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Sample records for hiv-negative quechua patients

  1. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma presenting in the oral cavity of two HIV-negative Quechua patients.

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    Mohanna, Salim; Bravo, Francisco; Ferrufino, Juan Carlos; Sanchez, Juvenal; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2007-09-01

    Traditionally, classic KS lesions have a general distribution, often involving the skin of the feet and legs, and to a lesser extent, that of the hands, arms, and trunk. Oral involvement is a rare manifestation. Initial oral involvement is an even rarer occurrence. We report two unusual cases of classic KS presenting in the oral cavity of two patients from indigenous origin; the first patient with primary oral KS lesion on the hard palate, with no other signs of the condition in any other region of the body; the second patient with generalized dermal KS lesions with lymph node and lower lip involvement. In conclusion, clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the typical clinical, gross, and histologic features of KS. Moreover, we would like to emphasize that oral KS may affect patients without AIDS or exposure to immunosuppression. The awareness of oral classic KS as a diagnostic possibility is important in the work-up of vascular lesions in the oral cavity of non-immunosuppressed individuals.

  2. Neurologic emergencies in HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients.

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    Guzmán-De-Villoria, J A; Fernández-García, P; Borrego-Ruiz, P J

    HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients comprise a heterogeneous group including transplant patients, patients undergoing treatment with immunosuppressors, uremic patients, alcoholics, undernourished patients, diabetics, patients on dialysis, elderly patients, and those diagnosed with severe or neoplastic processes. Epileptic seizures, focal neurologic signs, and meningoencephalitis are neurologic syndromes that require urgent action. In most of these situations, neuroimaging tests are necessary, but the findings can be different from those observed in immunocompetent patients in function of the inflammatory response. Infectious disease is the first diagnostic suspicion, and the identification of an opportunistic pathogen should be oriented in function of the type and degree of immunosuppression. Other neurologic emergencies include ischemic stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, neoplastic processes, and pharmacological neurotoxicity. This article reviews the role of neuroimaging in HIV-negative immunodepressed patients with a neurologic complication that requires urgent management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Kaposi’s sarcoma in an HIV-negative patient

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    Clara Georgina Garcia Lahera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma is a vascular tumour of the skin, most frequently seen in men over 50 years of age, of long-term progress and low mortality. It is related to the infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; it appears in the advanced stages of the disease and with immunosuppression, affecting approximately 20 % of the people with HIV who do not take antiretroviral drugs. This is a case of an urban female patient who did not have a history of disease and who began to have squamous erythematous lesions on the right foot and on the thighs. A skin biopsy was performed and the patient was diagnosed with a Kaposi’s sarcoma. The patient was HIV-negative. This case is presented as it is a rare condition in an HIV-negative patient.

  4. DISSEMINATED FUNGAL INFECTION WITH ADRENAL INVOLVEMENT: REPORT OF TWO HIV NEGATIVE BRAZILIAN PATIENTS

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    Graziella Hanna PEREIRA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis and histoplasmosis are systemic fungal infections endemic in Brazil. Disseminated clinical forms are uncommon in immunocompetent individuals. We describe two HIV-negative patients with disseminated fungal infections, paracoccidioidomycosis and histoplasmosis, who were diagnosed by biopsies of suprarenal lesions. Both were treated for a prolonged period with oral antifungal agents, and both showed favorable outcomes.

  5. Incidentally Detected Kaposi Sarcoma of Adrenal Gland with Anaplastic Features in an HIV Negative Patient

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    Zeliha Esin Celik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma (KS, a vascular tumor caused by infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8, is a systemic disease that can present with cutaneous lesions with or without visceral involvement. Very few cases of KS, most of which were associated with AIDS, have been reported in the adrenal gland. Anaplastic transformation of KS is a rare clinical presentation known as an aggressive disease with local recurrence and metastatic potential. We report here a 47-year-old HIV negative male presented with extra-adrenal symptoms and had an incidentally detected anaplastic adrenal KS exhibited aggressive clinical course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of anaplastic primary adrenal KS without mucocutaneous involvement but subsequently developed other side adrenal metastases in an HIV negative patient.

  6. Plasmablastic lymphoma of the upper gingiva in an HIV-negative elderly patient

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    Tomohiro Yamada, DDS, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL is a highly aggressive variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and is usually treated by chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP or CHOP-like regimens. However, elderly patients tend to have difficulty with the chemotherapy. We successfully treated an HIV-negative elderly PBL patient with surgery alone. An 87-year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital because of gingival swelling of the left maxilla. After several examinations, a multilobular 3-cm tumor of the left maxilla and lymph node swelling on the left side of the neck were revealed. The patient was HIV negative and human T-cell leukemia virus negative. He was diagnosed with PBL, or undifferentiated carcinoma/sarcoma, and we performed surgical therapy, radical neck dissection, and a partial maxillectomy. The surgical margin of the resected specimen was negative for tumor cells, and 6 of 27 lymph nodes contained tumor cells. Histologically, the tumor consisted of basophilic large cells with deviated nuclei. Together with the immunohistochemical findings, the final diagnosis was PBL. The patient and his family did not agree to chemotherapy. Nineteen months after surgery, he is fine and no signs of recurrence were observed. Surgery-only therapy may be a reasonable alternative for elderly PBL patients.

  7. Maxillary Sinus Kaposi Sarcoma: Case Report in an HIV-Negative Patient with Thymoma

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    Bernardo Carvalho Araújo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Kaposi sarcoma is an angioproliferative disorder that requires infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 for its development. The majority of cases are associated with HIV infection or other immunocompromising conditions. Thymomas are occasionally associated to cytopenia, which may alter the patients’ immune responses. Methods. Case report using clinical records. Results. Case report of a 46-year-old male patient diagnosed with thymoma and myasthenia gravis. The patient was referred to an otolaryngology consultation with complaints of facial pain in the right malar region, interpreted as an acute sinusitis. Following examination, an expansive maxillary sinus mass was found, and endoscopic surgery was undertaken. After careful investigation, it was diagnosed as a Kaposi sarcoma. Conclusions. It is thought to be the first described case of a maxillary sinus Kaposi sarcoma in an HIV-negative patient. Thus, this entity has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of sinus masses, even in non-HIV patients.

  8. MDR-TB Outbreak among HIV-Negative Tunisian Patients followed during 11 Years.

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    Naira Dekhil

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB outbreaks that evolve, from the outset, in a context strictly negative for HIV infection deserve special consideration since they reflect the true intrinsic epidemic potential of the causative strain. To our knowledge, the long-term evolution of such exceptional outbreaks and the treatment outcomes for the involved patients has never been reported hitherto. Here we provide a thorough description, over an 11-year period, of an MDR-TB outbreak that emerged and expanded in an HIV-negative context, Northern Tunisia.From October 2001 to June 2011, the MDR-TB outbreak involved 48 HIV-negative individuals that are mainly young (mean age 31.09 yrs; 89.6% male and noninstitutionalized. Drug susceptibility testing coupled to mutational analysis revealed that initial transmission involved an isolate that was simultaneously resistant to isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and streptomycin. The causative Haarlem3-ST50 outbreak strain expanded mainly as an 11-banded IS6110 RFLP profile (77.1%, from which a 12-banded subclone evolved. After undergoing a 2-year treatment with second-line drugs, 22 (45.8% patients were cured and 3 (6.2% completed treatment, thus yielding an overall treatment success rate of 52.1%. Among the patients that experienced unfavorable treatment outcomes, 10 (20.8% failed treatment, 3 (6.2% were lost to follow-up, 5 (10.4% died, and 5 (10.4% could not be evaluated. Poor adherence to treatment was found to be the main independent predictor of unfavorable outcomes (HR: 9.15; 95% CI 1.72-48.73; P = 0.014. Intriguingly, the evolved 12-banded subclone proved significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes (HR: 4.90; 95% CI 1.04-23.04, P = 0.044. High rate of fatality and relapse was further demonstrated at the long-term, since 70% of those whose treatment failed have died, and 24% among those deemed successfully treated have relapsed.Taken together, the data obtained in this study indicate that MDR

  9. Kaposi’s sarcoma: An unusual penile lesion in a HIV negative patient

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    Aldo Franco De Rose

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS of the penis is a very rare lesion and it is usually observed in HIV-infected patients. We introduce a case of KS of the penis in a 75 years old HIV negative patient with a peripheral T-cell lymphoma. He came to our attention with a painful ulcerated red lesion on the glans that stretched from the urethral meatus to the coronal skin. This lesion was found to be a KS balanopreputial in the classical variant. Penile KS must be included in the differential diagnosis of genital diseases especially when the clinical features of the lesion are aspecific and diagnosis can be made histologically by performing a biopsy.

  10. Clinical and laboratory peculiarities of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in patients with hiv-negative status

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    Елена Леонидовна Панасюк

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of research: to study the clinical, ummunologic, pathomorphologic peculiarities of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in patients with HIV-negative status. Materials and methods: there were examined and treated 9 patients (5 women and 5 men 23-65 years old with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CME with HIV-negative status. In this group of patients in 3 (33,3 % mycotic injure of nervous system developed on the background of pathology of ENT-organs (2 – larynx cancer, 1 – nasopharynx tumour, in 2 (22,2 % – endocrinopathy (decompensated diabetes mellitus type 11, chronic suprarenal insufficiency, in 1 case tuberculous meningoencephalitis, chronic suprarenal insufficiency connected with chronic pyelonephritis, polypous cystitis, hemolytic anemia, colloid cyst of the 111 ventricle of brain. Among persons with pathology of ENT-organs three patients entered into intensive care department (ICD after operative treatment and repeated courses of chemo- and radial therapy, 1 – after palliative operative treatment. Results: Primary clinical manifestations of cryptococcal menongoencephalitis depended on premorbid background and character of previous medical manipulations. Typical gradual development of CME was noticed only in patients with decompensated somatic pathology. In single cases initial manifestations of CME can flow acutely, violently imitating an image of an acute disorder of brain blood circulation or feebly, inertly on the background of already present neuroinfection. It was set the separate group of patients whose development of CME had a temporal connection with previous operative interventions. Most patients were transferred to IEID (Public Institution “Institute of Epidemiology and infectious diseases L.V. Gromashevsky National Academy of Medical sciences of Ukraine’ at the mean on 18±2,1 day of disease in the grave condition, in all cases the late diagnostics of disease was observed. At admission in 8 cases were

  11. Detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii by nested PCR in HIV-negative patients with pulmonary disease.

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    Santos, Cristina Rodrigues; de Assis, Ângela M; Luz, Edson A; Lyra, Luzia; Toro, Ivan F; Seabra, José Claudio C; Daldin, Dira H; Marcalto, Tathiane U; Galasso, Marcos T; Macedo, Ronaldo F; Schreiber, Angélica Z; Aoki, Francisco H

    Nested PCR can be used to determine the status of Pneumocystis jirovecii infection in other lung diseases. This study sought to detect a target DNA fragment (mitochondrial large subunit rRNA or mtL SUrRNA) of P. jirovecii in patients with lung disease who underwent bronchoscopy with collection of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The results from toluidine blue staining were compared with those obtained using molecular methods that included an "in house" DNA extraction procedure, PCR and nested PCR. Fifty-five BAL samples from patients with atypical chest X-rays were screened for P. jirovecii. None of the samples was positive for P. jirovecii using toluidine blue staining. In contrast, P. jirovecii DNA was detected by nested PCR in BAL samples from 36 of 55 patients (65.5%). The lung diseases in the patients included cancer, pneumonia, tuberculosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Other chronic problems in the patients included hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and alcoholism. Nested PCR showed high sensitivity for detecting P. jirovecii, especially when compared with toluidine blue staining. Using this method, P. jirovecii infection was detected in HIV-negative patients with lung disease. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, pulmonary tuberculosis and visceral leishmaniasis in an adult HIV negative patient

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    Antonio Carlos Toledo Jr.

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a 29 year old male with pneumocystis pneumonia and tuberculosis, and who was initially suspected of having HIV infection, based on risk factor analyses, but was subsequently shown to be HIV negative. The patient arrived at the hospital with fever, cough, weight loss, loss of appetite, pallor, and arthralgia. In addition, he was jaundiced and had cervical lymphadenopathy and mild heptosplenomegaly. He had interstitial infiltrates of the lung, sputum smears positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Pneumocystis carinii, and stool tests were positive for Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma mansoni. He was diagnosed as having AIDS, and was treated for tuberculosis, pneumocystosis, and strongyloidiasis with a good response. The patient did not receive anti-retroviral therapy, pending outcome of the HIV tests. A month later, he was re-examined and found to have worsening hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, fever, and continued weight loss. At this time, it was determined that his HIV ELISA antibody tests were negative. A bone marrow aspirate was done and revealed amastigotes of leishmania, and a bone marrow culture was positive for Leishmania species. He was treated with pentavalent antimony, 20 mg daily for 20 days, with complete remission of symptoms and weight gain. This case demonstrates that immunosuppression from leishmaniasis and tuberculosis may lead to pneumocystosis, and be misdiagnosed as HIV infection. The occurrence of opportunistic infections in severely ill patients without HIV must always be considered and alternate causes of immunosuppression sought.

  13. Clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes of syphilitic uveitis in HIV-negative patients in China: A retrospective case study.

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    Zhu, Jiang; Jiang, Yuan; Shi, Yewen; Zheng, Bo; Xu, Zhiguo; Jia, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Syphilitic chorioretinitis should be included in differential diagnosis of any form of ocular inflammation. A significantly higher proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with ocular syphilis as compared to HIV-negative cases have been reported in published studies. However, the clinical signs and symptoms are more insidious in HIV-negative patients who are easily misdiagnosed. We report a series of cases of ocular syphilis and describe the clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes of syphilitic chorioretinitis in HIV-negative patients in China.This was a retrospective case series study. The clinical records of patients with syphilis chorioretinitis were reviewed. Demographic information and findings of fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were analyzed. All patients received the standard treatment. Ophthalmology examination and laboratory evaluation were repeated every 3 months. All changes were recorded. The treatment was considered successful if the patients had no inflammation in both eyes and rapid plasma reagin titer was negative after therapy.The study examined 41 eyes of 28 HIV-negative patients. The main complaints were blurry vision, floaters, and visual field defect. Twenty-seven eyes presented with panuveitis, and all had posterior involvement, including uveitis, vasculitis, chorioretinitis, and optic neuritis. The most common manifestations were uveitis and retinal vasculitis. Disc hyperfluorescence and persistent dark spots were the most common findings on FFA and ICGA. The ill-defined inner segment/outer segment junction was the most frequent manifestation on SD-OCT. Patients were diagnosed with syphilitic uveitis based on positive serological tests. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was improved in 34 eyes after treatment. Eleven patients were misdiagnosed before serological tests were performed. The delay in treatment

  14. Ocular surface squamous neoplasia in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients and response to 5-fluorouracil in Angola

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    Nutt RJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Robert J Nutt,1 John L Clements,2 William H Dean3 1Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; 2Boa Vista Eye Clinic, Benguela, Angola; 3Bristol Eye Hospital, Bristol, UK Background: Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN is becoming increasingly prevalent and aggressive in Sub-Saharan Africa. It is a phenomenon linked with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, although association rates in Angola are currently unknown. A topical treatment that is effective in HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals may be preferable to surgery in some contexts. We aimed to estimate the proportion of OSSN associated with HIV in Angola and to report on the success of topical 5-fluorouracil as a primary treatment in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients.Methods: Photographs of OSSNs taken at presentation and following treatment with 5-fluorouracil in patients presenting to Boa Vista Eye Clinic, Angola, between October 2011 and July 2013 were grouped into HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups and analyzed to compare presenting features and treatment response. Eighty-one OSSNs were analyzed for clinical features and 24 met the inclusion criteria for analysis of treatment response.Results: Eighty-two patients presented with OSSN between October 2011 and July 2013. Twenty-one (26% were HIV-positive and typically had OSSNs that exhibited more pathological features than those in HIV-negative patients. Twenty-four (29% patients met the inclusion criteria for analysis of treatment response; of these, 26 (91% OSSNs in both groups displayed at least partial resolution after one treatment course. In the HIV-positive group, five of eight patients displayed complete resolution, two showed partial resolution, and one failed. In the HIV-negative group, five of 16 showed complete resolution, ten of 16 had partial resolution, and one failed.Conclusion: Individuals presenting with OSSN in Angola are more likely to have HIV infection compared

  15. Possible paradoxical reaction to treatment of tubercular meningitis in an HIV negative patient

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    Ana C. Rey Deutsch

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paradoxical response to tuberculosis treatment consists in the appearance of new clinical or radiologic manifestations or worsening of previous injuries after an initial improvement with anti-tuberculosis therapy. It can be observed in 6 to 30 percent of the cases of tubercular meningitis. It is the consequence of an exaggerated immune reaction that should be considered since the treatment is based on the use of immunomodulators and not in the change of anti-tuberculous drugs. We present the case of an HIV negative adult with tuberculous meningitis with a good initial response to specific therapy who showed, 10 weeks later, a paradoxical reaction to treatment that responded successfully to corticosteroids

  16. Natural History of Tuberculosis: Duration and Fatality of Untreated Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Negative Patients: A Systematic Review

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    Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Williams, Brian G.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis, specifically the case fatality and duration, of untreated tuberculosis is important as many patients are not correctly diagnosed and therefore receive inadequate or no treatment. Furthermore, duration and case fatality of tuberculosis are key parameters in interpreting epidemiological data. Methodology and Principal Findings To estimate the duration and case fatality of untreated pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV negative patients we reviewed studies from the pre-chemotherapy era. Untreated smear-positive tuberculosis among HIV negative individuals has a 10-year case fatality variously reported between 53% and 86%, with a weighted mean of 70%. Ten-year case fatality of culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis was nowhere reported directly but can be indirectly estimated to be approximately 20%. The duration of tuberculosis from onset to cure or death is approximately 3 years and appears to be similar for smear-positive and smear-negative tuberculosis. Conclusions Current models of untreated tuberculosis that assume a total duration of 2 years until self-cure or death underestimate the duration of disease by about one year, but their case fatality estimates of 70% for smear-positive and 20% for culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis appear to be satisfactory. PMID:21483732

  17. Factors Associated with Length of Hospital Stay among HIV Positive and HIV Negative Patients with Tuberculosis in Brazil

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    Gonçalves, Maria Jacirema Ferreira; Ferreira, Alaidistania A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Identify and analyze the factors associated to length of hospital stay among HIV positive and HIV negative patients with tuberculosis in Manaus city, state of Amazonas, Brazil, in 2010. Methods Epidemiological study with primary data obtained from monitoring of hospitalized patients with tuberculosis in Manaus. Data were collected by interviewing patients and analyzing medical records, according to the following study variables age, sex, co-morbidities, education, race, income, lifestyle, history of previous treatment or hospitalization due to tuberculosis, treatment regimen, adverse reactions, smear test, clinical form, type of discharge, and length of hospital stay. The associated factors were identified through chi-square or t-Student test at a 5% significance level. Results Income from 1 to 3 minimum wages (P = 0.028), pulmonary tuberculosis form (P = 0.011), negative smear test or no information in this regard (P = 0.014), initial 6-month treatment scheme (P = 0.029), and adverse drug reactions (P = 0.021) were associated to prolonged hospital stay in HIV positive patients. Conclusion We found out that although there were no significant differences in the length of hospital stay in HIV positive patients, all factors significantly associated to prolonged hospital stay occurred in this group of patients. This finding corroborates other studies indicating the severity of tuberculosis in HIV patients, which may also contribute to lengthen their hospital stay. PMID:23593227

  18. Kaposi sarcoma in an HIV-negative Tunisian patient: A rare cause of metatarsalgia

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    A. Ben Tekaya

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: In a patient presenting with metatarsalgia without a commonly detected cause, it is mandatory to search for other lesions that may point to a rare diagnosis as KS which is famous for involvement of the metatarsal bone.

  19. The radiological spectrum of pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: in HIV-Negative patients

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    Zahirifard, S.; Amiri, M.V.; Bakhshayesh Karam, M.; Mirsaeidi, S.M.; Ehsanpour, A.; Masjedi, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is a major worldwide health problem. In countries where tuberculosis is of moderate to high prevalence, the issue of Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis carries significant importance. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, similar to drug-sensitive tuberculosis, is contagious. Meanwhile its treatment is not only more difficult but also more expensive with lower success rates. Regarding clinical findings, there is no significant difference between Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Therefore determination of characteristic radiological findings in cases of Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis might be of help in early detection, and hence appropriate management of this disease condition. Objective: To explain the radiological spectrum of pulmonary Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients and methods: We retrospectively evaluated the radiographic images of 35 patients with clinically-and microbiologically- proven Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis admitted to our tertiary-care tuberculosis unit over a period of 13 months. The latest chest x-ray of all patients and the conventional chest CT scan without contrast of 15 patients were reviewed by three expert radiologists who rendered consensus opinion. Results: Of the 35 patients with imaging studies, 23 (66%) were male and 12 (34%) were female. The mean±SD age of participants was 38.2±17.3 (range: 16-20) years. 33 patients were known as secondary and only 2 had primary Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Chest radiography revealed cavitary lesion in 80% pulmonary infiltration in 89% and nodules in 80% of the cases. Pleurisy was the rarest finding observed in only 5 (14%) patients. All of 15 chest CT scans revealed cavitation, 93% of which were bilateral and multiple. Pleural involvement was seen in 93% of patients. Conclusion: Presence of multiple cavities, especially in both lungs, nodular and infiltrative lesions, and pleural effusion are main features

  20. Negative role of malnutrition in cell-mediated immune response: Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in a severely malnourished, HIV-negative patient with anorexia nervosa.

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    Hanachi, Mouna; Bohem, Vanessa; Bemer, Pauline; Kayser, Nadja; de Truchis, Pierre; Melchior, Jean-Claude

    2018-06-01

    It is generally acknowledged that malnutrition is a propensity factor for secondary infections in different clinical situations (malnutrition-associated infections in hospitalized patients and malnourished children in developing countries). However, it is not clear how malnutrition might facilitate the development of opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative patients without a definite etiology (disease or treatment) of impaired cell-mediated immune response. We report here on a case of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in an HIV-negative patient suffering from anorexia nervosa with extreme malnutrition, which had a favorable outcome despite the severity of her respiratory failure. This report indicates the need for the early screening of nutritional status and rapid treatment initiation in patients with malnutrition, as well as the determination of opportunistic infections in the event of a low lymphocyte count. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Lymphocyte subset abnormalities in multitransfused HIV-negative haemophilia A patients are not due to chronic hepatitis C virus infection

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    Meijer, K; van der Meer, J; Smit, JW; Verspiek, SPJ; Haagsma, EB; Smid, WM

    Several abnormalities of immune parameters have been described in HIV-negative haemophiliacs, including changes in numbers of T4 and T8 cells, T4/T8 ratio and numbers of activated T cells, To assess the contribution of hepatitis C to these abnormalities, we compared lymphocyte subsets in 20

  2. Urine-Based Nested PCR for the Diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Comparative Study Between HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Patients.

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    Jamshidi Makiani, Mahin; Davoodian, Parivash; Baghershiroodi, Mahnaz; Nejatizadeh, Abdol Azim; Fakkhar, Farideh; Zangeneh, Mehrangiz; Jahangiri, Nadia

    2016-08-01

    While tuberculosis (TB) can be diagnosed by microscopy and culture, the sensitivity of Ziehl-Neelsen staining is variable and culture results require 4 - 8 weeks to be determined. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its modifications, including nested PCR, might be promising methods for the rapid diagnosis of TB. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of nested PCR on urine samples of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and -negative patients with different manifestations of clinical TB. In a prospective study, three early-morning urine samples from 100 patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) or extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) were evaluated using a molecular target with insertion element IS6110, specific to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and nested PCR was performed. The results were analyzed with SPSS version 22. A total of 100 patients, including 74 (74%) with PTB and 26 (26%) with EPTB, were enrolled. Positive smears were seen in 38 patients (38%). Lymph nodes were the most commonly involved organ in 14 of the 26 (53.8%) EPTB patients (13.5%). Seven (23.1%) of the EPTB patients were HIV-positive. Urine PCR was positive in only 28 patients (28%). Seven HIV-positive patients with PTB showed positive urine PCR results. Moreover, PCR results were positive in only one of the seven HIV-positive subjects with EPTB. Positive PCR results were found in 20 of the 73 HIV-negative patients (27.4%) and in 8 of the 27 HIV-positive patients (29.6%). Therefore, there was no significant difference between the HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients for urine PCR (sensitivity 29.6%, specificity 72.6%; positive and negative predictive values 28% and 72%, respectively; P = 0.138). Nested PCR showed the same sensitivity in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. It can be applied as a rapid technique for the diagnosis of TB.

  3. Prevalence of human Papilloma Virus in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in the State of Bahia: a pilot study

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    Conceição Queiroz

    Full Text Available Human Papilloma Virus (HPV plays a central role in the development of cervical cancer. However, other coexisting factors, such as HIV infection, must be present for this to occur. We evaluated the prevalence of HPV in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in the city of Salvador , Bahia, Brazil, and determined the most prevalent types of HPV in these patients. Fifty-five cases were selected from among patients attending three institutions providing cervical pathology services in the city of Salvador. HIV testing (Elisa/WB, HPV-DNA testing by PCR, colposcopy, cytology and biopsy were carried out in all patients. The histopathological results were classified as follows: 11 cases were normal/negative for neoplasia, 15 were diagnosed as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN 1, 10 were CIN 2, 15 cases were CIN 3 and there were four cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Among the 55 patients studied, 43 tested positive for HPV-DNA and 20 for HIV. All HIV-positive patients were positive for HPV-DNA. The most prevalent types of HPV were HPV 16, 52, 58, 53, 54, 33 and 51, and there was little difference between the groups of HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with respect to the type of HPV encountered. The HIV-positive patients were found to be infected with a greater number of types of HPV than the HIV-negative patients. This study corroborates the existence of regional variations in the distribution of certain types of HPV, which is probably due to the particular ethnic constitution found in this region of Brazil.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities in HIV-negative patients with secondary and early latent syphilis and serum VDRL ≥ 1:32

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    Maciej Pastuszczak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Syphilis is caused by a spirochete Treponema pallidum. Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS by T. pallidum may appear early during the course of disease. The diagnosis of confirmed neurosyphilis is based on the reactive Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Recent studies indicated that serum RPR ≥ 1:32 are associated with higher risk of reactivity of CSF VDRL. Aims : The main aim of the current study was to assess cerebrospinal fluid serological and biochemical abnormalities in HIV negative subjects with secondary and early latent syphilis and serum VDRL ≥ 1:32. Materials and Methods : Clinical and laboratory data of 33 HIV-negative patients with secondary and early latent syphilis, with the serum VDRL titer ≥ 1:32, who underwent a lumbar puncture and were treated in Department of Dermatology at Jagiellonian University School of Medicine in Cracow, were collected. Results : Clinical examination revealed no symptoms of CNS involvement in all patients. 18% ( n = 6 of patients met the criteria of confirmed neurosyphilis (reactive CSF-VDRL. In 14 (42% patients CSF WBC count ≥ 5/ul was found, and in 13 (39% subjects there was elevated CSF protein concentration (≥ 45 mg/dL. 10 patients had CSF WBC count ≥ 5/ul and/or elevated CSF protein concentration (≥ 45 mg/dL but CSF-VDRL was not reactive. Conclusions : Indications for CSF examination in HIV-negative patients with early syphilis are the subject of discussion. It seems that all patients with syphilis and with CSF abnormalities (reactive serological tests, elevated CSF WBC count, elevated protein concentration should be treated according to protocols for neurosyphilis. But there is a need for identification of biomarkes in order to identify a group of patients with syphilis, in whom risk of such abnormalities is high.

  5. A comparative study of human T-cell lymphotropic virus-associated myelopathy in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in KwaZulu-Natal

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    Hoosain F. Paruk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: KwaZulu-Natal is an endemic area for HIV and human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV infection. The main neurological manifestation of HTLV is HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. The effect of HIV co-infection in patients with HAM/TSP is not well documented. Aims: To determine the prevalence of HIV seropositivity in patients with HAM/TSP and compare the clinical, laboratory and radiological features of patients mono-infected with HTLV and those dually infected with HTLV and HIV. Methods: Adult patients referred to the Neurology Department at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, for the period 01 January 2004 to 31 December 2015 with a positive HTLV serology were identified from the National Health Laboratory Service database. A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify all patients who had a diagnosis of HAM/TSP and to record their HIV status. Clinical, laboratory and radiological data were compared for HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. Results: A total of 52 patients with HAM/TSP were identified. HIV results were available in 44 patients of whom 23 (52% patients were HIV co-infected. Patients who were HIV-positive had a younger age of presentation compared to HIV-negative patients (median: 31 vs 50 years, p = 0.002. HIV-positive patients had a median duration of symptoms at presentation of 12 months compared to 16 months for HIV-negative patients, but the difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.082. The CD4 cell counts of HIV-positive patients were well preserved with a median count of 781 cells/µL. Conclusions: HIV co-infection is commonly seen in the setting of HAM/TSP in KwaZulu-Natal. An interaction between the viruses may accelerate the development of HAM/TSP, leading to a younger age of presentation. Co-infection may have treatment implications because of CD4 counts being preserved in these patients.

  6. The management of isolated positive syphilis enzyme immunoassay results in HIV-negative patients attending a sexual health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Nicola; Adebayo, Michael; Smit, Erasmus; Radcliffe, Keith

    2016-08-01

    An unconfirmed positive treponemal enzyme immunoassay (enzyme immunoassay positive, Treponema pallidum particle agglutination negative and rapid plasma reagin negative) presents a clinical challenge to distinguish early syphilis infection from false-positive results. These cases are referred for syphilis line assay (INNO-LIA) and recalled for repeat syphilis serology. We performed a retrospective audit to establish the proportion of HIV-negative cases with unconfirmed positive enzyme immunoassay results, the proportion of these cases that received an INNO-LIA test and repeat syphilis serology testing and reviewed the clinical outcomes; 0.35% (80/22687) cases had an unconfirmed positive treponemal enzyme immunoassay result. Repeat syphilis serology was performed in 80% (64/80) cases, but no additional cases of syphilis were identified. Eighty-eight per cent (70/80) received an INNO-LIA test; 14% (5/37) unconfirmed enzyme immunoassay-positive cases with no prior history of syphilis were confirmed on INNO-LIA assay, supporting a diagnosis of latent syphilis. As a confirmatory treponemal test, the INNO-LIA assay may be more useful than repeat syphilis serological testing. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS OF TUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA DEFINING DRUG RESISTANCE IN HIV POSITIVE AND HIV NEGATIVE TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS WITHOUT PRIOR HISTORY OF TREATMENT IN SVERDLOVSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Panov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of the study: to identify profile of mutations of tuberculous mycobacteria responsible for resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis patients without prior history of treatment.Materials and methods. 165 strains of tuberculous mycobacteria from HIV positive patients and 166 strains of tuberculous mycobacteria from HIV negative patients were studied in Sverdlovsk Region (TB Dispensary, Yekaterinburg. Mutations in genes were identified using microchips of TB-BIOCHIP® and TB-BIOCHIP®-2 in compliance with the manufacturer's guidelines (OOO Biochip-IMB, Moscow.Results. It was observed that 85/165 (51.52% strains isolated from HIV positive tuberculosis patients and 58/166 (34.94% strains isolated from tuberculosis patients not associated with HIV possessed MDR genotype (p < 0.01. The majority of MDR strains had mutations in the 531th codon of rpoB (Ser→Leu and 315th codon of katG (Ser→Thr (64/85, 75.29% and 38/58, 65.52% respective the groups, resulting in the high level of resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid. Each group also had approximately equal ratio (11/165, 6.67% and 12/166, 7.23% respective the groups of strains with genomic mutations defining the resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin and fluoruquinolones. No confident difference was found in mutation patterns of genome of tuberculous mycobacteria isolated from HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis patients

  8. Structures actancielles en Quechua

    OpenAIRE

    Kirtchuk , Pablo

    1987-01-01

    18 pp.; International audience; Description and explanation of the syntactic behavior of the verb and its actants (arguments) in Quechua; Description et explication du fonctionnement du verbe et des relations actancielles en Quechua

  9. Natural History of Tuberculosis: Duration and Fatality of Untreated Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Negative Patients: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Williams, Brian G.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The prognosis, specifically the case fatality and duration, of untreated tuberculosis is important as many patients are not correctly diagnosed and therefore receive inadequate or no treatment. Furthermore, duration and case fatality of tuberculosis are key parameters in interpreting

  10. Natural history of tuberculosis: duration and fatality of untreated pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV negative patients: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, E.W.; van der Werf, M.J.; Borgdorff, M.W.; Williams, B.G.; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis, specifically the case fatality and duration, of untreated tuberculosis is important as many patients are not correctly diagnosed and therefore receive inadequate or no treatment. Furthermore, duration and case fatality of tuberculosis are key parameters in interpreting

  11. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C for anal carcinoma: Are there differences between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraunholz, Ingeborg; Rabeneck, Daniela; Gerstein, Johanna; Jaeck, Katharina; Haberl, Annette; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report treatment compliance, toxicity and clinical outcome of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for anal carcinoma in HIV-negative vs. HIV-positive patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy. Material and methods: Between 1997 and 2008, 25 HIV-positive and 45 HIV-negative patients received CRT (50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction plus 5.4-10.8 Gy boost; 5-fluorouracil, 1000 mg/m 2 , Days 1-4 and 29-32, mitomycin C, 10 mg/m 2 , Days 1 and 29). Median follow-up was 51 (range, 3-235) months. Results: HIV-positive patients were significantly younger (mean age, 47 vs. 57 years, p < 0.001) and predominantly male (92% vs. 29%, p < 0.001). CRT could be completed in all patients with a reduction of chemotherapy and/or RT-interruption in 28% and 8%, respectively, in HIV-positive patients, and in 9% and 11%, respectively, in HIV-negative patients. Acute Grade 3/4-toxicity occurred in 44% vs. 49% (p = 0.79). Initial complete response (84% vs. 93%, p = 0.41), 5-year rates of local control (65% vs. 78%, p = 0.44), cancer-specific (78% vs. 90%, p = 0.17) and overall survival (71% vs. 77%, p = 0.76) were not significantly different. Conclusion: HIV-positive patients with anal cancer can be treated with standard CRT, with the same tolerability and toxicity as HIV-negative patients. Long-term local control and survival rates are not significantly different between these groups.

  12. D2-40 negative pyogenic granuloma-like Kaposi's sarcoma: Diagnostic features and histogenetic hypothesis of an uncommon skin tumor in HIV-negative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabibi, D; Giannone, A G; Guarnotta, C; Schillaci, O; Franco, V

    2015-07-01

    Pyogenic granuloma-like Kaposi's sarcoma (PGLKS) is a recently described skin tumor showing features both of pyogenic granuloma (PG) and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). The differential diagnosis is often challenging. We reviewed a series of 50 PG and 23 Ks located on distal extremities with the aid of an immunohistochemical panel comprising CD34, CD31, FVIII, SMA, D2-40, HHV8. After revision, 6/50 PG lesions previously diagnosed as PG, showed positive immunostaining for LNA1-HHV8 and focal positivity for CD31 and FVIII in the endothelial cells of the proliferating vessels, with some SMA positive pericytes. D2-40, a marker of lymphatic endothelium positive in KS, stained negatively. These lesions were renamed PGLKS. Of note, in our series, PGLKS represented the only form of KS localized in the hand; all the patients were HIV-negative, older than PG patients, with a prevalence for male gender. PGLKS and PG need a different management and a follow-up is advisable for PGLKS, as for the other variants of KS. To date, D2-40 negative immunostaining has not yet been reported in PGLKS and should not lead to a misdiagnosis of PG. The morphological similarities with PG and the immunohistochemical findings, showing a defective phenotype of the neoplastic cells, suggest a histogenetic hypothesis in which D2-40 negative PGLKS could represent an early stage of HHV8 infection of a pre-existing PG, whose vessels loose progressively their blood vascular markers but have not still acquired the lymphatic ones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. La escritura del quechua

    OpenAIRE

    Authier, Martine du

    2015-01-01

    La mayor fantasía ha acompañado siempre la transcripción del quechua. El primer intento de sistematización fue el sistema de la Paz, en 1953. Sin embargo, no existe en el comercio un diccionario satisfactorio en lo que se refiere al quechua del Cusco y, prácticamente, nada se edita en quechua, fuera de algunos trabajos antropológicos bilingües. Bajo la égida de la UNESCO, la Academia Peruana de la Lengua Quechua, que tiene su sede en el Cusco, ha colaborado en un diccionario de doce de los tr...

  14. Peru: Institutionalizing Quechua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagoria, Consuelo Alfaro; Ballon, Lourdes Zegarra

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the 1975 decision of the Peruvian government to designate Quechua as an official language. Specific programs carried out as a result of this law are analyzed and assessed with respect to their effects and implications. The problems encountered in producing instructional materials for languages which are fragmented into dialects are…

  15. THE STRUCTURE OF AYACUCHO QUECHUA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARKER, GARY J.; SOLA, DONALD F.

    THIS LINGUISTIC DESCRIPTION OF AYACUCHO QUECHUA IS INTENDED TO BE A FAIRLY COMPLETE ANALYSIS OF THE SPOKEN LANGUAGE. USED WITH THE AUTHORS' SPOKEN AYACUCHO QUECHUA COURSE, IT IS A COMPREHENSIVE REFERENCE WORK FOR THE STUDENT AS WELL AS A CONTRIBUTION TO THE FIELD OF DESCRIPTIVE LINGUISTICS. BECAUSE OF THE HIGH DEGREE OF INFLECTION AND SYNTACTIC…

  16. THE STRUCTURE OF CUZCO QUECHUA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOLA, DONALD F.; AND OTHERS

    THIS DETAILED, LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS DOES NOT CONTRAST ENGLISH AND QUECHUA PHONOLOGY AND GRAMMAR BUT RATHER ATTEMPTS TO DESCRIBE THE DISTRIBUTIONAL AND SEMANTIC CATEGORIES PARTICULAR TO CUZCO QUECHUA IN A THOROUGH AND SCIENTIFIC MANNER. IT CAN BE USED IN THE FIELD TO IDENTIFY UNFAMILIAR UTTERANCES OR TO HELP UNDERSTAND HOW NATIVE SPEAKERS…

  17. Transient elastography discloses identical distribution of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C between HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients on HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünhage F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Progressive immunodeficiency associated with HIV-infection leads to a progressive course of liver disease in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART efficiently restores and preserves immune functions and has recently been demonstrated to also result in reduced liver-related mortality in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Methods To analyse differences in current liver fibrosis as a possible effect of HAART on fibrosis progression we assessed hepatic fibrosis by transient elastography in a cross-sectional comparison between HCV-mono-infected and HIV/HCV-co-infected patients presenting at our outpatient department in 2007. Results Overall, we did not find any difference in the distribution of liver stiffness between mono- (n = 84 and double-infected (n = 57 patients (14.4 kPa (10.8 - 18.2 versus 12.4 kPa (9.1 - 16.1, mean (95%-CI. However, in the 8 HIV+ patients with CD4 counts Conclusions These findings are in line with other data that show an improved prognosis of chronic hepatitis C in HIV+ patients under effective HAART, and may be a hint that fibrosis progression in well-treated HIV+ patients will no longer be different from that in HCV-mono-infected patients.

  18. Quechua I y Quechua II: En defensa de una distinción establecida

    OpenAIRE

    Adelaar, Willem F. H.

    2013-01-01

    La investigación sistemática de las lenguas (o ‘dialectos’) quechuas, iniciada a partir de los años ’60 del siglo XX, creó el fundamento para una división de la familia lingüística quechua en dos subgrupos dialectales, que fueron denominados Quechua I y Quechua II (Torero 1964). El subgrupo Quechua I se concentra en un sector continuo de la sierra central y norteña del Perú, mientras que el subgrupo Quechua II incluye todas las variedades quechuas originarias de otras regiones. En publicacion...

  19. Comparison of the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Toluidine Red Unheated Serum Test and the CSF Rapid Plasma Reagin Test with the CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory Test for Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis among HIV-Negative Syphilis Patients in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Gu, Xin; Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Cuini; Gao, Zixiao; Gao, Ying; Shi, Mei; Guan, Zhifang; Seña, Arlene C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commercial RPR antigen diluted 1:2 in 10% saline) test, the toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST), and the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test. Specificities, sensitivities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and kappa values were calculated to determine the performances of the tests. We compared results of the CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST among patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic neurosyphilis who had reactive CSF-Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test results. Overall, the CSF-VDRL test was reactive in 261 patients (23.1%). There were no cases in which the CSF-VDRL was nonreactive and CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, or CSF-TRUST was reactive. Agreement between the results of CSF-TRUST and CSF-RPR was almost perfect (κ = 0.861), with substantial agreement between the results of CSF-RPR and CSF-RPR-V (κ = 0.740). The sensitivities of CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST were 81.4%, 76.2%, 79.5%, and 76.2%, respectively. Compared to CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST had comparable PPVs and NPVs. However, the specificity of CSF-VDRL (90.3%) was significantly lower than those of the other tests (92.7 to 93.4%). Therefore, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST can be considered alternative tests for neurosyphilis diagnosis in HIV-negative populations, particularly when the CSF-VDRL is not available. PMID:24335955

  20. CT and MR findings in HIV-negative neurosyphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Fuhua [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: pfh93@21cn.com; Hu Xueqiang [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: huxueqiangqm@yahoo.com.cn; Zhong Xiufeng [State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center of Sun Yat-Sen University, 54 Xianlie Road, Guangzhou, 510060 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: xiufengzhong@yahoo.com.cn; Wei Qiu [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: qw9406@tom.com; Jiang Ying [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: jiangying722@163.com; Bao Jian [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: baoj92@tom.com; Wu Aimin [Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou, 510630 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: wuaim@126.com; Pei Zhong [Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, 89 Zhongshaner Road, Guangzhou, 510080 Guangdong Province (China)], E-mail: peizhong@yahoo.com

    2008-04-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate neuroimaging findings of patients with neurosyphilis. Methods: The neuroimaging studies of 14 patients with documented neurosyphilis were reviewed. Diagnosis was established in 14 patients with cerebrospinal fluid for a Treponema Pallidum Particle Agglutination (TPPA) test. All patients had reactive TPPA and Unheated Serum Regain test (USR) in their sera. Imaging studies included plain, contrast-enhanced CT of the brain, plain and gadolinium-enhanced MR, and MR angiography. Results: In the 14 HIV-negative patients with neurosyphilis, CT and MR showed the presence of cerebral infarction in six cases, arteritis in four cases, nonspecific white matter lesion in three cases, acute syphilitic meningitis in one case and normal neuroimaging finding in one case. In addition, 4 in 14 patients had general paresis, and MRI showed high signal intensity on T2 -weighted images involving frontotemporal lobes, hippocampus and periventricular area. Treatment with penicillin significantly diminished the size of these high signal intensity on T2-weighted images with general paresis. Conclusion: These results suggest that MR and CT images have some characteristic manifestations in patients of neurosyphilis. Because early diagnosis and treatment of neurosyphilis are crucial to avoid persistent brain damage, the neuroimaging findings are valuable adjunct to clinical diagnosis and to provide useful information to follow-up after therapy.

  1. Quechua Children's Theory of Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Penelope G.; Olson, David R.

    Three different theory of mind tasks were conducted with 4- to 8-year-old Quechua peasant children in the Peruvian Andes. The study investigated the ways in which children in preliterate cultures think and the possibility that they think differently than children in literate cultures. The tasks included: (1) a false-belief task, which tested the…

  2. THE STRUCTURE OF COCHABAMBA QUECHUA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LASTRA, YOLANDA; SOLA, DONALD F.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO DESCRIBE THE MAIN STRUCTURAL ASPECTS OF COCHABAMBA QUECHUA. IT IS INTENDED TO SERVE AS A REFERENCE BOOK FOR LINGUISTS AND THOSE LEARNING THIS DIALECT. THE INTRODUCTION DISCUSSES THE STUDY'S PURPOSE, INFORMANTS, METHODS, TERMINOLOGY, AND NOTATION. THE AUTHORS THEN EXAMINE IN SEPARATE CHAPTERS PHONOLOGY,…

  3. Kaposi's sarcoma after alpha-interferon treatment for HIV-negative T ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract A 54-year-old HIV-negative patient suffering frOIn. T-cell lytnphoIna of Lennert's lytnphoIna (Lel) type was treated for 13 Inonths with interferon a-. 2b. While on treatment with interferon the patient. derrlOnstrated suppression of total and CD4+ lytn- phocytes to levels < 0,5 and 0,2 x 10911, respectively. Although ...

  4. Radiological differences between HIV-positive and HIV-negative children with cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, J K; Fagan, J J; Wojno, M; Manning, K; Harris, T

    2018-07-01

    HIV-positive children are possibly more prone to developing cholesteatoma. Chronic inflammation of the middle ear cleft may be more common in patients with HIV and this may predispose HIV-positive children to developing cholesteatoma. There are no studies that describe the radiological morphology of the middle ear cleft in HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative children with cholesteatoma. Compare the radiological differences of the middle ear cleft in HIV-positive and HIV-negative children with cholesteatoma. A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational analytical review of patients with cholesteatoma at our institute over a 6 year period. Forty patients were included in the study, 11 of whom had bilateral cholesteatoma and therefore 51 ears were eligible for our evaluation. HIV-positive patients had smaller (p=0.02) mastoid air cell systems (MACS). Forty percent of HIV-positive patients had sclerotic mastoids, whereas the rate was 3% in HIV-negative ears (p<0.02). Eighty-two percent of the HIV-positive patients had bilateral cholesteatoma compared to 7% of the control group (p<0.02). There was no difference between the 2 groups with regards to opacification of the middle ear cleft, bony erosion of middle ear structures, Eustachian tube obstruction or soft tissue occlusion of the post-nasal space. HIV-positive paediatric patients with cholesteatoma are more likely to have smaller, sclerotic mastoids compared to HIV-negative patients. They are significantly more likely to have bilateral cholesteatoma. This may have implications in terms of surveillance of HIV-positive children, as well as, an approach to management, recurrence and follow-up. HIV infection should be flagged as a risk factor for developing cholesteatoma. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Early repeated infections with Trichomonas vaginalis among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Patricia; Secor, W Evan; Leichliter, Jami S; Clark, Rebecca A; Schmidt, Norine; Curtin, Erink; Martin, David H

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine whether early repeated infections due to Trichomonas vaginalis among human immunuodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative women are reinfections, new infections, or cases of treatment failure. Women attending an HIV outpatient clinic and a family planning clinic in New Orleans, Louisiana, who had culture results positive for T. vaginalis were treated with 2 g of metronidazole under directly observed therapy. At 1 month, detailed sexual exposure and sexual partner treatment information was collected. Isolates from women who had clinical resistance (i.e., who tested positive for a third time after treatment at a higher dose) were tested for metronidazole susceptibility in vitro. Of 60 HIV-positive women with trichomoniasis, 11 (18.3%) were T. vaginalis positive 1 month after treatment. The 11 recurrences were classified as 3 probable reinfections (27%), 2 probable infections from a new sexual partner (18%), and 6 probable treatment failures (55%); 2 of the 6 patients who experienced probable treatment failure had isolates with mild resistance to metronidazole. Of 301 HIV-negative women, 24 (8.0%) were T. vaginalis positive 1 month after treatment. The 24 recurrences were classified as 2 probable reinfections (8%) and 22 probable treatment failures (92%); of the 22 patients who experienced probable treatment failure, 2 had strains with moderate resistance to metronidazole, and 1 had a strain with mild resistance to metronidazole. HIV-positive women were more likely to have sexual re-exposure than were HIV-negative women, although the rate of treatment failure was similar in both groups. High rates of treatment failure among both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women indicate that a 2-g dose of metronidazole may not be adequate for treatment of some women and that rescreening should be considered.

  6. ENGLISH-QUECHUA DICTIONARY--CUZCO, AYACUCHO, COCHABAMBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARKER, GARY; AND OTHERS

    WRITTEN TO SUPPLEMENT THE AUTHORS' SPOKEN QUECHUA MATERIALS, THIS TRIDIALECTAL DICTIONARY PROVIDES THE SPEAKER OF ENGLISH WHO HAS HAD SOME TRAINING IN QUECHUA GRAMMAR WITH A MEANS OF ACCESS TO ADDITIONAL VOCABULARY IN THE CUZCO, AYACUCHO, AND COCHABAMBA DIALECTS. ALL THE QUECHUA WORDS AND PHRASES INCLUDED ARE IN ACTUAL USE AND WERE GATHERED FROM…

  7. Evidential Uses in the Spanish of Quechua Speakers in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Anna Maria

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of recordings of spontaneous speech of native speakers of Quechua speaking Spanish as a second language reveals that, using verbal morphological resources of Spanish, they have grammaticalized an epistemic marking system resembling that of Quechua. Sources of this process in both Quechua and Spanish are analyzed. (MSE)

  8. Impulsivity, Sensation Seeking, and Risk-Taking Behaviors among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Heroin Dependent Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydary, Koosha; Mahin Torabi, Somayeh; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Noori, Mehri; Noroozi, Alireza; Ameri, Sara; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare impulsivity and risky decision making among HIV-positive and negative heroin dependent persons. Methods. We compared different dimensions of impulsivity and risky decision making in two groups of 60 HIV-positive and 60 HIV-negative male heroin dependent persons. Each group was comprised of equal numbers of current (treatment seeker) and former (abstinent) heroin addicts. Data collection tools included Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), and Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS). Results. In SSS, comprised of four subscales including thrill and adventure seeking (TAS), experience seeking (ES), disinhibition (DIS), and boredom susceptibility (BS), there was a borderline difference in DIS (P = 0.08) as HIV-positive group scored higher than HIV-negative group. Also, ES and total score were significantly higher among HIV-positive patients. In BART, HIV-positive subjects scored higher in risk taking than HIV-negative subjects as reflected in higher Average Number of puffs in Successful Balloons (ANSB). In BIS, HIV-positive group scored significantly higher in cognitive impulsivity (CI) (P = 0.03) and nonplanning impulsivity (NPI) (P = 0.05) in comparison to HIV-negative group. Also, current heroin addicts scored significantly higher in NPI compared to former addict HIV-negative participants (P = 0.015). IGT did not show any significant difference between groups. Conclusion. Higher levels of impulsivity and risk taking behaviors among HIV-positive heroin addicts will increase serious concerns regarding HIV transmission from this group to other opiate dependents and healthy people. PMID:27051528

  9. Impulsivity, Sensation Seeking, and Risk-Taking Behaviors among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Heroin Dependent Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koosha Paydary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare impulsivity and risky decision making among HIV-positive and negative heroin dependent persons. Methods. We compared different dimensions of impulsivity and risky decision making in two groups of 60 HIV-positive and 60 HIV-negative male heroin dependent persons. Each group was comprised of equal numbers of current (treatment seeker and former (abstinent heroin addicts. Data collection tools included Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART, Iowa Gambling Task (IGT, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS, and Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS. Results. In SSS, comprised of four subscales including thrill and adventure seeking (TAS, experience seeking (ES, disinhibition (DIS, and boredom susceptibility (BS, there was a borderline difference in DIS (P=0.08 as HIV-positive group scored higher than HIV-negative group. Also, ES and total score were significantly higher among HIV-positive patients. In BART, HIV-positive subjects scored higher in risk taking than HIV-negative subjects as reflected in higher Average Number of puffs in Successful Balloons (ANSB. In BIS, HIV-positive group scored significantly higher in cognitive impulsivity (CI (P=0.03 and nonplanning impulsivity (NPI (P=0.05 in comparison to HIV-negative group. Also, current heroin addicts scored significantly higher in NPI compared to former addict HIV-negative participants (P=0.015. IGT did not show any significant difference between groups. Conclusion. Higher levels of impulsivity and risk taking behaviors among HIV-positive heroin addicts will increase serious concerns regarding HIV transmission from this group to other opiate dependents and healthy people.

  10. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonisation in HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebold, D; Enoh, D O; Kinge, T N; Akam, W; Bumah, M K; Russow, K; Klammt, S; Loebermann, M; Fritzsche, C; Eyong, J E; Eppel, G; Kundt, G; Hemmer, C J; Reisinger, E C

    2014-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), a major opportunistic infection in AIDS patients in Europe and the USA, in Cameroon. Induced sputum samples from 237 patients without pulmonary symptoms (126 HIV-positive and 111 HIV-negative outpatients) treated at a regional hospital in Cameroon were examined for the prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii by specific nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and staining methods. CD 4 counts and the history of antiretroviral therapy of the subjects were obtained through the ESOPE database system. Seventy-five of 237 study participants (31.6%) were colonised with Pneumocystis, but none showed active PCP. The Pneumocystis colonisation rate in HIV-positive subjects was more than double that of HIV-negative subjects (42.9% vs. 18.9%, P 500 cells/μl were colonised at a rate of 20.0%, subjects with CD 4 counts between 200 and 500 cells/μl of 42.5%, and subjects with CD 4 counts <200 cells/μl of 57.1%. Colonisation with Pneumocystis in Cameroon seems to be comparable to rates found in Western Europe. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures against Pneumocystis should be taken into account in HIV care in western Africa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Comparison of the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Toluidine Red Unheated Serum Test and the CSF Rapid Plasma Reagin Test with the CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory Test for Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis among HIV-Negative Syphilis Patients in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lin; Gu, Xin; Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Cuini; Gao, Zixiao; Zhou, Pingyu; Gao, Ying; Shi, Mei; Guan, Zhifang; Seña, Arlene C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commer...

  12. Acute/subacute cerebral infarction (ASCI) in HIV-negative adults with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM): a MRI-based follow-up study and a clinical comparison to HIV-negative CM adults without ASCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Lui, Chun-Chung; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tan, Teng-Yeow; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2011-01-26

    Acute/subacute cerebral infarction (ASCI) in HIV-negative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) adults has rarely been examined by a series of MRI-based follow-up study. We studied a series of MRI follow-up study of CM adults and compared the clinical characters of those with ASCI and those without ASCI. The clinical characteristics and a series of brain MRI findings of seven CM adults with ASCI were enrolled for analysis. The clinical characteristics of another 30 HIV-negative CM adults who did not have ASCI were also included for a comparative analysis. The seven HIV-negative CM adults with ASCI were four men and three women, aged 46-78 years. Lacunar infarction was the type of ASCI, and 86% (6/7) of the ACSI were multiple infarctions distributed in both the anterior and posterior cerebrovascular territories. The seven CM patients with ASCI were significantly older and had a higher rate of DM and previous stroke than the other 30 CM adults without ASCI. They also had a higher incidence of consciousness disturbance at presentation and had a poor prognosis. ASCI was found in 18.9% (7/37) of HIV-negative CM adults. Serial MRI follow-up studies may allow a better delineation of ASCI in this specific group of infectious disease and multiple lacunar infarctions was the most common type. Older in age and presence of DM and previous stroke were the significant underlying conditions. CM patients with ASCI also had a poor therapeutic outcome.

  13. Acute/subacute cerebral infarction (ASCI in HIV-negative adults with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM: a MRI-based follow-up study and a clinical comparison to HIV-negative CM adults without ASCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chiung-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute/subacute cerebral infarction (ASCI in HIV-negative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM adults has rarely been examined by a series of MRI-based follow-up study. We studied a series of MRI follow-up study of CM adults and compared the clinical characters of those with ASCI and those without ASCI. Methods The clinical characteristics and a series of brain MRI findings of seven CM adults with ASCI were enrolled for analysis. The clinical characteristics of another 30 HIV-negative CM adults who did not have ASCI were also included for a comparative analysis. Results The seven HIV-negative CM adults with ASCI were four men and three women, aged 46-78 years. Lacunar infarction was the type of ASCI, and 86% (6/7 of the ACSI were multiple infarctions distributed in both the anterior and posterior cerebrovascular territories. The seven CM patients with ASCI were significantly older and had a higher rate of DM and previous stroke than the other 30 CM adults without ASCI. They also had a higher incidence of consciousness disturbance at presentation and had a poor prognosis. Conclusion ASCI was found in 18.9% (7/37 of HIV-negative CM adults. Serial MRI follow-up studies may allow a better delineation of ASCI in this specific group of infectious disease and multiple lacunar infarctions was the most common type. Older in age and presence of DM and previous stroke were the significant underlying conditions. CM patients with ASCI also had a poor therapeutic outcome.

  14. SPOKEN AYACUCHO QUECHUA, UNITS 11-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARKER, GARY J.; SOLA, DONALD F.

    THE ESSENTIALS OF AYACUCHO GRAMMAR WERE PRESENTED IN THE FIRST VOLUME OF THIS SERIES, SPOKEN AYACUCHO QUECHUA, UNITS 1-10. THE 10 UNITS IN THIS VOLUME (11-20) ARE INTENDED FOR USE IN AN INTERMEDIATE OR ADVANCED COURSE, AND PRESENT THE STUDENT WITH LENGTHIER AND MORE COMPLEX DIALOGS, CONVERSATIONS, "LISTENING-INS," AND DICTATIONS AS WELL…

  15. SPOKEN CUZCO QUECHUA, UNITS 7-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOLA, DONALD F.; AND OTHERS

    THIS SECOND VOLUME OF AN INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN SPOKEN CUZCO QUECHUA ALSO COMPRISES ENOUGH MATERIAL FOR ONE INTENSIVE SUMMER SESSION COURSE OR ONE SEMESTER OF SEMI-INTENSIVE INSTRUCTION (120 CLASS HOURS). THE METHOD OF PRESENTATION IS ESSENTIALLY THE SAME AS IN THE FIRST VOLUME WITH FURTHER CONTRASTIVE, LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF ENGLISH-QUECHUA…

  16. SPOKEN COCHABAMBA QUECHUA, UNITS 1-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LASTRA, YOLANDA; SOLA, DONALD F.

    THE FIRST OF TWO VOLUMES PREPARED FOR TEACHING THE COCHABAMBA DIALECT OF QUECHUA TO SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH, THIS DOCUMENT IS MADE UP OF 12 UNITS THAT COMPRISE A 6-WEEK INTENSIVE COURSE OF 20 CLASS HOURS A WEEK. EACH UNIT CONSISTS OF ONE OR MORE DIALOGS TO BE MEMORIZED, A DIALOG REVIEW, A SECTION ON GRAMMAR WITH ACCOMPANYING EXERCISES, CONVERSATION,…

  17. Authenticity and Unification in Quechua Language Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.; King, Kendall

    1998-01-01

    Examines the potentially problematic tension between the goals of authenticity and unification in Quechua-language planning. One case study examines the orthographic debate that arose in Peru, and the second case study concerns two indigenous communities in Saraguro in the Southern Ecuadorian highlands where Spanish predominates but two Quichua…

  18. The Binding Properties of Quechua Suffixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David

    This paper sketches an explicitly non-lexicalist application of grammatical theory to Huallaga (Huanuco) Quechua (HgQ). The advantages of applying binding theory to many suffixes that have previously been treated only as objects of the morphology are demonstrated. After an introduction, section 2 outlines basic assumptions about the nature of HgQ…

  19. SPOKEN CUZCO QUECHUA, UNITS 1-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOLA, DONALD F.; AND OTHERS

    THE MATERIALS IN THIS VOLUME COMPRISE SIX UNITS WHICH PRESENT BASIC ASPECTS OF CUZCO QUECHUA PHONOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY, AND SYNTAX FOR THE BEGINNING STUDENT. THE SIX UNITS ARE DESIGNED FOR APPROXIMATELY 120 HOURS OF SUPERVISED CLASS WORK WITH OUTSIDE PREPARATION EXPECTED OF THE STUDENT. EACH UNIT CONSISTS OF A DIALOGUE TO BE MEMORIZED, A DIALOGUE…

  20. SPOKEN COCHABAMBA QUECHUA, UNITS 13-24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LASTRA, YOLANDA; SOLA, DONALD F.

    UNITS 13-24 OF THE SPOKEN COCHABAMBA QUECHUA COURSE FOLLOW THE GENERAL FORMAT OF THE FIRST VOLUME (UNITS 1-12). THIS SECOND VOLUME IS INTENDED FOR USE IN AN INTERMEDIATE OR ADVANCED COURSE AND INCLUDES MORE COMPLEX DIALOGS, CONVERSATIONS, "LISTENING-INS," AND DICTATIONS, AS WELL AS GRAMMAR AND EXERCISE SECTIONS COVERING ADDITIONAL…

  1. SPOKEN AYACUCHO QUECHUA. UNITS 1-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARKER, GARY J.; SOLA, DONALD F.

    THIS BEGINNING COURSE IN AYACUCHO QUECHUA, SPOKEN BY ABOUT A MILLION PEOPLE IN SOUTH-CENTRAL PERU, WAS PREPARED TO INTRODUCE THE PHONOLOGY AND GRAMMAR OF THIS DIALECT TO SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH. THE FIRST OF TWO VOLUMES, IT SERVES AS A TEXT FOR A 6-WEEK INTENSIVE COURSE OF 20 CLASS HOURS A WEEK. THE AUTHORS COMPARE AND CONTRAST SIGNIFICANT FEATURES OF…

  2. An Introduction to Spoken Bolivian Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bills, Garland D.; And Others

    This text is intended for use in a college-level course in Bolivian Quechua for speakers of English. It is divided into thirty units and is specifically designed for a two-semester academic year of fifteen weeks a semester. The entire text is highly structured, carefully graded, and organized on the principles of the audiolingual approach to…

  3. Anal cancer precursor lesions in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients seen at a tertiary health institution in Brazil Lesões precursoras do câncer anal em pacientes HIV-positivos e HIV-negativos atendidos numa instituição de saúde terciária no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Tramujas da Costa e Silva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL or anal cancer in patients attended at the Tropical Medicine Foundation of Amazonas. Methods: 344 patients consecutively attended at the institution, in 2007/2008, were distributed in the following strata according to presence/abscense of at risk conditions for anal cancer: Group 1 _ HIV-positive men-who-have-sex-with-men (101; Group 2 _ HIV-positive females (49; Group 3 _ patients without any at risk condition for anal cancer (53; Group 4 _ HIV-positive heterosexual men (38; Group 5 _ HIV-negative patients, without anoreceptive sexual habits, but with other at risk conditions for anal cancer (45; Group 6 _ HIV-negative men-who-have-sex-with-men (26; and Group 7 _ HIV-negative anoreceptive females (32. The histopathological results of biopsies guided by high-resolution anoscopy were analyzed by frequentist and bayesian statistics in order to calculate the point-prevalence of ASIL/cancer and observe any eventual preponderance of one group over the other. Results: The point-prevalence of ASIL for all the patients studied was 93/344 (27%, the difference between HIV-positive and negative patients being statistically significant (38.3% versus 13.5%; p Objetivo: Investigar a prevalência de lesões intraepiteliais escamosas anais (ASIL ou câncer anal em pacientes atendidos na Fundação de Medicina Tropical do Amazonas. Métodos: 344 pacientes consecutivamente atendidos na instituição, em 2007/2008, foram distribuídos nos seguintes estratos conforme a presença/ausência de fatores de risco para o câncer anal: Grupo 1 _ homens-que-fazem-sexo-com-homens HIV-positivos (101; Grupo 2 _ mulheres HIV-positivas (49; Grupo 3 _ pacientes sem condição de risco para o câncer anal (53; Grupo 4 _ homens heterossexuais HIV-positivos (38; Grupo 5 _ pacientes HIV-negativos, sem hábitos sexuais anorreceptivos, mas com outras condições de risco para o câncer anal (45

  4. Cryptococcal Meningitis in a HIV-Negative Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Barreiros

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a risk factor for the development of cryptococcal infection due to dysfunction at T-cell level. Its rarity may, however, delay diagnosis and treatment. We describe the case of a 60-year-old man, diagnosed with sarcoidosis since 1999. He had never received systemic immunomodulatory therapy, such as corticosteroid therapy. In 2012, he was diagnosed with pulmonary cryptococcosis and treated with fluconazole. In April 2013, he presented with symptoms compatible with central nervous system (CNS infection, namely, Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis. He was treated with amphotericin B, followed by fluconazole. The clinical outcome was favourable.

  5. Molecular identification of Candida dubliniensis isolated from oral lesions of HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in São Paulo, Brazil Identificação molecular de amostras de Candida dubliniensis isoladas de lesões orais de pacientes HIV positivos e negativos em São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Kleber Chavasco

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida dubliniensis is a new, recently described species of yeast. This emerging oral pathogen shares many phenotypic and biochemical characteristics with C. albicans, making it hard to differentiate between them, although they are genotypically distinct. In this study, PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to investigate the presence of C. dubliniensis in samples in a culture collection, which had been isolated from HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with oral erythematous candidiasis. From a total of 37 samples previously identified as C. albicans by the classical method, two samples of C. dubliniensis (5.4% were found through the use of PCR. This study underscores the presence of C. dubliniensis, whose geographical and epidemiological distribution should be more fully investigated.Candida dubliniensis é uma nova espécie recentemente descrita. Este patógeno oral emergente compartilha muitas características fenotípicas e bioquímicas com C. albicans dificultando assim a diferenciação entre elas. As mesmas, porém, mostram-se genotipicamente distintas. Este trabalho tem como objetivo identificar, pela técnica de PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction, a possível presença de C. dubliniensis dentre amostras isoladas de candidose oral eritematosa, provenientes de pacientes HIV positivos e HIV negativos. Em um total de 37 amostras identificadas anteriormente, por método clássico, como C. albicans encontramos duas amostras de C. dubliniensis (5,4% utilizando a técnica do PCR. Esta técnica mostrou-se útil, prática e com identificação taxonômica mais acurada.

  6. Puerperal brain cryptococcoma in an HIV-negative woman successfully treated with fluconazole: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Edward Hagan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus spp. cerebral abscesses are uncommon in immunocompetent subjects. The recommended induction treatment is the administration of amphotericin B plus flucytosine combined with resection for lesions ≥3cm. In this paper, we describe an HIV-negative woman diagnosed with a large cryptococcoma in the immediate postpartum period. The lesion was not resected, and due to amphotericin B intolerance, she received an extended course of fluconazole monotherapy. There was no disease recurrence during the 4 years of follow-up. The abrupt onset of her symptoms following delivery suggests that she developed a postpartum immune reconstitution syndrome. This case also demonstrates that in specific situations fluconazole monotherapy can be attempted in immunocompetent patients with cryptococcoma.

  7. L'apprentissage du quechua à l'INALCO : Cours de quechua avec Lydia CORNEJO ENDARA

    OpenAIRE

    Cornejo Endara , Lydia; De Pablo , Elisabeth; STOCKINGER , Peter; Legrand , Valérie

    2008-01-01

    Cette vidéo présente un cours de quechua à l'INALCO. Après nous avoir expliqué sa méthode personnelle d'apprentissage de la langue quechua, Lydia Cornejo Endara nous propose de la mettre en application lors d'un cours où les étudiants s'exercent à pratiquer la langue en chantant, en racontant des histoires ou en recréant des situations de la vie courante.La série "Enseigner et apprendre à parler le quechua" que nous vous proposons ici, n'est pas un séminaire à proprement parler, mais une séri...

  8. Quechua Language Attitudes and Maintenance in Cuzco, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Marilyn S.

    2008-01-01

    This article qualitatively and quantitatively investigates the Quechua language attitudes and maintenance practices of the members of two non-profit, non-governmental agencies in Cuzco, Peru. Within their respective agency/community contexts, the members of both groups claim to have significantly more positive attitudes toward Quechua and exhibit…

  9. Can Peru's Rural Schools Be Agents for Quechua Language Maintenance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    1989-01-01

    Draws on sociolinguistic literature and on an ethnographic study of language use and bilingual education in Quechua-speaking rural communities of Puno. Consider the roles of both language planning and the schools in achieving language maintenance for Quechua. (35 references) (Author/CB)

  10. Language Policy: Status Planning for the Quechua Language in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel-Molina, Serafin

    1997-01-01

    The status of Quechua in Peruvian society is discussed, noting specific social and political factors contributing to the dying out of the Quechua language, functional domains the language serves, and possible measures to improve its status. The relationship of those functional domains to Peruvian language policies is also explored. An introductory…

  11. The Historical-Comparative Classification of Colombian Inga (Quechua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Roger

    1990-01-01

    Colombian Inga is of particular interest to the Quechuanist because it is the northernmost member of the Quechuan language family spoken in modern times. In the present work, the relationship of Colombian Inga to other varieties of Quechua is examined. The affiliation of Inga with the Ecuadorian group of Parker's (1969a) Quechua A branch of the…

  12. Corpus Planning for the Southern Peruvian Quechua Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel-Molina, Serafin M.

    1997-01-01

    The discussion of corpus planning for the Southern Quechua language variety of Peru examines issues of graphization, standardization, modernization, and renovation of Quechua in the face of increasing domination by the Spanish language. The efforts of three major groups of linguists and other scholars working on language planning in Peru, and the…

  13. Chorioamnionitis in pregnancy: a comparative study of HIV-positive and HIV-negative parturients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocheke, Amaka N; Agaba, Patricia A; Imade, Godwin E; Silas, Olugbenga A; Ajetunmobi, Olanrewaju I; Echejoh, Godwins; Ekere, Clement; Sendht, Ayuba; Bitrus, James; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Sagay, Atiene S

    2016-03-01

    Chorioamnionitis is an important risk factor for vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS. We compared the prevalence and correlates of histologic chorioamnionitis (HCA) in HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women. HIV-positive and -negative parturients were interviewed, examined and had their placentas examined histologically for chorioamnionitis. Data regarding HIV were also retrieved from their hospital records. A total of 298 parturients (150 HIV positive and 148 HIV negative) were enrolled. The two groups were similar in socio-demographic and obstetric parameters except for age. The prevalence of HCA was 57.1% in HIV-positive women and 61.6% in HIV-negative women (p = 0.43). HCA staging was associated with the number of intrapartum vaginal examinations in HIV-positive subjects and nulliparity in HIV-negative subjects. The number of intrapartum vaginal examinations and coitus in the week prior to delivery significantly affected the grade of HCA in HIV-negative subjects. The prevalence of HCA in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative is high. Most variables did not affect the occurrence of HCA in both groups studied except number of intrapartum examinations, coitus in the preceding one week and nulliparity, which were related to severity of the disease. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Comparative Quechua Phonology and Grammar V: The Evolution of Quechua B(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Gary J.

    It is possible to observe phonological innovations in Quechua B in purely linguistic terms, abandoning the use of dialects and subdialects. Isolect and lect are used instead. A particular speech form, with respect to a particular innovation, is an isolect in one of three possible ways: it lacks the innovation; it has the innovation as a variable…

  15. Lecciones de Quechua. Primer Nivel, Segundo Nivel (Quechua Lessons. First Level, Second Level).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Joaquin; And Others

    The two volumes comprising this text represent the beginning and intermediate levels of a course in the Quechua language for speakers of Spanish. Based on the "Audio Lingual Materials" format, the ten lessons in the the first volume generally contain: (1) a short dialog and a supplementary vocabulary section or adapted dialog which…

  16. First record of chytridiomycosis in Bolivia (Rhinella quechua; Anura: Bufonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrionuevo, J Sebastián; Aguayo, Rodrigo; Lavilla, Esteban O

    2008-11-20

    The finding of tadpoles of Rhinella quechua (Huayramayu River, Carrasco National Park, Cochabamba, Bolivia) with oral abnormalities caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis constitutes the first record of this fungal infection reported for Bolivian amphibians.

  17. The Archaeology of Wari and the Dispersal of Quechua

    OpenAIRE

    Isbell, William H.

    2012-01-01

    The association of Wari with Quechua, or proto-Quechan speech, cannot be demonstrated by an unbroken tradition of material culture such as ceramic style from the Middle Horizon to ethnohistorically known Quechua speaking communities. However, the spread of Wari from its northern Ayacucho homeland, to the archaeologically most obvious colonies that stretch across Andes from Cuzco to southern Ayacucho, and into Ica and Arequipa, corresponds remarkably with the ethnohistoric distribution of Quec...

  18. Quechua reivindication in Roncalla, Gonzales and Ninawaman poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Juan Zevallos-Aguilar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the literary works of transnational Peruvian Quechua poets Fredy Roncalla (Apurímac 1953, Odi Gonzales (Cuzco 1962, and Chaska Anka Ninawaman (Cuzco 1972. It addresses ethnic Quechua reinvindication, identity politics, and denounces the exclusions Quechua people suffer in various cultural and social contexts, focusing, moreover, on each poet’s transnational perspective. Roncalla underlines Quechua people’s flexibility to adapt and overcome problems from New York City. Anka Ninawaman manifests her confidence in the Quechua community and family from Paris. Also from New York City, Gonzales suggests the dismissal of Incan mythic realms. All three poets have thus incorporated new topics and registers into the written Quechua literary tradition. Roncalla, Gonzalez and Anka Ninawaman distance themselves from the two versions of utopic horizon typical of the 1980s, in the then ongoing debate on the future of Peru, namely, Alberto Flores Galindo’s “Andean Utopian” and Mario Vargas Llosa’s “neoliberal utopia”.

  19. Safety, tolerability, and systemic absorption of dapivirine vaginal microbicide gel in healthy, HIV-negative women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nel, Annalene M.; Coplan, Paul; van de Wijgert, Janneke H.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; von Mollendorf, Claire; Geubbels, Eveline; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Rees, Helen V.; Masenga, Gileard; Kiwelu, Ireen; Moyes, Jocelyn; Smythe, Shanique C.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the local and systemic safety of dapivirine vaginal gel vs. placebo gel as well as the systemic absorption of dapivirine in healthy, HIV-negative women. Two prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase I/II studies were conducted at five research centers, four in Africa

  20. Targeting mTOR in HIV-Negative Classic Kaposi's Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofer Merimsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 66-year old female with HIV-negative classic Kaposi's sarcoma responded to mTOR targeting by rapamycin. The response was well documented by PET-CT. This case provides supporting evidence that the mTOR pathway may be important in the tumorigenesis of KS and that rapamycin may have activity in this disease.

  1. Aerobic endurance in HIV-positive young adults and HIV-negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-09

    Mar 9, 2015 ... not taking antiretroviral medication and 78 HIV-negative participants (45 ... between groups were adjusted for age differences using analysis of ... habits, body composition, gender, age and genetic factors ..... Three meta - analyses ... Exercise Treadmill Test for the Assessment of Cardiac Risk Markers.

  2. HIV-positive and HIV-negative consumers accept an instant soy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV-positive and HIV-negative consumers accept an instant soy maize porridge. ... Health SA Gesondheid ... The objective of this study was to assess consumer acceptability, preference and consumption intent of an instant soy ... as a food supplement for HIV subjects in a subsequent nutrition intervention trial, to improve

  3. Efavirenz poisoning in a 12 year old HIV negative African boy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efavirenz is an oral antiretroviral drug in the class of non nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Toxicity at therapeutic doses has been documented but there is scarcity of data on presentation and management of Efavirenz overdose. We describe a case of Efavirenz poisoning in a 12-year old HIV Negative African boy ...

  4. Screening for human papillomavirus, cervical cytological abnormalities and associated risk factors in HIV-positive and HIV-negative women in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukanyangezi, M F; Sengpiel, V; Manzi, O; Tobin, G; Rulisa, S; Bienvenu, E; Giglio, D

    2018-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the major cause of death from cancer in Africa. We wanted to assess the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and associated risk factors and to determine whether HPV testing could serve as a screening method for squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) in Rwanda. We also wanted to obtain a broader understanding of the underlying risk factors for the establishment of HPV infection in Rwanda. A total of 206 HIV-positive women, 172 HIV-negative women and 22 women with unknown HIV status were recruited at the University Teaching Hospitals of Kigali (UTHK) and of Butare (UTHB) in Rwanda. Participants underwent an interview, cervical sampling for a Thinprep Pap test and a screening test analysing 37 HPV strains. Only 27% of HIV-positive women and 7% of HIV-negative women had been screened for cervical cancer before. HPV16 and HPV52 were the most common HPV strains. HIV-positive women were more commonly infected with high-risk (HR) HPV and multitype HPV than HIV-negative women. The sensitivity was 78% and the specificity 87% to detect high-grade SIL (HSIL) with HPV screening. Among HIV-negative women, being divorced was positively associated with HR-HPV infection, while hepatitis B, Trichomonas vaginalis infection and HR-HPV infection were factors positively associated with SILs. Ever having had gonorrhoea was positively associated with HR-HPV infection among HIV-positive women. HR-HPV infection and the number of live births were positively associated with SILs. The currently used quadrivalent vaccine may be insufficient to give satisfactory HPV coverage in Rwanda. HPV Screening may be effective to identify women at risk of developing cervical cancer, particularly if provided to high-risk patients. © 2017 British HIV Association.

  5. Visceral leishmaniasis in 26 HIV-negative adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrady Rhizlane

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral leishmaniasis is a notifiable parasitic disease that had increased in incidence in our region on the past few years. It is common in children. In adults, it occurs more on a background of immunodeficiency, and frequently with incomplete clinical manifestations, making the diagnosis complicated. Findings The aim of our study is to reveal different features of visceral leishmaniasis in adults, through the analysis of its epidemiological, clinical and biological parameters, in a group of 26 patients. No one was infected with HIV or under immunosuppressive therapy Clinical presentation was generally conservative, but there was few differences in adults compared to children, concerning both the clinical symptoms and the laboratory parameters. Diagnosis was provided by direct examination of bone marrow smears in 24 cases (sensitivity 92%, and anti-leishmanial serology in the others. Conclusion We should think to the diagnosis of VL even if the patient is not known immunocompromised, and even if the clinical is incomplete, to avoid a delay of care which can lead to serious complications.

  6. Dietary intake and coronary risk factors in Peruvian Quechua Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, E W; Picon-Reategui, E; Gahagan, H E; Buskirk, E R

    1976-06-01

    Some of the "risk" factors implicated in the etiology of coronary atherosclerotic heart disease were investigated in sixty Quechua men living in two areas of Peru. Highland Quechua had higher serum triglycerides (mean, 122 vs. 90 mg. per deciliter) than downward migrants. There were no significant differences between the two groups in serum cholesterol (mean 150 vs. 157 mg. per deciliter), body fat (mean, 15 vs. 17%), or blood pressure (mean, 113/72 vs. 114/72 mm Hg). Both groups consumed about 2,500 kcal per man per day, while the highland Quechua consumed more carbohydrate (mean, 66 vs. 51%) and less fat (mean 19 vs. 33%). By American standards, both groups had low serum cholesterol values, as well as low blood pressure.

  7. Attitudes of Heterosexual Men and Women Toward HIV Negative and Positive Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini Pala, Andrea; Villano, Paola; Clinton, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of Italian heterosexual men and women toward gay men, both HIV positive and negative, are poorly investigated. Italian culture is still extremely conservative and provides limited support to the gay community (e.g., lack of same-sex marriage recognition). Consequently, gay men experience social exclusion and disparities. The present study explores the association between homophobia and closeness with sexual orientation and HIV status. 261 heterosexual Italian men and women were assessed for feelings of closeness and homophobia after reading a vignette where the character was C1: heterosexual and HIV negative; C2: gay and HIV negative; or C3: gay and HIV positive. Experiences of homophobia and closeness varied depending on gender of participant and condition assigned, and higher levels of homophobia were correlated with lower levels of closeness regardless of HIV status. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  8. Perceptions and Definitions of Power Within the Context of HIV-Negative Male Couples’ Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Jason W.; Sophus, Amber I.

    2016-01-01

    Examining dynamics within relationships is critical for development of effective HIV prevention interventions for male couples. The dynamic of power has received little attention in research with male couples, though power has been reported to affect HIV risk among heterosexual couples. To help address this knowledge gap, the present cross-sectional analysis used mixed methods with dyadic data from 142 HIV-negative male couples to (1) assess partnered men’s perception of who has the most powe...

  9. An OT Account of Laryngealization in Cuzco Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Steve

    Classical phonemic accounts of Cuzco (Peru) Quechua posit three distinct types of stops: plain, aspirated, and glottalized. A later analysis argued instead for a root-level feature of laryngealization governed by a small number of formal mechanisms. This latter analysis is taken one step further, showing that even greater explanatory power may be…

  10. Learning to Construct Verbs in Navajo and Quechua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Ellen H.; Saville-Troike, Muriel

    2002-01-01

    Navajo and Quechua, both languages with a highly complex morphology, provide intriguing insights into the acquisition of inflectional systems. The development of the verb in the two languages is especially interesting, since the morphology encodes diverse grammatical notions, with the complex verb often constituting the entire sentence. While the…

  11. Historical Perspectives on Spanish-Quechua Language Contact in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Carol A.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an overview of language policy in Peru from colonial times to the present and analyzes the impact of this policy, together with the underlying social conditions, on Spanish-Quechua language contact and Spanish language change in present-day Peru. (Author/VWL)

  12. Teleological Talk in Parent-Child Conversations in Quechua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Susan A.; Mannheim, Bruce; Escalante, Carmen; Tapia, Ingrid Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Southern Peruvian Quechua is an indigenous language spoken primarily in rural communities in the Peruvian Andes. The language includes a syntactic construction, "-paq", that expresses purpose or function, thus providing an opportunity to trace how parents and children with little formal education express teleological concepts. The…

  13. QUECHUA LANGUAGE MATERIALS PROJECT, GUIDE TO THE MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOLA, DONALD F.

    THIS GUIDEBOOK DESCRIBES THE NATURE AND USE OF THE MATERIALS PREPARED FOR TEACHING THREE OF THE MAIN DIALECTS OF QUECHUA TO SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH INTERESTED IN WORKING OR DOING RESEARCH IN THE ANDEAN REGION. DESCRIPTIVE AND PEDAGOGICAL MATERIALS HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR EACH OF THREE IMPORTANT DIALECTS--CUZCO AND AYACUCHO IN PERU, AND COCHABAMBA IN…

  14. Factors associated with self-reported HBV vaccination among HIV-negative MSM participating in an online sexual health survey: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Matthews

    Full Text Available A substantial proportion of men who have sex with men (MSM in the United States remain unvaccinated against hepatitis B. We sought to understand which factors are associated with vaccination among HIV-negative MSM.Data were from a 2010 web-based survey of adult MSM. We calculated the prevalence of self-reported hepatitis B vaccination among 1,052 HIV-negative or HIV-untested men who knew their hepatitis B vaccination status, and used multivariate logistic regression to determine associated factors. 679 (64.5% MSM reported being vaccinated. Younger men were more likely to report being vaccinated than older men, and there was a significant interaction between age and history of hepatitis B testing. Men with at least some college education were at least 2.1 times as likely to be vaccinated as men with a high school education or less (95% CI = 1.4-3.1. Provider recommendation for vaccination (aOR = 4.2, 95% CI = 2.4-7.4 was also significantly associated with receipt of vaccination.Providers should assess sexual histories of male patients and offer those patients with male sex partners testing for hepatitis infection and vaccinate susceptible patients. There may be particular opportunities for screening and vaccination among older and more socioeconomically disadvantaged MSM.

  15. High-altitude haematology: Quechua-Aymara comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, J; Quilici, J C; Rivière, G

    1981-01-01

    Haematological studies have been carried out at various altitudes between 450 m and 4800 m, on two separate human groups (Quechuas and Aymaras) living in South America. Changes in the haematological parameters do not develop linearly in relation to the attitude. Th impact of chronic hypoxia on erythropoiesis is greater above 3000 m. The haemogram varies quantitatively and not qualitatively (mean corpuscular volume and mean haemoglobin concentration remain constant). The haematological study also reveals the greater adaptability to high altitude of the Aymaras, an adaptability characterized by an increase in red cell count and concentration and a decrease in red cell volume. The adaptative phenomena observed in the Quechuas are reversible, whereas they persist in the Aymaras when they migrate to the lowlands (450 m).

  16. Neither the State nor the Grass Roots: Language Maintenance and the Discourse of the Academia Mayor de la Lengua Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Tim

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Academia Mayor de la Lengua Quechua, a Peruvian institution ostensibly dedicated to maintaining Quechua. Data from writings by and about the Academia and from administrator interviews suggest that the institution shows signs of an ambivalent and potentially conflictive attitude toward the Peruvian state and Quechua speakers, and this…

  17. Functional Domains of the Quechua Language in Peru: Issues of Status Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel-Molina, Serafin M.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the status of Quechua in Peru and how it has affected language maintenance efforts; discusses the functional domains served by Quechua, relating them to Peruvian language policies; notes the lack of grassroots efforts by indigenous people in Peru; and suggests possible measures to improve its status, noting predictions of the future of…

  18. "Una Nacion Acorralada": Southern Peruvian Quechua Language Planning and Politics in Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Bruce

    1984-01-01

    Outlines history of Spanish colonial policies toward Southern Peruvian Quechua and points out those issues under debate concerning the indigenous languages. The central issue of the "Andean language debate" continues to be whether or not the Quechua have a right to exist as a separate community. (SL)

  19. Syntactic Universals and the Acquisition of Spanish Word Order by Quechua-Speaking Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Marta; Liliana Minaya

    Because of the syntactic differences between Spanish and Quechua, Quechua-speaking children must make major word order adjustments to learn the Peruvian Spanish taught in school. This study investigates whether the order or time sequence in which these changes are adopted reflects any general constraint, or is in any way predicted by a theory of…

  20. Spanish as a Second Language when L1 Is Quechua: Endangered Languages and the SLA Researcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalt, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. Quechua is the largest indigenous language family to constitute the first language (L1) of second language (L2) Spanish speakers. Despite sheer number of speakers and typologically interesting contrasts, Quechua-Spanish second language acquisition is a nearly untapped research area,…

  1. Functional Convergence in the Tense, Evidentiality and Aspectual Systems of Quechua Spanish Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Liliana

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, I present an exploratory study on cross-linguistic interference among Quechua-Spanish bilingual children living in a language contact situation. The study focuses on convergence in the tense, aspectual and evidentiality systems of the two languages. While in Quechua past tense features are strongly linked to evidentiality in the…

  2. Misbehaviour, Punishment, and Put-Down: Stress for Quechua Children in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    1988-01-01

    Explores language and interaction behaviors of Quechua children that point to the possibility of a stress reaction on their part. Behaviors of Quechua children in two schools, one with and one without a bilingual program, are discussed. Interaction is discussed in terms of underparticipation, overparticipation, and hostile participation. (15…

  3. Safety, tolerability, and systemic absorption of dapivirine vaginal microbicide gel in healthy, HIV-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Annalene M; Coplan, Paul; van de Wijgert, Janneke H; Kapiga, Saidi H; von Mollendorf, Claire; Geubbels, Eveline; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Rees, Helen V; Masenga, Gileard; Kiwelu, Ireen; Moyes, Jocelyn; Smythe, Shanique C

    2009-07-31

    To assess the local and systemic safety of dapivirine vaginal gel vs. placebo gel as well as the systemic absorption of dapivirine in healthy, HIV-negative women. Two prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase I/II studies were conducted at five research centers, four in Africa and one in Belgium. A total of 119 women used dapivirine gel (concentrations of 0.001, 0.002, 0.005, or 0.02%), and 28 used placebo gel twice daily for 42 days. The primary endpoints were colposcopic findings, adverse events, Division of AIDS grade 3 or grade 4 laboratory values, and plasma levels of dapivirine. Safety data were similar for the dapivirine and placebo gels. None of the adverse events with incidence more than 5% occurred with greater frequency in the dapivirine than placebo groups. Similar percentages of placebo and dapivirine gel users had adverse events that were considered by the investigator to be related to study gel. A total of five serious adverse events occurred in the two studies, and none was assessed as related to study gel. Mean plasma concentrations of dapivirine were approximately dose proportional, and, within each dose group, mean concentrations were similar on days 7, 28, and 42. The maximum observed mean concentration was 474 pg/ml in the 0.02% gel group on day 28. Two weeks after the final application of study gel, mean concentrations decreased to 5 pg/ml or less. Twice daily administration of dapivirine vaginal gel for 42 days was safe and well tolerated with low systemic absorption in healthy, HIV-negative women suggesting that continued development is warranted.

  4. HPV seroconversion following anal and penile HPV infection in HIV-negative and HIV-infected MSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Sofie H.; Landén, Olivia; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; de Melker, Hester E.; Xiridou, Maria; van Eeden, Arne; Heijman, Titia; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed human papillomavirus (HPV) seroconversion following anal and penile HPV infection in HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM aged ≥18 years were recruited in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (2010-2011), and followed up semiannually. Antibodies against 7 high-risk

  5. La escritura fonémica del quechua Ayacuchano

    OpenAIRE

    Majerhua Castro, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    El presente trabajo de investigación es el resultado de varios años de recopilación de datos concernientes a demostrar que en el mundo andino hay una diversidad de lenguas y dialectos que continúan vertiginosamente atomizándose producto de la presencia compulsiva de la política etnocentrista de la cultura occidental, quien genera en los Andes la barrera lingüística y la discriminación social y cultural. En el caso de la lengua quechua, el factor fundamental de la profunda dialectalizació...

  6. Vowel Height Allophony and Dorsal Place Contrasts in Cochabamba Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of two studies investigating the role of allophony in cueing phonemic contrasts. In Cochabamba Quechua, the uvularvelar place distinction is often cued by additional differences in the height of the surrounding vowels. An acoustic study documents the lowering effect of a preceding tautomorphemic or a following heteromorphemic uvular on the high vowels /i u/. A discrimination study finds that vowel height is a significant cue to the velar-uvular place contrast. These findings support a view of contrasts as collections of distinguishing properties, as opposed to oppositions in a single distinctive feature. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual methamphetamine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Shirley J; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    While many studies have examined correlates of trading sex for money, few have examined factors associated with exclusive trading of sex for drugs. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual men and women who were enrolled in a sexual risk reduction intervention in San Diego, California. Of 342 participants, 26% overall (21% of males and 31% of females) reported trading sex for methamphetamine in the past two months. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that recently trading sex for methamphetamine was independently associated with being female, homeless, binging on methamphetamine, sexual victimization in the past two months, engaging in anal sex 24 or more times in the past two months, and higher sexual compulsivity scores. Effective interventions for this high-risk population should consider gender-focused counseling for sexual abuse, motivational enhancement therapy, social-cognitive skills training, as well as enhanced access and utilization of social services, including drug treatment.

  8. El sufijo «infinitivizador» en quechua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Rocha Martínez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available El quechua presenta un sufijo formador de nuevas palabras que ha sido descrito como derivativo nominal deverbativo, es decir, como un sufijo que deriva nombres a partir de elementos lexicales de naturaleza verbal. Sin embargo, la categorización de este sufijo como un derivativo nominal trae consigo una serie de escollos de los que daremos cuenta en el presente estudio con la finalidad de plantear una propuesta factible respecto del estatus nominal o verbal del morfema involucrado. Nuestra investigaciónpropone una recategorización del sufijo en cuestión ya que las descripciones taxonómicas solamente lo han definido como una terminación propiamente infinitiva que constituye formas no personales, pero cuya naturaleza es de tipo nominal. El problema potencial que encontramos en el análisis tradicional de este sufijo es que nos remite a una forma nominal como producto derivado a partir de un verbo; no obstante, el comportamientode dicha forma derivada dista mucho de ser propiamente un nombre.Palabras claves: Quechua, morfología derivativa, sufijo infinitivizador.

  9. A developmental analysis of generic nouns in Southern Peruvian Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Bruce; Gelman, Susan A; Escalante, Carmen; Huayhua, Margarita; Puma, Rosalía

    2010-01-01

    Generic noun phrases (e.g., "Cats like to drink milk") are a primary means by which adults express generalizations to children, yet they pose a challenging induction puzzle for learners. Although prior research has established that English speakers understand and produce generic noun phrases by preschool age, little is known regarding the cross-cultural generality of generic acquisition. Southern Peruvian Quechua provides a valuable comparison because, unlike English, it is a highly inflected language in which generics are marked by the absence rather than the presence of any linguistic markers. Moreover, Quechua is spoken in a cultural context that differs markedly from the highly educated, middle-class contexts within which earlier research on generics was conducted. We presented participants from 5 age groups (3-6, 7-9, 10-12, 14-35, and 36-90 years of age) with two tasks that examined the ability to distinguish generic from non-generic utterances. In Study 1, even the youngest children understood generics as applying broadly to a category (like "all") and distinct from indefinite reference ("some"). However, there was a developmental lag before children understood that generics, unlike "all", can include exceptions. Study 2 revealed that generic interpretations are more frequent for utterances that (a) lack specifying markers and (b) are animate. Altogether, generic interpretations are found among the youngest participants, and may be a default mode of quantification. These data demonstrate the cross-cultural importance of generic information in linguistic expression.

  10. Alcohol and condom use among HIV-positive and HIV-negative female sex workers in Nagaland, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuken, Amenla; Kermode, Michelle; Saggurti, Niranjan; Armstrong, Greg; Medhi, Gajendra Kumar

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the relationship between alcohol use, HIV status, and condom use among female sex workers in Nagaland, India. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey undertaken in 2009, using descriptive and multivariate statistics. Out of 417 female sex workers, one-fifth used alcohol daily and one-tenth were HIV-positive. HIV-positive female sex workers were more likely than HIV-negative female sex workers to consume alcohol daily (30.2% vs. 18.0%). HIV-positive daily alcohol users reported lower condom use at last sex with regular clients compared to HIV-positive non-daily alcohol users (46.2% vs. 79.3%), a relationship not evident among HIV-negative female sex workers. There is a need to promote awareness of synergies between alcohol use and HIV, and to screen for problematic alcohol use among female sex workers in order to reduce the spread of HIV.

  11. Enzyme mechanisms for pyruvate-to-lactate flux attenuation: a study of Sherpas, Quechuas, and hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochachka, P W; Stanley, C; McKenzie, D C; Villena, A; Monge, C

    1992-10-01

    During incremental exercise to fatigue under hypobaric hypoxia, Andean Quechua natives form and accumulate less plasma lactate than do lowlanders under similar conditions. This phenomenon of low lactate accumulation despite hypobaric hypoxia, first discovered some half century ago, is known in Quechuas to be largely unaffected by acute exposure to hypoxia or by acclimatization to sea level conditions. Earlier Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and metabolic biochemistry studies suggest that closer coupling of energy demand and energy supply in Quechuas allows given changes in work rate with relatively modest changes in muscle adenylate and phosphagen concentrations, thus tempering the activation of glycolytic flux to pyruvate--a coarse control mechanism operating at the level of overall pathway flux. Later studies of enzyme activities in skeletal muscles of Quechuas and of Sherpas have identified a finely-tuned control mechanism which by adaptive modifications of a few key enzymes apparently serves to specifically attenuate pyruvate flux to lactate.

  12. A-B-O and Rh affinities between highland and lowland Quechua-speaking Peruvian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisancho, A R; Klayman, J E

    1975-09-01

    According to the accounts of the Spanish chronicles and various historical analyses the Quechua-speaking population inhabiting the Province of Lamas in the Eastern Tropical Lowlands of Peru are descendants of the Chanca Tribes that migrated from the highlands about 500 years ago. The results of the present study indicate that in terms of the A-B-O and Rh systems the lowland Quechua-speaking population from the Province of Lamas and the highland Quechua population from the Province of Junin are more similar to each other than to other tropical tribes. Therefore, it is quite possible that the present lowland Quechua-speaking population from the Province of Lamas may be descendants of Andean populations.

  13. HIV-positive and HIV-negative consumers accept an instant soy maize porridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna C Bouwer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess consumer acceptability, preference and consumption intent of an instant soy maize porridge, compared to an instant plain maize porridge, in order to determine the successful inclusion of the soy maize porridge as a food supplement for HIV subjects in a subsequent nutrition intervention trial, to improve their nutritional status. A 5-point hedonic and food action rating scale was used for this purpose. HIV-positive (n=57 and HIV-negative (n=47 subjects were recruited on a basis of availability and willingness to participate. Long-term acceptability and compliance of HIV-positive consumers (n=9 was assessed after three and five months. Analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s multiple comparison test and T-tests (p≤0.05 were performed. Overall, consumers found the soy maize porridge significantly more acceptable, preferred it to, and also intended to consume it more often than the plain maize porridge. There were no significant differences between the HIV-positive and HIV-negative group regarding acceptability, preference and consumption intent. After three and five months, the HIV-positive consumers (n=9 did not find acceptability of the soy maize porridge significantly different from the first evaluation. It therefore had the potential to be included successfully in the nutrition intervention trial. The current study emphasises the need for sensory evaluation of food products prior to including them in intervention studies, to assess consumers’ acceptance of them. Opsomming Die doel van hierdie studie was om verbruikers se aanvaarding, voorkeur en voorneme van verbruik van ‘n kitssojamieliepap, in vergelyking met ‘n gewone kitsmieliepap te bepaal, ten einde die suksesvolle insluiting van die kitssojamieliepap as voedselaanvulling vir HIV-proefpersone om hul voedingstatus te verbeter, in ‘n daaropvolgende voedingsintervensiestudie te ondersoek. ‘n Vyf-punt hedoniese en voedselaksie

  14. Modeling the Relationship Between Trauma and Psychological Distress Among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women

    OpenAIRE

    Delany-Brumsey, A; Joseph, NT; Myers, HF; Ullman, JB; Wyatt, GE

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the association between cumulative exposure to multiple traumatic events and psychological distress, as mediated by problematic substance use and impaired psychosocial resources. A sample of HIV-positive and HIV-negative women were assessed for a history of childhood and adult sexual abuse and non-sexual trauma as predictors of psychological distress (i.e., depression, non-specific anxiety, and posttraumatic stress), as mediated by problematic alcohol and drug use and ...

  15. Patterns of repeated anal cytology results among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary A. Robbins

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM are at increased risk for anal cancer. In cervical cancer screening, patterns of repeated cytology results are used to identify low- and high-risk women, but little is known about these patterns for anal cytology among MSM. Methods: We analyzed Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS data for MSM who were offered anal cytology testing annually (HIV-positive or every 2 years (HIV-negative for 4 years. Results: Following an initial negative (normal cytology, the frequency of a second negative cytology was lower among HIV-positive MSM with CD4 ≥ 500 (74% or CD4 < 500 (68% than HIV-negative MSM (83% (p < 0.001. After an initial abnormal cytology, the frequency of a second abnormal cytology was highest among HIV-positive MSM with CD4 < 500 (70% compared to CD4 ≥ 500 (53% or HIV-negative MSM (46% (p = 0.003. Among HIV-positive MSM with at least three results, 37% had 3 consecutive negative results; 3 consecutive abnormal results were more frequent among CD4 < 500 (22% than CD4 ≥ 500 (10% (p = 0.008. Conclusions: More than one-third of HIV-positive MSM have consistently negative anal cytology over three years. Following abnormal anal cytology, a repeated cytology is commonly negative in HIV-negative or immunocompetent HIV-positive men, while persistent cytological abnormality is more likely among HIV-positive men with CD4 < 500. Keywords: Anal cancer, Anal cytology, HIV, MSM, Anal cancer screening

  16. Perceptions and Definitions of Power Within the Context of HIV-Negative Male Couples’ Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W.; Sophus, Amber I.

    2016-01-01

    Examining dynamics within relationships is critical for development of effective HIV prevention interventions for male couples. The dynamic of power has received little attention in research with male couples, though power has been reported to affect HIV risk among heterosexual couples. To help address this knowledge gap, the present cross-sectional analysis used mixed methods with dyadic data from 142 HIV-negative male couples to (1) assess partnered men’s perception of who has the most power in their relationship and why, (2) examine whether partners concur about who has the most power and their reasoning for this selection, and (3) assess whether male couples’ concurrence about who has the most power is associated with their engagement of condomless anal sex within and/or outside the relationship, type of relationship, and aspects of their sexual agreement. Individual- and couple-level responses about who has the most power were quantitatively assessed, whereas for why, their responses were coded qualitatively. Fifty-six percent of couples concurred about who has the most power in their relationship and of these, many said it was equal. Regarding why, themes of responses ranged from “compromise” and “shared responsibility” for those who concurred about who has the most power versus “dominant/compliant personality” and “money” among the couples who disagreed about who has the most power in their relationship. Concordance about who has the most power was only associated with condomless anal sex within the relationship. Further research is warranted to examine how power may affect other dynamics of male couples’ relationships and risk-related behaviors. PMID:26186952

  17. Perceptions and Definitions of Power Within the Context of HIV-Negative Male Couples' Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W; Sophus, Amber I

    2017-07-01

    Examining dynamics within relationships is critical for development of effective HIV prevention interventions for male couples. The dynamic of power has received little attention in research with male couples, though power has been reported to affect HIV risk among heterosexual couples. To help address this knowledge gap, the present cross-sectional analysis used mixed methods with dyadic data from 142 HIV-negative male couples to (1) assess partnered men's perception of who has the most power in their relationship and why, (2) examine whether partners concur about who has the most power and their reasoning for this selection, and (3) assess whether male couples' concurrence about who has the most power is associated with their engagement of condomless anal sex within and/or outside the relationship, type of relationship, and aspects of their sexual agreement. Individual- and couple-level responses about who has the most power were quantitatively assessed, whereas for why, their responses were coded qualitatively. Fifty-six percent of couples concurred about who has the most power in their relationship and of these, many said it was equal. Regarding why, themes of responses ranged from "compromise" and "shared responsibility" for those who concurred about who has the most power versus "dominant/compliant personality" and "money" among the couples who disagreed about who has the most power in their relationship. Concordance about who has the most power was only associated with condomless anal sex within the relationship. Further research is warranted to examine how power may affect other dynamics of male couples' relationships and risk-related behaviors.

  18. Pharmacokinetic assessment of dapivirine vaginal microbicide gel in healthy, HIV-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Annalene M; Coplan, Paul; Smythe, Shanique C; McCord, Karen; Mitchnick, Mark; Kaptur, Paulina E; Romano, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    To assess the pharmacokinetics of dapivirine in plasma and dapivirine concentrations in cervicovaginal fluids (CVF) and cervicovaginal tissues following vaginal administration of dapivirine microbicide gel in healthy, HIV-negative women for 10 days. A randomized, double-blind, phase I study was conducted at a single research center in South Africa. A total of 18 women used dapivirine gel (0.001%, 0.005%, or 0.02%) once daily on Days 1 and 10 and twice daily on Days 2-9. Pharmacokinetics of dapivirine were assessed in plasma on Days 1 and 10. Dapivirine concentrations were measured in CVF on Days 1 and 10 and in cervicovaginal tissues on Day 10. Safety was evaluated through laboratory tests (hematology, clinical chemistry, and urinalysis), physical examinations, and assessment of adverse events. Plasma concentrations of dapivirine increased over time with gel dose and were greater on Day 10 (C(max) 31 to 471 pg/ml) than Day 1 (C(max) 23 to 80 pg/ml). T(max) was 10-12 h on Day 1, and 9 h on Day 10. Concentrations in CVF generally increased with dose but were highly variable among participants. Mean peak values ranged from 4.6-8.3 × 10(6) pg/ml on Day 1 and from 2.3-20.7 × 10(6) pg/ml on Day 10 across dose groups. Dapivirine was detectable in all tissue biopsies on Day 10 at concentrations of 1.0-356 × 10(3) pg/mg. Dapivirine was widely distributed throughout the lower genital tract with low systemic absorption when administered in a vaginal gel formulation for 10 consecutive days. The gel was safe and well tolerated.

  19. Neurocysticercosis as an important differential of paradoxical response during antituberculosis therapy in HIV-negative patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis can simulate a paradoxical response during antituberculosis therapy with neurological ailments. We report the case of a 31 year-old-man, treated for tuberculous meningitis who developed neurological deficit after nine weeks of early antituberculous therapy. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis was confirmed by CT scan and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Neurocysticercosis should be sought as an important differential of paradoxical response during antituberculosis therapy.

  20. CD3 Positive Gastric Plasmablastic Lymphoma in A HIV Negative Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Bolat Küçükzeybek,

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare and aggressive lymphoma characterized by the diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic cells resembling immunoblasts with an immunophenotype of plasma cells. A 47-year-old male was referred to our hospital with gastrointestinal bleeding, and a mass 10 cm in diameter, was detected. An endoscopic biopsy was performed subsequently. Histopathological examination of the biopsy material revealed ulcer, alterations associated with ulcer, and further presented a diffuse infiltration of atypical cells with abundant cytoplasm and pleomorphic nuclei, some with crush artifacts in lamina propria. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were negative for cytokeratin, CD2, CD20, and PAX5; but they were positive for CD3, MUM1, CD38 and CD138. Ki67 proliferation index was as high as 95%. The case was signed out as CD3-positive plasmablastic lymphoma with clinical, histopathological and immunohisto-chemical findings. The plasmablastic lymphoma case with an aberrant CD3 expression has been presented here, which is rarely observed in stomach.

  1. Bilateral pleural effusion in a HIV negative patient - TB or not TB?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, Michaëla A. M.; Hermanides, Hillegonda S.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Kross, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Pleural tuberculosis is an infrequent cause of respiratory illness in Europe and usually presents unilaterally. We present the case of a young, immunocompetent sailor from the Phillippines, who presented with bilateral pleural fluid caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the Netherlands.

  2. Origin of Bolivian Quechua Amerindians: their relationship with other American Indians and Asians according to HLA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Siles, Nancy; Moscoso, Juan; Zamora, Jorge; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; R-A-Cachafeiro, Juan I; Castro, Maria J; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The Incas were Quechua-speaking people who settled down near Cuzco (Peru). They had an empire ranging from Ecuador to Chile, when Spanish conquerors seized their kingdom around 1532 AD. Nowadays, Quechua-speaking people inhabits Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru and Argentina; however, Quechua language was imposed by both Incas and Spaniards to many non-Quechua speaking communities. We have taken a sample of Quechuan Bolivian blood donors from La Paz (Titicaca Lake region) where Inca-Quechuas themselves believed that came from. This group was compared with 6892 individuals from 68 different world populations regarding HLA/DNA allele frequencies distribution. Genetic distances, dendrograms and correspondence analyses were carried out in order to establish relationships among populations. The main conclusions are: (1) DRB1 and -DQB1 haplotypes shared with Asians are found in Quechuas and are not observed in other (Mesoamerican) Amerindians. (2) Aymara-speaking people from the same Titicaca Lake (La Paz) area shows close genetic distances with Quechuas in one dimension results (genetic distances); however, their HLA gene frequency distribution differs according to Neighbor-Joining (NJ) trees and correspondence analysis (multidimensional and more reliable analyses). Also, the common high frequency Asian and Athabascan HLA-DRB1*0901 allele is found in Quechuas in a significant frequency. Quechuas are clearly included within the Amerindian group.

  3. Human papillomavirus type-16 variants in Quechua aboriginals from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picconi, María Alejandra; Alonio, Lidia Virginia; Sichero, Laura; Mbayed, Viviana; Villa, Luisa Lina; Gronda, Jorge; Campos, Rodolfo; Teyssié, Angélica

    2003-04-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer death in Quechua indians from Jujuy (northwestern Argentina). To determine the prevalence of HPV-16 variants, 106 HPV-16 positive cervical samples were studied, including 33 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 28 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), 9 invasive cervical cancer (ICC), and 36 samples from women with normal colposcopy and cytology. HPV genome variability was examined in the L1 and E6 genes by PCR-hybridization. In a subset of 20 samples, a LCR fragment was also analyzed by PCR-sequencing. Most variants belonged to the European branch with subtle differences that depended on the viral gene fragment studied. Only about 10% of the specimens had non-European variants, including eight Asian-American, two Asian, and one North-American-1. E6 gene analysis revealed that 43% of the samples were identical to HPV-16 prototype, while 57% corresponded to variants. Interestingly, the majority (87%) of normal smears had HPV-16 prototype, whereas variants were detected mainly in SIL and ICC. LCR sequencing yielded 80% of variants, including 69% of European, 19% Asian-American, and 12% Asian. We identified a new variant, the Argentine Quechua-51 (AQ-51), similar to B-14 plus two additional changes: G7842-->A and A7837-->C; phylogenetic inference allocated it in the Asian-American branch. The high proportion of European variants may reflect Spanish colonial influence on these native Inca descendants. The predominance of HPV-16 variants in pathologic samples when compared to normal controls could have implications for the natural history of cervical lesions. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Developmental Effects Determine Submaximal Arterial Oxygen Saturation in Peruvian Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyamu, Melisa; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Rivera-Chira, María; Elías, Gianpietro; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2015-06-01

    Kiyamu, Melisa, Fabiola León-Velarde, María Rivera-Chira, Gianpietro Elías, and Tom D. Brutsaert. Developmental effects determine submaximal arterial oxygen saturation in Peruvian Quechua. High Alt Med Biol 16, 138-146, 2015.--Andean high altitude natives show higher arterial oxygen saturation (Sao(2)) during exercise in hypoxia, compared to acclimatized sojourners. In order to evaluate the effects of life-long exposure to high altitude on Sao(2), we studied two groups of well-matched, self-identified Peruvian Quechua natives who differed in their developmental exposure to hypoxia before and after a 2-month training period. Male and female volunteers (18-35 years) were recruited in Lima, Peru (150 m). The two groups were: a) Individuals who were born and raised at sea-level (BSL, n=34) and b) Individuals who were born and raised at high altitude (BHA, n=32), but who migrated to sea-level as adults (>16 years old). Exercise testing was conducted using a submaximal exercise protocol in normobaric hypoxia in Lima (BP=750 mmHg, Fio(2)=0.12), in order to measure Sao(2) (%), ventilation (VE L/min) and oxygen consumption (Vo(2), L/min). Repeated-measures ANOVA, controlling for VE/VO(2) (L/min) and sex during the submaximal protocol showed that BHA maintained higher Sao(2) (%) compared to BSL at all workloads before (p=0.005) and after training (p=0.017). As expected, both groups showed a decrease in Sao(2) (%) (p<0.001), as workload increased. Resting Sao(2) levels were not found to be different between groups. The results suggest that developmental exposure to altitude contributes to the maintenance of higher Sao(2) levels during submaximal exercise at hypoxia.

  5. Seroadaptive practices: association with HIV acquisition among HIV-negative men who have sex with men.

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    Snigdha Vallabhaneni

    Full Text Available Although efficacy is unknown, many men who have sex with men (MSM attempt to reduce HIV risk by adapting condom use, partner selection, or sexual position to the partner's HIV serostatus. We assessed the association of seroadaptive practices with HIV acquisition.We pooled data on North American MSM from four longitudinal HIV-prevention studies. Sexual behaviors reported during each six-month interval were assigned sequentially to one of six mutually exclusive risk categories: (1 no unprotected anal intercourse (UAI, (2 having a single negative partner, (3 being an exclusive top (only insertive anal sex, (4 serosorting (multiple partners, all HIV negative, (5 seropositioning (only insertive anal sex with potentially discordant partners, and (6 UAI with no seroadaptive practices. HIV antibody testing was conducted at the end of each interval. We used Cox models to evaluate the independent association of each category with HIV acquisition, controlling for number of partners, age, race, drug use, and intervention assignment. 12,277 participants contributed to 60,162 six-month intervals with 663 HIV seroconversions. No UAI was reported in 47.4% of intervals, UAI with some seroadaptive practices in 31.8%, and UAI with no seroadaptive practices in 20.4%. All seroadaptive practices were associated with a lower risk, compared to UAI with no seroadaptive practices. However, compared to no UAI, serosorting carried twice the risk (HR = 2.03, 95%CI:1.51-2.73, whereas seropositioning was similar in risk (HR = 0.85, 95%CI:0.50-1.44, and UAI with a single negative partner and as an exclusive top were both associated with a lower risk (HR = 0.56, 95%CI:0.32-0.96 and HR = 0.55, 95%CI:0.36-0.84, respectively.Seroadaptive practices appear protective when compared with UAI with no seroadaptive practices, but serosorting appears to be twice as risky as no UAI. Condom use and limiting number of partners should be advocated as first-line prevention

  6. Recurrence of cervical intraepithelial lesions after thermo-coagulation in HIV-positive and HIV-negative Nigerian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oga, Emmanuel A; Brown, Jessica P; Brown, Clayton; Dareng, Eileen; Adekanmbi, Victor; Odutola, Michael; Olaniyan, Olayinka; Offiong, Richard; Obende, Kayode; Adewole, Ayodele Stephen; Peter, Achara; Dakum, Patrick; Adebamowo, Clement

    2016-05-11

    The burden of cervical cancer remains huge globally, more so in sub-Saharan Africa. Effectiveness of screening, rates of recurrence following treatment and factors driving these in Africans have not been sufficiently studied. The purpose of this study therefore was to investigate factors associated with recurrence of cervical intraepithelial lesions following thermo-coagulation in HIV-positive and HIV-negative Nigerian women using Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid (VIA) or Lugol's Iodine (VILI) for diagnosis. A retrospective cohort study was conducted, recruiting participants from the cervical cancer "see and treat" program of IHVN. Data from 6 sites collected over a 4-year period was used. Inclusion criteria were: age ≥18 years, baseline HIV status known, VIA or VILI positive and thermo-coagulation done. Logistic regression was performed to examine the proportion of women with recurrence and to examine factors associated with recurrence. Out of 177 women included in study, 67.8 % (120/177) were HIV-positive and 32.2 % (57/177) were HIV-negative. Recurrence occurred in 16.4 % (29/177) of participants; this was 18.3 % (22/120) in HIV-positive women compared to 12.3 % (7/57) in HIV-negative women but this difference was not statistically significant (p-value 0.31). Women aged ≥30 years were much less likely to develop recurrence, adjusted OR = 0.34 (95 % CI = 0.13, 0.92). Among HIV-positive women, CD4 count thermo-coagulation occurs in a significant proportion of women. HIV-positive women with low CD4 counts are at increased risk of recurrent lesions and may be related to immunosuppression.

  7. De novo anaplastic Kaposi sarcoma in a HIV-negative man: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slim Charfi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic Kaposi sarcoma is a rare variant of Kaposi’s and is typically associated with an agressive clinical course. We report a case of a 67-year-old HIV negative man, presented with multiple, pink nodules on the left ankle and a keratotic lesion of the right heel. Initial histopathological exam concluded to an undifferentiated sarcoma. A second biopsy was performed and concluded to an anaplastic Kaposi sarcoma. Immunohistochemical study was positive for HHV8. Treatment consisted on a tumor excision of all lesions. Our case and the review of the literature highlight the benefit of the non conservative surgical treatment for this aggressive form of Kaposi sarcoma.

  8. Contrastive and Innovative Uses of the Present Perfect and the Preterite in Spanish in Contact with Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Anna Maria

    1997-01-01

    Argues that where Spanish is in contact with Quechua, the Spanish present perfect, preterite, and pluperfect are in contrast on the basis of a spatio-temporal parameter derived from the notion of present relevance. These innovative uses come from interaction between semantic systems of Quechua and Spanish and are consistent with universals of the…

  9. Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-negative persons with partners living with HIV: uptake, use, and effectiveness in an open-label demonstration project in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, Renee; Ngure, Kenneth; Odoyo, Josephine; Bulya, Nulu; Tindimwebwa, Edna; Hong, Ting; Kidoguchi, Lara; Donnell, Deborah; Mugo, Nelly R; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Katabira, Elly; Asiimwe, Stephen; Morton, Jennifer; Morrison, Susan; Haugen, Harald; Mujugira, Andrew; Haberer, Jessica E; Ware, Norma C; Wyatt, Monique A; Marzinke, Mark A; Frenkel, Lisa M; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-11-06

    Introduction : Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can provide high protection against HIV infection and is a recommended intervention for HIV-negative persons with substantial HIV risk, such as individuals with a partner living with HIV.  Demonstration projects of PrEP have been conducted in diverse settings worldwide to illustrate practical examples of how PrEP can be delivered.  Methods : We evaluated delivery of PrEP for HIV-negative partners within heterosexual HIV serodiscordant couples in an open-label demonstration project in East Africa.  The delivery model integrated PrEP into HIV treatment services, prioritizing PrEP for HIV-negative partners within serodiscordant couples prior to and during the first 6 months after the partner living with HIV initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART).  We measured adherence to PrEP through medication event monitoring system (MEMS) bottle caps and quantification of tenofovir in plasma among a random sample of participants. We estimated HIV infections prevented using a counterfactual cohort simulated from the placebo arm of a previous PrEP clinical trial. Results : We enrolled 1,010 HIV serodiscordant couples that were naïve to ART and PrEP.  Ninety-seven percent (97%) of HIV-negative partners initiated PrEP, and when PrEP was dispensed, objective measures suggest high adherence: 71% of HIV-negative participants took ≥80% of expected doses, as recorded via MEMS, and 81% of plasma samples had tenofovir detected.  A total of 4 incident HIV infections were observed (incidence rate=0.24 per 100 person-years), a 95% reduction (95% CI 86-98%, pproject for African HIV-negative individuals whose partners were known to be living with HIV.  Delivery of PrEP to HIV-negative partners within HIV serodiscordant couples was feasible and should be prioritized for wide-scale implementation.

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) alleles in the Quechua, a high altitude South American native population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, J L; Devine, D V; Monsalve, M V; Hochachka, P W

    1999-01-01

    Recently it was reported that an allelic variant of the gene encoding angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was significantly over-represented in a cohort of elite British mountaineers. It was proposed that this may be evidence for a specific genetic factor influencing the human capacity for physical performance. The implication that this allele could enhance performance at high altitude prompted us to determine its frequency in Quechua speaking natives living at altitudes greater than 3000m on the Andean Altiplano in South America. We found that the frequency of the putative performance allele in the Quechuas, although significantly higher than in Caucasians, was not different from lowland Native American populations. This observation suggests that, although the higher frequency of the 'performance allele' may have facilitated the migration of the ancestral Quechua to the highlands, the ACE insertion allele has not been subsequently selected for in this high altitude population.

  11. Differences in physical growth of Aymara and Quechua children living at high altitude in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meer, K; Bergman, R; Kusner, J S; Voorhoeve, H W

    1993-01-01

    Physical growth of Amerindian children living in two Aymara and three Quechua peasant communities in the Andean highlands of southern Peru (altitude 3,810-3,840 m) was studied, taking into account differences in the microclimate, agronomic situation, and sociodemographic variables. Anthropometric measurements were taken in 395 children aged under 14 years of age in a sample of 151 families in these communities, who were surveyed for sociodemographic variables as well. Data on the land system were available for 77 families. In comparison with reference populations from the United States (NCHS) and The Netherlands, stature, weight, head circumference, and midupper arm circumference (but not weight for stature) in the sample children were reduced. Growth retardation increased after the age of 1 year. Stature and weight in the present sample were very similar compared with previously published data on growth of rural Aymara children living near Lake Titicaca in Bolivia. Head circumference, midupper arm circumference, and weight for stature were significantly larger in Aymara children compared with Quechua children. Land was significantly more fragmented in Aymara compared with Quechua families, but amount of land owned was not different. Perinatal and infant mortality was elevated in Aymara vs. Quechua communities. Most families in Aymara communities used protected drinking water. One Quechua community had a severe microclimate, grim economic outlook, and weak social cohesion. Children in this community showed significant reductions in weight and midupper arm circumference compared with their peers in the other communities. We conclude that (presumably nutritionally mediated) intervillage and Aymara-Quechua differences in childhood physical growth existed in this rural high-altitude population in Peru and were associated with microclimate and the village economy, sociodemographic factors, and differences in the land system.

  12. Different hematologic responses to hypoxia in Sherpas and Quechua Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, R M; Chapman, K W; Gibson, C C; Samaja, M; Monge, C C; Goldwasser, E; Sherpa, M; Blume, F D; Santolaya, R

    1989-04-01

    Previous studies of the erythropoietic response to hypoxia in high-altitude natives suggest that the hematocrit and hemoglobin values in Himalayan natives (Sherpas) are lower than expected for the altitude, perhaps because of a genetic adaptation. However, differences in sampling techniques and experimental methods make comparisons difficult. Our studies were carried out to compare the erythropoietic response with the same altitude in age-matched natives of the Himalayas and Andes by the same experimental techniques. Healthy male subjects were selected in Ollagüe, Chile (n = 29, 27.3 +/- 5.9 yr) and in Khunde, Nepal (n = 30, 24.7 +/- 3.8 yr). Both of these villages are located at 3,700 m above sea level. Hematologic measurements confirmed lower hematocrit values in Nepal (48.4 +/- 4.5%) than in Chile (52.2 +/- 4.6%) (P less than 0.003). When subjects were matched for hematocrit, erythropoietin concentrations in Chile were higher than in Nepal (P less than 0.01). Detailed measurements of blood O2 affinity in Nepal showed no differences in shape or position of the O2 equilibrium curve between Sherpas and Western sojourners. Our results indicate that although Quechua Indians have higher hematocrits than Sherpas living at the same altitude, nevertheless they may be functionally anemic.

  13. Time to complete wound healing in HIV-positive and HIV-negative men following medical male circumcision in Kisumu, Kenya: a prospective cohort study.

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    John H Rogers

    Full Text Available While voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC has been shown to be protective against HIV-acquisition, the procedure may place men and their partners at risk of HIV infection in the period following circumcision if sex is resumed before the wound is healed. This prospective cohort study evaluates post-circumcision wound healing to determine whether the 42-day post-circumcision abstinence period, recommended by the World Health Organization and adopted by VMMC programs, is optimal.Men were circumcised by forceps-guided method and their post-circumcision wounds examined weekly for seven weeks and at 12 weeks. Time to complete healing was recorded in completed weeks since circumcision, and its associations with baseline covariates were assessed by Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox Proportional Hazard Models. A total of 215 HIV-negative and 108 HIV-positive men aged 18-35 years (median 26, IQR 23-30 were enrolled. 97.1% of scheduled follow-up visits were completed. At week 4, 59.3% of HIV-positive men and 70.4% of age-matched HIV-negative men were healed. At week 6, these percentages rose to 93.4% in HIV-positive men and 92.6% in age-matched HIV-negative men. There was no difference in the hazard of healing between 108 HIV-positive and 108 age-matched HIV-negative men (HR 0.91 95% CI 0.70-1.20. Early post-operative infection was associated with delayed healing in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative men (HR 0.48 95% CI 0.23-1.00.Our results indicate that the WHO recommendation for 42-days post-circumcision sexual abstinence should be maintained for both HIV-positive and HIV-negative men. It is important to stress condom use upon resumption of sex in all men undergoing circumcision.

  14. Modeling the Relationship between Trauma and Psychological Distress among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumsey, Ayesha Delany; Joseph, Nataria T; Myers, Hector F; Ullman, Jodie B; Wyatt, Gail E

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the association between cumulative exposure to multiple traumatic events and psychological distress, as mediated by problematic substance use and impaired psychosocial resources. A sample of HIV-positive and HIV-negative women were assessed for a history of childhood and adult sexual abuse and non-sexual trauma as predictors of psychological distress (i.e., depression, non-specific anxiety, and posttraumatic stress), as mediated by problematic alcohol and drug use and psychosocial resources (i.e., social support, self-esteem and optimism). Structural equation modeling confirmed that cumulative trauma exposure is positively associated with greater psychological distress, and that this association is partially mediated through impaired psychosocial resources. However, although cumulative trauma was associated with greater problematic substance use, substance use did not mediate the relationship between trauma and psychological distress.

  15. Screening, prevalence, and risk factors for cervical lesions among HIV positive and HIV negative women in Swaziland

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    Pauline E. Jolly

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical Cancer (CC is the number one cancer among women in sub-Saharan Africa. Although CC is preventable, most women in developing countries do not have access to screening. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence and risk factors for cervical lesions using visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA among 112 HIV positive and 161 negative women aged 18–69 years. Results The presence of cervical lesions was greater among HIV positive (22.9% than HIV negative women (5.7%; p < 0.0001. In logistic models, the risk of cervical lesions among HIV positive women was 5.24 times higher when adjusted by age (OR 5.24, CI 2.31–11.88, and 4.06 times higher in a full model (OR 4.06, CI 1.61–10.25, than among HIV negative women. In the age-adjusted model women who had ≥2 lifetime sexual partners were 3 times more likely (OR 3.00, CI 1.02–8.85 to have cervical lesions compared to women with one lifetime partner and the odds of cervical lesions among women with a history of STIs were 2.16 greater (OR 2.16, CI 1.04–4.50 than among women with no previous STI. In the fully adjusted model women who had a previous cervical exam were 2.5 times more likely (OR 2.53, CI 1.06–6.05 to have cervical lesions than women who had not. Conclusions The high prevalence of HIV infection and the strong association between HIV and cervical lesions highlight the need for substantial scale-up of cervical screening to decrease the rate of CC in Swaziland.

  16. Potential Predictors for Serofast State after Treatment among HIV-Negative Persons with Syphilis in China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jiabi; Yang, Tubao; Wang, Hua; Feng, Tiejian; Liu, Xiaoying

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have been conducted in China in order to investigate the potential predictors of serofast state after treatment among syphilitic patients. However, there is a remarkable diversity among the results. This meta-analysis was conducted to assess potential predictors of serofast among syphilitic patients in China. International and national electronic databases were searched up to September 2013. Reference lists of retrieved articles were also reviewed. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors of serofast among syphilitic patients were included in this study. We assessed 27 separate studies involving overall 6682 HIV-negative participants with syphilis of which 1962 remained in the serofast state. The serofast was positively associated with older age(P trend=0.001), female(summary risk ratio[sRR]=1.50, 95%CI:1.34-;1.68), latent syphilis(sRRlatent vs primary=3.17, 95%CI: 2.66-;3.77; sRRlatent vs secondary=2.00, 95%CI: 1.48-;2.69) as well as non-penicillin treatment(sRR =2.99, 95%CI:2.45-;3.67), but negatively associated with higher baseline titers(sRR>1:32 vs ≤1:32=0.63, 95%CI: 0.54-;0.75). Compared with healthy group and serological cure group, respectively, the levels of CD4 (+), IL-2, and IL-6 among serofast patients were decreased (standardized mean difference[SMD]SMD>0, Pinfection. The age, gender, stage of infection, baseline titers, treatment drug, cellular immune suppression and disorders, TP occult infection and subtypes i of TP repeat gene should be considered as important predictors of serofast. However, until now the definition and mechanism of serofast has still been not clear.

  17. Semantic and Pragmatic Functions of the Spanish Diminutive in Spanish in Contact with Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Anna Maria

    2001-01-01

    Presents data from the Spanish of Quechua-Spanish bilinguals that exemplify a contact situation that gives rise to a process called structural interference. Concentrates on the use of the diminutive in the Spanish of speakers of Spanish in the Andes. (Author/VWL)

  18. The Proficiency Continuum in Quechua-Spanish Bilingual Speakers: An Analysis of the Verbal Clitic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Liliana

    2001-01-01

    Examines the variable use of verbal clitics in bilingual Spanish and proposes that the contact between Quechua and Spanish is expressed in the existence of more than one clitic system across an oral proficiency continuum in Spanish. Proposes that the clitic use in these different systems is variable and constrained by different factors.…

  19. Emotional Understanding in Quechua Children from an Agro-Pastoralist Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Harriet R.; Visscher, Paloma; Pons, Francisco; Harris, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Research on children's understanding of emotion has rarely focused on children from nonindustrialised countries, who may develop an understanding at different ages as compared to children reared in industrialised countries. Quechua children from an agro-pastoralist village were given an adapted version of the Test of Emotion Comprehension (TEC) to…

  20. Determinants of School Performance among Quechua Children in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Enrique; Pollitt, Ernesto; Cueto, Santiago

    1999-01-01

    Tests the proposition that family and personal factors, in combination with school characteristics, contribute to the academic progress of Quechua school children. Finds that family background and nutritional history are not as important in shaping educational progress as initially envisioned, but that duration of schooling is an important factor…

  1. The Acquisition of Clitic Pronouns in the Spanish Interlanguage of Peruvian Quechua Speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Carol A.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of four adult Quechua speakers' acquisition of clitic pronouns in Spanish revealed that educational attainment and amount of contact with monolingual Spanish speakers were positively related to native-like norms of competence in the use of object pronouns in Spanish. (CB)

  2. Voice and Biliteracy in Indigenous Language Revitalization: Contentious Educational Practices in Quechua, Guarani, and Maori Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    2006-01-01

    This article considers instances of biliterate educational practice in contexts of indigenous language revitalization involving Quechua in the South American Andes, Guarani in Paraguay, and Maori in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In these indigenous contexts of sociohistorical and sociolinguistic oppression, the implementation of multilingual language…

  3. Literacies and Quechua Oral Language: Connecting Sociocultural Worlds and Linguistic Resources for Biliteracy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Piedra, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    This article presents partial findings of an ethnographic study in a Quechua rural community in the Peruvian Andes. It discusses the uses of hegemonic Spanish literacy practices in the school. These were characterized by emphasis on formal issues over meaning; students lives, cultural, and linguistic resources were ignored. However, there were…

  4. Hybrid Literacies: The Case of a Quechua Community in the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on data from an ethnographic study in a Quechua rural community in the Peruvian Andes, this article examines hybrid literacy practices among bilingual rural speakers in the context of the household and the community. I examine the coexistence of two types of textual practices that operate side by side, at times integrated in the same…

  5. Religious and Self-Generated Quechua Literacy Practices in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Quechua speakers' religious literacy practices in the native language in a rural community located in the department of Cuzco (Peru). I argue that in a situation where the school did not play the role of developing or maintaining the written vernacular, a group of community members found specific situations where they felt…

  6. No evidence for a protective effect of naturally induced HPV antibodies on subsequent anogenital HPV infection in HIV-negative and HIV-infected MSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Sofie H.; Landén, Olivia; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; de Melker, Hester E.; Coutinho, Roel A.; van Eeden, Arne; van Rooijen, Martijn S.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether HPV serum antibodies detected after natural infection protect against subsequent anal or penile infection with the same HPV type in HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM aged ≥18 years were recruited in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (2010-2011), and

  7. Determinants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV prevalence in homosexual and bisexual men screened for admission to a cohort study of HIV negatives in Belo Horizonte, Brazil: Project Horizonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro Mariângela

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Project Horizonte, an open cohort of homosexual and bisexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 negative men, is a component of the AIDS Vaccine Program, in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The objective of this study was to compare volunteers testing HIV positive at cohort entry with a sample of those who tested HIV negative in order to identify risk factors for prevalent HIV infection, in a population being screened for enrollment at Project Horizonte. A nested case-control study was conducted. HIV positive volunteers at entry (cases were matched by age and admission date to three HIV negative controls each. Selected variables used for the current analysis included demographic factors, sexual behavior and other risk factors for HIV infection. During the study period (1994-2001, among the 621 volunteers screened, 61 tested positive for HIV. Cases were matched to 183 HIV negative control subjects. After adjustments, the main risk factors associated with HIV infection were unprotected sex with an occasional partners, OR = 3.7 (CI 95% 1.3-10.6, receptive anal intercourse with an occasional partner, OR = 2.8 (95% CI 0.9-8.9 and belonging to the negro racial group, OR = 3.4 (CI 95% 1.1-11.9. These variables were associated with an increase in the risk of HIV infection among men who have sex with men at the screening for admission to an open HIV negative cohort.

  8. Determinants of CD4 counts among HIV-Negative ethiopians: Role of body mass index, gender, cigarette smoking, khat (Catha edulis) chewing, and possibly altitude?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abuye, C.; Tsegaye, A.; West, C. E.; Versloot, P.; Sanders, E. J.; Wolday, D.; Hamann, D.; Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Fontanet, A. L.

    2005-01-01

    To study the determinants of CD4% and CD4 counts among HIV-negative Ethiopians, and to identify factors susceptible to explain the low CD4 counts observed among Ethiopian subjects. Cohort studies among factory workers in Akaki and Wonji, Ethiopia. Clinical and laboratory examinations, including

  9. Climacteric symptoms in Quechua and Mestizo women from the Andean region of Cusco, Peru: effects of altitude and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Eliana; Blümel, Juan E; Vallejo, María Soledad; Lavín, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    Latin-American women present a greater severity of climacteric symptoms than women from other parts of the world. Previous studies suggest that this could be due to either its Amerindian crossbreeding or the altitude in which a huge proportion of the Latin-American population lives. To answer this question, climacteric symptoms between Peruvian women ("Hispanic-Mestizas" and "Quechuas") living in similar altitude (around 3000 MASL) were compared. This is a cross sectional descriptive study of healthy women of 40-59 years of age living in Departamento de El Cusco, Peru. Using the MRS questionnaire climacteric symptoms were assessed in 395 "Hispanic-Mestizas" (Quechua-Spaniard breeding) and 376 pure "Quechuas". The "Quechuas" compared with "Hispanic-Mestizas" have comparable similar age, but less: obesity, schooling years, cigarette smoking, use of hormonal therapy, diabetes and hypertension; and a greater: proportion of postmenopausal women and number of children. "Quechuas" showed a greater prevalence in ten of the eleven symptoms evaluated by the MRS scale, except for insomnia. The total MRS score was 14.54±7.51 vs. 9.87±6.26 (pQuechuas" had a deteriorated quality of life due to severe climacteric symptomatology, compared to only 14.2% of "Hispanic-Mestizas" women (pQuechua being (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.27-4.45). Peruvian "Quechuas" women have severer climacteric symptoms than the Peruvian "Hispanic-Mestizas" who live in a comparable altitude. This could suggest that the ethnicity could be one of the factors that could explain the augmented symptoms in Latin-American climacteric woman. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ippolito Galante y la filología quechua en los años 1930 y 1940

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    Alan Durston

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEn los años 1930 y 1940, el filólogo y diplomático italiano Ippolito Galante realizó las primeras ediciones críticas de textos coloniales en quechua, entre ellos el Manuscrito de Huarochirí. Fue también el director fundador del Instituto de Filología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, donde estableció una cátedra de quechua en 1938. Su legado para la filología y la lingüística quechuas fue importante y duradero, pero también tuvo algunas limitaciones claves. Este artículo examina la carrera de Ippolito Galante y los contextos políticos y culturales de sus proyectos quechuistas, especialmente las reacciones encontradas que provocaron en Lima.Palabras clave: filología quechua, Ippolito Galante, lingüística amerindia, ideologías lingüísticas AbstractIn the 1930s and 1940s, the Italian philologist and diplomat Ippolito Galante made the first critical editions of colonial texts in Quechua, including the Huarochirí Manuscript. He was also the founding director of the Institute of Philology of the Universidad Nacional de San Marcos, where he established a chair of Quechua in 1938. His legacy for Quechua philology and linguistics was significant and durable, but also had some key limitations. This article examines the career of Ippolito Galante and the political and cultural contexts of his Quechuist projects, especially the mixed reactions they provoked in Lima.Keywords: Quechua Philology, Ippolito Galante, Amerindian Linguistics, linguistic ideologies

  11. Condom Use Errors and Problems: A Comparative Study of HIV-Positive Versus HIV-Negative Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Richard; Mena, Leandro; Yarber, William L; Graham, Cynthia A; Sanders, Stephanie A; Milhausen, Robin R

    2015-11-01

    To describe self-reported frequencies of selected condom use errors and problems among young (age, 15-29 years) black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) and to compare the observed prevalence of these errors/problems by HIV serostatus. Between September 2012 October 2014, electronic interview data were collected from 369 YBMSM attending a federally supported sexually transmitted infection clinic located in the southern United States. Seventeen condom use errors and problems were assessed. χ(2) Tests were used to detect significant differences in the prevalence of these 17 errors and problems between HIV-negative and HIV-positive men. The recall period was the past 90 days. The overall mean (SD) number of errors/problems was 2.98 (2.29). The mean (SD) for HIV-negative men was 2.91 (2.15), and the mean (SD) for HIV-positive men was 3.18 (2.57). These means were not significantly different (t = 1.02, df = 367, P = 0.31). Only 2 significant differences were observed between HIV-negative and HIV-positive men. Breakage (P = 0.002) and slippage (P = 0.005) were about twice as likely among HIV-positive men. Breakage occurred for nearly 30% of the HIV-positive men compared with approximately 15% among HIV-negative men. Slippage occurred for approximately 16% of the HIV-positive men compared with approximately 9% among HIV-negative men. A need exists to help YBMSM acquire the skills needed to avert breakage and slippage issues that could lead to HIV transmission. Beyond these 2 exceptions, condom use errors and problems were ubiquitous in this population regardless of HIV serostatus. Clinic-based intervention is warranted for these young men, including education about correct condom use and provision of free condoms and long-lasting lubricants.

  12. Predicting the Onset of Sexual and Drug Risk Behaviors in HIV-Negative Youths with HIV-Positive Mothers: The Role of Contextual, Self-Regulation, and Social-Interaction Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellins, Claude A.; Dolezal, Curtis; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Nicholson, Ouzama; Warne, Patricia; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV-negative, inner-city adolescents with HIV-infected parents are considered to be at high risk for acquiring HIV themselves. Using a modified theory of health behavior, this study examined the effects of maternal HIV infection and psychosocial variables on the onset of sexual and drug risk behavior in 144 HIV-negative adolescents with and…

  13. Autosomal and X chromosome Alu insertions in Bolivian Aymaras and Quechuas: two languages and one genetic pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayà-Vidal, Magdalena; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Esteban, Esther; Athanasiadis, Georgios; Rodríguez, Armando; Villena, Mercedes; Vasquez, René; Moral, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-two polymorphic Alu insertions (18 autosomal and 14 from the X chromosome) were studied in 192 individuals from two Amerindian populations of the Bolivian Altiplano (Aymara and Quechua speakers: the two main Andean linguistic groups), to provide relevant information about their genetic relationships and demographic processes. The main objective was to determine from genetic data whether the expansion of the Quechua language into Bolivia could be associated with demographic (Inca migration of Quechua-speakers from Peru into Bolivia) or cultural (language imposition by the Inca Empire) processes. Allele frequencies were used to assess the genetic relationships between these two linguistic groups. Our results indicated that the two Bolivian samples showed a high genetic similarity for both sets of markers and were clearly differentiated from the two Peruvian Quechua samples available in the literature. Additionally, our data were compared with the available literature to determine the genetic and linguistic structure, and East-West differentiation in South America. The close genetic relationship between the two Bolivian samples and their differentiation from the Quechua-speakers from Peru suggests that the Quechua language expansion in Bolivia took place without any important demographic contribution. Moreover, no clear geographical or linguistic structure was found for the Alu variation among South Amerindians. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. The Genetic History of Peruvian Quechua-Lamistas and Chankas: Uniparental DNA Patterns among Autochthonous Amazonian and Andean Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, José R; Lacerda, Daniela R; Acosta, Oscar; Jota, Marilza S; Robles-Ruiz, Paulo; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Paz-Y-Miño, César; Fujita, Ricardo; Santos, Fabricio R

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on the genetic history of the Quechua-Lamistas, inhabitants of the Lamas Province in the San Martin Department, Peru, who speak their own distinct variety of the Quechua family of languages. It has been suggested that different pre-Columbian ethnic groups from the Peruvian Amazonia, like the Motilones or "shaven heads", assimilated the Quechua language and then formed the current native population of Lamas. However, many Quechua-Lamistas claim to be direct descendants of the Chankas, a famous pre-Columbian indigenous group that escaped from Inca rule in the Andes. To investigate the Quechua-Lamistas and Chankas' ancestries, we compared uniparental genetic profiles (17 STRs of Q-M3 Y-chromosome and mtDNA complete control region haplotypes) among autochthonous Amazonian and Andean populations from Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador. The phylogeographic and population genetic analyses indicate a fairly heterogeneous ancestry for the Quechua-Lamistas, while they are closely related to their neighbours who speak Amazonian languages, presenting no direct relationships with populations from the region where the ancient Chankas lived. On the other hand, the genetic profiles of self-identified Chanka descendants living in Andahuaylas (located in the Apurimac Department, Peru, in the Central Andes) were closely related to those living in Huancavelica and the assumed Chanka Confederation area before the Inca expansion. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  15. Beta2-adrenergic receptor allele frequencies in the Quechua, a high altitude native population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, J L; Monsalve, M V; Devine, D V; Hochachka, P W

    2000-03-01

    The beta2-adrenergic receptor is involved in the control of numerous physiological processes and, as the primary catecholamine receptor in the lungs, is of particular importance in the regulation of pulmonary function. There are several polymorphic loci in the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene that have alleles that alter receptor function, including two (A/G46, G/C79) that increase agonist sensitivity. As such a phenotype may increase vaso and bronchial dilation, thereby facilitating air and blood flow through the lungs, we hypothesized that selection may have favoured these alleles in high altitude populations as part of an adaptive strategy to deal with the hypoxic conditions characteristic of such environments. We tested this hypothesis by determining the allele frequencies for these two polymorphisms, as well one additional missense mutation (C/T491) and two silent mutations (G/A252 and C/A523) in 63 Quechua speaking natives from communities located between 3200 and 4200 m on the Peruvian altiplano. These frequencies were compared with those of two lowland populations, one native American (Na-Dene from the west coast of Canada) and one Caucasian of Western European descent. The Quechua manifest many of the pulmonary characteristics of high altitude populations and differences in allele frequencies between the Quechua and lowlanders could be indicative of a selective advantage conferred by certain genotypes in high altitude environments. Allele frequencies varied between populations at some loci and patterns of linkage disequilibrium differed between the old-world and new-world samples; however, as these populations are not closely related, significant variation would be expected due to stochastic effects alone. Neither of the alleles associated with increased receptor sensitivity (A46, G79) was significantly over-represented in the Quechua compared with either lowland group. The Quechua were monomorphic for the C allele at base 79. This variant has been

  16. Evaluation of Salivary Vitamin C and Catalase in HIV Positive and Healthy HIV Negative Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Vaziri-Amjad, Samaneh; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Poorolajal, Jalal

    2017-01-01

    Saliva is a complex oral biologic fluid secreted by major and minor salivary glands. Saliva has immunological, enzymatic and antioxidant defense mechanisms. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a life-threatening disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate salivary vitamin C and catalase levels in HIV-positive patients in comparison to a healthy control group. Forty-nine HIV-infected individuals and 49 healthy subjects were selected. Five mL of unstimulated saliva was collected in 5 minutes using a sterilized Falcon tube with Navazesh method. Catalase and vitamin C levels were assessed by spectrophotometric assay. Data were analyzed with STATA 12. Salivary catalase levels were 7.99±2.40 and 8.37±1.81 in the case and control groups, respectively. Catalase level was lower in the case group but the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.380). Salivary vitamin C levels in the case and control groups were 3.76±1.92 and 4.87±2.20, respectively (P=0.009). HIV can alter salivary antioxidant capacity as well as vitamin C and catalase levels. Saliva may reflect serum antioxidative changes in these patients. Therefore, further research is necessary on salivary and serum oxidants and the antioxidant changes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. The relationship between pornography use and sexual behaviors among at-risk HIV negative men who have sex with men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Lisa A.; Cain, Demetria N.; Pope, Howard; Garcia, Jonathan; Cherry, Chauncey

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although pornography is widely available and frequently used among many adults in the US, little is known about the relationship between pornography and risk factors for HIV transmission among men who have sex with men. Methods Baseline assessments from a behavioral intervention trial for at-risk men who have sex with men were conducted in Atlanta, GA in 2009. Univariate and multivariate generalized linear models were used to assess the relationships between known risk factors for HIV infection, time spent viewing pornography, and sex behaviors. Results One hundred forty nine men reporting HIV-negative status and two or more unprotected anal sex partners in the past six months were enrolled in an intervention trial and completed survey assessments. Time spent viewing pornography was significantly associated with having more male sexual partners (B=.45, SE=.04, ppornography. Conclusions This exploratory study is novel in that it sheds light on the associations between viewing pornography and sexual risk taking for HIV infection. Future studies in this area should focus on understanding how the content of pornography, in particular the viewing of unprotected and protected sex acts, may affect sexual risk taking behavior. PMID:22498161

  18. Safety and pharmacokinetics of dapivirine delivery from matrix and reservoir intravaginal rings to HIV-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Annalene; Smythe, Shanique; Young, Katherine; Malcolm, Karl; McCoy, Clare; Rosenberg, Zeda; Romano, Joseph

    2009-08-01

    Vaginal microbicides for the prevention of HIV transmission may be an important option for protecting women from infection. Incorporation of dapivirine, a lead candidate nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, into intravaginal rings (IVRs) for sustained mucosal delivery may increase microbicide product adherence and efficacy compared with conventional vaginal formulations. Twenty-four healthy HIV-negative women 18-35 years of age were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to dapivirine matrix IVR, dapivirine reservoir IVR, or placebo IVR. Dapivirine concentrations were measured in plasma and vaginal fluid samples collected at sequential time points over the 33-day study period (28 days of IVR use, 5 days of follow-up). Safety was assessed by pelvic/colposcopic examinations, clinical laboratory tests, and adverse events. Both IVR types were safe and well tolerated with similar adverse events observed in the placebo and dapivirine groups. Dapivirine from both IVR types was successfully distributed throughout the lower genital tract at concentrations over 4 logs greater than the EC50 against wild-type HIV-1 (LAI) in MT4 cells. Maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values were significantly higher with the matrix than reservoir IVR. Mean plasma concentrations of dapivirine were <2 ng/mL. These findings suggest that IVR delivery of microbicides is a viable option meriting further study.

  19. A rapid assessment of post-disclosure experiences of urban HIV-positive and HIV-negative school-aged children in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Gachanja

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been limited involvement of HIV-negative children in HIV disclosure studies; most studies conducted on the effects of disclosure on children have been with HIV-positive children and HIV-positive mother-child dyads. Seven HIV-positive and five HIV-negative children participated in a larger study conducted to understand the lived experiences of HIV-positive parents and their children during the disclosure process in Kenya. In this study, the experiences of these 12 children after receiving disclosure of their own and their parents’ illnesses respectively are presented. Each child underwent an in-depth qualitative semi-structured digitally recorded interview. The recorded interviews were transcribed and loaded into NVivo8 for phenomenological data analysis. Five themes emerged from the data, indicating that HIV-positive and negative children appear to have differing post-disclosure experiences revolving around acceptance of illness, stigma and discrimination, medication consumption, sexual awareness, and use of coping mechanisms. Following disclosure, HIV-negative children accepted their parents’ illnesses within a few hours to a few weeks; HIV-positive children took weeks to months to accept their own illnesses. HIV-negative children knew of high levels of stigma and discrimination within the community; HIV-positive children reported experiencing indirect incidences of stigma and discrimination. HIV-negative children wanted their parents to take their medications, stay healthy, and pay their school fees so they could have a better life in the future; HIV-positive children viewed medication consumption as an ordeal necessary to keep them healthy. HIV-negative children wanted their parents to speak to them about sexual-related matters; HIV-positive children had lingering questions about relationships, use of condoms, marriage, and childbearing options. All but one preadolescent HIV-positive child had self-identified a person to speak

  20. HIV-negative male couples' attitudes about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and using PrEP with a sexual agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W; Lee, Ji-Young; Woodyatt, Cory; Bauermeister, José; Sullivan, Patrick; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-08-01

    One efficacious strategy to help prevent HIV is oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a daily regimen of antiretroviral treatment taken by HIV-negative individuals. Two of the recommendations of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for PrEP pertain to being in a relationship (i.e., male couples). Despite the recognition of how primary partners in male couples' relationships shape HIV risk and CDC's PrEP guidelines, there is a paucity of data that examine HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use and using PrEP with a sexual agreement. A sexual agreement is an explicit agreement made between two individuals about what sex and other related behaviors may occur within and outside of their relationship. In this qualitative study, we examine HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use and whether they thought PrEP could be integrated into a sexual agreement. Data for this study are drawn from couple-level interviews conducted in 2014 with 29 HIV-negative male couples who had a sexual agreement and were from Atlanta or Detroit. Both passive (e.g., flyers) and active (e.g., targeted Facebook advertisements) recruitment methods were used; the sample was stratified by agreement type. Thematic analysis was applied to identify the following themes regarding HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use: (1) PrEP and condom use; (2) concerns about PrEP (e.g., effectiveness, side effects, and promoting sexually risky behavior); and (3) accessibility of PrEP. Some thought PrEP could be a part of couples' agreement because it could help reduce sexual anxiety and sexual risk, and would help keep the couple safe. Others described PrEP use with an agreement as something for "others". Some were also concerned that incorporating PrEP could usurp the need for a sexual agreement in a couples' relationship. These themes highlight the need to improve informational messaging and promotion efforts about PrEP among HIV-negative male couples

  1. Haematology and erythrocyte metabolism in man at high altitude: an Aymara-Quechua comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, J; Gutierrez, N; Tellez, W; Vergnes, H

    1985-07-01

    In the course of haematological and biological investigations among Aymara and Quechua populations in Bolivia, an anthropological study of the erythrocytary respiratory function was carried out on the two groups at two altitudes: 3,600 m and 450 m. A difference in the intensity of the biological variations of the two populations is observed at high altitude. In the Quechuas, as in any lowland native, the adaptative phenomena are totally and quickly reversible. In the Aymaras, we detected the existence of more marked haematological and biochemical characters: moderate polycythemia, hyperhaemoglobinemia, microcytosis, metabolical hyperactivity with accumulation of 2-3 di-phosphoglycerate and ATP, and methaemoglobinemia with a drop in the activity of the methaemoglobin reductases. The Aymaras preserve some of those characters (methaemoglobinemia excepted) when they settle in lowlands.

  2. Recognizing Suffering or Resistance? Honoring the Courage of Indigenous Quechua Women in Post Conflict Ayacucho, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Barrios Suarez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on extensive field work in Ayacucho, the area most affected by the past armed conflict in Peru (1980–2000, this practice note outlines some of the contributions to justice and reconciliation made by Quechua women in post-conflict Ayacucho and hypothesizes a number of reasons why these contributions have not been recognized to the same extent as their suffering.

  3. Beta-fibrinogen allele frequencies in Peruvian Quechua, a high-altitude native population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, J L; Devine, D V; Monsalve, M V; Hochachka, P W

    1999-06-01

    Elevated hematocrits, which are found in many high-altitude populations, increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood and may represent an adaptation to hypoxic environments. However, as high hematocrit increases blood viscosity, which in turn is associated with hypertension and heart disease, it may be advantageous for high-altitude populations to limit other factors that contribute to increased blood viscosity. One such factor is the plasma concentration of the coagulation protein fibrinogen. Several common polymorphisms in the beta-fibrinogen gene have been identified that affect fibrinogen concentrations. We determined the allele frequencies of three of these polymorphisms (G/A-455(HaeIII), C/T-148(HindIII), and G/A+448(MnlI)) in sample groups drawn from three populations: Quechua-speaking natives living at over 3,200 m in the Peruvian Andes, North American natives (Na-Dene) from coastal British Columbia, and Caucasian North Americans. The frequencies of the alleles previously shown to be associated with increased fibrinogen levels were so low in the Quechuas that their presence could be accounted for solely by genetic admixture with Caucasians. Frequencies in the Na-Dene, a Native American group unrelated to the Quechua, were not significantly different from those in Caucasians.

  4. Exploring and Adapting a Conceptual Model of Sexual Positioning Practices and Sexual Risk Among HIV-Negative Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangerfield, Derek T; Ober, Allison J; Smith, Laramie R; Shoptaw, Steven; Bluthenthal, Ricky N

    2018-02-21

    Estimates show a 50% lifetime human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) in the United States(U.S.). Studying the dynamics of sexual positioning practices among BMSM could provide insights into the disparities observed among U.S. groups of men who have sex with men (MSM). This study explored sexual positioning dynamics among HIV-negative BMSM and how they aligned with a theoretical model of sexual positioning and HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk among MSM. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 29 HIV-negative BMSM between ages 25 and 35 in Los Angeles. Comments related to sexual behaviors were reviewed for relevance regarding oral or anal sexual positioning practices. Data presented represent the range of themes related to decision making regarding sexual positioning. Personal preference, partner attraction, HIV avoidance, and feeling obligated to practice partner preferences influenced sexual positioning. Drug use also affected decision making and was sometimes preferred in order to practice receptive anal intercourse. These variables build on the conceptual model of sexual positioning practices and sexual risk, and add understanding to the relationship between preferences, practices, and risk management. Future research on risk among HIV-negative BMSM should quantify the relative impact of personal preferences, partner attraction, partner type, compromise, and substance use on sexual positioning practices and risk.

  5. Increased Rates of Respiratory and Diarrheal Illnesses in HIV-Negative Persons Living With HIV-Infected Individuals in a Densely Populated Urban Slum in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Joshua M; Cosmas, Leonard; Nyachieo, Dhillon; Williamson, John M; Olack, Beatrice; Okoth, George; Njuguna, Henry; Feikin, Daniel R; Burke, Heather; Montgomery, Joel M; Breiman, Robert F

    2015-09-01

    Prolonged pathogen shedding and increased duration of illness associated with infections in immunosuppressed individuals put close human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative contacts of HIV-infected persons at increased risk of exposure to infectious pathogens. We calculated incidence and longitudinal prevalence (number of days per year) of influenzalike illness (ILI), diarrhea, and nonspecific febrile illness during 2008 from a population-based surveillance program in the urban slum of Kibera (Kenya) that included 1830 HIV-negative household contacts of HIV-infected individuals and 13 677 individuals living in exclusively HIV-negative households. For individuals ≥5 years old, incidence was significantly increased for ILI (risk ratio [RR], 1.47; P 5 years old. Targeted interventions are needed, including ensuring that HIV-infected persons are receiving appropriate care and treatment. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. HbA1c level cannot predict the treatment outcome of smear-positive non-multi-drug-resistant HIV-negative pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Ken; Horita, Nobuyuki; Nagai, Kenjiro; Ikeda, Misako; Shinkai, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Masaki; Sato, Takashi; Hara, Yu; Nagakura, Hideyuki; Shibata, Yuji; Watanabe, Hiroki; Nakashima, Kentaro; Ushio, Ryota; Nagashima, Akimichi; Narita, Atsuya; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Kudo, Makoto; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study to evaluate whether the HbA1c level on admission could predict the in-hospital treatment outcome of smear-positive non-multi-drug-resistant HIV-negative culture-proven pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients. Our standard regimens under the direct observation were HRZE or HRE for the first two months followed by combination therapy with isoniazid and rifampicin. Our cohort consisted of consecutive 239 patients consisted of 147 men and 92 women with a median age of 73 years. The HbA1c level of patients whose HbA1c was above 7.0% on admission showed clear declining trends after admission. HbA1c on admission had no Spearman’s rank correlation with time to discharge alive (r = 0.17) and time to becoming non-infective (r = 0.17). By Kaplan-Meier curves and a log-rank trend test, HbA1c quartile subgroups showed no association with times to discharge alive (p = 0.431), becoming non-infective (p = 0.113), and in-hospital death (p = 0.427). Based on multi-variate Cox analysis, HbA1c on admission had no significant impact on time to discharge alive (hazard ratio = 1.03, 95% CI 0.89–1.20, p = 0.659), becoming non-infective (hazard ratio = 0.93, 95% CI 0.80–1.06, p = 0.277), and in-hospital death (hazard ratio = 0.68, 0.43–1.07, p = 0.097). In conclusion, the HbA1c level on admission did not seem to affect in-hospital tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Japanese cohort. PMID:28406247

  7. Prevalence and determinants of unplanned pregnancy in HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women in Cape Town, South Africa: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyun, Victoria; Brittain, Kirsty; Phillips, Tamsin K; le Roux, Stanzi; McIntyre, James A; Zerbe, Allison; Petro, Greg; Abrams, Elaine J; Myer, Landon

    2018-04-03

    Prevention of unplanned pregnancy is a crucial aspect of preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission. There are few data investigating how HIV status and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) may influence pregnancy planning in high HIV burden settings. Our objective was to examine the prevalence and determinants of unplanned pregnancy among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women in Cape Town, South Africa. Cross-sectional analysis. Single primary-level antenatal care clinic in Cape Town, South Africa. HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women, booking for antenatal care from March 2013 to August 2015, were included. Unplanned pregnancy was measured at the first antenatal care visit using the London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy (LMUP). Analyses examined LMUP scores across four groups of participants defined by their HIV status, awareness of their HIV status prior to the current pregnancy and/or whether they were using antiretroviral therapy (ART) prior to the current pregnancy. Among 2105 pregnant women (1512 HIV positive; 593 HIV negative), median age was 28 years, 43% were married/cohabiting and 20% were nulliparous. Levels of unplanned pregnancy were significantly higher in HIV-positive versus HIV-negative women (50% vs 33%, p<0.001); and highest in women who were known HIV positive but not on ART (53%). After adjusting for age, parity and marital status, unplanned pregnancy was most common among women newly diagnosed and women who were known HIV positive but not on ART (compared with HIV-negative women, adjusted OR (aOR): 1.43; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.94 and aOR: 1.57; 95% CI 1.13 to 2.15, respectively). Increased parity and younger age (<24 years) were also associated with unplanned pregnancy (aOR: 1.42; 95% CI 1.25 to 1.60 and aOR: 1.83; 95% CI 1.23 to 2.74, respectively). We observed high levels of unplanned pregnancy among HIV-positive women, particularly among those not on ART, suggesting ongoing missed opportunities for improved family planning and

  8. Amazonian plants from Peru used by Quechua and Mestizo to treat malaria with evaluation of their activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumy, V; Garcia-Pizango, G; Gutierrez-Choquevilca, A-L; Ruiz, L; Jullian, V; Winterton, P; Fabre, N; Moulis, C; Valentin, A

    2007-07-25

    Indigenous Quechua and Mestizo populations from distinct areas in Loreto, Peru, were interviewed about traditional medication for the treatment of malaria. An ethnographic survey concerning the native theory of illness aetiology in the specific case of malaria permitted the elaboration of an efficient ethnopharmacological enquiry. The survey took place on three main zones corresponding to villages on the Napo and the Pastaza rivers (for the Quechua), and in the surroundings of Iquitos (for the Mestizos) and led to the collection of 14 plants. Serial extractions in hexane, dichloromethane, and methanol were performed on the different parts of the plants collected. The extracts were then tested for antiplasmodial activity in vitro. Seven plants displayed antiplasmodial activity (IC(50) from 2 to 25 microg/mL) and usually low cytotoxicity, indicating their antiplasmodial specificity. The results give scientific validation to the traditional medical knowledge of Quechua and Mestizo populations from Loreto and confirm a source of potentially active plants.

  9. Racial differences in prostate cancer risk in young HIV-positive and HIV-negative men: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anupriya; Uno, Hajime; Holman, Alex; Lorenz, David R; Gabuzda, Dana

    2017-07-01

    African American men have the highest incidence of prostate cancer among ethnic groups, and racial disparity is highest in younger men. Prostate cancer prevalence is rising in HIV-infected men due to improved survival on antiretroviral therapies, yet little is known about racial differences in prostate cancer risk by HIV-infection status and age. This is a prospective cohort study of prostate cancer risk in 2,800 HIV-infected and -uninfected men who have sex with men (MSM) aged 40-70 years (22% African American) who were enrolled in the multicenter AIDS cohort study from 1996 to 2010. Poisson regression models were used to examine associations between race and HIV-infection status and prostate cancer risk among men aged 40-70, 40-55, and 56-70 years. Among men aged 40-70 years, incidence rates (IR) per 100,000 person-years were 169 among all men and 276 among African American HIV-infected men. Prostate cancer risk was similar by HIV-infection status (IRR 1.0, 95% CI 0.55-1.82), but nearly threefold higher in African Americans compared to non-African Americans in adjusted models (IRRs 2.66 and 3.22, 95% CIs 1.36-5.18 and 1.27-8.16 for all or HIV-infected men, respectively). Racial disparity in prostate cancer risk was greatest in African American men aged 40-55 years (adjusted IRR 3.31, 95% CI 1.19-9.22). Prostate cancer risk showed associations with family history of prostate cancer (p = 0.001), but not heavy smoking, androgen supplement use, or HIV-related factors. Among MSM, African American HIV-positive and HIV-negative men aged 40-55 years have threefold increased risk of young-onset prostate cancer compared to non-African American men, highlighting the need to make informed decisions about screening in this population.

  10. Comparison of health conditions treated with traditional and biomedical health care in a Quechua community in rural Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandebroek, Ina; Thomas, Evert; Sanca, Sabino; Van Damme, Patrick; Puyvelde, Luc Van; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2008-01-14

    The objective of the present study was to reveal patterns in the treatment of health conditions in a Quechua-speaking community in the Bolivian Andes based on plant use data from traditional healers and patient data from a primary health care (PHC) service, and to demonstrate similarities and differences between the type of illnesses treated with traditional and biomedical health care, respectively. A secondary analysis of plant use data from semi-structured interviews with eight healers was conducted and diagnostic data was collected from 324 patients in the community PHC service. Health conditions were ranked according to: (A) the percentage of patients in the PHC service diagnosed with these conditions; and (B) the citation frequency of plant use reports to treat these conditions by healers. Healers were also queried about the payment modalities they offer to their patients. Plant use reports from healers yielded 1166 responses about 181 medicinal plant species, which are used to treat 67 different health conditions, ranging from general symptoms (e.g. fever and body pain), to more specific ailments, such as arthritis, biliary colic and pneumonia. The results show that treatment offered by traditional medicine overlaps with biomedical health care in the case of respiratory infections, wounds and bruises, fever and biliary colic/cholecystitis. Furthermore, traditional health care appears to be complementary to biomedical health care for chronic illnesses, especially arthritis, and for folk illnesses that are particularly relevant within the local cultural context. Payment from patients to healers included flexible, outcome contingent and non-monetary options. Traditional medicine in the study area is adaptive because it corresponds well with local patterns of morbidity, health care needs in relation to chronic illnesses, cultural perceptions of health conditions and socio-economic aspects of health care. The quantitative analysis of plant use reports and patient

  11. Developmental and genetic components explain enhanced pulmonary volumes of female Peruvian Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyamu, Melisa; Bigham, Abigail; Parra, Esteban; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Rivera-Chira, María; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2012-08-01

    High altitude natives have enlarged vital capacities and residual volumes (RV). Because pulmonary volumes are an indication of functionally relevant traits, such as diffusion capacity, the understanding of the factors (genetic/developmental) that influence lung volumes provides insight into the adaptive responses of highlanders. In order to test for the effect of growth and development at high altitude on lung volumes, we obtained forced vital capacities (FVC), RV, and total lung capacities (TLC) for a sample of 65 Peruvian females of mostly Quechua origins (18-34 years) who were sub-divided into two well-matched groups: 1) sea-level born and raised females (BSL, n = 34) from Lima, Peru (150 m), and 2) high-altitude born and raised females (BHA, n = 31) from Cerro de Pasco, Peru (4,338 m). To determine Quechua origins, Native American ancestry proportion (NAAP) for each individual was assessed using a panel of 70 ancestry informative markers. NAAP was similar between groups (BSL = 91.71%; BHA = 89.93%; P = 0.240), and the analysis confirmed predominantly Quechua origins. After adjusting for body size and NAAP, BHA females had significantly higher FVC (3.79 ± 0.06 l; P < 0.001), RV (0.98 ± 0.03 l; P < 0.001) and TLC (4.80 ± 0.07 l; P < 0.001) compared to BSL females (FVC = 3.33 ± 0.05 l; RV = 0.69 ± 0.03 l; TLC = 4.02 ± 0.06 l). NAAP was not associated with FVC (P = 0.352) or TLC (P = 0.506). However, NAAP was positively associated with RV (P = 0.004). In summary, results indicate that developmental exposure to high altitude in females constitutes an important factor for all lung volumes, whereas both genetic and developmental factors seem to be important for RV. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Persistent Low-Risk and High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infections of the Uterine Cervix in HIV-Negative and HIV-Positive Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally N. Adebamowo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe prevalence, persistence, and multiplicity of human papillomavirus (HPV infection appears different comparing HIV-positive to HIV-negative women. In this study, we examined prevalent, persistent, and multiple low- and high-risk cervical HPV infections in HIV-negative and HIV-positive women.MethodsWe studied 1,020 women involved in a study of HPV infection using SPF25/LiPA10. Two study visits were scheduled, at enrollment and 6 months afterward. At each study visit, research nurses used a cervical brush to collect samples of exfoliated cervical cells from the cervical os, from all the study participants. Exact logistic regression models were used to estimate associations between HIV and HPV infections.ResultsThe mean (SD age of the study participants was 38 (8 years, 56% were HIV-negative and 44% were HIV-positive. Among HIV-negative women at baseline, single low-risk HPV (lrHPV infections occurred in 12%; multiple lrHPV in 2%; single high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV infections in 9%, and multiple hrHPV infections in 2%. Single lrHPV infections were persistent in 6%, but there was no persistent multiple lrHPV infections. Single hrHPV infections were persistent in 4% while multiple hrHPV infections were persistent in 0.3%. Among HIV-positive women at baseline, single lrHPV infections occurred in 19%, multiple lrHPV in 6%, single hrHPV infections in 17%, and multiple hrHPV infections occurred in 12%. Single lrHPV infections were persistent in 9%, multiple lrHPV infections in 0.6%, single hrHPV infections in 13%, while multiple hrHPV were persistent in 3%. Prevalent, persistent, and multiple infections were more common in HIV-positive women, compared to HIV-negative women. In multivariate models adjusted for age, marital status, socioeconomic status, age at sexual initiation, and douching, the odds ratios comparing HIV-positive to HIV-negative women, were 2.09 (95% CI 1.47–2.97, p < 0.001 for prevalent lrHPV, 1.26 (95% CI

  13. Human papillomavirus in anal biopsy tissues and liquid-based cytology samples of HIV-positive and HIV-negative Thai men who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tippawan Pankam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM are at high risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV-related anal cancer. We compared HPV genotypes in anal tissues (Bx and anal liquid-based cytology fluid (LBC from HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM. Methods: Bx (32 normal, 41 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL and 22 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL, along with LBC from the same visit, were selected from 61 HIV-positive and 34 HIV-negative MSM who enrolled into a prospective cohort in Bangkok, Thailand. HPV genotyping was performed on Bx and LBC. Results: Any HPV and high-risk HPV (HR-HPV prevalence were 63.2% and 60.0% in Bx and 71.6% and 62.1% in LBC, respectively. HIV-positive MSM had higher rates of HR-HPV genotypes detection (70.5% vs. 47.1%, p=0.03 in LBC than HIV-negative MSM. HPV16 (27% was the most common HR-HPV found in HSIL tissue. In HIV-positive MSM, the frequency of HR-HPV detection increased with histopathologic grading in both Bx and LBC samples. HSIL was associated with the presence of any HR-HPV(OR 7.6 (95%CI 1.8–31.9; P=0.006 in LBC and in Bx((OR 5.6 (95%CI 1.4–22.7; P=0.02. Conclusions: Our data strongly support the integration of HR-HPV screening on LBC samples, along with HPV vaccination, into an anal cancer prevention program. Keywords: Human papillomavirus, Anal tissues, Men who have sex with men, HIV, Thailand

  14. Sexual risk behaviors and acceptability of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis among HIV-negative gay and bisexual men in serodiscordant relationships: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Ronald A; Landovitz, Raphael J; Kaplan, Rachel L; Lieber, Eli; Lee, Sung-Jae; Barkley, Thomas W

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this mixed methods study was to examine current sexual risk behaviors, acceptability and potential adoption of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention, and sexual behavior intentions with PrEP adoption among HIV-negative gay and bisexual men (GBM) in HIV serodiscordant relationships. A multiracial/ethnic sample of 25 HIV-negative GBM in serodiscordant relationships completed a qualitative interview and a brief interviewer-administered survey. A modified grounded theory approach was used to identify key themes relating to acceptability and future adoption of PrEP. Participants reported engaging in sexual risk behaviors that place them at risk for HIV infection. Participants also reported a high level of acceptability for PrEP and willingness to adopt PrEP for HIV prevention. Qualitative themes explaining future PrEP adoption included: (1) the opportunity to engage in sex using a noncondom HIV prevention method, (2) protection from HIV infection, and (3) less anxiety when engaging in sex with an HIV-positive partner. Associated with the future adoption of PrEP, a majority (64%) of participants indicated the likelihood for an increase in sexual risk behaviors and a majority (60%) of participants also indicated the likelihood for a decrease or abandonment of condom use, both of which are in contrast to the findings from the large iPrEx study. These findings suggest that the use of PrEP by HIV-negative GBM in serodiscordant relationships carries with it the potential for risk compensation. The findings suggest that PrEP only be offered as part of a comprehensive HIV prevention strategy that includes ongoing risk reduction counseling in the delivery of PrEP to help moderate risk compensation.

  15. The epidemiology of sexually transmitted co-infections in HIV-positive and HIV-negative African-Caribbean women in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remis, Robert S; Liu, Juan; Loutfy, Mona; Tharao, Wangari; Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Perusini, Stephen J; Chieza, Lisungu; Saunders, Megan; Green-Walker, LoriAnn; Kaul, Rupert

    2013-11-17

    HIV disproportionately affects African-Caribbean women in Canada but the frequency and distribution of sexually transmitted infections in this community have not been previously studied. We recruited women based on HIV status through a Toronto community health centre. Participants completed a socio-behavioural questionnaire using Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interview (ACASI) and provided blood for syphilis, HIV, hepatitis B and C, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and human cytomegalovirus (CMV) serology, urine for chlamydia and gonorrhea molecular testing and vaginal secretions for bacterial vaginosis (BV) and human papillomavirus (HPV). Differences in prevalence were assessed for statistical significance using chi-square. We recruited 126 HIV-positive and 291 HIV-negative women, with a median age of 40 and 31 years, respectively (p history of HBV vaccination (66.1% vs. 44.0%, p = 0.0001). Classical STIs were rare in both groups; BV prevalence was low and did not vary by HIV status. HSV-2 infection was markedly more frequent in HIV-positive (86.3%) than HIV-negative (46.6%) women (p < 0.0001). Vaginal HPV infection was also more common in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative women (50.8% vs. 22.6%, p < 0.0001) as was infection with high-risk oncogenic HPV types (48.4% vs. 17.3%, p < 0.0001). Classical STIs were infrequent in this clinic-based population of African-Caribbean women in Toronto. However, HSV-2 prevalence was higher than that reported in previous studies in the general Canadian population and was strongly associated with HIV infection, as was infection with hepatitis B and HPV.

  16. Performance of visual inspection with acetic acid and human papillomavirus testing for detection of high-grade cervical lesions in HIV positive and HIV negative Tanzanian women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dartell, Myassa Arkam; Rasch, Vibeke; Iftner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this cross sectional study was to assess type distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) among HIV positive and HIV negative women who underwent cervical cancer screening, and to examine the ability of visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA), the standard detection method in Tanzania......, and HPV-testing to detect cytologically diagnosed high grade lesions or cancer (HSIL+). Women from different areas in Tanzania were invited by public announcement to cervical cancer screening organized by Ocean Road Cancer Institute (Dar-es-Salaam). A total of 3,767 women were enrolled. Women underwent...

  17. Perceptions of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among HIV-negative and HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspal, Rusi; Daramilas, C.

    2016-01-01

    open access article Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a novel bio-medical HIV prevention op- tion for individuals at high risk of HIV exposure. This qualitative interview study ex- plores perceptions and understandings of PrEP among a sample of 20 HIV-negative and HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in the UK, where there is a debate about the feasibility of o ering PrEP on the NHS. Data were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis and social representations theory from soci...

  18. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy with mefloquine in HIV-negative women: a multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended by WHO to prevent malaria in African pregnant women. The spread of SP parasite resistance has raised concerns regarding long-term use for IPT. Mefloquine (MQ is the most promising of available alternatives to SP based on safety profile, long half-life, and high efficacy in Africa. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of MQ for IPTp compared to those of SP in HIV-negative women.A total of 4,749 pregnant women were enrolled in an open-label randomized clinical trial conducted in Benin, Gabon, Mozambique, and Tanzania comparing two-dose MQ or SP for IPTp and MQ tolerability of two different regimens. The study arms were: (1 SP, (2 single dose MQ (15 mg/kg, and (3 split-dose MQ in the context of long lasting insecticide treated nets. There was no difference on low birth weight prevalence (primary study outcome between groups (360/2,778 [13.0%] for MQ group and 177/1,398 (12.7% for SP group; risk ratio [RR], 1.02 (95% CI 0.86-1.22; p=0.80 in the ITT analysis. Women receiving MQ had reduced risks of parasitemia (63/1,372 [4.6%] in the SP group and 88/2,737 [3.2%] in the MQ group; RR, 0.70 [95% CI 0.51-0.96]; p=0.03 and anemia at delivery (609/1,380 [44.1%] in the SP group and 1,110/2743 [40.5%] in the MQ group; RR, 0.92 [95% CI 0.85-0.99]; p=0.03, and reduced incidence of clinical malaria (96/551.8 malaria episodes person/year [PYAR] in the SP group and 130/1,103.2 episodes PYAR in the MQ group; RR, 0.67 [95% CI 0.52-0.88]; p=0.004 and all-cause outpatient attendances during pregnancy (850/557.8 outpatients visits PYAR in the SP group and 1,480/1,110.1 visits PYAR in the MQ group; RR, 0.86 [0.78-0.95]; p=0.003. There were no differences in the prevalence of placental infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes between groups. Tolerability was poorer in the two MQ groups compared to SP. The most frequently reported related adverse events were dizziness

  19. Development of Teleological Explanations in Peruvian Quechua-Speaking and U.S. English-Speaking Preschoolers and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Tapia, Ingrid; Gelman, Susan A.; Hollander, Michelle A.; Manczak, Erika M.; Mannheim, Bruce; Escalante, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Teleological reasoning involves the assumption that entities exist for a purpose (giraffes have long necks for reaching leaves). This study examines how teleological reasoning relates to cultural context, by studying teleological reasoning in 61 Quechua-speaking Peruvian preschoolers (M[subscript age] = 5.3 years) and adults in an indigenous…

  20. The Quechua Manta Pouch: A Caretaking Practice for Buffering the Peruvian Infant against the Multiple Stressors of High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronick, E. Z.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the caretaking practices employed by the Peruvian Quechua mountain people, who swaddle infants in cloths and blankets (known as a manta pouch) to protect them from the harsh and frigid environment. The practices of 14 mother-infants pairs are examined in detail, and the benefits and drawbacks of the manta pouch are examined. (MDM)

  1. Determinants of School Performance Among Quechua Children in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Enrique; Cueto, Santiago; Pollitt, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    In the rural Andes of Peru, primary school inefficiency ranks higher than in the rest of the country, with a nearly 50 per cent rate of first grade repetition. In 1993 the investigators administered a battery of four psycho-educational tests to 360 schoolchildren in the fourth and fifth grades at ten primary schools in the Andean region of Huaraz. They also recorded the children's individual characteristics, i.e. family background, nutritional status, and educational attainment, and rated the schools according to educational features such as classroom size, time devoted to learning, and student-teacher ratio. A year later, in 1994, children were re-examined in the schools using the same test battery. All subjects were small for their age, had poor diets, spoke mostly Quechua at home (Spanish in school), lived in a rural environment, and walked considerable distances to school. Regression analyses of the 1993 data indicated that the performance of Quechua children on verbal tests was heavily influenced by family background, while their mathematical competence was related to school experience. On the other hand, improvement in test scores from one year to the next appeared to be strongly related to test performance in 1993 and less clearly to the other recorded variables. Finally, the schools' promotion rates were clearly associated with test scores from the previous year but less clearly with grade repetition rates.

  2. 3-mountain and 4-world: the numbers of the banquet of Quechua offerings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lorente Fernández

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Quechua offerings in the South of Peru are banquets dedicated to the Pachamama and the Apus, and at the same time, are elaborated mathematical systems controlled by sophisticated operations. Using two principal numbers, 3 and 4, the religious specialist is capable of transmitting polysemic messages. Through the number 3, the religious specialist refers to the people, landscapes and mountains, in sum, to «persons» able to interact among themselves. The number 3 appears in the k’intus, composed of coca leaves, also in the prayers said during the process of the offering ritual. On the contrary, the number 4 does not indicate relationships but spatial forms: it is a geometrical operator that is constructed of the ceremonial square napkin (unk’uña and paper in which the offering is completely wrapped to make the offering a miniature world, containing the «four directions of the world.» Using these numbers, the religious specialist can recreate the cosmos, establish covenants with the gods and define new situations favorable to the life of Quechuas.

  3. Intimacy motivations and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) adoption intentions among HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) in romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarel, Kristi E; Golub, Sarit A

    2015-04-01

    In the USA, men who have sex with men (MSM) in primary partnerships are at elevated risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a new biomedical prevention strategy, has potential to reduce HIV transmission. This study examined predictors of PrEP adoption intentions among HIV-negative MSM in primary partnerships. The sample included HIV-negative MSM (n = 164) who participated in an ongoing cross-sectional study with an in-person interview examining PrEP adoption intentions. Higher HIV risk perception, intimacy motivations for condomless sex, recent condomless anal sex with outside partners, education, and age were each independently associated with PrEP adoption intentions. In a multivariate model, only age, education, and intimacy motivations for condomless sex were significantly associated with PrEP adoption intentions. Intimacy motivations may play a central role in PrEP adoption for MSM couples. Incorporating relationship dynamics into biomedical strategies is a promising avenue for research and intervention.

  4. Juan Puma, el hijo del oso. Cuento quechua de La Jalca, Chachapoyas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available JUAN PUMA, LE FILS DE L'OURS . CONTE QUECHUA DE LA JALCA, CHACHAPOYAS. Une des fêtes les plus importantes de la communauté de La Jalca, Province de Chachapoyas, Amazonas, est celle de la Saint-Pierre où l’on exécute une danse de l’ours très semblable à celle des ukukus du sud péruvien. Le narrateur du récit que nous publions ici assimile ce rite à l’histoire de Juan Oso (Jean de l’Ours très connue dans le monde andin. L’importance de l’ours dans cette culture des hautes terres amazoniennes est fondamentale. En quechua local, l’ours s’appelle “puma” et partage avec le puma de la forêt les caractéristiques de puissance effrayante et de pouvoirs surnaturels. Le fils de l’ours, Juan, évoque les relations ambiguës liant les “chrétiens” des hautes terres d’Amazonas et les “sauvages” de la forêt. Una de las fiestas más importantes de la comunidad de La Jalca, Provincia de Chachapoyas, Amazonas, es la de San Pedro en la que se representa un baile del oso muy semejante al baile de los ukukus del sur peruano. El narrador del cuento que publicamos aquí asimila este rito a la historia de Juan Oso, muy conocido en el mundo andino. La importancia del oso en esta cultura de la ceja de selva alta es fundamental. En quechua local, el oso se llama “puma” y comparte con el puma de la selva las características de fuerza temible y poderes sobrenaturales. El hijo del oso, Juan, evoca las relaciones ambiguas existentes entre los “cristianos” de la serranía de Amazonas y los “chunchos” de la selva. JUAN PUMA, THE BEAR'S SON. A QUECHUA TALE FROM LA JALCA, CHACHAPOYAS. One of the most important feasts of the community of La Jalca, Province of Amazonas, is that of Saint Peter in which a bear dance similar to the southern Peruvian dance of the ukukus is performed. In the story published here, the narrator assimilates this rite with the tale of Juan Oso, another story which is well known throughout the Andes. The importance of bears

  5. El léxico de parentesco quechua según Juan Pérez Bocanegra (Cuzco, siglo XVII

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    Raúl Bendezú-Araujo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEn el marco de los estudios andinos coloniales, la figura de Juan Pérez Bocanegra, párroco de Andahuaylillas (Cuzco, goza de gran prestigio y su obra es frecuentemente citada como una fuente muy digna de crédito. El aporte más significativo de este clérigo a nuestro conocimiento del pasado andino lo constituye, muy probablemente, su detallada descripción del sistema de parentesco quechua. Ahora bien, sin intentar desmerecer el valor general de la obra de Pérez Bocanegra, la presente nota busca ofrecer una perspectiva lingüístico-filológica de los datos que esta presenta respectodel léxico de parentesco del quechua de inicios del siglo XVII. En ese sentido, intentaremos fundamentar la hipótesis de que, en relación con este aspecto particular, los datos de Pérez Bocanegra no son del todo fiables, pues obedecen a un proyecto evangelizador particular, que deja rastros en la selección y presentación de los lexemas que componen el campo léxico en cuestión.Palabras clave: filología andina, términos de parentesco, Juan Pérez Bocanegra, quechua colonial AbstractWithin the framework of colonial Andean studies, the image of Juan Perez Bocanegra, parish priest of Andahuaylillas (Cuzco, is highly regarded, and his work is often cited as a very reliable source. The most significant contribution of this cleric to our knowledge of the Andean past lies in its detailed description of the Quechua kinship system. However, without trying dismiss the overall value of the work of Pérez Bocanegra, this article seeks to provide a linguistic-philological perspective of the data he provides regarding the Quechua kinship lexicon from the early seventeenth century. In this respect, I will try to support the hypothesis that, on this particular aspect, this author’s data is not entirely reliable, for it obeys a particular evangelizer project that leaves traces in the selection and presentation of the lexemes that compose the lexical field in

  6. Impaired progenitor cell function in HIV-negative infants of HIV-positive mothers results in decreased thymic output and low CD4 counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S. D.; Jeppesen, D. L.; Kolte, L.

    2001-01-01

    and fetal thymic organ cultures (FTOCs). Lower naive CD4 counts (459.3 +/- 68.9 vs 1128.9 +/- 146.8 cells/microL, P mothers were found (frequency of CD4(+) cells with TRECs was 3.6% +/- 0.7% compared with 14.3% +/- 2.2% in controls, P ...). In combination with lower red blood cell counts in infants of HIV-positive mothers, this finding suggested impairment of progenitor cell function. Indeed, progenitors from infants of HIV-positive mothers had decreased cloning efficiency (15.7% +/- 2.6% vs 55.8% +/- 15.9%, P =.009) and seemed to generate fewer T...... cells in FTOCs. In conclusion, lower numbers of naive CD4(+) cells and reduced thymic output in HIV-negative infants of HIV-positive mothers may be due to impaired progenitor cell function....

  7. Age related patterns of immunoglobulin serum levels in the Quechua Indians of Andean Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memeo, S. A.; Piantanelli, L.; Mazzufferi, G.; Guerra, L.; Nikolitz, M.; Fabris, N.

    1982-03-01

    Age-dependent changes of IgA, IgG, IgM, and IgD serum levels in a population of Quechua Indians of Peruvian Andes at 4 300 m were investigated. A first increase and a subsequent decrease in IgA and IgM levels were observed with advancing age. IgG and IgD only display an increase during development. More or less pronounced sex-related changes were also found in all Ig classes, the sex dependent pattern of IgA being the more evident one. It has been suggested that sexual, genetic and environmental influences strongly superimpose to high altitude related changes in Ig profile during ageing.

  8. Linking HIV-Negative Youth to Prevention Services in 12 U.S. Cities: Barriers and Facilitators to Implementing the HIV Prevention Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Mimi; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Roseland, Denise; McAuliff, Kathleen; Wilson, Craig M; Boyer, Cherrie B

    2018-04-01

    Linkage of HIV-negative youth to prevention services is increasingly important with the development of effective pre-exposure prophylaxis that complements behavioral and other prevention-focused interventions. However, effective infrastructure for delivery of prevention services does not exist, leaving many programs to address HIV prevention without data to guide program development/implementation. The objective of this study was to provide a qualitative description of barriers and facilitators of linkage to prevention services among high-risk, HIV-negative youth. Thematic analysis of structured interviews with staff implementing linkage to prevention services programs for youth aged 12-24 years. Twelve adolescent medicine HIV primary care programs as part of larger testing research program focused on young sexual minority men of color. The study included staff implementing linkage to prevention services programs along with community-based HIV testing programs. The main outcomes of the study were key barriers/facilitators to linkage to prevention services. Eight themes summarized perspectives on linkage to prevention services: (1) relationships with community partners, (2) trust between providers and youth, (3) youth capacity to navigate prevention services, (4) pre-exposure prophylaxis specific issues, (5) privacy issues, (6) gaps in health records preventing tailored services, (7) confidentiality of care for youth accessing services through parents'/caretakers' insurance, and (8) need for health-care institutions to keep pace with models that prioritize HIV prevention among at-risk youth. Themes are discussed in the context of factors that facilitated/challenged linkage to prevention services. Several evidence-based HIV prevention tools are available; infrastructures for coordinated service delivery to high-risk youth have not been developed. Implementation of such infrastructures requires attention to community-, provider-, and youth-related issues. Copyright

  9. Generationing, Stealthing, and Gift Giving: The Intentional Transmission of HIV by HIV-Positive Men to their HIV-Negative Sex Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hugh

    2014-11-06

    Gift giving is the process by which an HIV-positive person purposely infects an HIV-negative person with HIV, usually with that person's knowledge and consent. Little has been written about this HIV transmission practice. In this paper, two specific types of gift giving - generationing and stealthing - are explained and introduced to the scientific literature. Generationing is a type of gift giving in which one gift giver successfully infects a previously-uninfected man with HIV, and then the two men collaborate in an effort to seroconvert another man, and so forth. Stealthing is another type of gift giving in which an HIV-positive man actively tries to infect an HIV-negative man with HIV, without the latter's knowledge or consent. The present study reports on the prevalence of gift giving (4.6%) in a population of men who use the Internet specifically to identify partners for unprotected sex. The research is based on a national random sample of 332 men who have sex with men, identified from 16 websites. Data were collected via telephone interviews conducted between January 2008 and May 2009. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings for HIV prevention and intervention efforts. Most notably, to the extent that generationing, stealthing, and gift giving occur among MSM, they represent a very high risk of HIV transmission. More work needs to be done to understand these behaviors, the factors that underlie them, and to determine how prevalent they are in the bare-backing population of MSM.

  10. NUNOA: a computer simulator of individuals, families, and extended families of the high-altitude Quechua

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    Brandt, C.C.; Weinstein, D.A.; Shugart, H.H.; Simmons, B.

    1980-10-01

    The Quechua Indians of the Peruvian Andes are an example of a human population which has developed special cultural adaptations to deal with hypocaloric stress imposed by a harsh environment. A highly detailed human ecosystem model, NUNOA, which simulates the yearly energy balance of individuals, families, and extended families in a hypothetical farming and herding Quechua community of the high Andes was developed. Unlike most population models which use sets of differential equations in which individuals are aggregated into groups, this model considers the response of each individual to a stochastic environment. The model calculates the yearly energy demand for each family based on caloric requirements of its members. For each family, the model simulates the cultivation of seven different crops and the impact of precipitation, temperature, and disease on yield. Herding, slaughter, and market sales of three different animal species are also simulated. Any energy production in excess of the family's energy demand is placed into extended family storage for possible redistribution. A family failing to meet their annual energy demand may slaughter additional herd animals, temporarily migrate from the community, or borrow food from the extended family storage. The energy balance is used in determining births, deaths, marriages, and resource sharing in the Indian community. In addition, the model maintains a record of each individual's ancestry as well as seven genetic traits for use in tracing lineage and gene flow. The model user has the opportunity to investigate the effect of changes in marriage patterns, resource sharing patterns, or subsistence activities on the ability of the human population to survive in the harsh Andean environment. In addition, the user may investigate the impact of external technology on the Indian culture.

  11. La tradición oral quechua antigua en los procesos de idolatrías de Cajatambo

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    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available LA TRADITION ORALE QUECHUA ANCIENNE DANS LES PROCÈS D’IDOLATRIE DE CAJATAMBO. Les cinquante six textes rituels contenus dans les procès d’idolâtrie de Cajatambo (1656-1663 constituent un de nos rares corpus de tradition orale quechua primitive. J’en présente ici une nouvelle version paléographique, un essai d’interprétation phonologique et une traduction. Afin de cerner le mieux possible les contenus des textes, j’accompagne l’édition et la traduction d’abondantes notes à caractère essentiellement sémantique et je consacre une étude préliminaire à ce qu’ils nous révèlent de leur contexte dialectal et à la fonction qu’y remplissent de nombreux éléments linguistiques étrangers à la variété locale. Los cincuenta y seis textos rituales contenidos en los procesos de idolatrías de Cajatambo (1656-1663 constituyen uno de nuestros escasos corpus de tradición oral quechua primitiva. Presento aquí una nueva versión paleográfica, un intento de interpretación fonológica y una traducción de este material. Con el objetivo de acercarnos lo más posible a los contenidos, acompaño la edición y traducción de los textos con abundantes notas de carácter sobre todo semántico y dedico un estudio preliminar a los que nos dan luces de su contexto dialectal y a la función que desempeñan en ellos los numerosos elementos lingüísticos ajenos a la variedad local. EARLY QUECHUA ORAL TRADITION IN THE CAJATAMBO IDOLATRY TRIALS. The fifty-six ritual texts contained in the Cajatambo idolatry trials (1656-1663 constitute one of the few corpora of primitive Quechua oral tradition. Presented here are a new paleographic version, a tentative philological interpretation, and a Spanish translation of the texts. In numerous footnotes, the author attempts to clarify hidden meanings through semantic analysis. The introduction is a preliminary study of dialect and of foreign linguistic elements incorporated in the local language variant.

  12. Patterns of prevalent HPV and STI co-infections and associated factors among HIV-negative young Western Cape, South African women: the EVRI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Lynette J; Pokharel, Ubin; Sudenga, Staci L; Botha, Matthys H; Zeier, Michele; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Glashoff, Richard H; Engelbrecht, Susan; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; van der Laan, Louvina E; Kipping, Siegfried; Taylor, Douglas; Giuliano, Anna R

    2018-02-01

    To estimate the prevalence and describe the patterns of concurrent human papillomavirus (HPV) and STIs and associated factors among HIV-negative young Western Cape, South African women participating in the Efficacy of HPV Vaccine to Reduce HIV Infection (EVRI) trial. HIV-negative women aged 16-24 years old were enrolled in the EVRI trial (NCT01489527) and randomised to receive the licensed four-valent HPV vaccine or placebo. At study entry, participants were clinically evaluated for five STIs: herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and disease-causing HPV genotypes (6/11/16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59/68). Demographic and sexual history characteristics were compared among women with STI co-infections, single infection and no infection using Pearson χ 2 and Mann-Whitney tests. ORs were calculated to evaluate factors associated with STI co-infection prevalence. Among 388 young women, STI co-infection prevalence was high: 47% had ≥2 concurrent STIs, 36% had a single STI and 17% had none of the five evaluated STIs. HPV/HSV-2 (26%) was the most prevalent co-infection detected followed by HPV/HSV-2/ Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) (17%) and HPV/CT (15%). Co-infection prevalence was independently associated with alcohol use (adjusted OR=2.01, 95% CI 1.00 to 4.06) and having a sexual partner with an STI (adjusted OR=6.96, 95% CI 1.53 to 30.08). Among high-risk young women from underserved communities such as in Southern Africa, a multicomponent prevention strategy that integrates medical and behavioural interventions targeting both men and women is essential to prevent acquisition of concurrent STI infections and consequent disease. NCT01489527; Post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. The relationship between pornography use and sexual behaviours among at-risk HIV-negative men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Lisa A; Cain, Demetria N; Pope, Howard; Garcia, Jonathan; Cherry, Chauncey

    2012-05-01

    Although pornography is widely available and frequently used among many adults in the USA, little is known about the relationship between pornography and risk factors for HIV transmission among men who have sex with men. Baseline assessments from a behavioural intervention trial for at-risk men who have sex with men were conducted in Atlanta, GA in 2009. Univariate and multivariate generalised linear models were used to assess the relationships between known risk factors for HIV infection, time spent viewing pornography, and sex behaviours. One hundred forty-nine men reporting HIV-negative status and two or more unprotected anal sex partners in the past 6 months were enrolled in an intervention trial and completed survey assessments. Time spent viewing pornography was significantly associated with having more male sexual partners (B=0.45, SE=0.04, Ppornography. This exploratory study is novel in that it sheds light on the associations between viewing pornography and sexual risk taking for HIV infection. Future studies in this area should focus on understanding how the content of pornography; in particular, the viewing of unprotected and protected sex acts, may affect sexual risk taking behaviour.

  14. Neonatal erythropoiesis and subsequent anemia in HIV-positive and HIV-negative Zimbabwean babies during the first year of life: a longitudinal study

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    Malaba Lucie C

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia is common in HIV infection and independently associated with disease progression and mortality. The pathophysiology of HIV-related anemia is not well understood especially in infancy. Methods We conducted a longitudinal cohort study nested within the Zimbabwe Vitamin A for Mothers and Babies Project. We measured hemoglobin, erythropoietin (EPO, serum transferrin receptor (TfR and serum ferritin at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months of age and hemoglobin at 9 and 12 months in 3 groups of randomly selected infants: 136 born to HIV-negative mothers, and 99 born to HIV-positive mothers and who were infected themselves by 6 weeks of age, and 324 born to HIV-positive mothers but who did not become infected in the 6 months following birth. Results At one year of age, HIV-positive infants were 5.26 (adjusted odds ratio, P Conclusion HIV strongly increases anemia risk and confounds interpretation of hematologic indicators in infants. Among HIV-infected infants, the EPO response to anemia is attenuated near the time of infection in the first weeks of life, but normalizes by 6 months.

  15. Preliminary evidence of HIV seroconversion among HIV-negative men who have sex with men taking non-prescribed antiretroviral medication for HIV prevention in Miami, Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttram, Mance E; Kurtz, Steven P

    2017-04-01

    Background Limited information suggests that men who have sex with men (MSM) are informally obtaining antiretroviral medication (ARVs) and using them for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Data are drawn from an on-going study examining the use of non-prescribed ARVs for PrEP. To date, 24 qualitative interviews have been conducted with HIV-negative, substance-using MSM living in Miami, Florida, USA. Data are presented from two participants who reported HIV seroconversion while using non-prescribed ARVs for PrEP. Preliminary data indicate that some young MSM: (i) lack awareness of and accurate information about the efficacious use of PrEP; (ii) obtain non-prescribed ARVs from HIV-positive sex partners and use these medications for PrEP in a way that does not provide adequate protection against HIV infection or cohere with established guidelines; and (iii) engage in multiple HIV transmission risk behaviours, including condomless anal sex and injection drug use. The informal, non-prescribed and non-medically supervised use of ARVs for HIV prevention has the potential to undermine the protective benefits of PrEP and leave men unprotected against HIV transmission and at risk for ARV resistance.

  16. Cultural significance of medicinal plant families and species among Quechua farmers in Apillapampa, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evert; Vandebroek, Ina; Sanca, Sabino; Van Damme, Patrick

    2009-02-25

    Medicinal plant use was investigated in Apillapampa, a community of subsistence farmers located in the semi-arid Bolivian Andes. The main objectives were to identify the culturally most significant medicinal plant families and species in Apillapampa. A total of 341 medicinal plant species was inventoried during guided fieldtrips and transect sampling. Data on medicinal uses were obtained from fifteen local Quechua participants, eight of them being traditional healers. Contingency table and binomial analyses of medicinal plants used versus the total number of inventoried species per family showed that Solanaceae is significantly overused in traditional medicine, whereas Poaceae is underused. Also plants with a shrubby habitat are significantly overrepresented in the medicinal plant inventory, which most likely relates to their year-round availability to people as compared to most annual plants that disappear in the dry season. Our ranking of medicinal species according to cultural importance is based upon the Quality Use Agreement Value (QUAV) index we developed. This index takes into account (1) the average number of medicinal uses reported for each plant species by participants; (2) the perceived quality of those medicinal uses; and (3) participant consensus. According to the results, the QUAV index provides an easily derived and valid appraisal of a medicinal plant's cultural significance.

  17. 3-cerro y 4-mundo: los números del banquete en las ofrendas quechuas

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    David Lorente Fernández

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Las ofrendas quechuas del sur del Perú son platos alimenticios, banquetes destinados principalmente a la pachamama y los apus, pero también elaborados sistemas matemáticos regidos por operaciones sofisticadas. Sirviéndose de dos números fundamentales, el 3 y el 4, los especialistas rituales son capaces de transmitir mensajes polisémicos. Mediante el número 3 aglutinan clientes, parajes y cerros, en suma, «personas» capaces de interactuar entre sí. El 3 aparece en los k’intus de hojas de coca y en las oraciones que se recitan durante el proceso de realizar la ofrenda. Por el contrario, el número 4 no indica relaciones sino formas espaciales: es un operador geométrico que unifica la servilleta ceremonial (unk’uña, el papel envoltorio y el paquete acabado para representar las cuatro direcciones del mundo y hacer de la ofrenda un mundo en miniatura. Gracias a los dos números el ritualista puede recrear el cosmos, establecer convenios con los dioses y definir nuevas situaciones favorables para la vida de sus clientes.

  18. The Need for Cervical Cancer Control in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women from Romania by Primary Prevention and by Early Detection Using Clinically Validated HPV/DNA Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Gabriela Ursu

    Full Text Available In Romania, a country with no organized national surveillance program regarding cervical cancer, the early diagnosis of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus infections is a major requirement, especially in HIV-infected women. The objective of this study was to determine the HPV prevalence and type distribution in young HIV-positive women and to assess the difference in the risk factors for developing cervical cancer compared to those of HIV-negative women.We conducted one cross-sectional cohort study from June 2013-September 2014, including 1,032 women: 992 HIV- women who were 36.5 years old (limits: 17 ÷ 84 and 40 HIV + women who were 22.9 years old (limits: 17 ÷ 30 with iatrogenic HIV infected. We detected HPV types with the Linear Array HPV Genotyping test (Roche, Romania.DNA/HPV was detected in 18/40 (45% of the HIV+ patients and in 350/992 (35.2% of the HIV- patients (OR = 1.5, 95%CI 0.76÷2.96. After age adjustment, the overall HPV prevalence was 51.6% in HIV+ versus 63.2% in HIV- women aged under 25, and 22.2% in HPV+ versus 47.2% in HIV- women aged 25-34. We detect HIV being a risk factor for acquiring multiple HPV type infections (OR = 2.30, 95% CI 0.88÷5.97. The eight most common HPV types (high-risk, and low-risk for women below age 30, HIV+ / - were: HPV 16, 18, 31, 51, 58, 68, and 6 and 82 respectively. To assess the risk factors of HIV-positive women for acquiring HPV infection, we analyzed the CD4/μL, ARN/HIV copies/μL, the age group, the number of sexual partners, smoking, and the type of HPV infection (single versus multiple infections. We found that the number of sexual partners and smoking are statistically significant risk factors.Even though there are no significant differences regarding the prevalence of HPV infection in HIV + versus HIV - patients, multiple infections were more frequent in the first group. In our study group young HIV-infected patients under HAART therapy, high number of sexual partners (more than 3 and smoking

  19. Ancestry explains the blunted ventilatory response to sustained hypoxia and lower exercise ventilation of Quechua altitude natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutsaert, Tom D; Parra, Esteban J; Shriver, Mark D; Gamboa, Alfredo; Rivera-Ch, Maria; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2005-07-01

    Andean high-altitude (HA) natives have a low (blunted) hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR), lower effective alveolar ventilation, and lower ventilation (VE) at rest and during exercise compared with acclimatized newcomers to HA. Despite blunted chemosensitivity and hypoventilation, Andeans maintain comparable arterial O(2) saturation (Sa(O(2))). This study was designed to evaluate the influence of ancestry on these trait differences. At sea level, we measured the HVR in both acute (HVR-A) and sustained (HVR-S) hypoxia in a sample of 32 male Peruvians of mainly Quechua and Spanish origins who were born and raised at sea level. We also measured resting and exercise VE after 10-12 h of exposure to altitude at 4,338 m. Native American ancestry proportion (NAAP) was assessed for each individual using a panel of 80 ancestry-informative molecular markers (AIMs). NAAP was inversely related to HVR-S after 10 min of isocapnic hypoxia (r = -0.36, P = 0.04) but was not associated with HVR-A. In addition, NAAP was inversely related to exercise VE (r = -0.50, P = 0.005) and ventilatory equivalent (VE/Vo(2), r = -0.51, P = 0.004) measured at 4,338 m. Thus Quechua ancestry may partly explain the well-known blunted HVR (10, 35, 36, 57, 62) at least to sustained hypoxia, and the relative exercise hypoventilation at altitude of Andeans compared with European controls. Lower HVR-S and exercise VE could reflect improved gas exchange and/or attenuated chemoreflex sensitivity with increasing NAAP. On the basis of these ancestry associations and on the fact that developmental effects were completely controlled by study design, we suggest both a genetic basis and an evolutionary origin for these traits in Quechua.

  20. Syndemic conditions and HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-negative gay and bisexual men in a U.S. national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jeffrey T; Millar, Brett M; Moody, Raymond L; Starks, Tyrel J; Rendina, H Jonathon; Grov, Christian

    2017-07-01

    The syndemics framework has been used to explain the high rates of HIV infection among gay and bisexual men. However, most studies have relied primarily on urban or otherwise limited (e.g., single location) samples. We evaluated the prevalence of syndemics-here, depression, polydrug use, childhood sexual abuse, intimate partner violence, and sexual compulsivity-among gay and bisexual men from across the United States, including nonurban areas. Using data from a national sample of 1,033 HIV-negative gay and bisexual men, demographic differences in the prevalence of each syndemic condition and associations with HIV transmission risk behavior were examined. More than 62% of men reported at least 1 syndemic condition. Prevalence did not vary by U.S. region-however, a larger proportion of nonurban men and those with lower income and education levels were above the median number of syndemic conditions. In bivariate analyses, HIV transmission risk behavior was associated with each syndemic condition except for childhood sexual abuse, whereas in multivariate analyses, it was associated with polydrug use, sexual compulsivity, being Latino, and being single and was highest among those reporting 3 or more syndemic conditions. Rates of syndemic conditions among this national sample of gay and bisexual men were generally comparable to previous studies, however elevated rates in nonurban men suggest the need for targeted intervention and support. Links observed between syndemics and HIV transmission risk behavior highlight the ongoing need to address psychosocial concerns among gay and bisexual men in order to reduce their disproportionately high rates of HIV infection. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Acceptability and willingness to use HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis among HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredig, Daniel; Uggowitzer, Franziska; Hassler, Benedikt; Weber, Patrick; Nideröst, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is discussed as an additional HIV prevention method targeting men who have sex with men (MSM). So far, PrEP has not been approved in Switzerland and only little is known about the acceptability of PrEP among MSM living in Switzerland. Given the slow uptake of PrEP among MSM in the USA, the objectives of the study were to investigate the acceptability for PrEP and to identify factors influencing the acceptability for this prevention method and the willingness to adopt it. During a 4-month period we conducted five focus group discussions with 23 consecutively sampled HIV-negative MSM aged 22-60 years living in Switzerland. We analyzed the data according to qualitative content analysis. The acceptability of PrEP varied considerably among the participants. Some would use PrEP immediately after its introduction in Switzerland because it provides an alternative to condoms which they are unable or unwilling to use. Others were more ambivalent towards PrEP but still considered it (1) an additional or alternative protection to regular condom use, (2) an option to engage in sexual activities with less worries and anxieties or (3) a protection during receptive anal intercourse independently of the sexual partner's protective behaviour. Some participants would not consider using PrEP at all: they do not see any benefit in PrEP as they have adopted safer sex practices and did not mention any problems with condom use. Others are still undecided and could imagine using an improved form of PrEP. The results provide a valuable basis for a model explaining the acceptability of PrEP among MSM and suggest including the personal HIV protection strategy in the considerations adopted.

  2. Social support among HIV-positive and HIV-negative adolescents in Umlazi, South Africa: changes in family and partner relationships during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Lauren M; Maman, Suzanne; Groves, Allison K; Moodley, Dhayendre

    2015-05-17

    Pregnancy is common among adolescents in South Africa, yet the social experiences of adolescents during the pregnancy and postpartum period remain understudied in this context. We aimed to explore how adolescent women's discovery and disclosure of both their pregnancy and HIV status affected their relationships with family members and sexual partners, with a particular focus on whether and how support changed throughout this time period. We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews with 15 HIV-positive and HIV-negative adolescent women who were either pregnant or had delivered in the last 18 months from one urban clinic in Umlazi, South Africa. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, translated, and coded for analysis. Young women described stress and instability in their relationships with family and partners during pregnancy and the postpartum period, though prior to and during HIV-status disclosure women generally experienced less stress than in disclosing their pregnancy to family members and partners. After a destabilizing period immediately following pregnancy disclosure, families became and remained the primary source of material and emotional support for the young women. Women discussed heightened closeness with their partners during pregnancy, but few women had close relationships with their partners postpartum. Support experiences did not differ by HIV status. Programs should be aware of the relative importance of pregnancy-related concerns over HIV-related concerns in this population of young women. Engaging family members is critical in ensuring social support for this population of young pregnant women, and in encouraging timely initiation of antenatal care.

  3. Reporting diarrhoea through a vernacular term in Quechua-speaking settings of rural Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Gonzalo Durán; Christen, Andri; Arnold, Ben; Hattendorf, Jan; Colford, John M; Smith, Thomas A; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Field studies often use caregiver-reported diarrhoea and related symptoms to measure child morbidity. There are various vernacular terms to define diarrhoea that vary across the local cultural contexts. The relationship between vernacular definitions of diarrhoea and symptoms-based definitions is not well-documented. This paper describes the association of the vernacular Quechua term k'echalera with the symptoms-based standard definition of diarrhoea in rural Bolivian settings. During a cluster randomized trial in rural Bolivia, both signs and symptoms of diarrhoea and reports of k'echalera were collected for children aged less than five years. Reported k'echalera were found to be associated with important changes in stool frequency, consistency, and presence of blood and mucus. Reported k'echalera were highly related to three of four recorded categories of watery stool. The intermediate (milk-rice) stool consistency, which fits into the definition of watery stool, was not strongly related to k'echalera. Mucus in the stool was also associated with k'echalera; however, its presence in k'echalera-free days accounted for at least 50% of the possible false negatives. The sensitivity and specificity of the term k'echalera were estimated by Bayesian methods, allowing for both symptoms of diarrhoea and reports of k'echalera to be subject to diagnosis error. An average specificity of at least 97% and the sensitivity of at least 50% were obtained. The findings suggest that the use of k'echalera would identify fewer cases of diarrhoea than a symptom-based definition in rural Bolivia.

  4. Two Decades Later: The Resilience and Post-Traumatic Responses of Indigenous Quechua Girls and Adolescents in the Aftermath of the Peruvian Armed Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eliana Barrios

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In comparison to other traumatic events, the impact of a childhood during war on resilience later in life has been seldom examined. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the long term outcomes of post-traumatic responses and resilience of a sample of adult Indigenous Quechua women, who were girls or adolescents during the…

  5. Living in fast-flowing water: morphology of the gastromyzophorous tadpole of the bufonid Rhinella quechua (R. veraguensis group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, R; Lavilla, E O; Vera Candioti, M F; Camacho, T

    2009-12-01

    We describe the bufonid gastromyzophorous tadpoles of Rhinella quechua from montane forest streams in Bolivia. Specimens were cleared and stained, and the external morphology, buccopharyngeal structures, and the musculoskeletal system were studied. These tadpoles show a combination of some traits common in Rhinella larvae (e.g., emarginate oral disc with large ventral gap in the marginal papillae, labial tooth row formula 2/3, prenarial ridge, two infralabial papillae, quadratoorbital commissure present, larval otic process absent, mm. mandibulolabialis superior, interhyoideus posterior, and diaphragmatopraecordialis absent, m. subarcualis rectus I composed of three slips), some traits apparently exclusive for the described species of the R. veraguensis group (e.g., second anterior labial tooth row complete, lingual papillae absent, adrostral cartilages present), and some traits that are shared with other gastromyzophorous tadpoles (e.g., enlarged oral disc, short and wide articular process of the palatoquadrate, several muscles inserting on the abdominal sucker). In the context of the substantial taxonomic and nomenclatural changes that the former genus Bufo has undergone, and despite the conspicuous morphological differences related to the presence of an abdominal sucker, the larval morphology of R. quechua supports including it in the genus Rhinella and placing it close to species of the R. veraguensis assemblage. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. On the front line of primary health care: the profile of community health workers in rural Quechua communities in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela; Malca, Rosa; Zumaran, Adriana; Miranda, J Jaime

    2006-05-17

    To describe the profile of community health workers--health promoters, traditional birth attendants and traditional healers--in rural Quechua communities from Ayacucho, Peru. Basic quantitative and qualitative information was gathered as part of a community health project implemented between 1997 and 2002 in 40 Andean communities with information from questionnaires, personal interviews and group discussions. The majority of current community health workers are men with limited education who are primarily Quechua speakers undertaking their work on a voluntary basis. Health promoters are mostly young, male, high school graduates. There exists a high drop-out rate among these workers. In contrast, traditional healers and traditional birth attendants possess an almost diametrically opposite profile in terms of age, education and drop-out rates, though males still predominate. At the community level the health promoters are the most visible community health workers. It is very important to consider and to be aware of the profile of community health workers in order to provide appropriate alternatives when working with these groups as well as with the indigenous population, particularly in terms of culture, language and gender issues.

  7. On the front line of primary health care: the profile of community health workers in rural Quechua communities in Peru

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    Zumaran Adriana

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe the profile of community health workers – health promoters, traditional birth attendants and traditional healers – in rural Quechua communities from Ayacucho, Peru. Methods Basic quantitative and qualitative information was gathered as part of a community health project implemented between 1997 and 2002 in 40 Andean communities with information from questionnaires, personal interviews and group discussions. Results The majority of current community health workers are men with limited education who are primarily Quechua speakers undertaking their work on a voluntary basis. Health promoters are mostly young, male, high school graduates. There exists a high drop-out rate among these workers. In contrast, traditional healers and traditional birth attendants possess an almost diametrically opposite profile in terms of age, education and drop-out rates, though males still predominate. At the community level the health promoters are the most visible community health workers. Conclusion It is very important to consider and to be aware of the profile of community health workers in order to provide appropriate alternatives when working with these groups as well as with the indigenous population, particularly in terms of culture, language and gender issues.

  8. The population genetics of Quechuas, the largest native South American group: autosomal sequences, SNPs, and microsatellites evidence high level of diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scliar, Marilia O; Soares-Souza, Giordano B; Chevitarese, Juliana; Lemos, Livia; Magalhães, Wagner C S; Fagundes, Nelson J; Bonatto, Sandro L; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    Elucidating the pattern of genetic diversity for non-European populations is necessary to make the benefits of human genetics research available to individuals from these groups. In the era of large human genomic initiatives, Native American populations have been neglected, in particular, the Quechua, the largest South Amerindian group settled along the Andes. We characterized the genetic diversity of a Quechua population in a global setting, using autosomal noncoding sequences (nine unlinked loci for a total of 16 kb), 351 unlinked SNPs and 678 microsatellites and tested predictions of the model of the evolution of Native Americans proposed by (Tarazona-Santos et al.: Am J Hum Genet 68 (2001) 1485-1496). European admixture is Quechua or Melanesian populations, which is concordant with the African origin of modern humans and the fact that South America was the last part of the world to be peopled. The diversity in the Quechua population is comparable with that of Eurasian populations, and the allele frequency spectrum based on resequencing data does not reflect a reduction in the proportion of rare alleles. Thus, the Quechua population is a large reservoir of common and rare genetic variants of South Amerindians. These results are consistent with and complement our evolutionary model of South Amerindians (Tarazona-Santos et al.: Am J Hum Genet 68 (2001) 1485-1496), proposed based on Y-chromosome data, which predicts high genomic diversity due to the high level of gene flow between Andean populations and their long-term effective population size. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Commercial lubricant use among HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Los Angeles: implications for the development of rectal microbicides for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Heather A; Gorbach, Pamina M; Reback, Cathy J; Landovitz, Raphael J; Mutchler, Matt G; Mitsuyasu, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    To inform the development and assess potential use of rectal microbicide gels for HIV prevention among men who have sex with men (MSM), we examined the dynamics and contexts of commercial lubricant use during receptive anal intercourse (RAI) within this population. From 2007 to 2010, 168 HIV-negative MSM living in Los Angeles who practice RAI completed computer-assisted self-interviews, which collected information on their last sexual event with ≤3 recent partners, at baseline, three months, and one-year study visits. Logistic generalized linear mixed models were used to identify individual- and sexual event-level characteristics associated with commercial lubricant use during RAI at the last sexual event within 421 partnerships reported by participants over the course of follow-up. During RAI at their last sexual event, 57% of partnerships used a condom and 69% used commercial lubricant. Among partnerships that used commercial lubricant, 56% reported lubricant application by both members of the partnership, 66% first applied lubricant during sex, but before penetration, and 98% applied lubricant at multiple locations. The relationship between substance use and commercial lubricant use varied by condom use (interaction p-value = 0.01). Substance use was positively associated with commercial lubricant use within partnerships that did not use condoms during RAI at their last sexual event (AOR = 4.47, 95% [corrected] [CI]: 1.63-12.28), but no association was observed within partnerships that did use condoms (AOR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.23-1.85). Commercial lubricant use during RAI was also positively associated with reporting more sexual partners (AOR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.05-1.31), while older age (units = 5 years; AOR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.61-0.94), homelessness (past year; AOR = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.13-0.76), and having sex with an older (>10 years) partner (AOR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14-0.95) were negatively associated with commercial lubricant use. These factors should be considered

  10. Aerobic capacity of Peruvian Quechua: a test of the developmental adaptation hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyamu, Melisa; Rivera-Chira, María; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2015-03-01

    High altitude natives are reported to have outstanding work capacity in spite of the challenge of oxygen transport and delivery in hypoxia. To evaluate the developmental effect of lifelong exposure to hypoxia on aerobic capacity, VO2peak was measured on two groups of Peruvian Quechua subjects (18-35 years), who differed in their developmental exposure to altitude. Male and female volunteers were recruited in Lima, Peru (150 m), and were divided in two groups, based on their developmental exposure to hypoxia, those: a) Born at sea-level individuals (BSL), with no developmental exposure to hypoxia (n = 34) and b) Born at high-altitude individuals (BHA) with full developmental exposure to hypoxia (n = 32), but who migrated to sea-level as adults (>16-years-old). Tests were conducted both in normoxia (BP = 750 mm Hg) and normobaric hypoxia at sea-level (BP = 750 mm Hg, FiO2  = 0.12, equivalent to 4,449 m), after a 2-month training period (in order to control for initial differences in physical fitness) at sea-level. BHA had a significantly higher VO2peak at hypoxia (40.31 ± 1.0 ml/min/kg) as compared to BSL (35.78 ± 0.96 ml/min/kg, P = 0.001), adjusting for sex. The decrease of VO2peak at HA relative to SL (ΔVO2peak ) was not different between groups, controlling for baseline levels (VO2peak at sea-level) and sex (BHA = 0.35 ± 0.04 l/min, BSL = 0.44 ± 0.04 l/min; P = 0.12). Forced vital capacity (controlling for height) and the residuals of VO2peak (controlling for weight) had a significant association in the BHA group only (r = 0.155; P = 0.031). In sum, results indicate that developmental exposure to altitude constitutes an important factor to determine superior exercise performance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype and arterial oxygen saturation at high altitude in Peruvian Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Abigail W; Kiyamu, Melisa; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Parra, Esteban J; Rivera-Ch, Maria; Shriver, Mark D; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2008-01-01

    The I-allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism has been associated with performance benefits at high altitude (HA). In n = 142 young males and females of largely Quechua origins in Peru, we evaluated 3 specific hypotheses with regard to the HA benefits of the I-allele: (1) the I-allele is associated with higher arterial oxygen saturation (Sa(O(2))) at HA, (2) the I-allele effect depends on the acclimatization state of the subjects, and (3) the putative I-allele effect on Sa(O(2)) is mediated by the isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR, l/min(1)/% Sa(O(2))(1)). The subject participants comprised two different study groups including BLA subjects (born at low altitude) who were lifelong sea-level residents transiently exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (<24 h) and BHA subjects (born at HA) who were lifelong residents of HA. To control for the possibility of population stratification, Native American ancestry proportion (NAAP) was estimated as a covariate for each individual using a panel of 70 ancestry-informative molecular markers (AIMS). At HA, resting and exercise Sa(O(2)) was strongly associated with the ACE genotype, p = 0.008 with approximately 4% of the total variance in Sa(O(2)) attributed to ACE genotype. Moreover, I/I individuals maintained approximately 2.3 percentage point higher Sa(O(2)) compared to I/D and D/D. This I-allele effect was evident in both BLA and BHA groups, suggesting that acclimatization state has little influence on the phenotypic expression of the ACE gene. Finally, ACE genotype was not associated with the isocapnic HVR, although HVR had a strong independent effect on Sa(O(2)) (p = 0.001). This suggests that the I-allele effect on Sa(O(2)) is not mediated by the peripheral control of breathing, but rather by some other central cardiopulmonary effect of the ACE gene on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS).

  12. Perceptions of HIV Seriousness, Risk, and Threat Among Online Samples of HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex With Men in Seven Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Anna N; Metheny, Nicholas; Stephenson, Rob

    2017-06-20

    Rates of new HIV infections continue to increase worldwide among men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite effective prevention strategies such as condoms and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), low usage of both methods in many parts of the world hinder prevention efforts. An individual's perceptions of the risk of acquiring HIV and the seriousness they afford to seroconversion are important drivers of behavioral risk-taking. Understanding the behavioral factors suppressing the uptake of HIV prevention services is a critical step in informing strategies to improve interventions to combat the ongoing HIV pandemic among MSM. The study aimed to examine cross-national perceptions of HIV/AIDS seriousness, risk, and threat and the association between these perceptions and sociodemographic characteristics, relationships, and high-risk sexual behaviors among MSM. Participants in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Thailand, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States were recruited for a self-administered survey via Facebook (N=1908). Respondents were asked to rate their perceived seriousness from 1 (not at all serious) to 5 (very serious) of contracting HIV, their perceived risk from 1 (no risk) to 10 (very high risk) of contracting HIV based on their current behavior, and their perception of the threat of HIV-measured as their confidence in being able to stay HIV-negative throughout their lifetimes-on a scale from 1 (will not have HIV by the end of his lifetime) to 5 (will have HIV by the end of his lifetime). Covariates included sociodemographic factors, sexual behavior, HIV testing, drug use, and relationship status. Three ordered logistic regression models, one for each outcome variable, were fit for each country. Contracting HIV was perceived as serious (mean=4.1-4.6), but perceptions of HIV risk (mean=2.7-3.8) and threat of HIV (mean=1.7-2.2) were relatively low across countries. Older age was associated with significantly lower perceived seriousness of acquiring

  13. Actual sexual risk and perceived risk of HIV acquisition among HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Toronto, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya A. Kesler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theory suggests that perceived human immunodeficiency virus (HIV risk and actual HIV risk behaviour are cyclical whereby engaging in high risk behaviour can increase perceived risk, which initiates precautionary behaviour that reduces actual risk, and with time reduces perceived risk. While current perceived risk may impact future actual risk, it is less clear how previous actual risk shapes current perceived risk. If individuals do not base their current perceived risk on past behaviour, they lose the protective effect of perceived risk motivating precautionary behaviour. Our goal was to determine the impact of actual risk on perceived risk. Methods Sexually active men who have sex with men (MSM were recruited at the Maple Leaf Medical Clinic in downtown Toronto from September 2010 to June 2012. Participants completed a socio-behavioural questionnaire using an Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interview (ACASI. Actual HIV risk (primary predictor was constructed by applying principal component analysis (PCA to eight sexual risk survey questions and comprised three components which reflected sex with casual partners, sex with HIV-positive regular partners and sex with HIV unknown status regular partners. Perceived HIV risk (outcome was measured by asking participants what the chances were that they would ever get HIV. Multivariable logistic regression was used to measure the association between actual and perceived HIV risk. Results One hundred and fifty HIV-negative MSM were recruited (median age 44.5 years [IQR 37–50 years]. Twenty percent of MSM perceived their HIV risk to be high. The odds of having a high perceived risk was significantly higher in those with high actual HIV risk indicated by low condom use with an HIV-positive regular partner compared to those with low actual HIV risk indicated by high condom use with an HIV-positive regular partner (Odds Ratio (OR 18.33, 95 % confidence interval (CI 1.65–203.45. Older

  14. Formative Work to Develop a Tailored HIV Testing Smartphone App for Diverse, At-Risk, HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W; Torres, Maria Beatriz; Joe, Jennifer; Danh, Thu; Gass, Bobbi; Horvath, Keith J

    2016-11-16

    Although gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, few test for HIV at regular intervals. Smartphone apps may be an ideal tool to increase regular testing among MSM. However, the success of apps to encourage regular testing among MSM will depend on how frequently the apps are downloaded, whether they continue to be used over months or years, and the degree to which such apps are tailored to the needs of this population. The primary objectives of this study were to answer the following questions. (1) What features and functions of smartphone apps do MSM believe are associated with downloading apps to their mobile phones? (2) What features and functions of smartphone apps are most likely to influence MSM's sustained use of apps over time? (3) What features and functions do MSM prefer in an HIV testing smartphone app? We conducted focus groups (n=7, with a total of 34 participants) with a racially and ethnically diverse group of sexually active HIV-negative MSM (mean age 32 years; 11/34 men, 33%, tested for HIV ≥10 months ago) in the United States in Miami, Florida and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Focus groups were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and deidentified for analysis. We used a constant comparison method (ie, grounded theory coding) to examine and reexamine the themes that emerged from the focus groups. Men reported cost, security, and efficiency as their primary reasons influencing whether they download an app. Usefulness and perceived necessity, as well as peer and posted reviews, affected whether they downloaded and used the app over time. Factors that influenced whether they keep and continue to use an app over time included reliability, ease of use, and frequency of updates. Poor performance and functionality and lack of use were the primary reasons why men would delete an app from their phone. Participants also shared their preferences for an app to

  15. How Best to Obtain Valid, Verifiable Data Online From Male Couples? Lessons Learned From an eHealth HIV Prevention Intervention for HIV-Negative Male Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason; Lee, Ji-Young; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-09-20

    As interest increases in the development of eHealth human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-preventive interventions for gay male couples, Web-based methods must also be developed to help increase the likelihood that couples enrolled and data collected from them represent true unique dyads. Methods to recruit and collect reliable and valid data from both members of a couple are lacking, yet are crucial for uptake of novel sexual health and HIV-prevention eHealth interventions. Methods to describe best practices to recruit male couples using targeted advertisements on Facebook are also lacking in the literature, yet could also help in this uptake. The objective of our study was to describe challenges and lessons learned from experiences from two phases (developmental phase and online randomized controlled trial [RCT]) of an eHealth HIV-prevention intervention for concordant HIV-negative male couples in terms of (1) recruiting male couples using targeted advertisements on Facebook, (2) validating that data came from two partners of the couple, and (3) verifying that the two partners of the couple are in a relationship with each other. The developmental phase refined the intervention via in-person focus groups, whereas the pilot-testing phase included an online RCT. For both phases, couples were recruited via targeted Facebook advertisements. Advertisements directed men to a study webpage and screener; once eligible, participants provided consent electronically. A partner referral system was embedded in the consenting process to recruit the relationship partner of the participant. Both men of the couple had to meet all eligibility criteria-individually and as a couple-before they could enroll in the study. Verification of couples' relationships was assessed via the concurrence of predetermined screener items from both partners, done manually in the developmental phase and electronically in the pilot-testing phase. A system of decision rules was developed to assess the

  16. Varicella Zoster Virus Necrotizing Retinitis in Two Patients with Idiopathic CD4 Lymphocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Meenakashi; Jardeleza, Maria Stephanie R; Kim, Ivana; Durand, Marlene L; Kim, Leo; Lobo, Ann-Marie

    2016-10-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) is usually diagnosed in HIV positive or immunosuppressed patients. We report two cases of immunocompetent patients with necrotizing viral retinitis found to have idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. Clinical presentation, examination, imaging, and laboratory testing of two patients with VZV retinitis are presented. An HIV negative patient with history of herpes zoster presented with rapid loss of vision and examination consistent with PORN. PCR testing confirmed VZV. Lymphocytopenia was noted with a CD4 count of 25/mm(3). A second HIV negative patient presented with blurred vision and lid swelling and was found to have peripheral VZV retinitis confirmed by PCR. Laboratory workup revealed lymphocytopenia with a CD4 count of 133/mm(3). VZV necrotizing retinitis classic for PORN can occur in HIV negative patients. Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia should be considered healthy patients who develop ocular infections seen in the immunocompromised.

  17. The Quechua manta pouch: a caretaking practice for buffering the Peruvian infant against the multiple stressors of high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronick, E Z; Thomas, R B; Daltabuit, M

    1994-08-01

    The manta pouch--a caretaking practice of tightly swaddling and enclosing the infant in a set of cloths and blankets--and other caretaking practices are described for high-altitude resident (> 4,000 m) Quechua mother-infant pairs (N = 14). The manta pouch modifies the microenvironment inside the pouch so that, compared to the ambient environment, the temperature is higher and more stable, the humidity is higher, the partial pressure of O2 is lower, and stimulation levels are reduced. As the infant gets older, the characteristics of the pouch are modified such that the infant is increasingly exposed to ambient conditions. These caretaking practices may benefit the infant by buffering the infant from the multiple ecological stressors of high altitude, but they may also incur costs by exposing the infant to additional microenvironmental stressors (e.g., higher CO2 levels) and by reducing stimulation and limiting infant movement.

  18. Llaki and ñakary: idioms of distress and suffering among the highland Quechua in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Duncan; Kienzler, Hanna; Gamarra, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    This article examines some of the long-term health outcomes of extreme adversities and the ways in which social inequalities and idioms of distress are historically and socially produced in the Peruvian context. We describe how the highland Quechua of northern Ayacucho construct and experience expressions of distress and suffering such as pinsamientuwan (worrying thoughts, worries), ñakary (suffering) and llaki (sorrow, sadness), in a context of persistent social inequalities, social exclusion and a recent history of political violence. It is concluded that the multiple expressions of distress and suffering are closely related to past and current events, shaped by beliefs, core values and cultural norms and, in this process, transformed, recreated and invested with new meanings and attributions.

  19. Prognostic factors predicting a fatal outcome in HIV-negative children with neurotuberculosis Fatores prognósticos de letalidade da neurotuberculose em crianças HIV-negativas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Gimenes Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify prognostic factors predicting a fatal outcome in HIV-negative children with neurotuberculosis based on clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory findings. METHOD: The clinical records of all in-patients diagnosed with neurotuberculosis from 1982 to 2005 were evaluated retrospectively. The following prognostic parameters were examined: gender, age, close contact with a tuberculosis-infected individual, vaccination for bacillus Calmette-Guérin, purified protein derivative (PPD of tuberculin results, concomitant miliary tuberculosis, seizures, CSF results, and hydrocephalus. RESULTS: One hundred forty-one patients diagnosed with neurotuberculosis were included. Seventeen percent of the cases resulted in death. The factors that were correlated with a negative outcome included lack of contact with a tuberculosis-infected individual, negative PPD reaction, coma, and longer hospitalisation time. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify which of these factors most often resulted in death. CONCLUSION: Coma at diagnosis, lack of tuberculosis contact, and a non-reactive PPD were the most important predictors of fatality in patients with neurotuberculosisOBJETIVO: Identificar elementos prognósticos para a letalidade da neurotuberculose na criança, a partir das manifestações clínicas, dados epidemiológicos e laboratoriais. MÉTODO: Registros de pacientes internados durante o período de 1982 a 2005 foram retrospectivamente avaliados. Os elementos prognósticos considerados foram: sexo, idade, história de contato íntimo com indivíduo com tuberculose, vacinação com o bacilo de Calmette-Guérin (BCG, teste tuberculínico (PPD, concomitância de tuberculose miliar, convulsões, resultados da análise do LCR e presença de hidrocefalia. RESULTADOS: 141 pacientes com diagnóstico de neurotuberculose foram incluídos. Dezessete por cento dos pacientes foram a óbito. Os fatores associados ao óbito foram

  20. Comparison of effects of breast-feeding practices on birth-spacing in three societies: nomadic Turkana, Gainj, and Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, S J

    1994-01-01

    Variation in the duration and pattern of breast-feeding contributes significantly to inter-population differences in fertility. In this paper, measures of suckling frequency and intensity are used to compare the effects of breast-feeding practices on the duration of lactational amenorrhoea, and on the length of the birth interval in three prospective studies undertaken during the 1980s, among Quechua Indians of Peru, Turkana nomads of Kenya, and Gainj of Papua New Guinea. In all three societies, lactation is prolonged well into the second year postpartum, and frequent, on-demand breast-feeding is the norm. However, the duration of lactational amenorrhoea and the length of birth intervals vary considerably. Breast-feeding patterns among Gainj and Turkana are similar, but Turkana women resume menses some 3 months earlier than do the Gainj. The average birth interval among the Gainj exceeds that of nomadic Turkana by over 15 months. Suckling activity decreases significantly with increasing age of nurslings among both Gainj and Quechua, but not among Turkana. Earlier resumption of menses among Turkana women may be linked to the unpredictable demands of the pastoral system, which increase day-to-day variation in the number of periods of on-demand breast-feeding, although not in suckling patterns. This effect is independent of the age of infants. The short birth intervals of Turkana women, relative to those of the Gainj, may be related to early supplementation of Turkana nurslings with butterfat and animals' milk, which reduces energetic demands on lactating women at risk of negative energy balance.

  1. LA GUERRA INTERNA Y LA PRESENCIA ANDINA EN IGLESIAS EVANGÉLICAS (1980-2000: EL CULTO EN QUECHUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedilberto Aguilar de la Cruz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available La guerra interna en el Perú durante el período 1980-2000 marcó profundamente no solo las estructuras sociopolíticas del país, sino que generó también cambios en los sistemas religiosos, tanto de la sierra, como en Lima. Fueron las iglesias evangélicas, especialmente pentecostales, las que se convirtieron en un polo de atracción para la población andina de la sierra centro-sur, aquellos que más sufrieron las consecuencias del conflicto. El desplazamiento forzado y la rápida actuación del Concilio Nacional Evangélico del Perú potenciaron el surgimiento de cultos en quechua en algunas iglesias evangélicas, dinámica que posteriormente tomó sus propios caminos. En una ciudad y una sociedad marcadas por las profundas divisiones étnico-raciales y de clase, los cultos en quechua impulsaron la visibilización de una amplia población étnicamente negada. Además, las iglesias evangélicas compitieron con Sendero Luminoso por atraer al mismo público, constituyendo uno de los pocos espacios para la reorganización sociopolítica y étnica de los andinos quechuahablantes en las zonas en conflicto, urbanas y rurales, lo cual les dio legitimidad religiosa, social y política.

  2. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium Species in Patients with Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cryptosporidium is said to cause diarrhoea in HIV / AIDS patients. The study was done to determine the prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in Lagos. Stool samples were collected from 193 HIV positive and 200 HIV negative (control) patients presenting with diarrhoea at LUTH. The patient or a close relative filled a ...

  3. Quechua Amerindian population characterized by HLA-DQ alpha, YNZ22, 3'APO B, HUMTH01, and HUMVWA31A polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gené, M; Fuentes, M; Huguet, E; Piqué, E; Bert, F; Corella, A; Pérez-Pérez, A; Corbella, J; Moreno, P

    1998-03-01

    Allele and genotype frequencies of DNA polymorphisms were determined in a population sample of Quechua (n = 113) using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report data on the frequencies of HLA-DQ alpha, YNZ22, 3'ApoB, HUMTH01 and HUMVWA31A alleles and the distribution of the different genotypes. No significant deviations between observed and expected numbers were found, thus assuming the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

  4. Fundamentos psicolingüísticos y psicométricos de un test breve de bilingüismo quechua-español (TBB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Gonzales Moreyra

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available En base a trabajos de investigación previos, el autor propone un Test Breve de Bilingüismo Quechua-Español formado por reactivos gráficos. Se presenta los resultados de los análisis de validez y confiabilidad obtenidos así como el análisis de ítems y el escalograma. Todas las mencionadas mediciones permiten considerar la prueba como aceptable para futuras investigaciones.

  5. Body size, composition, and blood pressure of high-altitude Quechua from the Peruvian Central Andes (Huancavelica, 3,680 m).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toselli, S; Tarazona-Santos, E; Pettener, D

    2001-01-01

    Although much information is available about the effects of high altitude on physiological characteristics, less is know about its effect on body composition. In the present study, anthropometric and body composition variables were investigated in a sample of 77 adult Quechua males from the Peruvian Central Andes (Huancavelica, 3,680 m). The subjects are shorter in relation to body weight than other ethnic groups, whereas body proportions are macrocormic (indicating a long trunk relative to the lower extremities), with intermediate values of the acromial-iliac index. All skinfold thicknesses are low (approximately 15th percentiles of NHANES reference values for the triceps and subscapular skinfolds), but tend to be higher than in the other Quechua populations. Similar results are obtained when percentage fat is estimated. Somatotypes are dominant in mesomorphy with very low ectomorphy. Comparison with a sample of high-altitude Kirghiz (3,200 m), previously studied with the same methods, shows higher values in the Peruvian sample for all variables related to adiposity. The presence of low adiposity in the Quechua population could be associated with stresses of the high-altitude environment. Mean values of blood pressure are very low and there is no correlation with age.

  6. Predictors of esophageal candidiasis among patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-19

    Sep 19, 2014 ... to occur in 39.1% of patients receiving anti-cancer treat- ment3. In HIV negative ... Data analysis. Data were entered and cleaned using Microsoft Excel ..... Karmeli Y, Stalnikowitz R, Eliakim R, Rahav G: Con- ventional dose of ...

  7. Sero-prevalance of anti-R7V antibody in HIV infected patients in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The seroprevalence of Anti-R7V antibody was therefore investigated in HIV patients attending clinic within the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) and compared with HIV negative patients. Correlation between the presence of the antibody and the clinical status of patients was also investigated. The HIV positive patients were ...

  8. Bone mineral density abnormalities in HIV infected patients and HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone mineral density abnormalities in HIV infected patients and HIV ... Comprehensive Care Clinic (CCC) and a HIV negative control group seen at the ... Older patients had lower levels of BMD (i.e. more negative BMD. p-value = 0.032).

  9. [Human Papilloma virus in Quechua women from Jujuy with high frequency of cervical cancer: viral types and HPV-16 variants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Gronda, Jorge; Alonio, Lidia V; Villa, Luisa L; Sichero, Laura; Miranda, Sergio; Barcena, Martin; Teyssie, Angelica

    2002-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are etiologically associated to cervical carcinoma. In order to evaluate HPV infection and its relationship with the high frequency of this neoplasia in Quechua women from Jujuy (Argentina), 271 cervical samples from preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions (biopsies) and normal controls (cytologies) were studied. Detection and typing were performed using PCR-RFLP or PCR-hybridization and the HPV-16 variability in L1 and E6 genes (by PCR-hybridization) was analysed. HPV was detected in 52% of controls, 91% of low-grade lesions, 97% of high-grade lesions and 100% of invasive carcinomas, corresponding 55% to HPV-16. HPV-16 European variants were predominant, most of them being non-prototypic strains. The high frequency of high risk infection types and the raised proportion of HPV-16 non-prototypic variants related to a greater oncogenic potential could explain, in part, the high cervical cancer frequency of this native population. These data may contribute to disease control and vaccinal formulation.

  10. Evolved priors for ethnolinguistic categorization: A case study from the Quechua-Aymara boundary in the Peruvian Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Ethnic categories uniquely structure human social worlds. People readily form stereotypes about these, and other social categories, but it is unclear whether certain dimensions are privileged for making predictions about strangers when information is limited. If humans have been living in culturally-structured groups for much of their evolutionary history, we might expect them to have adaptations for prioritizing ethno-linguistic cues as a basis for making predictions about others. We provide a strong test of this possibility through a series of studies in a field context along the Quechua-Aymara linguistic boundary in the Peruvian Altiplano where the language boundary is not particularly socially meaningful. We find evidence of such psychological priors among children and adults at this site by showing that their age, and the social categories' novelty affect participants' reliance on ethno-linguistic inductive inferences (i.e. one-to-many predictions). Studies 1-3 show that participants make more ethno-linguistic inferences when the social categories are more removed from their real-world context. Additionally, in Study 4 when the category is marked with acoustic cues of language use, young children rely heavily on ethno-linguistic predictions, even though adults do not.

  11. Perception and Interpretation of Climate Change among Quechua Farmers of Bolivia: Indigenous Knowledge as a Resource for Adaptive Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Boillat

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We aim to explore how indigenous peoples observe and ascribe meaning to change. The case study involves two Quechua-speaking farmer communities from mountainous areas near Cochabamba, Bolivia. Taking climate change as a starting point, we found that, first, farmers often associate their observations of climate change with other social and environmental changes, such as value change in the community, population growth, out-migration, urbanization, and land degradation. Second, some of the people interpret change as part of a cycle, which includes a belief in the return of some characteristics of ancient or mythological times. Third, environmental change is also perceived as the expression of "extra-human intentionalities," a reaction of natural or spiritual entities that people consider living beings. On the basis of these interpretations of change and their adaptive strategies, we discuss the importance of indigenous knowledge as a component of adaptive capacity. Even in the context of living with modern science and mass media, indigenous patterns of interpreting phenomena tend to be persistent. Our results support the view that indigenous knowledge must be acknowledged as process, emphasizing ways of observing, discussing, and interpreting new information. In this case, indigenous knowledge can help address complex relationships between phenomena, and help design adaptation strategies based on experimentation and knowledge coproduction.

  12. Genetic structure of Quechua-speakers of the Central Andes and geographic patterns of gene frequencies in South Amerindian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiselli, D; Simoni, L; Tarazona-Santos, E; Pastor, S; Pettener, D

    2000-09-01

    A sample of 141 Quechua-speaking individuals of the population of Tayacaja, in the Peruvian Central Andes, was typed for the following 16 genetic systems: ABO, Rh, MNSs, P, Duffy, AcP1, EsD, GLOI, PGM1, AK, 6-PGD, Hp, Gc, Pi, C3, and Bf. The genetic structure of the population was analyzed in relation to the allele frequencies available for other South Amerindian populations, using a combination of multivariate and multivariable techniques. Spatial autocorrelation analysis was performed independently for 13 alleles to identify patterns of gene flow in South America as a whole and in more specific geographic regions. We found a longitudinal cline for the AcP1*a and EsD*1 alleles which we interpreted as the result of an ancient longitudinal expansion of a putative ancestral population of modern Amerindians. Monmonnier's algorithm, used to identify areas of sharp genetic discontinuity, suggested a clear east-west differentiation of native South American populations, which was confirmed by analysis of the distribution of genetic distances. We suggest that this pattern of genetic structures is the consequence of the independent peopling of western and eastern South America or to low levels of gene flow between these regions, related to different environmental and demographic histories. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Morbidity and mortality of black HIV-positive patients with end-stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. This retrospective study compared the incidences of vascular and infectious morbidity and mortality in black HIV-positive patients with those in a group of HIV-negative patients matched for ethnicity, age and gender. All the patients were receiving chronic haemodialysis in the medically insured healthcare sector of ...

  14. Eficacia del alfabeto lloje yupanki en la enseñanza – aprendizaje del quechua como segunda lengua en el I.S.P.P. Mercedes Cabello de Carbonera de Moquegua – 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez Castro, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    La investigación titulada EFICACIA DEL ALFABETO LLOJE YUPANKI EN LA ENSEÑANZA – APRENDIZAJE DEL QUECHUA COMO SEGUNDA LENGUA EN EL I.S.P.P. MERCEDES CABELLO DE CARBONERA DE MOQUEGUA – 2011da a conocer la experiencia educativa realizada en esta institución en el año 2008, durante los meses de setiembre y octubre. Con un total de ochenta horas pedagógicas: dos horas diarias. El objetivo es demostrar que el Alfabeto Lloje Yupanki es eficaz para el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje del quechua co...

  15. Prevalence and management of intestinal helminthiasis among HIV-infected patients at Muhimbili National Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwambete, Kennedy D; Justin-Temu, Mary; Peter, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted at Muhimbili National Hospital (Tanzania) to determine prevalence of helminthiasis among in-patients with HIV/AIDS. After signing an informed consent form, participants answered a sociodemographic and risk factor questionnaire. Fecal specimens from patients with HIV-infected and uninfected patients were screened for intestinal helminthiasis (IHLs) using coprological methods. A total of 146 patients were recruited, of those 66 were HIV-negative while 80 were HIV-negative patients. Thirty-five patients (12 HIV/AIDS and 23 non-HIV/AIDS) had helminthic infections. Hookworms were the most frequently detected helminths among patients living with HIV/AIDS (13.6%) and HIV-negative patients (17.5%), followed by schistosomiasis (9%) detected among HIV-negative individuals only. Prevalence of helminthiases (HLs) was observed to be relatively lower among HIV-infected than uninfected patients, which is ascribable to prophylactic measures adopted for patients with HIV/AIDS. Thus, it is recommended that routine screening for HLs and prophylactic measures should be adopted for the improvement of patients' health status.

  16. Spanish genetic admixture is associated with larger V(O2) max decrement from sea level to 4338 m in Peruvian Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutsaert, Tom D; Parra, Esteban J; Shriver, Mark D; Gamboa, Alfredo; Palacios, Jose-Antonio; Rivera, Maria; Rodriguez, Ivette; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2003-08-01

    Quechua in the Andes may be genetically adapted to altitude and able to resist decrements in maximal O2 consumption in hypoxia (DeltaVo2 max). This hypothesis was tested via repeated measures of Vo2 max (sea level vs. 4338 m) in 30 men of mixed Spanish and Quechua origins. Individual genetic admixture level (%Spanish ancestry) was estimated by using ancestry-informative DNA markers. Genetic admixture explained a significant proportion of the variability in DeltaVo2 max after control for covariate effects, including sea level Vo2 max and the decrement in arterial O2 saturation measured at Vo2 max (DeltaSpO2 max) (R2 for admixture and covariate effects approximately 0.80). The genetic effect reflected a main effect of admixture on DeltaVo2 max (P = 0.041) and an interaction between admixture and DeltaSpO2 max (P = 0.018). Admixture predicted DeltaVo2 max only in subjects with a large DeltaSpO2 max (P = 0.031). In such subjects, DeltaVo2 max was 12-18% larger in a subgroup of subjects with high vs. low Spanish ancestry, with least squares mean values (+/-SE) of 739 +/- 71 vs. 606 +/- 68 ml/min, respectively. A trend for interaction (P = 0.095) was also noted between admixture and the decrease in ventilatory threshold at 4338 m. As previously, admixture predicted DeltaVo2 max only in subjects with a large decrease in ventilatory threshold. These findings suggest that the genetic effect on DeltaVo2 max depends on a subject's aerobic fitness. Genetic effects may be more important (or easier to detect) in athletic subjects who are more likely to show gas-exchange impairment during exercise. The results of this study are consistent with the evolutionary hypothesis and point to a better gas-exchange system in Quechua.

  17. Quechua II contraction in the Ayacucho intermontane basin: Evidence for rapid and episodic Neogene deformation in the Andes of central Perú

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, James M.; Noble, Donald C.; Zanetti, Kathleen A.; Spell, Terry L.

    2008-12-01

    In the Ayacucho basin of central Perú the regional Quechua II contractional deformation is bracketed by 40Ar/ 39Ar isotopic age determinations to a maximum duration of about 300,000 years, and probably less than 150,000 years, centered on 8.7 Ma. The strongly deformed Huanta Formation beneath the Quechua II angular unconformity was deposited during a period of extension that began before 9.05 ± 0.05 Ma. Deposition of a thick succession of alluvial fan deposits interbedded with flows of basaltic andesite in the Tingrayoc Member continued up to about 8.76 ± 0.05 Ma with the later part of the sedimentary record reflected by lacustrine deposits of the Mayocc Member. The upper limit on contractional deformation is constrained by an age of 8.64 ± 0.05 Ma on a unit of tuff near the base of the Puchcas volcanics, which in places was deposited upon near-vertical beds of the Huanta Formation. The Ayacucho Formation was deposited, locally unconformably, upon the Puchcas volcanics beginning slightly before 7.65 ± 0.10 Ma. Extended periods of neutral to tensional stress interrupted by rapid well-developed pulses of contractional deformation demonstrate the episodic behavior of Andean orogeny in Perú. The very short duration for the Quechua II event implies that driving forces for episodic deformation may be related to coupling along the orogen boundaries and strain accumulation and release mechanisms in the continental crust instead of much longer-term variations in the configuration of converging plates.

  18. Los medios de comunicación de masas y de la identidad cultural de los jóvenes universitarios quechuas del Cusco

    OpenAIRE

    Concha Flores, Gladys Georgina

    2009-01-01

    El trabajo de investigación se llevó a cabo en la ciudad del Cusco (Perú) en la Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco, donde se aplicó un cuestionario a 129 estudiantes de origen quechuas con la finalidad de obtener información y describir los contextos familiares donde viven, los contextos educativos donde estudian, los contextos laborales donde trabajan y los contextos sociales donde cultivan sus amistades. Así mismo, se describe y analiza la exposición a los medios de comunica...

  19. Choir of Seeds and Sirens. Indiscipline and Accessible Territories in Guaraní, Quechua, Rarámuri and other Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Forns-Broggi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Reflections and thoughts were made about a cinema looking for an activist spectator. She is able to leave her own world behind and cross linguistic and cultural borders. This is a cinema which does not negotiate with neoliberal and mono-linguistic States where heard voices, stories, and tensions in diminished or ignored Amerindian tongues reclaim a dignified existence. This map may be incomplete, but it aims to considerthe contribution of visual anthropology and filmmaking in Latin America by showing some examples of it. It is also a reassessment of Peruvian cinema in which Quechua language is spoken.

  20. TRADUCTOR MÓVIL PARA MEJORAR LA COMUNICACIÓN EN LA ASISTENCIA MÉDICA A PACIENTES QUECHUA HABLANTES, AYACUCHO 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Lagos Barzola, Manuel Avelino

    2017-01-01

    El propósito de la presente investigación fue desarrollar un software traductor móvil para permitir realizar un diagnóstico adecuado a pacientes quechua hablantes a través de una comunicación fluida, en las instituciones de salud de la región Ayacucho, 2016. El caso de estudio se desarrolló en el Centro de Salud de Carmen Alto de Ayacucho, y el software fue diseñado para ser utilizado en atención de consultorio de medicina general. Para el desarrollo del traductor móvil se u...

  1. la circulacion entre mundos en la tradicion oral y ritual y las categorias del pensamiento quechua: en hanansaya ccullana ch’isikata (Cusco, Peru)

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Ríos, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Esta tesis se ubica en el campo de la antropología auto-etnográfica. En ella se estudian las posibilidades que ofrece la lengua quechua para realizar la auto-etnografía sin tener que limitarse al problema de la objetivación y la subjetivación. Provengo de la comunidad de Ch’isikata, ubicada en la puna peruana de la región del pueblo Yauri Espinar (departamento del Cuzco, Perú). Mi familia me formó e instituyó como cuenta cuentos, siguiendo los pasos maternos, y también como tej...

  2. Individual-Level, Partnership-Level, and Sexual Event-Level Predictors of Condom Use During Receptive Anal Intercourse Among HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex with Men in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Heather A; Gorbach, Pamina M; Weiss, Robert E; Reback, Cathy J; Landovitz, Raphael J; Mutchler, Matt G; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T

    2016-06-01

    We examined individual-level, partnership-level, and sexual event-level factors associated with condom use during receptive anal intercourse (RAI) among 163 low-income, racially/ethnically diverse, HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) in Los Angeles (2007-2010). At baseline, 3-month, and 12-month visits, computer-assisted self-interviews collected information on ≤3 recent male partners and the last sexual event with those partners. Factors associated with condom use during RAI at the last sexual event were identified using logistic generalized linear mixed models. Condom use during RAI was negatively associated with reporting ≥ high school education (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.32, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.11-0.96) and methamphetamine use, specifically during RAI events with non-main partners (AOR = 0.20, 95 % CI 0.07-0.53) and those that included lubricant use (AOR = 0.20, 95 % CI 0.08-0.53). Condom use during RAI varies according to individual-level, partnership-level, and sexual event-level factors that should be considered in the development of risk reduction strategies for this population.

  3. Dose-Response Associations Between Number and Frequency of Substance Use and High-Risk Sexual Behaviors Among HIV-Negative Substance-Using Men Who Have Sex With Men (SUMSM) in San Francisco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Glenn-Milo; Coffin, Phillip O.; Das, Moupali; Matheson, Tim; DeMicco, Erin; Raiford, Jerris L.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dilley, James W.; Colfax, Grant; Herbst, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between frequency and number of substances used and HIV risk [ie, serodiscordant unprotected anal intercourse (SDUAI)] among 3173 HIV-negative substance-using MSM. Compared with nonusers, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for SDUAI among episodic and at least weekly users, respectively, was 3.31 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.55 to 4.28] and 5.46 (95% CI, 3.80 to 7.84) for methamphetamine, 1.86 (95% CI, 1.51 to 2.29) and 3.13 (95% CI, 2.12 to 4.63) for cocaine, and 2.08 (95% CI, 1.68 to 2.56) and 2.54 (95% CI, 1.85 to 3.48) for poppers. Heavy alcohol drinkers reported more SDUAI than moderate drinkers [AOR, 1.90 (95% CI, 1.43 to 2.51)]. Compared with nonusers, AORs for using 1, 2, and ≥3 substances were 16.81 (95% CI, 12.25 to 23.08), 27.31 (95% CI, 18.93 to 39.39), and 46.38 (95% CI, 30.65 to 70.19), respectively. High-risk sexual behaviors were strongly associated with frequency and number of substances used. PMID:23572012

  4. The Rio de Janeiro HIV Vaccine Site : I. Recruitment Strategies and Socio-demographic Data of a HIV Negative Homosexual and Bisexual Male Cohort in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutmoller Frits

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial effort of the Brazilian Ministry of Health to be an active partner in the world effort in the preparation of future accurate human immune deficiency virus (HIV efficacy trials was the establishment of a multi-centered cohort of homosexual and bisexual men. An open cohort was established to determine the HIV incidence and the socio-behavioral aspects involved in Rio de Janeiro. A total of 318 potential participants, originated from multiple sources (health units, public information, snowball recruitment, were screened and recruitment became effective through the direct involvement of target communities (with the support of Non Governmental Organizations and the population. Among this group, seropositivity for sexually transmitted diseases was high with 23, 32 and 46% for HIV, syphilis and hepatitis B, respectively. The socio-demographic data from the first 200 participants of this HIV negative cohort suggests that the cohort volunteers are an appropriate sample of the general male population of the State of Rio de Janeiro

  5. Mitochondrial DNA diversity of the Amerindian populations living in the Andean Piedmont of Bolivia: Chimane, Moseten, Aymara and Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, Alfons; Bert, Francesc; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Gené, Manel; Turbón, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Chimane, Moseten Aymara and Quechua are Amerindian populations living in the Bolivian Piedmont, a characteristic ecoregion between the eastern slope of the Andean mountains and the Amazonian Llanos de Moxos. In both neighbouring areas, dense and complex societies have developed over the centuries. The Piedmont area is especially interesting from a human peopling perspective since there is no clear evidence regarding the genetic influence and peculiarities of these populations. This land has been used extensively as a territory of economic and cultural exchange between the Andes and Amazonia, however Chimane and Moseten populations have been sufficiently isolated from their neighbour groups to be recognized as distinct populations. Genetic information suggests that evolutionary processes, such as genetic drift, natural selection and genetic admixture have formed the history of the Piedmont populations. The objective of this study is to characterize the genetic diversity of the Piedmont populations, analysing the sequence variability of the HVR-I control region in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Haplogroup mtDNA data available from the whole of Central and South America were utilized to determine the relationship of the Piedmont populations with other Amerindian populations. Hair pulls were obtained in situ, and DNA from non-related individuals was extracted using a standard Chelex 100 method. A 401 bp DNA fragment of HVR-I region was amplified using standard procedures. Two independent 401 and 328 bp DNA fragments were sequenced separately for each sample. The sequence analyses included mismatch distribution and mean pairwise differences, median network analyses, AMOVA and principal component analyses. The genetic diversity of DNA sequences was measured and compared with other South Amerindian populations. The genetic diversity of 401 nucleotide mtDNA sequences, in the hypervariable Control Region, from positions 16 000-16 400, was characterized in a sample of 46

  6. HIV Infection Is Associated With Poor Outcomes for Patients With Anal Cancer in the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grew, David; Bitterman, Danielle; Leichman, Cynthia G; Leichman, Lawrence; Sanfilippo, Nicholas; Moore, Harvey G; Du, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    HIV status may affect outcomes after definitive chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer. Here, we report a large series in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era comparing outcomes between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with anal cancer. This was a retrospective chart review. The study was conducted at an outpatient oncology clinic at large academic center. A total of 107 patients were reviewed, 39 HIV positive and 68 HIV negative. All of the patients underwent definitive chemoradiation for anal cancer. Data on patient characteristics, treatment, toxicity, and outcomes were collected. Overall survival, colostomy-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival were analyzed. Median follow-up was 15 months. HIV-positive patients were younger (median, 52 vs 64 years; p HIV-positive patients had a significantly longer duration from biopsy to start of chemoradiation (mean number of days, 82 vs 54; p = 0.042). There were no differences in rates of acute toxicities including diarrhea, fatigue, or dermatitis. HIV-positive patients had significantly higher rates of hospitalization (33% vs 15%; p = 0.024). The 3-year overall survival rate was 42% in HIV-positive and 76% in HIV-negative patients (p = 0.037; HR, 2.335 (95% CI, 1.032-5.283)). Three-year colostomy-free survival was 67% in HIV-positive and 88% in HIV-negative patients (p = 0.036; HR, 3.231 (95% CI, 1.014-10.299)). Differences in overall survival rates were not significant on multivariate analysis. This study was limited by its retrospective design and small patient numbers. In this cohort, HIV-positive patients had significantly worse overall and colostomy-free survival rates than HIV-negative patients. However, differences in survival were not significant on multivariate analysis. Additional studies are necessary to establish the etiology of this difference.

  7. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in HIV positive patients-an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    26 consecutive patients (37 hips) with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head treated surgically at our institution from 1999 to 2008 were reviewed . The aims of the study were to evaluate the risk factors associated with AVN in HIV positive and HIV negative individuals, and assess early response to total hip ...

  8. Promoting male partner HIV testing and safer sexual decision making through secondary distribution of self-tests by HIV-negative female sex workers and women receiving antenatal and post-partum care in Kenya: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Masters, Samuel H; Mavedzenge, Sue Napierala; Maman, Suzanne; Omanga, Eunice; Agot, Kawango

    2016-06-01

    Increased uptake of HIV testing by men in sub-Saharan Africa is essential for the success of combination prevention. Self-testing is an emerging approach with high acceptability, but little evidence exists on the best strategies for test distribution. We assessed an approach of providing multiple self-tests to women at high risk of HIV acquisition to promote partner HIV testing and to facilitate safer sexual decision making. In this cohort study, HIV-negative women aged 18-39 years were recruited at two sites in Kisumu, Kenya: a health facility with antenatal and post-partum clinics and a drop-in centre for female sex workers. Participants gave informed consent and were instructed on use of oral fluid based rapid HIV tests. Participants enrolled at the health facility received three self-tests and those at the drop-in centre received five self-tests. Structured interviews were conducted with participants at enrolment and over 3 months to determine how self-tests were used. Outcomes included the number of self-tests distributed by participants, the proportion of participants whose sexual partners used a self-test, couples testing, and sexual behaviour after self-testing. Between Jan 14, 2015, and March 13, 2015, 280 participants were enrolled (61 in antenatal care, 117 in post-partum care, and 102 female sex workers); follow-up interviews were completed for 265 (96%). Most participants with primary sexual partners distributed self-tests to partners: 53 (91%) of 58 participants in antenatal care, 91 (86%) of 106 in post-partum care, and 64 (75%) of 85 female sex workers. 82 (81%) of 101 female sex workers distributed more than one self-test to commercial sex clients. Among self-tests distributed to and used by primary sexual partners of participants, couples testing occurred in 27 (51%) of 53 in antenatal care, 62 (68%) of 91 from post-partum care, and 53 (83%) of 64 female sex workers. Among tests received by primary and non-primary sexual partners, two (4%) of 53

  9. Nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in AIDS patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Kjaeldgaard, P

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe a nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis during four months after June 1989. SETTING--A department of infectious diseases in Copenhagen, seeing about half the patients with AIDS in Denmark. SUBJECTS--73 HIV antibody negative subjects and 60 antibody positive subjects...... admitted as inpatients during the transmission period of the outbreak (20 June-14 August), of whom 18 (17 with AIDS, one with AIDS related complex), developed cryptosporidiosis. Two further HIV negative subjects (one departmental secretary, one visiting relative) developed cryptosporidiosis. MAIN OUTCOME...... out ice for cold drinks. The mean incubation time was at least 13 days-that is, twice that in HIV-negative patients. Of the 18 patients with AIDS who developed cryptosporidiosis, five recovered, two were symptomless carriers, three died of unrelated causes, and eight died after prolonged diarrhoea...

  10. Prevalence and associated factors of unprotected anal intercourse with regular male sex partners among HIV negative men who have sex with men in China: a cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongliang Li

    Full Text Available The HIV prevalence and incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM in China are high. Unprotected anal intercourse (UAI with a regular male sex partner (RP, a significant predictor of HIV sero-conversion, was high yet under-emphasized among MSM having RP (MSMRP. The present cross-sectional survey interviewed 307 HIV negative MSMRP recruited through convenient sampling from multiple sources, including venue-based outreaching, online recruitment, and referrals made by peers, in Beijing and Chengdu, China. Among MSMRP, the prevalence of UAI with RP in the last three months was 52.4%. The results of the multivariate analysis showed that trust and intimacy within the relationship with RP and presence of clinical depression symptoms were positively associated with UAI with RP in the last three months. Other associated scalar factors derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior were related to perceptions on condom use, including positive attitudes toward condom use (a negative association, subjective norm of the perception that MSM do not usually use condoms during anal intercourse with RP (a positive association, perceived behavioral control over condom use with RP (a negative association, and behavioral intention to use condoms with RP in the coming three months (a negative association. It is seen that MSMRP were at high risk of HIV/STD transmission. The associated factors hence involved those related to perceptions about condom use, mental health, and interpersonal relationship. Future interventions should take these multi-dimensional factors into account. In particular, future research to test the efficacy of couple-based interventions that include mental health elements needs to be conducted, as trust and intimacy within the relationship were associated with UAI among MSMRP, and mental health problems may exist for both the MSMRP and their RP.

  11. Affective differences in Iowa Gambling Task performance associated with sexual risk taking and substance use among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Sarit A.; Thompson, Louisa I.; Kowalczyk, William J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between emotional distress and decision-making in sexual risk and substance use behavior among 174 (ages 25 to 50, 53% black) men who have sex with men (MSM), a population at increased risk for HIV. The sample was stratified by HIV status. Measures of affective decision-making (Iowa Gambling Task, IGT, Bechara et al., 1994), depression, anxiety, sex acts, and substance use during the past 60 days were collected at our research center. Negative binomial regression models were used to examine the relationship between age, HIV status, anxiety, depression, and IGT performance in the prediction of number of risky sex acts and substance use days. Among those without anxiety or depression, both number of risky sex acts and drug use days decreased with better performance during risky trials (i.e., last two blocks) of the IGT. For those with higher rates of anxiety, but not depression, IGT risk trial performance and risky sex acts increased concomitantly. Anxiety also interacted with IGT performance across all trials to predict substance use, such that anxiety was associated with greater substance use among those with better IGT performance. The opposite was true for those with depression, but only during risk trials. HIV-positive participants reported fewer substance use days than HIV-negative participants, but there was no difference in association between behavior and IGT performance by HIV status. Our findings suggest that anxiety may exacerbate risk-taking behavior when affective decision-making ability is intact. The relationship between affective decision-making and risk taking may be sensitive to different profiles of emotional distress, as well as behavioral context. Investigations of affective decision-making in sexual risk taking and substance use should examine different distress profiles separately, with implications for HIV prevention efforts. PMID:26745769

  12. HIV and alcohol knowledge, self-perceived risk for HIV, and risky sexual behavior among young HIV-negative men identified as harmful or hazardous drinkers in Katutura, Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitters, Amee; Sabatier, Jennifer; Seth, Puja; Glenshaw, Mary; Remmert, Dietrich; Pathak, Sonal; Bock, Naomi

    2015-11-26

    Namibia's HIV prevalence is 13.3%. Alcohol is associated with sexual risk-taking, leading to increased HIV risk. Baseline sexual behaviors, HIV and alcohol knowledge, and self-perceived HIV risk were examined among men reporting high-risk drinking in Katutura, Namibia. HIV negative men, ≥ 18 years, were screened for harmful or hazardous levels of drinking and >1 recent sex partner prior to randomization into control or intervention arm. SAS 9.3 and R 3.01 were used for descriptive baseline cohort analyses. A total of 501 participants who met criteria were included in analysis (mean Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test [AUDIT] =12.4). HIV and alcohol knowledge were high with the majority (>85 and 89.8-98%, respectively) of respondents correctly answering assessment questions. Despite high knowledge levels, 66.7% of men felt they were at some or high risk of HIV acquisition. Among those respondents, 56.5% stated often wanting to have sex after drinking and 40.3% stated sex was better when drunk. Among respondents with non-steady partners [n = 188], 44.1% of last sexual encounters occurred while the participant was drunk and condoms were not used 32.5% of those times. Among persons who were not drunk condoms were not used 13.3% of those times. Sex with casual partners was high. Inconsistent condom use and alcohol use before sex were frequently reported. Increased emphasis on alcohol risk-reduction strategies, including drinking due to peer pressure and unsafe sexual behaviors, is needed.

  13. Socio-demographic, behavioral and functional characteristics of groups of community and institutionalized elderly Quechua Indians of Peru, and their association with nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Laura; Drusini, Andrea G

    2005-06-01

    Socio-demographic, behavioral, functional and anthropometric data for groups of elderly Quechua Indians of Peru were used to investigate the effects of gender and lifestyle patterns on nutritional status. Two community-dwelling samples were selected for study, representative of divergent lifestyles in terms of their combination of socio-economic, demographic and cultural contexts, plus an ad-hoc sample of institutionalized individuals with controlled food intake and reduced physical activity. Results suggest that differences in socio-demographic, behavioral and functional characteristics exist between the sexes and across settings (low- vs. highland) and lifestyles (institutionalized vs. community-dwelling; semi-urban vs. rural). These factors are likely to be related to diverging dietary and physical activity patterns, and have considerable effects on the nutritional status of the respondents.

  14. Sobre el nombre "Quechua"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Cerrón-Palomino

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los primeros problemas con el que a menudo tropiezael estudioso de los idiomas ágrafos, como es el caso de las lenguasaborígenes de América, es el de su denominación (glotónimo.En la medida ,en que, por razones históricas, las noticias sobretales lenguas, y por consiguiente los primeros estudios sobre lasmismas, surgen a partir del contacto con los miembros de la civilización occidental, los nombres de los distintos idiomas, así comode los grupos étnicos que los manejan, son el resultado casi siempre arbitrario cie designaciones fortuitas hechas por viajeros, misiioneros y exploradores, quienes por lo general se basan, para ello, bien en descripciones físicas de los grupo étnicos, en ciertos indios geográficos que constituyen el habitat de los mismos, e incluso en prejuicios que se nutren de un marcado europocentrismo.

  15. Bone marrow infection with mycobacterium fortuitum in a diabetic patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, L.; Abbasi, S.; Sattar, A.; Ikram, A.; Manzar, M.A.; Khalid, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Incidence and prevalence of Mycobacterium fortuitum infection vary greatly by location and death is very rare except in disseminated disease in immunocompromised individuals. We present what we believe is the first case of bone marrow infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum in an HIV negative patient. Bone marrow examination revealed presence of numerous acid fast bacilli which were confirmed as Mycobacterium fortuitum on culture and by molecular analysis. Patient was managed successfully with amikacin and ciprofloxacin. (author)

  16. Comparison between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive and Negative Patients with Tuberculosis in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Henn

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the different characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive and negative patients treated for tuberculosis (TBC in a tertiary hospital in Southern Brazil. We conducted a retrospective cohort study over a 5-year period, from January 1992 through December 1996. We reviewed medical charts of patients from our institution who received TBC treatment. We reviewed 167 medical charts of patients with confirmed TBC. HIV positivity was detected in 74 patients. There were statistically significant difference between HIV positive and negative patients in sex and age. HIV-infected patients showed significantly more signs of bacteremia than HIV-negative patients. Extra-pulmonary TBC was present respectively in 13 (17.6% and 21 (22.6% HIV positive and negative patients. There was a significant difference between chest radiograph presentation in HIV positive and negative patients. There were significantly lower hematocrit, hemoglobin, leukocyte and lymphocyte levels in HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative patients. Outcome was significantly different in the two groups with a death rate of 36.5% and 10.8% in HIV-positive and in HIV-negative patients. The difference between HIV positive and negative patients may have importance in the diagnosis, management and prognosis of patients with TBC.

  17. Hot and cold: medicinal plant uses in Quechua speaking communities in the high Andes (Callejón de Huaylas, Ancash, Perú).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Mercedes Gonzales; Malpartida, Severo Baldeón; Santiago, Hamilton Beltrán; Jullian, Valérie; Bourdy, Geneviève

    2014-09-11

    An ethnopharmacological survey has been set up in high altitude Quechua speaking communities dwelling in Callejón de Huaylas (Ancash department, Peru) and in medicinal plant markets in order to document the medicinal plants use of 178 species within the frame of a traditional Andean medicinal system. A sound ethnopharmacological survey was performed during the years 2011, 2012 and 2013 in different places along Callejón de Huaylas valley in the peruvian Andes, were Quechua speaking communities dwell. Two different methodologies were used: first, plant uses were recorded during walks with informants and in medicinal plant markets held on a regular bases in the area (Huaraz, Carhuaz, Yungay). Secondly, traditional healers (curanderas, curanderos) were interviewed about their practices and healing sessions were observed, in order to understand better the traditional medicinal system as a whole (disease aetiology, diagnosis, treatments, healers). Altogether, 178 medicinal species were collected. Most of the plants found on the market were also found in the wild and vice-versa. Medicinal plant trade is exclusively held by women, selling their merchandise to local people or to big retailer. Plants are classified according their hot or cold virtues, this in accordance with the local conception of the body physiology and disease aetiology, based on a hot-cold polarity. Main use notified for medicinal plants is "(bath) against cold", a prophylactic measure against diseases of cold nature. Other uses include culture bound illnesses i.e. susto, aire, nervios, or heart pain, commonly cited in South America. Regarding symptoms, rheumatic/arthritic pain, musculoskeletal traumas, cough, pulmonary and respiratory problems, gastritis and stomach ache, were the most frequently cited. Diagnosis and treatment are intrinsically linked together and mainly based upon divination techniques using egg and cuy (Cavia porcellus L., Caviidae). Medicinal plants use and traditional medicinal

  18. HIV Status Does Not Influence Outcome in Patients With Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Treated With Chemotherapy Using Doxorubicin, Bleomycin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine in the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoto, Silvia; Shaw, Kate; Okosun, Jessica; Gandhi, Shreyans; Fields, Paul; Wilson, Andrew; Shanyinde, Milensu; Cwynarski, Kate; Marcus, Robert; de Vos, Johannes; Young, Anna Marie; Tenant-Flowers, Melinda; Orkin, Chloe; Johnson, Margaret; Chilton, Daniella; Gribben, John G.; Bower, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The prognosis of HIV-infected patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era approaches that of the general population when they are treated with the same protocols. We analyzed the outcome of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) in the HAART era according to HIV serostatus to establish whether this also holds true for HL. Patients and Methods From 1997 to 2010, 224 patients newly diagnosed with HL, of whom 93 were HIV positive, were consecutively treated with ABVD chemotherapy. HIV-positive patients had more high-risk disease according to the International Prognostic Score (IPS) than HIV-negative patients (IPS ≥ 3: 68% v 26%, respectively; P < .001). Forty-seven HIV-positive patients had a CD4 count less than 200/μL, and 92 patients received HAART during chemotherapy. Results The complete response rate was 74% for HIV-positive patients and 79% for HIV-negative patients (P = not significant). After a median follow-up of 60 months (range, 8 to 174 months), 23 patients (16 HIV-negative and seven HIV-positive patients) have experienced relapse at a median time of 6 months (range, 1 to 106 months). Five-year event-free survival (EFS) was 59% (95% CI, 47% to 70%) for HIV-positive patients and 66% (95% CI, 57% to 74%) for HIV-negative patients (P = not significant). Five-year overall survival (OS) was 81% (95% CI, 69% to 89%) and 88% (95% CI, 80% to 93%) for HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients, respectively (P = not significant). HIV status did not predict OS or EFS on multivariate analysis including IPS and HIV status. Conclusion This mature study demonstrates that HIV-positive patients with HL have more extensive disease with more adverse prognostic factors than HIV-negative patients, but when treated with ABVD, HIV infection does not adversely affect OS or EFS. PMID:23045581

  19. Surnames and genetic structure of a high-altitude Quechua community from the Ichu River Valley, Peruvian Central Andes, 1825-1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettener, D; Pastor, S; Tarazona-Santos, E

    1998-10-01

    Changes in isolation, inbreeding, population subdivision, and isonymous relationships are examined in six Quechua communities from the upper valley of the Ichu River in the Peruvian Central Andes (3700 m). All marriages registered between 1825 and 1914 in the Parish of Santa Ana were analyzed. The data (1680 marriages) were divided into 2 periods (1825-1870 and 1871-1914) and into the 6 villages that constitute the parish. Endogamy rates are between 81% and 100%, indicating high levels of reproductive isolation. The inbreeding indicated by isonymy (Ft, Fr, and Fn) is lower than in other mountain populations studied. Isonymy values, calculated from the different surname combinations made possible by the Ibero-American Surnames System, indicate a strong rejection of consanguineous marriages, particularly between patrilineal relatives, in agreement with the parental structure typical of Andean populations. The comparison between observed and expected repeated-pair values reveals a moderate level of subdivision within populations, which could be related to cultural and socioeconomic factors. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling was used to investigate temporal changes in the isonymous relationships among the communities. The results reveal a decrease in the interpopulational variability measured by surnames, in agreement with an increase in exogamy. Surnames and data contained in historical and demographic records yield reliable information, and they can be used to reconstruct the biological history of Amerindian populations over the last few centuries.

  20. A variant of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) associated with AMS susceptibility is less common in the Quechua, a high altitude Native population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Ha, Alice Y N; Kidd, Kenneth K; Koehle, Michael S; Rupert, Jim L

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is a vascular enzyme that produces nitric oxide, a transient signaling molecule that by vasodilatation regulates blood flow and pressure. Nitric oxide is believed to play roles in both short-term acclimatization and long-term evolutionary adaptation to environmental hypoxia. Several laboratories, including ours, have shown that variants in NOS3 (the gene encoding eNOS) are overrepresented in individuals with altitude-related illnesses such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS), suggesting that NOS3 genotypes contribute to altitude tolerance. To further test our hypothesis that the G allele at the G894T polymorphism in NOS3 (dbSNP number: rs1799983; protein polymorphism Glu298Asp) is beneficial in hypoxic environments, we compared frequencies of this allele in an altitude-adapted Amerindian population, Quechua of the Andean altiplano, with those in a lowland Amerindian population, Maya of the Yucatan Peninsula. While common in both populations, the G allele was significantly more frequent in the highlanders. Taken together, our data suggest that this variant in NOS3, which has been previously associated with higher levels of nitric oxide, contributes to both acclimatization and adaptation to altitude.

  1. "Now he walks and walks, as if he didn't have a home where he could eat": food, healing, and hunger in Quechua narratives of madness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, David M R

    2013-12-01

    In the Quechua-speaking peasant communities of southern Peru, mental disorder is understood less as individualized pathology and more as a disturbance in family and social relationships. For many Andeans, food and feeding are ontologically fundamental to such relationships. This paper uses data from interviews and participant observation in a rural province of Cuzco to explore the significance of food and hunger in local discussions of madness. Carers' narratives, explanatory models, and theories of healing all draw heavily from idioms of food sharing and consumption in making sense of affliction, and these concepts structure understandings of madness that differ significantly from those assumed by formal mental health services. Greater awareness of the salience of these themes could strengthen the input of psychiatric and psychological care with this population and enhance knowledge of the alternative treatments that they use. Moreover, this case provides lessons for the global mental health movement on the importance of openness to the ways in which indigenous cultures may construct health, madness, and sociality. Such local meanings should be considered by mental health workers delivering services in order to provide care that can adjust to the alternative ontologies of sufferers and carers.

  2. MRI in patients with general paresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zifko, U.; Wimberger, D.; Lindner, K.; Zier, G.; Grisold, W.; Schindler, E.

    1996-01-01

    Few cases of MRI in neurosyphilis have been reported. We examined the value of MRI in patients with general paresis; MRI was performed on four HIV-negative patients with parenchymatous neurosyphilis. It demonstrated frontal and temporal atrophy, subcortical gliosis and, in one patient, increased ferritin in the basal ganglia. The progression of the lesions on MRI correlated well with the neuropsychiatric disturbances. The MRI findings correlated with the wellknown neuropathological findings. This combination of pathological findings in neurosyphilis has not been described before and we suggest that MRI is of prognostic value in patients with general paresis. (orig.)

  3. The association between post-traumatic stress-related symptoms, resilience, current stress and past exposure to violence: a cross sectional study of the survival of Quechua women in the aftermath of the Peruvian armed conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The long lasting resilience of individuals and communities affected by mass violence has not been given equal prominence as their suffering. This has often led to psychosocial interventions in post-conflict zones being unresponsive to local realities and ill-equipped to foster local strengths. Responding to the renewed interest in resilience in the field of violence and health, this study examines the resilience and post-traumatic responses of Indigenous Quechua women in the aftermath of the political violence in Peru (1980–2000). Methods A cross-sectional study examined the relationship between resilience, post-traumatic responses, exposure to violence during the conflict and current life stress on 151 Quechua women participants. Purposive and convenience sampling strategies were used for recruitment in Ayacucho, the area most exposed to violence. The study instruments were translated to Quechua and Spanish and cross-culturally validated. Data was analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis. A locally informed trauma questionnaire of local idioms of distress was also included in the analysis. Findings Sixty percent of women (n = 91) were recruited from Ayacucho city and the rest from three rural villages; the mean age was 45 years old. Despite high levels of exposure to violence, only 9.3% of the sample presented a level of symptoms that indicated possible PTSD. Resilience did not contribute to the overall variance of post-traumatic stress related symptoms, which was predicted by past exposure to violence, current life stress, age, and schooling (R2 = .421). Resilience contributed instead to the variance of avoidance symptoms (Stand β = −.198, t = −2.595, p = 0.010) while not for re-experiencing or arousal symptoms. Conclusions These findings identified some of the pathways in which resilience and post-traumatic responses interrelate in the aftermath of violence; yet, they also point to the complexity of their

  4. The association between post-traumatic stress-related symptoms, resilience, current stress and past exposure to violence: a cross sectional study of the survival of Quechua women in the aftermath of the Peruvian armed conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eliana B

    2013-10-23

    The long lasting resilience of individuals and communities affected by mass violence has not been given equal prominence as their suffering. This has often led to psychosocial interventions in post-conflict zones being unresponsive to local realities and ill-equipped to foster local strengths. Responding to the renewed interest in resilience in the field of violence and health, this study examines the resilience and post-traumatic responses of Indigenous Quechua women in the aftermath of the political violence in Peru (1980-2000). A cross-sectional study examined the relationship between resilience, post-traumatic responses, exposure to violence during the conflict and current life stress on 151 Quechua women participants. Purposive and convenience sampling strategies were used for recruitment in Ayacucho, the area most exposed to violence. The study instruments were translated to Quechua and Spanish and cross-culturally validated. Data was analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis. A locally informed trauma questionnaire of local idioms of distress was also included in the analysis. Sixty percent of women (n = 91) were recruited from Ayacucho city and the rest from three rural villages; the mean age was 45 years old. Despite high levels of exposure to violence, only 9.3% of the sample presented a level of symptoms that indicated possible PTSD. Resilience did not contribute to the overall variance of post-traumatic stress related symptoms, which was predicted by past exposure to violence, current life stress, age, and schooling (R2 = .421). Resilience contributed instead to the variance of avoidance symptoms (Stand β = -.198, t = -2.595, p = 0.010) while not for re-experiencing or arousal symptoms. These findings identified some of the pathways in which resilience and post-traumatic responses interrelate in the aftermath of violence; yet, they also point to the complexity of their relationship, which is not fully explained by linear

  5. La Circulación entre mundos en la tradición oral y ritual y las categorías del pensamiento quechua hanansaya ccullana ch'isikata (Cusco, Perú) /

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Ríos, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Esta tesis se ubica en el campo de la antropología auto-etnográfica. En ella se estudian las posibilidades que ofrece la lengua quechua para realizar la auto-etnografía sin tener que limitarse al problema de la objetivación y la subjetivación. Provengo de la comunidad de Ch'isikata, ubicada en la puna peruana de la región del pueblo Yauri Espinar (departamento del Cuzco, Perú). Mi familia me formó e instituyó como cuenta cuentos, siguiendo los pasos maternos, y también como tejedora, al igual...

  6. Imaginaire acoustique et apprentissage d’une ontologie animiste Acoustic imagination and the learning of an animistic ontologyThe case of the Quechua of Peruvian Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa-Luz Gutierrez Choquevilca

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cet article examine le rôle de l’imitation sonore au sein des pratiques et des représentations de la chasse et de la maladie chez les Quechua d’Amazonie (Pastaza, Pérou. L’analyse se fonde sur un ensemble de récits qui mettent en scène une interaction avec les « maîtres du gibier » dans un contexte ordinaire ou rituel. Partant de la description des techniques de chasse au leurre, l’auteur montre la pertinence d’un mode de communication fondé sur la simulation sonore au sein des interactions contrôlées et incontrôlées avec les entités tutélaires du gibier (récits d’initiation cynégétique ou biographies de rencontre d’esprit. Après avoir montré la cohérence de ce schéma dans la sphère de la praxis cynégétique, l’auteur explore un cas de maladie infantile shinkurana, dans lequel l’usage du « masque sonore » et les mécanismes de « voix citées » jouent un rôle clef dans le processus d’attribution d’une « agentivit�� » aux entités pathogènes. L’article analyse ainsi le phénomène de l’imitation sonore comme une stratégie perceptive et cognitive efficace, massivement mobilisée dans un contexte d’apprentissage et de validation des représentations animistes.This article examines the role of sound imitation in the practice and representation of hunting and sickness among the Quechua of Amazonia (Pastaza, Peru. The analysis is based on a set of stories that presents an interaction with “masters of game” in an ordinary or ritual context. Beginning with a description of lure hunting techniques, the author shows the relevance of a communication mode based on sound simulation in controlled and uncontrolled interactions with entities protective of game (stories of hunting initiation or accounts of spirit encounters. After having demonstrated the consistency of this pattern in the sphere of hunting praxis, the author explores a case of infant sickness shinkurana, in which

  7. Screening for cervical cancer among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women in Cameroon using simultaneous co-testing with careHPV DNA testing and visual inspection enhanced by digital cervicography: Findings of initial screening and one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholli, Preetam; Bradford, Leslie; Manga, Simon; Nulah, Kathleen; Kiyang, Edith; Manjuh, Florence; DeGregorio, Geneva; Ogembo, Rebecca K; Orock, Enow; Liu, Yuxin; Wamai, Richard G; Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy; Gona, Philimon N; Sando, Zacharie; Welty, Thomas; Welty, Edith; Ogembo, Javier Gordon

    2018-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO)'s cervical cancer screening guidelines for limited-resource settings recommend sequential screening followed by same-day treatment under a "screen-and-treat" approach. We aimed to (1) assess feasibility and clinical outcomes of screening HIV-positive and HIV-negative Cameroonian women by pairing visual inspection with acetic acid and Lugol's iodine enhanced by digital cervicography (VIA/VILI-DC) with careHPV, a high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) nucleic acid test designed for low-resource settings; and (2) determine persistence of HR-HPV infection after one-year follow-up to inform optimal screening, treatment, and follow-up algorithms. We co-tested 913 previously unscreened women aged ≥30years and applied WHO-recommended treatment for all VIA/VILI-DC-positive women. Baseline prevalence of HR-HPV and HIV were 24% and 42%, respectively. On initial screen, 44 (5%) women were VIA/VILI-DC-positive, of whom 22 had HR-HPV infection, indicating 50% of women screened false-positive and would have been triaged for unnecessary same-day treatment. VIA/VILI-DC-positive women with HIV infection were three times more likely to be HR-HPV-positive than HIV-negative women (65% vs. 20%). All women positive for either VIA/VILI-DC or HR-HPV (n=245) were invited for repeat co-testing after one year, of which 136 (56%) returned for follow-up. Of 122 women who were HR-HPV-positive on initial screen, 60 (49%) re-tested negative, of whom 6 had received treatment after initial screen, indicating that 44% of initially HR-HPV-positive women spontaneously cleared infection after one year without treatment. Women with HIV were more likely to remain HR-HPV-positive on follow-up than HIV-negative women (61% vs. 22%, p<0.001). Treatment was offered to all VIA/VILI-DC positive women on initial screen, and to all women screening VIA/VILI-DC or HR-HPV positive on follow-up. We found careHPV co-testing with VIA/VILI-DC to be feasible and valuable in

  8. The diagnostic value of intraocular fluid analysis by polymerase chain reaction in Thai patients with uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathanapitoon, Kessara; Kongyai, Natedao; Sirirungsi, Wasna; de Groot-Mijnes, Jolanda D F; Leechanachai, Pranee; Choovuthayakorn, Janejit; Kunavisarut, Paradee; Rothova, Aniki

    2011-11-01

    Uveitis is a major cause of severe visual impairment throughout the world and can be initiated by various infectious and non-infectious causes. Early recognition of specific infections is important as the treatment with antimicrobial agents might stop the progression or even cure the eye disease. To determine the infectious causes of uveitis in Thailand, intraocular fluid samples of 100 HIV-negative patients and 47 HIV-positive patients with uveitis were examined using real-time PCR analysis for herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus and Toxoplasma gondii. Positive PCR results were found in 33/100 (33%) HIV-negative patients and in 33/47 (70%) HIV-positive patients with uveitis. In Thailand, cytomegalovirus was identified as the most frequent cause of infectious uveitis in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients (49 and 91%, respectively). PCR analysis of intraocular samples in uveitis was a valuable diagnostic assay. The pattern of uveitis observed in the Far East differs from that found in the West. Copyright © 2011 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tubuloreticular inclusions in skin biopsies from patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Horn, T; Junge, Jette

    1989-01-01

    Skin biopsies obtained from apparently normal skin from 15 HIV infected patients and 6 anti-HIV negative patients were examined by electron microscopy. Tubuloreticular inclusions (TRI) were detected within the cytoplasm of capillary endothelial cells in 5/5 AIDS patients and in 2/5 patients...... of the patients without TRI, interferon activity was below detection level. The occurrence of TRI was not dependent on the presence of free p24 antigen in serum. It is concluded that the occurrence of TRI in entothelial cells of skin capillaries is associated with late stages of HIV infection and this may...

  10. High-dose chemotherapy and immunotherapy in adult Burkitt lymphoma: comparison of results in human immunodeficiency virus-infected and noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Albert; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Bergua, Juan; Giménez Mesa, Eduardo; Grande, Carlos; Esteve, Jordi; Brunet, Salut; Moreno, Maria-Jose; Escoda, Lourdes; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus-Maria; Hoelzer, Dieter

    2008-07-01

    It has been recognized that cure is possible for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia (BL) if appropriate chemotherapy is used. The introduction of rituximab in BL therapeutic schemes has been scarcely explored. The outcome and toxicity of HIV-positive patients with BL treated in a rituximab and intensive chemotherapy-based trial was evaluated. Thirty-six consecutive patients, 15 to 55 years of age, diagnosed with advanced stage BL were recruited from July 2003 to August 2006, stratified according to HIV infection status and treated with 6 cycles of intensive chemotherapy including 8 doses of rituximab. Nineteen of the patients (53%) were HIV-infected. Their clinical characteristics were comparable to those of the HIV-negative patients. Complete remission (CR) rates were 88% and 84%, respectively, for HIV-negative and -positive patients. Twenty-seven patients (82% and 68%, respectively, for HIV-negative and -positive patients) completed the 6 protocol scheduled cycles. HIV-infected patients presented higher incidences of grade 3-4 mucositis (27% vs 7% of cycles, P = .0005) and severe infectious episodes (26% vs 8%, P = .0025). However, there were no statistically significant differences in 2-year overall survival (82%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 65%-99% and 73%, 95% CI, 54%-92%, respectively) or 2-year disease-free survival (93%, 95% CI, 82%-99% and 87%, 95% CI 72%-99%, respectively). Intensive immunochemotherapy can be administered safely to patients with HIV infection. Despite a higher incidence of severe mucositis and infections the remission and survival rates are comparable to those observed in HIV-negative patients. (Copyright) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  11. HRCT-features of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and their evolution before and after treatment in non-HIV immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, M.N.; Vatlach, M.; Weissgerber, P.; Goeppert, B.; Claussen, C.D.; Hetzel, J.; Horger, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study retrospectively analyzes the characteristics and kinetics of pulmonary changes in Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP) before and after treatment as depicted by thin-section-CT in HIV-negative patients. Materials and methods: Serial CT scans of 84 consecutive HIV-negative PJP patients were reviewed retrospectively encompassing a median follow-up of 76 (range, 37–506) days. Along with underlying disease and time span between the onset of symptoms and specific antimicrobial therapy, early and late pulmonary CT-findings were evaluated. Results: Imaging findings at initial diagnosis differed from those in the posttherapeutic setting. In the acute (initial) PJP-phase, most frequent finding was symmetric, apically distributed ground glass opacities (GGO) with peripheral sparing 43% (n = 36). These initial changes resolved up to 1st follow-up-examination in 57% (n = 48), and finally in all except for two patients after a median period of 13 (mean 26, range 1–58) days following application of specific therapy. In 42% (n = 35) architectural distortions occurred, but they resolved after a median period of 27 (mean 60, range 11–302) days. Only in 9 patients, complete resolution could not be documented. Significant correlations of the underlying disease or the time span between the onset of symptoms and specific antibiotic therapy and morphologic kinetic could not be found. Conclusion: Thin-section CT-findings of PJP usually resolve soon after onset of specific therapy. Postinfectious fibrosis rarely occurs following PJP in HIV-negative patients.

  12. T Cell Reactivity against Mycolyl Transferase Antigen 85 of M. tuberculosis in HIV-TB Coinfected Subjects and in AIDS Patients Suffering from Tuberculosis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Launois

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mycolyl transferase antigen 85 complex is a major secreted protein family from mycobacterial culture filtrate, demonstrating powerful T cell stimulatory properties in most HIV-negative, tuberculin-positive volunteers with latent M.tuberculosis infection and only weak responses in HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. Here, we have analyzed T cell reactivity against PPD and Ag85 in HIV-infected individuals, without or with clinical symptoms of tuberculosis, and in AIDS patients with disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Whereas responses to PPD were not significantly different in HIV-negative and HIV-positive tuberculin-positive volunteers, responses to Ag85 were significantly decreased in the HIV-positive (CDC-A and CDC-B group. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated low T cell reactivity against Ag85, irrespective of HIV infection, and finally AIDS patients suffering from NTM infections were completely nonreactive to Ag85. A one-year follow-up of twelve HIV-positive tuberculin-positive individuals indicated a decreased reactivity against Ag85 in patients developing clinical tuberculosis, highlighting the protective potential of this antigen.

  13. The impact of HIV status and antiretroviral treatment on TB treatment outcomes of new tuberculosis patients attending co-located TB and ART services in South Africa: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nglazi, Mweete D; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Wood, Robin; Kaplan, Richard

    2015-11-19

    The implementation of collaborative TB-HIV services is challenging. We, therefore, assessed TB treatment outcomes in relation to HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) among TB patients attending a primary care service with co-located ART and TB clinics in Cape Town, South Africa. In this retrospective cohort study, all new TB patients aged ≥ 15 years who registered and initiated TB treatment between 1 October 2009 and 30 June 2011 were identified from an electronic database. The effects of HIV-infection and ART on TB treatment outcomes were analysed using a multinomial logistic regression model, in which treatment success was the reference outcome. The 797 new TB patients included in the analysis were categorized as follows: HIV- negative, in 325 patients (40.8 %); HIV-positive on ART, in 339 patients (42.5 %) and HIV-positive not on ART, in 133 patients (16.7 %). Overall, bivariate analyses showed no significant difference in death and default rates between HIV-positive TB patients on ART and HIV-negative patients. Statistically significant higher mortality rates were found among HIV-positive patients not on ART compared to HIV-negative patients (unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.25; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.53-6.91). When multivariate analyses were conducted, the only significant difference between the patient categories on TB treatment outcomes was that HIV-positive TB patients not on ART had significantly higher mortality rates than HIV-negative patients (adjusted OR 4.12; 95 % CI 1.76-9.66). Among HIV-positive TB patients (n = 472), 28.2 % deemed eligible did not initiate ART in spite of the co-location of TB and ART services. When multivariate analyses were restricted to HIV-positive patients in the cohort, we found that being HIV-positive not on ART was associated with higher mortality (adjusted OR 7.12; 95 % CI 2.95-18.47) and higher default rates (adjusted OR 2.27; 95 % CI 1.15-4.47). There was no significant difference in death and

  14. Use of human papillomavirus DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry to detect and predict anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nittaya Phanuphak

    Full Text Available Men who have sex with men (MSM are at high risk of having anal cancer. Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL is the precursor of anal cancer. We explored the use of different biomarkers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV infection and HPV-mediated cell transformation to detect and predict HSIL among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM.A total of 123 HIV-positive and 123 HIV-negative MSM were enrolled and followed for 12 months. High-resolution anoscopy (HRA with biopsies were performed at every visit along with anal sample collection for cytology, high-risk HPV DNA genotyping, HPV E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry. Performance characteristics and area under the receiver operator characteristics curve were calculated for these biomarkers at baseline, and Cox regression compared the usefulness of these biomarkers in predicting incident HSIL. High-risk HPV DNA, E6/E7 mRNA, and p16 immunocytochemistry each identified 43-46% of MSM whose baseline test positivity would trigger HRA referral. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity (64.7% and correctly classified the highest number of prevalent HSIL cases. With the exception of p16 immunochemistry, most tests showed significant increases in sensitivity but decreases specificity versus anal cytology, while the overall number of correctly classified cases was not significantly different. Baseline or persistent type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA was the only test significantly predicting incident histologic HSIL within 12 months in models adjusted for HIV status and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions at baseline.Countries with a high HIV prevalence among MSM and limited HRA resources may consider using biomarkers to identify individuals at high risk of HSIL. E6/E7 mRNA had the highest sensitivity for prevalent HSIL detection regardless of HIV status, whereas type 16 and/or 18 HPV DNA performed best in predicting development of incident HSIL within 12 months.

  15. The neuromyelitis optica presentation and the aquaporin-4 antibody in HIV-seropositive and seronegative patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed I. Bhigjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association of the anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP-4 water channel antibody with neuromyelitis optica (NMO syndrome has been described from various parts of the world. There has been no large study describing this association from southern Africa, an HIV endemic area. HIV patients often present with visual disturbance or features of a myelopathy but seldom both either simultaneously or consecutively. We report our experience of NMO in the era of AQP-4 testing in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients seen in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods: A retrospective chart review was undertaken of NMO cases seen from January 2005 to April 2016 in two neurology units serving a population of 7.1 million adults. The clinical, radiological and relevant laboratory data were extracted from the files and analysed. Results: There were 12 HIV-positive patients (mean age 33 years, 9 (75% were women and all 12 were black patients. Of the 17 HIV-negative patients (mean age 32 years, 15 (88% were women and 10 (59% were black people. The clinical features in the two groups ranged from isolated optic neuritis, isolated longitudinally extensive myelitis or combinations. Recurrent attacks were noted in six HIV-positive patients and six HIV-negative patients. The AQP-4 antibody was positive in 4/10 (40% HIV-positive patients and 11/13 (85% HIV-negative patients. The radiological changes ranged from longitudinal hyperintense spinal cord lesions and long segment enhancing lesions of the optic nerves. Three patients, all HIV-positive, had tumefactive lesions with incomplete ring enhancement. Conclusion: This study confirms the presence of AQP-4-positive NMO in southern Africa in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. The simultaneous or consecutive occurrence of optic neuritis and myelitis in an HIV-positive patient should alert the clinician to test for the AQP-4 antibody. It is important to recognise this clinical syndrome as specific therapy is available

  16. La Comprensión Lectora en el Desarrollo de las Habilidades Lingüísticas de los Idiomas Quechua e Inglés en los Estudiantes de Pregrado de la Universidad Nacional José Faustino Sánchez Carrión

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero Escudero, Melchor Epifanio; Universidad Nacional José Faustino Sánchez Carrión; Escudero Villanueva, Yulliana de Lourdes; Universidad Nacional José Faustino Sánchez Carrión

    2017-01-01

    Objetivo: Explicar cómo la compresión lectora influye en el desarrollo de las habilidades lingüísticas de los idiomas quechua e inglés en los estudiantes de Pregrado de la Universidad Nacional José Faustino Sánchez Carrión. Métodos: Se aplicó un diseño preexperimental con pretest y postest para medir el cambio ocurrido desde el pretest hasta el postest de la comprensión lectora en el desarrollo de las habilidades lingüísticas de los idiomas quechua e inglés, teniendo como muestra de estudio a...

  17. [Molecular tests in diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using real-time PCR in HIV positive and HIV-negative pregnant women in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Alice Rogomenoma; Kabre, Madeleine; Bisseye, Cyrille; Zohoncon, Théodora Mahoukèdè; Asshi, Maleki; Soubeiga, Serge Théophile; Diarra, Birama; Traore, Lassina; Djigma, Florencia Wendkuuni; Ouermi, Djénéba; Pietra, Virginio; Barro, Nicolas; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Herpesvirus EBV, CMV and HHV-6 are viruses that evolve based on pandemic modeling and are responsible for congenital infections causing severe sequelae in infants. This study aims to determine the prevalence of CMV, EBV and HHV-6 among HIV (+) and HIV (-) pregnant women in Ouagadougou. In this study 200 blood plasma samples taken from pregnant women, of whom 100 with HIV(+) and 100 with HIV(-), were analyzed using multiplex real-time PCR which detected three infections (EBV, CMV and HHV-6). Out of the 200 samples tested, 18(9.0%) were positive for at least one of the three viruses, 12(6.0%) were positive for EBV, 13(6.5%) were positive for CMV and 12(6.0%) were positive for HHV-6. Among the 18 cases with infections, 10 cases (55.6%) had co-infections of whom 90.0% (9/10) with multiple EBV/CMV/HHV6 infection and 10.0% with EBV/HHV6 co-infection. HHVs infection rate was higher among HIV (-) pregnant women than among HIV (+) pregnant women (12.0% versus 6.0%). Among HIV (+) pregnant women, PCR showed 7.1% (6/85) of HHVs infection in patients who were not treated with ARV against 0% in those treated with ARVs. Herpes virus infections are a common condition in pregnant women in Burkina Faso. They may represent a real threat to pregnant women because of complications and risks of infection in infants.

  18. Pattern of neuropsychological performance among HIV positive patients in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Thomas D

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined cognitive functioning of HIV positive patients in sub-Saharan Africa. It cannot be assumed that HIV positive patients in Africa exhibit the same declines as patients in high-resource settings, since there are differences that may influence cognitive functioning including nutrition, history of concomitant disease, and varying HIV strains, among other possibilities. Part of the difficulty of specifying abnormalities in neuropsychological functioning among African HIV positive patients is that there are no readily available African normative databases. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the pattern of neuropsychological performance in a sample of HIV positive patients in comparison to HIV negative control subjects in Uganda. Methods The neuropsychological test scores of 110 HIV positive patients (WHO Stage 2, n = 21; WHO Stage 3, n = 69; WHO Stage 4, n = 20 were contrasted with those of 100 control subjects on measures of attention/concentration, mental flexibility, learning/memory, and motor functioning. Results Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA revealed significant group differences on measures of verbal learning and memory, speed of processing, attention and executive functioning between HIV seropositive and seronegative subjects. Conclusion Ugandan patients with HIV demonstrated relative deficits on measures of verbal learning and memory, speed of processing, attention, and executive functioning compared to HIV negative controls. These results from a resource limited region where clades A and D are prevalent are consistent with previous findings in the developed world where clade B predominates.

  19. Basic Quechua. Volume I: Quechua Reader. Volume II: Quechua Grammar and Dictionary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken-Soux, Percy G.; Crapo, Richley H.

    Volume I, the reader, has 86 lessons consisting of short passages and vocabulary lists. The language and the stories presented were learned and collected at the Indian community and Hacienda of Cayara near Potosi, Bolivia. Translations of the passages are provided in a separate section. The second volume presents the grammar and phonology of the…

  20. Low prevalence of H. pylori Infection in HIV-Positive Patients in the Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Cícero IS

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study conducted in Northeastern Brazil, evaluated the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the presence of gastritis in HIV-infected patients. Methods There were included 113 HIV-positive and 141 age-matched HIV-negative patients, who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for dyspeptic symptoms. H. pylori status was evaluated by urease test and histology. Results The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly lower (p H. pylori status and gender, age, HIV viral load, antiretroviral therapy and the use of antibiotics. A lower prevalence of H. pylori was observed among patients with T CD4 cell count below 200/mm3; however, it was not significant. Chronic active antral gastritis was observed in 87.6% of the HIV-infected patients and in 780.4% of the control group (p = 0.11. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with chronic active gastritis in the antrum in both groups, but it was not associated with corpus chronic active gastritis in the HIV-infected patients. Conclusion We demonstrated that the prevalence of H. pylori was significantly lower in HIV-positive patients compared with HIV-negative ones. However, corpus gastritis was frequently observed in the HIV-positive patients, pointing to different mechanisms than H. pylori infection in the genesis of the lesion.

  1. Lung functions among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Dar es Salaam - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manji, Mohamed; Shayo, Grace; Mamuya, Simon; Mpembeni, Rose; Jusabani, Ahmed; Mugusi, Ferdinand

    2016-04-23

    Approximately 40-60 % of patients remain sufferers of sequela of obstructive, restrictive or mixed patterns of lung disease despite treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). The prevalence of these abnormalities in Tanzania remains unknown. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among 501 patients with PTB who had completed at least 20 weeks of treatment. These underwent spirometry and their lung functions were classified as normal or abnormal (obstructive, restrictive or mixed). Logistic regression models were used to explore factors associated with abnormal lung functions. Abnormal lung functions were present in 371 (74 %) patients. There were 210 (42 %) patients with obstructive, 65 (13 %) patients with restrictive and 96 (19 %) patients with mixed patterns respectively. Significant factors associated with abnormal lung functions included recurrent PTB (Adj OR 2.8, CI 1.274 - 6.106), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) negative status (Adj OR 1.7, CI 1.055 - 2.583), age more than 40 years (Adj OR 1.7, CI 1.080 - 2.804) and male sex (Adj OR 1.7, CI 1.123 - 2.614). The prevalence of abnormal lung functions is high and it is associated with male sex, age older than 40 years, recurrent PTB and HIV negative status.

  2. Anti-tuberculosis therapy-induced hepatotoxicity among Ethiopian HIV-positive and negative patients.

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    Getnet Yimer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess and compare the prevalence, severity and prognosis of anti-TB drug induced hepatotoxicity (DIH in HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis (TB patients in Ethiopia.In this study, 103 HIV positive and 94 HIV negative TB patients were enrolled. All patients were evaluated for different risk factors and monitored biochemically and clinically for development of DIH. Sub-clinical hepatotoxicity was observed in 17.3% of the patients and 8 out of the 197 (4.1% developed clinical hepatotoxicity. Seven of the 8 were HIV positive and 2 were positive for HBsAg.Sub-clinical hepatotoxicity was significantly associated with HIV co-infection (p = 0.002, concomitant drug intake (p = 0.008, and decrease in CD4 count (p = 0.001. Stepwise restarting of anti TB treatment was also successful in almost all the patients who developed clinical DIH. We therefore conclude that anti-TB DIH is a major problem in HIV-associated TB with a decline in immune status and that there is a need for a regular biochemical and clinical follow up for those patients who are at risk.

  3. An ultrasound-based comparative study on carotid plaques in HIV-positive patients vs. atherosclerotic and arteritis patients: atherosclerotic or inflammatory lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Paolo; Perilli, Francesco; Lillo, Antonio; Carito, Valentina; Epifani, Giuseppe; Bellacosa, Chiara; Pastore, Giuseppe; Regina, Guido

    2007-02-01

    We have previously described two cases of HIV-1-positive patients undergoing surgery for stenosis of the internal carotid arteries. Histology revealed an extensive inflammatory infiltration of the vascular wall and no evidence of atheromasic plaque. This unexpected pattern of carotid damage prompted us to perform a more accurate investigation of the characteristics of carotid plaques in a group of HIV-positive patients. The results were compared with those obtained from young patients affected by atherosclerosis of the epi-aortic vessels and patients with arteritis. The patients underwent ultrasonography of the epi-aortic vessels using one of the latest generation power color-Doppler with 7.5 MHz probes. The study population included 61 HIV-positive patients and 47 HIV-negative patients (37 atherosclerotic and 10 with arteritis). Compared with HIV-negative atherosclerotic patients, there were significantly higher proportions of HIV-positive patients with iso-hypoechogenic lesions (81.8 vs. 29%) that were homogeneous both in their parietal and endoluminal portions (96.7 vs. 21.6% and 88.5 vs. 54.0%, respectively), with a smooth or slightly irregular surface (99.0 vs. 56.7%) (P=0.001 for all differences). No statistically significant differences were seen between HIV-positive and arteritis patients. Our study evidenced that the ultrasonographic structure of the epi-aortic lesions in HIV-positive patients substantially differ from those of the plaques in atherosclerotic patients, although they share similar characteristics with patients affected by arteritis. Further investigations are warranted to better define the structure and the mechanism of onset of these lesions.

  4. Molecular diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised patients: a 3-year multicenter retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Sterkers, Yvon; Yera, Hélène; Accoceberry, Isabelle; Menotti, Jean; Cassaing, Sophie; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Hennequin, Christophe; Delhaes, Laurence; Bonhomme, Julie; Villena, Isabelle; Scherer, Emeline; Dalle, Frédéric; Touafek, Feriel; Filisetti, Denis; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Pelloux, Hervé; Bastien, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients (ICPs). The definitive diagnosis relies on parasite DNA detection, but little is known about the incidence and burden of disease in HIV-negative patients. A 3-year retrospective study was conducted in 15 reference laboratories from the network of the French National Reference Center for Toxoplasmosis, in order to record the frequency of Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection in ICPs and to review the molecular methods used for diagnosis and the prevention measures implemented in transplant patients. During the study period, of 31,640 PCRs performed on samples from ICPs, 610 were positive (323 patients). Blood (n = 337 samples), cerebrospinal fluid (n = 101 samples), and aqueous humor (n = 100 samples) were more frequently positive. Chemoprophylaxis schemes in transplant patients differed between centers. PCR follow-up of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) patients was implemented in 8/15 centers. Data from 180 patients (13 centers) were further analyzed regarding clinical setting and outcome. Only 68/180 (38%) patients were HIV(+); the remaining 62% consisted of 72 HSCT, 14 solid organ transplant, and 26 miscellaneous immunodeficiency patients. Cerebral toxoplasmosis and disseminated toxoplasmosis were most frequently observed in HIV and transplant patients, respectively. Of 72 allo-HSCT patients with a positive PCR result, 23 were asymptomatic; all were diagnosed in centers performing systematic blood PCR follow-up, and they received specific treatment. Overall survival of allo-HSCT patients at 2 months was better in centers with PCR follow-up than in other centers (P toxoplasmosis in HIV-negative ICPs and suggests that regular PCR follow-up of allo-HSCT patients could guide preemptive treatment and improve outcome. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Tuberculous disseminated lymphadenopathy in an immunocompetent non-HIV patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karadonta Argiroula-Vasiliki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In cases of patients with disseminated lymphadenopathy, the differential diagnosis has to include both benign and malignant causes, including sarcoidosis, metastatic disease, lymphoma and, although rarely present, tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is still one of the most frequently occurring infectious diseases worldwide. However, disseminated mycobacterial lymphadenitis is rare in immunocompetent patients. Case presentation We present the case of a 56-year-old Caucasian Greek male, who was immunocompetent and HIV negative, with a two-month history of recurring fever, loss of appetite and disseminated lymphadenopathy. The patient was diagnosed with mycobacterial lymphadenopathy. Conclusion This case highlights the need for suspicion in order to identify mycobacterial infection in patients with generalized lymphadenopathy, since misdiagnosis is possible and may lead to fatal complications for the patient.

  6. Alpha interferon therapy in Danish haemophiliac patients with chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, A L; Scheibel, E; Ingerslev, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    Following a survey among all Danish haemophiliac patients 49 HIV-negative patients with chronic hepatitis C were offered enrollment in a randomized controlled open label study comparing two different maintenance regimens following standard interferon-alpha-2b treatment. Dose modifications...... and biochemical response after 6 months of follow up. Overall, the individualized treatment regimen did not seem to offer any advantage over the fixed dose regimen. The response to alpha interferon treatment in Danish haemophiliac patients with chronic hepatitis C immediately after treatment is comparable...... and treatment discontinuation were based upon changes in transaminase levels. Forty-seven patients enrolled received 3 MU of alpha interferon thrice weekly (TIW) for 3 months. Twenty-six nonresponders had their dose increased to 6 MU TIW for an additional 3 months, while 21 responding patients continued on 3 MU...

  7. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment-Basic (MoCA-B) is not a reliable screening tool for cognitive decline in HIV patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkers, C S; Beunders, A J M; Ensing, M H M; Barth, R E; Boelema, S; Devillé, W L J; Tempelman, H A; Coutinho, R A; Hoepelman, A I M; Arends, J E; van Zandvoort, M J E

    2018-02-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are frequently occurring comorbidities in HIV-positive patients, diagnosed by means of a neuropsychological assessment (NPA). Due to the magnitude of the HIV-positive population in Sub-Saharan Africa, easy-to-use cognitive screening tools are essential. This was a cross-sectional clinical trial involving 44 HIV-positive patients (on stable cART) and 73 HIV-negative controls completing an NPA, the International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS), and a culturally appropriate cognitive screening tool, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment-Basic (MoCA-B). HAND were diagnosed by calculating Z-scores using internationally published normative data on NPA, as well as by using data from the HIV-negative group to validate the MoCA-B. One hundred and seventeen patients were included (25% male, median age 35 years, median 11 years of education). A moderate correlation was found between the MoCA-B and NPA total Z-score (Pearson's r=0.36, p=0.02). Area under the curve (AUC) values for MoCA-B and IHDS were 0.59 and 0.70, respectively. The prevalence of HAND in HIV-positive patients was 66% when calculating Z-scores using published normative data versus 48% when using the data from the present HIV-negative cohort. The MoCA-B appeared not to be a valid screening tool for HAND in this setting. The prevalence of HAND in this setting is high, but appeared overestimated when using published norms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiological and clinical features of hepatitis delta in HBsAg-positive patients by HIV status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Laura A; Taramasso, Lucia; Schiavetti, Irene; Giannini, Edoardo G; Beltrame, Andrea; Feasi, Marcello; Cassola, Giovanni; Grasso, Alessandro; Bartolacci, Valentina; Sticchi, Laura; Picciotto, Antonino; Viscoli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of HBV-associated hepatitis has changed in recent years, especially after the introduction of anti-HBV vaccination, with a consequent decrease in the incidence of HDV-associated hepatitis. However, HDV remains of concern in non-vaccinated people and in immigrants. The aim of this retrospective survey has been to assess prevalence and clinical characteristics of HDV infection in Liguria, a region in Northern Italy, in both HIV-positive and negative patients. During the year 2010, 641 patients chronically infected with HBV entered an observational study of HBV infection conducted in eight tertiary care centres belonging to the 'Ligurian HBV Study Group'. Of 641 patients, 454 (70.8%) were evaluated for HDV serology and 26 (5.7%) were found positive. Among them, 16 were also HIV-positive and 10 were not. Of the 428 HDV-negative patients, only 313 were tested for HIV and 33 (10.5%) were positive. At the time point of study entry there was no age difference between HIV-positive or negative patients, but HIV-positive patients were 10 years younger than HIV-negative (mean age 34.25 ±6.16 versus 41.50 ±8.89 years; P=0.021) at the time point of their first visit in each centre and they were also more frequently intravenous drug users (P=0.009). Despite a similar rate of cirrhosis in the two groups, no HIV-positive patient received an HDV-active therapy (that is, interferon), versus 4 of 10 HIV-negative patients (P=0.014). HDV infection is still a problem in patients not covered by HBV vaccination. Both HDV and HIV testing were frequently overlooked in our setting.

  9. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIV-positive patients on the island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea: its relation to sanitary conditions and socioeconomic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roka, Margarita; Goñi, Pilar; Rubio, Encarnación; Clavel, Antonio

    2012-08-15

    The prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases and their associated factors has been investigated in HIV populations from the Island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. The feces of 310 participants from the island of Bioko (260 HIV-positive and 50 HIV-negative) were analyzed by microscopic observation. Immunochromatography was also used to diagnose Giardia, Entamoeba histolytica and Cryptosporidium spp. In addition, patients were asked for sociodemographic, economic and academic status, and CD4+ T cell counts were recorded. For HIV-positive patients, the prevalence of infection by intestinal parasites was 81.5% (212/260), 83.8% (218/260) by pathogenic helminths and 55.4% (168/260) by pathogenic protozoa (E. histolytica/dispar and Giardia duodenalis). Gender association was found between the infection by Ascaris and Schistosoma, a higher proportion being found in women; and between Entamoeba and the place of residence, a higher proportion being observed in the urban belt. Strongyloides stercoralis and Chilomastix mesnili appeared only in the people of this group, all the cases of Chilomastix being in females. For HIV-negative participants, the prevalence of infection by intestinal parasites was 74.0% (37/50), 90.0% (45/50) by pathogenic helminths and 66.0% (43/50) by pathogenic protozoa. Gender, educational level and low hygiene were associated with intestinal parasitic infection. When comparing the two groups (HIV-positive and HIV-negative), statistical association between HIV co-infection and infection by Giardia and Entamoeba was found. Diarrhea was also associated with intestinal parasitic infection in the HIV-positive group. Not only do our findings reflect high rates of intestinal parasitic infections in HIV-positive people, but also in the HIV-negative group, suggesting a closer relationship between sanitary status and living conditions than with immune status, and thus they highlight the need to carry out health education policies in the population. In addition

  10. Antibody responses to a major Pneumocystis carinii antigen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with and without P. carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Nielsen, T

    1992-01-01

    of pulmonary symptoms. Significantly more patients with P. carinii pneumonia (PCP) had detectable antibodies compared with HIV-infected patients without PCP and with HIV-negative controls (50 [66%] of 76 vs. 18 [34%] of 53 and 7 [35%] of 20, respectively; P less than .001), and the level of antibody response......Antibody responses to a major purified human Pneumocystis carinii surface antigen (gp95) were determined by ELISA in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Serum IgG directed against gp95 was measured in 129 consecutive HIV-infected patients who underwent bronchoscopy for evaluation...... response, compared with only 1 (3%) of 31 patients without PCP (P less than .001). This patient had PCP on the basis of clinical criteria, including response to therapy. Thus, despite severe immunosuppression, a proportion of HIV-infected patients with PCP can mount a specific IgG-mediated antibody...

  11. A chart review of human immunodeficiency virus status in patients admitted with psychosis in Durban, South Africa

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    Sellwane M. Mere

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Comorbid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection among patients with psychotic disorders is associated with a poorer outcome. Understanding the association of HIV infection with demographic and clinical variables may provide clues to modify risk factors and outcomes. Aim: To describe and compare the socio-demographic and clinical profile of patients admitted with psychotic disorders with and without HIV infection. Method: A retrospective chart review of 100 adult patients consecutively admitted with psychosis and HIV infection and compared to 101 patients with psychosis without HIV infection. Results: HIV-infected patients with psychotic disorders were more likely to be females (74.0%, younger than 50 years (94.0% and less likely to have secondary education than HIV- negative patients with psychotic disorders (56.0% vs. 72.0%. HIV-infected patients were also less likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia (33.0%, had higher rates of medical (73.0% and psychiatric (21.0% comorbid disorders and were less likely to report lifetime nicotine and cannabis use (p = 0.047 and p = 0.011. HIV-negative patients with psychotic disorders were more likely to be readmitted to the unit in the next 12 months (p < 0.05. HIV-infected patients with psychotic disorders had increased abnormal haematological results (33.0%. Conclusion: Patients with psychotic disorders and HIV infection had several negative prognostic factors such as younger age, increased rates of medical and psychiatric comorbidity, abnormal haematological results and longer length of admission periods. This suggests the need to target HIV prevention programmes at young females with mental illness and provide an integrated healthcare service with medical and psychiatric assessment and care for patients with HIV and psychosis.

  12. Secondary Syphilis in Patients Treated at the City Institute for Skin and Venereal Diseases in Belgrade from 2010 to 2014

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    Bjekić Milan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics and clinical manifestations of secondary syphilis among patients registered at the City Institute for Skin and Venereal Diseases in Belgrade, during the period from 2010 to 2014. The study was designed as a case-note review. In the five-year period, a total of 62 patients with secondary syphilis were registered. The average patient age was 32 years. There were 45 (72.6% HIV-negative, and 17 (27.4% HIV-positive patients. The incidence of HIV–positive patients was significantly different from random distribution (p = 0.016. All HIV-positive patients were unmarried men. A significant percentage of HIV-positive patients were unemployed (p < 0.001, reported unknown source of infection (p = 0.002 and were all homosexuall (p = 0.026. More than 25% of all patients with syphilis had a history of chancres, and it was still present at the time of examination in 11.3% of all patients. The majority of cases (87.1% had a rash, and lymphadenopathy was found in 20% of patients. However, syphilitic alopecia was detected only in HIV-positive cases (p = 0.004. There were no statistically significant differences between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in regard to other clinical manifestations, such as mucous patches and condylomata lata. Being a great imitator, secondary syphilis may manifest in a myriad of diverse morphological entities and clinical manifestations. We review a range of cutaneous manifestations of secondary syphilis and skin diseases it may mimic. Clinicians must be vigilant and consider syphilis in differential diagnosis, and maintain a high index of suspicion, especially when assessing vulnerable populations, such as men who have sex with men and HIV-infected individuals.

  13. Factors for Predicting Outcomes among Non-HIV Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, Toshinori; Horita, Nobuyuki; Tashiro, Ken; Nagai, Kenjiro; Shinkai, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Masaki; Sato, Takashi; Hara, Yu; Nagakura, Hideyuki; Shibata, Yuji; Watanabe, Hiroki; Nakashima, Kentaro; Ushio, Ryota; Nagashima, Akimichi; Ikeda, Misako; Narita, Atsuya; Sasaki, Katsuhito; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Kudo, Makoto; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective Onodera's Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI), determined as “10× albumin (g/dL) + 0.005× lymphocyte count (/μL),” was originally designed to determine the risk of complications following gastrointestinal surgery. This single-center, retrospective observational study was designed to investigate whether or not the PNI can predict the treatment outcome. Methods We consecutively reviewed HIV-negative pulmonary tuberculosis adults in an isolation ward. Most patients were being treated with standard three- or four-drug regimens. Patients were discharged after consecutive negative smears/cultures were confirmed. The risk of all-cause death was assessed using a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model and a log-rank trend test. Results During the observation period, we observed 371 consecutive patients with a median age of 72 (interquartile range [IQR]: 54-82) years. In our cohort, 295 (79.5%) patients were discharged alive, and 76 (20.5%) died in-hospital. Patients who died in-hospital had a lower PNI [median 21.2 (IQR: 18.5-25.9)] than those who were discharged alive [median 35.1 (IQR: 28.0-43.3); p<0.001]. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.87. After dividing the patients based on the baseline PNI quartile, those patients with a lower PNI showed a poorer survival than those with a higher PNI (log-rank trend p<0.001). After adjusting for other baseline variables, the baseline PNI was still associated with in-hospital death with a hazard ratio of 0.86 (95% confidence interval: 0.82-0.91, p<0.001). Conclusion Our results showed that a low PNI was clearly related to a poor survival prognosis in smear-positive HIV-negative pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients. PMID:29021438

  14. A first-line antiretroviral therapy-resistant HIV patient with rhinoentomophthoromycosis

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    Rachita Dhurat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Conidiobolus coronatus-related rhinoentomophthoromycosis in immunocompetent and immunocompromised (HIV negative individuals has been treated successfully with antifungal drugs. However, C. coronatus infections in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART-resistant (HIV infected individuals particularly with rhinoentomophthoromycosis have not been reported previously. Here, we describe a case of itraconazole non-responding rhinoentomophthoromycosis in an HIV-infected patient with first-line antiretroviral (ART drug resistance which was successfully managed through systematic diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in dermatologic setting. A 32-year-old HIV-1-infected man presented with painless swelling, nasal redness and respiratory difficulty. The patient was receiving first-line ART and had a history of traumatic injury before the onset of nasopharyngeal manifestations. The patient's previous history included oral candidiasis and pulmonary tuberculosis.

  15. Analysis of imaging findings and clinical abnormalities in patients with lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, Flavio Augusto Ataliba; Montomiya, Carolina Tsumori; Silva, Helena Cristina da

    2002-01-01

    Computed tomography is currently the method of choice for the diagnostic and staging of lymphomas. Computed tomography enables accurate measurements of both tumor extent and volume and provides information that can be used to plan an appropriate strategy for the treatment. The purpose of the present article is to describe and analyze the chest and abdomen computed tomography and ultrasound findings in HIV-negative patients with lymphoma. Clinical abnormalities, such as the reason the patient sought medical assistance already showing evidence of lymphocytic disease (not yet diagnosed at this point) and the physical examination abnormalities seen on the first consultation were also studied. This study comprised 30 patients: 40% with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 46,6% with Hodgkin lymphoma, 10% with Burkitt's lymphoma and 3,3% with lymphoblastic lymphoma. (author)

  16. Prevalence of the subclinical sinus disease in HIV positive patients evaluated by the computed tomography versus a control population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senneville, E.; Valette, M.; Ajana, F.; Gerard, Y.; Alfandari, S.; Chidiac, C.; Mouton, Y.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of subclinical sinus disease in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), cerebral computed tomography scans (CCT) done at the Tourcoing hospital over an 18-month period in 139 HIV-positive patients and 140 control patients without evidence of active sinus disease were reviewed retrospectively. CCTs were evaluated independently by two physicians who were blinded to clinical data. Mucosal thickening and/or a full patients (20/139, 14.4%) than in the controls (8/140, 5.7%) (p=0.016). Mucosal thickening was the most common abnormality in both groups. CD4+cell counts were not correlated with the radiographic abnormalities studies. These radiographic data suggest that subclinical chronic sinusitis independent from the degree of immune deficiency may be more common in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative subjects. (author)

  17. Insulin signaling in skeletal muscle of HIV‐infected patients in response to endurance and strength training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Mathur, Neha; Hvid, Thine

    2013-01-01

    . Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps with muscle biopsies were performed before and after the training interventions. Fifteen age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched HIV-negative men served as a sedentary baseline group. Phosphorylation and total protein expression of insulin signaling molecules as well...... hexokinase II (HKII) protein. HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy have decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and defects in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(thr308). Endurance and strength training increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in these patients......Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy have decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Both endurance and resistance training improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle of HIV-infected patients, but the mechanisms are unknown. This study aims...

  18. The role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in evaluating the impact of HIV infection on tumor burden and therapy outcome in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawal, Ismaheel O.; Mokgoro, Neo P.; Boshomane, Tebatso G.; Sathekge, Mike M. [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Nyakale, Nozipho E.; Harry, Lerwine M.; Msomi, Alphonse P. [Inkosi Albert Lithuli Central Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Durban (South Africa); Modiselle, Moshe R. [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); KVNR Nuclear and Molecular Imaging, Pretoria (South Africa); Ankrah, Alfred O. [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Wiele, Christophe van de [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the impact of HIV infection on tumor burden and therapy outcome following treatment with chemotherapy in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. A total of 136 patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma were studied (mean age ± SD = 32.31 ± 1.39 years, male = 86, female = 50). Advanced disease (stage III and IV) was present in 64% of patients. HIV infection was present in 57 patients while 79 patients were HIV-negative. Baseline F-18 FDG PET/CT was obtained in all patients. SUVmax, MTV and TLG were determined on the baseline scan to evaluate for tumor burden. All patients completed a standard regimen of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD). After a median period of 8 weeks (range = 6 to 17 weeks), a repeat F-18 FDG PET/CT scan was obtained to evaluate response to therapy using Deauville 5-point scoring system. The HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups were similar with regards to age and disease stage. The groups were heterogeneous with respect to gender (p = 0.029). The SUVmax, MTV and TLG of lesions were not significant different between the two groups. Complete response was seen in 72.8% of the study population. Presence of HIV infection was associated with higher rate of treatment failure with 40.4% of the HIV-positive patients having treatment failure while only 17.7% of the HIV-negative patients had treatment failure (p = 0.0034). HIV infection was a significant predictor of response to chemotherapy. Effects of SUVmax, MTV, TLG and Ann Arbor stage of the disease were not statistically significant as predictors of therapy outcome. In a multiple logistic regression, presence of HIV infection still remained an independent predictor of therapy outcome in the presence of other factors such as SUVmax, MTV, TLG and the Ann Arbor stage of the disease. HIV infection is not associated with a higher tumor burden in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. HIV infection is, however, a strong predictor of poor therapy outcome in patients treated with

  19. The role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in evaluating the impact of HIV infection on tumor burden and therapy outcome in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawal, Ismaheel O.; Mokgoro, Neo P.; Boshomane, Tebatso G.; Sathekge, Mike M.; Nyakale, Nozipho E.; Harry, Lerwine M.; Msomi, Alphonse P.; Modiselle, Moshe R.; Ankrah, Alfred O.; Wiele, Christophe van de

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of HIV infection on tumor burden and therapy outcome following treatment with chemotherapy in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. A total of 136 patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma were studied (mean age ± SD = 32.31 ± 1.39 years, male = 86, female = 50). Advanced disease (stage III and IV) was present in 64% of patients. HIV infection was present in 57 patients while 79 patients were HIV-negative. Baseline F-18 FDG PET/CT was obtained in all patients. SUVmax, MTV and TLG were determined on the baseline scan to evaluate for tumor burden. All patients completed a standard regimen of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD). After a median period of 8 weeks (range = 6 to 17 weeks), a repeat F-18 FDG PET/CT scan was obtained to evaluate response to therapy using Deauville 5-point scoring system. The HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups were similar with regards to age and disease stage. The groups were heterogeneous with respect to gender (p = 0.029). The SUVmax, MTV and TLG of lesions were not significant different between the two groups. Complete response was seen in 72.8% of the study population. Presence of HIV infection was associated with higher rate of treatment failure with 40.4% of the HIV-positive patients having treatment failure while only 17.7% of the HIV-negative patients had treatment failure (p = 0.0034). HIV infection was a significant predictor of response to chemotherapy. Effects of SUVmax, MTV, TLG and Ann Arbor stage of the disease were not statistically significant as predictors of therapy outcome. In a multiple logistic regression, presence of HIV infection still remained an independent predictor of therapy outcome in the presence of other factors such as SUVmax, MTV, TLG and the Ann Arbor stage of the disease. HIV infection is not associated with a higher tumor burden in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. HIV infection is, however, a strong predictor of poor therapy outcome in patients treated with

  20. Granulomatous hypophysitis by Mycobacterium gordonae in a non HIV-infected patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Ruiz-Sandoval

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytic or granulomatous hypophysitis is a rare entity with a difficult diagnosis. Our objective was to report a patient with non-tuberculous granulomatous hypophysitis. An HIV-negative 45-year old man with confusional state, subacute ophthalmoplegia, and clinical and laboratory findings of panhypopituitarism was seen in the emergency unit. A cranial MRI showed a sellar mass suggestive of hypophysitis. After an unsuccessful attempt with steroids and antituberculous drugs the patient died. Post-mortem histopathology revealed granulomatous lesions and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis confirmed the presence of Mycobacterium gordonae’s DNA. In conclusion, we should consider granulomatous hypophysitis in the differential diagnosis of non-secreting hypophyseal tumors. The etiology of a pituitary granuloma by a non-tuberculous mycobacteria is best reached by histopathological techniques and molecular assays. The optimal therapy is yet to be established.

  1. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in immunocompromised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Nogueira Cordeiro Moraes Jardim

    Full Text Available Occult hepatitis B infection is characterized by hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA in the serum in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg. We assessed occult HBV infection prevalence in two groups of immunocompromised patients (maintenance hemodialysis patients and HIV-positive patients presenting HBsAg-negative and anti-HBc positive serological patterns, co-infected or not by HCV. Thirty-four hemodialysis anti-HIV negative patients, 159 HIV-positive patients and 150 blood donors who were anti-HBc positive (control group were selected. HBV-DNA was detected by nested-PCR. Occult hepatitis B infection was not observed in the hemodialysis patients group but was found in 5% of the HIV-patients and in 4% of the blood donors. Immunosuppression in HIV positive patients was not a determining factor for occult HBV infection. In addition, no significant relationship between HBV-DNA and HCV co-infection in the HIV-positive patient group was found. A lack of significant associations was also observed between positivity for HBV-DNA and CD4 count, viral load and previous lamivudine treatment in these HIV-positive patients.

  2. Opportunistic and other intestinal parasitic infections in AIDS patients, HIV seropositive healthy carriers and HIV seronegative individuals in southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariam, Zelalem T; Abebe, Gemeda; Mulu, Andargachew

    2008-12-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and major causes of morbidity and mortality of such patients are opportunistic infections caused by viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic pathogens. To determine the magnitude of opportunistic and non-opportunistic intestinal parasitic infections among AIDS patients and HIV positive carrier individuals. Cross-sectional study was conducted among AIDS patients, HIV positive healthy carriers and HIV negative individuals in Jimma University Hospital, Mother Theresa Missionary Charity Centre, Medan Acts Projects and Mekdim HIV positive persons and AIDS orphans' national association from January to May, 2004. Convenient sampling technique was employed to identify the study subjects and hence a total of 160 subjects were included. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data of the patients. Stool samples were examined by direct saline, iodine wet mount, formol-ether sedimentation concentration, oocyst concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique. Out of 160 persons enrolled in this study 100 (62.5%) (i.e. 65 male and 35 female) were infected with one or more intestinal parasites. The highest rate 36 (69.2%) of intestinal parasites were observed among HIV/AIDS patients, followed by HIV positive healthy carriers 35 (61.4%) of and HIV negative individuals (29 (56.9%). Isospora belli 2 (3.9%), Cryptosporidum parvum 8 (15.4%), Strongyloides stercoralis 6 (11.5%) and Blastocystis 2 (3.9%) were found only in HIV/AIDS groups I. belli, C. parvum, S. stercoralis and Blastocystis are the major opportunistic intestinal parasites observed in HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, early detection and treatment of these parasites are important to improve the quality of life of HIV/AIDS patients with diarrhoea.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in spinal tuberculosis: Comparison of HIV positive and negative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Michael Anley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increasing incidence of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and tuberculosis (TB co-infection. This has led to an increasing number of atypical features on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We postulated that the type 4 hypersensitivity response causing granulomatous inflammation may be disrupted by the HIV resulting in less vertebral body destruction. This study compares the MRI features of spinal tuberculosis in HIV positive and negative patients. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with confirmed spinal tuberculosis, HIV status and available MRI scans at a single institution from 2003-2009 were identified. HIV status was positive in 20 and negative in 30. Females were predominant (34:16. The HIV positive group was younger at 32.4 versus 46 years (P=0.008. Blood parameters (WCC, ESR, Hb, Lymphocyte count were not significantly different between the HIV groups. MRI scans were reviewed by a radiologist who was blinded to the HIV status. Site, extent of disease, body collapse, abscess location and volume, kyphotic deformity and cord signal were reported. Results: There was no difference between the number of vertebral bodies affection with TB involvement, presence of cord signal or incidence of non-contiguous lesions. The HIV negative group had significantly more total vertebral collapse (P=0.036 and greater kyphosis (P=0.002. The HIV positive group had a trend to larger anterior epidural pus collection (P=0.2. Conclusion: HIV negative patients demonstrate greater tuberculous destruction in terms of total percentage body collapse and resultant kyphosis. There is no difference in the incidence of cord signal or presence of non-contiguous lesions. HIV positive patients show a trend to a greater epidural abscess volume. This difference may be explained by the reduced autoimmune response of the type 4 hypersensitivity reaction caused by the HIV infection.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid metabolomics reveals altered waste clearance and accelerated aging in HIV patients with neurocognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassol, Edana; Misra, Vikas; Dutta, Anupriya; Morgello, Susan; Gabuzda, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain prevalent in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Some features of HAND resemble those of age-associated cognitive decline in the absence of HIV, suggesting that overlapping mechanisms may contribute to neurocognitive impairment. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 100 individuals (46 HIV-positive patients and 54 HIV-negative controls). Methods: Untargeted CSF metabolite profiling was performed using liquid/gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry. Cytokine profiling was performed by Bioplex. Bioinformatic analyses were performed in Metaboanalyst and R. Results: Alterations in the CSF metabolome of HIV patients on ART mapped to pathways associated with neurotransmitter production, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and metabolic waste. Many CSF metabolites altered in HIV overlapped with those altered with advanced age in HIV-negative controls, suggesting a pattern indicative of accelerated aging. Machine learning models identified neurotransmitters (glutamate, N-acetylaspartate), markers of glial activation (myo-inositol), and ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyric acid, 1,2-propanediol) as top-ranked classifiers of HAND. These CSF metabolites correlated with worse neurocognitive test scores, plasma inflammatory biomarkers [interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2Ra], and intrathecal IFN responses (IFN-γ and kynurenine : tryptophan ratio), suggesting inter-relationships between systemic and intrathecal inflammation and metabolic alterations in CSF. Conclusions: Alterations in the CSF metabolome of HIV patients on ART suggest that persistent inflammation, glial responses, glutamate neurotoxicity, and altered brain waste disposal systems contribute to mechanisms involved in HAND that may be augmented with aging. PMID:24752083

  5. Clinical Features of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients Presenting with Cholera in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sévère, Karine; Anglade, Stravinsky B; Bertil, Claudin; Duncan, Aynsley; Joseph, Patrice; Deroncenay, Alexandra; Mabou, Marie M; Ocheretina, Oksana; Reif, Lindsey; Seo, Grace; Pape, Jean W; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2016-11-02

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been postulated to alter the natural history of cholera, including increased susceptibility to infection, severity of illness, and chronic carriage of Vibrio cholerae Haiti has a generalized HIV epidemic with an adult HIV prevalence of 1.9% and recently suffered a cholera epidemic. We conducted a prospective study at the cholera treatment center (CTC) of GHESKIO in Haiti to characterize the coinfection. Adults admitted at the CTC for acute diarrhea were invited to participate in the study. Vital signs, frequency, and volume of stools and/or vomiting were monitored, and single-dose doxycycline was administered. After counseling, participants were screened for HIV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and for cholera by culture. Of 729 adults admitted to the CTC, 99 (13.6%) had HIV infection, and 457 (63%) had culture-confirmed cholera. HIV prevalence was three times higher in patients without cholera (23%, 63/272) than in those with culture-confirmed cholera (7.9%, 36/457). HIV prevalence in patients with culture-confirmed cholera (7.9%) was four times higher than the adult prevalence in Port-au-Prince (1.9%). Of the 36 HIV-infected patients with cholera, 25 (69%) had moderate/severe dehydration versus 302/421 (72%) in the HIV negative. Of 30 HIV-infected patients with weekly stool cultures performed after discharge, 29 (97%) were negative at week 1. Of 50 HIV-negative patients with weekly stool cultures, 49 (98%) were negative at week 1. In countries with endemic HIV infection, clinicians should consider screening patients presenting with suspected cholera for HIV coinfection. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  6. Poor CD4 response despite viral suppression is associated with increased non-AIDS related mortality among HIV patients and their parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, Marie; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S

    2012-01-01

    association between poor CD4 response and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer (IRR 1.6 (95%CI 0.8-3.2) and 1.6 (95%CI 0.6-4.8)). CONCLUSIONS:: poor CD4 increase after HAART is associated with adverse prognosis even in absence of severe immunosuppression. CD4 response in HIV patients......INTRODUCTION:: poor CD4 response to antiretroviral treatment (HAART) is associated with increased mortality. We analyzed the impact of CD4 increase on non-AIDS related morbidity and on mortality in HIV patients and their parents. METHODS:: mortality rates were estimated among 1,758 virally...... is associated with mortality among their parents, thus poor CD4 response may be caused by genetic factors, which might also affect morbidity and mortality in the HIV negative population....

  7. Sexual behavior and risk practices of HIV positive and HIV negative Rwandan women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ADEDIMEJI, Adebola A.; HOOVER, Donald R.; SHI, Qiuhu; GARD, Tracy; MUTIMURA, Eugene; SINAYOBYE, Jean d’Amour; COHEN, Mardge H.; ANASTOS, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    It is not well understood how infection with HIV and prior experience of sexual violence affects sexual behavior in African women. We describe factors influencing current sexual practices of Rwandan women living with or without HIV/AIDS. By design, 75% of participants were HIV positive and ~50% reported having experienced genocidal rape. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fit to describe demographic and clinical characteristics that influenced sexual behavior in the previous 6 months, condom use, history of transactional sex, and prior infection with a non-HIV sexually transmitted disease. Respondents’ age, where they lived, whether or not they lived with a husband or partner, experience of sexual trauma, CD4 count, CES-D and PTSD scores were strongly associated with risky sexual behavior and infection with non-HIV STI. HIV positive women with a history of sexual violence in the contexts of war and conflict may be susceptible to some high-risk sexual behaviors. PMID:25488169

  8. The prevalence of anal human papillomavirus among young HIV negative men who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Huachun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men who have sex with men (MSM especially those who are HIV positive are at risk for HPV-associated anal cancer. We systematically reviewed studies with data on the prevalence of vaccine preventable anal HPV among men who have sex with men aged 25 or younger and identified 6 studies. None of these studies were specifically designed to determine the prevalence of HPV in this population. Available data, albeit limited, suggest many young MSM may not already be HPV infected. Further studies using representative sampling focused on teenage MSM are required to confirm this.

  9. Aerobic endurance in HIV-positive young adults and HIV-negative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Aerobic endurance is an important aspect of physical fitness that enables individuals living with HIV to endure in the work place as well as in agricultural operations in order to earn a living and improve their quality of life. However, despite high HIV prevalence rates, the aerobic endurance status of young ...

  10. Dynamic Variation in Sexual Contact Rates in a Cohort of HIV-Negative Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Severson, E O; Volz, E; Koopman, J S; Leitner, T; Ionides, E L

    2015-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission models that include variability in sexual behavior over time have shown increased incidence, prevalence, and acute-state transmission rates for a given population risk profile. This raises the question of whether dynamic variation in individual sexual behavior is a real phenomenon that can be observed and measured. To study this dynamic variation, we developed a model incorporating heterogeneity in both between-person and within-person sexual contact patterns. Using novel methodology that we call iterated filtering for longitudinal data, we fitted this model by maximum likelihood to longitudinal survey data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Collaborative HIV Seroincidence Study (1992-1995). We found evidence for individual heterogeneity in sexual behavior over time. We simulated an epidemic process and found that inclusion of empirically measured levels of dynamic variation in individual-level sexual behavior brought the theoretical predictions of HIV incidence into closer alignment with reality given the measured per-act probabilities of transmission. The methods developed here provide a framework for quantifying variation in sexual behaviors that helps in understanding the HIV epidemic among gay men. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma after alpha-interferon treatment for HIV-negative T ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although interferon was successful in controlling the lymphoma the clinical course was complicated by the rapid development of aggressive, fatal Kaposi's sarcoma shortly after cessation of interferon treatment. It is suggested that the immunosuppressive effect of interferon therapy (or the T -cell lymphoma or both) may have ...

  12. Anal microbiota profiles in HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoqin; Fadrosh, Doug; Ma, Bing; Ravel, Jacques; Goedert, James J

    2014-03-13

    Because differences in anal microbial populations (microbiota) could affect acquisition of HIV or other conditions, especially among MSM, we profiled the microbiota of the anal canal, assessed its stability, and investigated associations with diversity and composition. Microbiota profiles in anal swabs collected from 76 MSM (52 in 1989, swab-1; 66 1-5 years later, swab-2) were compared by HIV status (25 HIV-positive), T-cell subsets, and questionnaire data. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified, sequenced (Illumina MiSeq), and clustered into species-level operational taxonomic units (QIIME and Greengenes). Regression models and Wilcoxon tests were used for associations with alpha diversity (unique operational taxonomic units, Shannon's index). Composition was compared by Adonis (QIIME). Most anal bacteria were Firmicutes (mean 60.6%, range 21.1-91.1%) or Bacteroidetes (29.4%, 4.1-70.8%). Alpha diversity did not change between the two swabs (N = 42 pairs). In swab-2, HIV-positives had lower alpha diversity (P ≤ 0.04) and altered composition, with fewer Firmicutes and more Fusobacteria taxa (P ≤ 0.03), not completely attributable to very low CD4(+) cell count (median 232 cells/μl), prior AIDS clinical diagnosis (N = 17), or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use (N = 6). Similar but weaker differences were observed in swab-1 (HIV-positive median 580 CD4(+) cells/μl; no trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Associations with T-cell subsets, smoking, and sexual practices were null or inconsistent. The anal microbiota of MSM was relatively stable over 1-5 years. However, with uncontrolled, advanced HIV infection, the microbiota had altered composition and reduced diversity partially attributable to antibiotics. Investigations of microbial community associations with other immune perturbations and clinical abnormalities are needed.

  13. Family conflict and depression in HIV-negative heterosexuals: the role of methamphetamine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Shirley J; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L

    2009-06-01

    Previous research has reported elevated levels of depressive symptoms among methamphetamine users, but little attention has been paid to possible links between family environment and psychological distress. This study examined relationships between family conflict, substance use, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 104 heterosexual methamphetamine users in San Diego, California. Eighty-nine percent of the sample reported conflict with a family member in the past year. Conflict was reported most often with parents and siblings. Sources of conflict included drug use, lifestyle issues, interpersonal and communication issues, and concern for other family members. In regression analyses, being female, being a polydrug user, and facing social and legal stressors were associated with higher levels of family conflict. Multiple regression analyses also revealed a positive association between family conflict and depressive symptoms. Contrary to expectation, methamphetamine dose did not moderate the relationship between family conflict and depressive symptoms. Reducing family conflict may be an important first step toward ameliorating depressive symptoms and creating more supportive environments for methamphetamine users who are in urgent need of effective interventions. Copyright (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Kinetics of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test during treatment of patients with sputum smear-positive tuberculosis in relation to initial TST result and severity of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idh, Jonna; Abate, Ebba; Westman, Anna

    2010-01-01

    . Smear-positive TB patients (n = 71) were recruited at Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. The TST, QFN, CD4+ cell count and clinical symptoms (TB score) were assessed and followed up during treatment. From baseline to 7 months after treatment, there was a significant decrease in QFN reactivity (93.......8% to 62.5% in HIV-negative/TB; 70.3% to 33.3% in HIV-positive/TB patients) down to a level comparable to a control group of blood donors (51.2%). The agreement between TST and QFN was poor in TB patients compared to healthy controls. A negative TST correlated to more advanced TB in contrast to a negative...

  15. Prevalence of and risk for gastrointestinal bleeding and peptic ulcerative disorders in a cohort of HIV patients from a U.S. healthcare claims database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Bratton

    Full Text Available The primary study objectives were to estimate the frequencies and rates of gastrointestinal bleeding and peptic ulcerative disorder in HIV-positive patients compared with age- and sex-matched HIV-negative subjects. Data from a US insurance claims database was used for this analysis. Among 89,207 patients with HIV, 9.0% had a GI bleed, 1.0% had an upper gastrointestinal bleed, 5.6% had a lower gastrointestinal bleed, 1.9% had a peptic ulcerative disorder diagnosis, and 0.6% had both gastrointestinal/peptic ulcerative disorder. Among 267,615 HIV-negative subjects, the respective frequencies were 6.9%, 0.6%, 4.3%, 1.4%, and 0.4% (p<0.0001 for each diagnosis subcategory. After combining effect measure modifiers into comedication and comorbidity strata, gastrointestinal bleeding hazard ratios (HRs were higher for HIV-positive patients without comedication/comorbidity, and those with comedication alone (HR, 2.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.62-2.84; HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.47-1.71. The rate of peptic ulcerative disorder among those without a history of ulcers and no comorbidity/comedication was also elevated (HR, 2.72; 95% CI, 2.48-2.99. Hazard ratios of gastrointestinal bleeding, and peptic ulcerative disorder without a history of ulcers were lower among patients infected with HIV with comedication/comorbidity (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.56-0.73; HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.33-0.65. Rates of gastrointestinal bleeding plus peptic ulcerative disorder followed a similar pattern. In summary, the rates of gastrointestinal/peptic ulcerative disorder events comparing HIV-infected subjects to non-HIV-infected subjects were differential based on comorbidity and comedication status.

  16. Audit of paired anal cytology and histopathology outcomes in patients referred to a public sexual health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Vincent M; Metcalf, Cecily; French, Martyn A; McCloskey, Jenny C

    2010-09-01

    The level of agreement between anal cytology and histopathology is not clear with only a few studies evaluating the reliability of anal specimen reporting. Australian data in relation to this are limited. The results of paired anal cytology and histopathology specimens received between 2002 and 2008 from patients who were referred within the sexual health clinic were retrieved from the anatomical pathology database. A total of 248 paired samples from 154 (21 females, 133 males) participants were extracted. Concurrent high risk human papilloma virus (hrHPV) DNA assay and HIV status for the study group were also collected. Data were tabulated according to reported grade of squamous abnormality based on the Bethesda system. Using the biopsy result as the gold standard the specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for cytology were calculated and the association between grade of abnormality, HIV status and hrHPV infection estimated. Concordance between cytology and histology showed that in 204 (85%) paired samples both tests were categorised as abnormal (Kappa statistic 0.73, P = 0.013). The cytology result showed a sensitivity of 96%, specificity 14%, PPV 89% and NPV 31% when compared with histopathology. HrHPV assay was positive in 192 (80%) samples. High-grade squamous abnormalities were reported in biopsy specimens from 60% (n = 42/67) of HIV-positive subjects and 25% (n = 22/87) of HIV-negative subjects. HIV-positive individuals were more likely to be hrHPV positive, odds ratio (OR) 6.21 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.69 to 14.34], when compared with HIV-negative subjects. Anal cytology is highly sensitive for the detection of abnormal squamous cells. While cytology has low specificity for predicting the grade of abnormality compared with biopsy outcome, its application as a screening method in asymptomatic at risk populations warrants further study.

  17. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of Salmonella: comparison of isolates from HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolday, D; Erge, W

    1998-07-01

    A retrospective analysis of all cases of Salmonella infections occurring between 1991 and 1995 was undertaken in order to evaluate the antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of the isolates from both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and uninfected Ethiopian patients. During the 5-year study period, we identified 147 cases of Salmonella infections. Only in 49 cases was the HIV serostatus known; 22 (44.9%) of the infections were in HIV seronegative patients while 27 (55.9%) were in HIV seropositive patients. The strains were isolated from blood (71.4%), urine (18.4%) and stool (8.2%). Salmonella infection was found to be more frequent (55.15% versus 44.9%) among HIV positive than HIV-negative patients. Moreover, Salmonella isolates recovered from HIV-seropositive patients were significantly resistant to many of the antibiotics tested when compared to the isolates from HIV-seronegative patients. The only chloramphenicol resistant Salmonella typhi occurred in a patient who was seropositive for HIV. According to these results, Ethiopian patients infected with HIV may be at risk of acquiring infections, especially non-typhoidal salmonellas, that are multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains than HIV-uninfected subjects. The emergence of MDR Salmonella infection among HIV-positive patients requires reassessment of chemotherapeutic approaches in this patient population, and warrants continued laboratory surveillance.

  18. Toxicity of Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, James; Grew, David; DeLacure, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the acute morbidity of high dose head and neck RT and CRT in patients with infected with HIV. Methods and Materials: All HIV-positive patients who underwent radiation therapy for head and neck cancer in our department between 2004 and 2008 were reviewed. Treatment related data were examined. All treatments were delivered with megavoltage photon beams or electron beams. Patients were evaluated by an attending radiation oncologist for toxicity and response on a weekly basis during therapy and monthly after treatment in a multidisciplinary clinic. Acute toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group (RTOG) common toxicity criteria. Response to treatment was based on both physical exam as well as post-treatment imaging as indicated. Results: Thirteen patients who underwent RT with a diagnosis of HIV were identified. Median age was 53 years and median follow-up was 22 months. Twelve had squamous cell carcinoma and one had lymphoproliferative parotiditis. Median radiation dose was 66.4 Gy and median duration of treatment was 51 days. The median number of scheduled radiotherapy days missed was zero (range 0 to 7). One patient (8%) developed Grade 4 confluent moist desquamation. Eight patients (61%) developed Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Based on our results, HIV-positive individuals appear to tolerate treatment for head and neck cancer, with toxicity similar to that in HIV-negative individuals.

  19. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in HIV-infected patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Daniel T; Morgan, Christopher J; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    The risk factors for acquiring Helicobacter pylori and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections are different: H. pylori is transmitted by gastro- or fecal-oral routes and is associated with low socioeconomic conditions, while HIV is transmitted through sexual intercourse, infected body fluids, and transplacentally. If the host responses to these infections were independent, the prevalence of H. pylori should be similar in HIV-infected and non-infected patients. Yet, several studies have detected a lower prevalence of H. pylori in patients with HIV infection, whereas other studies found either no differences or greater rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-positive subjects. To review studies that addressed the issue of these two simultaneous infections and attempt to determine whether reliable conclusions can be drawn from this corpus of often contrasting evidence. Electronic literature search for relevant publications, followed by manual search of additional citations from extracted articles. The initial search yielded 44 publications; after excluding case reports, reviews, narrowly focused articles, and duplicate reports, there remained 29 articles, which are the corpus of this review. With one exception, all studies reported higher rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-negative subjects. Five studies also examined the CD4 lymphocyte counts and found an inverse correlation between the degree of immunosuppression and the prevalence of active H. pylori infection. Current evidence suggests that it is likely that H. pylori needs a functional immune system to successfully and persistently colonize the human gastric mucosa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Chronic diarrhoea in HIV patients: Prevalence of coccidian parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIV patients with or without diarrhoea and to see an association between diarrhoea and the coccidian parasites in our setting. Stool samples from 113 HIV patients, 34 chronic diarrhoea and 79 without any history of diarrhoea were collected and examined for enteric parasites by microscopy. One hundred and thirteen control samples from HIV negative patients complaining of prolonged diarrhoea were also collected and analysed. Prevalence of coccidian parasites in HIV and non-HIV patients; with and without diarrhoea was compared using chi-square tests. Enteric parasites were detected in 55.8% HIV patients with diarrhoea compared to 16.4% in patients without diarrhoea ( P < 0.001. Isospora belli was found in 41.1% (14/34 of chronic diarrhoea and 6.3% (5/79 in non-diarrhoeal cases ( P < 0.001. Cryptosporidium was detected in 20.6% (7/34 of chronic diarrhoea and 2.5% (2/79 in non-diarrhoeal cases ( P < 0.01. Cyclospora cayetanensis associated diarrhoea was detected in only one case of chronic diarrhoea (2.9%. CD4+ T-cell count was lower (180 cells/μl0 in diarrhoeal HIV patients as compared to non-diarrhoeal patients. Coccidian parasites were seen at a mean CD4+ T-cell count of 186.3 cells/μL. This study concluded that Isospora belli was the predominant parasite followed by Cryptosporidium spp. and both were strongly associated with diarrhoea among HIV patients.

  1. Factors associated with collagen deposition in lymphoid tissue in long-term treated HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Alba; Alós, Llúcia; León, Agathe; Mozos, Anna; Caballero, Miguel; Martinez, Antonio; Plana, Montserrat; Gallart, Teresa; Gil, Cristina; Leal, Manuel; Gatell, Jose M; García, Felipe

    2010-08-24

    The factors associated with fibrosis in lymphoid tissue in long-term treated HIV-infected patients and their correlation with immune reconstitution were assessed. Tonsillar biopsies were performed in seven antiretroviral-naive patients and 29 successfully treated patients (median time on treatment, 61 months). Twenty patients received protease inhibitors-sparing regimens and nine protease inhibitor-containing regimens. Five tonsillar resections of HIV-negative individuals were used as controls. Lymphoid tissue architecture, collagen deposition (fibrosis) and the mean interfollicular CD4(+) cell count per mum were assessed. Naive and long-term treated HIV-infected patients had a higher proportion of fibrosis than did HIV-uninfected persons (P lymphoid tissue (P = 0.03) and smaller increase in peripheral CD4(+) T cells (r = -0.40, P = 0.05). The factors independently associated with fibrosis in lymphoid tissue were age (P lymphoid tissue viral load when compared with patients with undetectable lymphoid tissue viral load (median 5 vs. 12%, respectively, P = 0.017) and patients receiving a protease inhibitor-sparing vs. a protease inhibitor-containing regimen (median 8 vs. 2.5%, respectively, P = 0.04). Fibrosis in lymphoid tissue was associated with a poor reconstitution of CD4(+) T cells and long-term antiretroviral therapy did not reverse this abnormality. HIV infection, older age, a detectable level of lymphoid tissue viral load in treated patients and protease inhibitor-sparing regimens seem to favour fibrosis in lymphoid tissue.

  2. [Renal transplantation in HIV-infected patients in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuecos, A; Pascual, J; Gómez, E; Sola, E; Cofán, F; López, F; Puig-Hooper, C E; Baltar, J M; González-Molina, M; Oppenheimer, F; Marcén, R; Rivero, M

    2006-01-01

    HIV infection has experienced dramatic improvement in morbidity and mortality with the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This prompted a reevaluation of organ-solid transplantation as a treatment option for HIV-infected patients. Some trials in the United States have shown that one- and 2-year graft and patient survival is comparable to HIV-negative transplant population. In Europe the experience is still scarce. The aim of this study is to analyse the outcome and the clinical characteristics of HIV-infected patients who received kidney transplantation in Spain in the HAART era. Ten patients were transplanted in our country since 2001. Only one patient was black. The main cause of end-stage renal disease reported was glomerulonephritis. Six of the recipients were coinfected by hepatitis C virus. Inclusion criteria included undetectable HIV viral load and CD4 counts greater than 200/pL. Immunosuppression consisted of steroids, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil, with antibody induction in 4 cases. The median and mean follow-up was 11 and 16.3+/-15.6 (3-46) months, respectively. One recipient lost his graft because of early renal venous thrombosis. The remaining patients are functioning graft with mean serum creatinina level of 1.5 +/- 0.5 mg/dl. Biopsy-proven acute rejection was diagnosed in 4 recipients and was reversed in all cases with antirejection treatment. The plasma HIV RNA levels have remained controlled and CD4 counts have been stable in excess of 200 cell/microL. None of patients have developed AIDS complications. Recipients receiving protease inhibitor-based HAART regimens required significant dosing modification to maintain appropriate tacrolimus levels. Our results show that renal transplantation can be a safe and effective treatment in select HIV-infected patients. Like other series, the acute rejection rate was higher than in non-HIV recipients. The reasons of this rejection incidence remain unknown.

  3. Prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes in patients diagnosed with anogenital malignancies in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia S. Rantshabeng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV associated malignancies are the leading cause of cancer death in Botswana. We sought to determine causative HPV types in patients with anogenital malignancies in Botswana to inform vaccine strategy. Methods We used formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue blocks from patients diagnosed with anal, penile and vulvar squamous cell carcinomas between the years, 2014 and 2016. Presence of HPV 16, 18, or other high-risk (HR types was detected using Abbott m2000 real-time PCR platform. Tissues with other high-risk types were subsequently analysed using a multiplex qPCR assay that includes 15 validated fluorophore probes. Results A total of 126 tissue specimens, comprising of 21 anal (9 males, 12 females, 31 penile and 74 vulvar were studied. Ninety-three (73.8% patients had their HIV status documented in the records while the rest did not. Eighty-three (83 out of 93 were HIV positive, a prevalence of 89.4% (95% CI: 81–94. HPV was detected in 68/126 (54% tissues, of which 69% (95% CI: 54–79 had HPV 16 only, 28% (95% CI: 19–40 had other hr.-HPV types and 2.9% (95% CI, 3.5–10.1 were co-infected with HPV 16 and other hr.-types. Other high-risk types detected included HPV 26, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 66 and 68. HPV 18 was not detected. Multiple-type HPV infection was detected in 44 of 47 (93.6% HIV positive participants co-infected with HPV. In HIV-negative individuals, only HPV 16 was detected. Conclusion In our study, anogenital carcinomas were associated with HPV 16 and other hr.-HPV types besides HPV 16 and 18. HIV co-infected patients had multiple hr.-HPV types detected whereas in HIV-negative patients only HPV 16 was detected. Our study suggests that multivalent vaccines may be more suitable in this setting, especially for HIV-infected individuals.

  4. Kaposi’s Sarcoma Presenting as Lymphadenopathy in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Zoubeidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS is an angioproliferative disorder first described in 1872 by Moritz Kaposi. Four main clinical presentations of KS have been described: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and epidemic. KS involvement of the lymph nodes is extremely uncommon in the classical variant form, especially if it precedes the skin manifestations. We describe the case of an elderly HIV-negative patient presenting with lymphadenopathy who was found to have KS. Case Report: A 67-year-old patient was admitted for exploration of polyadenopathies in the context of a general decline in health. Physical examination revealed an erythematosus left lower limb rash associated with angiomatous nodules and multiple lymphadenopathies. The diagnosis of erysipelas in the left leg was retained and the patient was treated with good evolution of the rash but persistence of the angiomatous nodules and the polyadenopathies. Skin and lymph node biopsies led to a diagnosis of KS. The patient is proposed for polychemotherapy. Conclusion: KS must be suspected in lymphadenopathies despite the absence of typical cutaneous signs of the disease and in immunocompetent patients.

  5. Awareness, discussion and non-prescribed use of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis among persons living with HIV/AIDS in Italy: a Nationwide, cross-sectional study among patients on antiretrovirals and their treating HIV physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palummieri, Antonio; De Carli, Gabriella; Rosenthal, Éric; Cacoub, Patrice; Mussini, Cristina; Puro, Vincenzo

    2017-11-28

    Before Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) was officially recommended and made available, a few surveys among gay and bisexual men, and persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), identified an informal use of antiretrovirals (ARVs) for PrEP among HIV-negative individuals. Before PrEP availability in Italy, we aimed to assess whether PLWHA in Italy shared their ARVs with HIV-negative individuals, whether they knew people who were on PrEP, and describe the level of awareness and discussion on this preventive measure among them and people in their close circle. Two anonymous questionnaires investigating personal characteristics and PrEP awareness, knowledge, and experience were proposed to HIV specialists and their patients on ARVs in a one-week, cross-sectional survey (December 2013-January 2014). Among PLWHA, a Multivariable Logistic Regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with PrEP discussion with peers (close circle and/or HIV associations), and experience (use in close circle and/or personal ARV sharing). Eighty-seven specialists in 31 representative Infectious Diseases departments administered the questionnaire to 1405 PLWHA. Among specialists, 98% reported awareness, 65% knew the dosage schedule, and 14% had previously suggested or prescribed PrEP. Among PLWHA, 45.6% were somehow aware, discussed or had direct or indirect experience of PrEP: 38% "had heard" of PrEP, 24% were aware of studies in HIV-negative individuals demonstrating a risk reduction through the use of ARVs, 22% had discussed PrEP, 12% with peers; 9% reported PrEP use in close circle and 1% personal ARV sharing. Factors predictive of either PrEP discussion with peers or experience differed between men and women, but across all genders were mainly related to having access to information, with HIV association membership being the strongest predictor. At a time and place where there were neither official information nor proposals or interventions to guide public policies on PrEP in

  6. Nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in AIDS patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Kjaeldgaard, P

    1991-01-01

    admitted as inpatients during the transmission period of the outbreak (20 June-14 August), of whom 18 (17 with AIDS, one with AIDS related complex), developed cryptosporidiosis. Two further HIV negative subjects (one departmental secretary, one visiting relative) developed cryptosporidiosis. MAIN OUTCOME...

  7. Pencillium keratitis in an Immunocompetent Patient from Pune, Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyawahare, Chanda Ratnakar; Misra, Rabindra Nath; Gandham, Nageswari Rajesh; Angadi, Kalpna Mohan; Paul, Retina

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of fungal keratitis is less common than bacterial and viral keratitis. However, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Delayed clinical diagnosis is common mainly because of lack of suspicion. Further slow growth of fungus increases the time for confirmed laboratory diagnosis. After accurate diagnosis, patient's management remains inadequate due to lack of availability of antifungal agents and its poor corneal penetration. Multitude of genera of molds and yeast have been identified in fungal keratitis. Due to their ubiquitous nature and easy isolation from the environment, their role in true pathogenesis is difficult to ascertain. Worldwide, incidence of fungal keratitis is rising at present. The predisposing factors comprises trauma, use of contact lenses and topical steroids. Filamentous fungi and dematiaceous fungi are the frequently encountered etiological agents of fungal keratitis. Dimorphic fungi are reported less frequently. Fungal keratitis tends to occur more frequently in young males and usually in winter and monsoon. Penicillium genera includes several species. By far Penicillium marneffei (P. marneffei) infection is most common, mainly associated with AIDS. A number of infections caused by species other than P. marneffei have been reported as well. Here we report a case of Penicillium keratitis in a young, HIV negative male farmer.

  8. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in a diffuse large B cell lymphoma patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savsek, Lina; Opaskar, Tanja Ros

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic protozoal infection that has, until now, probably been an underestimated cause of encephalitis in patients with hematological malignancies, independent of stem cell or bone marrow transplant. T and B cell depleting regimens are probably an important risk factor for reactivation of a latent toxoplasma infection in these patients. We describe a 62-year-old HIV-negative right-handed Caucasian female with systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma who presented with sudden onset of high fever, headache, altered mental status, ataxia and findings of pancytopenia, a few days after receiving her final, 8 th cycle of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy regimen. A progression of lymphoma to the central nervous system was suspected. MRI of the head revealed multiple on T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintense parenchymal lesions with mild surrounding edema, located in both cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres that demonstrated moderate gadolinium enhancement. The polymerase chain reaction on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF PCR) was positive for Toxoplasma gondii. The patient was diagnosed with toxoplasmic encephalitis and successfully treated with sulfadiazine, pyrimethamine and folic acid. Due to the need for maintenance therapy with rituximab for lymphoma remission, the patient now continues with secondary prophylaxis of toxoplasmosis. With this case report, we wish to emphasize the need to consider cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with hematological malignancies on immunosuppressive therapy when presenting with new neurologic deficits. In such patients, there are numerous differential diagnoses for cerebral toxoplasmosis, and the CNS lymphoma is the most difficult among all to distinguish it from. If left untreated, cerebral toxoplasmosis has a high mortality rate; therefore early recognition and treatment are of essential importance

  9. Does first line antiretroviral therapy increase the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in Indian patients?: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, R A B; Rupali, P; Abraham, O C; Kattula, D

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with a myriad of metabolic complications which are potential cardiovascular risk factors. Early detection of these risk factors could help in alleviating morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients on ART. To study the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in patients on a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) - the standard combination first line ART regimen used in tertiary referral center. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in HIV infected subjects with stage 1t disease on standard first line ART for at least 1 year, HIV infected subjects with stage 1 disease and not on ART and HIV negative subjects was assessed. The study was a cross-sectional study design. Basic demographic data was collected and patients were examined for anthropometric data and blood was collected for analysis of blood glucose, serum lipids, and fasting insulin levels. Chi-square test was used to calculate significance. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 16.0 was used for data analysis. The prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia was higher in the patients on ART when compared to patients not on ART (PART and those not on ART. First line ART is associated with increased prevalence of dyslipidemia. Early detection and treatment of dyslipidemia should help in reducing the cardiovascular morbidity in patients on ART.

  10. Optimal management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ntekim, Atara; Campbell, Oladapo; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients has challenges mainly due to the concerns on immune status. At present, their mode of management is similar to HIV-seronegative patients involving the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy concurrently as indicated. HIV infection, cancer, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy lower immunity through reduction in CD4 cell counts. At present there are no treatment guidelines for HIV-positive patients. This study was done to systematically review the literature on cervical cancer management in HIV-positive patients and treatment outcomes. A systematic literature search was done in the major databases to identify studies on the management of HIV-positive patients with cervical cancer. Identified studies were assessed for eligibility and inclusion in the review following the guidelines of The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and CRD's (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) guidance for undertaking reviews in health care. Eight eligible studies were identified from the literature. Three of them were prospective while five were retrospective studies. Notably, the average age at diagnosis of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients was a decade lower than in seronegative patients. There was no difference in distribution of stages of disease at presentation between HIV-positive and negative patients. Mild acute toxicity (Grades 1 and 2) was higher in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients in hematopoietic system. In the grades 3 and 4 reactions, anemia was reported in 4% versus 2% while gastrointestinal reactions were reported in 5% versus 2% respectively. In general, patients who were started early on HAART had higher rates of treatment completion. The study supports the suggestion that HAART should be commenced early at cervical cancer diagnosis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with cervical cancer to ensure less toxicity and better treatment compliance

  11. Plasma levels of Transforming Growth Factor Beta in HIV-1 patients with oral candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, A; Asadikaram, G; Nakhaee, N; Hadizadeh, S; Ayatollahi Mousavi, A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: TGF-β is a potent regulator and suppressor of the immune system and overproduction of this cytokine may contribute to immunosuppression in HIV-infected patients. Increasing population of immunosuppressed patients has resulted in increasingly frequent of fungal infections, including oral candidiasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the plasma levels of TGF-β under in vivo conditions. Materials and Methods: Seventy- two samples were obtained from the oral cavities of HIV-positive Iranian patients and cultured on Sabouraud’s dextrose agar and CHROMagar. Also blood samples were obtained to assess TGF-β levels using ELISA technique. Results: Thirty-three out of 72 oral samples yielded candida isolates, Candida albicans in 14 and non-albicans candida in 19.Fungal infection decreased significantly more TGF-β level than non-fungal infection also HIV negative were significantly more TGF-β than HIV positive. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a significant interaction between fungal infection and HIV on expression of Transforming Growth Factor Beta. PMID:28680977

  12. SPECIFIC COURSE OF PREGNANCY, PERINATAL OUTCOMES AND TREATMENT RESULTS IN HIV NEGATIVE FEMALE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Nesterenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to investigate the specific course of pregnancy, perinatal outcomes and treatment results in HIV negative female patients.Subjects and Methods. Medical files of 109 pregnant tuberculosis patients were analyzed who were followed up in Krasnoyarsk Regional TB Dispensary no. 1 from 2010 to 2014.Results. The part of children prematurely born by mothers ill with tuberculosis was practically compatible with the overall national cohort of live-born children (6.8% in the analyzed group versus 5.7% in the national cohort for 2014. The part of children with congenital abnormalities born by mothers suffering from tuberculosis turned out to be twice lower versus the overall national cohort of live-born children (1.4% versus 3.0% in 2010 and 2.9% in 2014.The efficiency of the main treatment course in pregnant women without multiple drug resistant tuberculosis, of which 3.8 ± 0.3 months of tuberculosis treatment coincided with pregnancy was practically the same as treatment efficiency for the overall cohort of patients in Krasnoyarsky Kray (66.2% in the analyzed cohort versus 60.3-72.7% in the regional cohort for 2010-2014. In the pregnant with multiple drug resistant forms of tuberculosis, treatment efficiency was lower versus the regional cohort (30.4% in the analyzed cohort versus 41.1-60.2% in the regional cohort for 2010-2014. 

  13. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in newly diagnosed patients with Human immunodeficiency virus in Ilorin, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayokunle, Dada Samuel; Olusegun, Olanrewaju Timothy; Ademola, Aderibigbe; Adindu, Chijioke; Olaitan, Rafiu Mojeed; Oladimeji, Ajayi Akande

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) the causative agent of Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an important cause of renal diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. There is paucity of studies on the burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients with HIV/AIDS in the North-Central zone of Nigeria. This is a cross-sectional study of 227 newly-diagnosed, antiretroviral naïve patients with HIV/AIDS seen at the HIV clinic of the Medical Out-patient Department (MOPD) of University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH). They were matched with 108 control group. Laboratory investigations were performed for the participants. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 30 mg/g. There were 100 (44%) males among the patients and 47 (43.5%) among the control group. The mean ages of the patients and controls were 40.3 ± 10.3 years and 41.8 ± 9.5 years respectively. CKD was observed in 108 (47.6%) among the patients and 18 (16.7%) of the controls (p = 0.01). The median CD4 T-cell count was significantly lower in patients with CKD. Ninety-three (41.0%) of the patients had dipstick proteinuria of > 2 +. The median albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) was significantly higher among the HIV-positive patients (272.3 mg/g) compared with the HIV-negative controls (27.22 mg/g) p = 0.01. The CD4 T-cell count correlates positively with eGFR (r = 0.463, p = 0.001) and negatively with ACR (r = -0.806, p = 0.001). CKD is very common among patients with HIV/AIDS in Ilorin. Screening and early intervention for CKD should be part of the protocols in the management of these patients.

  14. Collapse of genitive and benefactive case in Ecuadorian Quechua ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 48 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  15. Quechua and Spanish, Evidentiality and Aspect: Commentary on Liliana Sanchez

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muysken, Pieter

    2004-01-01

    Liliana Sanchez' paper is a welcome contribution to the growing body of literature on Andean Spanish (cf. a recent survey in Muysken, 2004a), welcome both because a well-motivated and clearly described methodology is used and because it is embedded in an explicit theoretical framework. I do not have reservations about the overall conclusions of…

  16. Some Cholón discourse particles and Quechua homologues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander-Bakkerus, A.; Romero-Figueroa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Cholón belongs to a small language family. It was spoken in North Peru in the valley of the Huallaga River. Cholón is an agglutinative SOV language, and it has, amongst other things, some twenty interesting, suffixed discourse particles: adverbial markers, emphasis markers, exclamation markers,

  17. Opportunistic and other intestinal parasites among HIV/AIDS patients attending Gambi higher clinic in Bahir Dar city, North West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Abebe; Shiferaw, Yitayal; Getnet, Gebeyaw; Yalew, Aregaw; Addis, Zelalem

    2011-08-01

    To determine the magnitude of opportunistic and non-opportunistic intestinal parasitic infections among HIV/AIDS patients in Bahir Dar. Cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV/AIDS patients attending Gambi higher clinic from April1-May 30, 2009. Convenient sampling technique was employed to identify the study subjects and hence a total of 248 subjects were included. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data of patients. Stool samples were examined by direct saline, iodine wet mount, formol-ether sedimentation concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique. Out of 248 enrolled in the study, 171(69.0%) (90 males and 81 females) were infected with one or more intestinal parasites. The highest rate of intestinal parasites were observed among HIV/AIDS patients (80.3%, 151/188), and the infection rate of HIV negative individuals was 33.3% (20/60). Cryptosporidum parvum (43.6%), Isospora belli (15.5%) and Blastocystis hominis (10.5%) were opportunistic parasites that were found only in HIV/AIDS patients. Opportunistic parasite infections are common health problem among HIV/AIDS patients in the study area. Therefore, early detection and treatment of these parasites are important to improve the quality of life of HIV/AIDS patients. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. HIV providers' likelihood to prescribe pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention differs by patient type: a short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Leah M; Balderson, Benjamin H

    2016-09-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the antiretroviral treatment regimen for HIV-negative people at high risk of acquiring HIV, has demonstrated efficacy across clinical trials in several patient populations. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have released detailed guidelines to aid providers in prescribing PrEP for their high-risk patients, including men who have sex with men (MSM), high-risk heterosexuals, and injection drug users (IDUs). Given that much attention in PrEP has focused on MSM patients, the present study used an online survey to assess factors involved in HIV care providers' (n = 363) decisions about prescribing PrEP, along with their willingness to prescribe PrEP to patients from various risk populations (e.g., MSM, heterosexuals, IDUs). The efficacy of PrEP was an important factor in providers' decisions about prescribing PrEP, as were considerations about patients' adherence to the regimen, regular follow-up for care, and medication costs. This survey's findings also suggest that providers' willingness to prescribe PrEP varies by patient group, with providers most willing to initiate the regimen with MSM who have an HIV-positive partner, and least willing to prescribe to high-risk heterosexuals or IDUs. In the context of the current CDC recommendations for PrEP that include MSM, heterosexuals, and IDUs, examining providers' rationales for and barriers against supporting this HIV prevention strategy across patient groups merits further attention.

  19. Treatment outcomes of treatment-naïve Hepatitis C patients co-infected with HIV: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Davies

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Co-infection with Hepatitis C (HCV and HIV is common and HIV accelerates hepatic disease progression due to HCV. However, access to HCV treatment is limited and success rates are generally poor. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess HCV treatment outcomes in observational cohorts. Two databases (Medline and EMBASE were searched using a compound search strategy for cohort studies reporting HCV treatment outcomes (as determined by a sustained virological response, SVR in HIV-positive patients initiating HCV treatment for the first time. RESULTS: 40 studies were included for review, providing outcomes on 5339 patients from 17 countries. The pooled proportion of patients achieving SVR was 38%. Significantly poorer outcomes were observed for patients infected with HCV genotypes 1 or 4 (pooled SVR 24.5%, compared to genotypes 2 or 3 (pooled SVR 59.8%. The pooled proportion of patients who discontinued treatment due to drug toxicities (reported by 33 studies was low, at 4.3% (3.3-5.3%. Defaulting from treatment, reported by 33 studies, was also low (5.1%, 3.5-6.6%, as was on-treatment mortality (35 studies, 0.1% (0-0.2%. CONCLUSIONS: These results, reported under programmatic conditions, are comparable to those reported in randomised clinical trials, and show that although HCV treatment outcomes are generally poor in HIV co-infected patients, those infected with HCV genotypes 2 or 3 have outcomes comparable to HIV-negative patients.

  20. Neurotoxoplasmosis diagnosis for HIV-1 patients by real-time PCR of cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Luís Nascimento Nogui

    Full Text Available Encephalitis caused by Toxoplasma gondii is the most common cause of central nervous system damage in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Toxoplasma may infect any of the brain cells, thus leading to non-specific neurotoxoplasmosis clinical manifestations including focused or non-focused signs and symptoms of central nervous system malfunction. Clinical development ranges from insidious display during weeks to experiencing acute general confusion or ultimately fatal onset. Cerebral toxoplasmosis occurs in advanced stages of immunodeficiency, and the absence of anti-toxoplasmosis antibodies by the immunofluorescence method does not allow us to rule out its diagnosis. As specific therapy begins, diagnosis confirmation is sought through clinical and radiological response. There are few accurate diagnosis methods to confirm such cases. We present a method for T. gondii DNA detection by real time PCR-Multiplex. Fifty-one patients were evaluated; 16 patients had AIDS and a presumptive diagnosis for toxoplasmosis, 23 patients were HIV-positive with further morbidities except neurotoxoplasmosis, and 12 subjects were HIV-negative control patients. Real time PCR-Multiplex was applied to these patients' cephalorachidian liquid with a specific T. gondii genome sequence from the 529bp fragment. This test is usually carried out within four hours. Test sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated according to applicable tables. Toxoplasma gondii assay by real time Multiplex of cephalorachidian fluid was positive for 11 out of 16 patients with AIDS and a presumptive diagnosis for cerebral toxoplasmosis, while none of the 35 control patients displayed such a result. Therefore, this method allowed us to achieve 68.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 87.8% negative predictive value. Real time PCR on CSF allowed high specificity and good sensitivity among

  1. Gender Differences in Survival among Adult Patients Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa: A Multicentre Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Morna; Schomaker, Michael; Garone, Daniela Belen; Giddy, Janet; Hoffmann, Christopher J.; Lessells, Richard; Maskew, Mhairi; Prozesky, Hans; Wood, Robin; Johnson, Leigh F.; Egger, Matthias; Boulle, Andrew; Myer, Landon

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased mortality among men on antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been documented but remains poorly understood. We examined the magnitude of and risk factors for gender differences in mortality on ART. Methods and Findings Analyses included 46,201 ART-naïve adults starting ART between January 2002 and December 2009 in eight ART programmes across South Africa (SA). Patients were followed from initiation of ART to outcome or analysis closure. The primary outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were loss to follow-up (LTF), virologic suppression, and CD4+ cell count responses. Survival analyses were used to examine the hazard of death on ART by gender. Sensitivity analyses were limited to patients who were virologically suppressed and patients whose CD4+ cell count reached >200 cells/µl. We compared gender differences in mortality among HIV+ patients on ART with mortality in an age-standardised HIV-negative population. Among 46,201 adults (65% female, median age 35 years), during 77,578 person-years of follow-up, men had lower median CD4+ cell counts than women (85 versus 110 cells/µl, p<0.001), were more likely to be classified WHO stage III/IV (86 versus 77%, p<0.001), and had higher mortality in crude (8.5 versus 5.7 deaths/100 person-years, p<0.001) and adjusted analyses (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 1.31, 95% CI 1.22–1.41). After 36 months on ART, men were more likely than women to be truly LTF (AHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12–1.28) but not to die after LTF (AHR 1.04, 95% CI 0.86–1.25). Findings were consistent across all eight programmes. Virologic suppression was similar by gender; women had slightly better immunologic responses than men. Notably, the observed gender differences in mortality on ART were smaller than gender differences in age-standardised death rates in the HIV-negative South African population. Over time, non-HIV mortality appeared to account for an increasing proportion of observed mortality. The analysis was limited by missing

  2. Gender differences in survival among adult patients starting antiretroviral therapy in South Africa: a multicentre cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morna Cornell

    Full Text Available Increased mortality among men on antiretroviral therapy (ART has been documented but remains poorly understood. We examined the magnitude of and risk factors for gender differences in mortality on ART.Analyses included 46,201 ART-naïve adults starting ART between January 2002 and December 2009 in eight ART programmes across South Africa (SA. Patients were followed from initiation of ART to outcome or analysis closure. The primary outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were loss to follow-up (LTF, virologic suppression, and CD4+ cell count responses. Survival analyses were used to examine the hazard of death on ART by gender. Sensitivity analyses were limited to patients who were virologically suppressed and patients whose CD4+ cell count reached >200 cells/µl. We compared gender differences in mortality among HIV+ patients on ART with mortality in an age-standardised HIV-negative population. Among 46,201 adults (65% female, median age 35 years, during 77,578 person-years of follow-up, men had lower median CD4+ cell counts than women (85 versus 110 cells/µl, p<0.001, were more likely to be classified WHO stage III/IV (86 versus 77%, p<0.001, and had higher mortality in crude (8.5 versus 5.7 deaths/100 person-years, p<0.001 and adjusted analyses (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 1.31, 95% CI 1.22-1.41. After 36 months on ART, men were more likely than women to be truly LTF (AHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12-1.28 but not to die after LTF (AHR 1.04, 95% CI 0.86-1.25. Findings were consistent across all eight programmes. Virologic suppression was similar by gender; women had slightly better immunologic responses than men. Notably, the observed gender differences in mortality on ART were smaller than gender differences in age-standardised death rates in the HIV-negative South African population. Over time, non-HIV mortality appeared to account for an increasing proportion of observed mortality. The analysis was limited by missing data on baseline HIV disease

  3. HIV-infected mental health patients: characteristics and comparison with HIV-infected patients from the general population and non-infected mental health patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schadé Annemiek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing mental health symptoms, which negatively influence the treatment of the HIV-infection. Mental health problems in HIV-infected patients may affect public health. Psychopathology, including depression and substance abuse, can increase hazardous sexual behaviour and, with it, the chance of spreading HIV. Therefore, it is important to develop an optimal treatment plan for HIV-infected patients with mental health problems. The majority of HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands (almost 60% are homosexual men. The main objectives of this study were to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with HIV who seek treatment for their mental health symptoms in the Netherlands. Secondly, we tested whether HIV infected and non-infected homosexual patients with a lifetime depressive disorder differed on several mental health symptoms. Methods We compared a cohort of 196 patients who visited the outpatient clinic for HIV and Mental Health with HIV-infected patients in the general population in Amsterdam (ATHENA-study and with non-HIV infected mental health patients (NESDA-study. DSM-IV diagnoses were determined, and several self-report questionnaires were used to assess mental health symptoms. Results Depressive disorders were the most commonly occurring diagnoses in the cohort and frequent drug use was common. HIV-infected homosexual men with a depressive disorder showed no difference in depressive symptoms or sleep disturbance, compared with non-infected depressive men. However, HIV-positive patients did express more symptoms like fear, anger and guilt. Although they showed significantly more suicidal ideation, suicide attempts were not more prevalent among HIV-infected patients. Finally, the HIV-infected depressive patients displayed a considerably higher level of drug use than the HIV-negative group. Conclusion Habitual drug use is a risk factor for

  4. Ethical and Scientific Issues Surrounding Solid Organ Transplantation in Hiv-Positive Patients: Absence of Evidence Is Not Evidence of Absence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Christie

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available End-stage liver disease is emerging as a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients. Historically, an HIV diagnosis was a contraindication for a liver transplant; however, because of the efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, HIV-positive patients have one-year, two-year, and three-year post-transplantation survival rates similar to that of HIV-negative patients. Based on this evidence, HIV-positive patients are now considered eligible for transplantation. However, newly emerging guidelines include the stipulation that HIV-positive patients must be on HAART to be placed on a waiting list for transplantation. The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate the scientific and ethical probity of requiring HIV-positive patients to be on HAART as a condition for being on a liver transplant waiting list. It is argued that the emphasis should be placed on the probability of post-transplantation HAART tolerance, and that concerns about pretransplantation HAART tolerance are of secondary importance.

  5. Comparative transcriptome analysis of PBMC from HIV patients pre- and post-antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; Ma, Jinmin; Huang, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    Infections of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) trigger host immune responses, but the virus can destroy the immune system and cause acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can suppress viral replication and restore the impaired immune function......, minimum numbers of patients (one HIV alone; one HIV + tuberculosis, TB; one HIV + TB with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome during HAART) and two HIV negative volunteers were used. More than 15,000 gene transcripts were detected in each individual sample. Fourteen HAART up-regulated and eleven...... down-regulated DEGs were specifically identified in the HIV patients. Among them, nine up-regulated (CXCL1, S100P, AQP9, BASP1, MMP9, SOD2, LIMK2, IL1R2 and BCL2A1) and nine down-regulated DEGs (CD160, CD244, CX3CR1, IFIT1, IFI27, IFI44, IFI44L, MX1 and SIGLEC1) have already been reported as relevant...

  6. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  7. Peritonitis outcomes in patients with HIV and end-stage renal failure on peritoneal dialysis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlovu, Kwazi C Z; Sibanda, Wilbert; Assounga, Alain

    2017-02-03

    Few studies have investigated the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated end-stage renal failure particularly in low-resource settings with limited access to renal replacement therapy. We aimed to evaluate the effects of HIV infection on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)-associated peritonitis outcomes and technique failure in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-treated HIV-positive CAPD populations. We conducted a single-center prospective cohort study of consecutive incident CAPD patients recruited from two hospitals in Durban, South Africa from September 2012-February 2015. Seventy HIV-negative and 70 HIV-positive end-stage renal failure patients were followed monthly for 18 months at a central renal clinic. Primary outcomes of peritonitis and catheter failure were assessed for the first 18 months of CAPD therapy. We assessed risk factors for peritonitis and catheter failure using Cox regression survival analysis. The HIV-positive cohort had a significantly increased rate of peritonitis compared to the HIV-negative cohort (1.86 vs. 0.76 episodes/person-years, respectively; hazard ratio [HR], 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69-3.45, P peritonitis rate rose to 3.69 episodes/person-years (HR 4.54, 95% CI 2.35-8.76, P peritonitis rate of 1.60 episodes/person-years (HR 2.10, CI 1.39-3.15, P = 0.001). HIV was associated with increased hazards of peritonitis relapse (HR, 3.88; CI, 1.37-10.94; P = 0.010). Independent predictors associated with increased peritonitis risk were HIV (HR, 1.84; CI, 1.07-3.16; P = 0.027), diabetes (HR, 2.09; CI, 1.09-4.03; P = 0.027) and a baseline CD4 count Peritonitis (HR, 14.47; CI, 2.79-75.00; P = 0.001), average hemoglobin concentrations (HR, 0.75; CI, 0.59-0.95; P = 0.016), and average serum C-reactive protein levels were independent predictors of catheter failure. HIV infection in end-stage renal disease patients managed by CAPD was associated with

  8. Kaposis sarkom tolket som haematom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Jesper R; Hasselager, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a frequent skin cancer in HIV-positive patients, but is relatively uncommon in HIV-negative and non-immune compromised patients. We present a case of Kaposi's sarcoma of the face and scalp in a HIV-negative male with previous facial basal cell carcinoma....

  9. Analysis of peculiarities of identification, diagnostics and course of tuberculosis in patients with tuberculosis/HIV co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Melnyk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to analyse dynamics of detection of tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS in tuberculosis/HIV co-infection, to identify the main clinical forms of tuberculosis, the type of tuberculosis process and the structure of incidence of tuberculosis, to analyse dependence of a clinical form of tuberculosis on quantity of CD4 cells. Materials and methods. 155 patients with tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and 155 patients with tuberculosis without HIV infection were examined. All patients underwent general clinical examination, laboratory tests, X-ray, microbiological, histological studies (with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Results. In all patients, co-infection was detected mainly by respiratory tuberculosis (in 73 % of HIV-positive and 89 % of HIV-negative patients. In HIV-positive patients, tuberculosis was more often detected by the passive way (81 %, and in HIV-negative patients – by the active way (78 %. 66.5 % of patients had HIV infection first, 21.3 % had the first tuberculosis, and 12.2 % had HIV infection and tuberculosis at the same time. In clinical forms in patients with HIV-infection, infiltrative and disseminated tuberculosis prevailed. Pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed in 70.3 % of patients, extrapulmonary – in 11 %, pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis – in 18.7 %. In 28.4 % of patients, immunodeficiency was detected with CD4 cells less than 100 in 1mm3, in 22.6 % of patients – 101–200 CD4 cells in 1 mm3, in 10.3 % in 201–300 CD4 in 1 mm3, in 14.8 % of patients – 301–500 CD4 in 1 mm3 and in 23.9 % ≥ 500 CD4 in 1 mm3. In 56.1 % of patients, first diagnosed tuberculosis was detected, 28.4 % had the relapse of tuberculosis, 7.7 % had tuberculosis after a previous ineffective treatment, 7.7 % had tuberculosis with treatment after the break. Bacterial excretion (by the scopic method was detected in 42.6 % of patients, by the bacteriological method – in 73.9 %, by the molecular-genetic method – in 93.2 %, typical

  10. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among HIV patients in Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Olusegun Akinbo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the presence of intestinal parasites and their correlation with CD4+ T-cell counts and demographics among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients in Benin City, Nigeria. Stool specimens from 2,000 HIV-positive patients and 500 controls (HIV-negative individuals were examined for ova, cysts, or parasites, using standard procedures. In addition, patient's blood samples were analyzed for CD4 counts by flow cytometry. An overall prevalence rate of 15.3% was observed among HIV-positive patients while 6.2% was noted among non-HIV subjects. HIV status was a significant (P<0.0001 risk factor for acquiring intestinal parasitic infections. Male gender, CD4 count <200cell/µl, and diarrhea were significantly associated with an increased prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among HIV-positive patients. The level of education, occupation, and source of water among HIV patients significantly (P<0.0001 affected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most predominant parasite in both HIV-positive patients and controls. A CD4 count <200 cells/µl was significantly associated with only Isospora belli and Cryptosporidium infections. The presence of pathogenic intestinal parasites such as A. lumbricoides, hookworm, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Trichuris trichiura, and Taenia species among HIV-infected persons should not be neglected. Cryptosporidium species and I. belli were the opportunistic parasites observed in this study. Routine screening for intestinal parasites in HIV-positive patients is advocated.

  11. HIV-Specific B Cell Frequency Correlates with Neutralization Breadth in Patients Naturally Controlling HIV-Infection

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    Angeline Rouers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs have been isolated from patients with high viremia but also from HIV controllers that repress HIV-1 replication. In these elite controllers (ECs, multiple parameters contribute to viral suppression, including genetic factors and immune responses. Defining the immune correlates associated with the generation of bnAbs may help in designing efficient immunotherapies. In this study, in ECs either positive or negative for the HLA-B*57 protective allele, in treated HIV-infected and HIV-negative individuals, we characterized memory B cell compartments and HIV-specific memory B cells responses using flow cytometry and ELISPOT. ECs preserved their memory B cell compartments and in contrast to treated patients, maintained detectable HIV-specific memory B cell responses. All ECs presented IgG1+ HIV-specific memory B cells but some individuals also preserved IgG2+ or IgG3+ responses. Importantly, we also analyzed the capacity of sera from ECs to neutralize a panel of HIV strains including transmitted/founder virus. 29% and 21% of HLA-B*57+ and HLA-B*57− ECs, respectively, neutralized at least 40% of the viral strains tested. Remarkably, in HLA-B*57+ ECs the frequency of HIV-Env-specific memory B cells correlated positively with the neutralization breadth suggesting that preservation of HIV-specific memory B cells might contribute to the neutralizing responses in these patients.

  12. Detection of free circulating Epstein-Barr virus DNA in plasma of patients with Hodgkin’s disease

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    Juliane Garcez Musacchio

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Free circulating Epstein-Barr virus (EBV DNA is often present in the plasma of Hodgkin’s disease patients. The aim here was to evaluate the prevalence of this finding, its correlation with the immunohistochemical expression of LMP-1 (latent membrane protein 1 and the influence of other clinical factors. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study in two public tertiary institutions: Hematology Service, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, and Oncology Service, Instituto Nacional do Câncer, Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: A cohort of 30 patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin’s disease was studied. The control group consisted of 13 healthy adult volunteers. EBV DNA was determined by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: The median age was 28 years, and 16 patients were women. Advanced disease was present in 19 patients, and six were HIV-positive. EBV DNA was present in the plasma of 13 patients and one control (43% versus 8%, p = 0.03. EBV DNA prevalence was higher in HIV-positive patients (100% versus 29%, p = 0.0007 and those with advanced disease (63% versus 9%, p = 0.006. Among HIV-negative patients alone, EBV DNA prevalence remained higher in those with advanced disease. EBV DNA was found in 10/11 patients with LMP-1 expression in the lymph nodes, and in 3/19 without LMP-1 expression (kappa coefficient = 0.72. CONCLUSION: EBV DNA was present in 91% of patients with EBV-associated Hodgkin’s disease, and in all patients with HIV-associated Hodgkin’s disease. EBV DNA prevalence was higher in patients with advanced disease, irrespective of HIV status.

  13. Birth Cohort Differences in Sexual Identity Development Milestones among HIV-Negative Gay and Bisexual Men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H Jonathon; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2017-10-12

    The coming-out process for gay and bisexual men (GBM) involves crossing sexual identity development (SID) milestones: (1) self-awareness of sexual attraction to the same sex, (2) self-acceptance of an identity as gay or bisexual, (3) disclosure of this sexual identity to others, and (4) having sex with someone of the same sex. We examined trends in SID milestones by birth cohort in a 2015 U.S. national sample of GBM (n = 1,023). Birth cohort was independent of when men first felt sexually attracted to someone of the same sex (median age 11 to 12). However, with the exception of age of first same-sex attraction, older cohorts tended to pass other milestones at later ages than younger cohorts. Latent class analysis (LCA) of SID milestone patterns identified three subgroups. The majority (84%) began sexual identity development with same-sex attraction around the onset of puberty (i.e., around age 10) and progressed to self-identification, same-sex sexual activity, and coming out-in that order. The other two classes felt same-sex attraction during teen years (ages 12.5 to 18.0) but achieved the remaining SID milestones later in life. For 13% of men, this was during early adulthood; for 3% of men, this was in middle adulthood. Findings highlight the need to monitor ongoing generational differences in passing SID milestones.

  14. Concomitant Mycobacterium avium infection and Hodgkin's disease in a lymph node from an HIV-negative child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Armas, Yaxsier; Capó, Virginia; González, Ida; Mederos, Lilian; Díaz, Raúl; de Waard, Jacobus H; Rodríguez, Alberto; García, Yarmila; Cabanas, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent child with simultaneously an infection with Mycobacterium avium and Hodgkin's disease in a cervical lymph node. A positive PCR result for M. avium on a biopsy of the lymph node directed the definitive diagnosis for both etiologies and avoided a possible dissemination of this infection after chemotherapy was started.

  15. Anal and penile high-risk human papillomavirus prevalence in HIV-negative and HIV-infected MSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aar, Fleur; Mooij, Sofie H.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Stolte, Ineke G.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Verhagen, Dominique W. M.; King, Audrey J.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2013-01-01

    Anal and penile high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with anogenital cancer, which is especially common in HIV-infected MSM. We assessed HPV prevalence and determinants in MSM. Analysis of baseline data from a prospective cohort study. MSM aged 18 years or older were

  16. Seroepidemiology of high-risk HPV in HIV-negative and HIV-infected MSM: the H2M study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Sofie H.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Schepp, Rutger M.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Bogaards, Johannes A.; de Melker, Hester E.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; van der Loeff, Maarten F. Schim

    2013-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM), in particular HIV-infected MSM, are at increased risk for diseases related to human papilloma virus (HPV). Our goal was to assess the effect of HIV status on the presence of type-specific antibodies against seven high-risk HPV types in HPV-unvaccinated MSM. Moreover,

  17. Risk Factors for High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Detection Among HIV-Negative and HIV-Positive Women From Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dartell, Myassa Arkam; Rasch, Vibeke; Munk, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. The prevalence is dependent on several known factors notably sexual behavior and age, and factors still under scrutiny....

  18. Gynaecological surgery in the HIV-positive patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa approximately 5 500 women are newly infected with HIV and more than 3 000 die from AIDS-related illnesses. In this ... of triple antiretroviral therapy, women living with HIV can now enjoy longer life ... There is a paucity of literature about the rate of complications after .... p=0.08) than their HIV-negative controls.6.

  19. Sputum is a surrogate for bronchoalveolar lavage for monitoring Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional profiles in TB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Benjamin J; Loxton, Andre G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Van, Tran T; Davis, J Lucian; de Jong, Bouke C; Voskuil, Martin I; Leach, Sonia M; Schoolnik, Gary K; Walzl, Gerhard; Strong, Michael; Walter, Nicholas D

    2016-09-01

    Pathogen-targeted transcriptional profiling in human sputum may elucidate the physiologic state of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) during infection and treatment. However, whether M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum recapitulates transcription in the lung is uncertain. We therefore compared M. tuberculosis transcription in human sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 11 HIV-negative South African patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We additionally compared these clinical samples with in vitro log phase aerobic growth and hypoxic non-replicating persistence (NRP-2). Of 2179 M. tuberculosis transcripts assayed in sputum and BAL via multiplex RT-PCR, 194 (8.9%) had a p-value <0.05, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing. Categorical enrichment analysis indicated that expression of the hypoxia-responsive DosR regulon was higher in BAL than in sputum. M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum was distinct from both aerobic growth and NRP-2, with a range of 396-1020 transcripts significantly differentially expressed after multiple testing correction. Collectively, our results indicate that M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum approximates M. tuberculosis transcription in the lung. Minor differences between M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum suggested lower oxygen concentrations or higher nitric oxide concentrations in BAL. M. tuberculosis-targeted transcriptional profiling of sputa may be a powerful tool for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and monitoring treatment responses in vivo. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Evidence of an increased pathogenic footprint in the lingual microbiome of untreated HIV infected patients

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    Dang Angeline T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opportunistic oral infections can be found in over 80% of HIV + patients, often causing debilitating lesions that also contribute to deterioration in nutritional health. Although appreciation for the role that the microbiota is likely to play in the initiation and/or enhancement of oral infections has grown considerably in recent years, little is known about the impact of HIV infection on host-microbe interactions within the oral cavity. In the current study, we characterize modulations in the bacterial composition of the lingual microbiome in patients with treated and untreated HIV infection. Bacterial species profiles were elucidated by microarray assay and compared between untreated HIV infected patients, HIV infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy, and healthy HIV negative controls. The relationship between clinical parameters (viral burden and CD4+ T cell depletion and the loss or gain of bacterial species was evaluated in each HIV patient group. Results In untreated HIV infection, elevated viremia was associated with significantly higher proportions of potentially pathogenic Veillonella, Prevotella, Megasphaera, and Campylobacter species in the lingual microbiome than observed in healthy controls. The upsurge in the prevalence of potential pathogens was juxtaposed by diminished representation of commensal Streptococcus and Veillonella species. Colonization of Neisseria flavescens was lower in the lingual microbiome of HIV infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy than in uninfected controls. Conclusions Our findings provide novel insights into the potential impact of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy on the community structure of the oral microbiome, and implicate potential mechanisms that may increase the capacity of non-commensal species to gain a stronger foothold.

  1. Which Patients in the Emergency Department Should Receive Preexposure Prophylaxis? Implementation of a Predictive Analytics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Jessica P; Almirol, Ellen A; Bender, Alvie; Richardson, Andrew; Schmitt, Jessica; Friedman, Eleanor; Lancki, Nicola; Leroux, Ivan; Pieroni, Nina; Dehlin, Jessica; Schneider, John A

    2018-04-19

    Emergency Departments (EDs) have the potential to play a crucial role in HIV prevention by identifying and linking high-risk HIV-negative clients to preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) care, but it is difficult to perform HIV risk assessment for all ED patients. We aimed to develop and implement an electronic risk score to identify ED patients who are potential candidates for PrEP. Using electronic medical record (EMR) data, we used logistic regression to model the outcome of PrEP eligibility. We converted the model into an electronic risk score and incorporated it into the EMR. The risk score is automatically calculated at triage. For patients whose risk score is above a given threshold, an automated electronic alert is sent to an HIV prevention counselor who performs real time HIV prevention counseling, risk assessment, and PrEP linkage as appropriate. The electronic risk score includes the following EMR variables: age, gender, gender of sexual partner, chief complaint, and positive test for sexually transmitted infection in the prior 6 months. A risk score ≥21 has specificity of 80.6% and sensitivity of 50%. In the first 5.5 months of implementation, the alert fired for 180 patients, 34.4% (62/180) of whom were women. Of the 51 patients who completed risk assessment, 68.6% (35/51) were interested in PrEP, 17.6% (9/51) scheduled a PrEP appointment, and 7.8% (4/51) successfully initiated PrEP. The measured number of successful PrEP initiations is likely an underestimate, as it does include patients who initiated PrEP with outside providers or referred acquaintances for PrEP care.

  2. Squamous cell dysplasia in the proximal rectum of three patients treated for ulcerative colitis on immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, James G; Goldstone, Stephen E

    2017-05-01

    Anal canal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) is the precursor to anal cancer. Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk and disease is usually within 3 cm from the anal verge. High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) with an 8-cm anoscope is used to identify and guide cautery treatment of HSIL. We report three patients with a long-term history of ulcerative colitis (UC) treated with systemic immunomodulators who developed proximally located rectal HSIL. Two patients were HIV-negative women, 63 and 48 years old, and the third was a 51-year-old HIV-positive man with underlying UC for 10, 16, and 3 years, respectively. They each presented with a HPV-positive HSIL visibly extending above the limits of the anoscope used for HRA. None developed cancer. All had episodes of active UC. It is unclear what causative role systemic immunomodulators play in predisposing UC patients to proximal HSIL. HSIL probably developed on a tongue of HPV-infected squamous epithelium growing proximally over the inflamed rectum. Islands developed when areas of squamous epithelium degenerated, creating skip areas. This study highlights the potential for HSIL to extend into the rectum either as a contiguous patch or isolated islands and the need for heightened surveillance in patients with extensive anal canal HSIL treated with immunodulator therapy. HSIL identified at the limit of the anoscope should be investigated further with colonoscopy, and argon plasma coagulation (APC) ablation can serve as an effective treatment option. Patients are at risk for stricture, but it is unclear what role the UC or the ablation played in stricture formation.

  3. Primary Effusion Lymphoma Involving both Pleural and Abdominal Cavities in a Patient with Hepatitis B Virus-related Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Hsieh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is characterized by lymphomatous effusion in body cavities, but no associated mass lesions. It is usually associated with an immunodeficient state most often with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. We describe a 54-year-old man with HIV-negative PEL, with a history of hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis. Both abdominal and pleural cavities were involved; no solid tumor masses were found and bone marrow investigations were normal. The ascites and pleural effusion contained numerous pleomorphic lymphoid cells. Immunophenotyping was positive for CD138. Chromosome study showed complex cytogenetics. The genomic human herpesvirus-8 was detected in the lymphoma cells. It is postulated that the immuno-suppressed state in this patient may have been caused by cirrhosis. The patient received four cycles of chemotherapy of CHOP and Picibanil (OK-432 intraperitoneal administration. However, no durable remission was achieved. Adefovir failed to halt the progressive liver failure after the development of YMDD mutant related to lamivudine. He died of sepsis and hepatic failure.

  4. Intestinal Parasitic Infections in HIV Infected and Non-Infected Patients in a Low HIV Prevalence Region, West-Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenfou, Céline Nguefeu; Nana, Christelle Tafou; Payne, Vincent Khan

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients requires careful consideration in the developing world where poor nutrition is associated with poor hygiene and several tropical diseases. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Cameroon. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Dschang -Cameroon. Stool and blood specimens from HIV/AIDS patients and control group were screened respectively for intestinal parasites and for HIV antibodies. Intestinal parasites were identified using direct microscopy, formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl Neelsen methods. Out of 396 participants recruited among patients consulting at hospital, 42 (10.6%) were HIV positive, thirty of them treatment naïve. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 14.64%. Out of 42 HIV/AIDS patients, 59.5% (25/42) were infected with intestinal parasites, while only 9.32% (33/354) of the HIV negative patients were infected with intestinal parasites. The parasites detected in our study population included Crystosporidium parvum (2.53%), Entamoeba histolytica (7.52%), Entamoeba coli (4.04%), Giardia lamblia (0.25%), Trichuris trichura (0.25%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%). In the HIV infected group, Crystosporidium parvum (19.04%), Entamoeba histolytica (19.04%), Entamoeba coli (21.42%), Giardia lamblia (2.38%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25%) and Taenia spp. (0.25%) were found. Crystosporidium parvum was found to be significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients than in controls (Pintestinal parasitosis. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the HIV patients by contributing in reducing morbidity and improving the efficiency of antiretroviral treatment. Even after the introduction of free anti-retroviral drugs, opportunistic intestinal infections are still a threat. HIV patients should be screened

  5. [Epidemiology of bacillary pulmonary tuberculosis according to HIV status of patients followed in the department of infectious diseases Conakry (Guinea)].

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    Traoré, F A; Sako, F B; Sylla, D; Bangoura, M; Kpamy, D O; Traoré, M; Doumbouya, M; Sangare, I

    2014-12-01

    Despite many efforts of prevention and the availability of free treatment, TB/HIV co-infection is still rampant in Guinea. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis according to HIV status among patients hospitalized in the infectious diseases department of Conakry University Hospital. This was a descriptive and analytical retrospective study of patient records admitted for pulmonary tuberculosis from January 2003 to December 2012. During this period, 1953 cases of tuberculosis were collected of which 346 (17.7%) were smear positive. There was a marked male predominance (59.7%). The average age was 38 ± 11 years. The majority of patients originated from the suburbs of Conakry and its surrounding prefectures (76.7%). People without profession were most represented (40.7%). A level of primary education was the most frequently reported (39.7%). Out of 325 patients tested for HIV, the serology was positive in 185 patients (56.9%). A contact with a TB patient was reported in 21.4% of HIV negative patients, and in 6.5% of the HIV-positive group (p = 0.0006). There was no difference between the two groups regarding clinical signs and symptoms. The mean CD4 count was comparable in both groups (p = 0.05). Lethality was higher among co-infected patients (30.4% against 15.56%; p = 0.00037). Strengthening the prevention of TB among PLWHA by the administration of isoniazide seems necessary and warrants further study on this subject in Guinea.

  6. Seroprevalence of Epstein-Barr virus among HIV positive patients moreover and its association with CD4 positive lymphocyte count.

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    Alireza Abdollahi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic infections are the leading cause of hospitalization and morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients and are the most common cause of death between them. We aimed to measure IgG antibody against EBV viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA IgG to determine the seroprevalence of this infection in HIV-positive population. A case-control study between September 2011 and October 2012 was conducted in a teaching hospital enrolling 114 HIV-positive patients as case group and 114 healthy individuals as control with similar age and sex. Enzyme-linked immunosurbant assay (ELISA technique was used for determination of EBV-VAC IgG in obtained samples. Of 114 serum samples obtained from HIV-positive patients, 103 (90.4% samples were found positive for EBV-VCA IgG antibody. There was no significant difference in seroprevalence of EBV VCA IgG antibody between patients received antiretroviral therapy and naive patients (91.5% vs. 87.5%, P>0.05. There was no statistically significant difference in EBV-VCA IgG seroprevalence between three groups of CD4+ in HIV positive group. In conclusion current study showed that seroprevalence of EBV in HIV-positive patients is higher than HIV-negative healthy participants; however, administration of HAART and CD4+ lymphocyte count did not reveal a significant effect in seroprevalence of EBV. Due to the significance of this virus in mortality and morbidity and causing certain malignancies in patients with AIDS, these patients are strongly recommended to be tested for this virus.

  7. Protein carbonyl content: a novel biomarker for aging in HIV/AIDS patients.

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    Kolgiri, Vaishali; Patil, Vinayak Wamanrao

    The major complications of "treated" Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are cardiovascular disease, malignancy, renal disease, liver disease, bone disease, and perhaps neurological complications, which are phenomena of the normal aging process occurring at an earlier age in the HIV-infected population. The present study is aimed to explore protein carbonyl content as a biomarker for detecting oxidative DNA damage induced ART toxicity and/or accelerated aging in HIV/AIDS patients. To investigate the potential of carbonyl content as a biomarker for detecting oxidative Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage induced Antiretroviral Theraphy (ART) toxicity and/or accelerated aging in HIV/AIDS patients. In this case-control study a total 600 subjects were included. All subjects were randomly selected and grouped as HIV-negative (control group) (n=300), HIV-infected ART naive (n=100), HIV-infected on first line ART (n=100), and HIV-infected on second line ART (n=100). Seronegative control subjects were age- and sex-matched with the ART naive patients and the two other groups. Carbonyl protein was determined by the method described in Levine et al. DNA damage marker 8-OH-dG was determined using 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy Guanosine StressXpress ELA Kit by StressMarq Biosciences. Protein carbonyl content levels and oxidative DNA damage were significantly higher (paging in HIV/AIDS patients. Larger studies are warranted to elucidate the role of carbonyl content as a biomarker for premature aging in HIV/AIDS patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Hepatitis delta virus infection in a large cohort of chronic hepatitis B patients in Ethiopia.

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    Aberra, Hanna; Gordien, Emmanuel; Desalegn, Hailemichael; Berhe, Nega; Medhin, Girmay; Mekasha, Bitsatab; Gundersen, Svein G; Gerber, Athenaïs; Stene-Johansen, Kathrine; Øverbø, Joakim; Johannessen, Asgeir

    2018-06-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection is associated with a more severe outcome in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB); however, little is known about the presence of HDV in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to determine the prevalence of HDV infection, as well as its clinical, biological and virological characteristics, in a large CHB cohort in Ethiopia. In total, 1267 HIV-negative CHB patients at St. Paul's Hospital Millennium Medical College in Addis Ababa were screened for anti-HDV antibodies using ELISA assays. Confirmed positive samples were further tested for HDV RNA using a consensus commercial real-time RT-PCR assay. HDV genotypes were also determined for RNA-positive samples by nucleotide sequencing followed by phylogenetic analyses. Demographical, clinical and biological data from patients were recorded and compared based on HDV RNA results. Most patients (n = 748, 59.0%) were men, and the median age was 31 years (interquartile range 26-40). Anti-HDV antibodies were detected in 19 individuals (1.5%), 12 of whom were HDV RNA-positive with a viral load ranging from 8 log 10 IU/mL. All strains were genotype 1. HDV RNA-positive patients were more likely to have significant liver fibrosis (63.6% vs 24.7%, P = .007) and cirrhosis (45.5% vs 16.4%, P = .024). HDV infection is rare in Ethiopia but is associated with more advanced liver fibrosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prevalence of Vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency in HIV-positive patients and its association with neuropsychiatric symptoms and immunological response.

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    Adhikari, Prabha M R; Chowta, Mukta N; Ramapuram, John T; Rao, Satish; Udupa, Karthik; Acharya, Sahana Devdas

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of micronutrients is prevalent even before the development of symptoms of HIV disease and is associated with accelerated HIV disease progression. This study evaluates the prevalence of folate and Vitamin B 12 deficiency in HIV-positive patients with or without tuberculosis (TB) and its association with neuropsychiatric symptoms and immunological response. Cross-sectional, observational study in an outpatient setting. Four groups of HIV-positive patients with TB (Group I), HIV-positive patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (Group II), HIV-positive patients without neuropsychiatric symptoms or TB (Group III), and HIV-negative controls with neuropsychiatric symptoms (Group IV). Vitamin B 12 and folate estimation was done using carbonyl metallo-immunoassay method. ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney, Pearson's correlation. The prevalence of folic acid deficiency was 27.1% in the Group I, 31.9% in the Group II, 23.4% in the Group III, and 32% in the Group IV being higher in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms in both HIV and non-HIV patients. The prevalence of Vitamin B 12 deficiency was 18.8% in Group I, 9.1% in Group II, 4.8% in Group III, and 16.7% in Group IV. The patients with folate deficiency had more severe depression and anxiety. Nearly, 30% of the HIV patients had a folic acid deficiency, and about 10% of the HIV patients had Vitamin B 12 deficiency. The folate deficiency was highest among neuropsychiatric patients with or without HIV infection and Vitamin B 12 deficiency was higher among HIV patients with TB.

  10. Economic costs and health-related quality of life outcomes of hospitalised patients with high HIV prevalence: A prospective hospital cohort study in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswaran, Hendramoorthy; Petrou, Stavros; Cohen, Danielle; MacPherson, Peter; Kumwenda, Felistas; Lalloo, David G; Corbett, Elizabeth L; Clarke, Aileen

    2018-01-01

    Although HIV infection and its associated co-morbidities remain the commonest reason for hospitalisation in Africa, their impact on economic costs and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are not well understood. This information is essential for decision-makers to make informed choices about how to best scale-up anti-retroviral treatment (ART) programmes. This study aimed to quantify the impact of HIV infection and ART on economic outcomes in a prospective cohort of hospitalised patients with high HIV prevalence. Sequential medical admissions to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Malawi, between June-December 2014 were followed until discharge, with standardised classification of medical diagnosis and estimation of healthcare resources used. Primary costing studies estimated total health provider cost by medical diagnosis. Participants were interviewed to establish direct non-medical and indirect costs. Costs were adjusted to 2014 US$ and INT$. HRQoL was measured using the EuroQol EQ-5D. Multivariable analyses estimated predictors of economic outcomes. Of 892 eligible participants, 80.4% (647/892) were recruited and medical notes found. In total, 447/647 (69.1%) participants were HIV-positive, 339/447 (75.8%) were on ART prior to admission, and 134/647 (20.7%) died in hospital. Mean duration of admission for HIV-positive participants not on ART and HIV-positive participants on ART was 15.0 days (95%CI: 12.0-18.0) and 12.2 days (95%CI: 10.8-13.7) respectively, compared to 10.8 days (95%CI: 8.8-12.8) for HIV-negative participants. Mean total provider cost per hospital admission was US$74.78 (bootstrap 95%CI: US$25.41-US$124.15) higher for HIV-positive than HIV-negative participants. Amongst HIV-positive participants, the mean total provider cost was US$106.87 (bootstrap 95%CI: US$25.09-US$106.87) lower for those on ART than for those not on ART. The mean total direct non-medical and indirect cost per hospital admission was US$87.84. EQ-5D utility scores were lower

  11. Comparação das contagens das células de Langerhans de tecidos contendo carcinoma anal em doentes com e sem infecção pelo HIV Comparison of Langerhans cells counts from tissues containing anal carcinoma of patients with and without HIV infection

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    Sidney Roberto Nadal

    2006-09-01

    number of T cells that infiltrate the tumor, preventing regression. OBJETIVE: Our proposal was to know what are the differences among LC counts comparing HIV-positive and -negative patients with anal carcinoma. METHOD: We evaluated 24 patients, 14 with HIV and 10 HIV-negative. Treatment for carcinoma was similar in both groups. Paraffin blocks containing biopsies were cut and stained with antibody anti-CD68. LC were counted in a histometrical way and number were compared to previous known specimens of HIV-negative patients without infectious anorectal diseases. We also studied cancer evolution and T CD4+ lymphocytes blood counts of HIV-positive patients. RESULTS: Statistics showed that anal carcinomas were more frequent in females HIV-negative and in seropositive males. HIV-positive patients were younger than seronegative ones. LC were decreased in seropositive patients and the most numerous counts were associated to worse prognosis. HIV-positive patients who had the most decreased T CD4+ counts had the worst prognosis, too. CONCLUSION: We conclude that LC were decreased in HIV-positive patients with anal carcinoma rather than in seronegative.

  12. Antiretroviral therapy-induced insulin resistance and oxidative deoxy nucleic acid damage in human immunodeficiency virus-1 patients

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    Vaishali Kolgiri Honnapurmath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Insulin resistance (IR is frequent in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and may be related to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Increased oxidative stress parameters and carbonyl protein are linked to insulin sensitivity. The present study is aimed to determine IR, its association with oxidative deoxy nucleic acid (DNA damage in HIV-1-infected patients with different ART status. Materials and Methods: In this case–control study, a total 600 subjects were included. We used plasma levels of the oxidized base, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, as our biomarker of oxidative DNA damage. 8-OHdG was measured with the highly sensitive 8-OHdG check enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. IR was determined using homeostasis model assessment. Results: All subjects were randomly selected and grouped as HIV-negative (control group (n = 300, HIV-positive without ART (n = 100, HIV-positive with ART first line (n = 100, and HIV-positive with ART second line (n = 100. IR and oxidative DNA damage were significantly higher in HIV-positive patients with second-line ART and HIV-positive patients with first-line ART than ART-naive patients. In a linear regression analysis, increased IR was positively associated with the increased DNA damage (odds ratio: 3.052, 95% confidence interval: 2.595–3.509 P < 0.001. Interpretation and Conclusions: In this study, we observed that ART plays a significant role in the development of IR and oxidative DNA damage in HIV-positive patients taking ART. Awareness and knowledge of these biomarkers may prove helpful to clinicians while prescribing ART to HIV/AIDS patients. Larger studies are warranted to determine the exact role of ART in the induction of IR and DNA damage.

  13. MRI signal changes of the bone marrow in HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy: correlation with clinical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Ana I.; Tomas, Xavier; Pomes, Jaume; Amo, Montserrat del; Milinkovic, Ana; Perez, Inaki; Mallolas, Josep; Rios, Jose; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    To assess the prevalence, imaging appearance, and clinical significance, of bone marrow MR signal changes in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy syndrome. Twenty-eight HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy syndrome treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy, and 12 HIV-negative controls underwent MRI of the legs. Whole-body MRI, SPECT/CT, and a complete radiographic skeletal survey were obtained in subjects with signal changes in bone marrow. MRI and clinical evaluations were reviewed 6 months after baseline to determine changes after switching from thymidine analogs (TA) to tenofovir-DF (TDF). MRI results correlated with clinical parameters. We observed foci of a serous-like pattern (low signal and no enhancement on T1-weighted, high signal on T2-weighted images) in 4 out of 28 patients (14.3%) and an intermediate signal on T1-weighted images in 4 out of 28 patients (14.3%). Serous-like lesions were located in the lower limbs and scattered in the talus, calcaneus, femurs, and humeral bones; they showed slight uptake on SPECT bone scans and were normal on CT and radiographs. Patients with serous-like lesions had significantly lower peripheral and total fat at baseline than other groups (P < 0.05). No changes at 6 months were observed on MRI, and the serous-like lesion group showed good peripheral fat recovery after changing drug treatment. A serous-like MRI pattern is observed in the peripheral skeletons of HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy, which correlates with peripheral lipoatrophy, and should not be misdiagnosed as malignant or infectious diseases. Although the MR lesions did not improve after switching the treatment, there was evidence of lipoatrophy recovery. (orig.)

  14. Role and interpretation of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography in HIV-infected patients with fever of unknown origin: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C; Castaigne, C; Tondeur, M; Flamen, P; De Wit, S

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate prospectively the usefulness of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in investigation of fever of unknown origin (FUO) in HIV-positive patients and to determine whether HIV viraemia impacts on FDG-PET/CT performance. The FDG-PET/CT results of 20 HIV-infected patients with FUO were analysed and compared with the FDG-PET/CT results of 10 HIV-infected viraemic patients without FUO. The performance of FDG-PET/CT for identifying the aetiology of FUO was assessed. Final diagnosis for FUO was based on histopathology, microbiological assays, or clinical and imaging follow-up. FDG-PET/CT contributed to the diagnosis or exclusion of a focal aetiology of the febrile state in 80% of patients with FUO. The presence of increased FDG uptake in the central lymph node has 100% specificity for focal aetiology of fever, even in viraemic patients. The absence of hypermetabolic central lymph nodes in FUO patients has 100% negative predictive value for focal disease. Lymph node biopsy in central hypermetabolic areas allowed, in 100% of cases, identification of underlying disease in patients with FUO. Biopsy of peripheral lymph nodes should be performed in lymph nodes with maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) ≥ 6-8 (sensitivity 62.5%; specificity 75%) and avoided in lymph nodes with SUVmax = 0-4 (specificity 0%). High HIV viraemia does not prevent correct interpretation of FDG-PET/CT. As in HIV-negative patients, we confirm the usefulness of FDG-PET/CT in investigation of FUO in HIV-positive patients even if they are viraemic. © 2013 British HIV Association.

  15. A prospective descriptive study of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV uninfected patients in Vietnam - high prevalence of Cryptococcus neoformans var grubii in the absence of underlying disease

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    Baker Stephen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cases of cryptococcal meningitis occur in patients with HIV infection: the course and outcome of disease in the apparently immunocompetent is much more poorly understood. We describe a cohort of HIV uninfected Vietnamese patients with cryptococcal meningitis in whom underlying disease is uncommon, and relate presenting features of patients and the characteristics of the infecting species to outcome. Methods A prospective descriptive study of HIV negative patients with cryptococcal meningitis based at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City. All patients had comprehensive clinical assessment at baseline, were cared for by a dedicated study team, and were followed up for 2 years. Clinical presentation was compared by infecting isolate and outcome. Results 57 patients were studied. Cryptococcus neoformans var grubii molecular type VN1 caused 70% of infections; C. gattii accounted for the rest. Most patients did not have underlying disease (81%, and the rate of underlying disease did not differ by infecting species. 11 patients died while in-patients (19.3%. Independent predictors of death were age ≥ 60 years and a history of convulsions (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals 8.7 (1 - 76, and 16.1 (1.6 - 161 respectively. Residual visual impairment was common, affecting 25 of 46 survivors (54.3%. Infecting species did not influence clinical phenotype or outcome. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of flucytosine and amphotericin B were significantly higher for C. neoformans var grubii compared with C. gattii (p Conclusion In HIV uninfected individuals in Vietnam, cryptococcal meningitis occurs predominantly in people with no clear predisposing factor and is most commonly due to C. neoformans var grubii. The rates of mortality and visual loss are high and independent of infecting species. There are detectable differences in susceptibility to commonly used antifungal drugs between species, but the clinical

  16. Occult Hepatitis B Virus infection in ART-Naive HIV-Infected Patients seen at a Tertiary Care Centre in North India

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    Singh Sarman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-infections of hepatitis B and C viruses are frequent with HIV due to shared routes of transmission. In most of the tertiary care health settings, HIV reactive patients are routinely tested for HBsAg and anti-HCV antibodies to rule out these co-infections. However, using the routine serological markers one can only detect active HBV infection while the occult HBV infection may be missed. There is insufficient data from India on HIV-HBV co-infection and even scarce on occult HBV infection in this group. Methods We estimated the burden of HBV infection in patients who were tested positive for HIV at a tertiary care centre in north India. We also attempted to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of occult HBV infection among these treatment-naïve patients and compare their demographic features with other HIV patients. During a period of 6 years between January 2002 to December 2007, 837 HIV positive patients (631 males and 206 females (M: F :: 3.06:1 were tested for serological markers of HBV (HBsAg and HCV (anti-HCV antibodies infections in our laboratory. For comparison 1000 apparently healthy, HIV-negative organ donors were also included in the study. Data on demographics, sexual behaviour, medical history, laboratory tests including the serum ALT and CD4 count of these patients were recorded. A sub-group of 53 HBsAg negative samples from HIV positive patients were assessed for anti-HBs, anti-HBc total (IgG+IgM and HBV-DNA using a highly sensitive qualitative PCR and analysed retrospectively. Results Overall, 7.28% of HIV positive patients showed presence of HBsAg as compared to 1.4% in the HIV negative control group. The prevalence of HBsAg was higher (8.55% in males than females (3.39%. The study revealed that occult HBV infection with detectable HBV-DNA was prevalent in 24.5% of patients positive for anti-HBc antibodies; being 45.5% in HBsAg negative patients. Most importantly the occult infection was

  17. Diagnosis and interim treatment outcomes from the first cohort of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients in Tanzania.

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    Stellah G Mpagama

    Full Text Available Kibong'oto National Tuberculosis Hospital (KNTH, Kilimanjaro, Tanzania.Characterize the diagnostic process and interim treatment outcomes from patients treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in Tanzania.A retrospective cohort study was performed among all patients treated at KNTH for pulmonary MDR-TB between November 2009 and September 2011.Sixty-one culture-positive MDR-TB patients initiated therapy, 60 (98% with a prior history of TB treatment. Forty-one (67% were male and 9 (14% were HIV infected with a mean CD4 count of 424 (±106 cells/µl. The median time from specimen collection to MDR-TB diagnosis and from diagnosis to initiation of MDR-TB treatment was 138 days (IQR 101-159 and 131 days (IQR 32-233, respectively. Following treatment initiation four (7% patients died (all HIV negative, 3 (5% defaulted, and the remaining 54 (89% completed the intensive phase. Most adverse drug reactions were mild to moderate and did not require discontinuation of treatment. Median time to culture conversion was 2 months (IQR 1-3 and did not vary by HIV status. In 28 isolates available for additional second-line drug susceptibility testing, fluoroquinolone, aminoglycoside and para-aminosalicylic acid resistance was rare yet ethionamide resistance was present in 9 (32%.The majority of MDR-TB patients from this cohort had survived a prolonged referral process, had multiple episodes of prior TB treatment, but did not have advanced AIDS and converted to culture negative early while completing an intensive inpatient regimen without serious adverse event. Further study is required to determine the clinical impact of second-line drug susceptibility testing and the feasibility of alternatives to prolonged hospitalization.

  18. Indicações e achados das colonoscopias nos doentes HIV-positivo: comparação com soronegativos Indications and results of colonoscopies in HIV-positive patients: comparison with seronegative patients

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    Carmen Ruth Manzione

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Embora as indicações da colonoscopia sejam semelhantes em doentes HIV-positivo, quando comparados aos soronegativos, os achados e as suas incidências parecem diferir, sendo alguns deles mais específicos para o grupo dos imunodeprimidos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar as indicações e os achados das colonoscopias comparando os doentes soropositivos com os soronegativos para o HIV. Realizamos 1909 exames entre 1997 e 2005, sendo 1341 HIV-negativo (771 mulheres e 570 homens com média etária de 51,2 anos e 568 HIV-positivo (137 mulheres e 431 homens com 34,4 anos, em média. A análise estatística dos dados estudados revelou haver mais exames em homens no grupo HIV-positivo e em mulheres entre os soronegativos. O grupo mais jovem foi o dos soropositivos. Houve mais indicações devidas a enterorragia (22,1% e dor abdominal (12,7% nos pacientes soronegativos, e diarréia crônica (45,9% entre os soropositivos. As colites e os tumores foram os achados mais comuns em pacientes HIV-positivo e a moléstia diverticular e os pólipos, os mais freqüentes entre os soronegativos. O tumor predominante nos soronegativos foi o adenocarcinoma, enquanto que entre os soropositivos foi o sarcoma de Kaposi. CONCLUSÃO: A comparação entre os grupos demonstrou haver diferenças com relação ao sexo, idade e algumas indicações. Os achados foram semelhantes, embora com freqüências distintas.Although colonoscopy indications are similar in HIV-positive patients when compared to sero-negative persons, the findings and their incidences seem to be different, and some are more specific to immunosuppressed patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate indications and findings of colonoscopies comparing patients, sero-negatives and sero-positives to HIV. We performed 1909 colonoscopies from 1997 to 2005, 1341 in HIV-negative persons (771 females and 570 males with mean age of 51.2 years old and 568 in HIV-positive people (137 females and 431 males with mean age of 34.4 years

  19. [Prevalence of HIV-Tuberculosis co-infection and HIV impact on patients with tuberculosis in the Lubumbashi Health Zone from 2014 to 2015].

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    Wa Ilunga, E N; Muya, R K; Kaponda, A A; Kaput, C M A; Kalonji, S M; Chiribagula, V B; Nshikala, B N; N'sasi, A N; Simbi, J-B L

    2018-02-01

    Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS are a dangerous couple in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the prevalence of the co-infection tuberculosis/HIV/AIDS and its impact on issues of tuberculosis patients treated in Lubumbashi Heath Zone (LHZ). A retrospective and transversal study was conducted through the analysis of tuberculosis patients' data admitted in the tuberculosis Health Centers for Diagnosis and treatment (HCDT) in the LHZ from January 2014 to December 2015. TB-HIV co-infection cases will be identified and the outcome will be analyzed. Data of 1368 patients were noted from three HCDT of the TB of the Lubumbashi ZS and among them 334 cases of co-infections were recorded. The most incriminated age range is 40-50 years. The mean of age of our patients is 32.84±15.32 years and the man/women sex ratio is 1.70. The most predominant clinical tuberculosis form is the extra pulmonary [EPT (52.70 %)]. Among co-infected patients, the predominant form is pulmonary (TPM-). Out of the 51 cases of deaths recorded, 23 (45.10 %) also had HIV while 28 (54.90 %) were HIV-negative. There was an increase of 11.6 % in TB-HIV/AIDS co-infection from 2014 to 2015. TB-HIV/AIDS co-infection is a reality in the LHZ, especially in patients with negative bacterial TB (TPM-) and we have to pay a particular attention on the impact of HIV on the death of tuberculosis patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Total Delay Is Associated with Unfavorable Treatment Outcome among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia: A Prospective Cohort Study.

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    Senedu Bekele Gebreegziabher

    Full Text Available delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB may worsen the disease, increase mortality and enhance transmission in the community. This study aimed at assessing the association between total delay and unfavorable treatment outcome among newly diagnosed pulmonary TB (PTB patients.A prospective cohort study was conducted in West Gojjam Zone, Amhara Region of Ethiopia from October 2013 to May 2015. Newly diagnosed PTB patients who were ≥15 years of age were consecutively enrolled in the study from 30 randomly selected public health facilities. Total delay (the time period from onset of TB symptoms to first start of anti-TB treatment was measured. Median total delay was calculated. Mixed effect logistics regression was used to analyze factors associated with unfavorable treatment outcome.Seven hundred six patients were enrolled in the study. The median total delay was 60 days. Patients with total delay of > 60 days were more likely to have unfavorable TB treatment outcome than patients with total delay of ≤ 60 days (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-5.26. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive TB patients were 8.46 times more likely to experience unfavorable treatment outcome than HIV negative TB patients (AOR, 8.46; 95% CI, 3.14-22.79.Long total delay and TB/HIV coinfection were associated with unfavorable treatment outcome. Targeted interventions that can reduce delay in diagnosis and treatment of TB, and early comprehensive management of TB/HIV coinfection are needed to reduce increased risk of unfavorable treatment outcome.

  1. Evaluation of coronary features of HIV patients presenting with ACS: The CUORE, a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyracchia, Mattia; De Lio, Giulia; Montrucchio, Chiara; Omedè, Pierluigi; d'Ettore, Gabriella; Calcagno, Andrea; Vullo, Vincenzo; Cerrato, Enrico; Pennacchi, Mauro; Sardella, Gennaro; Manga, Pravin; GrossoMarra, Walter; Vullo, Francesco; Fedele, Francesco; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Moretti, Claudio; Vachiat, Ahmed; Bonora, Stefano; Rinaldi, Mauro; Mancone, Massimo; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio

    2018-05-05

    The risk of recurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) in HIV patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is well known, but there is limited evidence about potential differences in coronary plaques compared to non-HIV patients. In this multicenter case-control study, HIV patients presenting with ACS, with intravascular-ultrasound (IVUS) data, enrolled between February 2015 and June 2017, and undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), were retrospectively compared to non-HIV patients presenting with ACS, before and after propensity score with matching, randomly selected from included centers. Primary end-point was the prevalence of multivessel disease. Secondary end-points were the prevalence of abnormal features at IVUS, the incidence of major-acute-cardiovascular-events (MACE), a composite end point of cardiovascular death, MI, target lesion revascularization (TLR), stent thrombosis (ST), non-cardiac death and target vessel revascularization (TVR). For each end-point, a subgroup analysis was conducted in HIV patients with CD4 cell count <200/mm 3 . Before propensity score, 66 HIV patients and 120 non-HIV patients were selected, resulting in 20 and 40 after propensity score. Patients with multivessel disease were 11 and 17, respectively (p = 0.56). IVUS showed a lower plaque burden (71% vs. 75%, p < 0.001) and a higher prevalence of hyperechoic non-calcified plaques (100% vs. 35%, p < 0.05) in HIV patients; a higher prevalence of hypoechoic plaques (7% vs. 0%, p < 0.05), a higher incidence of MACE (17.4% vs. 9.1% vs. l'8.0%, p < 0.05), MI recurrence (17.2% vs. 0.0% vs. 2.3%, p < 0.05), and ST (6.7% vs. 0.3% vs. 03%, p < 0.05) in HIV patients with CD4 < 200/mm 3 . Our study may provide a part of the pathophysiological basis of the differences in coronary arteries between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients, suggesting that the former present with peculiar morphological features at IVUS, even after adjustment for clinical variables

  2. Primary effusion lymphoma in an elderly patient effectively treated by lenalidomide: case report and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antar, A; El Hajj, H; Jabbour, M; Khalifeh, I; EL-Merhi, F; Mahfouz, R; Bazarbachi, A

    2014-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare aggressive subset of non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma. It is caused by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus type 8 (KSHV/HHV8). It occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in HIV-positive patients. PEL predominantly develops in serous cavities and occasionally in extracavitary regions. PEL carries a very poor prognosis with a median survival time of <6 months. Indeed, currently used treatment modalities such as CHOP chemotherapy are far from achieving complete and sustainable remission. Therefore, there is no clear standard of care established in the treatment of PEL patients, stressing the need for novel-targeted approaches. Here, we have attempted a comprehensive assessment of the treatment of PEL, discussed avant-garde therapies and updated the state of preclinical research with promising clinical applications in the field. These include inhibitors of viral replication, modulators of cell signaling and inflammation, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and histone deacetylase inhibitors, and recently the combination of arsenic trioxide and interferon-alpha. Some of these targeted therapies have not yet reached clinical studies, although others were used in a few individual case reports with low numbers of patients. We also describe the first case of a 77-year-old, HIV-negative, HHV8-positive patient diagnosed with PEL limited to the pleural and peritoneal cavities. He received lenalidomide 25 mg/day for 21 days every 28 days. Treatment was well tolerated with no side effects. He rapidly improved after 1 month of treatment and progressively achieved complete remission persistent after 18 months of therapy. We believe that this review will bridge an important gap between classical chemotherapy and modern approaches of targeted therapy. Finally, our findings warrant further evaluation of lenalidomide in future prospective clinical studies

  3. Physical activity and capacity at initiation of antiretroviral treatment in HIV patients in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mette Frahm; Kæstel, Pernille; Tesfaye, M

    2015-01-01

    with combined heart rate and movement sensors. Physical capacity was assessed by grip strength, sleeping heart rate and heart rate economy. Grip strength data was also available from a sex- and age-matched HIV-negative reference group. Median PAEE was 27·9 (interquartile range 17·4-39·8) kJ/kg per day and mean...

  4. Posterior fossa midline cryptococcoma in a patient with idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL is a rare disorder which is often diagnosed as HIV-negative AIDS in the light of poor immunity and AIDS-defining illnesses. We present a case of a 50-year-old male who presented with a midline posterior fossa tumour with ICL diagnosed as cerebellar cryptococcoma.

  5. Case study documenting the diagnosis of idiopathic CD4+ Lymphocytopenia in a patient with atypical fungal infection (disseminated blastomycosis by FNA of adrenal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siderits Richard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic CD4+ lymphocytopenia, described in 1992 by the Centers for Disease Control, is characterized by persistent CD4+ lymphocytopenia (less than 300 cells per micro-liter in nonimmunosuppressed, HIV negative individuals, who present with atypical infections. This rare though likely undiagnosed entity is associated with chronic disseminated forms of either fungal or bacterial infections in otherwise healthy adults. We report a case of a 59-year-old male with ring-enhancing brain lesions, bilateral adrenal masses, lung and vocal cord nodules, where the diagnosis of exclusion was metastatic malignancy. Fine needle aspiration (FNA of the adrenal mass and a subsequent vocal cord biopsy confirmed chronic widely disseminated blastomycosis. Flow cytometric evaluation of peripheral blood documented persistent selective CD4+ lymphocytopenia with T8 (suppressor T-Lymphocyte count within normal range. We believe that idiopathic CD4+ lymphocytopenia is an important etiologic factor to be considered for patients who present with mass lesions and are diagnosed by FNA with atypical fungal infections. We relate the diagnostic criteria for idiopathic CD4+ lymphocytopenia and the importance of providing on-site triage for FNA samples for fungal studies and correlation for flow cytometry.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus/human parvovirus B19 co-infection in blood donors and AIDS patients in Sichuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Miao; Zhu, Jiang; Yin, Huimin; Ke, Ling; Gao, Lei; Pan, Zhihong; Yang, Xiuhua; Li, Wuping

    2012-01-01

    Background Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a common pathogen which causes a variety of diseases. Persistent B19 infection is related to the degree of host immunodeficiency in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, the existence, loading, virus evolution and distribution of B19 in Chinese HIV-positive patients have not been determined. Materials and methods. We investigated 573 HIV-positive blood donors and AIDS patients in Sichuan, China in the last two decades. Bl9-specific serology and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were used to determine the prevalence of B19/HIV co-infection. Viral genome fragments were subjected to phylogeny and haplotype analysis. Results B19 genomic DNA was found in 26 of 573 (4.5%) HIV-positive individuals, a higher prevalence than in blood donors. DNA levels ranged from 5.3×102–1.1×105 copies/mL. The seroprevalence of IgG was significantly lower in HIV-positive samples than in HIV-negative blood donors, indicating deficient production of B19-specific IgG in the former. The B19 isolates were genotype-1 subtype B19-1A which formed a monophyletic group; seven distinct haplotypes were discovered with 60% of the B19/HIV co-infected variants sharing one central haplotype. Discussion. This study on the prevalence, phylogeny and distribution of human parvovirus B19 in Sichuan, China, demonstrates the persistence of B19 in the circulation of both immunocompetent and immunocompromised subjects, with implications for blood safety. PMID:22790259

  7. The distribution of sexually-transmitted Human Papillomaviruses in HIV positive and negative patients in Zambia, Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hause Lara

    2007-07-01

    % and HPV18 is 5%. The overall ratio of high-risk (HR to low-risk (LR HPVs in the patient cohort was 69% and 31% respectively; essentially identical to that for the HR and LR distributions worldwide. However, we discovered that HIV positive patients were two-times as likely to have an HR HPV as HIV negative individuals, while the distribution of LR HPVs was unaffected by HIV status. Interestingly, we observed a nine-fold increase in HPV18 infection frequency in HIV positive versus HIV negative individuals. Conclusion The rate of oncogenic HPVs (type 16 and 18 in Zambia was much higher than in the U.S., potentially providing an explanation for the high-rates of cervical cancer in Zambia. Surprisingly, we discovered a strong association between positive HIV status and the prevalence of HR HPVs, and specifically HPV18.

  8. HIV associated hypocalcaemia among diarrheic patients in northwest Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moges, Beyene; Amare, Bemnet; Yabutani, Timoki; Kassu, Afework

    2014-07-04

    Hypocalcaemia, defined by serum calcium level less than 8.5 mg/dl, could be caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and diarrheal diseases. In Ethiopia, while morbidities from diarrheal diseases and HIV are serious health problems, studies assessing the interactions amongst of the three do not exist. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the level of calcium among diarrheic patients with and without HIV co-infection. Consecutive diarrheic patients attending Gondar University Hospital in Ethiopia were enrolled and screened for HIV, intestinal parasites, Shigella and Salmonella. Concentration of calcium in serum was determined using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. A total of 206 diarrheic patients were included in the study (109 = HIV positive, 97 = HIV negative). Intestinal parasites and Shigella species were detected in 32.2% and 8.5% of the patients, respectively. The serum calcium levels in the patients who were found positive for Shigella species or intestinal parasites was not significantly different by the presence or absence of HIV co-infection. HIV infected diarrheic patients had significantly lower mean serum calcium levels (7.82 ± 1.23 mg/dl) than those negative for HIV (8.38 ± 1.97) (P = 0.015). The age groups 25-35 and greater than 45 years showed significantly lower mean serum calcium levels (7.77 ± 1.55 mg/dl) in comparison to the other age groups (7.84 ± 1.41 mg/dl, P = 0.009). On the other hand, females presented with significantly lower mean serum calcium levels (7.79 ± 1.60 mg/dl, P = 0.044) than males (8.26 ± 1.65 mg/dl). There is high prevalence of hypocalcaemia among diarrheic patients in northwest Ethiopia. And HIV stood out to be a major risk factor for development of hypocalcaemia among the diarrheic patients in northwest Ethiopia. Further studies are required to substantiate and characterize the mechanisms and consequences of calcium metabolism disorders among HIV infected individuals in the

  9. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC CD4 LYMPHOCYTOPENIA- A RARE CLINICAL ENTITY

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    Vijayashree Thyagaraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Since 1989, several investigators have reported unusual cases of severe opportunistic infections associated with CD4 lymphocytopenia in the absence of human immunodeficiency virus infection. The cause of this condition is unknown. The Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC defines Idiopathic CD4 T Lymphocytopenia (ICL as a clinical condition in which patients with depressed numbers of circulating CD4+ T-cell lymphocytes (<300 cells/μL or <20% of total T cells at a minimum of two separate time points at least 6 weeks apart, have no laboratory evidence of infection with human HIV-1 or HIV-2, or any defined immunodeficiency or therapy associated with depressed levels of CD4 T cells. The aim of the study is to analyse the clinical profile, opportunistic infections, laboratory parameters and outcome in terms of survival of patients diagnosed with ICL. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eight HIV negative patients who presented with opportunistic infections and who were diagnosed with ICL from 2007 to 2015 were included in the study. A detailed history was taken; physical examination was performed and the nature of illness with which they presented was documented. Then, CD4 and CD8 counts were done and CD4 count was repeated after a 6-week interval. The patients were followed up until discharge or death. RESULTS The mean age was 37.50±9.55 years. There were six males (75% and two females (25%. Fever was a presenting symptom among six (75% of them. Two were diagnosed to have cutaneous cryptococcosis (25%, two with invasive aspergillosis (25% and four with tuberculosis (50%. Absolute lymphocyte count was less than 1200 in seven patients (87.5%, which roughly correlates with a CD4 count of less than 200 cells/μL, among PLWHIV. The mean CD4 count was 183.63±63.74 cells/μL during the first measurement and 214.43±103.98 cells/μL during the second one. Two patients died (37.5%. None of the patients were recorded to have any form of malignancy

  10. Parvovirose e anemia acentuada em paciente imunocompetente Parvovirus and severe anemia in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Annete Damasceno

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de 16 anos, sexo masculino, com vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV negativo e sem doença hematológica prévia, desenvolveu anemia acentuada devido à infecção por parvovírus B19. A doença apresentou evolução bifásica, com acalmia clínica e retorno dos sintomas após 15 dias. Ao exame físico, apresentava-se descorado e febril, sem adeno e organomegalias, com sinais de insuficiência cardíaca. O aspirado de medula óssea mostrava megaloblastos com nucléolos aberrantes e, na histologia, foram observadas células gigantes com nucleolação aberrante e presença do corpúsculo de inclusão nuclear típico da parvovirose. O exame de imuno-histoquímica mostrou positividade para anticorpo específico para parvovírus. A sorologia comprovou a infecção.A 16-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV negative male patient without hematological disease developed acute anemia due to parvovirus B19 infection. The disease showed a biphasic evolution: clinical remission and return of symptoms after 15 days. Physical examination revealed paleness and fever, neither adeno nor organomegalies, and signs of heart failure. The bone marrow aspiration showed megaloblasts with aberrant nucleoli. As far as histology is concerned, giant cells with aberrant nucleoli and the presence of intranuclear inclusions typical of Parvoviruses were observed. Immunohistochemistry revealed positivity for specific Parvovirus antibody. Serology confirmed parvovirus B19 infection.

  11. Hepatitis B virus: molecular genotypes and HBeAg serological status among HBV-infected patients in the southeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçales Fernando L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of HBV genotype is very important for clinical treatment. Studies have suggested possible pathogenic and therapeutic differences among HBV genotypes. The aim of this study was to determine HBV subtypes and genotypes in HBV-infected patients in our region (southeast Brazil and to correlate results with clinical and histopathological data. Methods One hundred and thirty-nine HBsAg-positive patients were included in the study. All patients were anti-HCV and anti-HIV negative (64% male; mean age 42 ± 14.5 years; range 7-80 years; 84% Caucasian and were followed up at the University Hospital. A method for genotyping and subtyping HBV by partial HBsAg gene sequencing with primers common to all known genotypes was used. The viral load was measured by Amplicor Monitor assay (Roche. Results HBV genotype A was the most prevalent (55%, while genotypes C, D and F were found in 3%, 38% and 4% of HBV-infected patients, respectively. Among the patients infected by genotype A, 18.3% (14/76 were African descendents and, among the patients infected by genotype D, 11.3% (6/53 were also African descendents. In the four patients infected with genotype C, 2 were Asian descendents and 2 were Caucasians. All (7 genotype F infected patients were Caucasians. Seventy percent of our HBsAg-positive patients were HBeAg negative (62% genotypes A; 26.2% D; 7.1% C and 4.7%F. The viral load of HBV-DNA was about 5 times higher in HBeAg-positive than in HBeAg-negative patients. About 40% of these patients had alanine aminotransferase of up to 1.5 times the normal level. The mean stage of fibrosis in genotype A patients (2.8 was significantly higher than the mean stage of fibrosis in genotype D patients (2.0 (P = 0.0179. Conclusion The genotypes encountered in our HBV-infected patients were apparently a consequence of the types of immigration that occurred in our region, where European and African descendents predominate. The HBeAg-negative status

  12. Post exposure prophylaxis of HIV transmission after occupational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-19

    Mar 19, 2010 ... Triple therapy use increased over time and was more frequent ... in Malawi and other countries in sub-Saharan Africa than .... The percentage of expatriate elective students that received triple .... HIV negative source patients.

  13. Experiment list: SRX467611 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Latency isolate=Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) negative patient diagnosed with primary effusion (body ca...vity based) lymphoma (PEL) || age=85 || biomaterial_provider=Caucasian || sex=male || tissue=pleural effusion

  14. Experiment list: SRX467619 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (HIV) negative patient diagnosed with primary effusion (body cavity based) lymph...oma (PEL) || age=85 || biomaterial_provider=Caucasian || sex=male || tissue=pleural effusion || cell_line=BC

  15. Community-based MDR-TB care project improves treatment initiation in patients diagnosed with MDR-TB in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Pyae Phyo; Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Thein, Saw; Si Thu, Aung; Kyaw, Khine Wut Yee; Aye, Nyein Nyein; Phyo, Aye Mon; Maung, Htet Myet Win; Soe, Kyaw Thu; Aung, Si Thu

    2018-01-01

    The Union in collaboration with national TB programme (NTP) started the community-based MDR-TB care (CBMDR-TBC) project in 33 townships of upper Myanmar to improve treatment initiation and treatment adherence. Patients with MDR-TB diagnosed/registered under NTP received support through the project staff, in addition to the routine domiciliary care provided by NTP staff. Each township had a project nurse exclusively for MDR-TB and 30 USD per month (max. for 4 months) were provided to the patient as a pre-treatment support. To assess whether CBMDR-TBC project's support improved treatment initiation. In this cohort study (involving record review) of all diagnosed MDR-TB between January 2015 and June 2016 in project townships, CBMDR-TBC status was categorized as "receiving support" if date of project initiation in patient's township was before the date of diagnosis and "not receiving support", if otherwise. Cox proportional hazards regression (censored on 31 Dec 2016) was done to identify predictors of treatment initiation. Of 456 patients, 57% initiated treatment: 64% and 56% among patients "receiving support (n = 208)" and "not receiving support (n = 228)" respectively (CBMDR-TBC status was not known in 20 (4%) patients due to missing diagnosis dates). Among those initiated on treatment (n = 261), median (IQR) time to initiate treatment was 38 (20, 76) days: 31 (18, 50) among patients "receiving support" and 50 (26,101) among patients "not receiving support". After adjusting other potential confounders (age, sex, region, HIV, past history of TB treatment), patients "receiving support" had 80% higher chance of initiating treatment [aHR (0.95 CI): 1.8 (1.3, 2.3)] when compared to patients "not receiving support". In addition, age 15-54 years, previous history of TB and being HIV negative were independent predictors of treatment initiation. Receiving support under CBMDR-TBC project improved treatment initiation: it not only improved the proportion initiated but also

  16. Mortality and associated factors of patients with extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis: an emerging public health crisis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Chengli; Fu, Manjiao; Zhang, Yao; Xie, Hebin; Yin, Ke; Liu, Yanke; Zhang, Li; Xie, Bangruan; Li, Fang; Huang, Hua; Liu, Yuhong; Yang, Li; Zhou, Jing

    2018-06-07

    Limited treatment options of extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) have led to its high mortality worldwide. Relevant data about mortality of XDR-TB patients in literature are limited and likely underestimate the real situation in China, since the majority of patients with XDR-TB are lost to follow-up after discharge from TB hospitals. In this study, we sought to investigate the mortality and associated risk factors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-negative patients with XDR-TB in China. All patients who were diagnosed with XDR-TB for the first time in four TB care centers across China between March 2013 and February 2015 were consecutively enrolled. Active tracking through contacting patients or family members by phone or home visit was conducted to obtain patients' survival information by February 2017. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to evaluate factors associated with mortality. Among 67 patients enrolled, the mean age was 48.7 (Standard Deviation [SD] = 16.7) years, and 51 (76%) were men. Fourteen patients (21%) were treatment naïve at diagnosis indicating primary transmission. 58 (86.8%) patients remained positive for sputum smear or culture when discharged. During a median follow-up period of 32 months, 20 deaths occurred, with an overall mortality of 128 per 1000 person-years. Among patients who were dead, the median survival was 5.4 months (interquartile range [IQR]: 2.2-17.8). Seventeen (85%) of them died at home, among whom the median interval from discharge to death was 8.4 months (IQR: 2.0-18.2). In Cox proportional hazards regression models, body mass index (BMI) study suggested an alarming situation of XDR-TB patients in China with a sizable proportion of newly transmitted cases, a high mortality rate, and a long period in community. This observation calls for urgent actions to improve XDR-TB case management in China, including providing regimens with high chances of cure and palliative care, and enhanced infection

  17. Nitric oxide production in the exhaled air of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in relation to HIV co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melese Endalkachew

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO is essential for host defense in rodents, but the role of NO during tuberculosis (TB in man remains controversial. However, earlier observations that arginine supplementation facilitates anti-TB treatment, supports the hypothesis that NO is important in the host defense against TB. Local production of NO measured in fractional exhaled air (FeNO in TB patients with and without HIV co-infection has not been reported previously. Thus, our aim was to investigate levels of FeNO in relation to clinical symptoms and urinary NO metabolites (uNO. Methods In a cross sectional study, FeNO and uNO were measured and clinical symptoms, chest x-ray, together with serum levels of arginine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha and interleukin 12 (IL-12 were evaluated in sputum smear positive TB patients (HIV+/TB, n = 36, HIV-/TB, n = 59, their household contacts (n = 17 and blood donors (n = 46 from Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. Results The proportion of HIV-/TB patients with an increased FeNO level (> 25 ppb was significantly higher as compared to HIV+/TB patients, but HIV+/TB patients had significantly higher uNO than HIV-/TB patients. HIV+ and HIV-/TB patients both had lower levels of FeNO compared to blood donors and household contacts. The highest levels of both uNO and FeNO were found in household contacts. Less advanced findings on chest x-ray, as well as higher sedimentation rate were observed in HIV+/TB patients as compared to HIV-/TB patients. However, no significant correlation was found between FeNO and uNO, chest x-ray grading, clinical symptoms, TNF-alpha, IL-12, arginine levels or sedimentation rate. Conclusion In both HIV negative and HIV co infected TB patients, low levels of exhaled NO compared to blood donors and household were observed. Future studies are needed to confirm whether low levels of exhaled NO could be a risk factor in acquiring TB and the relative importance of NO in human TB.

  18. Heel quantitative ultrasound in HIV-infected patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzone, Marilia Rita; Castronuovo, Daniela; Di Gregorio, Adriana; Celesia, Benedetto Maurizio; Gussio, Maria; Borderi, Marco; Maggi, Paolo; Santoro, Carmen Rita; Madeddu, Giordano; Cacopardo, Bruno; Nunnari, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    HIV infection has been associated with increased risk of osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the reference standard to assess bone mineral density (BMD); however, it is not easily accessible in several settings. Heel Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is a radiation-free, easy-to-perform technique, which may help reducing the need for DXA. In this cross-sectional study, we used heel QUS (Hologic Sahara(®)) to assess bone status in a cohort of HIV-infected patients. A QUS stiffness index (QUI) threshold >83 was used to identify patients with a low likelihood of osteoporosis. Moreover, we compared QUS results with those of 36 sex- and age-matched HIV-negative controls. 244 HIV-positive patients were enrolled. Median heel QUI value was 83 (73-96) vs. 93 (IQR 84-104) in the control group (p = 0.04). 110 patients (45 %) had a QUI value ≤83. Risk factors for low QUI values were age (OR 1.04 per year, 95 % CI 1.01-1.07, p = 0.004), current use of protease inhibitors (OR 1.85, CI 1.03-3.35, p = 0.039), current use of tenofovir (OR 2.28, CI 1.22-4.27, p = 0.009) and the number of risk factors for secondary osteoporosis (OR 1.46, CI 1.09-1.95, p = 0.01). Of note, QUI values were significantly correlated with FRAX score (r = -0.22, p = 0.004). According to EACS guidelines, 45 % of patients had risk factors for osteoporosis which make them eligible for DXA. By using QUS, we may avoid DXA in around half of them. As HIV-positive patients are living longer, the prevalence of osteoporosis is expected to increase over time. Appropriate screening, prevention and treatment are crucial to preserve bone health in this population. The use of screening techniques, such as heel QUS, may help reducing the need for DXA. Further studies are needed to define the diagnostic accuracy of this promising technique in the setting of HIV.

  19. Intestinal parasitic infections in HIV infected and non-infected patients in a low HIV prevalence region, West-Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Nguefeu Nkenfou

    Full Text Available The magnitude of intestinal parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients requires careful consideration in the developing world where poor nutrition is associated with poor hygiene and several tropical diseases. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Cameroon. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Dschang -Cameroon. Stool and blood specimens from HIV/AIDS patients and control group were screened respectively for intestinal parasites and for HIV antibodies. Intestinal parasites were identified using direct microscopy, formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl Neelsen methods. Out of 396 participants recruited among patients consulting at hospital, 42 (10.6% were HIV positive, thirty of them treatment naïve. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 14.64%. Out of 42 HIV/AIDS patients, 59.5% (25/42 were infected with intestinal parasites, while only 9.32% (33/354 of the HIV negative patients were infected with intestinal parasites. The parasites detected in our study population included Crystosporidium parvum (2.53%, Entamoeba histolytica (7.52%, Entamoeba coli (4.04%, Giardia lamblia (0.25%, Trichuris trichura (0.25%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25% and Taenia spp. (0.25%. In the HIV infected group, Crystosporidium parvum (19.04%, Entamoeba histolytica (19.04%, Entamoeba coli (21.42%, Giardia lamblia (2.38%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0.25% and Taenia spp. (0.25% were found. Crystosporidium parvum was found to be significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients than in controls (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that the HIV status and the quality of water were the major risk factors for intestinal parasitosis. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the HIV patients by contributing in reducing morbidity and improving the efficiency of antiretroviral treatment. Even after the introduction

  20. Predictors of CD4 count over time among HIV patients initiated ART in Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, northwest Ethiopia: multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezie, Lemma Derseh

    2016-07-30

    The response of HIV patients to antiretroviral therapy could be measured by its strong predictor, the CD4+ T cell (CD4) count for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy and proper management of disease progress. However, in addition to HIV, there are other factors which can influence the CD4 cell count. Patient's socio-economic, demographic, and behavioral variables, accessibility, duration of treatment etc., can be used to predict CD4 count. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to examine the predictors of CD4 count among ART users enrolled in the first 6 months of 2010 and followed upto mid 2014. The covariance components model was employed to determine the predictors of CD4 count over time. A total of 1196 ART attendants were used to analyze their data descriptively. Eight hundred sixty-one of the attendants had two or more CD4 count measurements and were used in modeling their data using the linear mixed method. Thus, the mean rates of incensement of CD4 counts for patients with ambulatory/bedridden and working baseline functional status were 17.4 and 30.6 cells/mm(3) per year, respectively. After adjusting for other variables, for each additional baseline CD4 count, the gain in CD4 count during treatment was 0.818 cells/mm(3) (p value ART users who reached the normal range of CD4 count was very low. To see their long term treatment outcome, it requires further research with a sufficiently longer follow up data. In line with this, the local CD4 count for HIV negative persons should also be investigated for better comparison and proper disease management.

  1. Isoniazid Mono-Resistant Tuberculosis: Impact on Treatment Outcome and Survival of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Southern Mexico 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; García-García, Lourdes; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Montesinos-Castillo, Marlene; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Bobadilla-Del-Valle, Miriam; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Téllez-Vázquez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Yanes-Lane, Mercedes; Mongua-Rodriguez, Norma; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Isoniazid mono-resistance (IMR) is the most common form of mono-resistance; its world prevalence is estimated to range between 0.0 to 9.5% globally. There is no consensus on how these patients should be treated. To describe the impact of IMR tuberculosis (TB) on treatment outcome and survival among pulmonary TB patients treated under programmatic conditions in Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico. We conducted a prospective cohort study of pulmonary TB patients in Southern Mexico. From 1995 to 2010 patients with acid-fast bacilli or culture proven Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples underwent epidemiological, clinical and microbiological evaluation. We included patients who harbored isoniazid mono-resistant (IMR) strains and patients with strains susceptible to isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin. All patients were treated following Mexican TB Program guidelines. We performed annual follow-up to ascertain treatment outcome, recurrence, relapse and mortality. Between 1995 and 2010 1,243 patients with pulmonary TB were recruited; 902/1,243 (72.57%) had drug susceptibility testing; 716 (79.38%) harbored pan-susceptible and 88 (9.75%) IMR strains. Having any contact with a person with TB (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)) 1.85, 95% Confidence interval (CI) 1.15-2.96) and homelessness (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.76, 95% CI 1.08-6.99) were associated with IMR. IMR patients had a higher probability of failure (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 12.35, 95% CI 3.38-45.15) and death due to TB among HIV negative patients (aHR 3.30. 95% CI 1.00-10.84). All the models were adjusted for socio-demographic and clinical variables. The results from our study provide evidence that the standardized treatment schedule with first line drugs in new and previously treated cases with pulmonary TB and IMR produces a high frequency of treatment failure and death due to tuberculosis. We recommend re-evaluating the optimal schedule for patients harboring IMR. It is necessary to strengthen

  2. Assessment of HIV-1 patient recruitability in the Republic of Guinea-Bissau using African versus North American hematology and biochemistry reference intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Román, Victor Raúl; Jensen, Sanne Skov; Leo-Hansen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Hematology and biochemistry reference intervals have been derived from healthy, HIV-negative populations to guide clinical trials worldwide. However, it is less clear how such values may be applied to clinical trials involving HIV-infected individuals. We show that contradictory interpretations...

  3. Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Viral and Bacterial Infections in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex with Men in Toronto.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Remis

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B (HBV, hepatitis C (HCV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs have been associated with HIV transmission risk and disease progression among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM, but the frequency and distribution of STIs in this community in Canada has not been extensively studied.We recruited MSM living with and without HIV from a large primary care clinic in Toronto. Participants completed a detailed socio-behavioural questionnaire using ACASI and provided blood for syphilis, HIV, HBV and HCV, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and type 2 (HSV-2, and human cytomegalovirus (CMV serology, urine for chlamydia and gonorrhea, and a self-collected anal swab for human papillomavirus (HPV molecular diagnostics. Prevalences were expressed as a proportion and compared using chi-square.442 MSM were recruited, 294 living with HIV and 148 without. Active syphilis (11.0% vs. 3.4%, ever HBV (49.4% vs. 19.1%, HCV (10.4% vs. 3.4%, HSV-2 (55.9% vs. 38.2%, CMV (98.3% vs. 80.3% and high-risk (HR anal HPV (67.6% vs. 51.7% infections were significantly more common in men living with HIV. Chlamydia and gonorrhea were infrequent in both groups. Regardless of HIV infection status, age and number of lifetime male sexual partners were associated with HBV infection and lifetime injection drug use with HCV infection.Syphilis and viral infections, including HBV, HCV, HSV-2, CMV, and HR-HPV, were common in this clinic-based population of MSM in Toronto and more frequent among MSM living with HIV. This argues for the implementation of routine screening, vaccine-based prevention, and education programs in this high-risk population.

  4. Impact of HIV exposure on health outcomes in HIV-negative infants born to HIV-positive mothers in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraleda, Cinta; de Deus, Nilsa; Serna-Bolea, Celia; Renom, Montse; Quintó, Llorenç; Macete, Eusebio; Menéndez, Clara; Naniche, Denise

    2014-02-01

    Up to 30% of infants may be HIV-exposed noninfected (ENI) in countries with high HIV prevalence, but the impact of maternal HIV on the child's health remains unclear. One hundred fifty-eight HIV ENI and 160 unexposed (UE) Mozambican infants were evaluated at 1, 3, 9, and 12 months postdelivery. At each visit, a questionnaire was administered, and HIV DNA polymerase chain reaction and hematologic and CD4/CD8 determinations were measured. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate differences in hematologic parameters and T-cell counts between the study groups. All outpatient visits and admissions were registered. ENI infants received cotrimoxazol prophylaxis (CTXP). Negative binomial regression models were estimated to compare incidence rates of outpatient visits and admissions. Hematocrit was lower in ENI than in UE infants at 1, 3, and 9 months of age (P = 0.024, 0.025, and 0.012, respectively). Percentage of CD4 T cells was 3% lower (95% confidence interval: 0.86 to 5.15; P = 0.006) and percentage of CD8 T cells 1.15 times higher (95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 1.25; P = 0.001) in ENI vs. UE infants. ENI infants had a lower weight-for-age Z score (P = 0.049) but reduced incidence of outpatient visits, overall (P = 0.042), diarrhea (P = 0.001), and respiratory conditions (P = 0.042). ENI children were more frequently anemic, had poorer nutritional status, and alterations in some immunologic profiles compared with UE children. CTXP may explain their reduced mild morbidity. These findings may reinforce continuation of CTXP and the need to understand the consequences of maternal HIV exposure in this vulnerable group of children.

  5. Neurofilament light chain protein as a marker of neuronal injury: review of its use in HIV-1 infection and reference values for HIV-negative controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yilmaz, Aylin; Blennow, Kaj; Hagberg, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Price, Richard W.; Schouten, Judith; Spudich, Serena; Underwood, Jonathan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Gisslén, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Several CSF biomarkers of neuronal injury have been studied in people living with HIV. At this time, the most useful is the light subunit of the neurofilament protein (NFL). This major structural component of myelinated axons is essential to maintain axonal caliber and to facilitate

  6. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type distribution in 3603 HIV-positive and HIV-negative women in the general population of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dartell, Myassa Arkam; Rasch, Vibeke; Kahesa, Crispin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in Tanzania (PROTECT) study is to assess the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) and to determine the type distribution among women in the general population according to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, in preparation for a po......The aim of the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in Tanzania (PROTECT) study is to assess the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) and to determine the type distribution among women in the general population according to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, in preparation...

  7. Self-Reported HIV-Positive Status But Subsequent HIV-Negative Test Result Using Rapid Diagnostic Testing Algorithms Among Seven Sub-Saharan African Military Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    analysis, data interpretation, or writing of the report. Leidos provided support in the form of salaries for JH, BRT, AGT, MBJ and JM but did not have any...have data on a QA process. The survey used for all seven partner mili- taries was based on a standardized modular survey, which assessed HIV risk... Technical considerations Technical limitations have been shown to increase false-positive HIV test results in voluntary counseling and testing centers

  8. Sociodemographic differences among HIV-positive and HIV-negative recently pregnant women in Mexico City: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Zapata, Daniel; Piñeirúa-Menéndez, Alicia; Volkow-Fernández, Patricia; Rodríguez-Zulueta, Patricia; Ramos-Alamillo, Ubaldo; Cabrera-López, Teresita; Martin-Onraet, Alexandra

    2017-07-01

    National HIV preventive programs in Mexico focus on high-risk groups that do not consider women, apart from prenatal screening. Nonetheless, the epidemic in women is growing, and there is a need to better understand sociodemographic factors in women living with HIV (WLH). We performed a case-control study in Mexico City, including HIV+ and HIV- women with a recent pregnancy to compare their sociodemographic characteristics and describe the circumstances of diagnosis in HIV+ women, as well as prenatal screening frequency in both groups. Fifty cases and 102 controls were interviewed. HIV+ women were more frequently the only economic support of the family (20% vs 0%, P history of sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, history of violence, and civil status. Only 6% of controls were tested for HIV during prenatal follow-up. WLH in this study faced important social vulnerability. Targeting women living in these social contexts might increase early diagnosis and could tailor HIV prevention strategies. Prenatal coverage needs to be improved and should represent a national priority.

  9. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections, genital symptoms and health-care seeking behaviour among HIV-negative female sex workers in Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuijzen, N. J.; van Steijn, M.; Nyinawabega, J.; Kestelyn, E.; Uwineza, M.; Vyankandondera, J.; van de Wijgert, J. H. H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Timely diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is often hampered by the lack of symptoms, inadequate diagnostics and/or poor availability, accessibility and quality of treatment in resource-limited settings. Female sex workers (FSW) are highly vulnerable for HIV and key

  10. Impact of comorbidity and ageing on health-related quality of life in HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Kooij, Katherine W.; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Stolte, Ineke G.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Reiss, Peter; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may be at risk for the premature onset of age-associated noncommunicable comorbidities. Being HIV-positive, having comorbidities and being of higher age may adversely impact health-related quality of life (HRQL). We investigated the possible contribution of HIV infection,

  11. No difference in in vitro susceptibility to HIV type 1 between high-risk HIV-negative Ethiopian commercial sex workers and low-risk control subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messele, T.; Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Brouwer, M.; Aklilu, M.; Birru, T.; Fontanet, A. L.; Schuitemaker, H.; Hamann, D.

    2001-01-01

    Host factors such as increased beta-chemokine production, HIV-1 coreceptor expression level, and HIV-1 coreceptor polymorphism have been thought to influence susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. To determine the protective role of these factors in Ethiopians who remained HIV-1 uninfected, despite

  12. Preference for dry sex, condom use and risk of STI among HIV-negative black women in the Western Cape province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ruiter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The practice of dry sex is reportedly common among young black women in South Africa. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of women’s preference for dry sex with condom use and the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT, Neisseria gonorrhoea (NG and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV infections. Between January 2006 and December 2007, 446 women completed a behavioural survey in isiXhosa which assessed demographic information, sexual behaviours, condom use behaviour and other potential correlates. In total, 159 (36.72% women indicated preferring dry sex. A multivariate logistic regression model indicated that participants who preferred dry sex were more likely to report past STI episodes and to have a partner who also preferred dry sex. The findings indicate that dry sex behaviour was not directly associated with condom use and STI (CT, NG, and TV prevalence but may have been associated with relationships in which sexual preferences of the male partner were dominant.

  13. Effects of Emtricitabine/Tenofovir on Bone Mineral Density in HIV-Negative Persons in a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kathleen; Glidden, David V.; Anderson, Peter L.; Liu, Albert; McMahan, Vanessa; Gonzales, Pedro; Ramirez-Cardich, Maria Esther; Namwongprom, Sirianong; Chodacki, Piotr; de Mendonca, Laura Maria Carvalo; Wang, Furong; Lama, Javier R.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Guanira, Juan Vicente; Buchbinder, Susan; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Schechter, Mauro; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Grant, Robert M.; Vargas, Lorena; Sanchez, Jorge; Mai, Chiang; Saokhieo, Pongpun; Murphy, Kerry; Gilmore, Hailey; Holland, Sally; Faber, Elizabeth; Duda, John; Bewerunge, Linda; Batist, Elizabeth; Hoskin, Christine; Brown, Ben; de Janeiro, Rio; Beppu-Yoshida, Carina; da Costa, Marcellus Dias; Assis de Jesus, Sergio Carlos; Grangeiro da Silva, Jose Roberto; Millan, Roberta; de Siqueira Hoagland, Brenda Regina; Martinez Fernandes, Nilo; da Silva Freitas, Lucilene; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose; Bushman, Lane; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Anthony Guida, Louis; Kline, Brandon; Goicochea, Pedro; Manzo, Jonathan; Hance, Robert; McConnell, Jeff; Defechereux, Patricia; Levy, Vivian; Robles, Malu; Postle, Brian; Burns, David; Rooney, James

    2015-01-01

    Background. Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with oral emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) decreases the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Initiation of TDF decreases bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected people. We report the effect of FTC/TDF on BMD in HIV-seronegative men who have sex with men and in transgender women. Methods. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed at baseline and 24-week intervals in a substudy of iPrEx, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of FTC/TDF PrEP. Plasma and intracellular tenofovir concentrations were measured in participants randomized to FTC/TDF. Results. In 498 participants (247 FTC/TDF, 251 placebo), BMD in those randomized to FTC/TDF decreased modestly but statistically significantly by 24 weeks in the spine (net difference, −0.91% [95% confidence interval {CI}, −1.44% to −.38%]; P = .001) and hip (−0.61% [95% CI, −.96% to −.27%], P = .001). Changes within each subsequent 24-week interval were not statistically significant. Changes in BMD by week 24 correlated inversely with intracellular tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP), which was detected in 53% of those randomized to FTC/TDF. Net BMD loss by week 24 in participants with TFV-DP levels indicative of consistent dosing averaged −1.42% ± 29% and −0.85% ± 19% in the spine and hip, respectively (P < .001 vs placebo). Spine BMD tended to rebound following discontinuation of FTC/TDF. There were no differences in fractures (P = .62) or incidence of low BMD. Conclusions. In HIV-uninfected persons, FTC/TDF PrEP was associated with small but statistically significant decreases in BMD by week 24 that inversely correlated with TFV-DP, with more stable BMD thereafter. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00458393. PMID:25908682

  14. High awareness of hepatitis C virus (HCV) but limited knowledge of HCV complications among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers, Femke A. E.; Prins, Maria; Davidovich, Udi; Stolte, Ineke G.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a sexually transmitted infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in high-income countries. Little is reported about HCV awareness among MSM, although this is essential for developing targeted prevention strategies. We, therefore, studied HCV

  15. A prospective study of seroprevalence of Toxoplasmosis in general population, and in HIV/AIDS patients in Bombay, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisheri Y

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and seventy nine sera (age group 13-50 years were tested for antitoxoplasma IgG/IgM antibodies by ELISA techniques; the diagnostic titer for positive test is 10 iu/ml or > 1:100. Sera were obtained from (i 165 (100 men/65 women healthy adult voluntary blood donors (HIV, HBsAg, VDRL negative; (ii 89 consecutive HIV/AIDS patients (82 men/7 women; and (iii 25 patients (HIV negative: 12 men/13 women treated for cerebral Tuberculoma or Neurocysticercosis during this study from January 1996-June 1997. The overall seroprevalence was 30.9% (51/165 in the immunocompetent adult (group i 34% (34/100 men and 26.2% (17/65 in women [range: 10-899 iu/ml; (mean: 376.8]. In HIV infected hosts the seroprevalence [range: 21-340 iu/ml; (mean; 180] was 67.8% (56/82 men, 04/07 women. The seroprevalence was 20.5% (8/39, 32.8% (22/67, 34.8% (16/46 and 38.4% (5/13 in the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th decades respectively in healthy adults. In HIV/AIDS patients, 69% (29/42 in the 3rd and 70.6% (24/34 in 4th decade were seropositive. The risk of cerebral Toxoplasmosis (encephalitis-02, granuloma-24 was 43.3% (26/60, mean 250 iu/ml. The seroprevalence was 28% in group iii (range 12-80 iu/ml, mean 21 iu/ml. Anti-toxo IgM was negative in all. Primary Toxoplasma infection appears to be subclinical and prevalent throughout life. T. gondii has emerged as an important opportunistic infection in HIV/AIDS patients in Bombay. Recrudescence of cerebral toxoplasmosis (CTOX is observed with low IgG response during mid-late stage of the disease, as seen in our patients (mean IgG 250 iu/ml, CD4+ = 283/cmm (range 43-504 in 5 patients. Primary prophylaxis for CTOX seems rationale and can be targeted to asymptomatic HIV/AIDS population at risk who are seropositive for T. gondii (mean IgG 111.5 iu/ml in our study. The very high predictive value of a negative test for TOX remains the best serological parameter for excluding acute episode of TOX.

  16. CD4+, CD8+, CD3+ cell counts and CD4+/CD8+ ratio among patients with mycobacterial diseases (leprosy, tuberculosis), HIV infections, and normal healthy adults: a comparative analysis of studies in different regions of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tahziba; Kulshreshtha, K K; Yadav, V S; Katoch, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the CD4+, CD8+, CD3+ cell counts and the CD4/CD8 ratio among normal healthy controls (adults and children), leprosy patients (without any complications and during reactional states), TB patients (with and without HIV), and HIV-positive patients (early infection and full-blown AIDS) and correlated the changes with disease progression. In our study, it was observed that among adults, CD4+ cell counts ranged from 518-1098, CD8+ from 312-952, whereas CD4/CD8 ratio from 0.75-2.30. Among children, both CD4+ and CD8+ cells were more and the CD4/CD8 ratio varied from 0.91-3.17. With regard to leprosy patients, we observed that CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts were lower among PB (pauci-bacillary) and MB (multi-bacillary) patients. CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.99 ± 0.28 among PB patients while the ratio was lower, 0.78 ± 0.20, among MB patients. CD4+ cell counts were raised during RR (reversal reactions) and ENL (erythema nodosum leprosum) among the PB and MB patients whereas the CD8+ cell counts were lower among PB and MB patients. CD4/CD8 ratio doubled during reactional episodes of RR and ENL. Among the HIV-negative tuberculosis (TB) patients, both the CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts were found to be less and the CD4/CD8 ratio varied between 0.53-1.75. Among the HIV-positive TB patients and HIV-positive patients, both the CD4+ and CD8+ cells were very less and ratio drops significantly. In the initial stages of infection, as CD4+ counts drop, an increase in the CD8+ cell counts was observed and the ratio declines. In full-blown cases, CD4+ cell counts were very low, 3-4 to 54 cells, CD8+ cells from 12-211 and the ratio drops too low. This study is the first of its kind in this region of the country and assumes importance since no other study has reported the values of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte counts among patients with mycobacterial diseases (leprosy and TB), HIV infections along with normal healthy individuals of the region, and correlation with clinical

  17. Patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice.

  18. Patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Bhanu

    2010-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice.

  19. Social network characteristics and cervical cancer screening among Quechua women in Andean Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Luque

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peru has high cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates compared to other Andean countries. Therefore, partnerships between governmental and international organizations have targeted rural areas of Peru to receive cervical cancer screening via outreach campaigns. Previous studies have found a relationship between a person’s social networks and cancer screening behaviors. Screening outreach campaigns conducted by the nonprofit organization CerviCusco created an opportunity for a social network study to examine cervical cancer screening history and social network characteristics in a rural indigenous community that participated in these campaigns in 2012 and 2013. The aim of this study was to explore social network characteristics in this community related to receipt of cervical cancer screening following the campaigns. Methods An egocentric social network questionnaire was used to collect cross-sectional network data on community participants. Each survey participant (ego was asked to name six other women they knew (alters and identify the nature of their relationship or tie (family, friend, neighbor, other, residential closeness (within 5 km, length of time known, frequency of communication, topics of conversation, and whether they lent money to the person, provided childcare or helped with transportation. In addition, each participant was asked to report the nature of the relationship between all alters identified (e.g., friend, family, or neighbor. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to explore the relationship between Pap test receipt at the CerviCusco outreach screening campaigns and social network characteristics. Results Bivariate results found significant differences in percentage of alter composition for neighbors and family, and for mean number of years known, mean density, and mean degree centrality between women who had received a Pap test (n = 19 compared to those who had not (n = 50 (p’s < 0.05. The final logistic regression model was statistically significant (χ2 (2 = 20.911, p < .001. The model included the variables for percentage of family alter composition and mean density, and it explained 37.8 % (Nagelkerke R 2 of the variance in Pap test receipt, correctly classifying 78.3 % of cases. Those women with higher percentages of family alter composition and higher mean density in their ego networks were less likely to have received a Pap test at the CerviCusco campaigns. Conclusions According to this exploratory study, female neighbors more than family members may have provided an important source of social support for healthcare related decisions related to receipt of a Pap test. Future studies should collect longitudinal social network data on participants to measure the network effects of screening interventions in rural indigenous communities in Latin American countries experiencing the highest burden of cervical cancer.

  20. Families Around the World. The Quechua Family of Peru. Teacher's Resource Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    This resource guide outlines one of four units designed for grade 1. Some background material on the Quecha speaking Indians of Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador is presented for the teacher on the family structure and the economy, emphasizing subsistence, technology, clothing, division of labor, and sexual differentiation of labor. Major concepts…

  1. Picture This: Young Quechua Children's Reactions to Imported Picture Books in Ayacucho, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Jennifer Rowse

    2017-01-01

    Practitioners in ECE consider picture books an effective instructional tool in early childhood programming in the developed regions of the world. However, many young children from marginalized populations in the developing world have little to no access to them and thus, the effect that picture books could have upon their emergent literacy…

  2. Does Environmental Experience Shape Spatial Cognition? Frames of Reference among Ancash Quechua Speakers (Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapero, Joshua A.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that language contributes to humans' ability to orient using landmarks and shapes their use of frames of reference (FoRs) for memory. However, the role of environmental experience in shaping spatial cognition has not been investigated. This study addresses such a possibility by examining the use of FoRs in a nonverbal…

  3. Effects of birthplace and individual genetic admixture on lung volume and exercise phenotypes of Peruvian Quechua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutsaert, Tom D; Parra, Esteban; Shriver, Mark; Gamboa, Alfredo; Palacios, Jose-Antonio; Rivera, Maria; Rodriguez, Ivette; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2004-04-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC) and maximal exercise response were measured in two populations of Peruvian males (age, 18-35 years) at 4,338 m who differed by the environment in which they were born and raised, i.e., high altitude (Cerro de Pasco, Peru, BHA, n = 39) and sea level (Lima, Peru, BSL, n = 32). BSL subjects were transported from sea level to 4,338 m, and were evaluated within 24 hr of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Individual admixture level (ADMIX, % Spanish ancestry) was estimated for each subject, using 22 ancestry-informative genetic markers and also by skin reflectance measurement (MEL). Birthplace accounted for the approximately 10% larger FVC (P < 0.001), approximately 15% higher maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2)max, ml.min(-1).kg(-1)) (P < 0.001), and approximately 5% higher arterial oxygen saturation during exercise (SpO(2)) (P < 0.001) of BHA subjects. ADMIX was low in both study groups, averaging 9.5 +/- 2.6% and 2.1 +/- 0.3% in BSL and BHA subjects, respectively. Mean underarm MEL was significantly higher in the BSL group (P < 0.001), despite higher ADMIX. ADMIX was not associated with any study phenotype, but study power was not sufficient to evaluate hypotheses of genetic adaptation via the ADMIX variable. MEL and FVC were positively correlated in the BHA (P = 0.035) but not BSL (P = 0.335) subjects. However, MEL and ADMIX were not correlated across the entire study sample (P = 0.282). In summary, results from this study emphasize the importance of developmental adaptation to high altitude. While the MEL-FVC correlation may reflect genetic adaptation to high altitude, study results suggest that alternate (environmental) explanations be considered. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Indigenous Worldviews in Intercultural Education: Teachers' Construction of Interculturalism in a Bilingual Quechua-Spanish Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiviezo, Laura Alicia

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines teachers' implementation of a bilingual intercultural education (BIE) program in Peru. This program is inspired by global policies that promote cultural pluralism and educational access to marginalized indigenous populations. Broadly addressed in policy in Andean countries, interculturalism in Peru has remained a core…

  5. Social network characteristics and cervical cancer screening among Quechua women in Andean Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, John S; Opoku, Samuel; Ferris, Daron G; Guevara Condorhuaman, Wendy S

    2016-02-24

    Peru has high cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates compared to other Andean countries. Therefore, partnerships between governmental and international organizations have targeted rural areas of Peru to receive cervical cancer screening via outreach campaigns. Previous studies have found a relationship between a person's social networks and cancer screening behaviors. Screening outreach campaigns conducted by the nonprofit organization CerviCusco created an opportunity for a social network study to examine cervical cancer screening history and social network characteristics in a rural indigenous community that participated in these campaigns in 2012 and 2013. The aim of this study was to explore social network characteristics in this community related to receipt of cervical cancer screening following the campaigns. An egocentric social network questionnaire was used to collect cross-sectional network data on community participants. Each survey participant (ego) was asked to name six other women they knew (alters) and identify the nature of their relationship or tie (family, friend, neighbor, other), residential closeness (within 5 km), length of time known, frequency of communication, topics of conversation, and whether they lent money to the person, provided childcare or helped with transportation. In addition, each participant was asked to report the nature of the relationship between all alters identified (e.g., friend, family, or neighbor). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to explore the relationship between Pap test receipt at the CerviCusco outreach screening campaigns and social network characteristics. Bivariate results found significant differences in percentage of alter composition for neighbors and family, and for mean number of years known, mean density, and mean degree centrality between women who had received a Pap test (n = 19) compared to those who had not (n = 50) (p's < 0.05). The final logistic regression model was statistically significant (χ2 (2) = 20.911, p < .001). The model included the variables for percentage of family alter composition and mean density, and it explained 37.8% (Nagelkerke R(2)) of the variance in Pap test receipt, correctly classifying 78.3% of cases. Those women with higher percentages of family alter composition and higher mean density in their ego networks were less likely to have received a Pap test at the CerviCusco campaigns. According to this exploratory study, female neighbors more than family members may have provided an important source of social support for healthcare related decisions related to receipt of a Pap test. Future studies should collect longitudinal social network data on participants to measure the network effects of screening interventions in rural indigenous communities in Latin American countries experiencing the highest burden of cervical cancer.

  6. Indigenous Languages: Nahuatl, Quechua, & Maya--A Study of Multilingual Immigrant Students & Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated how immigrants from Latin America who speak indigenous languages perceive and respond to social, racial, linguistic, and cultural factors in the United States. It examined the multicultural and multilingual experiences of six participants, five of whom speak an indigenous language. There were three interviews conducted with…

  7. Patient opinion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zurita, Laura; Nøhr, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The paper is based upon a case study and aims to provide information abouit patients values and communication that will be useful in the design of more patient friendly health system.......The paper is based upon a case study and aims to provide information abouit patients values and communication that will be useful in the design of more patient friendly health system....

  8. Quantification of serum markers of hepatitis B (HBV) and Delta virus (HDV) infections in patients with chronic HDV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Gabriele; Popa, Delia Codruta; Cavallone, Daniela; Iacob, Speranta; Salvati, Antonio; Tabacelia, Daniela; Oliveri, Filippo; Mascolo, Giovanni; Bonino, Ferruccio; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao; Gheorghe, Liana; Brunetto, Maurizia Rossana

    2018-03-25

    The interplay between hepatitis B (HBV) and Delta (HDV) viruses is complex and not always characterized during chronic HDV infection. We assessed the clinical usefulness of new quantitative assays for HBV and HDV serum markers in a retrospective cross-sectional study. Sera obtained from 122 HDV-genotype-1 and HBV-genotype-D co-infected, anti-HIV-negative patients [71 males; median age 49.8 (21.7-66.9) years], recruited consecutively in two geographic areas (Italy 69 patients, Romania 53) with different HBV and HDV epidemiology, were tested for HBsAg, HBV-DNA, HBcrAg, total anti-HBc, HDV-RNA, IgM and total anti-HDV using quantitative assays. Cirrhosis, that showed comparable prevalence in the two cohorts, was diagnosed in 97 of 122 (79.5%) patients. At multivariate analysis, cirrhosis was associated with lower total anti-HBc/IgM-anti-HDV ratio (OR 0.990, 95%CI 0.981-0.999, P=0.038), whereas disease activity was associated with higher total anti-HDV (OR 10.105, 95% CI 1.671-61.107, P=0.012) and HDV-RNA levels (OR 2.366, 95% CI 1.456-3.844, P=0.001). HDV-RNA serum levels showed a positive correlation with HBV-DNA (ρ=0.276, P=0.005), HBsAg (ρ=0.404, PHBV and HDV serum markers identifies specific patterns associated with activity and stage of chronic hepatitis D (CHD). HDV pathogenicity depends on the underlying active HBV infection in spite of the inhibition of its replication. HDV-RNA, IgM anti-HDV, total anti-HDV, total anti-HBc, HBsAg and HBcrAg serum levels qualify for prospective studies to predict progressive CHD and identify candidates to antiviral therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of the novel antituberculous vaccine RUTI: randomized, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial in patients with latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Andre S; D'lom, Eva; Bouic, Patrick; Sabaté, Montserrat; Bosser, Ramon; Picas, Jordi; Amat, Mercè; Churchyard, Gavin; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of three different doses (5, 25 and 50 µg) of the novel antituberculous vaccine RUTI compared to placebo in subjects with latent tuberculosis infection. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase II Clinical Trial (95 patients randomized). Three different RUTI doses and placebo were tested, randomized both in HIV-positive (n = 47) and HIV-negative subjects (n = 48), after completion of one month isoniazid (INH) pre-vaccination. Each subject received two vaccine administrations, 28 Days apart. Five patients withdrew and 90 patients completed the study. Assessment of safety showed no deaths during study. Two subjects had serious adverse events one had a retinal detachment while taking INH and was not randomized and the other had a severe local injection site abscess on each arm and was hospitalized; causality was assessed as very likely and by the end of the study the outcome had resolved. All the patients except 5 (21%) patients of the placebo group (3 HIV+ and 2 HIV-) reported at least one adverse event (AE) during the study. The most frequently occurring AEs among RUTI recipients were (% in HIV+/-): injection site reactions [erythema (91/92), induration (94/92), local nodules (46/25), local pain (66/75), sterile abscess (6/6), swelling (74/83), ulcer (20/11), headache (17/22) and nasopharyngitis (20/5)]. These events were mostly mild and well tolerated. Overall, a polyantigenic response was observed, which differed by HIV- status. The best polyantigenic response was obtained when administrating 25 µg RUTI, especially in HIV-positive subjects which was not increased after the second inoculation. This Phase II clinical trial demonstrates reasonable tolerability of RUTI. The immunogenicity profile of RUTI vaccine in LTBI subjects, even being variable among groups, allows us considering one single injection of one of the highest doses in future trials, preceded by an extended safety clinical

  10. NESB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena; Fahridin, Salma

    2010-04-01

    General practitioner consultations with patients of non-English speaking background (NESB) account for one in 10 encounters recorded in the BEACH (Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health) program (NESB is defined as patients who reported that their primary language spoken at home is not English). We present a descriptive comparison of consultations with NESB and English speaking patients recorded between April 2007 and March 2009. Indigenous persons were excluded from the analysis to give a clearer picture of NESB patients of non- Australian origin. Only statistically significant differences with nonoverlapping 95% confidence intervals are reported.

  11. Extrahepatic manifestations associated with hepatitis C virus infection. A prospective multicenter study of 321 patients. The GERMIVIC. Groupe d'Etude et de Recherche en Medecine Interne et Maladies Infectieuses sur le Virus de l'Hepatite C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacoub, P; Renou, C; Rosenthal, E; Cohen, P; Loury, I; Loustaud-Ratti, V; Yamamoto, A M; Camproux, A C; Hausfater, P; Musset, L; Veyssier, P; Raguin, G; Piette, J C

    2000-01-01

    From January 1996 to January 1997, 321 patients with an average age of 46 +/- 16 years and chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) were prospectively enrolled in a study designed to determine the prevalence of extrahepatic manifestations associated with HCV infection in a large cohort of HCV patients, to identify associations between clinical and biologic manifestations, and to compare the results obtained in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive versus HIV-negative subsets. In a cross-sectional study, clinical extrahepatic manifestations, viral coinfections with HIV and/or hepatitis B virus, connective tissue diseases, and a wide panel of autoantibodies were assessed. Thirty-eight percent (122/321) of patients presented at least 1 clinical extrahepatic manifestation including arthralgia (60/321, 19%), skin manifestations (55/321, 17%), xerostomia (40/321, 12%), xerophthalmia (32/321, 10%), and sensory neuropathy (28/321, 9%). Main biologic abnormalities were mixed cryoglobulins (110/196, 56%), thrombocytopenia (50/291, 17%), and the presence of the following autoantibodies: antinuclear (123/302, 41%), rheumatoid factor (107/280, 38%), anticardiolipin (79/298, 27%), antithyroglobulin (36/287, 13%) and antismooth muscle cell (27/288, 9%). At least 1 autoantibody was present in 210/302 (70%) of sera. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, 4 parameters were significantly associated with cryoglobulin positivity: systemic vasculitis (p = 0.01, odds ratio OR[ = 17.3), HIV positivity (p = 0.0006, OR = 10.2), rheumatoid factor positivity (p = 0.01, OR = 2.8), and sicca syndrome (p = 0.03, OR = 0.27). A definite connective tissue disease was noted in 44 patients (14%), mainly symptomatic mixed cryoglobulinemia and systemic vasculitis, HIV coinfection (23%) was associated with 3 parameters: anticardiolipin (p = 0.003, OR = 4.18), thrombocytopenia (p = 0.01, OR = 3.56), and arthralgia or myalgia (p = 0.017, OR = 0.23). HIV-positive patients presented

  12. Patient life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid

    2004-01-01

    Background: The hypothesis for the study is that the informal relationships amongst patients during hospitalisation have more influence on wellbeing, understanding of own illnesses and recovery than we until now have recognised in nursing. Aim: The purpose is to describe patients' experiences of ...

  13. Labelling patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strudwick, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at how diagnostic radiographers label their patients. An ethnographic study of the workplace culture in one diagnostic imaging department was undertaken using participant observation for four months and semi-structured interviews with ten key informants. One of the key themes; the way in which radiographers label their patients, is explored in this article. It was found from the study that within the department studied the diagnostic radiographers labelled or categorised their patients based on the information that they had. This information is used to form judgements and these judgements were used to assist the radiographers in dealing with the many different people that they encountered in their work. This categorisation and labelling of the patient appears to assist the radiographer in their decision-making processes about the examination to be carried out and the patient they are to image. This is an important aspect of the role of the diagnostic radiographer. - Highlights: • I have studied the culture in one imaging department. • Radiographers label or categorise their patients. • These labels/categories are used to manage the patient. • This is an important aspect of the way in which radiographers work.

  14. The initial effectiveness of liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) and miltefosine combination for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in HIV co-infected patients in Ethiopia: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abongomera, Charles; Diro, Ermias; de Lima Pereira, Alan; Buyze, Jozefien; Stille, Kolja; Ahmed, Fareed; van Griensven, Johan; Ritmeijer, Koert

    2018-05-01

    North-west Ethiopia faces the highest burden world-wide of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and HIV co-infection. VL-HIV co-infected patients have higher (initial) parasitological failure and relapse rates than HIV-negative VL patients. Whereas secondary prophylaxis reduces the relapse rate, parasitological failure rates remain high with the available antileishmanial drugs, especially when administered as monotherapy. We aimed to determine the initial effectiveness (parasitologically-confirmed cure) of a combination of liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) and miltefosine for treatment of VL in HIV co-infected patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study at a Médecins Sans Frontières-supported health center in north-west Ethiopia. We included VL-HIV co-infected adults, treated for VL between January 2011 and August 2014, with AmBisome infusion (30 mg/kg total dose) and miltefosine orally for 28 days (100 mg/day). Proportions of initial treatment outcome categories were calculated. Predictors of initial parasitological failure and of death were determined using multivariable logistic regression. Of the 173 patients included, 170 (98.3%) were male and the median age was 32 years. The proportion of patients with primary VL (48.0%) and relapse VL (52.0%) were similar. The majority had advanced HIV disease (n = 111; 73.5%) and were on antiretroviral therapy prior to VL diagnosis (n = 106; 64.2%). Initial cure rate was 83.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 77.6-88.6); death rate 12.7% (95% CI, 8.5-18.5) and parasitological failure rate 3.5% (95% CI, 1.6-7.4). Tuberculosis co-infection at VL diagnosis was predictive of parasitological failure (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 8.14; p = 0.02). Predictors of death were age >40 years (aOR, 5.10; p = 0.009), hemoglobin ≤6.5 g/dL (aOR, 5.20; p = 0.002) and primary VL (aOR, 8.33; p = 0.001). Initial parasitological failure rates were very low with AmBisome and miltefosine combination therapy. This regimen seems a suitable

  15. disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase complex. This disorder results in recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Aspergillus species are the most common fungal infections in these patients. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of fungal infection in a girl with CGD. We confirmed aspergillosis through the positive microscopic and macroscopic examinations, as well as radiology results. Invasive aspergillosis in this patient with pneumonia, lung abscess, and osteomyelitis of the ribs was not initially treated with amphotericin B (Am B and recombinant interferon-gamma. Conclusion: Among infectious diseases, fungal infections, in particular aspergillosis, remain a serious problem in CGD patients. Considering poor clinical response and deficient immune system, rapid diagnosis of fungal infection and optimizing the treatment of these patients are recommended.

  16. Patient empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Nanna Bjerg; Joergensen, Clara Ruebner; Thomsen, Thora Grothe

    2017-01-01

    Background There is an increased attention to and demand for patient empowerment in cancer treatment and follow-up programmes. Patient empowerment has been defined as feeling in control of or having mastery in relation to cancer and cancer care. This calls for properly developed questionnaires...... assessing empowerment from the user perspective. The aim of this review was to identify questionnaires and sub-scales measuring empowerment and manifestations of empowerment among cancer patients. Materials and methods We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases....... Empowerment and multiple search terms associated with empowerment were included. We included peer-reviewed articles published in English, which described questionnaires measuring empowerment or manifestations of empowerment in a cancer setting. In addition, the questionnaire had to be a patient...

  17. chemotherapy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Augustyniuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background . Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM practices for cancer have become popular among oncology patients. An increasing interest in alternative medicine can be explained by the inefficiency of conventional treatment, dissatisfaction with treating patients like objects, and the will to use all available treatment methods. Objectives . The authors assessed how often patients use CAM methods, and which of them are most popular. Material and methods . The study was conducted in Military Hospital no. 109 and the Independent Public Clinical Hospital no. 1 in Szczecin among 100 chemotherapy patients. This survey-based study was performed using an original questionnaire. Results. Most respondents (68% did not use alternative methods to fight the disease. The most popular treatment methods were: herbal medicine (50%, alternative medicine preparations (38% and diet (25%, and the least common: hypnosis (3% and aromatherapy (3%. Analyzed sociodemographic factors had no effects on a choice of a CAM method. Patients obtained information about CAM methods mainly from the Internet (40%, medical staff (37% and literature (31%. Conclusions . 1. Using CAM by patients receiving chemotherapy for neoplasms is quite a common phenomenon. 2. CAM were more often chosen by women. Neither the duration of the disease nor sociodemographic data had effects on making the decision to use CAM methods. 3. The most popular CAM were: herbal medicine, alternative medicine preparations, and diet. 4. Cancer patients should receive special support from nurses and doctors as well as other members of the therapeutic team. Oncology patients should never be left on their own so that they were forced to seek help and support in therapies unconfirmed by scientific investigation.

  18. Epidemiological changes in leishmaniasis in Spain according to hospitalization-based records, 1997-2011: raising awareness towards leishmaniasis in non-HIV patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Herrador

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In Spain, Leishmania infantum is endemic, human visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis cases occurring both in the Peninsula, as well as in the Balearic Islands. We aimed to describe the clinical characteristics of leishmaniasis patients and the changes in the disease evolution after the introduction of antiretroviral therapy in 1997. In this descriptive study, we used Spanish Centralized Hospital Discharge Database for the hospitalized leishmaniasis cases between 1997 and 2011. We included in the analysis only the records having leishmaniasis as the first registered diagnosis and calculated the hospitalization rates. Disease trend was described taking into account the HIV status. Adjusted odds-ratio was used to estimate the association between clinical and socio-demographic factors and HIV co-infection. Of the total 8010 Leishmaniasis hospitalizations records, 3442 had leishmaniasis as first diagnosis; 2545/3442 (75.6% were males and 2240/3442 (65.1% aged between 14-65 years. Regarding disease forms, 2844/3442 (82.6% of hospitalizations were due to visceral leishmaniasis (VL, while 118/3442 (3.4% hospitalizations were cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL. Overall, 1737/2844 of VL (61.1% were HIV negatives. An overall increasing trend was observed for the records with leishmaniasis as first diagnosis (p=0.113. Non-HIV leishmaniasis increased during this time period (p=0.021 while leishmaniasis-HIV co-infection hospitalization revealed a slight descending trend (p=0.717. Leishmaniasis-HIV co-infection was significantly associated with male sex (aOR=1.6; 95% CI: 1.25-2.04, 16-64 years age group (aOR=17.4; 95%CI: 2.1-143.3, visceral leishmaniasis aOR=6.1 (95%CI: 3.27-11.28 and solid neoplasms 4.5 (95% CI: 1.65-12.04. The absence of HIV co-infection was associated with lymph/hematopoietic neoplasms (aOR=0.3; 95%CI:0.14-0.57, other immunodeficiency (aOR=0.04; 95% CI:0.01-0.32 and transplant (aOR=0.01; 95%CI:0.00-0.07. Our findings suggest a significant increase

  19. Hungry earth and vengeful stars: soul loss and identity in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, C

    1998-10-01

    This article contributes to the cross-cultural literature on fright sickness and soul loss with an analysis of cases among Quechua indians (runa) in a rural community in the southern Peruvian Andes. One of the aims of this article is to incorporate an emic understanding of the intersection of the cosmological and social landscapes into discussions of Quechua conceptions of health and illness. It outlines Quechua constructions of body, self, and cosmos that are relevant to explaining the concepts of soul/spirit, interior/exterior, and runa/nonruna that are related to soul loss. The illness suffered by victims of fright sickness embodies the Quechua construction of self and is linked not only to broader sociopolitical realities of Peru but also to cosmological beliefs. The diagnosis of spirit loss and fright in this cultural context reveals a crisis of identity: sufferers represent nonruna, or nonhumans. They succumb to fright or soul loss because of an emic concept of vulnerability that transcends the characteristics of gender and age usually associated with soul loss cross-culturally. Treatments, therefore, involve a reaffirmation of ethnic identity and a reintegration of patients into their families in terms of a culturally specific understanding of identity, community, and cosmos. rights reserved

  20. Lipid peroxidation and total cholesterol in HAART-naïve patients infected with circulating recombinant forms of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 in Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Teto

    Full Text Available HIV infection has commonly been found to affect lipid profile and antioxidant defense.To determine the effects of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection and viral subtype on patient's cholesterol and oxidative stress markers, and determine whether in the absence of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART, these biochemical parameters could be useful in patient's management and monitoring disease progression in Cameroon. For this purpose, we measured total cholesterol (TC, LDL cholesterol (LDLC, HDL cholesterol (HDLC, total antioxidant ability (TAA, lipid peroxidation indices (LPI, and malondialdehyde (MDA in HIV negative persons and HIV positive HAART-naïve patients infected with HIV-1 group M subtypes.We measured serum TC, LDLC, HDLC, plasma MDA, and TAA concentrations, and calculated LPI indices in 151 HIV-positive HAART-naïve patients and 134 seronegative controls. We also performed gene sequence analysis on samples from 30 patients to determine the effect of viral genotypes on these biochemical parameters. We also determined the correlation between CD4 cell count and the above biochemical parameters.We obtained the following controls/patients values for TC (1.96±0.54/1. 12±0. 48 g/l, LDLC (0. 67±0. 46/0. 43±0. 36 g/l, HDLC (105. 51±28. 10/46. 54±23. 36 mg/dl TAA (0. 63±0. 17/0. 16±0. 16 mM, MDA (0. 20±0. 07/0. 41±0. 10 µM and LPI (0. 34±0. 14/26. 02±74. 40. In each case, the difference between the controls and patients was statistically significant (p<0.05. There was a positive and statistically significant Pearson correlation between CD4 cell count and HDLC (r = +0.272; p<0.01, TAA (r = +0.199; p<0.05 and a negative and statistically significant Pearson correlation between CD4 cell count and LPI (r = -0.166; p<0.05. Pearson correlation between CD4 cell count and TC, CD4cell count and LDLC was positive but not statistically significant while it was negative but not statistically significant with MDA. The

  1. diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehraban Falahati

    2016-09-01

    candiduria and female gender, high FBS and urine glucose, uncontrolled diabetes (HbA1c ≥8, and acidic urine pH (P<0.05. Conclusion: Considering the high incidence rate of candiduria in diabetic patients, control of diabetes, predisposing factors, and causal relationships between diabetes and candiduria should be highlighted.

  2. Proportion and factors associated with recent HIV infection in a cohort of patients seen for care in Italy over 1996-2014: Data from the ICONA Foundation Study cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Nozza

    Full Text Available In Italy the prevalence of recent HIV infection (RHI isn't currently monitored. Early diagnosis is crucial to allow introduction of antiretroviral therapy (cART in the recent phase of infection. We aimed to estimate the proportion and the determinants of RHI among patients enrolled in the ICONA cohort; we explored differences in the median time from HIV diagnosis to cART initiation and in the viro-immunological response between RHI and Less Recent HIV infections (NRHI. We included antiretroviral-naïve HIV-positive patients enrolled in the cohort with documented dates of HIV-negative and positive antibodies tests, grouped in RHI (estimated date of seroconversion within 12 months of enrolment and NRHI. Proportion of RHI and the trend of this proportion by calendar period (1996-2014 were investigated (Chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was employed to identify factors associated with RHI. The time from seroconversion to cART initiation was compared in RHI and NRHI overall and after stratification by calendar period (survival analysis. We finally explored the time from starting cART to HIV-RNA <50 copies/mL and to CD4+ gain ≥200 cells/mmc by Cox regression. HIV seroconversion could be estimated for 2608/12,616 patients: 981/2608 (37.6% were RHI. Proportion of RHI increased in recent calendar periods and was associated with younger age, baseline higher HIV-RNA and CD4+ count. There wasn't difference in the 2-year estimates of cART start between RHI and NRHI, regardless of calendar period. Rates and hazards of virological response were similar in RHI versus NRHI. RHI showed a 1.5-fold higher probability of CD4+ gain, also following adjustment for calendar period and cART regimen, and for age, HCV and smoking; the difference in probability was however attenuated after further controlling for baseline HIV-RNA and CD4+ T-cells. The increased proportion of RHI over time suggests that in recent years in Italy HIV infections are more likely to

  3. HIV infection, aging and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe W

    2011-01-01

    , including cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is suggested that CVD occurs earlier among HIV-positive patients compared with HIV-negative patients, and at a higher rate. Several factors have been proposed to contribute to this. First, the traditional CVD risk factors are highly prevalent in this population...

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2012-08-08

    Aug 8, 2012 ... carried out among HIV positive patients and HIV negative blood donors, HIV ... infection and with increased morbidity and mortality [10]. ... therapy among HIV positive patients in sub Saharan Africa, ... males and 70 (68.6%) females with M: F ratio of 1:2.2 was enrolled for this ... In Table 2, triple infection with.

  5. Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM and associated risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM and associated risk factors among HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in Vhembe district of South Africa. ... shown a high prevalence of T. gondii (IgG) among patients attending different HIV clinics in the Vhembe district with no current infections among pregnant women.

  6. La escuela en el mundo campesino quechua: tensiones socioculturales entre modos de socialización de conocimientos. The school in the Quechua peasant world: sociocultural tensions between modes of socialization of knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Zambrana Vargas

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available En Bolivia, la implementación de reformas educativas estatales ha soslayado la realidad de una sociedad abigarrada y de diversidad cultural. Los modelos pedagógicos de la escuela fueron impuestos en el mundo rural y no han respondidoa las demandas e intereses socioculturales de la niñez campesina/indígena; enconsecuencia, la institución escolar'instrumento de uniformización cultural'noha sido sensible a las cosmovisiones indígenas y recurrentemente, a través de la historia, ha encubierto un escenario de conflicto, negociaciones y mediacionesculturales. El estudio, desde una perspectiva sociohistórica y cualitativa, analiza las tensiones entre los modos de socialización de conocimientos'escuela y comunidad campesina'en los procesos de transformación del sistema educativo estatal. Desde las percepciones e interacciones de los actores sociales educativos, los modos de socialización'como fenómeno cultural y pedagógico'revelan una complejidad de los sentidos/significados de las cosmovisiones de los actores. La investigación devela las características y las interrelaciones de las visiones y los discursos de las formas de socialización de la escuela y la comunidad campesina dentro de un contexto de implementación de la reforma educativa en la gestión del desarrollo municipal. The implementation of State educational reforms has sidestepped the reality of a heterogeneous society and Bolivia?s cultural diversity. The pedagogic models of formal schooling have been thrust upon a rural world and fail to respond to the needs and socio-cultural interests of an indigenous peasant youth. As a result, the institutionalized school?an instrument geared toward homogenizing the culture?has failed to be sensitive to diverse indigenous cosmic visions, which has historically and repeatedly resulted in cultural conflicts, bargaining and mediation. This study takes a socio-historical perspective to qualitatively analyze the tensions between the modes of socialization of knowledge?formal schooling vs. peasant community?in the transformative processes of the State education system. From the perceptions and interactions of the educational social actors, the modes of socialization?as cultural and pedagogical phenomena?reveal a complexity of manifestations regarding meaning/significance from the distinct cosmic visions of the different actors. The study reveals and contrasts the characteristics and inter-relationships of the different visions and discourses in the forms of socialization between formal schooling and the peasant community in the context of implementing State educational reform at the municipal level.

  7. Affirmative biopolitics: Social and vocational education for Quechua girls in the postcolonial “affectsphere” of Cusco, Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Trista C.C.; Minca, C.; Ormond, M.E.

    2018-01-01

    This paper draws on an affirmative biopolitical framework to analyze the governing of young lives in education and social spaces in Cusco, Peru. We engage with Berlant’s theorization of affect and spatialization of biopolitics in order to discuss youth’s embodied experiences of alternative forms of

  8. Indigenous Knowledge and Education from the Quechua Community to School: Beyond the Formal/Non-Formal Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida Huaman, Elizabeth; Valdiviezo, Laura Alicia

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose to approach Indigenous education beyond the formal/non-formal dichotomy. We argue that there is a critical need to conscientiously include Indigenous knowledge in education processes from the school to the community; particularly, when formal systems exclude Indigenous cultures and languages. Based on ethnographic…

  9. Acute care patients discuss the patient role in patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathert, Cheryl; Huddleston, Nicole; Pak, Youngju

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety has been a highly researched topic in health care since the year 2000. One strategy for improving patient safety has been to encourage patients to take an active role in their safety during their health care experiences. However, little research has shed light on how patients view their roles. This study attempted to address this deficit by inductively exploring the results of a qualitative study in which patients reported their ideas about what they believe their roles should be. Patients with an overnight stay in the previous 90 days at one of three hospitals were surveyed using a mailing methodology. Of 1,040 respondents, 491 provided an open-ended response regarding what they believe the patient role should be. Qualitative analysis found several prominent themes. The largest proportion of responses (23%) suggested that patients should follow instructions given by care providers. Other prominent themes were that patients should ask questions and become informed about their conditions and treatments, and many implied that they should expect competent care. Our results suggest that patients believe they should be able to trust that they are being provided competent care, as opposed to assuming a leadership role in their safety. Our results suggest that engaging patients in safety efforts may be complex, requiring a variety of strategies. Managers must provide environments conducive to staff and patient interactions to support patients in this effort. Different types of patients may require different engagement strategies.

  10. Longitudinal analysis of HIV risk behaviour patterns and their predictors among public primary care patients with tuberculosis in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl

    2018-12-01

    HIV-negative status (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.16-0.51) and inconsistent condom use (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.24-0.64) were associated with a lower odds of HIV status non-disclosure at last sex. The study found that among TB patients with problem drinking over a 6-month TB treatment period, the frequency of some HIV risk behaviours (inconsistent condom use) declined (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.41-0.98), but also persisted at a high-level calling for a strengthening and integration of HIV prevention into TB management.

  11. Communicating with patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask your patients about their outlooks, attitudes, and motivations. Learn the patient's perspective. Talk to the patient ... beliefs. This will help you understand the patient's motivation and let you plan the best ways to ...

  12. Nigerian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Vol 6, No 1-2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of drug induced hepatotoxicity among HIV positive and HIV negative patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Benin city, Nigeria · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. CV Nnabuchi, CE Omuemu, OA Lesi, DA Ndububa, 21-30 ...

  13. A clinical and epidemiologic update on the interaction between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background:Tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in human .... co-infected patients compared to HIV-negative .... Africa, the TB incidence rate was 3.5/100 person- ... Change to triple NRTI regimen or.

  14. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-11-02

    Nov 2, 2017 ... Being married, educated, HIV-negative, new treatment ... work is properly cited. Pan African ... important single predictor of TB incidence across the African continent ..... substantially improve TB patients' satisfaction which is highly ..... Female. 129. 33.5. Age groups. 18-27. 175. 45.5. 32.592. 6. 0.004. 28-37.

  15. Tubo-Ovarian Presentation of Burkitt's Lymphoma: Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burkitt's lymphoma rarely presents as a primary of the ovary. High index of suspicion is required to avoid delay of definitive management. There are a few case reports presented on ovarian Burkitt's lymphoma. We present a case of a 23 year old, para 1+1 HIV negative patient who presented to the Kenyatta National Hospital ...

  16. Oesophageal squamous cell cancer in a South African tertiary hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The site of tumour location was in the middle 96 (60.4%), distal 42(26.4%) and proximal 17(10.6%) oesophagus. The male to female ratio was 1:1 ... with HIV negative patients. Key words: Oesophageal cancer, squamous cell cancer, HIV, dental hygiene, socioeconomic status, South Africa, esophageal cancer, risk factors ...

  17. Patients' preferences for patient-centered communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Sofie Rosenlund; Christensen, Søren Troels; Andreasen T., Jesper

    2013-01-01

    To investigate patients' preferences for patient-centered communication (PCC) in the encounter with healthcare professionals in an outpatient department in rural Sierra Leone.......To investigate patients' preferences for patient-centered communication (PCC) in the encounter with healthcare professionals in an outpatient department in rural Sierra Leone....

  18. Differences in health-related quality of life between HIV-positive and HIV-negative people in Zambia and South Africa: a cross-sectional baseline survey of the HPTN 071 (PopART trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Ranjeeta Thomas, PhD

    2017-11-01

    Funding: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, International Initiative for Impact Evaluation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

  19. Views of Medical Doctors Regarding the 2013 WHO Adult HIV Treatment Guidelines Indicate Variable Applicability for Routine Patient Monitoring, for Their Family Members and for Themselves, in South-Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Daniel Francois Venter

    Full Text Available South African doctors (n = 211 experienced in antiretroviral therapy use were asked via an online questionnaire about the WHO 2013 adult antiretroviral integrated guidelines, as well as clinical and personal issues, in three hypothetical scenarios: directing the Minister of Health, advising a family member requiring therapy amidst unstable antiretroviral supplies, and where doctors themselves were HIV-positive. Doctors (54% favoured the 500 cells/μl WHO initiation threshold if advising the Minister; a third recommended retaining the 350 cells/μl threshold used at the time of the survey. However, they favoured a higher initiation threshold for their family member. Doctors were 4.9 fold more likely to initiate modern treatment, irrespective of their CD4 cell count, for themselves than for public-sector patients (95%CI odds ratio = 3.33-7.33; P<0.001, although lower if limited to stavudine-containing regimens. Doctors were equally concerned about stavudine-induced lactic acidosis and lipoatrophy. The majority (84% would use WHO-recommended first-line therapy, with concerns split between tenofovir-induced nephrotoxicity (55%, and efavirenz central nervous system effects (29%. A majority (61%, if HIV-positive, would pay for a pre-initiation resistance test, use influenza-prophylaxis (85%, but not INH-prophylaxis (61%, and treat their cholesterol and blood pressure concerns conventionally (63% and 60%. Over 60% wanted viral loads and creatinine measured six monthly. A third felt CD4 monitoring only necessary if clinically indicated or if virological failure occurred. They would use barrier prevention (83%, but not recommend pre-exposure prophylaxis, if their sexual partner was HIV-negative (68%. A minority would be completely open about their HIV status, but the majority would disclose to their sexual partners, close family and friends. Respondents were overwhelmingly in favour of continued antiretrovirals after breastfeeding. In conclusion, doctors

  20. Patient notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pádraig Ó Tuama

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Here’s the thing. While I have my asthma under control and my sleeping is no worse than usual, I am still near the uaigh. That’s the word for grave in Irish, and it’s also part of the word for loneliness. I’m near one or the other, or both. There was a time when my health was the only thing I talked about, and my friends from that time ask me now, and I remember that that was the person I was; when health was a fear, because pain was my first language. But what’s really bothering me is the way I use the possessive when it comes to my asthma, my insomnia, my thinning hair, my symptoms. It makes me think I think I am these things. Am I? I wilt therefore I am? If they are me, where will I go if I lose them? I remember when I learned the word ontology – the study of the nature of being. If I am sad, is sad me? If sad is me then what happens when someone treats my sadness? If we were all speaking Irish we would say that sadness is on me. But we’re not. Because when I was five I asked where English came from and my parents introduced me to stair. If we all spoke Irish we would say stair instead of history. But we speak English, mostly, and so stair is relegated to something we use to get up or down, never a story. Did you know that I carry my people’s history in my bones? People didn’t believe me when I said that but then scientists wrote about it, and discovered what was already there — inherited in the blood, the bones, the DNA, the genomes, the chromosomes, like thinning curly hair, like weak lungs, like poetry, like insomnia — and it’s all the rage now, that codified stairstory inside us. Once when I was waiting on a trolley I kept on trying to get up even though I knew I’d fall down. So they put an orderly to mind me. Well, he was there to restrain me, but I didn’t mind. He was young and eager to be seen to be good with patients. I asked him how long his shift had been and he said it was his first. After a bit of this

  1. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  2. Patient life in hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid

    Patient life in hospital.A qualitative study of informal relationships between hospitalised patients Introduction Within a patientology framework, this PhD dissertation is about an empirical study on patient life that provides insight into the nature of informal relationships between patients...... are created through stories about three roughly framed aspects of hospitalisation: A. Being together with fellow patients entails a constant dilemma, B. Relationships between patients are restricted and extended and C. Shifting perspectives in solidarity. Conclusion Patients' hospitalisation is strongly...

  3. Preoperative patient education: evaluating postoperative patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, B J

    1994-04-01

    Preoperative teaching is an important part of patient care and can prevent complications, as well as promote patient fulfillment during hospitalization. A study was conducted at Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans, LA, in 1989, to determine the impact of a preoperative teaching program on the incidence of postoperative atelectasis and patient satisfaction. Results showed no significant difference of postoperative complications and patient gratification after participating in a structured preoperative teaching program. As part of this study, it was identified that a patient evaluation tool for a preoperative teaching class needed to be developed. The phases of this process are explained in the following article.

  4. Haplotype Study in SCA10 Families Provides Further Evidence for a Common Ancestral Origin of the Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampi, Giovana B; Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Hünemeier, Tábita; Gheno, Tailise C; Furtado, Gabriel V; Veliz-Otani, Diego; Cornejo-Olivas, Mario; Mazzeti, Pillar; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Jardim, Laura B; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza

    2017-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and epilepsy. The disease is caused by a pentanucleotide ATTCT expansion in intron 9 of the ATXN10 gene on chromosome 22q13.3. SCA10 has shown a geographical distribution throughout America with a likely degree of Amerindian ancestry from different countries so far. Currently available data suggest that SCA10 mutation might have spread out early during the peopling of the Americas. However, the ancestral origin of SCA10 mutation remains under speculation. Samples of SCA10 patients from two Latin American countries were analysed, being 16 families from Brazil (29 patients) and 21 families from Peru (27 patients) as well as 49 healthy individuals from Indigenous Quechua population and 51 healthy Brazilian individuals. Four polymorphic markers spanning a region of 5.2 cM harbouring the ATTCT expansion were used to define the haplotypes, which were genotyped by different approaches. Our data have shown that 19-CGGC-14 shared haplotype was found in 47% of Brazilian and in 63% of Peruvian families. Frequencies from both groups are not statistically different from Quechua controls (57%), but they are statistically different from Brazilian controls (12%) (p Quechuas, 19-15-CGGC-14-10, is found in 50% of Brazilian and in 65% of Peruvian patients with SCA10. These findings bring valuable evidence that ATTCT expansion may have arisen in a Native American chromosome.

  5. Awake craniotomy. A patient`s perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajunaid, Khalid M; Ajlan, Abdulrazag M

    2015-07-01

    To report the personal experiences of patients undergoing awake craniotomy for brain tumor resection. We carried out a qualitative descriptive survey of patients` experiences with awake craniotomies for brain tumor resection. The survey was conducted through a standard questionnaire form after the patient was discharged from the hospital. Of the 9 patients who met the inclusion criteria and underwent awake craniotomy, 3 of those patients reported no recollection of the operation. Five patients had auditory recollections from the operation. Two-thirds (6/9) reported that they did not perceive pain. Five patients remembered the head clamp fixation, and 2 of those patients classified the pain from the clamp as moderate. None of the patients reported that the surgery was more difficult than anticipated. Awake craniotomy for surgical resection of brain tumors was well tolerated by patients. Most patients reported that they do not recall feeling pain during the operation. However, we feel that further work and exploration are needed in order to achieve better control of pain and discomfort during these types of operations.

  6. Patient Assessment File (PAF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Patient Assessment File (PAF) database compiles the results of the Patient Assessment Instrument (PAI) questionnaire filled out for intermediate care Veterans...

  7. Transfer Out Patient Not Abandon The Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Physician-patient relationship is unique in some aspects and not-so-unique in other aspects when compared to other human interactions. Until-unless for the sake of health promotional activities, this relationship is almost always conceived in the times of human sufferings and consequently culminated when those sufferings have subsided as well as sought out happiness has ensued/been achieved. However, not all physician-patient relationships follow the normal course and/or meet the natural ends. These abnormal relationships are not inconsequential in terms of numbers and/or their effects (short-term and long term on both patients and physicians. Every country has its own baggage in the wake of why, how and what about these abnormal ends to physician-patient relationships; however, the most common causes are the patients’ inability to pay their medical bills, the conflicting goals of physicians and their patients in regards to patients’ sufferings’ management and finally the behavioral issues (patients’ and/or physicians’ interfering these relationships. Irrespective of any cause, the physicians should never forget that the patient can always discharge their physicians and discontinue their relationship with their physicians without any reason (until unless the physicians deem those patients either incapable/non-consentable to do so and/or potential threat to their own personal safety or other people’s safety. Contrarily, physicians can also discharge patients from their care but cannot abandon these patients (1-3 which mean that physicians have to ensure their discharged patients either are referred to or have sought another physician within appropriate time frame post-relationship-discontinuation. Each country has their own medico-legal liabilities that vary in terms of penalties imposed; however, irrespective of the feared legal concerns, the physicians should not forget that ethical essence of medicine is the art of healing that

  8. Dentist-Patient Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    In the dentist-patient relationship confidence comes from the assurance that personal information(belonging to the patient will remain confidential; this is in the interest of the patient and the patient'sautonomy is recognized. There were presented several behavioral types which can lead to a physicianpatientrelationship, based on trust.

  9. A good patient?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Catherine; Scott, Kerry; Skovdal, Morten

    2015-01-01

    , physical cleanliness, honesty, gratitude and lifestyle adaptations (taking pills correctly andcoming to the clinic when told). As healthcare workers may decide to punish patients who do not live up the‘good patient persona’, many patients seek to perform within the confines of the ‘good patient persona...

  10. Detecção de imunoglobulinas IgG, IgM e IgA anti-Toxoplasma gondii no soro, líquor e saliva de pacientes com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida e neurotoxoplasmose Detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG, IgM and IgA immunoglobulins in the serum, cerebrospinal fluid and saliva of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and neurotoxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aercio Sebastião Borges

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudamos 55 pacientes com sindrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (SIDA e neurotoxoplasmose (grupo 1; 37 pacientes com SIDA e comprometimento neurológico por outra etiologia (grupo 2 e 18 indivíduos anti-HIV negativos com manifestações neurológicas (grupo 3, pesquisando IgG, IgA e IgM anti-Toxoplasma gondii, no soro, líquor e saliva, utilizando teste ELISA, para fins diagnósticos. O valor preditivo negativo do teste para o encontro de IgG no soro foi 100% e no líquor, 92,4%. Não houve diferença entre os três grupos quanto aos anticorpos IgA neste material. Para IgA, no líquor, o teste alcançou 72,7% de especificidade (pWe studied 55 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS and neurotoxoplasmosis (group 1, 37 patients with AIDS and neurological involvement due to another etiology (group 2 and 18 anti-HIV-negative individuals with neurological manifestations, by searching for anti-T. gondii IgG, IgA and IgM immunoglobulins in serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSFand saliva, using ELISA. The negative predictive value of the test for IgG in serum was 100% and in CSF, 92.4%. There was no difference among the three groups studied regarding IgA in serum. For IgA, in CSF the test reached 72.7% specificity (p<0.05. In saliva, only the detection of IgG was found to be correlated with a diagnosis of neurotoxoplasmosis. We emphasize that the absence of anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies in serum and CSF strongly indicates the absence of a diagnosis of neurotoxoplasmosis and that specific IgA immunoglobulins in CSF and IgG in saliva may represent two auxiliary markers for the differential diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis in AIDS.

  11. Patient-centred Prevention among PAD Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pii, Kathrine Hoffmann

    2015-01-01

    Intro: This paper discusses a central professional dilemma in patient-centred education: on one hand the concern for ensuring patients autonomy and right to make their own decisions regarding their treatment and, on the other hand, a concern for getting patients to make the “right” decisions......-centredness is thus promoted as a way to organize health more effectively (in terms of cost and treatment outcomes) and as a way to ensure patients’ autonomy and fundamental right to make their own decisions regarding their treatment. Critical voices within social and nursing theory have however argued....... The paper shows that the programme’s attempt to facilitate that patients make their “own” decision is challenged by patients who understand the preventive programme in relational terms and even demand more intervention from the professionals in terms of expert advice, involvement, and discipline. Conclusion...

  12. Ergonomics and patient handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoskey, Kelsey L

    2007-11-01

    This study aimed to describe patient-handling demands in inpatient units during a 24-hour period at a military health care facility. A 1-day total population survey described the diverse nature and impact of patient-handling tasks relative to a variety of nursing care units, patient characteristics, and transfer equipment. Productivity baselines were established based on patient dependency, physical exertion, type of transfer, and time spent performing the transfer. Descriptions of the physiological effect of transfers on staff based on patient, transfer, and staff characteristics were developed. Nursing staff response to surveys demonstrated how patient-handling demands are impacted by the staff's physical exertion and level of patient dependency. The findings of this study describe the types of transfers occurring in these inpatient units and the physical exertion and time requirements for these transfers. This description may guide selection of the most appropriate and cost-effective patient-handling equipment required for specific units and patients.

  13. The Angry Dying Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert E.

    1999-02-01

    Over 25 years ago, Kubler-Ross identified anger as a predictable part of the dying process. When the dying patient becomes angry in the clinical setting, all types of communication become strained. Physicians can help the angry dying patient through this difficult time by using 10 rules of engagement. When physicians engage and empathize with these patients, they improve the patient's response to pain and they reduce patient suffering. When physicians educate patients on their normal responses to dying and enlist them in the process of family reconciliation, they can impact the end-of-life experience in a positive way.

  14. Patient Safety Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Solvejg

    of health care professional’s behaviour, habits, norms, values, and basic assumptions related to patient care; it is the way things are done. The patient safety culture guides the motivation, commitment to and know-how of the safety management, and how all members of a work place interact. This thesis......Patient safety is highly prioritised in the Danish health care system, never the less, patients are still exposed to risk and harmed every day. Implementation of a patient safety culture has been suggested an effective mean to protect patients against adverse events. Working strategically...

  15. Organizing Patient Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm Johansen, Mette

    hospitals. During the last 25 years, patient involvement and quality improvement have become connected in Danish healthcare policy. However, the ideal of involving patients in quality improvement is described in very general terms and with only few specific expectations of how it is to be carried out...... in practice, as I show in the thesis. In the patient involvement literature, the difficulties of getting patient involvement in quality improvement to have in an impact on the planning and development of healthcare services is, for example, ascribed to conceptual vagueness of patient involvement, differences...... in perspectives, values and understandings between patients and healthcare professionals, or the lack of managerial attention and prioritization....

  16. National Patient Safety Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Member Testimonials Lifetime Members Stand Up for Patient Safety Welcome Stand Up Members Stand Up e-News ... PLS Webcast Archives Stand Up Templates and Logos Patient Safety Coalition Coalition Overview Coalition Member Roster Members-Only ...

  17. Praying for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Julie; Macey, Nicola

    2017-01-04

    I feel sad for the nurse who was sacked for praying for a patient. Whatever happened to freedom of speech? What is wrong with offering to pray with patients? I pray this nurse finds a job where people appreciate her.

  18. Wooing patients with technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Technologies that can give healthcare organizations a marketing advantage with patients include: Registration kiosks that request payment automatically, in a more comfortable environment for both patients and registration staff. Emails that enable patients to schedule initial visits and follow-up care. Secure online messaging platforms that enable patients to obtain timely answers to questions they have for their providers both before and after receiving services.

  19. Can "patient keeper" help in-patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinnawi, M F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present our "Patient Keeper" application, which is a client-server medical application. "Patient Keeper" is designed to run on a mobile phone for the client application and on a PC for the server application using J2ME and JAVA2, respectively. This application can help doctors during visits to their patients in hospitals. The client application allows doctors to store on their mobile phones the results of their diagnoses and findings such as temperature, blood pressure, medications, analysis, etc., and send this information to the server via short message service (SMS) for storage in a database. The server can also respond to any request from the client and send the result via Bluetooth, infrared, or over the air. Experimental results showed a significant improvement of the healthcare delivery and reduction for in-patient stay.

  20. Influence of HIV infection on the clinical presentation and outcome of adults with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde, Cameroon: a retrospective hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yone Eric Walter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of HIV infection on the evolution of acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate possible differences in the clinical presentation and in-hospital outcomes of patients with CAP with and without HIV infection in a specialised service in Yaounde. Methods Medical files of 106 patients (51 men aged 15 years and above, admitted to the Pneumology service of the Yaounde Jamot Hospital between January 2008 and May 2012, were retrospectively studied. Results Sixty-two (58.5% patients were HIV infected. The median age of all patients was 40 years (interquartile range: 31.75-53 and there was no difference in the clinical and radiological profile of patients with and without HIV infection. The median leukocyte count (interquartile range was 14,600/mm3 (10,900-20,600 and 10,450/mm3 (6,400-16,850 respectively in HIV negative and HIV positive patients (p = 0.002. Median haemoglobin level (interquartile range was 10.8 g/dl (8.9-12 in HIV negative and 9.7 g/dl (8–11.6 in HIV positive patients (p = 0.025. In-hospital treatment failure on third day (39.5% vs. 25.5.1%, p = 0.137 and mortality rates (9% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.401 were similar between HIV negative and HIV positive patients. Conclusion Clinical and radiological features as well as response to treatment and in hospital fatal outcomes are similar in adult patients hospitalised with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde. In contrast, HIV infected patients tend to be more anaemic and have lower white cell counts than HIV negative patients. Larger prospective studies are needed to consolidate these findings.

  1. Learning from patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Prior research on the use of patients as teachers has focused on testing the effectiveness of this practice and exploring its benefits for students. However, very little is known about the added value of patient teaching and how it relates to patient-centred learning. The aim of this study...

  2. The elderly patients' dignity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente; Hall, E.O.C.; Wagner, L.

    2007-01-01

    the principles of nursing practice, protecting, enhancing and promoting the elderly patient's health potential. It is suggested that these themes of dignity provide a frame of reference in elder care; they shape the understanding of when health issues become a concern for health-promoting care for the elderly...... patient and what goals should be defined. Key words: Dignity, elderly patient, phenomenological hermeneutical method....

  3. Does patient satisfaction affect patient loyalty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Daniel P; Mylod, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate how patient satisfaction affects propensity to return, i.e. loyalty. Data from 678 hospitals were matched using three sources. Patient satisfaction data were obtained from Press Ganey Associates, a leading survey firm; process-based quality measures and hospital characteristics (such as ownership and teaching status) and geographic areas were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The frequency with which end-of-life patients return to seek treatment at the same hospital was obtained from the Dartmouth Atlas. The study uses regression analysis to estimate satisfaction's effects on patient loyalty, while holding process-based quality measures and hospital and market characteristics constant. There is a statistically significant link between satisfaction and loyalty. Although satisfaction's effect overall is relatively small, contentment with certain hospitalization experience may be important. The link between satisfaction and loyalty is weaker for high-satisfaction hospitals, consistent with other studies in the marketing literature. RESEARCH LIMITATION/IMPLICATIONS: The US hospitals analyzed are not a random sample; the results are most applicable to large, non-profit teaching hospitals in competitive markets. Satisfaction ratings have business implications for healthcare providers and may be useful as a management tool for private and public purchasers. The paper is the first to show that patient satisfaction affects actual hospital choices in a large sample. Because patient satisfaction ratings are also correlated with other quality measures, the findings suggest a pathway through which individuals naturally gravitate toward higher-quality care.

  4. Remote Patient Management for Home Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Wallace

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote patient management (RPM offers renal health care providers and patients with end-stage kidney disease opportunities to embrace home dialysis therapies with greater confidence and the potential to obtain better clinical outcomes. Barriers and evidence required to increase adoption of RPM by the nephrology community need to be clearly defined. Ten health care providers from specialties including nephrology, cardiology, pediatrics, epidemiology, nursing, and health informatics with experience in home dialysis and the use of RPM systems gathered in Vienna, Austria to discuss opportunities for, barriers to, and system requirements of RPM as it applies to the home dialysis patient. Although improved outcomes and cost-effectiveness of RPM have been demonstrated in patients with diabetes mellitus and heart disease, only observational data on RPM have been gathered in patients on dialysis. The current review focused on RPM systems currently in use, on how RPM should be integrated into future care, and on the evidence needed for optimized implementation to improve clinical and economic outcomes. Randomized controlled trials and/or large observational studies could inform the most effective and economical use of RPM in home dialysis. These studies are needed to establish the value of existing and/or future RPM models among patients, policy makers, and health care providers.

  5. Displacing the patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    a care-oriented approach to the patient and also deploys market perceptions of patients as homogeneous target groups to which information can be standardized. In the latter approach (market orientation), the patient is also a resource for organizational development. Overall, the strategy presents...... an information-pursuing patient figure making it possible to streamline the organization's care orientation on market conditions. In contrast to a dichotomy of care and market as mutually exclusive (Mol 2008), care and market appear to be intertwined in political patient figures through which the organization...

  6. Learning the Patient's Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Sandra L; Kanter, Elisa

    2017-12-01

    To provide a brief history on narrative medicine and highlight its importance in providing quality patient care. Explains narrative medicine using published, peer-reviewed literature and highlights some of the literary, medical, sociological, and communication perspectives that contributed to the narrative medicine movement. A commitment to the patient-provider relationship and knowing the patient's story is a critical aspect in providing quality cancer care. Teaching oncology nurses skills that are grounded in narrative medicine will improve health care by increasing the nurses' knowledge of their patients and strengthening the nurse-patient relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Displacing the patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2014-01-01

    is not only about disease treatment, but also about ‘information treatment’ for the purpose of increasing patient satisfaction at the hospital. The goal of patient satisfaction addresses both a care-oriented approach to the patient and also deploys market perceptions of patients as homogeneous target groups...... for which information can be standardized. In the latter approach (market orientation), the patient is also a resource for organizational development. Overall, the strategy presents an information-pursuing patient figure that makes it possible to streamline the organization's care orientation on market......Over the past decade, patient communication has become a strategic priority in Danish public hospitals: communication is a focal point of policies, plans and daily work practices. Hospitals today create communication strategies and build communication departments to improve communication...

  8. Inpatient mortality rates during an era of increased access to HIV testing and ART: A prospective observational study in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoga, Mitch M; Rosenberg, Nora E; Stanley, Christopher C; LaCourse, Sylvia; Munthali, Charles K; Nsona, Dominic P; Haac, Bryce; Hoffman, Irving; Hosseinipour, Mina C

    2018-01-01

    In the era of increased access to HIV testing and antiretroviral treatment (ART), the impact of HIV and ART status on inpatient mortality in Malawi is unknown. We prospectively followed adult inpatients at Kamuzu Central Hospital medical wards in Lilongwe, Malawi, between 2011 and 2012, to evaluate causes of mortality, and the impact of HIV and ART status on mortality. We divided the study population into five categories: HIV-negative, new HIV-positive, ART-naïve patients, new ART-initiators, and ART-experienced. We used multivariate binomial regression models to compare risk of death between categories. Among 2911 admitted patients the mean age was 38.5 years, and 50% were women. Eighty-one percent (81%) of patients had a known HIV status at the time of discharge or death. Mortality was 19.4% and varied between 13.9% (HIV-negative patients) and 32.9% (HIV-positive patients on ART ≤1 year). In multivariable analyses adjusted for age, sex and leading causes of mortality, being new HIV-positive (RR = 1.64 95% CI: 1.16-2.32), ART-naive (RR = 2.28 95% CI: 1.66-2.32) or being a new ART-initiator (RR = 2.41 95% CI: 1.85-3.14) were associated with elevated risk of mortality compared to HIV-negative patients. ART-experienced patients had comparable mortality (RR = 1.33 95% CI: 0.94-1.88) to HIV-negative patients. HIV related mortality remains high among medical inpatients, especially among HIV-positive patients who recently initiated ART or have not started ART yet.

  9. Depression in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not enough to consider treatment and care depression in the oncology that is the most common psychiatric illness in cancer patient affects of cancer treatment and the patient`s quality of life negatively, which is determined through researches in the field. With development of psycho-oncology it has been demonstrated to establish an important link between the cancer patient`s treatment as well as psycho-social support for the patient and psychiatric treatment and care for the if it is needed. With this connection between them it has been proposed to use of bio-psycho-social-model in cancer patient to improve their care. To achieve this goal, it is expected from medical personnel to realize patients psychosocial need und if he/she has a psychiatric disorders or syndromes. For the medical personnel that work in oncology services, it is inevitable to organize in order to raise the awareness of depression in the cancer patients. In the present study, it is focused on raising the awareness of depression in cancer patient for the medical personnel. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 186-198

  10. Measuring the patient experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the complex issues of measuring the patient experience and evaluating the quality of health care. It discusses the use of surveys, patient stories and narrative methods of data collection in an attempt to define quality and how it should be measured. A recent Department of Health (DH) document insists that patients will be at the heart of decision making in the NHS by having greater control in informing strategic commissioning decisions (DH 2010c). The government aims to improve patient experience, enabling patients to rate services according to the quality of care they receive. This will be carried out using information generated by patients. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using surveys in gathering patient satisfaction data. It considers the value of surveys in measuring quality of care and appraises their usefulness in strengthening patients' collective voice. The paper investigates the use of another source of feedback - it examines the design of qualitative data collection methods as a means of gaining feedback from service users in encouraging providers of health care to be more responsive to their needs. Too often, patients are expected to fit the services, rather than services meeting the patients' needs. The most effective way of exploring and representing the patient's experience is by using a mixed-method approach. In other words, an integrated approach with the use of surveys and more narrative methods, such as patient stories, will effectively define quality and how it should be measured, ensuring that the focus is always on what matters most to patients.

  11. Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes patients: study of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medication adherence in type 2 diabetes patients: study of patients in ... impact of medication adherence on the clinical outcomes of type 2 diabetes patients at ... the review of case notes of one-hundred and fifty two randomly selected patients.

  12. Understanding patient experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tariq O.; Andersen, Pernille R. D.; Kornum, Anders C.

    2017-01-01

    , safety) arise from getting feedback on symptoms and from continuous and comforting interaction with clinicians. With this paper, we aim to sensitise UX researchers and designers of patient-centred e-health by proposing three UX dimensions: connectedness, comprehension, and compassion.......The term 'patient experience' is currently part of a global discourse on ways to improve healthcare. This study empirically explores what patient experience is in cardiac remote monitoring and considers the implications for user experience (UX). Through interviews around the deployment of a mobile...... app that enables patients to collaborate with clinicians, we unpack experiences in six themes and present narratives of patients' lifeworlds. We find that patients' emotions are grounded in negative feelings (uncertainty, anxiety, loss of hope) and that positive experiences (relief, reassurance...

  13. Music for Hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gross, B; Ketema Wassie, F; Agnholt, Hanne

    Music for hemodialysis patients Background Patients starting a new regimen of dialysis often experience anxiety and other psychological disturbances. They struggle with the unknown situation, feelings of uncertainty and on top of that, a high level of sophisticated technological equipment. Music...... is known from literature to influence and dampen anxiety and tension and has been used for millennia in the treatment of illness. Here we report a study on the influence of music on patients undergoing dialysis and whether music has a potential for lowering discomfort in patients during first-time dialysis.......   Purpose To investigate whether music can reduce feelings of anxiety, tension and restlessness in patients new to dialysis treatment and make them more relaxed during the treatment.   Method Twenty patients aged 42-84 were selected for participation in the study, which took place over two separate dialysis...

  14. Displacing the Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    as an affective care recipient, as a citizen with rights and as an individual need-oriented user on the one hand. On the other hand, the goal of patient satisfaction also deploys market perceptions of patients as homogeneous target groups to which information can be standardised. In the latter (market orientation......), the patient is also a resource for organizational development and a customer with consumer behavior. Overall, the strategy presents an information-pursuing patient figure making it possible to streamline the organization's care orientation on market conditions. In contrast to Annemarie Mol’s dichotomy of care......The analysis is based on an empirical study of a hospital’s communication strategy entitled: 'The Perspective of the Patient'. The paper asks how the strategy organizes communication work as situated displacements of the patient. Based on methodological elements from situational analysis (Clarke...

  15. Why measure patient satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskind, Patty; Fossey, Leslie; Brill, Kari

    2011-01-01

    A practice that consistently and continuously measures patient perceptions will be more efficient and effective in its daily operations. With pay-for-performance requirements on the horizon and consumer rating sites already publicizing impressions from physician encounters, a practice needs to know how it is performing through the eyes of the patients. Azalea Orthopedics has used patient feedback to coach its physicians on better patient communication. The Orthopaedic Institute has used patient satisfaction results to reduce wait times and measure the return on investment from its marketing efforts. Patient survey results that are put to work can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of practice operations as well as position the practice for increased profitability.

  16. Acknowledging the back patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    the back patient the narrative must be complemented by a different perspective that includes the issue of ethical responsibility. It is therefore also a question of adopting certain norms as binding; to be bound by obligation or loyalty. Thus, the literature review argues for a more process......-oriented patient approach that incorporates patients' narratives as an integral and ethical part of the care and treatment....

  17. Patients and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eardley, A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of interviews with thirty discharged patients who had undergone radical radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck are presented. Patients were asked whether their side-effects had got worse or had stayed the same, what effect their side effects had had on eating and drinking and whether they had felt depressed during this period. Measures which could be taken to improve patients' experiences of radiotherapy are discussed. (U.K.)

  18. Keeping our patients' secrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, J D; Rowan, D W; Nickelson, D E

    1999-10-01

    Protecting the privacy of the patient's medical record is a central issue in current discussions about a patient bill of rights, and controversy over a proposed "unique health identifier" has raised the decibel level of these discussions. At the heart of the debate is how best to resolve the inherent conflict between the individual's right to privacy and the need for access to patients' health information for reasons of public health, research, and health care management.

  19. Patient tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.J.; Hakimi, R.; Salehi, D.; McCord, T.; Zionczkowski, B.; Churchill, R.

    1987-01-01

    This exhibit describes computer applications in monitoring patient tracking in radiology and the collection of management information (technologist productivity, patient waiting times, repeat rate, room utilization) and quality assurance information. An analysis of the reports that assist in determining staffing levels, training needs, and patient scheduling is presented. The system is designed to require minimal information input and maximal information output to assist radiologists, quality assurance coordinators, and management personnel in departmental operations

  20. Patients Are Our Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Becker

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the patient-physician encounter, physicians hone their skills while alleviating the patient’s suffering. Both benefit. Leaning on the work of Hippocrates, Darwin, and William Osler, the authors sketch out the case for honoring patients as indispensable teachers of the art and science of medicine. They argue that this tradition of Hippocratic medicine both anticipates modern precision medicine and reawakens a focus on public health medicine, each a benefit to the patients and communities served by physicians. A community that compromises the learning relationship of physician to patient and population undermines quality of care.