ academic performance. Results Achievement scores were similar between children with OFC and their siblings. Children with cleft palate only were significantly more likely to use special education than their unaffected siblings. Siblings’ academic achievement was inversely related to distance in birth order and age from the affected child. Conclusion Children with OFC and their siblings received similar achievement scores. Younger siblings, in particular, may share a vulnerability to poor academic outcomes. PMID:24993102

  17. Immunological effects of donor lymphocyte infusion in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia relapsing after bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro F.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT is the only curative therapy for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML. This success is explained by the delivery of high doses of antineoplastic agents followed by the rescue of marrow function and the induction of graft-versus-leukemia reaction mediated by allogeneic lymphocytes against host tumor cells. This reaction can also be induced by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI producing remission in most patients with CML who relapse after alloBMT. The immunological mechanisms involved in DLI therapy are poorly understood. We studied five CML patients in the chronic phase, who received DLI after relapsing from an HLA-identical BMT. Using flow cytometry we evaluated cellular activation and apoptosis, NK cytotoxicity, lymphocytes producing cytokines (IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma, and unstimulated (in vivo lymphocyte proliferation. In three CML patients who achieved hematological and/or cytogenetic remission after DLI we observed an increase of the percent of activation markers on T and NK cells (CD3/DR, CD3/CD25 and CD56/DR, of lymphocytes producing IL-2 and IFN-gamma, of NK activity, and of in vivo lymphocyte proliferation. These changes were not observed consistently in two of the five patients who did not achieve complete remission with DLI. The percent of apoptotic markers (Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 on lymphocytes and CD34-positive cells did not change after DLI throughout the different study periods. Taken together, these preliminary results suggest that the therapeutic effect of DLI in the chronic phase of CML is mediated by classic cytotoxic and proliferative events involving T and NK cells but not by the Fas pathway of apoptosis.

  18. Quantification of transplant-derived circulating cell-free DNA in absence of a donor genotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilon Sharon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of cell-free DNA (cfDNA in circulating blood derived from a transplanted organ is a powerful approach to monitoring post-transplant injury. Genome transplant dynamics (GTD quantifies donor-derived cfDNA (dd-cfDNA by taking advantage of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed across the genome to discriminate donor and recipient DNA molecules. In its current implementation, GTD requires genotyping of both the transplant recipient and donor. However, in practice, donor genotype information is often unavailable. Here, we address this issue by developing an algorithm that estimates dd-cfDNA levels in the absence of a donor genotype. Our algorithm predicts heart and lung allograft rejection with an accuracy that is similar to conventional GTD. We furthermore refined the algorithm to handle closely related recipients and donors, a scenario that is common in bone marrow and kidney transplantation. We show that it is possible to estimate dd-cfDNA in bone marrow transplant patients that are unrelated or that are siblings of the donors, using a hidden Markov model (HMM of identity-by-descent (IBD states along the genome. Last, we demonstrate that comparing dd-cfDNA to the proportion of donor DNA in white blood cells can differentiate between relapse and the onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. These methods alleviate some of the barriers to the implementation of GTD, which will further widen its clinical application.

  19. Nyretransplantation med levende donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Løkkegaard, H; Rasmussen, F

    2000-01-01

    with only few complications. The long-term outcome for kidney donors is good without increase in mortality or risk for development of hypertension and renal failure; proteinuria may be seen. Living kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment of end-stage renal disease with better graft survival than...

  20. National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    replacement business analyst to continue working on business and system requirements for HapLogic Phase III ! 100f2l National Marrow Donor Program® NOOOO...NOOOO 14-1 0-1-0204 IID.I. Task 3: Expand Immuno - biology Research QUARTER PROGRESS REPORT Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response

  1. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion Sanguine of Geneva will be held at CERN on Tuesday 13 March 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  2. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion d'Annemasse will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  3. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tuesday 19 March 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion sanguine of Geneva If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  4. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Wednesday 13 November 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs will be held a blood donors campaign, organized by the Etablissement de Transfusion de Haute-Savoie If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  5. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Établissement de Transfusion de Rhône-Alpes will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2000 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  6. Sibling relationship quality and psychosocial outcomes among adult siblings of individuals with autism spectrum disorder and individuals with intellectual disability without autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomeny, Theodore S; Ellis, Brandi M; Rankin, James A; Barry, Tammy D

    2017-03-01

    Research on adult typically-developing (TD) siblings of individuals with developmental disabilities remains limited, and outcomes for TD siblings appear to vary widely. For the current study, 82 adult TD siblings of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or intellectual disability (ID) completed questionnaires about themselves and their affected sibling. Results of this study suggest that the attitudes possessed by adult TD siblings are important to consider when understanding adult TD sibling outcomes. Specifically, data indicate that higher levels of positive sibling relationship attitudes are related to TD siblings providing more aid/support to their sibling with a disability, along with having higher levels of general life satisfaction, and negatively related to levels of stress and depressive symptoms among TD siblings. Consistent with previous child research, siblings of individuals with ASD reported fewer positive sibling relationship attitudes compared to siblings of individuals with ID. Finally, group membership related to aid provided, depressive symptoms, and stress of TD siblings indirectly through sibling relationship attitudes. Overall, results indicate that sibling relationship attitudes may be particularly important to consider when conceptualizing sibling relationships when one sibling has an intellectual or developmental disability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Household siblings and nasal and fecal microbiota in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Linnemann, Rachel W; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Ajami, Nadim J; Espinola, Janice A; Fiechtner, Lauren G; Petrosino, Joseph F; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-04-01

    Early-life exposure to older siblings is associated with a lower risk of asthma. To date, no study has addressed the impact of having siblings on both the airway and fecal microbiota during infancy. The aim of this study was therefore to profile the nasal airway and fecal microbiota in infants, and to examine the association between having siblings and microbiota profile. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 105 healthy infants (aged siblings and microbiome profile. Overall, the median age was 3.4 months (IQR, 2.0-4.7 months); 43% had siblings in the household. Unbiased clustering of nasal airway microbiota identified three profiles: Moraxella dominant (43%), Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum dominant (36%), and mixed (21%). Infants with siblings were more likely to have a Moraxella-dominant profile than Corynebacterium/Dolosigranulum-dominant profile (76% vs 18%), while those without siblings had the opposite pattern (18% vs 50%; P siblings were more likely to have a Bifidobacterium-dominant profile than Escherichia-dominant profile (49% vs 24%) while those without siblings had the opposite pattern (32% vs 37%; P = 0.04, multivariable-adjusted). In this cross-sectional study, infants with siblings were more likely to have a Moraxella-dominant nasal microbiota profile and Bifidobacterium-dominant fecal microbiota profile. These findings should facilitate further investigation of the interplay between early-life environmental exposure, the microbiome, and childhood asthma. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. The role of older siblings in infant motor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Hayley C; Hill, Elisabeth L

    2016-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that infant motor skills may be affected by older siblings but has not considered whether this is due to specific characteristics of the older sibling or of the quality of the sibling relationship. The current study used a longitudinal diary method to record infant motor milestones from 23 infants with older siblings along with parent reports and standardized assessments of motor skills. Parent reports of the older siblings' motor skills and the sibling relationship were also collected until the infants were 18months old. The motor skills, age, and sex of the older siblings were not significantly related to any measure of infant motor development. A significant correlation was revealed between perceived agonism between siblings and infant fine motor skills at 18months, suggesting the importance of considering reciprocal effects of motor development on sibling relationships. Overall, the suggestion that older siblings may provide a good model of motor skills for infants is not supported by the current data. In the future, it will be important to assess the dynamic interactions between different factors in predicting infant motor development, allowing early identification of motor difficulties, which could affect other areas of cognitive development and health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Olmsted syndrome: Rare occurrence in four siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atishay Bukharia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a very rare and severe cicatrizing keratoderma associated with periorificial lesion. Most cases are sporadic but familial occurrence has been also seen. Till now around 73 cases have been reported and none of the reported cases have 4 siblings affected from this disease. We are reporting cases of 4 siblings of age 30 year female, 26 year female, 20 year male and 10 year male who were born to a third degree consangueinous marriage and presented with palmoplantar keratoderma, periorificial hyperkeratosis, flexion deformity, pseudoainhum and contracture of digits. There was no cardiac involvement. Hence, the diagnosis of Olmsted syndrome was made and all four patients were non responsive to treatment which included topical corticosteroid, topical salicylic acid, systemic isotretinoin, systemic acitretin and oral zinc in child.

  10. Cherubism in siblings: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarda D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cherubism is a benign disease of bones affecting the jaws and giving a characteristic cherubic appearance to the patient. On radiography, the lesions exhibit bilateral multilocular radiolucent areas. Histopathology shows numerous multinucleated giant cells in the background of proliferating fibrous connective tissue. Cherubism can be a solitary case. The present report describe cherubism in two siblings and briefly review the literature on this subject.

  11. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... for blood transfusions Medication side effects Abdominal hernia Death Potential long-term organ specific donor complications blank - ...

  12. Perceptions of emotion expression and sibling-parent emotion communication in Latino and non-Latino white siblings of children with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kristin A; Lobato, Debra; Kao, Barbara; Plante, Wendy; Grullón, Edicta; Cheas, Lydia; Houck, Christopher; Seifer, Ronald

    2013-06-01

    Examine general emotion expression and sibling-parent emotion communication among Latino and non-Latino white (NLW) siblings of children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and matched comparisons. 200 siblings (ages 8-15 years) completed the newly developed Sibling-Parent Emotion Communication Scale and existing measures of general emotion expression and psychosocial functioning. Preliminary analyses evaluated scale psychometrics across ethnicity. Structure and internal consistency of the emotion expression and communication measures differed by respondent ethnicity. Latino siblings endorsed more general emotion expression problems and marginally lower sibling-parent emotion communication than NLW siblings. Siblings of children with ID reported marginally more general emotion expression problems than comparisons. Emotion expression problems and lower sibling-parent emotion communication predicted more internalizing and somatic symptoms and poorer personal adjustment, regardless of ID status. Siblings of children with ID endorsed poorer personal adjustment. Cultural differences in emotion expression and communication may increase Latino siblings' risk for emotional adjustment difficulties.

  13. Adult Female and Male Siblings of Persons with Disabilities: Findings from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodapp, Robert M.; Urbano, Richard C.; Burke, Meghan M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors used a national, Web-based survey to examine female and male siblings of individuals with disabilities. More than 1,160 adult siblings completed a 163-question survey about themselves, their siblings, and their sibling relationships. Most respondents reported fairly close contact with their siblings and positive sibling…

  14. Self-reported behaviour problems and sibling relationship quality by siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, R P; Petalas, M A

    2014-11-01

    There are few published research studies in which siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) provide self-reports about their own behavioural and emotional problems and their sibling relationships. Reliance on parent reports may lead to incomplete conclusions about the experiences of siblings themselves. Siblings 7-17 years and their mothers from 94 families of children with ASD were recruited. Mothers reported on family demographics, the behavioural and emotional problems of their child with ASD, and on their own symptoms of depression. Siblings reported on their relationship with their brother or sister with ASD, and siblings 11+ years of age also self-reported on their behavioural and emotional problems. Compared with normative British data, siblings reported very slightly elevated levels of behavioural and emotional problems. However, none of the mean differences were statistically significant and all group differences were associated with small or very small effect sizes - the largest being for peer problems (effect size = 0.31). Regression analysis was used to explore family systems relationships, with sibling self-reports predicted by the behaviour problems scores for the child with ASD and by maternal depression. Maternal depression did not emerge as a predictor of siblings' self-reported sibling relationships or their behavioural and emotional problems. Higher levels of behaviour problems in the child with ASD predicted decreased warmth/closeness and increased conflict in the sibling relationship. These data support the general findings of recent research in that there was little indication of clinically meaningful elevations in behavioural and emotional problems in siblings of children with ASD. Although further research replication is required, there was some indication that sibling relationships may be at risk where the child with ASD has significant behaviour problems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Experiences of Siblings of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Maureen E.; Meadan, Hedda; Stoner, Julia B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of siblings of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and identify their self-reported support needs. We conducted in-person semi-structured interviews with 12 siblings aged 7 to 15 of children aged 6 to 15 with ASDs. Employing a qualitative collective case study research method, we conducted cross-case analyses to address our research questions. Three major themes emerged: (a) descriptions of the sibling subsystem (b) cohesion between and among the siblings, and (c) adaptability of the participant siblings to having family members with ASDs. Discussion of these findings and recommendations for future research contributes to the existing literature on siblings of children with disabilities. PMID:22928104

  16. National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-17

    radiological exposure event. Period 8 Activity: • Attended a meeting with the EBMT Nuclear Accident Committee Ulm, Germany from June 30 to July 1st... nuclear Safety, Bonn o Cullen Case United States National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota o Nelson Chao... radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses o Dieter Graessle, Dipl.- Math. Oec. Germany Radiation Medicine Research Group, Ulm

  17. Number of siblings and allergic rhinitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Soewira Sastra; Lily Irsa; Mohammad Sjabaroeddin Loebis; Rita Evalina

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Recent studies have suggested that having fewer siblings was associated with allergic rhinitis and atopic diseases in children. Previous studies also indicated that older siblings was associated with higher incidence of allergic rhinitis. Objectives To assess for a possible association between number of siblings and allergic rhinitis and to assess for an effect of birth order on allergic rhinitis in chil...

  18. Number of siblings and allergic rhinitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Soewira Sastra; Lily Irsa; Muhammad Sjabaroeddin Loebis; Rita Evalina

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Recent studies have suggested that having fewer siblings was associated with allergic rhinitis and atopic diseases in children. Previous studies also indicated that older siblings was associated with higher incidence of allergic rhinitis. Objectives To assess for a possible association between number of siblings and allergic rhinitis and to assess for an effect of birth order on allergic rhinitis in child...

  19. Impact of childhood chronic illnesses on siblings: a literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Brien, Irene

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood illness can have a significant impact on families, particularly on the ill child\\'s siblings. There is a dearth of published literature focusing on the needs of siblings of ill children. AIM: This literature review aims to provide an overview of the current healthcare literature in relation to the impact of childhood chronic illness or disability on siblings. METHOD: A literature review was undertaken by searching the databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuest and Cochrane Library for relevant articles in English using the search terms: \\'siblings\\

  20. Academic achievement in children with oral clefts versus unaffected siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Brent R; Wehby, George L; Barron, Sheila; Romitti, Paul A; Ansley, Timothy N; Speltz, Matthew L

    2014-08-01

    To compare academic achievement in children with oral-facial clefts (OFC) with their unaffected siblings. 256 children with OFC were identified from the Iowa Registry for Congenital and Inherited Disorders, and 387 unaffected siblings were identified from birth certificates. These data were linked to Iowa Testing Programs achievement data. We compared academic achievement in children with OFC with their unaffected siblings using linear regression models, adjusted for potential confounders. In post hoc analyses, we explored modifiers of siblings' academic performance. Achievement scores were similar between children with OFC and their siblings. Children with cleft palate only were significantly more likely to use special education than their unaffected siblings. Siblings' academic achievement was inversely related to distance in birth order and age from the affected child. Children with OFC and their siblings received similar achievement scores. Younger siblings, in particular, may share a vulnerability to poor academic outcomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The Emotional Well-Being of Older Siblings of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Older Siblings of Children with Typical Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, Renuka Sundaram

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the emotional well-being of older siblings of children who are deaf or hard of hearing and older siblings of children with typical hearing (control group). We interviewed 70 families and had both the parent and the older sibling complete questionnaires on sibling perceptions and relationships. Findings revealed no significant…

  2. Intra HLA-D/DR region recombinant detected by primed lymphocyte typing (PLT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, B K; Kristensen, T; Lamm, L U

    1983-01-01

    The chromosome 6 markers, HLA-ABC, D, DR, MT, properdin factor Bf, and complement factors 2 (C2) and 5 (C4), were studied in three families, each of which included two HLA identical siblings, one or both of whom were known to be HLA-B: GLO recombinants. The families were also typed with primed...... lymphocyte typing (PLT) for HLA-D/DR region associated DP antigens. None of these studies gave evidence that the recombinations had occurred within the HLA region. Mixed leucocyte culture (MLC) tests within the families showed no detectable stimulation between the HLA identical siblings in two...... of the families, but a very weak stimulation between the HLA identical siblings (H and G) in the third family (GG). No reactive PLT reagents were generated when cells from the HLA identical siblings of the first two families were primed against each other. In contrast, priming between cells of H and G gave rise...

  3. Siblings of Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Theoretical Perspectives on Sibling Relationships and Individual Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Susan M.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    A burgeoning research literature investigates the sibling relationships of youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their implications for individual adjustment. Focusing on four relationship domains--behaviors, emotions, cognitions and involvement--and toward advancing this generally atheoretical literature, we review and apply tenets from a…

  4. Assessing Functional Impairment in Siblings Living With Children With Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havercamp, Susan; Jamieson, Barry; Sahr, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to empirically test if siblings of children with disability had higher levels of parent-reported behavioral and emotional functional impairment compared with a peer group of siblings residing with only typically developing children. METHODS: This was a retrospective secondary analysis of data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We included only households with at least 2 children to ensure sibling relationships. Two groups of siblings were formed: 245 siblings resided in households with a child with disability and 6564 siblings resided in households with typically developing children. Parents responded to questions from the Columbia Impairment Scale to identify functional impairment in their children. RESULTS: On the basis of parent reports and after adjusting for sibling demographic characteristics and household background, siblings of children with disability were more likely than siblings residing with typically developing children to have problems with interpersonal relationships, psychopathological functioning, functioning at school, and use of leisure time (P siblings of children with disability classified with significant functional impairment was 16.0% at the first measurement period and 24.2% at the second (P siblings of typically developing children there was a smaller percentage increase from 9.5% to 10.3% (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Functional impairment is a key indicator for the need of mental health services and, as such, early assessment and interventions to limit increasing severity and short- to long-term consequences need to be addressed. Health care professionals need to consider a family-based health care approach for families raising children with disability. PMID:23897909

  5. Hydrolethalus syndrome in consecutive African siblings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adetoro, O.O.; Komolafe, F.; Anjorin, A.

    1984-09-01

    Hydrolethalus syndrome may comprise mainly hydrocephalus, polydactyly, micrognathia, congenital cardiac and respiratory anomalies and uniform lethality. It was recently described in Finland, with a suggestion that it might be one of the ''Finnish'' diseases. We report two cases of this syndrome in consecutive siblings of a Nigerian couple. In addition, we describe associated healing fractures of the long bones, a feature not mentioned in the original report, apparently because those cases were not subjected to post-partum radiography.

  6. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome in three siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçakar, Z Birsin; Yalçınkaya, Fatoş; Altugan, F Semsa; Kavaz, Aslı; Ensari, Arzu; Ekim, Mesiha

    2013-03-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) is relatively uncommon and generally seen in the fourth decade of life. There are very few pediatric cases with the diagnosis of HUVS in the literature. In this report, we describe the first familial cases of HUVS in three siblings. The disease onset was during childhood period in all patients. One of them developed severe renal involvement and died. The other two had ongoing skin and eye manifestations and the elder one developed lupus. Presence of these three patients is a strong evidence for the role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of this rare vasculitis.

  7. Sibling Relationships in Families with a Child with Special Needs. A case study of a Norwegian family with a child with Down syndrome and her three siblings.

    OpenAIRE

    Martirosyan, Avgustina

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at exploring sibling relationships in a family which has a child with special needs. Since most previous research studies undertaken on sibling relationships were based either on parental or professionals opinions and perspectives, the sibling relationships were presented primarily from the point of view of outsiders and did not take into consideration the siblings own voice. This study aims at investigating sibling relationships from both insiders (i.e. the child with spec...

  8. Donor attention to reading materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S F; Osmond, L; Choquet, K; Yi, Q-L; Goldman, M

    2015-11-01

    Mandatory predonation reading materials inform donors about risk factors for transmissible disease, possible complications of donation and changes to the donation process. We aimed to assess the attention to predonation reading materials and factors which may affect attention. A national survey in 2008 of 18,108 blood donors asked about self-assessed attention to reading the materials. In face-to-face interviews, 441 donors completed additional questions about reading the materials and a literacy test. Qualitative interviews of 27 donors assessed their approach to reading. In the national survey, most of the first-time donors said they read all or most of the materials (90.9% first-time vs. 57.6% repeat donors, P reading them carefully (P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read, most knew that donors are informed of positive transmissible disease test results (97.1%, 95.5, 98.0 P > 0.05), but fewer recalled seeing the definition of sex (77.2%, 56.9, 24.2 P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read were compared (P > 0.05). Qualitative interviews showed that donors are reluctant to read any more than necessary and decide based on perceived importance or relevance. Attention to predonation reading materials tends to be better among first-time donors. The effectiveness is limited by low motivation to read, especially for repeat donors, as well as poor literacy. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  9. A report of heat stroke in two Nigerian siblings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-31

    May 31, 2014 ... had normal random blood sugar, white blood cell counts, and liver function tests. They were monitored closely and after. 4 and 16 h on admission, the younger sibling (Case 2) and elder sibling (Case 1), respectively became fully conscious. They were discharged on the third day of admission with.

  10. Associations between Family Communication Patterns, Sibling Closeness, and Adoptive Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Diana R.; Rueter, Martha A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the protective effect of family and sibling closeness on child adjustment, but fewer studies have investigated how closeness is promoted within families. Guided by Family Communication Patterns Theory, we tested the association between family communication and sibling emotional and behavioral closeness, and…

  11. Shyness, Sibling Relationships, and Young Children's Socioemotional Adjustment at Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Allison A.; Coplan, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the moderating role of sibling relationship quality in the associations between shyness and indices of socioemotional adjustment in an early childhood education context. Participants were 79 children ages 4 to 6 (M = 4.74 years) who had at least one sibling. Parents completed ratings of child shyness,…

  12. Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome in two siblings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yekeler, Ensar; Ozdemir, Candan; Acunas, Gulden [Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Istanbul University, Capa, Istanbul (Turkey); Gokalp, Selman; Yildirim, Abdurrahman; Bas, Firdevs; Gunoz, Hulya [Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-03-01

    Cases of Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome involving the upper extremities and affecting siblings have rarely been reported. We present the radiological findings of Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome in two siblings, with upper extremity involvement in one of them. (orig.)

  13. Adolescent Depression and Time Spent with Parents and Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desha, Laura N.; Nicholson, Jan M.; Ziviani, Jenny M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines adolescent depressive symptoms and the quantity and quality of time spent by adolescents with their parents and siblings. We use measures of the quality of relationships with parents and siblings as proxy indicators for the quality of time spent with these social partners. The study emphasizes the salience of parent…

  14. Cortical Excitability Measures in Patients and Unaffected Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at St Vincent's Hospital, Victoria, Australia, measured cortical excitability using transcranial magnetic stimulation in 157 patients with epilepsy (95 generalized and 62 focal and their asymptomatic siblings and results were compared to those of 12 controls and 20 of their siblings.

  15. Influence of Siblings on Out-of-School Reading Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoester, Matthew; Plikuhn, Mari

    2016-01-01

    This study draws on interviews with 26 individuals who attained an advanced degree and whose parents did not attend university and who reported having at least one older sibling. Participants were asked about independent reading practices in their youth and the reading practices of their older siblings. Participants reported many memories of their…

  16. Support Between Siblings and Between Friends : Two Worlds Apart?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorpostel, Marieke; Lippe, Tanja van der

    2007-01-01

    This research examines whether siblings and friends resemble each other in supportive behavior. Using a Dutch national sample of 6,289 individuals containing 12,578 relationships with siblings and friends, we investigated the relative importance of gender composition, geographical proximity,

  17. Sibling Socialization: The Effects of Stressful Life Events and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Katherine J.; Stocker, Clare; McGuire, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    Stressful life events and experiences may disrupt the typical day-to-day interactions between sisters and brothers that provide the foundation of sibling socialization. This chapter examines four experiences that may affect patterns of sibling interaction: parental marital conflict, parental divorce and remarriage, foster care placement, and a…

  18. Ethnic Perspectives on Sibling Abuse in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoza, Kimberly A.; Cook, Kelley; Zaveri, Tanvi; Malley-Morrison, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Sibling abuse has been studied much less extensively than other forms of family violence in the United States; moreover, research on how sibling abuse is viewed in different ethnic-minority groups has been rare. Convenience samples of Native American (n = 25), Latino/Hispanic (n = 45), African American (n = 30), European American (n = 78), Asian…

  19. Sibling Incest: Reports from Forty-One Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Bonnie E.; Maciol, Katherine; Schneider, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted with a convenience sample of 41 adult survivors of sibling incest using a retrospective survey design. Participants were interviewed about their childhood sexual experiences with a sibling. Most participants reported vaginal or oral intercourse and coercive experiences. Half of the sample reported sexual…

  20. Latino Adolescents' Academic Motivation: The Role of Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Edna C.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2010-01-01

    Guided by an ecological perspective, two competing models were tested to examine how sibling relationship quality directly predicted or interacted with academic support from siblings to predict Latino adolescents' academic motivation (N = 258). Gender differences were examined utilizing multiple group analysis in structural equation modeling.…

  1. Sibling and peer victimization in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Corinna Jenkins; Finkelhor, David; Turner, Heather; Shattuck, Anne M

    2014-10-01

    This study examined how victimizations by either a sibling or peer are linked to each other and to mental health in childhood and adolescence. The data were from the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence which includes a sample of children aged 3-9 (N=1,536) and adolescents aged 10-17 (N=1,523) gathered through telephone interviews. An adult caregiver (usually a parent) provided the information for children while self-reports were employed for adolescents. Fifteen percent of each age group reported victimization by both a sibling and peer. Victimization by a sibling alone was more common in childhood than adolescence. Victimization by a sibling was predictive of peer victimization. Children and adolescents victimized by both a sibling and peer reported the greatest mental distress. This work establishes that for some children and adolescents, victimization at the hands of other juveniles happens both at home and school. Programs should consider the role of siblings and target parents and siblings to encourage the development and maintenance of constructive sibling interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Lived Experience of Losing a Sibling through Murder | Pretorius ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Lived Experience of Losing a Sibling through Murder. Gertie Pretorius, Julia Halstead-Cleak, Brandon Morgan. Abstract. This study explores the grief experiences of young adults in the aftermath of the murder of a sibling. Three young adults were recruited to participate in interviews in which they described their lived ...

  3. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Sibling Relationships: Research and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Julia F.

    2009-01-01

    Significant attention has been paid in the literature to sibling relationships and the effects of birth order, family size, and gender on such relationships. Although these are important areas to study, there is relatively little research on the effects of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) on sibling relationships. The existent research identifies…

  4. Birth Order, Sibling IQ Differences, and Family Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfouts, Jane H.

    The differential impact of birth order and IQ on sibling roles were examined with particular interest focused on achievement outcomes. Subjects were a stratified sample of 37 pairs of near-in-age siblings, all within the normal range in personality and IQ, but differing significantly in scores on the Slosson IQ Test. Results indicate that when the…

  5. Plasma ultrafiltrates from Fanconi Anemia patients induces chromosomal breakages in donor lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerit, I.; Levy, A. [CNRS and Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Pagano, G. [Italian Association for Fanconi Anemia Research, Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The present study investigated the occurrence, if any, of transferable clastogenic activity in the plasma from Fanconi Anemia (FA) patients and their families. A total of 13 FA homozygotes, 25 parents, and 12 siblings were studied for their: (a) spontaneous and DEB-induced chromosomal instability, and (b) induction of chromosomal breaks in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy donors, following exposure to plasma ultrafiltrates from FA subjects, their parents or siblings. Plasma was ultrafiltered through membranes with a cutoff at 10,000 daltons (YM 10 Amicon) and 0.25 ml-aliquote added to PBL from 14 healthy donors. DEB test provided FA confirmatory diagnosis. The occurrence of clastogenic factors (CF) was evident in all FA patients, except for one. In two out of three patients, who died during this study, very high CF levels were observed. Clastogenic activity was significantly higher in male than in female patients (p<0.05). No correlation was observed between CF data and spontaneous or DEB-induced chromosomal instability. Ultrafiltrates from parents and siblings showed less CF than FA homozygotes; however, concentration by ultrafiltration through YM 2 (3x to 5x) led to excess clastogenic activity. The control plasmas were lacking CF even after an 8x concentration. The present data suggest that CF formation in the plasma of FA patients is consistent with an in vivo prooxident state in FA.

  6. Concordance of visual and structural features between siblings with albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinmiller, Laura J; Holleschau, Ann; Summers, C Gail

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate similarities and differences in visual function and ocular structure between siblings with albinism. The medical records of all siblings diagnosed with albinism were retrospectively reviewed. Comparisons were made using examination at oldest age for younger sibling and examination closest to that age for older siblings. A total of 111 patients from 54 families were studied. Mean age was 12.9 years (range, 2 months to 44.2 years). Mean difference in ages between sibling pair examinations was 11.5 months (range, 0-87 months). Of 45 families, best-corrected visual acuity was equal in 9 (20%), within 1/2 octave in 9 (20%), >1/2 but albinism should be counseled with due caution because visual function is often disparate despite similar structural findings. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reducing sibling conflict in maltreated children placed in foster homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, L Oriana; Jimenez, Jessica; Nesci, Cristina; Pearson, Eva; Beller, Sarah; Edwards, Nancy; Levin-Rector, Alison

    2015-02-01

    Sibling aggression among maltreated children placed in foster homes is linked to other externalizing problems and placement disruption. The reduction of sibling conflict and aggression may be achieved via a multicomponent ecologically focused intervention for families in the foster care system. The focus of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and short-term effectiveness of a transtheoretical intervention model targeting sibling pairs and their foster parent that integrates family systems, social learning theory, and a conflict mediation perspective. In this pilot study, sibling pairs (N = 22) and their foster parent were randomized into a three-component intervention (n = 13) or a comparison (n = 9) group. Promoting Sibling Bonds (PSB) is an 8-week prevention intervention targeting maltreated sibling pairs ages 5-11 years placed together in a foster home. The siblings, parent, and joint components were delivered in a program package at the foster agency by a trained two-clinician team. Average attendance across program components was 73 %. Outcomes in four areas were gathered at pre- and postintervention: observed sibling interaction quality (positive and negative) including conflict during play, and foster parent reports of mediation strategies and sibling aggression in the foster home. At postintervention, adjusting for baseline scores and child age, intervention pairs showed higher positive (p Foster parents in the intervention group reported a higher number of conflict mediation strategies than those in the comparison group (p Foster parents in the intervention group reported lower sibling physical aggression from the older toward the younger child than those in the comparison group (p foster home.

  8. Sibling Conflict in Middle Childhood: Influence of Maternal Context and Mother-Sibling Interaction over Four Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Nina; Fiorentino, Lisa M.; Gariepy, Nadine

    2003-01-01

    Investigated: (1) influence of maternal context on frequency and types of conflicts of sibling dyads in middle childhood, and (2) the stability of maternal and sibling interaction over 4 years. Found that maternal presence depressed conflict frequency and aggression. Earlier patterns of family interaction were related to later indices of sibling…

  9. [Haemovigilance donors: methods and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebibo, Danielle; Danic, Bruno

    2007-05-01

    There is no official definition of haemovigilance donors. However, it concerns the observation and management of Serious Adverse Events observed in blood donors (SAEDs), Post Donation Informations (PDI), and donor epidemiologic survey. The French Decree of 1 February 2006 imposes the declaration of the SAEDs. In 2006, 196 SAEDs were notified for 2599978 donations (7.5/100,000 donations). The incidence of the SAEDs was of 7/100,000 whole blood donations and 10.7/100,000 aphaeresis donations. Donors that are more susceptible to present a SAED are: women, women under 30, repeat donor and aphaeresis donor. For 2/3 of donors having presented a SAED, a medical consultation was prescribed and 1/3 was hospitalized. Vasovagal reaction is the most frequent category. Seven thousand three hundred and sixty one PDI were notified in 2005. The risks of infection represented the principal cause (mainly ENT). Concerning donor epidemiologic survey, the viral residual risk clearly decreased since 1992 and for the period of 2003-2005 it 1/2600000 for HIV, 1/6500000 for HCV and 1/1000000 for HBV. The first national data already give useful information. This information will permit a better care of blood donors and of blood component recipients as well.

  10. Assessment of the degree of satisfaction among living kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, B; Mascarenhas, C; Cardoso, G; Sá, J; Casal, M

    2011-01-01

    Organ donation during life is an act of great altruism, with unique family, social, economic, and psychological impacts. The group of anesthesiologists involved in this program sought to assess the degree of satisfaction among kidney donors between 2007 and 2008 and, in particular, with the anesthetic approach. A telephone survey of kidney donors in 2007 and 2008 complemented a retrospective evaluation of the records of the Acute Pain Unit. Among 32 kidney donors, 2 were excluded as impossible to contact. Their mean age was 44.33 years including 60% women. The degree of relationship was fathers (43.3%), siblings (50%) or spouses (6.7%). Donors who underwent outpatient anesthesia were satisfied (40%) or very satisfied (60%) with the information received, all willing to repeat the experience of kidney donation. The positive aspects were: good reception (83.4%), help to a family member (30%), good information (13.3%), and confidence in the team (6.6%). No downside was mentioned by 50% of donors. Postoperative analgesia was performed using an epidural catheter (93.3%) or patient-controlled analgesia with morphine (6.7%) associated with intravenous paracetamol in all cases. With regard to analgesia using an epidural catheter, the mean total dose of morphine was 7.7 mg and 27.4 mg for 0.2% ropivacaine over an average of 3.32 days. Pain was assessed in the first 24 hours postoperatively using a scale ranging from 0 (no pain) to 4 (unbearable pain): 30% reported 0; 60% 1; and 10% 2. The complaints were pruritus (40%), nausea/vomiting (16.7%), constipation (6.7%) and/or urinary retention (3.3%). No donor showed an altered state of consciousness, motor block, or paresthesias. Living kidney donors showed a high degree of overall satisfaction. The anesthesia consultation was extremely helpful with a positive impact on kidney donation. An epidural catheter for analgesia after surgery proved to be effective and appropriate for this type of procedure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier

  11. Which Donor for Uterus Transplants: Brain-Dead Donor or Living Donor? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoué, Vincent; Vigneau, Cécile; Duros, Solène; Boudjema, Karim; Levêque, Jean; Piver, Pascal; Aubard, Yves; Gauthier, Tristan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate and compare the pros and cons of using living donors or brain-dead donors in uterus transplantation programs, 2 years after the first worldwide live birth after uterus transplantation. The Medline database and the Central Cochrane Library were used to locate uterine transplantation studies carried out in human or nonhuman primates. All types of articles (case reports, original studies, meta-analyses, reviews) in English or French were considered for inclusion. Overall, 92 articles were screened and 44 were retained for review. Proof of concept for human uterine transplantation was demonstrated in 2014 with a living donor. Compared with a brain-dead donor strategy, a living donor strategy offers greater possibilities for planning surgery and also decreases cold ischemia time, potentially translating into a higher success rate. However, this approach poses ethical problems, given that the donor is exposed to surgery risks but does not derive any direct benefit. A brain-dead donor strategy is more acceptable from an ethical viewpoint, but its feasibility is currently unproven, potentially owing to a lack of compatible donors, and is associated with a longer cold ischemia time and a potentially higher rejection rate. The systematic review demonstrates that uterine transplantation is a major surgical innovation for the treatment of absolute uterine factor infertility. Living and brain-dead donor strategies are not mutually exclusive and, in view of the current scarcity of uterine grafts and the anticipated future rise in demand, both will probably be necessary.

  12. Gratitude for help among adult friends and siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotkirch, Anna; Lyons, Minna; David-Barrett, Tamas; Jokela, Markus

    2014-07-06

    Although gratitude is a key prosocial emotion reinforcing reciprocal altruism, it has been largely ignored in the empirical literature. We examined feelings of gratitude and the importance of reciprocity in same-sex peer relations. Participants were 772 individuals (189 men; mean age = 28.80) who completed an online survey using a vignette design. We investigated (i) differences in reported gratitude and the importance of reciprocity among same-sex siblings and same-sex friends, and (ii) how relationship closeness moderates these associations. Based on the theory of kin altruism, we expect that people would feel more grateful towards friends than towards their siblings, and that lack of gratitude or failure to pay back a loan would bother more with friends than with siblings, irrespective of emotional closeness. Results showed that levels of gratitude and expectations of reciprocity were higher towards friends compared to siblings. This was the case also after controlling for emotional closeness. Being close generally made participants feel more grateful and expect lower displays of gratitude in the other. Closeness was also strongly associated with emotional gratitude among siblings compared to friends. We conclude that feelings and displays of gratitude have a special role in friendships. Although a close sibling may elicit as much gratitude as a friend does, even a very close friend is not exempt from the logic of reciprocity in the same way that a sibling is.

  13. Urinary biomarkers after donor nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendijk-van den Akker, Judith M; Warlé, Michiel C; van Zuilen, Arjan D.; Kloke, Heinrich J; Wever, Kim E; d'Ancona, Frank C H; Ӧzdemir, Denise M D; Wetzels, Jack F M; Hoitsma, Andries J

    2015-01-01

    As the beginning of living-donor kidney transplantation, physicians have expressed concern about the possibility that unilateral nephrectomy can be harmful to a healthy individual. To investigate whether the elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) during laparoscopic donor nephrectomy causes early

  14. Mothers', fathers', and siblings' perceptions of parents' differential treatment of siblings: Links with family relationship qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Alexander C; McHale, Susan M

    2017-10-01

    A family systems perspective directs attention to the potentially different experiences and perspectives of family members. This study examined parents' differential treatment (PDT) of siblings, discrepancies between parent and youth reports of PDT, and their links with relationships between adolescents and their mothers and fathers across three years. Participants were first- (Time 1 M age = 15.71, SD = 1.07) and secondborn (Time 1 M age = 13.18, SD = 1.29) siblings from 381, predominately white, working and middle class families. Analyses revealed that siblings' perceptions of being favored predicted less conflict with and greater warmth from both mothers and fathers, primarily for secondborn adolescents. Larger discrepancies between maternal and youth reports of differential affection were linked to more maternal conflict and less warmth for firstborns. These findings may suggest a hierarchy within families: parents may serve as referents for firstborns and firstborns as referents for secondborns. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metaphyseal osteopathy in three Australian Kelpie siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, C M; Brain, P H; Dunn, A L

    2014-04-01

    Metaphyseal osteopathy (MO) was diagnosed in three Australian Kelpie puppies that were presented for veterinary assessment of lameness. The three puppies were siblings. Each was from a different litter by the same breeding pair. The puppy in case one was seen by the authors, and the puppies in cases two and three were patients at other veterinary hospitals. However, the medical records and radiographs were examined and reviewed for this report. Radiographic investigation of the lameness revealed pathognomonic appearance of MO affecting the metaphyseal region of the long bones in all three puppies. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathology in one patient. MO is considered a disease of large and giant-breed dogs, being rarely reported in non-large-breed dogs, and has not been reported in the Australian Kelpie, which is considered a medium-breed dog. This case series suggests a previously unreported breed predisposition to MO in the Australian Kelpie. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  16. Restrictive Dermopathy: Report of Two Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Sheng Lu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive dermopathy (RD is a rare and lethal autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by very tight, thin, and easily eroded skin and contracture of joints. We present two siblings in a family. Case 1, a female neonate, showed mild characteristic presentations of RD and survived for 16 days, and Case 2, a male neonate, was stillborn with typical severe features of RD. His skin biopsy showed typical histological findings, and genetic study revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation on the exon 6 of zinc metalloproteinase STE24 (ZMPSTE24. The exact pathogenic mechanism of RD remains poorly understood. The most recent studies on mutations in lamin A and/or ZMPSTE24 have shed some light on the pathophysiology of RD and may help direct the development of future therapeutic approaches.

  17. Caroli's disease - a report of two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Keng-Liang; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Chung-Huang

    2002-12-01

    A 26-year-old man had suffered from several episodes of right upper-quadrant pain for 6 months. Abdominal ultrasonography showed multiple saccular dilatations of the intrahepatic biliary tract, with hepatolithiasis at the bilateral hepatic lobe. Abdominal computed tomography also revealed saccularly dilated intrahepatic ducts with hepatolithiasis. Communication between saccular dilatations of the intrahepatic biliary tract and normal bile ducts was demonstrated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Choledochal cyst type V (Caroli's disease) was diagnosed. The patient's 29-year-old sister was also diagnosed with Caroli's disease based on abdominal sonography. An ultrasonography survey was carried out on the family. Reports of Caroli's disease occurring in two siblings are rare in the literature.

  18. Three Siblings with Van der Knaap Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Şahin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, also known as van der Knaap disease, is a rare autosomal recessive disease. The disease develops as a consequence of mutations in the genes MLC1 and MLC2. A three years and nine months old male patient was operated for right inguinal hernia. Physical examination revealed macrocephalia, ataxia and mental retardation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy and subcortical cysts. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of van der Knaap disease. The patient was born to consanguineous parents. Two siblings of the patient (brother aged 23 years and sister aged 19 years, who showed similar neurological features, underwent genetic investigation and MLC1 gene mutation was detected. The presenceof this rare disease was quite interesting. These cases point out that genetic counseling is of importance in our country where consanguineous marriage is common.

  19. [Early sibling aggression in mammals and its hormonal correlates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonevich, A L; Naĭdenko, S V

    2007-01-01

    Early sibling aggression is a widespread phenomenon in birds. Ornithologists distinguish species with "obligate" and "facultative" siblicide. Sibling aggression was described in some mammal species: the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta), the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), and the Iberian lynx (L. par-dinus). In all of them, sibling aggression corresponds well with the "facultative" siblicide model in birds. Sibling aggression was observed at the age of 36-64 days in both lynx species. It is usually restricted to a single fight and can change the hierarchical structure and growth rate of the kittens. In the spotted hyena and the domestic pig, the frequency and intensity of aggressive interactions between siblings are strongest during the first days of postnatal ontogeny and then decrease gradually. The newborns of these species are much developed than newborn lynx kittens. Usually adult lynx females, in contrast to hyenas and pigs, try to stop sibling fights. This is probably related to the larger parental investment at the time of the fight in lynxes (a kitten's body weight is about 10% of the mother's) than in pigs (0.5%) and hyenas (1.9%). Sibling aggression in spotted hyenas could be related to the high level of androstenedione and is not related to testosterone concentration. In the Eurasian lynx, female sibs attack their littermates slightly more often than male sibs do, and sibling aggression is not testosterone-dependent. Hormones secreted by the adrenal glands may play an important role in this phenomenon. The data available so far, however, do not positively confirm the presence of hormonal trigger effects in mammal sibling aggression.

  20. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy John

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family history and twins studies suggest an inherited component to ischemic stroke risk. Candidate gene association studies have been performed but have limited capacity to identify novel risk factor genes. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS aims to conduct a genome-wide scan in sibling pairs concordant or discordant for ischemic stroke to identify novel genetic risk factors through linkage analysis. Methods Screening at multiple clinical centers identifies patients (probands with radiographically confirmed ischemic stroke and a family history of at least 1 living full sibling with stroke. After giving informed consent, without violating privacy among other family members, the proband invites siblings concordant and discordant for stroke to participate. Siblings then contact the study coordinating center. The diagnosis of ischemic stroke in potentially concordant siblings is confirmed by systematic centralized review of medical records. The stroke-free status of potentially discordant siblings is confirmed by validated structured telephone interview. Blood samples for DNA analysis are taken from concordant sibling pairs and, if applicable, from 1 discordant sibling. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines are created, and a scan of the human genome is planned. Discussion Conducting adequately powered genomics studies of stroke in humans is challenging because of the heterogeneity of the stroke phenotype and the difficulty of obtaining DNA samples from clinically well-characterized members of a cohort of stroke pedigrees. The multicentered design of this study is intended to efficiently assemble a cohort of ischemic stroke pedigrees without invoking community consent or using cold-calling of pedigree members.

  1. Applied Behavior Analysis Programs for Autism: Sibling Psychosocial Adjustment during and Following Intervention Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebula, Katie R.

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial adjustment in siblings of children with autism whose families were using a home-based, applied behavior analysis (ABA) program was compared to that of siblings in families who were not using any intensive autism intervention. Data gathered from parents, siblings and teachers indicated that siblings in ABA families experienced neither…

  2. Involvement of Adult Siblings of Persons with Developmental Disabilities in Future Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Tamar; Kramer, John

    2009-01-01

    This study examined factors influencing involvement of siblings of individuals with developmental disabilities in future planning and their expectation of future caregiving. The sample consisted of 139 adult siblings recruited from an online sibling list and a sibling conference. Results indicated that few families made plans or involved siblings…

  3. Psycho-Social Characteristics of Children and Adolescents with Siblings on the Autistic Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampoltzis, Aglaia; Defingou, Georgia; Antonopoulou, Katerina; Kouvava, Sofia; Polychronopoulou, Stavroula

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the psycho-social characteristics of typically developing children who have siblings with autism and their sibling relationship. Children's adjustment at school, their self-esteem and social relations, as well as their friends' attitudes towards their autistic siblings were examined. Participants were 22 siblings of…

  4. Siblings' Mediated Learning Strategies in Families with and without Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzuriel, David; Hanuka-Levy, Dikla

    2014-01-01

    Dyads of siblings in which the younger sibling had an intellectual disability (ID, n = 25) were videotaped interacting. The ID group was compared with typically developing sibling dyads matched on mental age (n = 25) and chronological age (n = 25). We observed the mediation strategies, activation, and antimediation behaviors of older siblings and…

  5. "Who Said You Could Wear My Sweater?" Adolescent Siblings' Conflicts and Associations with Relationship Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione-Barr, Nicole; Smetana, Judith G.

    2010-01-01

    A new measure of sibling conflict was used to identify 2 types of conflicts in 115 adolescent sibling pairs (older siblings, M = 15.59, SD = 2.01 years; younger siblings, M = 13.02, SD = 2.06 years). Conflicts overall were more frequent than intense and more likely to involve the invasion of the personal domain than conflicts involving equality…

  6. A Community Support Program for Children with Autism and Their Typically Developing Siblings: Initial Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzak, Lauren A.; Cengher, Mirela; Feeley, Kathleen M.; Fienup, Daniel M.; Jones, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Siblings are a critical part of lifelong support for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). But siblings face their own social-emotional adjustment needs. These needs may be addressed through programs that include support groups specifically for the siblings. This study examined the effects of a community program on typical siblings'…

  7. When Do Siblings Compromise? Associations with Children's Descriptions of Conflict Issues, Culpability, and Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Holly E.; Howe, Nina

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between children's descriptions of sibling conflicts and their resolutions during a structured negotiation task. A sample of 58 sibling dyads (older sibling M age = 8.39 years, younger sibling M = 6.06 years) were privately interviewed about an actual conflict. Each child provided a narrative that was coded for…

  8. Understanding Adolescent Delinquency: The Role of Older Siblings' Delinquency and Popularity with Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, Jessica L.; Tanaka,Teri A.; Nishina, Adrienne; Conger, Katherine J.

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined delinquency concordance and the moderating effects of younger sibling perceptions of older sibling popularity in a sample of 587 adolescent sibling pairs. Using a social learning framework and taking dyad composition into account, perceptions of popularity were hypothesized to strengthen siblings' concordance for…

  9. The Association of Sibling Relationship and Abuse with Later Psychological Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Amber L.; Fromuth, Mary Ellen; Kelly, David B.

    2010-01-01

    This study of 59 undergraduate men and 85 undergraduate women explored how defining emotional and physical sibling abuse affected the frequency of reported sibling abuse. In addition, the current study examined how the emotional context of the sibling relationship (i.e., rivalry and conflict) moderated the relationship between sibling abuse and…

  10. Integrating Parents' Views on Sibling Relationships to Tailor an Evidence-based Parenting Intervention for Sibling Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, John A; Sanders, Matthew R

    2017-03-01

    Parents play a crucial role in the development of their children's relationships with their siblings. Despite this, relatively few evidence-based parenting programs exist that specifically offer parents the strategies and techniques they desire and require for managing their children's sibling relationships. One way of bridging this gap is to design a tailored parenting intervention for sibling relationships that incorporates the parent voice in various aspects of program design. The current study recruited a convenience sample of 409 Australian parents to complete an online survey relating to their views on difficult sibling behaviors and what, if any, help they desire in dealing with the issue. The majority of respondents were Caucasian, middle- to upper-class mothers. Respondents predominantly attributed the causes of sibling conflict to their child's internal traits, but expressed strong desire for assistance with managing behavioral problems, especially when sibling relationships were marked by physical aggression. Respondents reported high levels of acceptability for positive, rather than punitive, parenting strategies and showed a clear preference for parenting interventions delivered in easy-to-access formats. The findings are interpreted in the context of guiding the development of a tailored parenting intervention for enhancing sibling relationships and reducing conflict. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  11. Treatment demands and differential treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis and their siblings: patient, parent and sibling accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C; Eiser, C; Oades, P; Sheldon, C; Tripp, J; Goldman, P; Rice, S; Trott, J

    2001-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a progressive disease with no known cure. Advances in diagnosis and treatment have resulted in patients living longer and thus families live with the illness for longer. Treatments are becoming increasingly demanding and are largely performed in the family home. Mothers are often reported to experience greater stress and poorer adjustment than mothers of well children or population norms. Patients and siblings are also reported to display adjustment difficulties. Siblings have rarely been included in research designs. This qualitative study investigates the impact of CF and treatment on eight patients, eight mothers, one father and eight siblings. A family systems perspective was adopted. Each individual was interviewed independently using semistructured interviews. Patients and siblings were aged between 9 and 21 years. Qualitative analyses revealed high levels of non-adherence (intentional and unintentional) and parental involvement in treatment, minimal involvement of siblings, and preferential treatment towards patients. Demanding treatment, coupled with the progressive nature of CF, promote high levels of parental involvement for younger children as well as older teenagers, often due to attempted or actual non-adherence. Siblings may receive less attention while patients' needs take priority. Future development of a measure of adherence suitable for children and adolescents should take into account different motivations for non-adherence, particularly regarding the level of personal control over adherence to treatment. In addition, the potential impact of having a brother or sister with CF should not be underestimated and the needs of siblings should not go unnoticed.

  12. The role of siblings in identity development in adolescence and emerging adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thessa M L; Branje, Susan J T; VanderValk, Inge E; Hawk, Skyler T; Meeus, Wim H J

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the role of siblings on identity formation in adolescence and emerging adulthood, using a three-wave longitudinal design. Measures of identity formation were filled out by 498 sibling dyads. Sibling effects differed as a function of age and gender configuration within the dyads. Controlled for age, earlier-born siblings reported the most advanced levels of identity formation, and later-born siblings the lowest. Positive relations between siblings' identity and changes in identity of respondents provided support for modeling processes between siblings. The identity of earlier-born same-sex siblings, in particular, tends to be important in influencing identity formation. Contrary to the expectations, differentiation processes between siblings did not appear to influence identity formation. It is apparent from this study that both the gender and birth order of siblings affect whether their own identity formation processes influence those of adolescents and emerging adults.

  13. Participation in extracurricular activities for children with and without siblings with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigston, Christine; Falkmer, Marita; Vaz, Sharmila; Parsons, Richard; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    To compare the number, frequency, enjoyment and performance in extracurricular activities of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to their typically developing (TD) peers, and to identify differences between actual and desired participation. A case-control study with 30 siblings of children with ASD and 30 siblings of TD children was conducted using the Paediatric Interest Profiles and a questionnaire. Siblings of children with ASD participated in fewer extracurricular activities than those with TD siblings. ASD symptoms were significantly associated with the sibling participating in fewer extracurricular activities. Children with TD siblings had higher enjoyment scores in relaxation activities than children with siblings with ASD. While results were mainly positive, some differences indicated that having a sibling with ASD may impact participation in extracurricular activities. Assessments of participation barriers, as well as support to minimise participation restrictions among siblings of children with ASD are required.

  14. Voluntary whole-blood donors, and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors: motivation to donate, altruism and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Michael; Lattacher, Helene; Janda, Monika

    2005-10-01

    To establish if voluntary whole-blood donors and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors may differ in their motivation to donate, altruism, aggression and autoaggression. Whole-blood (n=51), platelet (n=52) and plasma donors (n=48) completed a battery of validated questionnaires while waiting to donate. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of variance and t-tests were performed to detect differences between groups as noted. Altruism (mean=40.2) was slightly higher in whole-blood donors than in platelet (mean=38.3) and plasma donors (mean=39.1) (p=0.07). Blood donors (mean=2.8) scored lower in the spontaneous aggression measure than platelet (mean=4.1) and plasma donors (mean=4.4) (p=0.01). Plasma donors (mean=4.9) had higher auto-aggression than whole-blood donors and platelet donors (mean for both groups=3.4) (p=0.01). Differences between the three groups were mediated by sociodemographic variables (MANCOVA). Whole-blood donors donated to help others, platelet and plasma donors mostly to receive the compensation. However, those platelet and plasma donors, who would continue to donate without compensation were similar in altruism and aggression to whole-blood donors. While most platelet donors and plasma donors were motivated by the compensation, those who stated that they would continue to donate without compensation had altruism and aggression scores similar to voluntary whole-blood donors.

  15. 'Recognized, Valued and Supported'? : The Experiences of Adult Siblings of People with Autism Plus Learning Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Tozer, Rosemary; Atkin, Karl

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential of adult siblings to offer long-term support to a brother or sister with autism is rarely realized. To understand this, our study explores the expectations of social care among adult siblings. METHOD: Using qualitative interviews, we spoke to 21 adult siblings about their family relationships and engagement with service delivery, met with 12 of their siblings with autism and talked to 12 social care staff. RESULTS: Siblings, although reflecting on the difficulties of...

  16. "Infinity Means It Goes on Forever": Siblings' Informal Teaching of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Nina; Adrien, Emmanuelle; Della Porta, Sandra; Peccia, Stephanie; Recchia, Holly; Osana, Helena P.; Ross, Hildy

    2016-01-01

    Sibling-directed teaching of mathematical topics during naturalistic home interactions was investigated in 39 middle-class sibling dyads at two time points. At time 1 (T1), siblings were 2 and 4 years of age, and at time 2 (T2), siblings were 4 and 6 years of age. Intentional sequences of sibling-directed mathematical teaching were coded for (i)…

  17. Older Siblings Affect Gut Microbiota Development in Early Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Zachariassen, Gitte; Bahl, Martin Iain

    at three years of age. Bacterial compositions and diversity indices were determined in fecal samples collected from 114 infants in the SKOT cohort at age 9 and 18 months by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These were compared to the presence of older siblings, furred pets and early life infections.......006) at 18 months. Further, having older siblings was associated with increased relative abundance of several bacterial taxa at both 9 and 18 months of age. Compared to the effect of having siblings, presence of household furred pets and early life infections had less pronounced effects on the gut microbiota....... Gut microbiota characteristics were not significantly associated with cumulative occurrence of eczema and asthmatic bronchitis during the first three years of life. Conclusions: Presence of older siblings is associated with increased gut microbial diversity and richness during early childhood, which...

  18. Cockayne Syndrome : A Report Of Two Siblings In A Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thappa D.M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Family cases of cockayne’s syndrome are very rare. We report tow siblings in a family affected with this syndrome and highlight the significance of cutaneous features of this syndrome.

  19. Reframing Paul's sibling language in light of Jewish epistolary forms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and sister)' in Greco-Roman epistolary conventions and cultural backdrops. However, Jewish dimensions (particularly ethnic dimensions) of Paul's sibling language still remain unexplored in current scholarship. Furthermore, scholars have not ...

  20. Psychoeducation for siblings of people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jacqueline; Jordan, Cheryl D; Barley, Elizabeth A; Henderson, Claire; Norman, Ian

    2015-05-08

    Many people with severe mental illness (SMI) have siblings. Siblings are often both natural agents to promote service users' recovery and vulnerable to mental ill health due to the negative impact of psychosis within the family. Despite a wealth of research evidence supporting the effectiveness of psychoeducation for service users with SMI and their family members, in reducing relapse and promoting compliance with treatment, siblings remain relatively invisible in clinical service settings as well as in research studies. If psychoeducational interventions target siblings and improve siblings' knowledge, coping with caring and overall wellbeing, they could potentially provide a cost-effective option for supporting siblings with resulting benefits for service users' outcomes. To assess the effectiveness of psychoeducation compared with usual care or any other intervention in promoting wellbeing and reducing distress of siblings of people affected by SMI.The secondary objective was, if possible, to determine which type of psychoeducation is most effective. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register and screened the reference lists of relevant reports and reviews (12th November 2013). We contacted trial authors for unpublished and specific data on siblings' outcomes. All relevant randomised controlled trials focusing on psychoeducational interventions targeting siblings of all ages (on their own or amongst other family members including service users) of individuals with SMI, using any means and formats of delivery, i.e. individual (family), groups, computer-based. Two review authors independently screened the abstracts and extracted data and two other authors independently checked the screening and extraction process. We contacted authors of trials to ascertain siblings' participation in the trials and seek sibling-specific data in those studies where siblings' data were grouped together with other participants' (most commonly other family members

  1. Choanal atresia in siblings; Case report | Kaitesi | East and Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choanal atresia is an uncommon and often poorly recognized cause of unilateral or bilateral nasal obstruction. This report describes the case of bilateral choanal atresia in two consecutive siblings and describes the methods of treatment offered.

  2. Hostile siblings in the abused child’s mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Liselotte

    This paper is about the presence of a destructive link in an abused child’s mind between on the one side painful feelings related to fear of rejection from unavailable and violent parental objects and on the other side burning jalousie and fear of hostile sibling figures. I will present some...... findings concerning the quality of inner sibling relations, as found in a systematic single case study focusing on an abused child’s experience of breaks in a 2-weekly child psychotherapy. Thus in the mind of this child, hostile siblings seemed to be lurking everywhere, posing a threat to the survival...... of the baby in her mind by intruding and spoiling every good relational experience with adults. The findings will be discussed in the perspective of two possible, probably mutually reinforcing causal explanations: Firstly, the hostile sibling figures may originate from the external reality of the child’s life...

  3. Sibling Incest: A Study of the Dynamics of 25 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Holly; Israel, Edie

    1987-01-01

    Common family patterns observed in 25 cases of sibling incest were: (1) distant, inaccessible parents; (2) parental stimulation of sexual climate in the home; and (3) family secrets, especially with regard to extramarital affairs. (Author/DB)

  4. Sibling Recurrence and the Genetic Epidemiology of Autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Constantino, John N; Zhang, Yi; Frazier, Thomas; Abbacchi, Anna M; Law, Paul

    2010-01-01

    ... by an autism spectrum disorder and at least one full biological sibling. Results:A traditionally defined autism spectrum disorder in an additional child occurred in 10.9% of the families. An additional 20...

  5. Fragile X syndrome in two siblings with major congenital malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampietro, P.F.; Haas, B.R.; Lipper, E. [Cornell Univ. Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-17

    We report on 2 brothers with both fragile X and VACTERL-H syndrome. The first sibling, age 5, had bilateral cleft lip and palate, ventricular septal defect, and a hypoplastic thumb. The second sibling, age 2{1/2}, had a trachesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and vertebral abnormality. High-resolution chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY chromosome constitution in both siblings. By PCR and Southern blot analysis, the siblings were found to have large triplet repeat expansions in the fragile X gene (FMR 1) and both had methylation mosaicism. Enzyme kinetic studies of iduronate sulfatase demonstrated a two-fold increase in activity in the first sib as compared to the second. Possible mechanisms through which the fragile X mutation can cause down-regulation of adjacent loci are discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Supporting Siblings as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Lehmann, Vicky; Long, Kristin A; Alderfer, Melissa A

    2015-12-01

    In this study, evidence is provided for supporting siblings as a standard of care in pediatric oncology. Using Medline, PsycInfo, and CINAHL, a systematic search of articles published over the past two decades about siblings of children with cancer was conducted. A total of 125 articles, which were primarily descriptive studies, were evaluated by the four investigators using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. There is moderate-quality evidence, as well as support from community stakeholders, to justify a strong recommendation that siblings of children with cancer should be provided with psychosocial services and that parents and professionals are advised about how to meet siblings' needs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cancer risk in siblings of children with congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yuelian; Wu, Chun Sen; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cancer and birth defects cluster in families more often than expected by chance, but the reasons are neither well known nor well studied. METHODS: From singletons born alive in Denmark between 1 January 1977 and 31 December 2007, we identified children who had no congenital malformations...... but had a full or half sibling with a congenital malformation (CM) diagnosed in the first year of life; this constituted the exposed group, while children whose siblings had no such condition constituted a reference group. We estimated cancer risks for children who had a full sibling or a half sibling...... with a CM using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. To control for confounding related to change of family structure, we estimated cancer risks for children from core families and children from broken families separately. Children were followed from birth up to 30 years of age (median follow-up 13...

  8. Longitudinal associations among parental acceptance, familism values, and sibling intimacy in Mexican-origin families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoren, Sarah E; Wheeler, Lorey A; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Rodríguez de Jésus, Sue A; McHale, Susan M

    2015-06-01

    Prospective associations among parent-adolescent acceptance and familism values in early and middle adolescence and sibling intimacy in late adolescence and young adulthood were assessed in 246 Mexican-origin families. Older sibling gender and sibling gender constellation were investigated as moderators of these associations. Sibling intimacy was stable over time and younger siblings with older sisters reported higher levels of sibling intimacy than those with older brothers. As predicted, stronger familism values were associated with greater sibling intimacy, but this link was evident only for older sisters and for girl-girl dyads. The links from mother- and father-acceptance to sibling intimacy also depended on the gender constellation of the sibling dyad: Higher levels of maternal warmth were associated with greater sibling intimacy for older sisters and girl-girl sibling pairs but higher levels of paternal warmth were linked to greater sibling intimacy only for older siblings in mixed-gender sibling dyads. Findings are consistent with prior research on the role of gender in family relationships but extend this work to encompass the effects of both parents' and siblings' gender, as well as the role of sociocultural values in parents' socialization influences. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  9. The psychophysiological impact of childhood autism spectrum disorder on siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Brian; Wetherell, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    The negative impact of caring for a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on parents' psychophysiological functioning has been widely evidenced. However, siblings, who also face emotional, social and physical challenges associated with having a brother/sister with ASD, have been less widely studied. This study examined the psychophysiological impact of childhood ASD on siblings. A sample of 25 siblings of children with ASD (and their mothers) and a control group of 20 siblings of neuro-typical children (and their mothers) completed questionnaires assessing: (a) demographic and lifestyle information, (b) family characteristics, (c) child behaviour problems, (d) social support and (e) depressive symptomology. Saliva samples were collected at several time points on two consecutive days, and estimates of the cortisol awakening response (CAR), diurnal cortisol slope and mean diurnal cortisol output were derived. Total depressive symptoms were higher in siblings of children with ASD compared with controls. Group differences with respect to depressive symptomology were driven more by emotional than functional problems. With respect to physiological functioning, groups were comparable on all cortisol indices. In siblings of children with ASD, social support, especially from parents and close friends, predicted total depressive symptoms, as did the behaviour problems of their brother/sister with ASD. Siblings of children with ASD experience greater emotional problems and overall depressive symptoms compared with a control group. Interventions that enhance social support, as well as helping siblings better understand the behaviour problems of their brother/sister with ASD, might be effective for alleviating depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlation between siblings in caries in Norway. A quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobloug, Andreas; Grytten, Jostein

    2016-10-01

    The role of the family for caries between siblings has been a focus for researchers for almost 100 years. However, the contribution of the family to the variation in caries has not been determined. To estimate the correlation between siblings in caries, and to investigate whether this varied according to number of siblings, mother's level of education, marital status and country of birth. The population included families with two or more siblings, altogether 409 766 children and adolescents aged 6-18 years, and 181 551 mothers. Data on caries were from electronic dental journals, which were merged with data from Statistics Norway about the characteristics of the mothers. The analyses were performed using random-effects regression, in which separate regressions were run for the extent of the carious lesion. Caries was scored for permanent teeth only. Mothers were used to identify siblings within families. The correlation between siblings in caries was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient. The proportion of the variance in the outcome measures that was due to between-family variability was in the range 13-29%. The intraclass correlation coefficients from the analyses of the subpopulations that described the characteristics of the mothers were fairly similar to the ICCs as estimated on the whole population. We identified a fairly strong family effect, which confirms that the family is an important arena in which the dental health of the children is formed. An improvement in dental health for one of the siblings was associated with a positive effect on the dental health of the other sibling, and vice versa. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Examining Courtesy Stigma in Siblings of People with Down Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Fulk, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether siblings of people with Down syndrome face courtesy stigma, a stigma acquired as a result of an association with a person from a stigmatized group. The central hypothesis was that the majority of people who have a sibling with Down syndrome face courtesy stigma during both adolescence and adulthood. The data supports this hypothesis, showing that 76% of respondents reported courtesy stigma as adolescents and 62% reported courtesy stigma as ad...

  12. Providing care for an elderly parent: interactions among siblings?

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This article is focused on children providing and financing long-term care for their elderly parent. The aim of this work is to highlight the interactions that may take place among siblings when deciding whether or not to become a caregiver. We look at families with two children using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe; our sample contains 314 dependent elderly and their 628 adult children. In order to identify the interactions between siblings, we have specified ...

  13. Donor milk: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Giuliani,1 Ilaria Rovelli,1 Chiara Peila,1 Stefania Alfonsina Liguori,2 Enrico Bertino,1 Alessandra Coscia1 1SCDU Neonatologia, Dipartimento di Scienze Pediatriche e dell'Adolescenza, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy; 2SC Neonatologia, Ospedale Maria Vittoria, Torino, Italy Abstract: Mother's own milk is widely recognized as the optimal feeding for term infants, but increasing evidence exists of its benefits also for sick and preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units. However, the nutritional needs for appropriate growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes of such a particular population of infants should be attentively evaluated, considering also the indication to an appropriate fortification of human milk. The target is to achieve growth potential for preterm newborns while ensuring good metabolic outcomes and normal neurological development. When mother's milk is unavailable or in short supply, donor human milk (DHM represents the second best choice and, although somewhat modified by the Holder pasteurization process, it preserves many benefits when compared to formula, as documented by more and more reports, randomized controlled trials, and meta-analyses published in the past few years. Evidence exists of the protection exerted by DHM from necrotizing enterocolitis, while further studies are required to look at possible beneficial effects regarding infections, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, long-term cardiovascular risk factors, feeding tolerance, neurological outcome, and allergy. Finally, the concern that the use of DHM might decrease preterm infant breastfeeding is being raised. Conversely, publications exist showing that the use of DHM in the neonatal unit increases breastfeeding rates at discharge for infants of very low birth weight. Keywords: human milk, preterm infant feeding, milk bank, breast milk, mother's own milk, pasteurized human milk, fortification

  14. Notable signs observed in the growth process of “siblings" of handicapped children : their cause and mother's care of ""siblings"

    OpenAIRE

    立山, 清美; 立山, 順一; 宮前, 珠子

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate anxiety symptoms (hereafter referred to as “signs") observed in the growth process of brothers and sisters of handicapped children (hereafter referred to as “siblings"), their cause, and the special attention of the mother in bringing up the siblings by interviewing handicapped children's mothers and “siblings". The results of the investigation revealed that 12 of 32 siblings of handicapped children brought up by 20 mothers showed some signs, and 10 ...

  15. [Long live the kidney donor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fijter, Johan W; Meinders, Arend E

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation offers longer life expectancy and improves quality of life in selected patients with end-stage renal failure. The availability of living donors is critical, particularly to meet the increasing demand and potentially pre-emptive transplantation. In addition, living donor transplantation is associated with better outcomes on comparison with dialysis or transplants from deceased donors. The major disadvantage of living donation is that complications may occur both directly perioperatively and in the long-term. Two recent studies confirmed that the risk of renal failure among selected living donors is extremely low. This implies that there is no need to alter the existing positive attitude towards living donation. Finding a comparable long-term control group with relevant genetic and non-genetic risk factors remains a challenge to studies looking at long-term effects.

  16. Iron deficiency among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A. S.; Pedersen, O. B.; Magnussen, K.

    2017-01-01

    and menopausal status are the strongest predictors of iron deficiency. Only little information on the health effects of iron deficiency in blood donors exits. Possibly, after a standard full blood donation, a temporarily reduced physical performance for women is observed. However, iron deficiency among blood...... donors is not reflected in a reduced self-perceived mental and physical health. In general, the high proportion of iron-deficient donors can be alleviated either by extending the inter-donation intervals or by guided iron supplementation. The experience from Copenhagen, the Capital Region of Denmark......, is that routine ferritin measurements and iron supplementation are feasible and effective ways of reducing the proportion of donors with low haemoglobin levels....

  17. Specificities of transplantation of kidneys procured from donors with situs inversus totalis: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Milica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Situs inversus totalis (SIT represents a total vertical transposition of the thoracic and abdominal organs which are arranged in a mirror image reversal of the normal positioning 1. We presented a successful pre-dialysis kidney transplantation from a living sibling donor with SIT and the longest donor follow-up period, along with analysis of the reviewed literature. Case report. The pair for pre-dialysis kidney transplantation included a 68-year-old mother and 34-year-old daughter at low immunological risk. Comorbidities evidenced in kidney donors with previously diagnosed SIT, included moderate arterial hypertension and borderline blood glucose level. Explantation of the left donor kidney and its placement into the right iliac fossa of the recipient were performed in the course of the surgical procedure. A month after nephrectomy, second degree renal failure was noticed in the donor. A 20-month follow-up of the donor’s kidney and graft in the recipient proved that their functions were excellent. Conclusion. In donors with previously diagnosed SIT the multidisciplinary approach, preoperative evaluation of the patient and detection of possible vascular anomalies are required to provide maximum safety for the donor.

  18. Paternal and sibling incest: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celbis, Osman; Ozcan, M Erkan; Ozdemir, Bora

    2006-01-01

    A case is reported of a female victim of paternal incest, who had also been raped repeatedly by her elder brother for two years. A survey of the literature showed no other report of such a case from Turkey. This does not necessarily mean that the incidence of paternal and sibling incest does not happen, but may indicate that incestuous abuse is not reported or handled without making it known to legal authorities. The victim was first raped by her 16 year-old brother when she was 9 years old. He raped her repeatedly over a period of two years, until he left home. Her father began raping the victim when she was 13 year-old, leaving her pregnant at age 15. He took her to a doctor for a termination of pregnancy. The father continued abuse after the termination. The victim left home to marry a man. The father filed a lawsuit against the man for taking the victim away from home. More openness and awareness of incest in Turkey may encourage the victims to seek help from medical and legal authorities.

  19. 'Recognized, Valued and Supported'? The Experiences of Adult Siblings of People with Autism Plus Learning Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, Rosemary; Atkin, Karl

    2015-07-01

    The potential of adult siblings to offer long-term support to a brother or sister with autism is rarely realized. To understand this, our study explores the expectations of social care among adult siblings. Using qualitative interviews, we spoke to 21 adult siblings about their family relationships and engagement with service delivery, met with 12 of their siblings with autism and talked to 12 social care staff. Siblings, although reflecting on the difficulties of growing up with someone who had autism, expressed a commitment towards their brother or sister. Most wanted involvement in their care. While some siblings described positive relationships with services, many felt marginalized. Practitioners largely confirmed their perceptions, while offering a justification for why they struggled to engage with adult siblings. By understanding the way relationships between siblings change over time, adult siblings' contribution to the lives of their disabled brother or sister can be better supported. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mortality in siblings of patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    had had at least 1 HCV test were included (n=3531). In addition, 336,652 population control subjects matched for sex, age, and residency were identified from the Danish Civil Registration System. For both HIV-infected patients and population control subjects, we identified all siblings born after 1951......, with dates of death or emigration. Siblings of HIV-infected patients were classified according to the patients' HCV serostatus. Survival after age 20 years was compared among the groups of siblings. RESULTS: We identified 437 siblings of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, 1856 siblings of HIV-monoinfected patients......, and 285,509 siblings of population control subjects. Mortality was substantially higher in siblings of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients than in either siblings of HIV-monoinfected patients (mortality rate ratio [MRR], 2.97 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.98-4.45]) or siblings of control subjects (MRR, 4...

  1. Sibling rivalry and the new baby: anticipatory guidance and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, J A

    1997-01-01

    Sibling rivalry can be found in many families and frequently creates a stressful and challenging situation for parents. The arrival of a new baby often causes older siblings to feel displaced, frustrated, angry, and even unloved. Age, gender, personality and temperament, and parental behavior are factors that appear to influence the degree to which sibling rivalry occurs. Common reactions of older siblings to the birth of a new baby include aggression toward the newborn, behavioral regression, and attention seeking behavior, as well as independence and maturity. Anticipatory guidance is recommended to help parents adequately prepare their older child for the arrival of a new sibling. Strategies for managing sibling rivalry include open parent-child communication, equal treatment of siblings, non-intervention in sibling conflicts, distraction, and separation. Parents can minimize feelings of jealousy between siblings by providing a supportive, nurturing environment that allows each child to feel secure and loved.

  2. Quality of life of liver donors following donor hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Biju; Bharathan, Viju Kumar; Shaji Mathew, Johns; Amma, Binoj Sivasankara Pillai Thankamony; Gopalakrishnan, Unnikrishnan; Balakrishnan, Dinesh; Menon, Ramachandran Narayana; Dhar, Puneet; Vayoth, Sudheer Othiyil; Surendran, Sudhindran

    2017-03-01

    Although morbidity following living liver donation is well characterized, there is sparse data regarding health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of donors. HRQOL of 200 consecutive live liver donors from 2011-2014 performed at an Indian center were prospectively collected using the SF-36 version 2, 1 year after surgery. The effect of donor demographics, operative details, post-operative complications (Clavien-Dindo and 50-50 criteria), and recipient mortality on the quality-of-life (QOL) scoring was analyzed. Among 200 donors (female/male=141:59), 77 (38.5%) had complications (14.5%, 16.5%, 4.5%, and 3.5%, Clavien-Dindo grades I-IV, respectively). The physical composite score (PCS) of donors 1 year after surgery was less than ideal (48.75±9.5) while the mental composite score (MCS) was good (53.37±6.16). Recipient death was the only factor that showed a statistically significant correlation with both PCS (prepent the decision to donate.

  3. Philanthropic Motivations of Community College Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Linnie S.; Duggan, Molly H.

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study surveyed current, lapsed, and major gift donors to explore the impact of college communications on donors' decisions to contribute to the college, the likelihood of donor financial support for various college projects, and the philanthropic motivation profiles of the donors of a midsized, multicampus community college in…

  4. Kidney transplant outcomes from older deceased donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pippias, Maria; Jager, Kitty J; Caskey, Fergus

    2018-01-01

    As the median age of deceased kidney donors rises, updated knowledge of transplant outcomes from older deceased donors in differing donor-recipient age groups is required. Using ERA-EDTA Registry data we determined survival outcomes of kidney allografts donated from the same older deceased donor ...

  5. Sibling Competition & Growth Tradeoffs. Biological vs. Statistical Significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Kramer

    Full Text Available Early childhood growth has many downstream effects on future health and reproduction and is an important measure of offspring quality. While a tradeoff between family size and child growth outcomes is theoretically predicted in high-fertility societies, empirical evidence is mixed. This is often attributed to phenotypic variation in parental condition. However, inconsistent study results may also arise because family size confounds the potentially differential effects that older and younger siblings can have on young children's growth. Additionally, inconsistent results might reflect that the biological significance associated with different growth trajectories is poorly understood. This paper addresses these concerns by tracking children's monthly gains in height and weight from weaning to age five in a high fertility Maya community. We predict that: 1 as an aggregate measure family size will not have a major impact on child growth during the post weaning period; 2 competition from young siblings will negatively impact child growth during the post weaning period; 3 however because of their economic value, older siblings will have a negligible effect on young children's growth. Accounting for parental condition, we use linear mixed models to evaluate the effects that family size, younger and older siblings have on children's growth. Congruent with our expectations, it is younger siblings who have the most detrimental effect on children's growth. While we find statistical evidence of a quantity/quality tradeoff effect, the biological significance of these results is negligible in early childhood. Our findings help to resolve why quantity/quality studies have had inconsistent results by showing that sibling competition varies with sibling age composition, not just family size, and that biological significance is distinct from statistical significance.

  6. School attendance in childhood cancer survivors and their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Amy E; Tsangaris, Elena; Barrera, Maru; Guger, Sharon; Brown, Robert; Urbach, Stacey; Stephens, Derek; Nathan, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    To investigate school absenteeism among childhood cancer survivors and their siblings and examine factors related to absenteeism in survivors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among consecutive cancer survivors attending a large pediatric cancer survivor clinic. Absenteeism rates were obtained for survivors and their closest in age sibling from school report cards. Absenteeism was compared with a population control group of 167752 students using 1-sample t tests. The Child Vulnerability Scale, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, and Behavior Assessment System for Children were administered to survivors. Univariate and multiple regression analyses assessed variables associated with days absent. One hundred thirty-one survivors (median age at assessment: 13.4 years, range 8.0-19.2; median age at diagnosis: 9.4 years, range 4.3-17.3) and 77 siblings (median age at assessment: 13 years, age range 7-18) participated. Survivors and siblings missed significantly more school days than the population control group (mean ± SD: 9.6 ± 9.2 and 9.9 ± 9.8 vs 5.0 ± 5.6 days, respectively, P sibling pairs (N = 77), there was no difference in absenteeism (9.6 ± 9.2 vs 9.9 ± 9.8 days, P = .85). Absenteeism in survivors was significantly associated with a low Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Physical Health Summary Score (P = .01). Parents' perception of their child's vulnerability and emotional and social functioning were not associated with absenteeism. Childhood cancer survivors and siblings miss more school than the general population. The only predictor of absenteeism in survivors is poor physical quality of health. More research should be devoted to school attendance and other outcomes in siblings of childhood cancer survivors. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sibling Competition & Growth Tradeoffs. Biological vs. Statistical Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Karen L; Veile, Amanda; Otárola-Castillo, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood growth has many downstream effects on future health and reproduction and is an important measure of offspring quality. While a tradeoff between family size and child growth outcomes is theoretically predicted in high-fertility societies, empirical evidence is mixed. This is often attributed to phenotypic variation in parental condition. However, inconsistent study results may also arise because family size confounds the potentially differential effects that older and younger siblings can have on young children's growth. Additionally, inconsistent results might reflect that the biological significance associated with different growth trajectories is poorly understood. This paper addresses these concerns by tracking children's monthly gains in height and weight from weaning to age five in a high fertility Maya community. We predict that: 1) as an aggregate measure family size will not have a major impact on child growth during the post weaning period; 2) competition from young siblings will negatively impact child growth during the post weaning period; 3) however because of their economic value, older siblings will have a negligible effect on young children's growth. Accounting for parental condition, we use linear mixed models to evaluate the effects that family size, younger and older siblings have on children's growth. Congruent with our expectations, it is younger siblings who have the most detrimental effect on children's growth. While we find statistical evidence of a quantity/quality tradeoff effect, the biological significance of these results is negligible in early childhood. Our findings help to resolve why quantity/quality studies have had inconsistent results by showing that sibling competition varies with sibling age composition, not just family size, and that biological significance is distinct from statistical significance.

  8. Cardiovascular reactivity in Black and White siblings versus matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D K; Holmes, S D; Arheart, K; Alpert, B S

    1995-09-01

    Elevated cardiovascular (CV) reactivity may be a marker or mechanism for the early development of essential hypertension (EH) and may contribute to the greater prevalence of EH observed in Black adults. Previous research has demonstrated that Black children show greater CV reactivity than White children to psychological stressors, however, the role of heritability in understanding these racial differences is still unknown. Evidence which supports a genetic influence on CV reactivity comes from animal studies, research on family history of EH, and from twin and sibling studies. The present study expands on previous findings by examining racial differences in CV reactivity in 15 pairs of Black siblings, 15 pairs of age-and sex-matched unrelated Black control subjects, 17 pairs of White siblings, and 17 pairs of age-and sex-matched unrelated White control subjects. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) measurements were obtained at rest and during a stress task (competitive video game). Black siblings demonstrated a significantly higher intraclass correlation for DBP reactivity than Black controls or White siblings (r=0.73, versus 0.16, 0.14, respectively). Additionally, Black siblings demonstrated a steeper rise and then a plateau in DBP and HR reactivity to the video game task, while White siblings showed a more gradual increase in these measures over the course of playing three video games. The results for DBP and HR reactivity, however, were not consistent among either of the matched control groups. These results expand on previous research by suggesting a stronger genetic influence of CV reactivity in Black than in White children.

  9. Birthweight and perinatal mortality: paradoxes, social class, and sibling dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melve, Kari Klungsøyr; Skjaerven, Rolv

    2003-08-01

    Birthweight distributions among second-born infants depend on the birthweights of older siblings, with implications for weight-specific perinatal mortality. We wanted to study whether these relations were explained by socioeconomic levels, and to study time trends in a situation with decreasing perinatal mortality rates. Births in the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry from 1967 to 1998 were linked to their mothers through their national identification numbers. The study population was 546 688 mothers with at least two singletons weighing >/==" BORDER="0">500 g at birth. Weight-specific perinatal mortality for second-born siblings in families with first-born siblings in either the highest or the lowest birthweight quartile was analysed. Maternal education and cohabitation status were used as measures of socioeconomic level. For all 500-g categories below 3500 g, mortality rates were significantly higher among second-born infants with an older sibling in the highest rather than the lowest weight quartile. This pattern was the same across three educational levels. The exclusion of preterm births did not change the effect pattern. A comparison of perinatal mortality among second siblings in terms of relative birthweight (z-scores) showed a reversal of the relative risks, although these were only significantly different from unity for the smallest infants. Conclusion The crossover in weight-specific perinatal mortality for second siblings by weight of first sibling is largely independent of socioeconomic level, and is not weakened by the decreasing perinatal mortality rates in the population over time. Family data should be taken into consideration when evaluating the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome relating to weight.

  10. Siblings of Disabled Peoples' Attitudes Toward Prenatal Genetic Testing and Disability: A Mixed Methods Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carli Friedman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We used the phenomenon of prenatal genetic testing to learn more about how siblings of disabled people understand prenatal genetic testing and social meanings of disability. By interweaving data on siblings' conscious and unconscious disability attitudes and prenatal testing with siblings' explanations of their views of prenatal testing we explored siblings' unique relationships with disability, a particular set of perspectives on prenatal genetic testing, and examined how siblings' decision-making processes reveal their attitudes about disability more generally. In doing so we found siblings have both personal and broad stakes regarding their experiences with disability that impact their views.

  11. [Kidney transplantation from living donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laca, L; Grandtnerová, B; Lacková, E

    2000-10-01

    From Jan. 1, 1994 till August 31, 1999 in the Transplantation Centre of the F. D. Roosevelt Hospital and Policlinic 202 transplantations of the kidneys were made, incl. 11 from live donors. The survival of patients and renal grafts in our group is 100%, i.e. all transplanted kidneys are so far functional. In transplantations of kidneys from dead donors the one-year survival of grafts was 85% and the 5-year survival only 70%. During removal of kidneys from live donors we had only one minor complication--a surface infection of the surgical wound. The authors describe their own experience with assessing the indication criteria, criteria for selection of the most suitable donor-recipient pair. Consistently with work of authors from abroad, they consider transplantations of the kidneys from live donors as one of the best alternatives how to increase the number and quality of renal transplantations and to prevent thus an increase of the number of patients on the waiting list.

  12. Quest for the lost siblings of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Ruchti, G.; Feltzing, S.; Martínez-Barbosa, C. A.; Bensby, T.; Brown, A. G. A.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: The aim of this paper is to find lost siblings of the Sun by analyzing high resolution spectra. Finding solar siblings will enable us to constrain the parameters of the parental cluster and the birth place of the Sun in the Galaxy. Methods: The solar siblings can be identified by accurate measurements of metallicity, stellar age and elemental abundances for solar neighbourhood stars. The solar siblings candidates were kinematically selected based on their proper motions, parallaxes and colours. Stellar parameters were determined through a purely spectroscopic approach and partly physical method, respectively. Comparing synthetic with observed spectra, elemental abundances were computed based on the stellar parameters obtained using a partly physical method. A chemical tagging technique was used to identify the solar siblings. Results: We present stellar parameters, stellar ages, and detailed elemental abundances for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Ni for 32 solar sibling candidates. Our abundances analysis shows that four stars are chemically homogenous together with the Sun. Technique of chemical tagging gives us a high probability that they might be from the same open cluster. Only one candidate - HIP 40317 - which has solar metallicity and age could be a solar sibling. We performed simulations of the Sun's birth cluster in analytical Galactic model and found that most of the radial velocities of the solar siblings lie in the range -10 ≤ Vr ≤ 10 km s-1, which is smaller than the radial velocity of HIP 40317 (Vr = 34.2 km s-1), under different Galactic parameters and different initial conditions of the Sun's birth cluster. The sibling status for HIP 40317 is not directly supported by our dynamical analysis. Based on observations made with Nordic Optical Telescope at La Palma under programme 44-014. Based on observations made with ESO VLT Kueyen Telescope at the Paranal observatory under program me ID 085.C-0062(A), 087.D-0010(A), and 088.B-0820(A

  13. Healthy donor effect: its magnitude in health research among blood donors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsma, F.; Veldhuizen, I.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Kort, W. de; Vegt, F. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The healthy donor effect has been mentioned as a methodologic problem in blood donor health research. The aim of this study was to investigate different elements of the healthy donor effect. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: First, recent donors (<4 years registered as a donor) were compared

  14. Sibling rivalry: training effects, emergence of dominance and incomplete control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaiem, Sarah; Hofer, Heribert; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Brunner, Edgar; East, Marion L

    2012-09-22

    Within-brood or -litter dominance provides fitness-related benefits if dominant siblings selfishly skew access to food provided by parents in their favour. Models of facultative siblicide assume that dominants exert complete control over their subordinate sibling's access to food and that control is maintained, irrespective of the subordinate's hunger level. By contrast, a recent functional hypothesis suggests that subordinates should contest access to food when the cost of not doing so is high. Here, we show that within spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) twin litters, dominants most effectively skew access to maternal milk in their favour when their aggression prompts a highly submissive response. When hungry, subordinates were less submissive in response to aggression, thereby decreasing lost suckling time and increasing suckling time lost by dominants. In a species where adult females socially dominate adult males, juvenile females were more often dominant than males in mixed-sex litters, and subordinate sisters used more effective counter-tactics against dominant brothers than subordinate brothers against dominant sisters. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence in a mammal that dominant offspring in twin litters do not exert complete control over their sibling's access to resources (milk), and that sibling dominance relationships are influenced by sibling sex and training effects.

  15. Molecular differentiation of sibling species in the Galactomyces geotrichum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, E S; Smith MTh; Boekhout, T; de Hoog, G S; Naumov, G I

    2001-12-01

    PCR-analysis, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and molecular karyotyping were used to characterize 52 strains belonging to the genus Galactomyces. The resultant data revealed that a PCR method employing the universal primer N21 and microsatellite primer (CAC)5 is appropriate for the distinction of four Ga. geotrichum sibling species, Ga. citri-aurantii and Ga. reessii. Better separation was achieved with the UP primer N21; each species displayed a specific pattern with very low intraspecific variation. We propose to use the primer N21 for the differentiation of the six taxa composing the genus Galactomyces. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis revealed genetic homogeneity of each sibling species within the Ga. geotrichum complex. On the other hand, the four sibling species, having from 41 to 59% of nDNA homology and similar phenotypic characteristics, are clearly distinguished based on their electrophoretic profiles using two enzymes: mannose-6-phosphate isomerase (MPI) and phosphoglucomutase (PGM). Despite the same number of chromosomal bands, different karyotype patterns were found in Ga. geotrichum sensu stricto and its two sibling species A and B. Within each sibling species, chromosome length polymorphism was observed, in particular for small bands, allowing discrimination to the strain level.

  16. Aggression between siblings: Associations with the home environment and peer bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Neil; Wolke, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Sibling aggression is a common form of intra-familial aggression, yet has been largely neglected by research. Using an inclusive measure of sibling aggression, this study investigated, firstly, prevalence of sibling aggression and associations with family and household characteristics, and secondly, the relationship between sibling aggression and peer bullying. Participants were 4,237 adolescents from Wave 1 of Understanding Society. Four types of sibling aggression were measured: physical, verbal, stealing and teasing, and combined into composite measures of victimization and perpetration. Regression analysis identified associations with demographic characteristics, family and sibling composition, parent-child relationships and socioeconomic status and explored the link between sibling aggression and involvement in peer bullying. Using a broad definition, sibling aggression was found to be widespread, with 46% of all participants being victimized and 36% perpetrating aggression. Household and family characteristics, including a large family size, male siblings, and financial difficulties were associated with greater rates of sibling aggression. Parenting behavior showed the strongest relationship: harsh parenting increased the risk of sibling aggression while positive parenting protected against it. Sibling aggression was also homotypically related to involvement in peer bullying. Victimization by siblings significantly increased the odds of being a victim of peer bullying, and perpetrators of sibling aggression were more likely to be both peer bullies and bully-victims. Considering the adverse effects of sibling aggression on physical and mental health, the study provides pointers for efforts to reduce the risk of sibling aggression. Furthermore, the link with peer bullying suggests that school anti-bullying efforts should also take account of children's sibling relationships. Aggr. Behav. 41:14-24, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals

  17. Changes in siblings after the death of a child from cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Terrah L; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Vannatta, Kathryn; Barrera, Maru; Davies, Betty; Dietrich, Mary S; Fairclough, Diane L; Gerhardt, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined changes in siblings after the death of a brother or sister, particularly from mother, father, and sibling perspectives within the first year after death. This descriptive study identified and assessed the frequency of changes in siblings after a child's death from cancer. Participants were recruited from cancer registries at 3 hospitals in the United States and Canada 3 to 12 months after the child's death. Thirty-six mothers, 24 fathers, and 39 siblings from 40 families were included. Semistructured interviews using open-ended questions were conducted with each parent and sibling separately in the home. Content analysis identified emerging themes, and the McNemar tests compared frequencies between each paired set of reports (sibling vs mother, sibling vs father, mother vs father). Sixty-nine percent of participants reported personal changes in siblings (eg, changes in personality, school work, goals/life perspective, activities/interests). Forty-seven percent noted changes in siblings' relationships with family members and peers. Only 21% of participants reported no changes attributed to the death. Comparisons of frequencies across informants were not significant. Most siblings experienced changes in multiple areas of their lives after the death of a brother or sister to cancer. Some changes reflected siblings that were positively adapting to the death, whereas other changes reflected difficulties. Our findings offer guidance to improve aftercare for bereaved siblings and their families. Additional research is needed to further delineate the needs of bereaved siblings and to develop strategies to promote adaptation to loss.

  18. Grief related to the experience of being the sibling of a child with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenholt Nolbris, Margaretha; Enskär, Karin; Hellström, Anna-Lena

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have described the well siblings' experience of grief when a brother or sister is treated for cancer. Knowing how sibling grief is expressed will guide clinician and family efforts to provide appropriate support. The aim of this study was to describe siblings' reports of grief related to the experience of having a brother or sister with cancer. A qualitative descriptive method was chosen based on open-ended interviews with 29 siblings aged 8 to 24 years. Qualitative content analysis was applied to the interview data. Four categories of grief were identified: anticipatory grief after receiving information about the cancer diagnosis, grief and concern about the ill sibling's loss of a normal life, grief about being unimportant and forgotten in the family, and grief that continues after the sibling's death as a kind of bond. Despite variations in age and gender among participating siblings, their thoughts were similar. Grief was experienced differently from the time of the diagnosis onward, in the form of concerns related to the illness and situation of the ill sibling. Grief related to sibling bonds remained after death. This study recommends offering siblings realistic information about their ill sibling and support for them in their situation from diagnosis and continuously thereafter. To meet the needs of well siblings, it is necessary to ask the siblings about their thoughts and discuss with them their emotions and worries.

  19. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications.

  20. On the Origins of Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Sibling Correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Matthew J.; Sol, Joeri; Van Praag, Mirjam

    Promoting entrepreneurship has become an increasingly important part of the policy agenda in many countries. The success of such policies, however, rests in part on the assumption that entrepreneurship outcomes are not fully determined at a young age by factors that are unrelated to current policy....... We test this assumption and assess the importance of family background and neighborhood effects as determinants of entrepreneurship, by estimating sibling correlations in entrepreneurship. We find that between 20 and 50 percent of the variance in different entrepreneurial outcomes is explained...... then investigate a comprehensive set of mechanisms that explain sibling similarities. Parental entrepreneurship plays a large role in explaining sibling similarities, as do shared genes. We show that neighborhood effects matter, but are rather small, particularly when compared with the overall importance of family...

  1. Perinatal characteristics, older siblings, and risk of ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindström, Ulf; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena; Askling, Johan

    2016-01-01

    ' civil status and size of delivery unit. RESULTS: In the univariate analyses statistically significant increases in risk for developing AS were observed for having older siblings (OR 1.18; 95 % Cl 1.06-1.30). No association was observed for the remainder of analysed exposures, although there was a weak...... association with birth weight below 3000 g (OR 1.19; 95 % CI 1.04-1.37), though not for "low birth weight" siblings was consistent in a multivariate analysis adjusting for possible confounders (OR 1.23; 95 % Cl 1.......09-1.39). The direction and magnitude of the point estimates were also consistent in several sensitivity analyses and when stratifying by sex. CONCLUSIONS: Having older siblings was associated with an increased risk for developing AS. These results need to be repeated and confirmed in other cohorts....

  2. Family Complexity, Siblings, and Children's Aggressive Behavior at School Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomby, Paula; Goode, Joshua A.; Mollborn, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    As family structure in the United States has become increasingly dynamic and complex, children have become more likely to reside with step- or half-siblings through a variety of pathways. When these pathways are accounted for, more than one in six children in the United States lives with a half- or step-sibling at age 4. We use data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (N~6,550) to assess the independent and joint influences of residing with a single parent or stepparent and with step or half-siblings on children's aggressive behavior at school entry. The influences of parents’ union status and complex sibship status on aggressive behavior are independent. Family resources partially explain the association between residing with an unpartnered mother and aggressive behavior regardless of sibship status. However, the resource hypothesis does not explain the association of complex sibship with aggressive behavior. PMID:26608795

  3. Forensic evaluation in alleged sibling incest against children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Vera; Jardim, Patrícia; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Sibling incest is a serious form of intrafamilial sexual abuse with health, social, and legal relevance. A retrospective study was conducted through the analysis of forensic medical reports of the alleged sibling incest of victims under 18 years old (n = 68) from 2004 to 2011 as well as the respective judicial outcomes. Results demonstrated that sibling's sexual abuse is associated with several circumstances that might exacerbate its severity such as vaginal, anal, and/or oral penetration. Moreover, the victim's young age, the proximity between victim and abuser, and the fact that it is committed at the victim's and/or abuser's home and by using physical violence and verbal threats justify a late detection of these cases.

  4. Carbimazole/methimazole embryopathy in siblings: a possible genetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Himanshu; Dudding, Tracy

    2013-11-01

    The teratogenic effects of antenatal exposure of antithyroid drugs, carbimazole and methimazole have been well reported in the literature. These comprise of typical facial features and a wide variety of malformations such as choanal atresia, tracheo-esophageal anomalies, congenital heart disease and ectodermal defects. However, the longitudinal studies have failed to establish the consistent teratogenicity of these drugs. we report here two siblings with physical features consistent with carbimazole/methimazole embryopathy. We also describe previously unreported minor dental anomalies in these siblings with antenatal exposure of carbimazole. Generally, only a small proportion of prenatally exposed children have the typical manifestations, and the presence in siblings supports a possible hereditary susceptibility to carbimazole/ methimazole embryopathy. This highlights the importance of recognizing this diagnosis before a subsequent pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Alcohol-related morbidity and mortality within siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Osler, Merete; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate the association between educational status and alcohol-related somatic and non-somatic morbidity and mortality among full siblings in comparison with non-related individuals. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Approximately 1.4 million full siblings born...... in the inter-sibling analysis. For example, in the cohort analysis, females with a basic school education born 1970-79 had an increased rate of alcohol-related non-somatic morbidity and mortality [hazard rate ratio (HR) = 4.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.27-5.02] compared to those with a vocational...... males (aged 28-37) in the analyses of alcohol-related non-somatic outcomes. Health conditions earlier in life explained only a minor part of the associations. CONCLUSIONS: The association between educational status and alcohol-related somatic and non-somatic morbidity and mortality is only driven...

  6. The use of neoplastic donors to increase the donor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaschetti, P; Pretagostini, R; Stabile, D; Peritore, D; Oliveti, A; Gabbrielli, F; Cenci, S; Ricci, A; Vespasiano, F; Grigioni, W F

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the experience of the Centre-Sud Transplant Organization (OCST) area using cadaveric donor with neoplastic diseases to evaluate the possibility of transmission to recipients. From January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2010, the neoplastic risk has been reported to be 5.4% (377/4654 referred donors). In 2003, the number of donors with a tumor and their mean age were respectively: 60 (10.3%) and 59.6 ± 19.9; 2004: 33 (5.2%) and 61.4 ± 15.9; 2005: 32 (6%) and 62.8 ± 15.5; 2006: 46 (7%) and 60.7 ± 19.1; 2007: 51 (7%) and 58.9 ± 16; in 2008: 58 (7%) and 59.7 ± 19.6; 2009: 47 (7%) and 57 ± 26; 2010: 49 (7%) and 64 ± 16. The organ most affected by tumor has been the central nervous system (18%). The tumor was diagnosed before in 325 (86%) cases, versus during organ retrieval in 48 (12.7%) donor operations but before, which four cases (1%) occured after transplantation. According to the histological types and grades, 28 evaluated donors (8.2%) were suitable for transplantation. The histological types were: thyroid carcinoma (n = 3); prostate carcinoma (n = 8), renal clear cell carcinoma (n = 7), oncocytoma (n = 1), meningiomas (n = 2), dermofibrosarcoma (n = 1); verrucous carcinoma of the vulva (n = 1), colon adenocarcinoma (n = 1), grade II astrocytoma (n = 1), adrenal gland tumor (n = 1), gastric GIST (n = 1), oligodendroglioma (n = 1). Forty-five organs were retrieved (22 livers, 19 kidneys, 3 hearts, and 1 pancreas) and transplanted into 44 recipients with 1 liver-kidney combined transplantation. Four recipients died due to causes not related to the tumor. No donor-transmitted tumor was detected among the recipients. Donation is absolutely not indicated in cases of tumors with high metastatic potential and high grades. Performing an accurate evaluation of the donor, taking into account the histological grade, currently can allow, organ retrieval and transplantation with an acceptable risk. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier

  7. Faecalibacterium Gut Colonization Is Accelerated by Presence of Older Siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Martin Frederik; Laursen, Rikke Pilmann; Larnkjær, Anni

    2017-01-01

    . IMPORTANCEFaecalibacterium prausnitzii has been suggested to constitute a key marker of a healthy gut, yet the factors shaping the colonization of this highly oxygen-sensitive, non-spore-forming species in the intestinal environment remain poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence from three separate infant study...... populations that F. prausnitzii colonization in the gut happens during late infancy and is affected by the number of older siblings in the family. We conclude that Faecalibacterium acquisition is highly likely to be accelerated by contact between siblings. Bearing in mind the immunoregulatory properties of F...

  8. [Neurological soft signs in schizophrenic patients and their nonaffected siblings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechri, A; Slama, H; Bourdel, M-C; Chebel, S; Mandhouj, O; Krebs, M-O; Gaha, L

    2008-10-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are subtle neurological signs indicating non specific cerebral dysfunction. Several studies have found an excess of NSS in schizophrenic patients compared to healthy subjects. Although NSS have been consistently reported in schizophrenic patients, their clinical relevance and their relation to functional impairment and severity of this disease are not well-clarified. In addition, the presence of NSS in schizophrenic patient's relatives suggests that they could be associated with the genetic liability. To determine the prevalence and scores of NSS in schizophrenic patients and their nonaffected siblings and to examine the clinical correlates of NSS in the schizophrenic patients. Sixty-six schizophrenic patients (50 males and 16 females, mean age=31.16+/-7.17 years), were compared to 31 of their nonaffected siblings (22 males and nine females, mean age=32.19+/-5.88 years) and to 60 controls subjects (40 males and 20 females, mean age=30.70+/-6.54 years) without family psychiatric history. NSS were assessed with Krebs et al.'s neurological soft signs scale. It is a comprehensive and standardized scale consisting of 23 items comporting five factors: motor coordination, motor integration, sensory integration, quality of lateralization and involuntary movements or posture. The Simpson and Angus scale for extrapyramidal symptoms was also rated. Clinical assessment of the schizophrenic patients was conducted using the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS), clinical global impressions (CGI) and global functioning evaluation (GAF). Psychiatric disorders were ruled out among siblings of schizophrenic patients and control subjects by psychiatric review evaluation, according to the DSM-IV check list. When the total NSS score of 11.5 was considered the cut-off point, the prevalence of NSS was 96.9% in the schizophrenic patients versus 35.5% in the nonaffected siblings (ptotal score and subscores than the siblings and control groups. The NSS

  9. Siblings and human capital: A comparison between Italy and France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ferrari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how family size affects children's human capital, comparing Italy and France. We tested the dilution effect in these countries, starting with the assumption that the higher the number of siblings, the fewer parental resources are available for each child, and the lower the probability that each child will successfully pursue his/her educational career. We find a negative correlation between the number of siblings and human capital. However, when the analysis is developed with a causal approach, the strength of the dilution effect weakens in Italy and disappears in France.

  10. Sibling jealousy and aesthetic ambiguity in Austen's Pride and Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Margaret Ann Fitzpatrick

    2009-04-01

    Jane Austen's most popular novel, Pride and Prejudice (1813), illuminates and is illuminated by psychoanalytic aesthetics. When Austen dramatizes unconscious oedipal/sibling rivalries, irony acts as a type of aesthetic ambiguity (E. Kris 1952). A psychoanalytic perspective shows that Austen uses a grammar of negatives (negation, denial, minimization) to achieve the dual meanings of irony, engaging the reader's unconscious instinctual satisfactions, while at the same time protecting the reader from unpleasant affects. Austen's plot, which portrays regressions driven by sibling jealousy, reveals that a new tolerance of remorse and depression in her heroine and hero leads to psychic growth.

  11. Class Origin and Sibling Similarities in Long-run Income

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade, Stefan Bastholm

    2016-01-01

    Sibling correlations have gained increasing prominence in inequality studies as a Measurement of the total impact of family background on individual outcomes. Whilst previous studies have tended to use traditional socio-economic measures such as parent’s income or education, this paper introduces......’ education and income – include modifications of the Erikson–Goldthorpe–Portocarero schemes ranging from 3 to 15 classes and Grusky’s microclass scheme of 72 classes. The results show that although class adds to explanations of the family influence on children’s income, most of the sibling similarities...

  12. My Brother's Teacher? Siblings and Literacy Development in the Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sokal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency of sibling literacy interactions were examined in 134 families with at least two children, where at least one of the children attended school in grade one to grade four. Parents in the majority of families reported that their children read together on a regular basis without a parent present. This held across various demographic constellations including gender of the older child. However, children from families with three or more children were less likely to read with their siblings. Implications for parents and teachers are discussed.

  13. Siblings of children with complex care needs: their perspectives and experiences of participating in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, R L; Edwards, M; Ripat, J D; Rempel, G; Johnson, S F

    2016-07-01

    Participating in everyday life is essential to the healthy development and emotional well-being of children. However, little is known about siblings of children with complex care needs (CCN), and their perspectives and experiences of participating in everyday life. The aim of this paper is to present research findings that add to our understanding of how siblings of children with CCN view and experience participation in everyday life. To arrive at a detailed and accurate understanding of the siblings' perspectives and experiences, we used the qualitative research design of ethnography. Sixteen siblings (seven brothers, nine sisters) of children with CCN were recruited. The siblings ranged in age between 7 and 25 years, with a mean age of 14 years. All siblings took part in opened-ended interviews and completed ecomaps to describe how they participate. Five siblings also took part in the photovoice method. Analysis involved several iterative steps, congruent with ethnography. Four main themes emerged as follows: (1) participation is about being part of a group; (2) it feels good; (3) I love my sibling but…; and (4) promoting participation. Siblings of children with CCN identified challenges to participation and also described ways that they participate that relate to the care of their sibling. Siblings prioritized the relationship with their sisters and brothers with CCN in their life, and a great deal of their participation was chosen with their sibling in mind. Sibling-to-sibling relationships were distinct and meaningful and, as a result, participation was always done mindfully and with the family needs at the forefront. Nonetheless, clinicians caring for children with CCN must keep in mind the challenges that siblings of children with CCN experience and provide strategies to siblings that will help to promote their participation in everyday life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Developmental Unfolding of Sibling Influences on Alcohol Use over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, Diana R; Goodman, Rebecca J; Riley, Lucy; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2018-02-01

    Research has long demonstrated that siblings are similar in their alcohol use, however much of this work relies on cross-sectional samples or samples of adolescents alone and/or exclusive focus on older siblings' impact on younger siblings. Using a three time-point design from early adolescence to early adulthood (M ages = 14.9, 18.3, and 22.4 years, respectively; 55% female; 54% European ancestry, 38% Asian ancestry), we evaluated the prospective older and younger sibling influences on alcohol use across time (N = 613 sibling pairs; 35% sisters, 26% brothers, 39% mixed-gender; average age difference = 2.34 years; 34% full-biological siblings, 46% genetically-unrelated adopted siblings, 20% pairs where one child was the biological offspring of parents and the other was adopted). The results from both the traditional and random-intercept cross-lagged panel analyses showed that older siblings' alcohol use predicted younger siblings' alcohol use across each developmental transition and across a variety of sibling contexts (e.g., gender composition, age difference, genetic relatedness). On the other hand, younger siblings' alcohol use only predicted older siblings' alcohol use when siblings were close in age (1.5 years or less) and under conditions of high sibling companionship. These results add to a body of literature illustrating how both older and younger siblings are important socializing agents of adolescent and early adult alcohol use. Assessing or co-treating siblings for alcohol problems may be an important add-on to existing adolescent and early adult alcohol prevention and intervention programs.

  15. Liver transplant using octogenarian donors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferla, Fabio; De Carlis, Riccardo; Mariani, Anna; De Carlis, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    ... that liver transplantations (LTs) from octogenarian donors increased constantly between 2001 (3.5%) and 2010 (16.1%); this result is consistent with data from Spain and from the European Liver Transplant Registry. In our series (1571 liver transplants performed between December 1985 and December 2015), the first LT with an octogenarian do...

  16. Parents' Perceptions of Siblings' Interactions with Their Brothers and Sisters Who Are Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Fredrick, Laura D.

    1999-01-01

    A survey of parents of 36 children with deaf-blindness found that relationships between siblings consisted of unequal roles, with siblings primarily taking on a helping role. According to parents, unique modifications needed to interact effectively with individuals with deaf-blindness were not being implemented by the siblings. (Author/CR)

  17. Brothers, Sisters and Fictive Kin: Communication about Sex among Urban Black Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Scyatta A.; Hooper, Lisa M.; Persad, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Siblings have been shown to influence youth substance use and violent behavior. However, limited research has examined sibling-influences on sexual activity, particularly among urban Black youth. The current qualitative research was an exploratory study to describe discussions among siblings about sex and sexual health. Individual interviews were…

  18. "Recognized, Valued and Supported"? The Experiences of Adult Siblings of People with Autism Plus Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, Rosemary; Atkin, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential of adult siblings to offer long-term support to a brother or sister with autism is rarely realized. To understand this, our study explores the expectations of social care among adult siblings. Method: Using qualitative interviews, we spoke to 21 adult siblings about their family relationships and engagement with service…

  19. Siblings versus Parents and Friends: Longitudinal Linkages to Adolescent Externalizing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoe, Ivy N.; Keijsers, Loes; Hawk, Skyler T.; Branje, Susan; Dubas, Judith Semon; Buist, Kirsten; Frijns, Tom; van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Koot, Hans M.; van Lier, Pol A. C.; Meeus, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is well documented that friends' externalizing problems and negative parent-child interactions predict externalizing problems in adolescence, but relatively little is known about the role of siblings. This four-wave, multi-informant study investigated linkages of siblings' externalizing problems and sibling-adolescent negative…

  20. Mothers' Perceptions of the Quality of Childhood Sibling Relationships Affected by Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Melissa; Campbell, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The quality of the sibling relationship has an important role in the development of psychosocial skills throughout childhood. While the literature suggests that the significance of sibling relationships is heightened when one sibling has a disability, empirical findings about the quality of these relationships are few and inconsistent. The present…

  1. Sibling Relationships of Preschool-Aged Children in Gross Motor Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaugh, Sarah J.; Clifton, Marguerite A.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviors and interactions of preschool-aged siblings in object-oriented and body-oriented conditions were observed to discover if the child's siblings significantly influenced motor skill development. This study focused on categories of sibling behaviors and interactions. (Author/DF)

  2. The Influence of Older Siblings on the Sex-Typed Toy Play of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Alison; Fraleigh, Kimberly

    To examine the influence of older siblings on the sex-typed toy play of younger siblings, a study was undertaken of 60 children, 2 to 5 years old, with equal numbers of boys and girls with older brothers, older sisters, and no older siblings. Children's toy collections were inventoried and classified into conventionally male toys, or toys of the…

  3. Sibling Influence on Physical Activity and Sport Participation: Considerations for Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allbaugh, Chelsea N.; Bolter, Nicole D.; Shimon, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Sibling relationships are some of the most influential throughout one's life. While family influences have often been examined in sports settings, less has been studied regarding the specific roles siblings may play. Research suggests that the way athletes view sport participation can be shaped by their experiences and relationships with siblings.…

  4. Impact on Siblings of Children with Intellectual Disability: The Role of Child Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neece, Cameron L.; Blacher, Jan; Baker, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    The impact on everyday life for siblings of children with intellectual disability or typical development was examined. Participants were families of children with intellectual disability (n = 39) or typical development (n = 75). Child behavior problems and sibling impact were assessed at child ages 5, 6, 7, and 8. Results indicate that siblings of…

  5. Hidden Abuse within the Home: Recognizing and Responding to Sibling Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutey, Diane; Clemens, Elysia V.

    2015-01-01

    Sibling abuse is a serious phenomenon in our society that often goes unaddressed. Victims of sibling abuse experience psychological effects similar to those of child abuse (Caspi, 2012; Wiehe, 2002). The purpose of this article is to provide school counselors with a definition of sibling abuse and a five-step model to recognize and respond. A…

  6. Sibling Influences on Risky Behaviors from Adolescence to Young Adulthood: Vertical Socialization or Bidirectional Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; Jensen, Alexander C.; McHale, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    This study built on research on sibling influences to assess potential bidirectional effects of older and younger siblings' risky behaviors on one another's risky behaviors; our longitudinal design allowed us to test these effects when siblings were at about the same chronological age, at different points in time. We also tested whether the…

  7. A Comparison of College Women's Feelings toward Their Siblings and Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicirelli, Victor G.

    1980-01-01

    In this study college women prefer mother to sibling when needing a family member as helper, in spite of conflicts with parents over independence and identity. But ties with siblings are equally strong. They feel more positive toward siblings than toward fathers when needing a family member as helper. (Author/BEF)

  8. The Floating-Harbor syndrome: two affected siblings in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryns, J P; Kleczkowska, A; Timmermans, J; van den Berghe, H

    1996-10-01

    In this report we describe two siblings with pre- and postnatal growth retardation and clinical signs and symptoms most compatible with the diagnosis of Floating-Harbor syndrome. The oldest sibling, a girl, died in the first year of life from recurrent infections. The younger sibling, a male, is now 16.5 years old and mildly mentally retarded.

  9. Evaluation of a Sibling-Mediated Imitation Intervention for Young Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Katherine M.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2012-01-01

    Parents and peers have been successful at implementing interventions targeting social interactions in children with autism; however, few interventions have trained siblings as treatment providers. This study used a multiple-baseline design across six sibling dyads (four children with autism) to evaluate the efficacy of sibling-implemented…

  10. The More the Merrier? Sibling Composition and Early Manifestations of Theory of Mind in Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Élizabel; Bernier, Annie; Howe, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Sibling relationships are argued to offer a rich social context for the development of young children's theory of mind (ToM). There is evidence that the presence of siblings, particularly older siblings, may promote preschoolers' ToM, but it has not been investigated among toddlers. This study evaluated differences in early manifestations of ToM…

  11. Language Development among the Siblings of Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuthapisith, Jariya; Ruangdaraganon, Nichara; Sombuntham, Tasnawat; Roongpraiwan, Rawiwan

    2007-01-01

    Language development in 32 preschool siblings (aged 2-6 years) of children with diagnosed autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) was compared with that of a control group of 28 typical preschool children. Groups were matched by siblings' age, gender, maternal educational level and family income. The mean ages of the siblings group and the control group…

  12. DONOR-TRANSMITTED CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Mironkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate opportunities, prospects and safety of using heart transplants from aged donors who are at high risk of coronary atherosclerosis.Materials and methods. Over the period from March 1987 to May 2014450 heart transplantations (HTx were performed in V.I.Shumakov Federal Research Center of Transplantology and Artifi cial Organs. During the fi rst month after HTx coronarography was made to 152 (37,8% recipients inorder to exclude/confi rm donor-transmitted coronary atherosclerosis (DTCA and to identify tactics of treatment. Coronary atherosclerosis was detected among 16 patients (3,6% of total number of HTx, 15 (93,8% men and 1 (6,2% women. Mean age of recipients with DTCA at the moment of HTx was 48,3 ± 13,1 years.Results. Hemodynamically relevant coronary atherosclerosis was not detected and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI was not made in the group of patients with the mean age of 42,24 ± 8,91 years. Using heart transplants from aged donors is connected with increasing risk of DTCA among the recipients. DTCA-dependent PCI is not connected with coronary mortality. Actuarial survival rate of patients who underwent PCI is comparable with the same one in the total population of HTx recipients and is equal to 87,5% at 5 years and less.Conclusion. Hearts from aged donors (older than 50 years may be used for HTx with suffi cient level of safety. Due to high level of DTCA using of hearts from such donors is preferable for completing urgent HTx to recipients 1А–В UNOS.

  13. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, M; Mochtar, M H; de Melker, A A; van der Veen, F; Repping, S; Gerrits, T

    2016-05-01

    What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial counselling at the time that donor-offspring actually sought contact. Most studies on sperm donors are on anonymous donors and focus on recruitment, financial compensation, anonymity and motivations. There is limited knowledge on the value that identifiable sperm donors place on psychosocial counselling and what their needs are in this respect. We performed a qualitative study from March until June 2014 with 25 identifiable sperm donors, who were or had been a donor at the Centre for Reproductive Medicine of the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam any time between 1989 and 2014. We held semi-structured in-depth interviews with identifiable sperm donors with an average age of 44 years. The interviews were fully transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method of grounded theory. Twelve out of 15 donors (former donors ITALIC! n = 8, active donors ITALIC! n = 7) who had received a counselling session during their intake procedure found it important that they had been able to talk about issues such as the emotional consequences of donation, disclosure to their own children, family and friends, future contact with donor-offspring and rules and regulations. Of the 10 former donors who had received no counselling session, 8 had regretted the lack of intensive counselling. In the years following their donation, most donors simply wanted to know how many offspring had been born using their sperm and had no need for further counselling. Nevertheless, they frequently mentioned that they were concerned about the well-being of 'their' offspring. In addition, they would value the availability of psychosocial counselling in the event that donor-offspring actually sought contact. A limitation of our study is its

  14. Associations of health status with subsequent blood donor behavior-An alternative perspective on the Healthy Donor Effect from Donor InSight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hurk, Katja; Zalpuri, Saurabh; Prinsze, Femmeke J.; Merz, Eva-Maria; de Kort, Wim L. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    In donor health research, the 'Healthy Donor Effect' (HDE) often biases study results and hampers their interpretation. This refers to the fact that donors are a selected 'healthier' subset of a population due to both donor selection procedures and self-selection. Donors with long versus short donor

  15. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... free Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a ...

  19. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Mochtar, M.H.; de Melker, A.A.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER: Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? ... 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of ...

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? ... 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of ...

  3. Exploring sibling attitudes towards participation when the younger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. Typically developing peers were most positive towards participation in play activities with their sibling with a disability. They were also positive towards participation in household tasks. They were less positive towards communication participation and least positive about participation in interpersonal relationships.

  4. Male Psychosexual Development: Role of Sibling Sex and Ordinal Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Michael H.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that in two-sibling families the presence of an older sister is related to the younger brother's subsequent sexual behavior, sexual interests, attitudes, and problems as measured by a self-report sex questionnaire. (Authors)

  5. Physical Violence between Siblings: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Kristi L.; Kiecolt, K. Jill; Edwards, John N.

    2005-01-01

    This study develops and tests a theoretical model to explain sibling violence based on the feminist, conflict, and social learning theoretical perspectives and research in psychology and sociology. A multivariate analysis of data from 651 young adults generally supports hypotheses from all three theoretical perspectives. Males with brothers have…

  6. Parents' Differential Treatment of Adolescent Siblings in African American Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmeyer, Anna R; McHale, Susan M

    2017-03-01

    Research on European and European American families suggests that parents' differential treatment of siblings has negative implications for youths' adjustment, but few studies have explored these dynamics in minority samples. This study examined parents' differential acceptance and conflict in a sample of mothers, fathers, and two adolescent siblings in 179 African American families who were interviewed on three annual occasions. In an effort to replicate findings from European and European American samples, we assessed the longitudinal associations between differential treatment and adolescent adjustment and tested three sibling characteristics (birth order, gender, and dyad gender composition) as potential moderators of these linkages. To illuminate the sociocultural context of differential treatment and its implications, we also explored parents' cultural socialization practices and experiences of financial stress as potential moderators of these links. Multilevel models revealed that, controlling for average parent-child relationship qualities, decreases in parental acceptance and increases in parent-youth conflict over time-relative to the sibling-were associated with increases in youths' risky behavior and depressive symptoms. Links between differential treatment and adjustment were not evident, however, when mothers engaged in high levels of cultural socialization and in families under high financial stress. The discussion highlights the significance of sociocultural factors in family dynamics. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  7. Exploring sibling attitudes towards participation when the younger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    engaged while being there',[7] in other words, how the child interacts with the ... A significant difference between certain components of attitudes was reported for three of the four ... Age and gender differences were calculated ... face); 'Not sure' (showing the PCS symbol ..... Coping with stress in sibling relationships: A.

  8. Exploring sibling attitudes towards participation when the younger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    40(4):515–524. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cch.12100]. 2. McHugh M. Special Siblings: Growing up with Someone with a Disability. Baltimore: Paul H Brookes, 2003. 3. Vig S. Young children's object play: A window on development. J Devel.

  9. Distribution of veld rat sibling species Aethomys chrysophilus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sibling species Aethomys chrysophilus (de Winton) and Aethomys ineptus Thomas and Wroughton are indistinguishable in external morphology. Although their combined geographic range extends over a large area of southern Africa, their respective distributions are uncertain. We have assembled a database that includes ...

  10. Sensory Responsiveness in Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Claudia L.; Babb-Keeble, Alison; Westover, Erin Eitzmann; Zhang, Yi; Adams, Claire; Collins, Diane M.; Karmarkar, Amol; Reistetter, Timothy A.; Constantino, John N.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined sensory responsiveness in unaffected siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and associations between sensory responsiveness and social severity. Sensory Profile Caregiver Questionnaires and Social Responsiveness Scales were completed by parents of 185 children between age 4 and 10.95 years. Significant…

  11. Experiences of posttraumatic growth in siblings of children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, Anita; Mastroyannopoulou, Kiki; Kirby, Angela

    2017-04-01

    As survival rates continue to improve for children diagnosed with cancer, strides in achieving better psychosocial outcomes for both children with cancer and their families have been accentuated. The current study aimed to explore the experiences of siblings of children diagnosed with cancer and attempted to overcome some of the limitations described in previous research. Primarily, the study considered the theoretical framework of posttraumatic growth (PTG) in the project design and analysis. Semi-structured interviews were completed with six siblings. Thematic analysis was employed to identify themes within the data set as a whole. The data revealed that siblings experienced a range of difficult emotions throughout the cancer trajectory as well as experiencing remarkable changes in their lives. This included both positive and negative changes. These changes included increased empathy and resilience, improved family relationships, disrupted routine, increased responsibility and perceived changes in the ill child. Siblings described factors which they found helpful and unhelpful in adjusting to these changes. The report ends with a discussion of the themes and their clinical and theoretical implications. The report also highlights the research limitations and areas for future investigation.

  12. Sibling method increases risk assessment estimates for type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang V Lam

    Full Text Available We presented a risk assessment model to distinguish between type 1 diabetes (T1D affected and unaffected siblings using only three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes. In addition we calculated the heritability from genome-wide identity-by-descent (IBD sharing between full siblings. We analyzed 1,253 pairs of affected individuals and their unaffected siblings (750 pairs from a discovery set and 503 pairs from a validation set from the T1D Genetics Consortium (T1DGC, applying a logistic regression to analyze the area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve (AUC. To calculate the heritability of T1D we used the Haseman-Elston regression analysis of the squared difference between the phenotypes of the pairs of siblings on the estimate of their genome-wide IBD proportion. The model with only 3 SNPs achieving an AUC of 0.75 in both datasets outperformed the model using the presence of the high-risk DR3/4 HLA genotype, namely AUC of 0.60. The heritability on the liability scale of T1D was approximately from 0.53 to 0.92, close to the results obtained from twin studies, ranging from 0.4 to 0.88.

  13. Analysis of DNA methylation variation in sibling tobacco ( Nicotiana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) analysis were used to investigate the genome of two sibling tobacco cultivars, Yunyan85 and Yunyan87, their parent K326 and the other tobacco cultivar NC89. AFLP analysis indicated that, the genome primary ...

  14. Bereavement among South African adolescents following a sibling's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While increasing attention has been paid in recent years to studying the impact of parental death from AIDS on children, we know little about how a sibling's death from AIDS affects children. In this qualitative descriptive study, 11 in-depth interviews were conducted by trained social workers with adolescents who had lost a ...

  15. Behavioral problems of siblings of epileptic children in Enugu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... investigate to what extent the children's epilepsy has affected their healthy siblings in our own center. Materials and Methods: Epileptic patients who consecutively referred to the Pediatric Neurology Clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, from October 1999 to September 2000 were ...

  16. Lebers Amaurosis in Three Siblings: A case report | Samaila ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case report appears to be first reported incident of Lebers congenital amaurosis in three siblings in Kaduna State. Genetic issues, clinical presentation, counselling, treatment and future progression of this irreversible blinding condition are discussed. Keywords: Lebers amaurosis, retinitis pigmentosa, Kaduna, Nigeria

  17. Schizophrenic and Sibling: A Comparison of Parental Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Frank; Walsh, Froma

    1980-01-01

    Schizophrenics were differentiated from their siblings in tendencies to see themselves as symbiotically attached to their mothers and failing to be accommodated to by their fathers. Schizophrenics tend to be aligned with the same sex parent. Findings may help explain the psychosexual identification difficulties of schizophrenics. (Author)

  18. Siblings and Parents in One-Parent Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Edna K.; Wallace, Doris B.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of six one- and two-parent families reveals the following: (1) members of the same family have different perceptions of family experiences, including divorce and its impact on family relationships; (2) single parents seem to become closer to their children than do married parents; and (3) a one-parent two-sibling family differs from a…

  19. Optic Disc Coloboma in Two Nigerian Siblings: Case Report and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eye and counting fingers in the left eye. Dilated binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed a right large excavated colobomatous disc and a left small disc with infero‑temporal disc coloboma. Keywords: Optic disc coloboma, cognitive deficit, Nigeria. Optic Disc Coloboma in Two Nigerian Siblings: Case Report and. Review ...

  20. The Lived Experience of Losing a Sibling through Murder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    This study explores the grief experiences of young adults in the aftermath of the murder of a sibling. Three young ... who have lost a child through murder, and, to a lesser extent, on .... never going to help me again, and I never saw him again ...

  1. Infant siblings and the investigation of autism risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newschaffer Craig J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infant sibling studies have been at the vanguard of autism spectrum disorders (ASD research over the past decade, providing important new knowledge about the earliest emerging signs of ASD and expanding our understanding of the developmental course of this complex disorder. Studies focused on siblings of children with ASD also have unrealized potential for contributing to ASD etiologic research. Moving targeted time of enrollment back from infancy toward conception creates tremendous opportunities for optimally studying risk factors and risk biomarkers during the pre-, peri- and neonatal periods. By doing so, a traditional sibling study, which already incorporates close developmental follow-up of at-risk infants through the third year of life, is essentially reconfigured as an enriched-risk pregnancy cohort study. This review considers the enriched-risk pregnancy cohort approach of studying infant siblings in the context of current thinking on ASD etiologic mechanisms. It then discusses the key features of this approach and provides a description of the design and implementation strategy of one major ASD enriched-risk pregnancy cohort study: the Early Autism Risk Longitudinal Investigation (EARLI.

  2. Infantile malignant osteopetrosis: A case report of three siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infantile malignant osteopetrosis, a rare hereditary, generalized disorder of bone characterized by a significant increase in the density of the skeletal tissues is described in three siblings. The incidence, genetic etiology, clinical, laboratory, radiological features, management and prognosis have been discussed.

  3. Reframing Paul's sibling language in light of Jewish epistolary forms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-17

    Jun 17, 2015 ... Yet, whereas sociological explorations of Paul's sibling language in the context of the Greco-Roman background are ..... the carpenter.' In the Griechische Papyri der Staats- und. Universitätsbibliothek Hamburg (P.Hamb.) 60, Pascheis (a. Jew), a letter writer, addresses Justos (non-Jew) as 'strategos.

  4. Metaphyseal osteopathy-like disease in two sibling kittens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Valeria; D'Ettorre, Paolo; Caldin, Marco; Vezzoni, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of a growth plate disturbance resembling canine metaphyseal osteopathy in two, two-month-old, sibling, intact, female Domestic Shorthair cats. Clinical signs and radiographic lesions resolved spontaneously after three months. Follow-up examination at six months of age showed complete recovery and no radiographic abnormalities.

  5. Learning Emotional Understanding and Emotion Regulation through Sibling Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Young children's relationships with their sisters and brothers offer unique and important opportunities for learning about emotions and developing emotional understanding. Through a critical analysis, this article examines sibling interaction in 3 different but normative contexts (conflict/conflict management, play, and…

  6. The Privacy War: Enabling Siblings the Right to Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarese, Margaret; Giannetti, Charlene

    2003-01-01

    Polled adolescents, parents, and teachers to determine where the child's right to privacy ends and the parent's responsibility to protect begins. Results indicate that the worst offenders tend to be siblings. The paper presents a three-pronged strategy to help parents deal with battling children: recognize the breaches, negotiate the truce…

  7. Prosocial competencies among adolescent siblings of the physically disabled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Perenc

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The current study examined possible prosocial benefits of having a disabled sibling. Until now research has mainly focused on the negative effects of having a sibling with a disability. We hypothesized that regular and frequent interactions with a disabled person should result in an increase of positive attitude and empathy toward other people who are in a disadvantageous situation. Participants and procedure A sample of 208 students from public secondary schools (middle and high schools completed the Polish version of the Prosocial Tendencies Measure (PTM in order to assess the tendencies to prosocial behaviors in different conditions. Participants were between 13 and 18 years old. Ninety-six adolescents had a disabled sibling (group T and 112 constituted the control group (group C. Results Results showed that group T generally scored higher than group C in the number of helping behaviors. Furthermore, girls scored higher than boys in anonymous prosocial behaviors. The older adolescents are more inclined to use helping behaviors both in anonymous and compliant situations than their younger colleagues. Conclusions Presence of disabled children in a family context may facilitate prosocial behavior in their non-disabled siblings. Older participants less frequently described themselves as prosocial in public situations. In contrast, younger adolescents reported weaker prosocial tendencies in anonymous and compliant situations. The effect of gender on prosocial tendencies was significant for public prosocial behavior, with a higher level achieved by males in this domain. Data analysis also showed significantly greater emotional and altruistic tendencies in females than in males.

  8. Observations on sporozoite detection in naturally infected sibling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sporozoites were detected in naturally infected sibling species of the primary rural vector Anopheles culicifacies complex in two primary health centres (PHCs) and a variant of the urban vector Anopheles stephensi in Mangalore city, Karnataka, south India while carrying out malaria outbreak investigations from 1998–2006.

  9. Coexistent Hirschsprung's disease and esophageal achalasia in male siblings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, JL; Mulcahy, TM; O'Riordain, DS; Buys, CHCM; Hofstra, RMW; McCarthy, T; Kirwan, WO

    1997-01-01

    Achalasia of the esophagus developed in two male siblings soon after birth, and they were successfully treated by surgery. Persistent signs resulted in the later diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease. One required subtotal colectomy and ileoanal anastomosis, and the other is managing well on

  10. A report of heat stroke in two Nigerian siblings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-31

    May 31, 2014 ... Infants and children are at higher risk of heat stroke for several reasons. We report these cases to highlight the danger of leaving children unsupervised in vehicles, aid prompt diagnosis, and management of heat stroke. Two Nigerian siblings aged ranges 5 and 3 years old, were trapped inside an unlocked ...

  11. Similarities in Siblings' Experiences of Neglectful Parenting Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Denise A.; Kantor, Glenda Kaufman; Holt, Melissa K.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Researchers and policymakers typically assume that within families, individual children are at an equivalent risk of neglectful behaviors. There is evidence that siblings experience differential parental treatment, and some research suggests that parents may maltreat their children to differing degrees. However, because neglect is…

  12. Siblings as Communication Trainers for Prelinguistic Infants with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Nancy B.

    The study examined effects of training older siblings (ages 6-8) of six 1- to 3-year-old infants and toddlers with Down syndrome to employ social communication strategies in play sessions. Three secondary purposes included evaluating effects of intervention upon the communication skills of the Down syndrome children, effects of intervention on…

  13. Sibling influence on care given by children to older parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolkacheva, N.V.; Broese Van Groenou, M.I.; van Tilburg, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which siblings' behaviors and characteristics influence a child's caregiving. A sample of 186 older parents in need of care with at least two adult children reported on characteristics and caregiving of all their children (N = 703). Multilevel regression models show

  14. Tele-recruitment for Donor Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Amit; Tiwari, A.

    2012-01-01

    Blood transfusion services are the integral part of health care system and these services have safe blood transfusion as the major goal. Voluntary blood donation is the key to safe blood and this safety is further enhanced when the voluntary blood donors become repeat/regular donors. Retention of donors is therefore a very crucial strategy to ensure enhanced blood safety. Tele-recruitment is an effective medium of recruiting and more importantly retaining donors via means of telephone/Short M...

  15. Bereavement after sibling death: a population‐based longitudinal case‐control study

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, James M.; Au, Wendy; Chateau, Dan; Walld, Randy; Leslie, William D.; Enns, Jessica; Martens, Patricia J.; Katz, Laurence Y.; Logsetty, Sarvesh; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine mental disorders and treatment use among bereaved siblings in the general population. Siblings (N=7243) of all deceased children in the population of Manitoba, Canada who died between 1984 and 2009 were matched 1:3 to control siblings (N=21,729) who did not have a sibling die in the study period. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare the two sibling groups in the two years before and after the index child's death on physician‐diagnose...

  16. Siblings of People with Disabilities' Explicit and Implicit Disability Attitude Divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Carli

    2017-01-01

    Siblings of people with disabilities have more exposure to people with disabilities than most nondisabled people, uniquely positioning them toward disability, yet less is known about how this might impact their attitudes. This study examined siblings' disability attitudes by determining siblings' explicit and implicit disability bias, mapping their 2-dimensional prejudice, and examining theoretical variables that might be relevant to their attitudes. To do so, the Disability Attitudes Implicit Association Test, the Symbolic Ableism Scale, and survey questions were administered to 48 siblings. Findings revealed the majority of the siblings implicitly preferred nondisabled people, despite reporting low levels of explicit attitudes.

  17. The perspective of siblings of children with chronic illness: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Christiane; Hellmers, Claudia; Metzing, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    This review gives an overview about the existing research concerning siblings' perspective within the familial experiences of childhood chronic illness. Besides attaining a conception of their world, it was intended to identify the unacknowledged issues concerning siblings' experience. Four databases were systematically searched. The analysis was concentrated on nine literature reviews. As a result, we identified a map of dimensions of experiences-well-elaborated as well as fragmentary. Many of the studies were conducted by a proxy and not from the sole siblings' perspective. Further research should concentrate on the sole siblings' perspective, in order to make siblings' voices audible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Blood donor: nursing care plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The standardized nursing care plan can be used as a means through which the nurse will assess and identify the particular needs of the blood donor.To draw up the care plan, we have conducted the evaluation on the basis of the Marjory Gordon’s functional health patterns.The more prevailing diagnosis according to the NANDA taxonomy have been identified, results have been established according to the NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification taxonomy, and nursing interventions have been suggested according to the NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification taxonomy. Also, certain potential complications, which are infrequent, must be observed and controlled in the blood donation process. Our main aim with this article has been to offer to professionals resources that grant to the caring activity scientific rigor, professional recognition and an unique and valid tool to evaluate the assistance with the best levels of quality for the blood donor.

  19. School Experiences of Siblings of Children with Chronic Illness: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lucy L; Lum, Alistair; Wakefield, Claire E; Nandakumar, Beeshman; Fardell, Joanna E

    Siblings of children with chronic illness have unique experiences that can affect their school functioning, such that they may miss ongoing periods of school, experience difficulties with schoolwork or experience changes in their peer and teacher interactions. This review provides an overview of these siblings' school experiences. Six databases (Medline, PsychINFO, CINAHL, ERIC, Embase and The Cochrane Library) were systematically searched for studies examining the school experiences and peer relationships of siblings of children with chronic illness, as well as school-based interventions for these siblings. Studies were included if they were published in or after 2000 and were published in English. We identified 2137 articles upon initial search. From these, we identified 28 eligible studies examining the school experiences of >1470 siblings of children with chronic illness. Three key themes were identified throughout the reviewed articles. The literature described 1) the psychological impact on siblings at school; 2) decreases in school attendance and academic functioning, and; 3) changes or perceived differences in peer and teacher interactions. Siblings value teacher and peer support, and this support may contribute to better sibling school functioning. Many siblings are socially resilient, yet overlooked, members of the family who may present with psychological, academic and peer related difficulties at school following diagnosis of a brother or sister with chronic illness. Future research is needed to further delineate the sibling school experience to better facilitate the development of targeted sibling support interventions within the school environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. All in the family: correlations between parents' and adolescent siblings' weight and weight-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Meyer, Craig; MacLehose, Richard F; Crichlow, Renee; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2015-04-01

    To examine whether and how parents' and adolescent siblings' weight and weight-related behaviors are correlated. Results will inform which family members may be important to include in adolescent obesity prevention interventions. Data from two linked population-based studies, EAT 2010 and F-EAT, were used for cross-sectional analyses. Parents (n = 58; 91% females; mean age = 41.7 years) and adolescent siblings (sibling #1 n = 58, 50% girls, mean age = 14.3 years; sibling #2 n = 58, 64% girls, mean age = 14.8 years) were socioeconomically and racially/ethnically diverse. Some weight-related behaviors between adolescent siblings were significantly positively correlated (i.e., fast food consumption, breakfast frequency, sedentary patterns, p siblings' same behaviors. Some of the significant correlations found between adolescent siblings' weight-related behaviors were statistically different from correlations between parents' and adolescent siblings' weight-related behaviors. Although not consistently, adolescent siblings' weight-related behaviors were significantly correlated as compared with parents' and adolescent siblings' weight-related behaviors. It may be important to consider including siblings in adolescent obesity prevention interventions or in recommendations healthcare providers give to adolescents regarding their weight and weight-related behaviors. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  1. Energy intake, parental control of children's eating, and physical activity in siblings discordant for adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemmich, James N; White, Tressa M; Paluch, Rocco; Epstein, Leonard H

    2010-10-01

    Studying siblings discordant for adiposity allows for identifying risk factors for obesity by testing whether there is low familiality or resemblance of energy balance behaviors and then whether sibling differences in these behaviors are associated with differences in their adiposity. Nineteen sibling pairs discordant for overweight were assessed for physical activity, laboratory-based food consumption (single food, variety of foods), and parental control of child feeding behaviors. There was virtually no familiality for physical activity and energy intake during a single food meal. Sibling differences in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and energy intake independently predicted differences in their adiposity. There was high familiality for increased energy intake (responsivity) when presented with a meal composed of a variety of foods, and sibling differences in responsivity did not predict sibling differences in adiposity. Parent concern and monitoring of child eating had only slight familiality and were associated with sibling differences in adiposity. In conclusion, sibling differences in MVPA and energy intake and parent concern and monitoring of child eating may promote differences in adiposity. Increased responsivity to dietary variety by overweight siblings does not appear to promoting sibling discordance in overweight as normal weight and overweight siblings responded similarly to dietary variety.

  2. Placement shift, sibling relationship quality, and child outcomes in foster care: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, L Oriana; Li, Mimin; Shrout, Patrick E; Brody, Gene H; Pettit, Gregory S

    2007-12-01

    Sibling unity during family transitions is considered a protective factor for child behavior problems, but there is little empirical support for the widespread child protection policy of placing siblings together in foster care. In a prospective study of 156 maltreated children, siblings were classified in 1 of 3 placement groups: continuously together (n = 110), continuously apart (n = 22), and disrupted placement (siblings placed together were separated; n = 24). Changes in child adjustment as a function of sibling relationship and placement group were examined. Sibling positivity predicted lower child problems at follow-up (about 14 months later), while sibling negativity predicted higher child problems. Placement group did not affect child behavior problems at follow-up; however, compared to siblings in continuous placement (either together or apart), siblings in disrupted placement with high initial behavior problems were rated as having fewer problems at follow-up, while siblings in disrupted placement with low initial behavior problems were rated as having more problems at follow-up. These findings highlight the importance of considering relationships between siblings and the risk that one poses to another before early placement decisions are made.

  3. Cancer in the organ donor

    OpenAIRE

    DETRY, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Organ Donation and Cancer Pr Olivier Detry, Dpt of Abdominal Surgery and Transplantation, University of Liege The risk of transmission of cancer with the transplanted organ has been known since the pioneering years of solid organ transplantation, and is enhanced by immunosuppression and particularly the calcineurin inhibitors. Therefore, classically, potential organ donors with past history of cancer are excluded from donation, with the exception of low-grade malignant tumours of the...

  4. "It's Mine!" Does Sharing with Siblings at Age 3 Predict Sharing with Siblings, Friends, and Unfamiliar Peers at Age 6?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Naomi; Ensor, Rosie; Marks, Alex; Jacobs, Lorna; Hughes, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Studies of children's prosocial behavior typically focus on prosocial acts with a specific partner (e.g., a friend, peer, or sibling), and comparisons of prosociality in different contexts are rare. To address this gap, the current study examined predictive links among children's spontaneous sharing (a common and important form…

  5. Adolescent Siblings of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities with and without Comorbid Mental Health Problems: A Preliminary Comparison of Sibling Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Carolyn M.; Kozimor, Laura Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of comorbid mental illness in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) has been shown to have additional negative impact on parents and caregivers. However, the impact of such dual diagnoses on typically developing siblings has yet to be examined. Methods: Parents and typically developing…

  6. My older sibling was drunk - Younger siblings' drunkenness in relation to parental monitoring and the parent-adolescent relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gossrau-Breen, D.; Kuntsche, E.N.; Gmel, G.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the links between having older siblings who get drunk, satisfaction with the parent adolescent relationship, parental monitoring, and adolescents' risky drinking. Regression models were conducted based on a national representative sample of 3725 8th to 10th graders in Switzerland

  7. To share or not to share : Parental, sibling, and situational influences on sharing with a younger sibling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Berkel, Sheila R.; Van Der Pol, Lotte D.; Groeneveld, Marleen G.; Hallers-Haalboom, Elizabeth T.; Endendijk, Joyce J.; Mesman, Judi; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2015-01-01

    Sharing is an important indicator of internalised prosocial values. We examined predictors of sharing of 302 preschoolers with their younger siblings in a one-year longitudinal study. Sharing was observed during different home visits, once with father and once with mother. We examined the following

  8. Autonomy-Supportive Parenting and Autonomy-Supportive Sibling Interactions: The Role of Mothers' and Siblings' Psychological Need Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kaap-Deeder, Jolene; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Soenens, Bart; Loeys, Tom; Mabbe, Elien; Gargurevich, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    Autonomy-supportive parenting yields manifold benefits. To gain more insight into the family-level dynamics involved in autonomy-supportive parenting, the present study addressed three issues. First, on the basis of self-determination theory, we examined whether mothers' satisfaction of the psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness related to autonomy-supportive parenting. Second, we investigated maternal autonomy support as an intervening variable in the mother-child similarity in psychological need satisfaction. Third, we examined associations between autonomy-supportive parenting and autonomy-supportive sibling interactions. Participants were 154 mothers (M age = 39.45, SD = 3.96) and their two elementary school-age children (M age = 8.54, SD = 0.89 and M age = 10.38, SD = 0.87). Although mothers' psychological need satisfaction related only to maternal autonomy support in the younger siblings, autonomy-supportive parenting related to psychological need satisfaction in both siblings and to an autonomy-supportive interaction style between siblings. We discuss the importance of maternal autonomy support for family-level dynamics. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  9. To Share or Not to Share: Parental, Sibling, and Situational Influences on Sharing with a Younger Sibling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Sheila R.; Van der Pol, Lotte D.; Groeneveld, Marleen G.; Hallers-Haalboom, Elizabeth T.; Endendijk, Joyce J.; Mesman, Judi; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2015-01-01

    Sharing is an important indicator of internalised prosocial values. We examined predictors of sharing of 302 preschoolers with their younger siblings in a one-year longitudinal study. Sharing was observed during different home visits, once with father and once with mother. We examined the following predictors: both children's externalising…

  10. The Third Rail of Family Systems: Sibling Relationships, Mental and Behavioral Health, and Preventive Intervention in Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Mark E.; Solmeyer, Anna R.; McHale, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Sibling relationships are an important context for development, but are often ignored in research and preventive interventions with youth and families. In childhood and adolescence, siblings spend considerable time together, and siblings' characteristics and sibling dynamics substantially influence developmental trajectories and outcomes. This…

  11. Having a Brother or Sister with Down Syndrome: Perspectives from Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotko, Brian G.; Levine, Susan P.; Goldstein, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study asks brothers and sisters about their feelings and perceptions toward their sibling with Down syndrome. We analyzed valid and reliable surveys from 822 brothers and sisters whose families were on the mailing lists of six non-profit Down syndrome organizations around the country. More than 96% of brothers/sisters that responded to the survey indicated that they had affection toward their sibling with Down syndrome; and 94% of older siblings expressed feelings of pride. Less than 10% felt embarrassed, and less than 5% expressed a desire to trade their sibling in for another brother or sister without Down syndrome. Among older siblings, 88% felt that they were better people because of their siblings with Down syndrome, and more than 90% plan to remain involved in their sibling’s lives as they become adults. The vast majority of brothers and sisters describe their relationship with their sibling with Down syndrome as positive and enriching. PMID:21910244

  12. Sibling effects on nutritional status: Intersections of cooperation and competition across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrecht, Courtney; Meehan, Courtney L

    2016-01-01

    Examination of sibling effects on nutritional status is complicated by siblings being both alloparents and resource competitors, as well as the extensive changes children undergo across development. To evaluate sibling nutritional effects with consideration of these opposing roles, we use an evolutionary framework rooted in human ontogeny and cooperative breeding. Anthropometric data were collected from 113 Ngandu horticulturalist children (birth-Nutritional status across developmental risk periods (nutritional status, but their impacts vary by risk period. In general, older siblings (≥5 years old) have positive effects on their same-aged siblings, while younger siblings (nutritional status. By evaluating the effects of siblings during specific risk periods, we offer a strategy to untangle the intersections of cooperation and competition. Our results add to the growing body of evidence showing benefits to allocare and further demonstrate that even children target their assistance toward vulnerable periods in development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The development of interpersonal aggression during adolescence: the importance of parents, siblings, and family economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shannon Tierney; Conger, Katherine Jewsbury; Blozis, Shelley A

    2007-01-01

    Latent growth curve modeling employed data from a longitudinal study of 451 sibling families to examine parents, siblings, and family economics as factors in individual differences in the developmental course of interpersonal aggression during adolescence. Findings suggest that individual change in interpersonal aggression during adolescence can be predicted by the gender and aggression of one's sibling; predictions varied by the gender composition of the sibling dyad. Rates of parental hostility predicted levels of interpersonal aggression for both older (mean age = 12 years) and younger siblings (mean age = 15), and growth in aggression for younger siblings. Family economic pressure predicted interpersonal aggression of both siblings indirectly through parental hostility. Implications for future research and preventive interventions are discussed.

  14. Futures planning, parental expectations and sibling concern for people who have a learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davys, Deborah; Mitchell, Duncan; Haigh, Carol

    2010-09-01

    A questionnaire was e-mailed to 200 siblings on the Sibs database to explore future plans, parental expectations and sibling concerns regarding people who have a learning disability; 21 questionnaires were returned. A full discussion regarding sibling support was reported by 12 (57%) of respondents; 7 (33%) stated this discussion had not taken place, and 2 (9%) were unsure. Twelve (57%) of participants reported no clear future plan; where a plan did exist, seven (33%) of respondents claimed it was fully agreeable to both them and their parents. Eleven (52%) of respondents reported no difference between their wishes regarding their future role and parental wishes. Key themes generated were: satisfaction with services, parental influence, sibling concern about the future, futures planning, the impact of the disabled person upon sibling lives, and siblings needs. Further qualitative exploration into issues for siblings of adults who have a learning disability is required.

  15. The effect of siblings and family dog ownership on children's independent mobility to neighbourhood destinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christian, Hayley E.; Villanueva, Karen; Klinker, Charlotte D.

    2016-01-01

    ; the number of older siblings; if they owned a dog; and whether their child was allowed to independently travel to school, friends’ or family house, park/oval/sporting field and local shop. Data were analysed for 181 children aged 8–15 years. Results: The strongest significant sibling effect for independently......Objective: To investigate the effect of sibling age, gender and dog ownership on children's independent mobility and how this varies according to the destination visited. Methods: Parents reported whether their child had an older sibling; if the child and older sibling were of the same gender...... of being independently mobile to ≥3 destinations (OR=2.43; 95%CI=1.03–5.74). Conclusions: Parents may be more likely to grant children licence to travel to local places if they are accompanied by an older sibling or the family dog. Implications: Understanding the effects of siblings and dog ownership...

  16. Hyperbilirubinemia in normal healthy donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Veena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out in B.A.R.C. Hospital Blood Bank over a span of five years, and includes 2734 donors. All the bags were screened for HIV, HBsAg, HCV and VDRL and the plasma in the pilot tubes of the blood bags was observed to detect any abnormality in color. In 27 cases plasma was found to be icteric and liver function tests were carried out on these samples. Two donors showed higher SGPT level, and were excluded. No significant increases in liver enzymes were recorded in the others. Causes of icteric plasma in these apparently healthy donors are discussed. Differential diagnosis includes Gilbert′s disease, hemolytic anemia, drug-induced anemia and other hepatic causes of hyperbilirubinemia, of which Gilbert′s disease is most probable cause with a prevalence of 0.91% in our population. As there are no studies to document the safety of the recipients receiving such abnormal colored plasma as well as to document the hazards in its transfusion, the question arises whether to transfuse such units or not. This study highlights this dilemma. A reassessment of existing policies and regulations is merited.

  17. Mental health status after living donor hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Szu-Han; Lin, Ping-Yi; Wang, Jiun-Yi; Huang, Mei-Feng; Lin, Hui-Chuan; Hsieh, Chia-En; Hsu, Ya-Lan; Chen, Yao-Li

    2017-05-01

    Donor safety and preservation of donor health after living liver donation are of paramount importance. In addition, the preoperative mental state of a donor is an important factor in determining the psychological impact of donor hepatectomy. Thus, we aimed to explore the mental health status of living liver donors after hepatectomy. We enrolled 60 donors who were scheduled to undergo living donor hepatectomy during the period January 2014 to March 2015 at a single medical center. Mental health status was measured before and 3 months after surgery using 3 self-report questionnaires, namely the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) to assess depressive symptoms, the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire to measure quality of life, and the Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ) to screen for minor psychiatric disorders. A comparison of the pre- and postdonation CES-D scores revealed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms after surgery (P = .031). There were significant improvements in the physical health domain (P = .031), the psychological health domain (P = .005), the social relationships domain (P = .005), and the environmental health domain (P = .010) of the WHOQOL-BREF. There were no significant changes in CHQ scores after donor hepatectomy (P = .136). All donors reported that they would donate again if required. Approximately one-third (33.3%) of donors experienced more pain than they had anticipated in the immediate postoperative period, and 20.0% of donors had complications after donor hepatectomy. Donor mental health status tended to improve as donors regained physical function during the 1st 3 months of recovery. Long-term monitoring of living donors' mental health is needed to minimize the adverse psychological outcomes of living liver donation.

  18. Association between interleukin-4-producing T lymphocyte frequencies and reduced risk of graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imami, N; Brookes, P A; Lombardi, G; Hakooz, B; Johns, M; Goldman, J M; Batchelor, J R; Lechler, R I; Ritter, M A

    1998-04-15

    We have previously developed and used limiting dilution analysis to measure frequencies of alloreactive cytotoxic T cell precursors (CTLp) and interleukin (IL)-2-producing T helper cells (IL-2/HTLp) to assess the risk of graft-versus-host disease in bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, no test has been available to measure precursor frequencies of the important IL-4-secreting subset. We have now established a limiting dilution analysis to measure the frequency of IL-4-producing T helper cells (IL-4/HTLp) using the IL-4-responsive indicator cell line CT.h4S and have applied this assay to measure alloreactive IL-4/HTLp frequencies in BMT donor-recipient pairs. These frequencies were then analyzed in the context of clinical data to assess the relationship between the number of donor anti-recipient IL-4-secreting T cells and disease outcome. Frequencies of IL-4/HTLp have been studied in HLA-identical siblings, HLA-"matched" unrelated, and HLA-mismatched combinations and found to range from approximately 1/500,000 in HLA-identical sibling pairs to -1/2,000 in HLA-DR-mismatched pairs. These frequencies were independent of those for IL-2/HTLp and showed a negative correlation with those for CTLp. Clinical follow-up of 30 patients showed that high IL-4/HTLp frequencies are associated with a reduced risk of severe graft-versus-host disease. High IL-4/HTLp frequencies may also indicate an increased risk of leukemia relapse. Our data suggest that measurement of IL-4/HTLp frequencies provides information distinct from that obtained with CTLp and IL-2/HTLp. This new assay provides a valuable additional method for optimizing donor selection in unrelated BMT.

  19. Myeloablative allogeneic versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission: A prospective sibling donor versus no-donor comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); B. van der Holt (Bronno); G.E.G. Verhoef (Gregor); M.B. van 't Veer (Mars); M.H.J. van Oers (Marinus); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); J. Maertens (Johan); M. van Marwijk Kooy (Marinus); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); P.W. Wijermans (Pierre); D.H. Biesma (Douwe); S. Wittebol (Shulamit); P.J. Voogt (Paul); J.W. Baars (Joke); P. Zachée (Pierre); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); B. Löwenberg (Bob); A.W. Dekker (Adriaan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWhile commonly accepted in poor-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is still disputed in adult patients with standard-risk ALL. We evaluated outcome of patients with ALL in first complete remission (CR1),

  20. Myeloablative allogeneic versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission: a prospective sibling donor versus no-donor comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Jan J.; van der Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; van't Veer, Mars B.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Schouten, Harry C.; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Sonneveld, Pieter; Maertens, Johan; van Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Schaafsma, Martijn R.; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Biesma, Douwe H.; Wittebol, Shulamit; Voogt, Paul J.; Baars, Joke W.; Zachée, Pierre; Verdonck, Leo F.; Löwenberg, Bob; Dekker, Adriaan W.

    2009-01-01

    While commonly accepted in poor-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is still disputed in adult patients with standard-risk ALL. We evaluated outcome of patients with ALL in first complete remission (CR1), according to a

  1. Psychological outcomes of siblings of cancer survivors: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, David; Casillas, Jacqueline; Krull, Kevin R; Goodman, Pam; Leisenring, Wendy; Recklitis, Christopher; Alderfer, Melissa A; Robison, Leslie L; Armstrong, Gregory T; Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Stuber, Margaret; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2011-12-01

    To identify risk factors for adverse psychological outcomes among adult siblings of long-term survivors of childhood cancer. Cross-sectional, self-report data from 3083 adult siblings (mean age 29 years, range 18-56 years) of 5 + year survivors of childhood cancer were analyzed to assess psychological outcomes as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18). Sociodemographic and health data, reported by both the siblings and their matched cancer survivors, were explored as risk factors for adverse sibling psychological outcomes through multivariable logistic regression. Self-reported symptoms of psychological distress, as measured by the global severity index of the BSI-18, were reported by 3.8% of the sibling sample. Less than 1.5% of siblings reported elevated scores on two or more of the subscales of the BSI-18. Risk factors for sibling depression included having a survivor brother (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.42-3.55), and having a survivor with impaired general health (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.18-3.78). Siblings who were younger than the survivor reported increased global psychological distress (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.05-3.12), as did siblings of survivors reporting global psychological distress (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.08-4.59). Siblings of sarcoma survivors reported more somatization than did siblings of leukemia survivors (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.05-3.98). These findings suggest that siblings of long-term childhood cancer survivors are psychologically healthy in general. There are, however, small subgroups of siblings at risk for long-term psychological impairment who may benefit from preventive risk-reduction strategies during childhood while their sibling with cancer is undergoing treatment. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The role of older siblings in the sexual and reproductive health of Mexican-origin young women in immigrant families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman-Minahan, Kate; Scandlyn, Jean N

    2017-02-01

    In the USA, young people of Mexican-origin are more economically disadvantaged and experience higher birth rates than many other Latino groups. In this paper, we examine the influence of older siblings on the sexual and reproductive health of Mexican-origin immigrant women. Qualitative data were drawn from life history interviews with 21 first- and second-generation Mexican-origin women, aged 27-41 years old, resident in the Metro Denver area. Data suggest that older siblings may protect younger sisters from risky sexual behaviours through older siblings' responsibility and care for younger siblings, close and supportive sibling relationships, older siblings' advice about both sexual health and academic success, and sibling modelling. These mechanisms appear particularly protective due to the social and economic hardships immigrant families often face. Implications include fostering healthy sibling relationships and involving older siblings more fully in the sexuality education of younger siblings.

  3. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V.; Giani, Anette S.; Hofmann, Jan A.; Schmidt, Alexander H.

    2016-02-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors.

  4. Impact of posttransplantation G-CSF on outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Hanna J.; Loberiza, Fausto R.; Ringdén, Olle; Barrett, A. John; Bolwell, Brian J.; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Champlin, Richard E.; Gale, Robert Peter; Hale, Gregory A.; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Martino, Rodrigo; McCarthy, Philip L.; Tiberghien, Pierre; Verdonck, Leo F.; Horowitz, Mary M.

    2006-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is often administered after hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) to accelerate neutrophil recovery, but it is unclear what impact G-CSF has on long-term transplantation outcomes. We analyzed within the database of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research the impact of giving posttransplantation G-CSF on the outcomes of allogeneic HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia in 2719 patients who underwent transplantation between 1995 and 2000. These included 1435 recipients of HLA-identical sibling bone marrow (BM), 609 recipients of HLA-identical peripheral-blood stem cells (PBSCs), and 675 recipients of unrelated donor BM transplants. Outcomes were compared between patients receiving or not receiving G-CSF within 7 days of HCT according to graft type. Median follow-up was more than 30 months (range, 2-87 months). G-CSF shortened the posttransplantation neutropenic period, but did not affect days +30 and +100 treatment-related mortality (TRM). Probabilities of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), leukemia-free survival (LFS), and overall survival were similar whether or not G-CSF was given. Multivariate analyses confirmed that giving G-CSF did not affect the risk of GVHD, TRM, LFS, or survival. In conclusion, results of this study found no long-term benefit or disadvantage of giving G-CSF after transplantation to promote hematopoietic recovery. PMID:16239431

  5. Sibling self-report, parental proxies, and quality of life: the importance of multiple informants for siblings of a critically ill child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, B. A.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Caron, H. N.; Last, B. F.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of quality of life (QoL) has thus far been a neglected approach in describing psychological adaptation in siblings of seriously ill children. The present results concern differences and correspondences between parent- and child-reported QoL in siblings of pediatric cancer patients, at 1

  6. The Effect of Peer- and Sibling-Assisted Aquatic Program on Interaction Behaviors and Aquatic Skills of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Their Peers/Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chia-Hua; Pan, Chien-Yu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of peer- and sibling-assisted learning on interaction behaviors and aquatic skills in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Outcome measures were also examined in their typically developing (TD) peers/siblings. Twenty-one children with ASD and 21 TD children were assigned in three groups:…

  7. Older Sibling Support of Younger Siblings' Socio-Emotional Development: A Multiple-Case Study of Second-Generation Mexican and Honduran Children's Initiative and Co-Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Natalia; Kibler, Amanda K.; Yoder, Michelle; Baird, Ashley Simpson; Bergey, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Siblings play a critical role in the socialization experiences of their younger siblings. Societal values, standards, and customs are transmitted and created through the process of modeling and the construction of shared meaning. It follows, therefore, that the process of socialization may be culturally dependent. Using multiple case studies of…

  8. Continuity, commitment and context: adult siblings of people with autism plus learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, Rosemary; Atkin, Karl; Wenham, Aniela

    2013-09-01

    Sibling relationships are usually lifelong and reciprocal. They can assume particular significance when a brother or sister has a learning disability. Until recently, adult siblings of people with disabilities such as severe autism have been ignored by policy, practice and research. This qualitative study contributes to an emerging literature by exploring how adult siblings, who have a brother or sister with autism (plus learning disability) and living in England, give meaning to their family (and caring) relationships and engage with service delivery. We spoke to 21 adult siblings using semi-structured interviews and met with 12 of their siblings with autism. Our analysis, using a broad narrative approach, demonstrates the continuity of the sibling relationship and an enduring personalised commitment. The nature of this relationship, however, is sensitive to context. How non-disabled adult siblings relate to their childhood experience is fundamental when making sense of this, as is their need to fulfil other social and family obligations, alongside their 'sense of duty' to support their disabled brother or sister. Sibling experience was further mediated by negotiating their 'perceived invisibility' in social care policy and practice. Our work concludes that by understanding the way relationships between siblings have developed over time, adult siblings' contribution to the lives of their brother or sister with autism can be better supported for the benefit of both parties. Such an approach would support current policy developments. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Impact of First-Episode Psychosis on the Sibling Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Siann; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Howie, Linsey; McGorry, Patrick; Wade, Darryl

    2015-01-01

    Research and clinical practice in first-episode psychosis (FEP) has predominantly focused on parents and partners and has neglected siblings needs. This study aims to characterize the sibling relationship in FEP and to examine the illness-related variables that influence this relationship. Survey methodology explored the experience of 157 siblings during the first 18 months of their brother or sister's treatment. The Adult Sibling Relationship Questionnaire was used to measure the warmth, conflict, and rivalry within the relationship. A series of multivariate regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between illness characteristics and sibling relationship. When the young person experiencing FEP had a period of untreated psychosis longer than six months, required more than one hospital admission, had persisting psychotic symptoms, continued to use substances, and/or had a history of physical violence, warmth within the sibling relationship deteriorated. Regression analysis revealed that a history of violence was a significant predictor of the warmth, conflict, and rivalry within the sibling relationship. Suicide attempts were a significant predictor of conflict. This study has established associations between the sibling relationship and illness-related variables. This study promotes consideration of the importance of including siblings in early intervention. Given the powerful role this relationship can have as a protective factor, this study could inform future interventions involving siblings.

  10. Sibling differences in parent-child conflict and risky behavior: a three-wave longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chun Bun; Solmeyer, Anna R; McHale, Susan M

    2012-08-01

    To better understand why siblings growing up in the same family are often as different as unrelated individuals, this study explored the role of differential experiences with parents in the development of sibling differences. Cross-lagged models tested directions of effect by examining whether differential parent-child conflict predicted sibling differences in risky behavior over time, or vice versa. Participants were mothers, fathers, and the 2 eldest adolescent siblings (mean ages at Time 1 = 15.12 and 12.58 years) from 355 European American, working- and middle-class families. On 3 occasions over a 2-year period, mothers and fathers reported on their conflict with each of the 2 siblings, and siblings reported on their own risky behavior. Results revealed that, controlling for sibling age differences and average levels of conflict and risky behavior at Time 1, youths who had more conflict with their mothers and fathers in relation to their siblings subsequently engaged in relatively more risky behavior. Also, youths who engaged in more risky behavior in relation to their siblings experienced relatively more conflict with their fathers, but not mothers, at later time points. Findings highlight the importance of examining both family dynamics and child characteristics in understanding sibling differentiation, and illuminate potential differences in parenting processes involving mothers versus fathers. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Intra-family stressors among adult siblings sharing caregiving for parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngangana, Pamela C; Davis, Bertha L; Burns, Dorothy P; McGee, Zina T; Montgomery, Arlene J

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a Neuman Systems Model-guided study of perceptions of family stressors experienced by adult siblings who share caregiving for their parents and the influence of these stressors on adult siblings' relationships. The task of providing informal care for disabled parents is often shared by adult siblings. Family stressors experienced as part of caregiving may affect the sibling relationship. A mixed-method study design was used. Data were collected during 2013-2014 from 84 adult sibling caregivers. Seventy-two caregivers provided quantitative data for the Lifespan Sibling Relationship Scale and the Zarit Burden Scale and 79 provided qualitative data for the open-ended question. Adult siblings experienced mild-to-moderate levels of burden from family stressors when they share parental caregiving. The amount of burden from intra-family stressors was negatively related to the adult sibling relationship. Beneficial and noxious stressors were evident in the participants' responses to an open-ended question. The health of the parents affected the lives of adult siblings in both negative and positive ways. Although the majority of the adult siblings expressed a willingness to care for their parent(s) in an attempt to reciprocate the care, they had received from them, challenges emerged from dealing with family stressors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [The interaction between people with Down syndrome and their siblings: an exploratory study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Bruna Rafaela de; Duarte, Márcia; Cia, Fabiana

    2016-10-01

    The presence of a disabled person causes transformations in the family that demand a redefinition of the role of each member. Siblings, like all other members, experience frustration, acceptance, guilt and adaptation. In this respect, an attempt was made to; (a) analyze the interaction between a sibling with standard development and a sibling with Down syndrome; (b) identify what information and reaction the siblings with standard development have regarding the diagnosis of Down syndrome; (c) verify whether or not there were changes in the family context and also changes in their own lives after the birth of the sibling with Down syndrome. The survey was conducted through interviews, the participants being seven children with standard development having siblings with Down syndrome. The study showed that the siblings, as well as the other family members, experience processes of acceptance, confusion and other complex emotions related to the disability, albeit they are not as marked as those experienced by their parents. A fact revealed in this study is the importance of support groups for siblings, seeking to handle issues such as prejudice and adverse feelings towards disability. The siblings with standard development must have correct information, as well as support, in order to foster healthy interaction between siblings.

  13. Psychological Adjustment of Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J Yn; Lai, K Yc

    2016-12-01

    Findings about the psychological adjustment of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder have been inconsistent in western literature and little is known among non-western societies. This study explored the psychological adjustment of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder in Hong Kong. A total of 116 families with siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders co-morbid with learning disability were included in the study. Parents completed questionnaires about sibling emotional and behavioural adjustment, and their own mental well-being, quality of life, and family functioning. Siblings completed a questionnaire on their relationship with the autistic proband. Parent ratings did not reveal any significant negative impact on the emotional and behavioural adjustment of the typically developing siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder, but there were concerns about their peer relationships and weak prosocial behaviours. When cut-off scores were used to screen for risk of mental health problems, a quarter of the siblings warranted further assessment. Parents' quality of life and family functioning were significant predictors of sibling adjustment. In managing children with autism spectrum disorder, it is necessary to bear in mind the adjustment of their siblings, especially their peer relationships and prosocial behaviour. Adopting a holistic approach to address the psychosocial needs of the parents can facilitate sibling adjustment.

  14. Links Between Sibling Experiences and Romantic Competence from Adolescence Through Young Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Susan E; Lam, Chun Bun; Stanik, Christine E; McHale, Susan M

    2015-11-01

    Although previous research has linked sibling relationship experiences to youth's social competencies with peers, we know little about the role of siblings in youth's romantic relationship experiences. Drawing on data from a longitudinal sample of 190 families, this study examined the links between sibling experiences and the development of perceived romantic competence from early adolescence into young adulthood (ages 12-20). The data were collected from 373 youth (50.7 % female) in home interviews on up to five annual occasions. Multi-level models tested the moderating role of sibling gender constellation in romantic competence development and the links between (changes in) sibling intimacy and conflict, and romantic competence. The results revealed that youth with same-sex siblings showed no change in their perceived romantic competence, but those with opposite-sex siblings exhibited increases in romantic competence over time. Controlling for parent-child intimacy, at times when youth reported more sibling intimacy, they also reported greater romantic competence, and youth with higher cross-time average sibling conflict were lower in romantic competence, on average. This study illustrates that sibling experiences remain important in social development into early adulthood and suggests directions for application and future research.

  15. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar I. Mitre

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the initial experience of videolaparoscopic nephrectomy in live renal donor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period from April 2000 to August 2003, 50 left nephrectomies in live donor were performed by videolaparoscopy for transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were male (56% and 22 female (44%. Mean age was 37.2 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m². RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 179.5 minutes, and warm ischemia time of the graft was 3.79 minutes. The mean estimated bleeding was 141 mL. There was no need of blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. In 42 cases (84%, the vascular portion of the graft was considered good by the recipient's surgical team and in all cases, the ureter was considered of proper size, though in one of them (2% its vascularization was considered improper. The transplanted kidneys produced urine still in the surgical room in 46 of the 50 transplantations considered. In only 2 cases opioid was required for analgesia. In average, 3.1 doses of dipyrone were used for each patient during hospital stay, and hospital discharge occurred, in average, after 3.2 days post-operatively. Two patients required re-operations and one of them evolved to death. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor for renal transplantation is an alternative to conventional open surgery. In relation to the graft, no alteration, either anatomic or functional, was detected. Though there is already a large documentation in the international literature regarding this procedure, in our setting a prospective randomized study with the usual surgical study is still necessary in order to prove the advantages and disadvantages of the method.

  16. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitre Anuar I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the initial experience of videolaparoscopic nephrectomy in live renal donor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period from April 2000 to August 2003, 50 left nephrectomies in live donor were performed by videolaparoscopy for transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were male (56% and 22 female (44%. Mean age was 37.2 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m². RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 179.5 minutes, and warm ischemia time of the graft was 3.79 minutes. The mean estimated bleeding was 141 mL. There was no need of blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. In 42 cases (84%, the vascular portion of the graft was considered good by the recipient's surgical team and in all cases, the ureter was considered of proper size, though in one of them (2% its vascularization was considered improper. The transplanted kidneys produced urine still in the surgical room in 46 of the 50 transplantations considered. In only 2 cases opioid was required for analgesia. In average, 3.1 doses of dipyrone were used for each patient during hospital stay, and hospital discharge occurred, in average, after 3.2 days post-operatively. Two patients required re-operations and one of them evolved to death. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor for renal transplantation is an alternative to conventional open surgery. In relation to the graft, no alteration, either anatomic or functional, was detected. Though there is already a large documentation in the international literature regarding this procedure, in our setting a prospective randomized study with the usual surgical study is still necessary in order to prove the advantages and disadvantages of the method.

  17. Changes in Siblings after the Death of a Child from Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Terrah L.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Vannatta, Kathryn; Barrera, Maru; Davies, Betty; Dietrich, Mary S.; Fairclough, Diane L.; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined changes in siblings after the death of a brother or sister, particularly from mother, father, and sibling perspectives within the first year post-death. Objective This descriptive study identified and assessed the frequency of changes in siblings after a child's death from cancer. Methods Participants were recruited from cancer registries at three hospitals in the U.S. and Canada 3–12 months after the child's death. Thirty-six mothers, 24 fathers, and 39 siblings from 40 families were included. Semi-structured interviews using open-ended questions were conducted with each parent and sibling separately in the home. Content analysis identified emerging themes, and McNemar tests compared frequencies between each paired set of reports (sibling vs. mother, sibling vs. father, mother vs. father). Results Sixty-nine percent of participants reported personal changes in siblings (e.g., changes in personality, school work, goals/life perspective, activities/interests). Forty-seven percent noted changes in siblings' relationships with family members and peers. Only 21% of participants reported no changes attributed to the death. Comparisons of frequencies across informants were not significant. Conclusions Most siblings experienced changes in multiple areas of their lives after the death of a brother or sister to cancer. Some changes reflected siblings that were positively adapting to the death, while other changes reflected difficulties. Implications for practice Our findings offer guidance to improve aftercare for bereaved siblings and their families. Additional research is needed to further delineate the needs of bereaved siblings and to develop strategies to promote adaptation to loss. PMID:22067687

  18. Renal Involvement in 2 Siblings With Cockayne Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Chehida, Amel; Ghali, Narjess; Ben Abdelaziz, Rim; Ben Moussa, Fatma; Tebib, Neji

    2017-05-01

    Renal involvement in Cockayne syndrome is rare and its pathogenesis is yet unknown. We report herein 2 cases (siblings) with Cockayne syndrome type A confirmed by biochemical and molecular assays. The first case was a 13-year-old girl who presented with nephritic syndrome and a rapidly progressive kidney failure. Her younger sister, 7 years old, exhibited hypertension, hyperfiltration, and microalbuminuria. She had hyperreninemia and hyperaldosteronemia without kidney failure or renal arterial stenosis. Renal biopsy, performed the older sister, revealed cystic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy. The different clinical phenotypes in the two siblings support the absence of an obvious genotype-phenotype correlation in Cockayne syndrome type A patients. In the older sister, the particular focal glomerular sclerosis and senile lesions assume that kidney disease in Cockayne syndrome may be related to prematurely aging secondary to a defective nucleotide repair.

  19. Review of Two Siblings with Werner's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Sert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the clinical course of two siblings with Werner's syndrome (WS who were diagnosed and followed at our clinics for 12 years. Initial diagnosis of the first sibling (sister was at age 20, the second (brother at 16. At the initial diagnosis, the sister had amenorrhea, muscle atrophy at arms and legs, diabetes mellitus (DM, short stature, bilateral cataracts, genital hypoplasia, osteoporosis, and gray hair. During 12 years follow-up period, high-pitched voice, hepatosteatosis, renal parenchymal disease, and urethral obstruction developed. Regarding the brother, DM, cataracts and genital hypoplasia were observed at the initial diagnosis. During the 12 years follow-up period, gray hair, high-pitched voice, steatohepatosis, and osteoporosis developed.

  20. Osteogenesis Imperfecta (Type IV with Dental Findings in Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishir Ram Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a hereditary disorder characterized by increased tendency for bone fractures due to high fragility. The clinical and radiological features of OI manifest in different age groups, although the disease is congenital in nature. Besides bone fragility, features like laxity of the ligaments, blue sclera, growth retardation, and scoliosis are also observed. In severe cases, respiratory distress and death have been reported. The most important oral finding in OI is the presence of yellowish-brown-coloured brittle teeth characteristic of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Genetic factors play a very important role in the pathogenesis of OI either as a dominant or recessive factor. When a child has OI, there is a 25% chance of the sibling to have the same disorder. We report two cases of OI in siblings born to parents with a history of consanguineous marriage. The clinical and radiological features of the two cases are described in detail.

  1. Do adolescent pregnancy and childbearing affect younger siblings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, P L

    1996-01-01

    To understand the consequences of adolescent pregnancy and childbearing on siblings, a study compares 309 younger brothers and sisters of pregnant, parenting and never-pregnant teenagers. Compared with the younger siblings of never-pregnant teenagers, the younger sisters of pregnant teenagers see school and career as less important, are more accepting of adolescent childbearing, perceive younger ages as appropriate for first intercourse, marriage and childbearing and engage in more problem behavior. The younger sisters of parenting teenagers are more accepting of teenage childbearing than are younger sisters of never-pregnant teenagers and have more definite intentions of having a child at a young age. Compared with boys who have a never-pregnant older sister, younger brothers of pregnant and parenting teenagers are more accepting of nonmarital childbearing, ascribe more importance to childbearing, perceive fewer problems related to early childbearing, have lower self-esteem and report engaging in more drug use and partying behavior.

  2. Family donor care management: principles and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Walraven, S M; Nicoloso-de Faveri, G; Axdorph-Nygell, U A I; Douglas, K W; Jones, D A; Lee, S J; Pulsipher, M; Ritchie, L; Halter, J; Shaw, B E

    2010-08-01

    The World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA) is an international organization fostering collaboration in clinical transplantation and promoting the interests of unrelated stem cell donors. The WMDA has developed standards for the recruitment, counseling, work-up and subsequent donations to protect the interests of donors. Although the care of family donors has been carefully considered and managed in transplant centers (TCs) internationally over numerous years (and increasingly TCs are facing accreditation programs, which address this issue) there is currently a lack of standardized guidelines for the management of family donors. The underlying principles of family donor care are in many ways identical to those concerning unrelated donors, although key ethical considerations differ. Although the WMDA is primarily involved in the field of unrelated donors, we believe that it is important to collaborate with those involved with family donors, to standardize the care. This document hopes to encourage increased collaboration between those caring for related and unrelated donors, and build on the extensive work, which has already been undertaken in this field to homogenize care. We recognize that there will be financial, regulatory and logistic differences in different countries and that the manner in which these principles are achieved may vary.

  3. Living kidney donors: current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Connie L

    2009-07-01

    Living kidney donation continues as the cornerstone of transplantation. In order to determine with ever-renewing assurance that living donation is safe for the donor, we need to periodically review the literature, review the United Network for Organ Sharing database for donor characteristics that may put them in danger, and scour databases for donors starting dialysis and/or listed for transplant. Additionally, we must encourage financing studies that follow large diverse cohorts of donors over their entire lifetimes in order to detect key characteristics that influence outcomes. Currently, it can be stated that living donation is, on the whole, safe, with few perioperative deaths, complications, or long-term medical issues. Additionally, the living donor reflects the demographics of the general population including increased rates of obesity with some donors having hypertension and low-grade proteinuria. In the long run, death rates (for the white donor) are no different than for the general population, whereas end-stage renal disease rates are slightly increased over the general population, ranging from 0.1% to 1.1%. The higher risk is especially notable in the black donor. Preeclampsia in female donors may also be marginally greater than in those with 2 kidneys. Thus, the new health age brings a rejuvenated responsibility of the medical community and those in governance to design systems that allow more complete and continued follow-up of the living kidney donor, especially those of color.

  4. Sibling species or poecilogony in the polychaete Scoloplos armiger?

    OpenAIRE

    Kruse, Inken; Reusch, Thorsten B.H.; Schneider, M. V.

    2003-01-01

    In marine invertebrates multiple modes of development, or poecilogony, may occur in a single species. However, after close examination, many of such putative cases turned out to be sibling species. A case in point may be the cosmopolitan orbiniid polychaete Scoloplos armiger, which inhabits marine shallow sediments. In addition to the well-known direct, holobenthic development from egg cocoons, pelagic larvae have also been described. Our culture experiments revealed a spatially segregated so...

  5. Case Report : Siblings' School Truancy and Familial Background

    OpenAIRE

    斎藤, 巌; 佐藤, 豪

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a therapy experience of sibling truancy. The first was a 16 year old high school girl suffering from irritable colon syndrome of diarrhea and gas symptoms. The second case was 14 years old brother of junior middle school. One of characteristics in these cases was family problem which their parent was in severe crisis of divorce. Their mother complained of husband's violence and verbal abusiveness just after marriage. The rationale of treatment program based on, 1) to pro...

  6. Social Support for Siblings of Children with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    collect data included the Brown IDS Self-Concept Reference Test , Family Relations Test , Roberts Apperception Test and 17 the Family Environment Scale. The... Apperception Test (TAT). Scores from the Piers-Harris and Family Relations Test were analyzed using t tests for separate samples and chi-square tests ...DATES COVtIRED May 1993 THESIS/D_ 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Social Support for Siblings of Children with Cancer 6. AUTHOR(S) John

  7. Hypertension in Pregnancy and Future Cardiovascular Event Risk in Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen T.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Hanis, Craig L.; Milic, Natasa M.; Garovic, Vesna D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is a risk factor for future hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This may reflect an underlying familial predisposition or persistent damage caused by the hypertensive pregnancy. We sought to isolate the effect of hypertension in pregnancy by comparing the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in women who had hypertension in pregnancy and their sisters who did not using the dataset from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy study, which examined the genetics of hypertension in white, black, and Hispanic siblings. This analysis included all sibships with at least one parous woman and at least one other sibling. After gathering demographic and pregnancy data, BP and serum analytes were measured. Disease-free survival was examined using Kaplan–Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression. Compared with their sisters who did not have hypertension in pregnancy, women who had hypertension in pregnancy were more likely to develop new onset hypertension later in life, after adjusting for body mass index and diabetes (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.42). A sibling history of hypertension in pregnancy was also associated with an increased risk of hypertension in brothers and unaffected sisters, whereas an increased risk of cardiovascular events was observed in brothers only. These results suggest familial factors contribute to the increased risk of future hypertension in women who had hypertension in pregnancy. Further studies are needed to clarify the potential role of nonfamilial factors. Furthermore, a sibling history of hypertension in pregnancy may be a novel familial risk factor for future hypertension. PMID:26315531

  8. Sibling Death Clustering in India: Genuine Scarring vs Unobserved Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Wiji Arulampalam; Sonia Bhalotra

    2003-01-01

    Data from a range of environments indicate that the incidence of death is not randomly distributed across families but, rather, that there is a clustering of death among siblings. A natural explanation of this would be that there are (observed or unobserved) differences across families, e.g. in genetic frailty, education or living standards. Another hypothesis that is of considerable interest for both theory and policy is that there is a causal process whereby the death of a child influences ...

  9. Sibling death clustering in India: state dependence vs. unobserved heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Arulampalam, Wiji; Bhalotra, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    Data from a range of different environments indicate that the incidence of death is not randomly distributed across families but, rather, that there is a clustering of death amongst siblings. A natural explanation of this would be that there are (observed or unobserved) differences across families, for example in genetic frailty, education or living standards. Another hypothesis of considerable interest for both theory and policy is that there is a causal process whereby the death of a child ...

  10. Sibling rivalry: training effects, emergence of dominance and incomplete control

    OpenAIRE

    Benhaiem, S.; Hofer, H.; Kramer-Schadt, S; Brunner, E; East, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Within-brood or -litter dominance provides fitness-related benefits if dominant siblings selfishly skew access to food provided by parents in their favour. Models of facultative siblicide assume that dominants exert complete control over their subordinate sibling’s access to food and that control is maintained, irrespective of the subordinate’s hunger level. By contrast, a recent functional hypothesis suggests that subordinates should contest access to food when the cost of not do...

  11. Family Size, Sibling Rivalry and Migration: Evidence from Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Bratti, Massimiliano; Fiore, Simona; Mendola, Mariapia

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the causal effects of family size and demographic structure on offspring's international migration. We use rich survey data from Mexico to estimate the impact of sibship size, birth order and sibling composition on teenagers' and young adults' migration outcomes. We find no empirical support for the hypothesis that high fertility drives migration. The positive correlation between sibship size and migration disappears when endogeneity of family size is addressed using biolo...

  12. Phenotypes in defined genotypes including siblings with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Eva; Ponjavic, Vesna; Möller, Claes; Kimberling, William J; Andréasson, Sten

    2011-06-01

    To characterize visual function in defined genotypes including siblings with Usher syndrome. Thirteen patients with phenotypically different subtypes of Usher syndrome, including 3 families with affected siblings, were selected. Genetic analysis and ophthalmological examinations including visual fields, full-field electroretinography (ERG), multifocal electroretinography (mf ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were assessed. The patients' degree of visual handicap was evaluated by a questionnaire (ADL). Twelve of thirteen patients were genotyped as Usher 1B, 1D, 1F, 2A, 2C or 3A. In 12 of 13 patients examined with ERG the 30 Hz flickering light response revealed remaining cone function. In 3 of the patients with Usher type 1 mf ERG demonstrated a specific pattern, with a sharp distinction between the area with reduced function and the central area with remaining macular function and normal peak time. OCT demonstrated loss of foveal depression with distortion of the foveal architecture in the macula in all patients. The foveal thickness ranged from 159 to 384 µm and was not correlated to retinal function. Three siblings shared the same mutation for Usher 2C but in contrast to previous reports regarding this genotype, 1 of them diverged in phenotype with substantially normal visual fields, almost normal OCT and mf ERG findings, and only moderately reduced rod and cone function according to ERG. Evaluation of visual function comprising both the severity of the rod cone degeneration and the function in the macular region confirm phenotypical heterogeneity within siblings and between different genotypes of Usher syndrome.

  13. Presentation of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in two siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Ginjupally

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectodermal dysplasias are a large hereditary group of disorders which are usually manifested as X-linked recessive disorders and have a full expression in males, whereas females show little to no signs of the disorder. The two most common types of ectodermal dysplasias are hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome and hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (Clouston syndrome. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is characterized by hypodontia, hypotrichosis, and hypohidrosis. Here, we present two female sibling cases of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

  14. Cockayne syndrome: clinicopathologic and tissue culture studies of affected siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, R W; Brumback, R A; Miller, R H; Otsuka, F; Tarone, R E; Robbins, J H

    1985-09-01

    Two siblings with Cockayne syndrome (CS) had extremely severe and early onset cachectic dwarfism, developmental delay, cataracts, microcephaly, peripheral neuropathy, and spastic quadriplegia. In order to study the inherited DNA-repair defect known to be present in cultured CS cells, a lymphoblastoid line was established from the younger sibling. Tissue culture studies revealed the line to have a hypersensitivity to the lethal effects of 254-nm ultraviolet radiation (UV) equivalent to that of lymphoblastoid lines from CS patients who had either the usual severity or a very mild form of CS. Autopsy of the older sibling at six years of age showed the brain to be severely atrophic, with particularly severe cerebellar atrophy. There was a marked reduction in the number of granule cells in the cerebellum and irregular patchy myelination throughout the brain. Many astrocytes contained either a large, bizarre-shaped nucleus or multiple nuclei. Some Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus were binucleated. It is suggested that the DNA-repair defect of CS causes abnormalities in nuclear DNA replication and cell division which result in cell death and in the observed nuclear abnormalities.

  15. Automatic Hidden-Web Table Interpretation by Sibling Page Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cui; Embley, David W.

    The longstanding problem of automatic table interpretation still illudes us. Its solution would not only be an aid to table processing applications such as large volume table conversion, but would also be an aid in solving related problems such as information extraction and semi-structured data management. In this paper, we offer a conceptual modeling solution for the common special case in which so-called sibling pages are available. The sibling pages we consider are pages on the hidden web, commonly generated from underlying databases. We compare them to identify and connect nonvarying components (category labels) and varying components (data values). We tested our solution using more than 2,000 tables in source pages from three different domains—car advertisements, molecular biology, and geopolitical information. Experimental results show that the system can successfully identify sibling tables, generate structure patterns, interpret tables using the generated patterns, and automatically adjust the structure patterns, if necessary, as it processes a sequence of hidden-web pages. For these activities, the system was able to achieve an overall F-measure of 94.5%.

  16. A study about siblings in the face of intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lizasoain

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that siblings of a person with intellectual disabilities can present problems of identification and socialization, the need for compensation, early adoption of large responsibilities, feelings of abandonment, guilt, shame or sadness. Nevertheless, if the needs of these brothers and sisters are facing, disability can become a source of personal and family enrichment. This article presents the initial conclusions drawn after a series of personal interviews conducted with siblings of students in a special education school. Awareness of the issue leads us to approach this study with the aim of providing guidelines of intervention to help siblings to minimize the potential negative impact of having a brother or sister with intellectual disabilities, and facilitate the development of attitudes and behaviours that enable them to face stressful situations in a constructive manner. Thanks to the direct experience of those who have been confronted with this situation, is issued to prevent psychosocial problems associated with having a brother or sister with these features.

  17. Providing care for an elderly parent: interactions among siblings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Roméo; Gramain, Agnès; Wittwer, Jérôme

    2009-09-01

    This article is focused on children providing and financing long-term care for their elderly parent. The aim of this work is to highlight the interactions that may take place among siblings when deciding whether or not to become a caregiver. We look at families with two children using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe; our sample contains 314 dependent elderly and their 628 adult children. In order to identify the interactions between siblings, we have specified a two-person discrete game model. To estimate this model, without invoking the 'coherency' condition, we have added an endogenous selection rule to solve the incompleteness problem arising from multiplicity or absence of equilibrium. Our empirical results suggest that the three classical effects identified by Manski could potentially explain the observed correlation between the siblings' caregiving behaviour. Correlated effects alone appear to be weak. Contextual interactions and endogenous interactions reveal cross-effects. The asymmetric character of the endogenous interactions is our most striking result. The younger child's involvement appears to increase the net benefit of caregiving for the elder one, whereas the elder child's involvement decreases the net benefit of caregiving for the younger child. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Sibling rivalry, separation, and change in Austen's Sense and Sensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick Hanly, Margaret Ann

    2016-08-01

    The paper explores a process of growth represented in the interplay of Jane Austen's characterizations of Marianne and Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility, approaching the text through the lens of psychoanalytic theories on oedipal sibling rivalry, separation, and processes of change. A close reading of Sense and Sensibility tracks Marianne Dashwood's repudiation of any 'second attachment' as the surface of an unconscious fantasy, denying a rival for the mother's love. A psychoanalytic view contrasts Marianne's lack of separation from her mother, her use of denial and projection, and her near death after losing the man she loves, with her older sister Elinor Dashwood's capacities for depression, reflection, and greater acceptance of loss and separation. The narrative portrays Mrs. Dashwood's identification with and idealization of her daughter Marianne, which contribute to her oedipal sibling 'victory'. In the language and structure of the novel, the projections, identifications, aggressions, and separations (conscious and unconscious) of the sisters in the vicissitudes of their adolescent loves and rivalries constitute a process of growth. Austen's novel brings to life, with the vividness and coherence of great literature, forces and fantasies in oedipal sibling rivalries, inspiring renewed attention to their subtle presence in the transference and countertransference of the psychoanalytic process. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  19. Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masmas, T.N.; Petersen, S.L.; Madsen, H.O.

    2008-01-01

    Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with nonmyeloablative conditioning is a rare but serious clinical problem. Graft rejection and salvage therapy in eight patients in a retrospective analysis of 124 consecutive patients is reported. The patients were conditioned with low......-dose fludarabine and total body irradiation (TBI). The association of pretransplantation risk factors with rejection and the effect of chimerism and graft-versus-host disease on rejection were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared between patients with and without...... rejection. Retransplantation was performed with increased TBI conditioning for all patients, and with increased mycophenolate mofetil doses for recipients with HLA-identical sibling donors. No known pretransplantation risk factors were confirmed in this study. Rejection episodes were unevenly distributed...

  20. MULTIFACTORIAL ASSESSMENT OF POSTMORTEM LUNG DONOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Khubutiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate evaluation and the development of special measures to protect donor lungs are important factors for successful lung transplantation. Aim. To develop and determine the effectiveness of the protocol of morpho- functional assessment of potential lung donor. Methods and results. During the period from May, 2011 to May, 2012, 37 donors with diagnoses of brain death were surveyed. 5 bilateral lung transplantations were performed only in 2 cases donors have been evaluated as «ideal». In the majority of recipients early postoperative period was evaluated as satisfactory. Conclusion. Designed multivariate algorithm of donor with brain death assess- ment, effectively implemented through the selection of donors for lung transplantation with satisfactory results in the early postoperative period. However, compliance with ideal criteria will not allow to effectively provide care for patients with terminal lung disease under conditions of continuous growth of «waiting list». 

  1. Donor risk factors for graft failure in the cornea donor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Joel; Montoya, Monty; Dontchev, Mariya; Tanner, Jean Paul; Beck, Roy; Gal, Robin; Gallagher, Shawn; Gaster, Ronald; Heck, Ellen; Holland, Edward J; Kollman, Craig; Malling, Jackie; Mannis, Mark J; Woody, Jason

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between donor factors and 5-year corneal graft survival in the Cornea Donor Study. Donor corneas met criteria established by the Eye Bank Association of America, had an endothelial cell density of 2300 to 3300/mm, and were determined to be of good to excellent quality by the eye banks. Donor corneas were assigned using a random approach and surgeons were masked to information about the donor cornea including donor age. Surgery and postoperative care were performed according to the surgeons' usual routines and subjects were followed for 5 years. Donor and donor cornea factors were evaluated for their association with graft failure, which was defined as a regraft or a cloudy cornea that was sufficiently opaque to compromise vision for a minimum of 3 consecutive months. Graft failure was not significantly associated with the type of tissue retrieval (enucleation versus in situ), processing factors, timing of use of the cornea, or characteristics of the donor or the donor cornea. Adjusting for donor age did not affect the results. Donor and donor cornea characteristics do not impact graft survival rates for corneas comparable in quality to those used in this study.

  2. Self-reported stress among adolescent siblings of individuals with autism spectrum disorder and Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Carolyn M; McGregor, Casey; Hough, Ashlea

    2017-11-01

    Despite the prevalence of studies showing increased stress among mothers of individuals with autism spectrum disorders, few studies have examined general stress among typically developing siblings. This study used an online survey to compare the levels of self-reported stress between adolescent siblings of individuals with autism spectrum disorder and Down syndrome. Sibling of individuals with autism reported significantly more overall stress than did siblings of individuals with Down syndrome, as well as more stress specifically attributed to the brother/sister with autism. The two groups did not differ on perceived social support from family and friends. In linear regression models, the disability group (autism vs Down syndrome) was significantly related to sibling stress above and beyond target child behavior problems, perceived social support, and demographic factors. These results help shed light on the daily experiences of adolescent siblings of individuals with autism and call for more research into potential interventions to address increased stress levels.

  3. Predictors of Helping Profession Choice and Volunteerism among Siblings of Adults with Mild Intellectual Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Julie Lounds; Shivers, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined aspects of the sibling relationship that predicted altruistic behaviors in siblings of individuals with mild intellectual deficits at three time points in adulthood: in their mid 30s, early 50s, and mid 60s. We identified 393 such siblings from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a prospective longitudinal study that followed participants from ages 18 to 64. Being an only sibling, being older than the brother or sister with mild intellectual deficits, as well as having more contact with and feeling closer to the brother or sister predicted more altruistic behavior in adulthood for female siblings, but not for males. Earlier measures of contact and closeness between siblings were better indicators of altruistic behaviors than concurrent measures. PMID:21740255

  4. Ripple effects of developmental disabilities and mental illness on nondisabled adult siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Barbara; Song, Jieun; Greenberg, Jan S.; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental disabilities and severe mental illness are costly to the affected individual and frequently to their family as well. Little studied are their nondisabled siblings. Here we examine major life course outcomes (education, employment, and marriage) of these siblings in adulthood using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Our sample comprises 113 individuals with developmental disabilities and 337 of their nondisabled siblings; 97 individuals with mental illness and 235 of their nondisabled siblings; and 17,126 unaffected comparison group members. We find that siblings of individuals with mental illness have less education and less employment than the unaffected comparison group, whereas those who have a sibling with developmental disabilities had normative patterns of education and employment, but less marriage and more divorce. Robustness tests incorporating genetic data do not change the conclusions based on the nongenetic analyses. PMID:24607704

  5. Bereavement after sibling death: a population-based longitudinal case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, James M; Au, Wendy; Chateau, Dan; Walld, Randy; Leslie, William D; Enns, Jessica; Martens, Patricia J; Katz, Laurence Y; Logsetty, Sarvesh; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine mental disorders and treatment use among bereaved siblings in the general population. Siblings (N=7243) of all deceased children in the population of Manitoba, Canada who died between 1984 and 2009 were matched 1:3 to control siblings (N=21,729) who did not have a sibling die in the study period. Generalized estimating equations were used to compare the two sibling groups in the two years before and after the index child's death on physician-diagnosed mental disorders and treatment utilization, with adjustment for confounding factors including pre-existing mental illness. Analyses were stratified by age of the bereaved (rise in depression rates from pre-death to post-death was significantly higher for siblings aged under 13 (pWorld Psychiatric Association.

  6. Number of Siblings During Childhood and the Likelihood of Divorce in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbitt-Zeher, Donna; Downey, Douglas B; Merry, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Despite fertility decline across economically developed countries, relatively little is known about the social consequences of children being raised with fewer siblings. Much research suggests that growing up with fewer siblings is probably positive, as children tend to do better in school when sibship size is small. Less scholarship, however, has explored how growing up with few siblings influences children's ability to get along with peers and develop long-term meaningful relationships. If siblings serve as important social practice partners during childhood, individuals with few or no siblings may struggle to develop successful social lives later in adulthood. With data from the General Social Surveys 1972-2012, we explore this possibility by testing whether sibship size during childhood predicts the probability of divorce in adulthood. We find that, among those who ever marry, each additional sibling is associated with a three percent decline in the likelihood of divorce, net of covariates.

  7. The roles of adult siblings in the lives of people with severe intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah A; Rossetti, Zach

    2017-10-24

    Siblings of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often assume key roles to support their brothers and sisters. For people with more significant support needs, siblings may undertake additional roles and responsibilities throughout their lives. The purpose of the present study was to identify and describe the roles of adult siblings who have a brother or sister with severe IDD. Seventy-nine adult siblings from 19 to 72 years of age completed an online survey with open-ended questions about the roles they play in their relationships with their brother or sister. Thematic analysis resulted in identification of several roles including caregiver, friend (social partner), advocate, legal representative, sibling (teacher/role model), leisure planner and informal service coordinator. Siblings assume key roles in the lives of people with IDD and need support from family and professionals to perform these roles. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Stigma perspective of siblings of children with a major childhood burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehna, Carlee

    2013-10-01

    To understand the stigma perspective of siblings of children with major burn injury. A mixed method, qualitative-dominant study was conducted. The life story method was used for the qualitative portion. Only narratives from those family members describing the sibling's appearance change were used (N = 18 participants). Stigma experienced by siblings was first described by parents or noninjured siblings; they described how the sibling with changed appearance was stared at, ridiculed, or teased when they entered a new social situation. Only when specifically asked did the children with burn injury talk about their problems, saying, "This always happens when I go somewhere new." Children with changed appearance focused on normalizing their lives in a positive way. Oftentimes, it was a parent or noninjured sibling who would describe manifestations of stigma and ways they tried to protect the child with burn injury. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. The Third Rail of Family Systems: Sibling Relationships, Mental and Behavioral Health, and Preventive Intervention in Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Mark E.; Solmeyer, Anna R.; McHale, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Sibling relationships are an important context for development, but are often ignored in research and preventive interventions with youth and families. In childhood and adolescence siblings spend considerable time together, and siblings’ characteristics and sibling dynamics substantially influence developmental trajectories and outcomes. This paper reviews research on sibling relationships in childhood and adolescence, focusing on sibling dynamics as part of the family system and sibling influences on adjustment problems, including internalizing and externalizing behaviors and substance use. We present a theoretical model that describes three key pathways of sibling influence: one that extends through siblings’ experiences with peers and school, and two that operate largely through family relationships. We then describe the few existing preventive interventions that target sibling relationships and discuss the potential utility of integrating siblings into child and family programs. PMID:22105663

  10. Intervening to Improve Outcomes for Siblings in Foster Care: Conceptual, Substantive, and Methodological Dimensions of a Prevention Science Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Brianne H.; Blakeslee, Jennifer; Lamson-Siu, Emilie; Bank, Lew; Linares, L. Oriana; Waid, Jeffrey; Sorenson, Paul; Jimenez, Jessica; Pearson, Eva; Shlonsky, Aron

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the child welfare field has devoted significant attention to siblings in foster care. Policymakers and practitioners have supported efforts to connect siblings via shared foster placements and visitation while researchers have focused on illuminating the empirical foundations of sibling placement and sibling intervention in child welfare. The current paper synthesizes literature on sibling relationship development and sibling issues in child welfare in the service of presenting a typology of sibling-focused interventions for use with foster youth. The paper provides two examples of current intervention research studies focused on enhancing sibling developmental processes and understanding their connection to child welfare outcomes. The paper concludes by presenting an emerging agenda informing policy, practice, and research on siblings in foster care. PMID:24634558

  11. The normalization of sibling violence: does gender and personal experience of violence influence perceptions of physical assault against siblings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Roxanne; Rogers, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Despite its pervasive and detrimental nature, sibling violence (SV) remains marginalized as a harmless and inconsequential form of familial aggression. The present study investigates the extent to which perceptions of SV differ from those of other types of interpersonal violence. A total of 605 respondents (197 males, 408 females) read one of four hypothetical physical assault scenarios that varied according to perpetrator-victim relationship type (i.e., sibling vs. dating partner vs. peer vs. stranger) before completing a series of 24 attribution items. Respondents also reported on their own experiences of interpersonal violence during childhood. Exploratory factor analysis reduced 23 attribution items to three internally reliable factors reflecting perceived assault severity, victim culpability, and victim resistance ratings. A 4 × 2 MANCOVA-controlling for respondent age-revealed several significant effects. Overall, males deemed the assault less severe and the victim more culpable than did females. In addition, the sibling assault was deemed less severe compared to assault on either a dating partner or a stranger, with the victim of SV rated just as culpable as the victim of dating, peer, or stranger-perpetrated violence. Finally, respondents with more (frequent) experiences of childhood SV victimization perceived the hypothetical SV assault as being less severe, and victim more culpable, than respondents with no SV victimization. Results are discussed in the context of SV normalization. Methodological limitations and applications for current findings are also outlined. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Psychiatric approach to the living kidney donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Correia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kidney transplantation is considered the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. Living donor transplantation has increased because of the shortage, the needs of cadaver donors.Based on existing literature the authors address ethical issues and major psychiatric aspects involved in the evaluation of living donor kidney transplant, and the interference of this procedure on quality of life for donors, and their contraindications. The authors further describe the evaluation procedures used in the Hospital S. João, as well as data related to the 32 patients evaluated in the Department of Psychiatry since 2004.

  13. Psychological dimensions of relationships with siblings as predictors of loneliness of young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Walęcka-Matyja, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the variables differentiating the way how adult siblings experience loneliness and to indicate the sibling relationship dimensions having a predictive value for the multifacetedly defined phenomenon of loneliness. The research covered 153 persons at an average age of 25.5 years. Women accounted for 36.3% of the group. The participants had adult siblings, with whom they stayed in contact. The Emotional Loneliness Scale for Adults (SELSA-...

  14. The role of siblings in adoption outcomes and experiences from adolescence to emerging adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Rachel H; Flood, Margaux E; Grotevant, Harold D

    2016-04-01

    In many families, siblings play important roles in shaping each other's outcomes and experiences across development. In adoptive families, siblings may affect adoptees' feelings about adoption and birth family contact. Among "target adoptees" (i.e., 1 participating adopted individual within adoptive families) with siblings who may have also been adopted or the biological children of the adoptive parents, we examined how adoption experiences and individual adjustment from adolescence into emerging adulthood were associated with sibling relationship dynamics. We present 3 studies using longitudinal, mixed method data within the same overarching sample of adoptive families. Study 1 was a follow-up to Berge et al.'s (2006) study of adolescent adoptees and their adopted siblings with birth family contact; we found evidence of changes in the status of contact collectively experienced by 26 adopted sibling pairs when target adoptees were emerging adults. In Study 2, we found that target adoptees (n = 91) with siblings (adopted or not) who were more involved with target adoptees' birth family contact demonstrated more favorable behavioral outcomes than target adoptees who had uninvolved siblings. Finally in Study 3, for target adoptees with siblings who were also adopted (n = 51), results showed that target adoptees felt more positively about their own adoption when siblings expressed similar positive feelings about individual adoption experiences. Implications of our findings are discussed in terms of the enduring contributions of sibling relationships from childhood into adulthood and the unique ways in which adoptive siblings are important in shaping one another's experiences of adoption. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Children with PIMD in interaction with peers with PIMD or siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, S; Vlaskamp, C; Maes, B

    2016-01-01

    The complex disabilities of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) impede their presentation of peer directed behaviours. Interactions with typically developing peers have been observed to be more frequent than those with peers with PIMD. The typically developing peers with whom people with PIMD have frequent contact are their siblings. In this study, the amount of peer directed behaviours was compared between an interaction with a sibling and an interaction with a peer with PIMD. In addition, the attention directing strategies of the siblings, and how these affect the presentation of peer directed behaviours, were examined. Thirteen children and young people with PIMD, who had a typically developing sibling, were identified. For each of these thirteen children, a peer with PIMD and a sibling were selected. The child with PIMD was observed together with a peer with PIMD and together with a sibling. In both conditions, video observations were conducted. A coding scheme for the peer directed behaviours of the children and young people with PIMD and a coding scheme for the attention directing behaviours of the siblings were used. Descriptive, comparative and sequential analyses were conducted. Significantly, more peer directed behaviours of the children with PIMD were observed in the condition with the sibling (30.76%) compared with that of the condition with the peer with PIMD (13.73%). The siblings presented attention directing behaviours in 30% of the time; the most frequently used was nonverbal behaviour. When the siblings presented a combination of verbal and nonverbal attention directing behaviours, they elicited multiple peer directed behaviours in the children and young people with PIMD. Persons with PIMD interact more with their siblings compared with their peers with PIMD. Interacting with siblings may probably be more motivating and encouraging. Presenting a combination of verbal and nonverbal behaviours attracts more attention

  16. Recurrence of congenital heart defects among siblings-a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodwall, Kristoffer; Greve, Gottfried; Leirgul, Elisabeth; Tell, Grethe S; Vollset, Stein E; Øyen, Nina

    2017-06-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) constitute the largest group of congenital malformations. In most families, only one person has CHD; however, the risk of CHD increases for children born into families already affected. In this study, all births from 1994 through 2009 were identified in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, including supplemental information on CHD from clinical and administrative registers, as part of the CVDNOR project. By using the unique personal identification number of each parent we were able to link 16,078 pairs of twins, 445,584 pairs of full siblings, and 106,840 pairs of half-siblings. Sibling recurrence risk ratio (RRR) was calculated using CHD status in the oldest sibling as exposure and CHD status in the younger sibling as outcome, adjusted for year of birth, maternal age, and maternal diabetes. Among full sibling pairs with CHD in the older sibling, the younger sibling had CHD in 4.1% compared to 1.1% of the pairs without CHD in the older sibling (adjusted RRR 3.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.1-4.1). In same-sex twins the RRR was 14.0 (95% CI 10.6-18.6), and in opposite-sex twins the RRR was 11.9 (95% CI 7.1-19.9). For half-siblings the RRR was 1.5 (95% CI 0.8-2.8). When restricting to severe types of CHD, the RRR was 6.9 (95% CI 4.9-9.8) for full siblings. In 50% of the pairs with recurrent CHD, the siblings had similar types of CHD. The high relative risk of recurrence indicates that familial risk factors are important in the etiology of CHD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Sibling sexual abuse: why don't we talk about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Peter

    2017-08-01

    To explore two hypotheses for explaining why there is little written about sibling sexual abuse and to raise awareness of the subject in order better to protect children and to facilitate sensitive patient care. While there is no universal agreement over its definition, sibling sexual abuse is acknowledged internationally as a prevalent form of child sexual abuse but tends not to be recognised by health professionals. It is also under-represented within the literature in comparison with other forms of intrafamilial sexual abuse. Understanding why this is may help to illuminate the potential barriers to effective professional responses. Two explanations which emerge strongly are the existence of a sibling incest taboo and a prevailing belief that sibling sexual behaviour is largely harmless. Discursive position paper. The paper examines the two hypotheses through exploration of the extant literature on sibling incest and sibling sexual abuse. Sibling sexual abuse accounts for a significant minority of child sexual abuse and has the potential to be as harmful as sexual abuse by a parent. An abhorrence at the thought of sibling sexual activity and a prevailing view of its harmlessness may hinder nurses' detection of and appropriate responses to sibling sexual abuse, but do not provide convincing explanations for the dearth of literature. Instead, a deeply held perspective of sibling relationships as non-abusive offers a more profound explanation. A knowledge of sibling sexual abuse and its consequences are important both for the effective protection of children and the sensitive and appropriate treatment of patients who present with a variety of physical and mental health concerns. A perspective that sibling relationships are non-abusive provides a deeper level of understanding of the powerful obstacles to raising awareness of and responding appropriately to this form of abuse. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Children exposed to intimate partner violence: influences of parenting, family distress, and siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailor, Ketan; Stewart-Tufescu, Ashley; Piotrowski, Caroline

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate associations between maternal stress, parenting behavior, and sibling adjustment in relation to child trauma symptoms in families with and without a history of intimate partner violence (IPV). Maternal report was used to measure maternal stress and child trauma symptoms, whereas parenting behavior was assessed through an observational measure. Participants consisted of mothers with 2 school-age siblings recruited from the community. Results indicated that violent families reported higher levels of maternal stress and sibling trauma symptoms than nonviolent families, although no differences were found in parenting behavior. Sibling trauma symptoms and negative maternal behavior toward a sibling were strong predictors of trauma symptoms in younger siblings exposed to IPV but only modest predictors for older siblings. Moderator analyses showed that in IPV-affected families, the trauma symptoms of older siblings were related to the trauma symptoms of younger siblings when maternal stress was high. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Siblings versus parents and friends: longitudinal linkages to adolescent externalizing problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoe, Ivy N; Keijsers, Loes; Hawk, Skyler T; Branje, Susan; Dubas, Judith Semon; Buist, Kirsten; Frijns, Tom; van Aken, Marcel A G; Koot, Hans M; van Lier, Pol A C; Meeus, Wim

    2013-08-01

    It is well documented that friends' externalizing problems and negative parent-child interactions predict externalizing problems in adolescence, but relatively little is known about the role of siblings. This four-wave, multi-informant study investigated linkages of siblings' externalizing problems and sibling-adolescent negative interactions on adolescents' externalizing problems, while examining and controlling for similar linkages with friends and parents. Questionnaire data on externalizing problems and negative interactions were annually collected from 497 Dutch adolescents (M = 13.03 years, SD = 0.52, at baseline), as well as their siblings, mothers, fathers, and friends. Cross-lagged panel analyses revealed modest unique longitudinal paths from sibling externalizing problems to adolescent externalizing problems, for male and female adolescents, and for same-sex and mixed-sex sibling dyads, but only from older to younger siblings. Moreover, these paths were above and beyond significant paths from mother-adolescent negative interaction and friend externalizing problems to adolescent externalizing problems, 1 year later. No cross-lagged paths existed between sibling-adolescent negative interaction and adolescent externalizing problems. Taken together, it appears that especially older sibling externalizing problems may be a unique social risk factor for adolescent externalizing problems, equal in strength to significant parents' and friends' risk factors. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2013 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  20. Bereaved Siblings' Advice to Health Care Professionals Working With Children With Cancer and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, Malin; Bylund-Grenklo, Tove; Jalmsell, Li; Wallin, Alexandra Eilegård; Kreicbergs, Ulrika

    2016-07-01

    Siblings of children with cancer experience psychosocial distress during the illness and after bereavement, but often stand outside the spotlight of attention and care. This study explored bereaved siblings' advice to health care professionals (HCPs) working with children with cancer and their families. In a nationwide Swedish survey of bereaved siblings, 174/240 (73%) participated. Of these, 108 answered an open-ended question about what advice they would give to HCPs working with children with cancer and their families. In this study, responses to this single question were analyzed using content analysis. The most common advice, suggested by 56% of siblings, related to their own support. One third suggested giving better medical information to siblings. Some siblings wanted to be more practically involved in their brother's/sister's care and suggested that HCPs should give parents guidance on how to involve siblings. Other common advice related to psychosocial aspects, such as the siblings' wish for HCPs to mediate hope, yet also realism, and the importance of asking the ill child about what care they wanted. Information, communication, and involvement should be emphasized by HCPs to support siblings' psychosocial needs in both the health care setting and within the family. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  1. Food reinforcement and delay discounting in zBMI-discordant siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feda, Denise M; Roemmich, James N; Roberts, April; Epstein, Leonard H

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of food reinforcement and the inability to delay gratification are related to adult energy intake and obesity. This study was designed to test the association of sibling pair differences in relative reinforcing efficacy of food and delay discounting on sibling pair differences in zBMI scores of same-gender zBMI-discordant siblings. We tested main and interactive relationships between delay discounting and relative reinforcing efficacy of food on zBMI discordance in 14 zBMI-discordant biological sibling pairs (6 female pairs) using a discordant sibling study design. Sibling pair differences in relative reinforcing efficacy of food were associated with sibling pair differences in zBMI (p= 0.046); this effect was moderated by delay discounting (p delay discounting had greater differences in zBMI. The combination of greater sibling pair differences in delay discounting and relative reinforcing efficacy is associated with greater discordance in zBMI in adolescent sibling pairs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Food reinforcement and delay discounting in zBMI-discordant siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feda, Denise M.; Roemmich, James N.; Roberts, April; Epstein, Leonard H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The interaction of food reinforcement and the inability to delay gratification are related to adult energy intake and obesity. This study was designed to test the association of sibling pair differences in relative reinforcing efficacy of food and delay discounting on sibling pair differences in zBMI scores of same-gender zBMI-discordant siblings. Design and methods We tested main and interactive relationships between delay discounting and relative reinforcing efficacy of food on zBMI discordance in 14 zBMI-discordant biological sibling pairs (6 female pairs) using a discordant sibling study design. Results Sibling pair differences in relative reinforcing efficacy of food were associated with sibling pair differences in zBMI (p = 0.046); this effect was moderated by delay discounting (p delay discounting had greater differences in zBMI. Conclusions The combination of greater sibling pair differences in delay discounting and relative reinforcing efficacy is associated with greater discordance in zBMI in adolescent sibling pairs. PMID:25464024

  3. Psychological Well-Being and Family Environment of Siblings of Children with Life Threatening Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Lisa M; Hill, Douglas L; Carroll, Karen W; Rourke, Mary; Kang, Tammy I; Feudtner, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The psychological well-being of siblings of children with life threatening illness remains largely uncharted. Pediatric cancer research suggests that a supportive family environment may protect the psychological well-being of siblings. We hypothesized that (1) siblings of pediatric palliative care patients would show clinical/behavioral scores that were elevated but that rates of serious psychopathology would be comparable to the general population of children their age; and (2) higher family functioning scores would be associated with lower clinical scores and higher adaptive scores for these siblings. We conducted an observational study with families in which a patient receiving palliative care had one or more siblings between the ages of 6 and 11. Parents completed the Behavioral Assessment System for Children, Second Edition (BASC-2) to assess the siblings' psychological well-being and the Family Assessment Device (FAD) to assess the family environment. Twenty-four parents reported data for 30 siblings. Only three siblings scored in the clinical range on a BASC-2 composite clinical scale, and 11 siblings scored in the at-risk range on one or more composite scales. Higher FAD scores predicted significantly higher externalization composite clinical scores (7.54, 95% CI: 1.12, 13.97, p family environment would be associated with higher levels of psychological health was supported.

  4. Malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies sibling species differentiation using egg morphometry and morphology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tyagi, Varun; Sharma, A K; Dhiman, Sunil; Srivastava, A R; Yadav, Ruchi; Sukumaran, D; Agrawal, O P; Veer, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    .... Currently, for the first time egg morphometry and morphology has been used to differentiate the three known vector sibling species of Anopheles culicifacies collected from malaria endemic Madhya...

  5. The importance of the SIBLING family of proteins on skeletal mineralisation and bone remodelling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Staines, Katherine A; MacRae, Vicky E; Farquharson, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family consists of osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, dentin sialophosphoprotein and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein...

  6. Differences in Body Mass Index between Siblings Who Are Discordant for Exposure to Antenatal Maternal Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucott, Lorna; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; McNeill, Geraldine; Turner, Steve

    2017-09-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with increased childhood body mass index (BMI), but the relationship may be due to confounding by maternal factors. This study tested the hypothesis that siblings born to mothers who begin to smoke between pregnancies will have higher BMI than older unexposed siblings. Maternal details from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank were linked to the Study of Trends in Obesity in North East Scotland which holds offspring BMI at 5 years of age. Change in maternal smoking status between pregnancies was linked to offspring BMI and also to the difference in BMI between siblings. Maternal smoking status in successive pregnancies was linked to child BMI at age 5 years in 6581 mother-child pairs of whom 718 included sibling pars. Children whose mothers had quit, started smoking or smoked in consecutive pregnancies had higher BMI compared with those not exposed to maternal smoking. Siblings born after onset of maternal smoking had higher mean BMI z score (0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01, 0.36) compared with unexposed older siblings. Mean BMI z score was also higher by mean of 0.10 (95% CI 0.01, 0.20) in younger sibling compared with older siblings born to mothers who smoked in both pregnancies. BMI z score was not significantly different between siblings whose mothers quit between pregnancies. In utero exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy may increase the likelihood of increased BMI in childhood. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Sibling influences on theory of mind development for children with ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Karen; Slaughter, Virginia; Peterson, Candida C

    2011-06-01

    Research indicates that having child siblings is positively associated with theory of mind (ToM) in typically developing children. As ToM is important to everyday social behaviours it is important to extend this research to examine whether there are similar sibling effects for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Theory of mind and executive functioning abilities of 60 children clinically diagnosed with ASD were assessed with batteries of standard tasks. Verbal mental age (VMA) and severity of autism symptoms were also measured together with number of child-aged siblings (1 to 12 years) and position in the sibling constellation. Having older siblings was a significant negative predictor of ToM performance for children with ASD, even after controlling for age, VMA, executive function and autism symptom severity. A weaker ToM benefit of younger siblings was not statistically significant independently of control variables. In sharp contrast to findings for typically developing preschoolers, having an older sibling was a disadvantage for ToM development in children with ASD. Conceivably, older siblings may over-compensate for their younger ASD siblings in social interactions, thereby limiting opportunities for social-cognitive growth. Parental attitudes, family resources, cultural norms and access to educational interventions may also conceivably be relevant and clearly warrant further research. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2011 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  8. A review of factors associated with mental health in siblings of children with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incledon, Emily; Williams, Lauren; Hazell, Trevor; Heard, Todd R; Flowers, Alexandra; Hiscock, Harriet

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the literature on modifiable factors associated with mental health in siblings of children with chronic illness. Three clinical databases were searched. A total of 17 studies met the inclusion criteria. Several key themes emerged from the review. Better sibling mental health was associated with camp attendance, perceived parent/peer support, illness education and enhancing control through cognitive coping strategies and routine. Parental and sibling psychoeducation interventions and social support may enhance children's mental health when their sibling has a chronic illness. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Understanding sibling influence on adolescents' alcohol use: Social and cognitive pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Shawn D; Jensen, Alexander C; Mustillo, Sarah A; Maggs, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    Research indicates that older siblings uniquely influence their younger brothers' and sisters' substance use behaviors during adolescence; however, the underlying mechanisms of socialization are rarely examined. The present study investigated whether social and/or cognitive pathways mediated the association between adolescent siblings' alcohol use and whether these pathways were moderated by the gender composition of the sibling dyad. Participants included one parent and two adolescent siblings (M age=14.52 and 17.17years) from 326 families. Data were collected via telephone interviews. Path analysis demonstrated that the association between older and younger siblings' alcohol use was mediated via social and cognitive pathways. Specifically, older siblings' drinking was positively related to the frequency of siblings' co-use as well as more positive expectations about alcohol, which in turn were positively associated with younger siblings' alcohol use. Identifying the ways in which siblings influence each other's substance use and health is critical because they are emerging and effective targets of intervention and prevention. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Donor-Recipient Matching for KIR Genotypes Reduces Chronic GVHD and Missing Inhibitory KIR Ligands Protect against Relapse after Myeloablative, HLA Matched Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan Mujeeb Faridi

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT can be curative for many hematologic diseases. However, complications such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD and relapse of primary malignancy remain significant and are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Effects of killer Ig-like receptors (KIR-influenced NK cells on HCT outcomes have been extensively pursued over the last decade. However, the relevance of the reported algorithms on HLA matched myeloablative HCT with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG is used for GVHD prophylaxis remains elusive. Here we examined the role of KIR and KIR-ligands of donor-recipient pairs in modifying the outcomes of ATG conditioned HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor HCT.The study cohort consisted of 281 HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor-recipient pairs of first allogeneic marrow or blood stem cell transplantation allocated into 'discovery' (135 pairs and 'validation' (146 pairs cohorts. High resolution HLA typing was obtained from the medical charts and KIR gene repertoires were obtained by a Luminex® based SSO method. All surviving patients were followed-up for a minimum of two years. KIR and HLA class I distributions of HCT pairs were stratified as per applicable definitions and were tested for their association with cause specific outcomes [acute GVHD grade II-IV (aGVHD, chronic GVHD needing systemic therapy (cGVHD and relapse] using a multivariate competing risks regression model as well as with survival outcomes [relapse-free survival (RFS, cGVHD & relapse free survival (cGRFS and overall survival (OS] by multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. A significant association between KIR genotype mismatching (KIR-B/x donor into KIR-AA recipient or vice versa and cGVHD was found in both discovery (p = 0.001; SHR = 2.78; 95%CI: 1.50-5.17 and validation cohorts (p = 0.005; SHR = 2.61; 95%CI: 1.33-5.11. High incidence of cGVHD associated with KIR genotype mismatching was

  11. Don't forget the siblings: School-aged siblings of children presenting to mental health services show at-risk patterns of attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowska, Kasia; Elliott, Bronwen

    2017-04-01

    Family therapists understand that children presenting for treatment are often bearers of symptoms signalling relational problems within the family system. Rather than addressing the children's symptoms in isolation, family therapists typically take those relational problems as their starting point in therapy. This study used the School-aged Assessment of Attachment (SAA) to assess the self-protective (attachment) strategies of the siblings of children presenting for psychiatric evaluation and also of the siblings of control children drawn from the normative population. Siblings of children in the clinical group were much more likely than siblings of control children to use at-risk self-protective strategies and to have markers suggestive of unresolved loss or trauma. School-aged siblings were found to use a broad range of strategies, and the pattern of change from first born to later born involved either a reversal of strategy or a shift to a more complex strategy. The study highlights that siblings of children presenting to mental health services are significantly affected by family relational stress. A family systems approach to assessment, one that enquires about the wellbeing of all family members, will ensure that the emotional needs of siblings are also addressed during the therapy process.

  12. Evidence that familial liability for psychosis is expressed as differential sensitivity to cannabis: an analysis of patient-sibling and sibling-control pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Individual differences in cannabis sensitivity may be associated with genetic risk for psychotic disorder. To demonstrate and replicate, using 2 conceptually different genetic epidemiological designs, that (familial) liability to psychosis is associated with sensitivity to cannabis. Sibling-control and cross-sibling comparisons using samples of patients with a psychotic disorder (n = 1120), their siblings (n = 1057), and community controls (n = 590) in the Netherlands and Flanders. Positive and negative schizotypy using the Structured Interview for Schizotypy-Revised (for siblings and controls) and self-reported positive and negative psychotic experiences using the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (for siblings and patients). Cannabis use was assessed as current use (by urinalysis) and lifetime frequency of use (by Composite International Diagnostic Interview). In the sibling-control comparison, siblings displayed more than 15 times greater sensitivity to positive schizotypy associated with particularly current cannabis use by urinalysis (adjusted B = 0.197, P familial risk increasing sensitivity to cannabis) rather than mediation (familial risk increasing use of cannabis). Genetic risk for psychotic disorder may be expressed in part as sensitivity to the psychotomimetic effect of cannabis. Cannabis use may synergistically combine with preexisting psychosis liability to cause positive and negative symptoms of psychosis.

  13. BLOODR: blood donor and requester mobile application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Vamsi Krishna; El-Ocla, Hosam

    2017-01-01

    With rapid increase in the usage of social networks sites across the world, there is also a steady increase in blood donation requests as being noticed in the number of posts on these sites such as Facebook and twitter seeking blood donors. Finding blood donor is a challenging issue in almost every country. There are some blood donor finder applications in the market such as Blood app by Red Cross and Blood Donor Finder application by Neologix. However, more reliable applications that meet the needs of users are prompted. Several software technologies including languages and framework are used to develop our blood-donor web application known as BLOODR application. These technologies comprise Ruby programming language (simply known as Ruby) along with JavaScript and PostgreSQL for database are used. Ruby on Rails (simply known as Rails) is an open source Web framework that makes it possible to quickly and easily create data-based web applications. We show screenshots for the BLOODR application for different types of users including requester, donor, and administrator. Various features of the application are described and their needs of use are analyzed. If a patient needs a blood at a clinic, blood donors in vicinity can be contacted through using a clinic management service provided in this application. Registered donors will get notification for the blood requests only if their blood group is compatible with the requested blood type and in the same city/region. Then matching blood donors can go to the requesting clinic and donate. BLOODR application provides a reliable platform to connect local blood donors with patients. BLOODR creates a communication channel through authenticated clinics whenever a patient needs blood donation. It is a useful tool to find compatible blood donors who can receive blood request posts in their local area. Clinics can use this web application to maintain the blood donation activity. Future improvement of the BLOODR is explained.

  14. Travel behavior and deferral of Dutch blood donors : Consequences for donor availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout-Krikke, Ryanne W.; Oei, Welling; Habets, Karin; Pasker-De Jong, Pieternel C M

    2015-01-01

    Background Donors returning from areas with outbreaks of infectious diseases may donate infectious blood back home. Geographic donor deferral is an effective measure to ensure the blood safety, but donor deferral may pose a threat for the blood supply especially after holiday seasons. Insight into

  15. FORUM Paediatric living donor liver transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the definitive treatment for children with end-stage liver disease (ESLD). The greatest limitation for LT is scarcity of deceased donor organs. This is particularly critical for smaller children (weighing <10 kg). Living donor liver transplantation. (LDLT) has emerged over the last 2 decades as a viable ...

  16. Factors Influencing Donor Partnership Effectiveness | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-11-03

    Nov 3, 2010 ... This paper, published in the peer-reviewed journal of philanthropy The Foundation Review, discusses the development and use of this new tool as well as various aspects of internal and inter-institutional communication as it pertains to donor collaboration. Download the PDF : Factors Influencing Donor ...

  17. Normothermic machine perfusion for donor liver preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolboom, H.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, liver transplantation is the only treatment for end-stage liver failure. Unfortunately, a sever shortage of donor organs causes significant mortality amongst patients awaiting transplantation. The donor organ shortage could be alleviated by using organs that are normally not accepted for

  18. Tele-recruitment for Donor Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Tiwari, A

    2014-03-01

    Blood transfusion services are the integral part of health care system and these services have safe blood transfusion as the major goal. Voluntary blood donation is the key to safe blood and this safety is further enhanced when the voluntary blood donors become repeat/regular donors. Retention of donors is therefore a very crucial strategy to ensure enhanced blood safety. Tele-recruitment is an effective medium of recruiting and more importantly retaining donors via means of telephone/Short Message Service. This study was carried out at a standalone blood bank during the period from January to December 2011 with objectives of donor retention, relationship management with the support of personnel with good communication skills, Donor data base, Integrated software and communication facility. For Initial 4 months there was no tele-recruiter, then for 2 months two tele-recruiter and for next 6 months three tele-recruiter were dedicated. Only impact of tele-recruitment on in-house donation was taken into consideration. 2,091 donors were recruited through tele-recruitment in this eight-month period. This was 63 % of in-house donations and 13 % of total donations. In other words out of every five in-house donations, three donations were from people contacted through tele-recruitment. Repeat voluntary blood donation is the safest donation. Tele-recruitment does this by converting 'first-time' donors into repeat/regular donors. Simple intervention like reminder calls on telephone can be highly effective tool to retain donors. Tele-recruitment helped the blood center establish relationships with individual donors, and, maybe, even the society at large. Tele-recruitment is a very low-cost model which can be easily replicated in all kind of blood banks, be it standalone, or a hospital based. Even the blood centers which are largely dependent on replacement donors can possibly have good results and convert replacement donors into repeat/regular voluntary blood donors.

  19. Romantic Relationship Experiences from Late Adolescence to Young Adulthood: The Role of Older Siblings in Mexican-Origin Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lorey A; Killoren, Sarah E; Whiteman, Shawn D; Updegraff, Kimberly A; McHale, Susan M; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2016-05-01

    Youth's experiences with romantic relationships during adolescence and young adulthood have far reaching implications for future relationships, health, and well-being; yet, although scholars have examined potential peer and parent influences, we know little about the role of siblings in youth's romantic relationships. Accordingly, this study examined the prospective longitudinal links between Mexican-origin older and younger siblings' romantic relationship experiences and variation by sibling structural and relationship characteristics (i.e., sibling age and gender similarity, younger siblings' modeling) and cultural values (i.e., younger siblings' familism values). Data from 246 Mexican-origin families with older (M = 20.65 years; SD = 1.57; 50 % female) and younger (M = 17.72 years; SD = .57; 51 % female) siblings were used to examine the likelihood of younger siblings' involvement in dating relationships, sexual relations, cohabitation, and engagement/marriage with probit path analyses. Findings revealed older siblings' reports of involvement in a dating relationship, cohabitation, and engagement/marriage predicted younger siblings' relationship experiences over a 2-year period. These links were moderated by sibling age spacing, younger siblings' reports of modeling and familism values. Our findings suggest the significance of social learning dynamics as well as relational and cultural contexts in understanding the links between older and younger siblings' romantic relationship experiences among Mexican-origin youth.

  20. Potential organ donor audit in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, M

    2010-11-01

    As increasing demand for organs is a challenge for transplant services worldwide it is essential to audit the process of organ donation. To address this, a national audit of potential organ donors was undertaken across hospitals with Intensive Care Units (N = 36). Questionnaires were returned on all patients (n = 2073) who died in these units from 1\\/9\\/07-31\\/8\\/08; 200 (10%) of these patients were considered for Brain Stem Testing (BST), 158 patients (79%) were diagnosed Brain Stem Dead (BSD) and 138 patients (87%) became potential donors. Consent for donation was given by 92 (69%) next of kin and 90 potential donors (65%) became organ donors. There was no evidence of a large number of potential organ donors being missed. Recommendations included completion of BSTs on all appropriate patients, development of support on BST, referral of all BSD patients to the Organ Procurement Service; enhanced co-ordination within hospitals and sustained information\\/education campaigns.

  1. PATHOMORPHOLOGY OF ZERO BIOPSIES OF DONOR KIDNEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Arefjev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is well known fact that kidney transplants from Extended Criteria Donors may increase risk of De- layed Graft Function and Primary Non-Function of transplants. We have collected and tested 65 «zero» kidney biopsies from cadaver donors aged from 19 to 71 years old. In the pool of elderly donors who died from cerebrovascular accident the frequency of nephrosclerosis presentation was higher than in donors of yonger age who died from craniocephalic trauma. Nevertheless in the general donor pool the number of sclerosed glomeruli was no more than 12%. We did not meet at all in the whole volume of material any bi- opsy with the severe degree of arteriosclerosis. The «zero» biopsies of cadaver kidneys is quite usable and unexpensive tool to measure the degree of nephrosclerosis in order to exclude kidneys which are not fitable for transplantation. 

  2. A donor-specific epigenetic classifier for acute graft-versus-host disease severity in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dirk S; Jones, Allison; Sellar, Rob S; Mayor, Neema P; Feber, Andrew; Webster, Amy P; Afonso, Neuza; Sergeant, Ruhena; Szydlo, Richard M; Apperley, Jane F; Widschwendter, Martin; Mackinnon, Stephen; Marsh, Steven G E; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Peggs, Karl S; Beck, Stephan

    2015-12-15

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative treatment for many hematological conditions. Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a prevalent immune-mediated complication following HSCT. Current diagnostic biomarkers that correlate with aGVHD severity, progression, and therapy response in graft recipients are insufficient. Here, we investigated whether epigenetic marks measured in peripheral blood of healthy graft donors stratify aGVHD severity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling recipients prior to T cell-depleted HSCT. We measured DNA methylation levels genome-wide at single-nucleotide resolution in peripheral blood of 85 HSCT donors, matched to recipients with various transplant outcomes, with Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips. Using genome-wide DNA methylation profiling, we showed that epigenetic signatures underlying aGVHD severity in recipients correspond to immune pathways relevant to aGVHD etiology. We discovered 31 DNA methylation marks in donors that associated with aGVHD severity status in recipients, and demonstrated strong predictive performance of these markers in internal cross-validation experiments (AUC = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.96-0.99). We replicated the top-ranked CpG classifier using an alternative, clinical DNA methylation assay (P = 0.039). In an independent cohort of 32 HSCT donors, we demonstrated the utility of the epigenetic classifier in the context of a T cell-replete conditioning regimen (P = 0.050). Our findings suggest that epigenetic typing of HSCT donors in a clinical setting may be used in conjunction with HLA genotyping to inform both donor selection and transplantation strategy, with the ultimate aim of improving patient outcome.

  3. Marfan's syndrome: early and severe form in siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima M. P. Leite

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Marfan's syndrome is an inherited disorder of the connective tissue. Cardiologic manifestations, especially aortic dilation, are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the clinical course of the disease in adults and teenagers. In children, the presence of aortic aneurysm and its dissection or rupture is rare, occurring in patients with genetic mutation of the fibrillin gene but not in those who have the familial form of the disease. We describe here 2 patients, from the same family (siblings, diagnosed with gigantic aortic aneurysm early in infancy, one of them successfully undergoing surgery.

  4. Coexistent Hirschsprung's disease and esophageal achalasia in male siblings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, J L

    2012-02-03

    Achalasia of the esophagus developed in two male siblings soon after birth, and they were successfully treated by surgery. Persistent signs resulted in the later diagnosis of Hirschsprung\\'s disease. One required subtotal colectomy and ileoanal anastomosis, and the other is managing well on conservative treatment. Genetic analysis of the genes encoding the RET protooncogene, endothelin-3, and the endothelin-3 receptor did not show any defect. Familial achalasia of the esophagus in combination with Hirschsprung\\'s disease has never been reported.

  5. [Rare mesenchymal lesions in siblings. Two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guschmann, M; Frege, J; Lübbert, E; Golla, S; Rudolph, B; Haake, K; Stöver, B

    2003-05-01

    We report on a 15-month-old boy presenting a juvenile active ossifying fibroma in the right nasal cavity and the sibling, a 9-month-old girl with a mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall. The two lesions showed many similarities. Both lesions are present at the time of birth or in early life with local obstructive or compressive effects. The lesions have a similar mixture of mature and immature mesenchymal tissue with areas of ossification. The entities present a tumor-like development with an abnormal mixture of tissue indigenous to the specific area of the body without notable atypical cytologic features. These features are typical criteria for hamartoma lesions.

  6. IgM monoclonal gammopathy and neuropathy in two siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T S; Schrøder, H D; Jønsson, V

    1988-01-01

    A sister and a brother with a progressive mixed axonal and demyelinating polyneuropathy were found to have a monoclonal IgM gammopathy of kappa and lambda type, respectively. Sural nerve and cutaneous nerve specimens obtained by biopsy showed deposits of IgM on myelin sheets. Sera from both...... patients contained antibodies directed to bovine peripheral nerve myelin as determined by ELISA technique and to normal human peripheral nerve myelin as demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence histochemistry. These siblings may have a genetic predisposition to the formation of autoantibodies...... with peripheral nerve myelin as the target for the immune attack....

  7. Touraine-Solente-Gole syndrome in two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftikhar, Aisha; Hamid, Muhammad Haroon; Rathore, Ahsan Waheed

    2014-11-01

    Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy secondary to various causes is not a common entity but primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (also called Touraine-Solente-Gole Syndrome) is an extremely rare genetic disorder. It was first described in 1868 by Friedrich and has premier features of clubbing, periostosis and pachydermia. Based on clinical manifestations Touraine Solente and Gole distinguished it into three forms as complete, incomplete and fruste form. Most of the cases described up till now had onset in late adolescence. This report describes two siblings having symptoms consistent with Touraine-Solente-Gole Syndrome which had onset in early childhood.

  8. Hallervorden-Spatz disease: 2 cases of siblings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Gi; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo [College of Medicine Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    We report two patients with Hallervorden-Spatz disease, who were diagnosed by same MR findings of marked low signal intensity in the globus and substantia nigra. They presented with ataxic and spastic gait, intention tremor, delayed mental development, and dysarthria. They were 7 year-old male and 8 year-old female siblings, who were healthy until 3 years of age when they suffered from progressive symptoms. T2-weighted images showed marked low signal intensity in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra indicating an increased iron deposition, and it might suggest Hallervorden-Spatz disease.

  9. A Qualitative Study of Advice from Bereaved Parents and Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amanda L.; Miller, Kimberly S.; Barrera, Maru; Davies, Betty; Foster, Terrah L.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Hogan, Nancy; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing bereavement literature, relatively little is known about what families find helpful after a child’s death and how best to assist them during the grieving process. This qualitative study explored advice from 40 families (65 parents, 39 siblings) of children died who cancer 6–19 months earlier. Content analysis emphasized the individual nature of grief and revealed advice that fit into three temporal categories: before the death, soon after, and long-term. Findings are discussed in the context of contemporary theory and provide insight into the development and timing of grief interventions. PMID:21895435

  10. Donor Conception and "Passing," or; Why Australian Parents of Donor-Conceived Children Want Donors Who Look Like Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Karen-Anne

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the processes through which Australian recipients select unknown donors for use in assisted reproductive technologies and speculates on how those processes may affect the future life of the donor-conceived person. I will suggest that trust is an integral part of the exchange between donors, recipients, and gamete agencies in donor conception and heavily informs concepts of relatedness, race, ethnicity, kinship, class, and visibility. The decision to be transparent (or not) about a child's genetic parentage affects recipient parents' choices of donor, about who is allowed to "know" children's genetic backgrounds, and how important it is to be able to "pass" as an unassisted conception. In this way, recipients must trust the process, institutions, and individuals involved in their treatment, as well as place trust in the future they imagine for their child. The current market for donor gametes reproduces normative conceptions of the nuclear family, kinship, and relatedness by facilitating "matching" donors to recipients by phenotype and cultural affinities. Recipient parents who choose not to prioritize "matching," and actively disclose the process of children's conceptions, may embark on a project of queering heteronormative family structures and place great trust in both their own children and changing social attitudes to reduce stigma and generate acceptance for non-traditional families.

  11. DONOR CRITERIA FOR LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION - A COMPARATIVE-STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF DONOR LIVER SELECTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PRUIM, J; TENVERGERT, EM; DEKEMPENAER, MGV; BONSEL, GJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1993-01-01

    In a case-control study, the relevance of donor parameters used for donor selection on final transplant outcome was studied. Two matched groups of 17 donors were created: one group of 'ideal' donors and a control group not meeting the criteria for 'ideal' donors. Recipients of livers from both

  12. Higher organ donation consent rates by relatives of potential uncontrolled donors versus potential controlled donors after death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, J.; Mook, W.N. van; Willems, M.E.; Heurn, L.W. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Refusal to consent to organ donation is an important cause of the persisting gap between the number of potential organ donors and effectuated donors. In the Netherlands, organ donors include both uncontrolled donors: donors who die unexpectedly after cardiac death (DCD), after failed

  13. Swedish sperm donors are driven by altruism, but shortage of sperm donors leads to reproductive travelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerhovd, Erling; Faurskov, Anders; Werner, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Swedish legislation requires that sperm donors are identifiable to offspring. In Denmark sperm donors remain anonymous. The aim of this study was to examine sperm donation in Sweden by identifying socio-demographic backgrounds, motivations and attitudes among donors and to describe options and plans of sperm recipients. Furthermore, the willingness of Swedish health care providers to assist in treatment abroad, where sperm from an anonymous donor were to be used, was assessed. The extent of travelling to Denmark for reproductive purposes was also examined. Thirty Swedish sperm donors completed a questionnaire and were interviewed about their backgrounds, motivations and attitudes. Thirty couples where the infertility workup had shown azoospermia were interviewed about their options for achieving parenthood. The willingness to assist in fertility treatment abroad and the extent of reproductive cross border travelling were assessed by interviewing health care providers and by contacting Danish clinics. Almost all donors were Caucasian. The main motivation for sperm donors was to help others. Owing to shortage of sperm donors many Caucasian recipients intended to have treatment abroad. For most non-Caucasian recipients sperm from a donor of appropriate ethnicity were not available in Sweden. Whether the sperm donor was anonymous or identifiable was not of major importance to most sperm recipients. Health care providers expressed unanimous willingness to assist in treatment with sperm from an anonymous donor. Our inquiry indicated that more than 250 Swedish sperm recipients travel to Denmark annually. Identifiable sperm donors are driven by altruistic motives, but shortage of sperm donors leads to reproductive travelling. Recruitment strategies to increase the number of sperm donors in Sweden are therefore warranted.

  14. Projective drawings as measures of psychosocial functioning in siblings of pediatric cancer patients from the Camp Okizu study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Wendy; Mazaheri, Mary; Sporri, Lisa; Long, Janet K; Chesterman, Beth; Fine, Joselyn; Amylon, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    This research was conducted at a summer camp for siblings of children with cancer. Participants included 77 siblings (ages 6-17 years) and their parents. Before attending camp, 18 of the siblings had experienced the death of their brother or sister with cancer. Projective measures were administered before attending camp and 3 months after camp. These included the Human Figure Drawing (HFD) and the Kinetic Family Drawing-Revised (KFD-R). Siblings were administered both the HFD and KFD-R; parents were given the KFD-R. On the HFD, siblings' emotional distress scores decreased significantly pre- to postcamp. On the KFD-R, nonbereaved siblings and parents showed significant improvement in family environment scores. Bereaved siblings and parents also showed improvement (although nonsignificant). These results support Camp Okizu's effectiveness in increasing siblings' emotional well-being yet underscore the need to implement interventions to address family communication for both bereaved and nonbereaved families.

  15. Imitation, Dominance, Agonism and Prosocial Behavior: A Meta-Aalysis of Sibling Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Marcia

    The purpose of this paper is to elucidate processes involved in the sibling relationship in terms of four dimensions that are focal in the literature: imitation, dominance, agonism (negative behavior directed towards a sibling), and prosocial behavior. A number of findings on these dimensions were culled from 24 studies, 18 of which were done…

  16. Kid's Stuff: The Nature and Impact of Peer and Sibling Violence on Younger and Older Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelhor, David; Turner, Heather; Ormrod, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective: It is widely presumed that when children are hit by peers or siblings, it is not as serious as similar acts between adults or older youth, which would be termed, "assaults" and "violent crimes". The goal of this study was to compare the violent peer and sibling episodes of younger children to those of older youth in terms of their…

  17. Attachment States of Mind and the Quality of Young Adults' Sibling Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Keren; Roisman, Glenn I.; Haydon, Katherine C.; Groh, Ashley M.; Holland, Ashley S.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines young adults' states of mind regarding their early attachment experiences in relation to the observed and perceived quality of their sibling relationships. Sixty sibling pairs (18-25 years of age) were (a) administered the Adult Attachment Interview (George, Kaplan, & Main, 1985), (b) videotaped during a conflict…

  18. Qualitative "trial-sibling" studies and "unrelated" qualitative studies contributed to complex intervention reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Jane; Hendry, Margaret; Lewin, Simon; Glenton, Claire; Chandler, Jackie; Rashidian, Arash

    2016-06-01

    To compare the contribution of "trial-sibling" and "unrelated" qualitative studies in complex intervention reviews. Researchers are using qualitative "trial-sibling" studies undertaken alongside trials to provide explanations to understand complex interventions. In the absence of qualitative "trial-sibling" studies, it is not known if qualitative studies "unrelated" to trials are helpful. Trials, "trial-sibling," and "unrelated" qualitative studies looking at three health system interventions were identified. We looked for similarities and differences between the two types of qualitative studies, such as participants, intervention delivery, context, study quality and reporting, and contribution to understanding trial results. Reporting was generally poor in both qualitative study types. We detected no substantial differences in participant characteristics. Interventions in qualitative "trial-sibling" studies were delivered using standardized protocols, whereas interventions in "unrelated" qualitative studies were delivered in routine care. Qualitative "trial-sibling" studies alone provided insufficient data to develop meaningful transferrable explanations beyond the trial context, and their limited focus on immediate implementation did not address all phenomena of interest. Together, "trial-sibling" and "unrelated" qualitative studies provided larger, richer data sets across contexts to better understand the phenomena of interest. Findings support inclusion of "trial-sibling" and "unrelated" qualitative studies to explore complexity in complex intervention reviews. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Progeria (Hutchison - Gilford syndrome in siblings: In an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Tanjore

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclcrodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  20. Association between bronchial asthma in atopic children and their number of siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan El Hakim Siregar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The prevalence of asthma in children has increased in many countries. Environmental factors are believed to play an important role and an inverse relationship between number of siblings and atopic disorders has been observed. Objective To assess for an association between bronchial asthma in atopic children and their number of siblings. Methods A cross-secrional study was conducted from June to November 2010 in three elementary schools in Medan, North Sumatera. Trace cards from the Allergy-Immunology Indonesian Pediatric Association (IDAI Working Group and questionnaires on the clinical history of atopy were used to screen children with the risk of atopy. The International Study of .Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC questionnaire to screen for bronchial asthma was distributed to children aged 7-10 years with a history of asthma, allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis. Subjects were divided into two groups, those with <3 siblings and those with 2:3 siblings. Chi-square test was used to analyze differences in bronchial asthma prevalence between the two groups. Results Ninety-six subjects enrolled in the study, with 48 subjects per group. The prevalence of bronchial asthma was significantly higher in atopic children who had <3 siblings than in children with 2:3 siblings (73.5% and 26.5%, respectively; P=0.04. Conclusion Bronchial asthma was significantly more frequent in children with less than 3 siblings compared to those with 3 or more siblings.

  1. Psychological and School Functioning of Latino Siblings of Children with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Debra; Kao, Barbara; Plante, Wendy; Seifer, Ronald; Grullon, Edicta; Cheas, Lydia; Canino, Glorisa

    2011-01-01

    Background: Siblings of children with disabilities are at risk for internalizing psychological disorders; however, little is known about how culture influences this effect. This study examined the psychological and school functioning of Latino siblings of children with intellectual disability (ID). Methods: Participants were 100 Latino (L) and…

  2. Coping and family functioning predict longitudinal psychological adaptation of siblings of childhood cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, Bregje A.; Oort, Frans J.; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; Caron, Huib N.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Last, Bob F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective To assess associations of coping and family functioning with psychosocial adjustment in siblings of pediatric cancer patients at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months after diagnosis. Methods Eighty-three siblings (ages 7-19 years) participated. Effects on anxiety, quality of life, behavioral-emotional

  3. Psychosocial functioning in siblings of paediatric cancer patients one to six months after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, BA; Grootenhuis, MA; Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM; Caron, HN; Last, BF

    The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for psychosocial problems in siblings of paediatric cancer patients. One and 6 months after diagnosis, sibling self-reported anxiety, social-emotional problems and quality of life (QoL) were assessed, as were

  4. Psychosocial functioning in siblings of paediatric cancer patients one to six months after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, B. A.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J. E. H. M.; Caron, H. N.; Last, B. F.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for psychosocial problems in siblings of paediatric cancer patients. One and 6 months after diagnosis, sibling self-reported anxiety, social-emotional problems and quality of life (QoL) were assessed, as were

  5. Dead or Alive? Knowledge about a Sibling's Death Varies by Genetic Relatedness in a Modern Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollet, Thomas V.; Nettle, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Using a large sample of non-institutionalized individuals from the Netherlands (n = 7610), we examined the influence of relatedness on an individual's knowledge about whether their sibling is alive or not. Respondents were generally less likely to know whether their sibling was alive if they were

  6. Trajectories of Antisocial Behaviour towards Siblings Predict Antisocial Behaviour towards Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensor, Rosie; Marks, Alex; Jacobs, Lorna; Hughes, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Background: Young siblings' antisocial behaviour is common yet its impact has received relatively little research attention. Methods: We examined trajectories of antisocial behaviour for a socially diverse sample (n = 99, 58 boys and 41 girls) who were filmed with their older siblings (52 boys and 47 girls) at ages 3 and 6 and with unfamiliar…

  7. Super Mario brothers and sisters: Associations between coplaying video games and sibling conflict and affection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sarah M; Jensen, Alexander C; Smith, Nathan J; Erickson, Daniel H

    2016-02-01

    Video games can be played in many different contexts. This study examined associations between coplaying video games between siblings and levels of affection and conflict in the relationship. Participants were 508 adolescents (M age = 16.31 years of age, SD = 1.08) who completed questionnaires on video game use and sibling relationships. Participants were recruited from a large Northwestern city and a moderate city in the Mountain West of the United States. Video games played between siblings were coded by an independent sample to assess levels of physical aggression and prosocial behavior in each game. Playing video games with a sibling was associated with higher levels of sibling affection for both boys and girls, but higher levels of conflict for boys only. Playing a violent video game with a brother was associated with lower levels of conflict in the sibling relationship, whereas playing a prosocial video game was not related to any sibling outcome. The value of video games in sibling relationships will be discussed, with a focus on the type of game and the sex of the adolescent. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Siblings versus parents and friends : Longitudinal linkages to adolescent externalizing problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defou, I.N.; Keijsers, L.; Hawk, S.T.; Branje, S.T.J.; Dubas, J.S.; Buist, K.L.; Frijns, T.; van Aken, M.A.G.; Koot, H.M.; van Lier, P.A.C.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well documented that friends' externalizing problems and negative parent–child interactions predict externalizing problems in adolescence, but relatively little is known about the role of siblings. This four-wave, multi-informant study investigated linkages of siblings'

  9. Land inheritance establishes sibling competition for marriage and reproduction in rural Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Mhairi A; Gurmu, Eshetu

    2011-02-08

    Intergenerational transfer of wealth has been proposed as playing a pivotal role in the evolution of human sibling relationships. Sibling rivalry is assumed to be more marked when offspring compete for limited heritable resources, which are crucial for reproductive success (e.g., land and livestock); whereas in the absence of heritable wealth, related siblings may cooperate. To date, comparative studies undertaken to support this evolutionary assumption have been confounded by other socioecological factors, which vary across populations, e.g., food sharing and intergroup conflict. In this article we explore effects of sibling competition and cooperation for agricultural resources, marriage, and reproduction in one contemporary Ethiopian agropastoralist society. Here recent changes in land tenure policy, altering transfers of land from parents to offspring, present a unique framework to test the importance of intergenerational transfers of wealth in driving sibling competition, while controlling for socioeconomic biases. In households where land is inherited, the number of elder brothers reduces a man's agricultural productivity, marriage, and reproductive success, as resources diminish and competition increases with each additional sibling. Where land is not inherited (for males receiving land directly from the government and all females) older siblings do not have a competitive effect and in some instances may be beneficial. This study has wider implications for the evolution of human family sizes. Recent changes in wealth transfers, which have driven sibling competition, may be contributing to an increased desire for smaller family sizes.

  10. Decreased default-mode network homogeneity in unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Yao, Dapeng; Jiang, Jiajing; Su, Qinji; Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Jian; Yu, Liuyu; Zhai, Jinguo; Xiao, Changqing

    2014-12-30

    The dysconnectivity hypothesis proposes that abnormal resting state connectivity within the default-mode network (DMN) plays a key role in schizophrenia. Little is known, however, about alterations of the network homogeneity (NH) of the DMN in unaffected siblings of patients with schizophrenia. Unaffected siblings have unique advantages as subjects of neuroimaging studies independent of the clinical and treatment issues that complicate studies of the patients themselves. In the present study, we investigated NH of the DMN in unaffected siblings of schizophrenia. Participants comprised 46 unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients and 50 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls who underwent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Automated NH and group independent component analysis (ICA) approaches were used to analyze the data. Compared with healthy controls, the unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients showed decreased DMN homogeneity in the left precuneus. No significantly increased DMN homogeneity was found in the sibling group relative to the control group. Our results suggest that there is decreased NH of the DMN in unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients and indicate that the alternative perspective of examining the DMN NH in patients׳ siblings may improve understanding of the nature of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Coping of Siblings of Children with Developmental Disabilities in the Bedouin Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor-Binyamini, Iris; Abu-Ajaj, Othman

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study that examines the coping of siblings of children with developmental disabilities in comparison with siblings of children without disabilities in the Bedouin community in Israel. For this purpose, the study examines the components of self-esteem, stress, and growth. Data were collected from 200 adolescents. The findings of…

  12. Risk Factors for Behavioral and Emotional Difficulties in Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Katherine M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined risk factors for behavioral and emotional problems in 1973 siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Results revealed six correlates of sibling internalizing and externalizing problems: male gender, smaller family size, older age of the child with ASD, lower family income, child with ASD behavior problems, and…

  13. Patterns and Predictors of Anxiety among Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Carolyn M.; Deisenroth, Lauren K.; Taylor, Julie Lounds

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of anxiety among siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and determine the characteristics of the child with ASD and their parents that predicted anxiety. Data was collected from 1,755 siblings of children with ASD whose families participated in the Simons Simplex Collection;…

  14. Benefits of Including Siblings in the Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraioli, Suzannah J.; Hansford, Amy; Harris, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Having a brother or sister with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can significantly impact the life of a typically developing sibling. These relationships are generally characterized by less frequent and nurturing interactions than are evident in sibling constellations with neurotypical children or children with other developmental disabilities.…

  15. Positive affect in infant siblings of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filliter, Jillian H; Longard, Julie; Lawrence, Michael A; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Brian, Jessica; Garon, Nancy; Smith, Isabel M; Roncadin, Caroline; Roberts, Wendy; Bryson, Susan E

    2015-04-01

    Research on the expression of positive affect in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) suggests that differences in this domain emerge late in the first year or early in the second year. However, many previous studies in this area employed retrospective research methods and global rating schemes. In the current study, the expression of positive affect was examined prospectively at ages 6, 12, and 18 months in three groups: infant siblings with ASD, infant siblings without ASD, and low-risk comparison infants. Infant siblings were the younger brothers or sisters of children diagnosed with ASD and, therefore, had a higher familial risk of ASD. The frequency and duration of smiles were coded from video excerpts from the Autism Observation Scale for Infants (Bryson, Zwaigenbaum, McDermott, Rombough, and Brian 2008), a standardized, play-based assessment of early signs of ASD. Results indicated that at 12 months, infant siblings with ASD had a lower rate of smiling than the other two groups. At 18 months, infant siblings with ASD continued to display a lower rate of smiling than infant siblings without ASD, but not comparison infants. Overall, these results indicate that infant siblings with ASD demonstrate less positive affect than infant siblings without ASD and low-risk comparison infants at 12 months. This suggests that reduced smiling may be an informative behavioural risk marker for ASD by children's first birthdays and may have implications for our understanding of atypical social development in children with ASD.

  16. Food reinforcement and delay discounting in zBMI-discordant siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interaction of food reinforcement and the inability to delay gratification are related to adult energy intake and obesity. This study was designed to test the association of sibling pair differences in relative reinforcing efficacy of food and delay discounting on sibling pair differences in zBM...

  17. The Quality of Life of Siblings of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathleen O.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of typically developing siblings of individuals with autism spectrum disorders regarding their own quality of life. The researcher also sought to discover if there were specific characteristics that affected the typically developing siblings' descriptions of their lives. In order to achieve…

  18. Predictors of Future Caregiving by Adult Siblings of Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan M.; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Urbano, Richard; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    With the growing life expectancy for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, siblings will increasingly assume responsibility for the care of their brother or sister with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Using a 163-item survey completed by 757 siblings, the authors identified factors related to future caregiving…

  19. Genetic and Familial Environmental Effects on Suicide - An Adoption Study of Siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Liselotte; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2013-01-01

    While there is clear evidence of familial influences on suicide, the origin of these is less certain. We have investigated genetic and familial environmental factors by studying the occurrence of suicide in biological and adoptive siblings of adoptees who died by suicide compared to siblings...

  20. Recent developments in supporting adolescent and young adult siblings of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Pandora; Medlow, Sharon; McDonald, Fiona E J

    2015-07-01

    The psychosocial needs of adolescent and young adult (AYA) siblings of cancer patients are easily overlooked. Accordingly, the evidence base informing short and long-term outcomes for these young people is sparse. This review provides an overview of recent research highlighting the experiences, unmet needs and psychosocial issues of AYA siblings, together with recent interventions. The reviewed studies bring focus to the range of informational and supportive care needs that typically remain unmet in AYA siblings. The limited number of interventions designed specifically for this group not only appear to have positive results but also underscore the need for effective risk stratification preintervention and tailoring of interventions to the specific needs of participants. AYA siblings of cancer patients display a range of psychosocial symptoms that can be ameliorated with age-appropriate information and targeted intervention programs. Limited research suggests that the majority of unmet needs for AYA siblings seem to occur during the acute phases of the brother or sister's initial diagnosis, treatment and relapse. Further research is required on siblings' long-term psychosocial assessment and management, bereavement, family systems, the impact of the cancer experience on siblings' personality and identity, and the development and evaluation of tailored psychosocial interventions. Policy research is also required to identify opportunities for expanding established healthcare systems to include sibling support.