WorldWideScience

Sample records for hiv-1 tat activity

  1. Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity contributes to perturbation of lymphocyte miRNA by HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lianbo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA (miRNA-mediated RNA silencing is integral to virtually every cellular process including cell cycle progression and response to virus infection. The interplay between RNA silencing and HIV-1 is multifaceted, and accumulating evidence posits a strike-counterstrike interface that alters the cellular environment to favor virus replication. For instance, miRNA-mediated RNA silencing of HIV-1 translation is antagonized by HIV-1 Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity. The activity of HIV-1 accessory proteins Vpr/Vif delays cell cycle progression, which is a process prominently modulated by miRNA. The expression profile of cellular miRNA is altered by HIV-1 infection in both cultured cells and clinical samples. The open question stands of what, if any, is the contribution of Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity or Vpr/Vif activity to the perturbation of cellular miRNA by HIV-1. Results Herein, we compared the perturbation of miRNA expression profiles of lymphocytes infected with HIV-1NL4-3 or derivative strains that are deficient in Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity (Tat K51A substitution or ablated of the vpr/vif open reading frames. Microarrays recapitulated the perturbation of the cellular miRNA profile by HIV-1 infection. The miRNA expression trends overlapped ~50% with published microarray results on clinical samples from HIV-1 infected patients. Moreover, the number of miRNA perturbed by HIV-1 was largely similar despite ablation of Tat RSS activity and Vpr/Vif; however, the Tat RSS mutation lessened HIV-1 downregulation of twenty-two miRNAs. Conclusions Our study identified miRNA expression changes attributable to Tat RSS activity in HIV-1NL4-3. The results accomplish a necessary step in the process to understand the interface of HIV-1 with host RNA silencing activity. The overlap in miRNA expression trends observed between HIV-1 infected CEMx174 lymphocytes and primary cells supports the utility of cultured

  2. HIV-1 Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity is conserved across kingdoms and counteracts translational repression of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuiming; Zhong, Xuehua; Yu, Lianbo; Ding, Biao; de Haan, Peter; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2009-01-13

    The RNA silencing pathway is an intracellular innate response to virus infections and retro-transposons. Many plant viruses counter this host restriction by RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity of a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, e.g., tomato bushy stunt virus P19. Here, we demonstrate P19 and HIV-1 Tat function across the plant and animal kingdoms and suppress a common step in RNA silencing that is downstream of small RNA maturation. Our experiments reveal that RNA silencing in HIV-1 infected human cells severely attenuates the translational output of the unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA, and possibly all HIV-1 transcripts. The attenuation in gag mRNA translation is exacerbated by K51A substitution in the Tat double-stranded RNA-binding domain. Tat, plant virus RSS, or Dicer downregulation rescues robust gag translation and bolsters HIV-1 virion production. The reversal of HIV-1 translation repression by plant RSS supports the recent finding in Arabidopsis that plant miRNAs operate by translational inhibition. Our results identify common features between RNA silencing suppression of plant and animal viruses. We suggest that RNA silencing-mediated translation repression plays a strategic role in determining the viral set-point in a newly HIV-1-infected patient.

  3. HIV-1 Tat Inhibits Autotaxin Lysophospholipase D Activity and Modulates Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Natalie A.; Fuss, Babette; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2016-01-01

    White matter injury has been frequently reported in HIV+ patients. Previous studies showed that HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription), a viral protein that is produced and secreted by HIV-infected cells, is toxic to young, immature oligodendrocytes (OLGs). Adding Tat to the culture medium reduced the viability of immature OLGs, and the surviving OLGs exhibited reduced process networks. OLGs produce and secrete autotaxin (ATX), an ecto-enzyme containing a lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity that converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid signaling molecule that stimulates OLG differentiation. We hypothesized that Tat affects OLG development by interfering with the ATX-LPA signaling pathway. Our data show that Tat treatment leads to changes in the expression of OLG differentiation genes and the area of OLG process networks, both of which can be rescued by LPA. Tat-treated OLGs showed no change in LPA receptor expression but significantly decreased extracellular ATX levels and lysoPLD activity. In Tat transgenic mice, expression of Tat in vivo leads to decreased OLG ATX secretion. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed a potential physical interaction between Tat and ATX. Together, these data strongly suggest two functional implications of Tat blocking ATX’s lysoPLD activity. On one hand, it attenuates OLG differentiation, and on the other hand it interferes with the protective effects of LPA on OLG process morphology. PMID:27659560

  4. HIV-1 Tat protein increases microglial outward K(+ current and resultant neurotoxic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianuo Liu

    Full Text Available Microglia plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Increasing evidence indicates the voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels are involved in the regulation of microglia function, prompting us to hypothesize Kv channels may also be involved in microglia-mediated neurotoxic activity in HIV-1-infected brain. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the involvement of Kv channels in the response of microglia to HIV-1 Tat protein. Treatment of rat microglia with HIV-1 Tat protein (200 ng/ml resulted in pro-inflammatory microglial activation, as indicated by increases in TNF-α, IL-1β, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide, which were accompanied by enhanced outward K(+ current and Kv1.3 channel expression. Suppression of microglial Kv1.3 channel activity, either with Kv1.3 channel blockers Margatoxin, 5-(4-Phenoxybutoxypsoralen, or broad-spectrum K(+ channel blocker 4-Aminopyridine, or by knockdown of Kv1.3 expression via transfection of microglia with Kv1.3 siRNA, was found to abrogate the neurotoxic activity of microglia resulting from HIV-1 Tat exposure. Furthermore, HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal apoptosis was attenuated with the application of supernatant collected from K(+ channel blocker-treated microglia. Lastly, the intracellular signaling pathways associated with Kv1.3 were investigated and enhancement of microglial Kv1.3 was found to correspond with an increase in Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. These data suggest targeting microglial Kv1.3 channels may be a potential new avenue of therapy for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders.

  5. HIV-1 Tat primes and activates microglial NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivero, Ernest T; Guo, Ming-Lei; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Liao, Ke; Callen, Shannon E; Buch, Shilpa

    2017-03-07

    Neuroinflammation associated with HIV-1 infection is a problem affecting ∼50% of HIV-infected individuals. NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated in HIV-induced microglial activation, but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. Since HIV-Tat continues to be present despite antiretroviral therapy and activates NF-kB, we hypothesized that Tat could prime the NLRP3 inflammasome. We found a dose- and time-dependent induction of NLRP3 expression in microglia exposed to Tat compared with control. Tat exposure also time-dependently increased the mature caspase-1 and IL-1β levels and enhanced the IL-1β secretion. These in vitro findings were validated in archival brain tissues from SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques. Further validation of NLRP3 priming in-vivo involved administration of LPS to HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats followed by assessment of IL-1β mRNA expression and inflammasome activation (ASC oligomers and mature IL-1β). Intriguingly, LPS potentiated upregulation of IL-1β mRNA and inflammasome activation in HIV-Tg rats compared with the wild type controls. Interestingly, we found an inverse relationship in the expression of NLRP3 and its negative regulator, miR-223, suggesting a miR-223-mediated mechanism for Tat-induced NLRP3 priming. Furthermore, blockade of NLRP3 resulted in decreased IL-1β secretion. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel role of Tat in priming and activating the NLRP3 inflammasome. Thus, NLRP3 can be envisioned as a therapeutic target for ameliorating Tat-mediated neuroinflammation.Significance StatementDespite successful suppression of viremia with increased longevity in the era of cART, chronic inflammation with underlying neurocognitive impairment continues to afflict almost 50% of infected individuals. Viral, bacterial and cellular products have all been implicated in promoting the chronic inflammation found in these individuals. Understanding the molecular mechanism(s) by which viral proteins such as HIV Tat can activate

  6. Direct interaction of the human I-mfa domain-containing protein, HIC, with HIV-1 Tat results in cytoplasmic sequestration and control of Tat activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Virginie W; Sheehy, Noreen; Duffy, Margaret; Hashimoto, Kenichi; Hall, William W

    2005-11-08

    The primary function of the HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat, activation of transcription from the viral LTR, is highly regulated by complex interactions between Tat and a number of host cell proteins. Tat nuclear import, a process mediated by importin beta, is a prerequisite for its activity. Here, we report and characterize the interaction of the human inhibitor of MyoD family domain-containing protein (I-mfa), HIC, with Tat at a biochemical and a functional level. This interaction was shown to occur in vivo and in vitro and to involve the nuclear localization signal and the transactivation responsive element-binding domains of Tat and the I-mfa domain of HIC. Coexpression of HIC and Tat resulted in the down-regulation of transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR, and colocalization studies revealed the cytoplasmic sequestration of Tat by HIC. Functionally this sequestration appears to be the underlying mechanism of LTR transcriptional repression by HIC and represents a unique mechanism for the control of Tat activity and regulation of HIV-1 replication.

  7. Role of endolysosomes in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Combined anti-retroviral therapeutic drugs effectively increase the lifespan of HIV-1-infected individuals who then have a higher prevalence of HAND (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorder. Soluble factors including HIV-1 proteins released from HIV-1-infected cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, and particular attention has been paid to the HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription protein because of its ability to directly excite neurons and cause neuronal cell death. Since HIV-1 Tat enters cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and since endolysosomes play an important role in neuronal cell life and death, we tested here the hypothesis that HIV-1 Tat neurotoxicity is associated with changes in the endolysosome structure and function and also autophagy. Following the treatment of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons with HIV-1 Tat or as controls mutant-Tat or PBS, neuronal viability was determined using a triple staining method. Preceding observations of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death, we observed statistically significant changes in the structure and membrane integrity of endolysosomes, endolysosome pH and autophagy. As early as 24 h after HIV-1 Tat was applied to neurons, HIV-1 Tat accumulated in endolysosomes, endolysosome morphology was affected and their size increased, endolysosome membrane integrity was disrupted, endolysosome pH increased, specific activities of endolysosome enzymes decreased and autophagy was inhibited, as indicated by the significant changes in three markers for autophagy. In contrast, statistically significant levels of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death were observed only after 48 h of HIV-1 Tat treatment. Our findings suggest that endolysosomes are involved in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention against HAND.

  8. Role of Endolysosomes in HIV-1 Tat-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Combined anti-retroviral therapeutic drugs effectively increase the lifespan of HIV-1-infected individuals who then have a higher prevalence of HAND (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorder. Soluble factors including HIV-1 proteins released from HIV-1-infected cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, and particular attention has been paid to the HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription protein because of its ability to directly excite neurons and cause neuronal cell death. Since HIV-1 Tat enters cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and since endolysosomes play an important role in neuronal cell life and death, we tested here the hypothesis that HIV-1 Tat neurotoxicity is associated with changes in the endolysosome structure and function and also autophagy. Following the treatment of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons with HIV-1 Tat or as controls mutant-Tat or PBS, neuronal viability was determined using a triple staining method. Preceding observations of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death, we observed statistically significant changes in the structure and membrane integrity of endolysosomes, endolysosome pH and autophagy. As early as 24 h after HIV-1 Tat was applied to neurons, HIV-1 Tat accumulated in endolysosomes, endolysosome morphology was affected and their size increased, endolysosome membrane integrity was disrupted, endolysosome pH increased, specific activities of endolysosome enzymes decreased and autophagy was inhibited, as indicated by the significant changes in three markers for autophagy. In contrast, statistically significant levels of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death were observed only after 48 h of HIV-1 Tat treatment. Our findings suggest that endolysosomes are involved in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention against HAND.

  9. HIV-1 Tat activates neuronal ryanodine receptors with rapid induction of the unfolded protein response and mitochondrial hyperpolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Norman

    Full Text Available Neurologic disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is ultimately refractory to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART because of failure of complete virus eradication in the central nervous system (CNS, and disruption of normal neural signaling events by virally induced chronic neuroinflammation. We have previously reported that HIV-1 Tat can induce mitochondrial hyperpolarization in cortical neurons, thus compromising the ability of the neuron to buffer calcium and sustain energy production for normal synaptic communication. In this report, we demonstrate that Tat induces rapid loss of ER calcium mediated by the ryanodine receptor (RyR, followed by the unfolded protein response (UPR and pathologic dilatation of the ER in cortical neurons in vitro. RyR antagonism attenuated both Tat-mediated mitochondrial hyperpolarization and UPR induction. Delivery of Tat to murine CNS in vivo also leads to long-lasting pathologic ER dilatation and mitochondrial morphologic abnormalities. Finally, we performed ultrastructural studies that demonstrated mitochondria with abnormal morphology and dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER in brain tissue of patients with HIV-1 inflammation and neurodegeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that abnormal RyR signaling mediates the neuronal UPR with failure of mitochondrial energy metabolism, and is a critical locus for the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 in the CNS.

  10. Pentosan polysulfate as an inhibitor of extracellular HIV-1 Tat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnati, M; Urbinati, C; Caputo, A; Possati, L; Lortat-Jacob, H; Giacca, M; Ribatti, D; Presta, M

    2001-06-22

    HIV-1 Tat protein, released from HIV-infected cells, may act as a pleiotropic heparin-binding growth factor. From this observation, extracellular Tat has been implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and of AIDS-associated pathologies. Here we demonstrate that the heparin analog pentosan polysulfate (PPS) inhibits the interaction of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Tat protein with heparin immobilized to a BIAcore sensor chip. Competition experiments showed that Tat-PPS interaction occurs with high affinity (K(d) = 9.0 nm). Also, GST.Tat prevents the binding of [(3)H]heparin to GST.Tat immobilized to glutathione-agarose beads. In vitro, PPS inhibits GST.Tat internalization and, consequently, HIV-1 long terminal repeat transactivation in HL3T1 cells. Also, PPS inhibits cell surface interaction and mitogenic activity of GST.Tat in murine adenocarcinoma T53 Tat-less cells. In all assays, PPS exerts its Tat antagonist activity with an ID(50) equal to approximately 1.0 nm. In vivo, PPS inhibits the neovascularization induced by GST.Tat or by Tat-overexpressing T53 cells in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. In conclusion, PPS binds Tat protein and inhibits its cell surface interaction, internalization, and biological activity in vitro and in vivo. PPS may represent a prototypic molecule for the development of novel Tat antagonists with therapeutic implications in AIDS and AIDS-associated pathologies, including Kaposi's sarcoma.

  11. HIV-1 Tat interacts with LIS1 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Willie

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Tat activates transcription of HIV-1 viral genes by inducing phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII. Tat can also disturb cellular metabolism by inhibiting proliferation of antigen-specific T lymphocytes and by inducing cellular apoptosis. Tat-induced apoptosis of T-cells is attributed, in part, to the distortion of microtubules polymerization. LIS1 is a microtubule-associated protein that facilitates microtubule polymerization. Results We identified here LIS1 as a Tat-interacting protein during extensive biochemical fractionation of T-cell extracts. We found several proteins to co-purify with a Tat-associated RNAPII CTD kinase activity including LIS1, CDK7, cyclin H, and MAT1. Tat interacted with LIS1 but not with CDK7, cyclin H or MAT1 in vitro. LIS1 also co-immunoprecipitated with Tat expressed in HeLa cells. Further, LIS1 interacted with Tat in a yeast two-hybrid system. Conclusion Our results indicate that Tat interacts with LIS1 in vitro and in vivo and that this interaction might contribute to the effect of Tat on microtubule formation.

  12. In vitro nuclear interactome of the HIV-1 Tat protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gautier, Virginie W

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One facet of the complexity underlying the biology of HIV-1 resides not only in its limited number of viral proteins, but in the extensive repertoire of cellular proteins they interact with and their higher-order assembly. HIV-1 encodes the regulatory protein Tat (86-101aa), which is essential for HIV-1 replication and primarily orchestrates HIV-1 provirus transcriptional regulation. Previous studies have demonstrated that Tat function is highly dependent on specific interactions with a range of cellular proteins. However they can only partially account for the intricate molecular mechanisms underlying the dynamics of proviral gene expression. To obtain a comprehensive nuclear interaction map of Tat in T-cells, we have designed a proteomic strategy based on affinity chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Our approach resulted in the identification of a total of 183 candidates as Tat nuclear partners, 90% of which have not been previously characterised. Subsequently we applied in silico analysis, to validate and characterise our dataset which revealed that the Tat nuclear interactome exhibits unique signature(s). First, motif composition analysis highlighted that our dataset is enriched for domains mediating protein, RNA and DNA interactions, and helicase and ATPase activities. Secondly, functional classification and network reconstruction clearly depicted Tat as a polyvalent protein adaptor and positioned Tat at the nexus of a densely interconnected interaction network involved in a range of biological processes which included gene expression regulation, RNA biogenesis, chromatin structure, chromosome organisation, DNA replication and nuclear architecture. CONCLUSION: We have completed the in vitro Tat nuclear interactome and have highlighted its modular network properties and particularly those involved in the coordination of gene expression by Tat. Ultimately, the highly specialised set of molecular interactions identified will

  13. Potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication by a Tat mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Luke W; Sivakumaran, Haran; Major, Lee; Suhrbier, Andreas; Harrich, David

    2009-11-10

    Herein we describe a mutant of the two-exon HIV-1 Tat protein, termed Nullbasic, that potently inhibits multiple steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Nullbasic was created by replacing the entire arginine-rich basic domain of wild type Tat with glycine/alanine residues. Like similarly mutated one-exon Tat mutants, Nullbasic exhibited transdominant negative effects on Tat-dependent transactivation. However, unlike previously reported mutants, we discovered that Nullbasic also strongly suppressed the expression of unspliced and singly-spliced viral mRNA, an activity likely caused by redistribution and thus functional inhibition of HIV-1 Rev. Furthermore, HIV-1 virion particles produced by cells expressing Nullbasic had severely reduced infectivity, a defect attributable to a reduced ability of the virions to undergo reverse transcription. Combination of these inhibitory effects on transactivation, Rev-dependent mRNA transport and reverse transcription meant that permissive cells constitutively expressing Nullbasic were highly resistant to a spreading infection by HIV-1. Nullbasic and its activities thus provide potential insights into the development of potent antiviral therapeutics that target multiple stages of HIV-1 infection.

  14. Potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication by a Tat mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke W Meredith

    Full Text Available Herein we describe a mutant of the two-exon HIV-1 Tat protein, termed Nullbasic, that potently inhibits multiple steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Nullbasic was created by replacing the entire arginine-rich basic domain of wild type Tat with glycine/alanine residues. Like similarly mutated one-exon Tat mutants, Nullbasic exhibited transdominant negative effects on Tat-dependent transactivation. However, unlike previously reported mutants, we discovered that Nullbasic also strongly suppressed the expression of unspliced and singly-spliced viral mRNA, an activity likely caused by redistribution and thus functional inhibition of HIV-1 Rev. Furthermore, HIV-1 virion particles produced by cells expressing Nullbasic had severely reduced infectivity, a defect attributable to a reduced ability of the virions to undergo reverse transcription. Combination of these inhibitory effects on transactivation, Rev-dependent mRNA transport and reverse transcription meant that permissive cells constitutively expressing Nullbasic were highly resistant to a spreading infection by HIV-1. Nullbasic and its activities thus provide potential insights into the development of potent antiviral therapeutics that target multiple stages of HIV-1 infection.

  15. HIV-1 Tat Protein Activates both the MyD88 and TRIF Pathways To Induce Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin-10 in Human Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planès, Rémi; Ben Haij, Nawal; Leghmari, Kaoutar; Serrero, Manutea; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we show that the HIV-1 Tat protein interacts with rapid kinetics to engage the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway, leading to the production of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The pretreatment of human monocytes with Tat protein for 10 to 30 min suffices to irreversibly engage the activation of the TLR4 pathway, leading to the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), two cytokines strongly implicated in the chronic activation and dysregulation of the immune system during HIV-1 infection. Therefore, this study analyzed whether the HIV-1 Tat protein is able to activate these two pathways separately or simultaneously. Using three complementary approaches, including mice deficient in the MyD88, TIRAP/MAL, or TRIF adaptor, biochemical analysis, and the use of specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), we demonstrated (i) that Tat was able to activate both the MyD88 and TRIF pathways, (ii) the capacity of Tat to induce TIRAP/MAL degradation, (iii) the crucial role of the MyD88 pathway in the production of Tat-induced TNF-α and IL-10, (iv) a reduction but not abrogation of IL-10 and TNF-α by Tat-stimulated macrophages from mice deficient in TIRAP/MAL, and (v) the crucial role of the TRIF pathway in Tat-induced IL-10 production. Further, we showed that downstream of the MyD88 and TRIF pathways, the Tat protein activated the protein kinase C (PKC) βII isoform, the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and NF-κB in a TLR4-dependent manner. Collectively, our data show that by recruiting the TLR4 pathway with rapid kinetics, the HIV-1 Tat protein leads to the engagement of both the MyD88 and TRIF pathways and to the activation of PKC, MAP kinase, and NF-κB signaling to induce the production of TNF-α and IL-10. In this study, we demonstrate that by recruiting the TLR4 pathway with rapid kinetics, the HIV-1 Tat protein leads to the engagement

  16. DDX3 RNA helicase is required for HIV-1 Tat function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda-Inoue, Mariko; Kuroki, Misao; Ariumi, Yasuo

    2013-11-22

    Host RNA helicase has been involved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication, since HIV-1 does not encode an RNA helicase. Indeed, DDX1 and DDX3 DEAD-box RNA helicases are known to be required for efficient HIV-1 Rev-dependent RNA export. However, it remains unclear whether DDX RNA helicases modulate the HIV-1 Tat function. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, that DDX3 is required for the HIV-1 Tat function. Notably, DDX3 colocalized and interacted with HIV-1 Tat in cytoplasmic foci. Indeed, DDX3 localized in the cytoplasmic foci P-bodies or stress granules under stress condition after the treatment with arsenite. Importantly, only DDX3 enhanced the Tat function, while various distinct DEAD-box RNA helicases including DDX1, DDX3, DDX5, DDX17, DDX21, and DDX56, stimulated the HIV-1 Rev-dependent RNA export function, indicating a specific role of DDX3 in Tat function. Indeed, the ATPase-dependent RNA helicase activity of DDX3 seemed to be required for the Tat function as well as the colocalization with Tat. Furthermore, the combination of DDX3 with other distinct DDX RNA helicases cooperated to stimulate the Rev but not Tat function. Thus, DDX3 seems to interact with the HIV-1 Tat and facilitate the Tat function.

  17. HIV-1 Tat activates indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase in murine organotypic hippocampal slice cultures in a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Keith W

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have established that activation of the tryptophan degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO mediates the switch from cytokine-induced sickness behavior to depressive-like behavior. Because human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Tat protein causes depressive-like behavior in mice, we investigated its ability to activate IDO in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs derived from neonatal C57BL/6 mice. Methods Depressive-like behavior in C57BL/6J mice was assessed by the forced swim test. Expression of cytokines and IDO mRNA in OHSCs was measured by real-time RT-PCR and cytokine protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs. p38 MAPK phosphorylation was analyzed by western blot. Results Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of Tat (40 ng induced depressive-like behavior in the absence of sickness. Addition of Tat (40 ng/slice to the medium of OHSCs induced IDO steady-state mRNA that peaked at 6 h. This effect was potentiated by pretreatment with IFNγ. Tat also induced the synthesis and release of TNFα and IL-6 protein in the supernatant of the slices and increased expression of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and the serotonin transporter (SERT. Tat had no effect on endogenous synthesis of IFNγ. To explore the mechanisms of Tat-induced IDO expression, slices were pretreated with the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitor SB 202190 for 30 min before Tat treatment. SB 202190 significantly decreased IDO expression induced by Tat, and this effect was accompanied by a reduction of Tat-induced expression of TNFα, IL-6, iNOS and SERT. Conclusion These data establish that Tat induces IDO expression via an IFNγ-independent mechanism that depends upon activation of p38 MAPK. Targeting IDO itself or the p38 MAPK signaling pathway could provide a novel therapy for comorbid depressive disorders in HIV-1-infected patients.

  18. Modulation of microtubule assembly by the HIV-1 Tat protein is strongly dependent on zinc binding to Tat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller Sylviane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During HIV-1 infection, the Tat protein plays a key role by transactivating the transcription of the HIV-1 proviral DNA. In addition, Tat induces apoptosis of non-infected T lymphocytes, leading to a massive loss of immune competence. This apoptosis is notably mediated by the interaction of Tat with microtubules, which are dynamic components essential for cell structure and division. Tat binds two Zn2+ ions through its conserved cysteine-rich region in vitro, but the role of zinc in the structure and properties of Tat is still controversial. Results To investigate the role of zinc, we first characterized Tat apo- and holo-forms by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Both of the Tat forms are monomeric and poorly folded but differ by local conformational changes in the vicinity of the cysteine-rich region. The interaction of the two Tat forms with tubulin dimers and microtubules was monitored by analytical ultracentrifugation, turbidity measurements and electron microscopy. At 20°C, both of the Tat forms bind tubulin dimers, but only the holo-Tat was found to form discrete complexes. At 37°C, both forms promoted the nucleation and increased the elongation rates of tubulin assembly. However, only the holo-Tat increased the amount of microtubules, decreased the tubulin critical concentration, and stabilized the microtubules. In contrast, apo-Tat induced a large amount of tubulin aggregates. Conclusion Our data suggest that holo-Tat corresponds to the active form, responsible for the Tat-mediated apoptosis.

  19. Human DDX3 interacts with the HIV-1 Tat protein to facilitate viral mRNA translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chih Lai

    Full Text Available Nuclear export and translation of intron-containing viral mRNAs are required for HIV-1 gene expression and replication. In this report, we provide evidence to show that DDX3 regulates the translation of HIV-1 mRNAs. We found that knockdown of DDX3 expression effectively inhibited HIV-1 production. Translation of HIV-1 early regulatory proteins, Tat and rev, was impaired in DDX3-depleted cells. All HIV-1 transcripts share a highly structured 5' untranslated region (UTR with inhibitory elements on translation of viral mRNAs, yet DDX3 promoted translation of reporter mRNAs containing the HIV-1 5' UTR, especially with the transactivation response (TAR hairpin. Interestingly, DDX3 directly interacts with HIV-1 Tat, a well-characterized transcriptional activator bound to the TAR hairpin. HIV-1 Tat is partially targeted to cytoplasmic stress granules upon DDX3 overexpression or cell stress conditions, suggesting a potential role of Tat/DDX3 complex in translation. We further demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat remains associated with translating mRNAs and facilitates translation of mRNAs containing the HIV-1 5' UTR. Taken together, these findings indicate that DDX3 is recruited to the TAR hairpin by interaction with viral Tat to facilitate HIV-1 mRNA translation.

  20. Human DDX3 interacts with the HIV-1 Tat protein to facilitate viral mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Cheng, Lie; Tarn, Woan-Yuh; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq; Sun, H Sunny

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear export and translation of intron-containing viral mRNAs are required for HIV-1 gene expression and replication. In this report, we provide evidence to show that DDX3 regulates the translation of HIV-1 mRNAs. We found that knockdown of DDX3 expression effectively inhibited HIV-1 production. Translation of HIV-1 early regulatory proteins, Tat and rev, was impaired in DDX3-depleted cells. All HIV-1 transcripts share a highly structured 5' untranslated region (UTR) with inhibitory elements on translation of viral mRNAs, yet DDX3 promoted translation of reporter mRNAs containing the HIV-1 5' UTR, especially with the transactivation response (TAR) hairpin. Interestingly, DDX3 directly interacts with HIV-1 Tat, a well-characterized transcriptional activator bound to the TAR hairpin. HIV-1 Tat is partially targeted to cytoplasmic stress granules upon DDX3 overexpression or cell stress conditions, suggesting a potential role of Tat/DDX3 complex in translation. We further demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat remains associated with translating mRNAs and facilitates translation of mRNAs containing the HIV-1 5' UTR. Taken together, these findings indicate that DDX3 is recruited to the TAR hairpin by interaction with viral Tat to facilitate HIV-1 mRNA translation.

  1. HIV-1 Tat and Viral Latency: What We Can Learn from Naturally Occurring Sequence Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamori, Doreen; Ueno, Takamasa

    2017-01-01

    Despite the effective use of antiretroviral therapy, the remainder of a latently HIV-1-infected reservoir mainly in the resting memory CD4+ T lymphocyte subset has provided a great setback toward viral eradication. While host transcriptional silencing machinery is thought to play a dominant role in HIV-1 latency, HIV-1 protein such as Tat, may affect both the establishment and the reversal of latency. Indeed, mutational studies have demonstrated that insufficient Tat transactivation activity can result in impaired transcription of viral genes and the establishment of latency in cell culture experiments. Because Tat protein is one of highly variable proteins within HIV-1 proteome, it is conceivable that naturally occurring Tat mutations may differentially modulate Tat functions, thereby influencing the establishment and/or the reversal of viral latency in vivo. In this mini review, we summarize the recent findings of Tat naturally occurring polymorphisms associating with host immune responses and we highlight the implication of Tat sequence variations in relation to HIV latency.

  2. Intersubtype Genetic Variation of HIV-1 Tat Exon 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Chandra Nath; Khandaker, Irona; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 Tat is a regulatory protein that plays a pivotal role in viral transcription and replication. Our study aims to investigate the genetic variation of Tat exon 1 in all subtypes of HIV-1: A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, and K. We performed phylogenetic, mutation, and selection pressure analyses on a total of 1,179 sequences of different subtypes of HIV-1 Tat obtained from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The mean nucleotide divergences (%) among the analyzed sequences of subtypes A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, and K were 88, 89, 90, 88, 86, 89, 88, 97, and 97, respectively. We revealed that subtype B evolved relatively faster than other subtypes. The second and fifth domains were found comparatively more variable among all subtypes. Site-by-site tests of positive selection revealed that several positions in all subtypes were under significant positive selection. Positively selected sites were found in the acidic domain at positions 3, 4, and 19, in the cysteine-rich domains at positions 24, 29, 32, and 36, in the core domain at position 40, and in the basic domain for the rest of the positions for all subtypes. Positions 58 and 68 in the basic domain were positively selected in subtypes A, B, C and B, C, F, respectively. We also observed high variability within positively selected sites in amino acid positions. Our study findings on HIV-1 Tat genetic variability may contribute to a better understanding of HIV-1 evolution as well as to the development of effective Tat-targeted therapeutics and vaccines.

  3. Interaction between Tat and Drugs of Abuse during HIV-1 Infection and Central Nervous System Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique E Maubert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In many individuals, drug abuse is intimately linked with HIV-1 infection. In addition to being associated with one-third of all HIV-1 infections in the United States, drug abuse also plays a role in disease progression and severity in HIV-1-infected patients, including adverse effects on the central nervous system (CNS. Specific systems within the brain are known to be damaged in HIV-1-infected individuals and this damage is similar to that observed in drug abuse. Even in the era of anti-retroviral therapy (ART, CNS pathogenesis occurs with HIV-1 infection, with a broad range of cognitive impairment observed, collectively referred to as HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. A number of HIV-1 proteins (Tat, gp120, Nef, Vpr have been implicated in the etiology of pathogenesis and disease as a result of the biologic activity of the extracellular form of each of the proteins in a number of tissues, including the CNS, even in ART-suppressed patients. In this review, we have made Tat the center of attention for a number of reasons. First, it has been shown to be synthesized and secreted by HIV-1-infected cells in the CNS, despite the most effective suppression therapies available to date. Second, Tat has been shown to alter the functions of several host factors, disrupting the molecular and biochemical balance of numerous pathways contributing to cellular toxicity, dysfunction, and death. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of ART suppression with regard to controlling the genesis and progression of neurocognitive impairment are currently under debate in the field and are yet to be fully determined. In this review, we discuss the individual and concerted contributions of HIV-1 Tat, drug abuse, and ART with respect to damage in the CNS, and how these factors contribute to the development of HAND in HIV-1-infected patients.

  4. Direct effects of HIV-1 Tat on excitability and survival of primary dorsal root ganglion neurons: possible contribution to HIV-1-associated pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianxun Chi

    Full Text Available The vast majority of people living with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 have pain syndrome, which has a significant impact on their quality of life. The underlying causes of HIV-1-associated pain are not likely attributable to direct viral infection of the nervous system due to the lack of evidence of neuronal infection by HIV-1. However, HIV-1 proteins are possibly involved as they have been implicated in neuronal damage and death. The current study assesses the direct effects of HIV-1 Tat, one of potent neurotoxic viral proteins released from HIV-1-infected cells, on the excitability and survival of rat primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. We demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat triggered rapid and sustained enhancement of the excitability of small-diameter rat primary DRG neurons, which was accompanied by marked reductions in the rheobase and resting membrane potential (RMP, and an increase in the resistance at threshold (R(Th. Such Tat-induced DRG hyperexcitability may be a consequence of the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 activity. Tat rapidly inhibited Cdk5 kinase activity and mRNA production, and roscovitine, a well-known Cdk5 inhibitor, induced a very similar pattern of DRG hyperexcitability. Indeed, pre-application of Tat prevented roscovitine from having additional effects on the RMP and action potentials (APs of DRGs. However, Tat-mediated actions on the rheobase and R(Th were accelerated by roscovitine. These results suggest that Tat-mediated changes in DRG excitability are partly facilitated by Cdk5 inhibition. In addition, Cdk5 is most abundant in DRG neurons and participates in the regulation of pain signaling. We also demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat markedly induced apoptosis of primary DRG neurons after exposure for longer than 48 h. Together, this work indicates that HIV-1 proteins are capable of producing pain signaling through direct actions on excitability and survival of sensory neurons.

  5. Homonuclear 1H NMR and circular dichroism study of the HIV-1 Tat Eli variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Jennifer D; Campbell, Grant R; Halimi, Hubert; Loret, Erwann P

    2008-01-01

    Background The HIV-1 Tat protein is a promising target to develop AIDS therapies, particularly vaccines, due to its extracellular role that protects HIV-1-infected cells from the immune system. Tat exists in two different lengths, 86 or 87 residues and 99 or 101 residues, with the long form being predominant in clinical isolates. We report here a structural study of the 99 residue Tat Eli variant using 2D liquid-state NMR, molecular modeling and circular dichroism. Results Tat Eli was obtained from solid-phase peptide synthesis and the purified protein was proven biologically active in a trans-activation assay. Circular dichroism spectra at different temperatures up to 70°C showed that Tat Eli is not a random coil at 20°C. Homonuclear 1H NMR spectra allowed us to identify 1639 NMR distance constraints out of which 264 were interresidual. Molecular modeling satisfying at least 1474 NMR constraints revealed the same folding for different model structures. The Tat Eli model has a core region composed of a part of the N-terminus including the highly conserved Trp 11. The extra residues in the Tat Eli C-terminus protrude from a groove between the basic region and the cysteine-rich region and are well exposed to the solvent. Conclusion We show that active Tat variants share a similar folding pattern whatever their size, but mutations induce local structural changes. PMID:18808674

  6. BSA conjugates bearing multiple copies of the basic domain of HIV-1 Tat: Prototype for the development of multitarget inhibitors of extracellular Tat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugatti, Antonella; Chiodelli, Paola; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Loyter, Abraham; Rusnati, Marco

    2010-07-01

    The transactivating factor (Tat) of HIV-1 is involved in AIDS progression and associated pathologies. Tat possesses a basic amino acid sequence implicated in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-mediated internalization, nuclear localization and transactivation by Tat and in the interaction of Tat with integrins and with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (KDR) (kinase insert domain receptor). A BSA conjugate bearing an average of four copies of a peptide representing the basic domain/nuclear localization signal of Tat (BSA-Tat-NLS) inhibits transactivation by Tat exogenously added to cells but not by Tat endogenously produced after cell transfection with a tat cDNA, indicating that BSA-Tat-NLS does not interfere with Tat at an intracellular level. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments revealed that BSA-Tat-NLS binds to the HSPG analogue heparin. Accordingly, BSA-Tat-NLS binds to HSPGs of HL3T1 cell surface and inhibits HSPG-dependent Tat internalization. BSA-Tat-NLS retains its inhibitory potential when pre-incubated with HL3T1 cells before Tat administration, possibly by masking cell-surface HSPGs thus preventing Tat binding and internalization. SPR experiments revealed that BSA-Tat-NLS binds also to integrin alpha(v)beta(3) and KDR. Accordingly, it inhibits pro-angiogenic endothelial cell adhesion to Tat and motogenesis. In conclusion, BSA-Tat-NLS binds/masks three different cell-surface receptors of Tat inhibiting different biological activities. These data point to BSA-Tat-NLS as a prototype for the development of Tat-antagonists endowed with a multitargeted mechanism of action.

  7. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection.

  8. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyangshuk [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Medical Life Sciences, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Yong Soo [Department of Biological Science, College of Natural Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinseu, E-mail: jinpark@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  9. HIV-1 Tat regulates the expression of the dcw operon and stimulates the proliferation of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jinsong; Zhang, Yumin; Knapp, Pamela E; Zhao, Tianyong

    2016-01-01

    Infections of pathogenic bacteria are very common in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. However, the biological effects of HIV-1 Tat on bacteria are incompletely understood. In this study, HIV-1 Tat was expressed in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) to investigate its biological effects on bacteria. Bacterial cells expressing either HIV-1 Tat1-86 (Tat1-86) or HIV-1 Tat1-72 (Tat1-72) grow significantly faster than those with either only an empty vector or an unrelated control (GFP or Rluc). Supplementation of purified HIV-1 Tat1-86 or Tat1-101 protein into bacterial culture medium stimulated the growth of both E. coli and PA01. The expression profile of certain cell division-associated genes, such as those in the division cell wall (dcw) operon (ftsA, ftsQ, ftsW and ftsZ), yafO and zipA, was altered in HIV-1 Tat1-86 expressing E. coli BL21(DE3). Furthermore, the expression of firefly luciferase (Fluc) reporter gene, when engineered for control by the dcw promoter and terminator, was enhanced by HIV-1 Tat in E. coli, confirming that HIV-1 Tat transcriptionally regulates the expression of the dcw operon. The finding that HIV-1 Tat stimulates bacterial growth whether it is produced intracellularly or applied extracellularly may have relevance for HIV patients who are highly susceptible to opportunistic bacterial infections. Contents category: Viruses -Retroviruses. The GenBank accession number for the sequence of HIV-1 Tat1-86 is AF324439.1.

  10. Impact of Genetic Variations in HIV-1 Tat on LTR-Mediated Transcription via TAR RNA Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larance Ronsard

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 evades host defense through mutations and recombination events, generating numerous variants in an infected patient. These variants with an undiminished virulence can multiply rapidly in order to progress to AIDS. One of the targets to intervene in HIV-1 replication is the trans-activator of transcription (Tat, a major regulatory protein that transactivates the long terminal repeat promoter through its interaction with trans-activation response (TAR RNA. In this study, HIV-1 infected patients (n = 120 from North India revealed Ser46Phe (20% and Ser61Arg (2% mutations in the Tat variants with a strong interaction toward TAR leading to enhanced transactivation activities. Molecular dynamics simulation data verified that the variants with this mutation had a higher binding affinity for TAR than both the wild-type Tat and other variants that lacked Ser46Phe and Ser61Arg. Other mutations in Tat conferred varying affinities for TAR interaction leading to differential transactivation abilities. This is the first report from North India with a clinical validation of CD4 counts to demonstrate the influence of Tat genetic variations affecting the stability of Tat and its interaction with TAR. This study highlights the co-evolution pattern of Tat and predominant nucleotides for Tat activity, facilitating the identification of genetic determinants for the attenuation of viral gene expression.

  11. PKCtheta and HIV-1 transcriptional regulator Tat co-exist at the LTR promoter in CD4+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosa eLopez-Huertas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available PKCtheta is essential for the activation of CD4+ T cells. Upon TCR/CD28 stimulation, PKCtheta is phosphorylated and migrates to the immunological synapse, inducing the activation of cellular transcription factors such as NF-kB and kinases as ERK that are critical for HIV-1 replication. We previously demonstrated that PKCtheta is also necessary for HIV-1 replication but the precise mechanism is unknown. Efficient HIV-1 transcription and elongation is absolutely dependent on the synergy between NF-kB and the viral regulator Tat. Tat exerts its function by binding a RNA stem-loop structure proximal to the viral mRNA cap site termed TAR. Besides, due to its effect on cellular metabolic pathways, Tat causes profound changes in infected CD4+ T cells such as the activation of NF-kB and ERK. We hypothesized that the aberrant up-regulation of Tat-mediated activation of NF-kB and ERK occurred through PKCtheta signaling. In fact, Jurkat TetOff cells with stable and doxycycline-repressible expression of Tat (Jurkat-Tat expressed high levels of mRNA for PKCtheta. In these cells, PKCtheta located at the plasma membrane was phosphorylated at T538 residue in undivided cells, in the absence of stimulation. Treatment with doxycycline inhibited PKCtheta phosphorylation in Jurkat-Tat, suggesting that Tat expression was directly related to the activation of PKCtheta. Both NF-kB and Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway were significantly activated in Jurkat-Tat cells, and this correlated with high transactivation of HIV-1 LTR promoter. RNA interference for PKCtheta inhibited NF-kB and ERK activity, as well as LTR-mediated transactivation even in the presence of Tat. In addition to Tat-mediated activation of PKCtheta in the cytosol, we demonstrated by sequential ChIP that Tat and PKCtheta coexisted in the same complex bound at the HIV-1 LTR promoter, specifically at the region containing TAR loop. In conclusion, PKCtheta-Tat interaction seemed to be essential for HIV-1

  12. Transactivation and signaling functions of Tat are not correlated: biological and immunological characterization of HIV-1 subtype-C Tat protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddappa, Nagadenahalli Byrareddy; Venkatramanan, Mohanram; Venkatesh, Prasanna; Janki, Mohanbabu Vijayamma; Jayasuryan, Narayana; Desai, Anita; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Ranga, Udaykumar

    2006-01-01

    Background Of the diverse subtypes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1), subtype-C strains cause a large majority of infections worldwide. The reasons for the global dominance of HIV-1 subtype-C infections are not completely understood. Tat, being critical for viral infectivity and pathogenesis, may differentially modulate pathogenic properties of the viral subtypes. Biochemical studies on Tat are hampered by the limitations of the current purification protocols. Tat purified using standard protocols often is competent for transactivation activity but defective for a variety of other biological functions. Keeping this limitation in view, we developed an efficient protein purification strategy for Tat. Results Tat proteins obtained using the novel strategy described here were free of contaminants and retained biological functions as evaluated in a range of assays including the induction of cytokines, upregulation of chemokine coreceptor, transactivation of the viral promoter and rescue of a Tat-defective virus. Given the highly unstable nature of Tat, we evaluated the effect of the storage conditions on the biological function of Tat following purification. Tat stored in a lyophilized form retained complete biological activity regardless of the storage temperature. To understand if variations in the primary structure of Tat could influence the secondary structure of the protein and consequently its biological functions, we determined the CD spectra of subtype-C and -B Tat proteins. We demonstrate that subtype-C Tat may have a relatively higher ordered structure and be less flexible than subtype-B Tat. We show that subtype-C Tat as a protein, but not as a DNA expression vector, was consistently inferior to subtype-B Tat in a variety of biological assays. Furthermore, using ELISA, we evaluated the anti-Tat antibody titers in a large number of primary clinical samples (n = 200) collected from all four southern Indian states. Our analysis of the Indian

  13. HIV-1 tat and rev upregulates osteoclast bone resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Chew

    2014-11-01

    resorption pit volume by 11 and 6%, respectively. Tat protein treatment was associated with upregulation of NFATc1 and cathepsin K mRNA expression by 20 and 15%, respectively. Incubation with tat and rev led to a dose-dependent increase in intracellular ROS production in the monocytes and OC precursors and significant upregulation in TNFα cytokine production by the OC precursors. Conclusions: In addition to their effect of OC differentiation, we demonstrated the effects of tat and rev on OC resorption. HIV tat and rev are both biologically active in driving a pro-osteoclastic phenotype.

  14. LRRK2 kinase inhibition prevents pathological microglial phagocytosis in response to HIV-1 Tat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marker Daniel F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs are accompanied by significant morbidity, which persists despite the use of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART. While activated microglia play a role in pathogenesis, changes in their immune effector functions, including phagocytosis and proinflammatory signaling pathways, are not well understood. We have identified leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 as a novel regulator of microglial phagocytosis and activation in an in vitro model of HANDs, and hypothesize that LRRK2 kinase inhibition will attenuate microglial activation during HANDs. Methods We treated BV-2 immortalized mouse microglia cells with the HIV-1 trans activator of transcription (Tat protein in the absence or presence of LRRK2 kinase inhibitor (LRRK2i. We used Western blot, qRT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and latex bead engulfment assays to analyze LRRK2 protein levels, proinflammatory cytokine and phagocytosis receptor expression, LRRK2 cellular distribution and phagocytosis, respectively. Finally, we utilized ex vivo microfluidic chambers containing primary hippocampal neurons and BV-2 microglia cells to investigate microglial phagocytosis of neuronal axons. Results We found that Tat-treatment of BV-2 cells induced kinase activity associated phosphorylation of serine 935 on LRRK2 and caused the formation of cytoplasmic LRRK2 inclusions. LRRK2i decreased Tat-induced phosphorylation of serine 935 on LRRK2 and inhibited the formation of Tat-induced cytoplasmic LRRK2 inclusions. LRRK2i also decreased Tat-induced process extension in BV-2 cells. Furthermore, LRRK2i attenuated Tat-induced cytokine expression and latex bead engulfment. We examined relevant cellular targets in microfluidic chambers and found that Tat-treated BV-2 microglia cells cleared axonal arbor and engulfed neuronal elements, whereas saline treated controls did not. LRRK2i was found to protect axons in the presence

  15. Archetype JC virus efficiently propagates in kidney-derived cells stably expressing HIV-1 Tat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukuzuma, Souichi; Kameoka, Masanori; Sugiura, Shigeki; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Nukuzuma, Chiyoko; Miyoshi, Isao; Takegami, Tsutomu

    2009-11-01

    Pathogenic JCV with rearranged regulatory regions (PML-type) causes PML, a demyelinating disease, in the brains of immunocompromised patients. On the other hand, archetype JCV persistently infecting the kidney is thought to be converted to PML-type virus during JCV replication in the infected host under immunosuppressed conditions. In addition, Tat protein, encoded by HIV-1, markedly enhances the expression of a reporter gene under control of the JCV late promoter. In order to examine the influence of Tat on JCV propagation, we used kidney-derived COS-7 cells, which only permit archetype JCV, and established COS-tat cells, which express HIV-1 Tat stably. We found that the extent of archetype JCV propagation in COS-tat cells is significantly greater than in COS-7 cells. On the other hand, COS-7 cells express SV40 T antigen, which is a strong stimulator of archetype JCV replication. The expression of SV40 T antigen was enhanced by HIV-1 Tat slightly according to real-time RT-PCR, this was not closely related to JCV replication in COS-tat cells. The efficiency of JCV propagation depended on the extent of expression of functional Tat. To our knowledge, this is the first report of increased production of archetype JCV in a culture system using cell lines stably expressing HIV-1 Tat. We propose here that COS-tat cells are a useful tool for studying the role of Tat in archetype JCV replication in the development of PML.

  16. The HIV-1 transactivator factor (Tat induces enterocyte apoptosis through a redox-mediated mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Buccigrossi

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is an important target of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. HIV virus induces CD4+ T cell loss and epithelial damage which results in increased intestinal permeability. The mechanisms involved in nutrient malabsorption and alterations of intestinal mucosal architecture are unknown. We previously demonstrated that HIV-1 transactivator factor (Tat induces an enterotoxic effect on intestinal epithelial cells that could be responsible for HIV-associated diarrhea. Since oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis and morbidity of HIV infection, we evaluated whether Tat induces apoptosis of human enterocytes through oxidative stress, and whether the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC could prevent it. Caco-2 and HT29 cells or human intestinal mucosa specimens were exposed to Tat alone or combined with NAC. In an in-vitro cell model, Tat increased the generation of reactive oxygen species and decreased antioxidant defenses as judged by a reduction in catalase activity and a reduced (GSH/oxidized (GSSG glutathione ratio. Tat also induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, and caspase-3 activation. Rectal dialysis samples from HIV-infected patients were positive for the oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. GSH/GSSG imbalance and apoptosis occurred in jejunal specimens from HIV-positive patients at baseline and from HIV-negative specimens exposed to Tat. Experiments with neutralizing anti-Tat antibodies showed that these effects were direct and specific. Pre-treatment with NAC prevented Tat-induced apoptosis and restored the glutathione balance in both the in-vitro and the ex-vivo model. These findings indicate that oxidative stress is one of the mechanism involved in HIV-intestinal disease.

  17. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein by aptamer-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Uda; Fatin, M. F.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Uda, M. N. A.

    2017-03-01

    A study was conducted to detect the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) Tat protein using interdigitated electrodes. The measurements and images of the IDEs' finger gaps and the images of chitosan-carbon nanotubes deposited on top of the interdigitated electrodes were taken using the Scanning Electron Microscope. The detection of HIV-1 Tat protein was done using split aptamers and aptamer tail. Biosensors were chosen as diagnostic equipment due to their rapid diagnostic capabilities.

  18. Therapeutic immunization with HIV-1 Tat reduces immune activation and loss of regulatory T-cells and improves immune function in subjects on HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ensoli

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Although HAART suppresses HIV replication, it is often unable to restore immune homeostasis. Consequently, non-AIDS-defining diseases are increasingly seen in treated individuals. This is attributed to persistent virus expression in reservoirs and to cell activation. Of note, in CD4(+ T cells and monocyte-macrophages of virologically-suppressed individuals, there is continued expression of multi-spliced transcripts encoding HIV regulatory proteins. Among them, Tat is essential for virus gene expression and replication, either in primary infection or for virus reactivation during HAART, when Tat is expressed, released extracellularly and exerts, on both the virus and the immune system, effects that contribute to disease maintenance. Here we report results of an ad hoc exploratory interim analysis (up to 48 weeks on 87 virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals enrolled in a phase II randomized open-label multicentric clinical trial of therapeutic immunization with Tat (ISS T-002. Eighty-eight virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals, enrolled in a parallel prospective observational study at the same sites (ISS OBS T-002, served for intergroup comparison. Immunization with Tat was safe, induced durable immune responses, and modified the pattern of CD4(+ and CD8(+ cellular activation (CD38 and HLA-DR together with reduction of biochemical activation markers and persistent increases of regulatory T cells. This was accompanied by a progressive increment of CD4(+ T cells and B cells with reduction of CD8(+ T cells and NK cells, which were independent from the type of antiretroviral regimen. Increase in central and effector memory and reduction in terminally-differentiated effector memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells were accompanied by increases of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses against Env and recall antigens. Of note, more immune-compromised individuals experienced greater therapeutic effects. In contrast, these changes

  19. A Novel HIV-1 Therapeutic Target:Tat Transactivator protein%一个新的HIV-1治疗靶--Tat转录激活蛋白

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁伟; 王亚芹; DAVALIAN DARIUSH

    2004-01-01

    Tat is a HIV-1 transaction transcriptional activator protein and plays a pivotal role in viral replication and in several AIDS-associated pathologies. Its biological properties and functions make it as a good candidate for the development of an anti-AIDS vaccine and/or drug. Strategies designing vaccines and drugs for anti-AIDS include vaccines derived from Tat, extracellular Tat-binding antagonists, inhibitors of Tat-activated intracellular second messengers, anti-Tat antisense,anti-TAR antisense, decoy and antagonists, anti-Tat intracellular intrabody, inhibitors of intracellular Tat cofactors and so on. An effective anti-AIDS therapy will require a multi-targeted approach in which classic antiviral drugs and protease inhibitors are combined with novel extracellular and intracellular Tat antagonists. This approach could prevent the development of drug-resistant HIV strains and decrease the dosage and related toxicity of each single drug and lead to a cure for AIDS-associated pathologies.%Tat是HIV-1病毒进行转录和复制的一个十分重要的蛋白质,同时,Tat也与HIV-1感染引起的严重病理学程度密切相关.Tat的生物学性质和功能决定了其是一个理想的开发抗AIDS疫苗和药物的靶蛋白.基于Tat自身及其作用的TARRNA,可以设计Tat疫苗、细胞外结合Tat的拮抗剂、抗Tat的反义核酸、抗TAR的反义核酸、抗Tat的细胞内抗体和细胞内Tat协同因子的抑制剂等.传统的抗病毒药物及蛋白酶抑制剂与新的细胞内和细胞外Tat拮抗剂联合使用,多靶点地抑制HIV-1的复制将是一个有效的抗AIDS的治疗方案.这一治疗方案能够防止HIV病毒耐药株的产生,减少单一作用靶点药物的用药剂量和降低相应的毒性,最终治愈AIDS相关的病理学变化.

  20. Role of Histidine 547 of Human Dopamine Transporter in Molecular Interaction with HIV-1 Tat and Dopamine Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yaxia; Quizon, Pamela M; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yao, Jianzhuang; Zhu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-06-02

    HIV-1 Tat plays an important role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) by disrupting neurotransmission including dopamine uptake by human dopamine transporter (hDAT). Previous studies have demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat directly binds to hDAT and some amino-acid mutations that attenuate the hDAT-Tat binding also significantly decreased dopamine uptake activity of hDAT. This combined computational-experimental study demonstrates that histidine-547 (H547) of hDAT plays a crucial role in the hDAT-Tat binding and dopamine uptake by hDAT, and that the H547A mutation can not only considerably attenuate Tat-induced inhibition of dopamine uptake, but also significantly increase the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake. The finding of such an unusual hDAT mutant capable of both increasing the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake and disrupting the hDAT-Tat binding may provide an exciting knowledge basis for development of novel concepts for therapeutic treatment of the HAND.

  1. Molecular mechanism: the human dopamine transporter histidine 547 regulates basal and HIV-1 Tat protein-inhibited dopamine transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quizon, Pamela M; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yuan, Yaxia; Midde, Narasimha M; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zhu, Jun

    2016-12-14

    Abnormal dopaminergic transmission has been implicated as a risk determinant of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. HIV-1 Tat protein increases synaptic dopamine (DA) levels by directly inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) activity, ultimately leading to dopaminergic neuron damage. Through integrated computational modeling prediction and experimental validation, we identified that histidine547 on human DAT (hDAT) is critical for regulation of basal DA uptake and Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport. Compared to wild type hDAT (WT hDAT), mutation of histidine547 (H547A) displayed a 196% increase in DA uptake. Other substitutions of histidine547 showed that DA uptake was not altered in H547R but decreased by 99% in H547P and 60% in H547D, respectively. These mutants did not alter DAT surface expression or surface DAT binding sites. H547 mutants attenuated Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport observed in WT hDAT. H547A displays a differential sensitivity to PMA- or BIM-induced activation or inhibition of DAT function relative to WT hDAT, indicating a change in basal PKC activity in H547A. These findings demonstrate that histidine547 on hDAT plays a crucial role in stabilizing basal DA transport and Tat-DAT interaction. This study provides mechanistic insights into identifying targets on DAT for Tat binding and improving DAT-mediated dysfunction of DA transmission.

  2. The histone chaperone protein Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (hNAP-1 binds HIV-1 Tat and promotes viral transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the large amount of data available on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HIV-1 transcription, crucial information is still lacking about the interplay between chromatin conformation and the events that regulate initiation and elongation of viral transcription. During transcriptional activation, histone acetyltransferases and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes cooperate with histone chaperones in altering chromatin structure. In particular, human Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (hNAP-1 is known to act as a histone chaperone that shuttles histones H2A/H2B into the nucleus, assembles nucleosomes and promotes chromatin fluidity, thereby affecting transcription of several cellular genes. Results Using a proteomic screening, we identified hNAP-1 as a novel cellular protein interacting with HIV-1 Tat. We observed that Tat specifically binds hNAP1, but not other members of the same family of factors. Binding between the two proteins required the integrity of the basic domain of Tat and of two separable domains of hNAP-1 (aa 162–290 and 290–391. Overexpression of hNAP-1 significantly enhanced Tat-mediated activation of the LTR. Conversely, silencing of the protein decreased viral promoter activity. To explore the effects of hNAP-1 on viral infection, a reporter HIV-1 virus was used to infect cells in which hNAP-1 had been either overexpressed or knocked-down. Consistent with the gene expression results, these two treatments were found to increase and inhibit viral infection, respectively. Finally, we also observed that the overexpression of p300, a known co-activator of both Tat and hNAP-1, enhanced hNAP-1-mediated transcriptional activation as well as its interaction with Tat. Conclusion Our study reveals that HIV-1 Tat binds the histone chaperone hNAP-1 both in vitro and in vivo and shows that this interaction participates in the regulation of Tat-mediated activation of viral gene expression.

  3. Neoflavonoids as Inhibitors of HIV-1 Replication by Targeting the Tat and NF-κB Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisio A. Olmedo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-eight neoflavonoids have been prepared and evaluated in vitro against HIV-1. Antiviral activity was assessed on MT-2 cells infected with viral clones carrying the luciferase reporter gene. Inhibition of HIV transcription and Tat function were tested on cells stably transfected with the HIV-LTR and Tat protein. Seven 4-phenylchromen-2-one derivatives showed HIV transcriptional inhibitory activity but only the phenylchrome-2-one 10 inhibited NF-κB and displayed anti-Tat activity simultaneously. Compounds 10, 14, and 25, inhibited HIV replication in both targets at concentrations <25 μM. The assays of these synthetic 4-phenylchromen-2-ones may aid in the investigation of some aspects of the anti-HIV activity of such compounds and could serve as a scaffold for designing better anti-HIV compounds, which may lead to a potential anti-HIV therapeutic drug.

  4. Cannabinoids Occlude the HIV-1 Tat-Induced Decrease in GABAergic Neurotransmission in Prefrontal Cortex Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changqing; Hermes, Douglas J; Mackie, Ken; Lichtman, Aron H; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Fitting, Sylvia

    2016-06-01

    In the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is now considered a chronic disease that specifically targets the brain and causes HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Endocannabinoids exhibit neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties in several central nervous system (CNS) disease models, but their effects in HAND are poorly understood. To address this issue, whole-cell recordings were performed on young (14-24 day old) C57BL/6J mice. We investigated the actions of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 (1 μM) and the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA, 1 μM) in the presence of HIV-1 Tat on GABAergic neurotransmission in mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) slices. We found a Tat concentration-dependent (5-50 nM) decrease in the frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist rimonabant (1 μM) and zero extracellular calcium prevented the significant Tat-induced decrease in mIPSCs. Further, bath-applied WIN55,212-2 or AEA by itself, significantly decreased the frequency, but not amplitude of mIPSCs and/or spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs), and occluded a further downregulation of IPSCs by Tat. Pretreatment with rimonabant but not the CB2R antagonist AM630 (1 μM) prevented the WIN55,212-2- and AEA-induced decrease in IPSCs frequency without any further Tat effect. Results indicated a Tat-induced decrease in GABAergic neurotransmission, which was occluded by cannabinoids via a CB1R-related mechanism. Understanding the relationship between Tat toxicity and endocannabinoid signaling has the potential to identify novel therapeutic interventions to benefit individuals suffering from HAND and other cognitive impairments.

  5. HIV-1 Tat-induced microgliosis and synaptic damage via interactions between peripheral and central myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Ming Lu

    Full Text Available Despite the ability of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART to reduce viral burden to nearly undetectable levels in cerebrospinal fluid and serum, HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND continue to persist in as many as half the patients living with this disease. There is growing consensus that the actual substrate for HAND is destruction of normal synaptic architecture but the sequence of cellular events that leads to this outcome has never been resolved. To address whether central vs. peripheral myeloid lineage cells contribute to synaptic damage during acute neuroinflammation we injected a single dose of the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription protein (Tat or control vehicle into hippocampus of wild-type or chimeric C57Bl/6 mice genetically marked to distinguish infiltrating and resident immune cells. Between 8-24 hr after injection of Tat, invading CD11b(+ and/or myeloperoxidase-positive leukocytes with granulocyte characteristics were found to engulf both microglia and synaptic structures, and microglia reciprocally engulfed invading leukocytes. By 24 hr, microglial processes were also seen ensheathing dendrites, followed by inclusion of synaptic elements in microglia 7 d after Tat injection, with a durable microgliosis lasting at least 28 d. Thus, central nervous system (CNS exposure to Tat induces early activation of peripheral myeloid lineage cells with phagocytosis of synaptic elements and reciprocal microglial engulfment of peripheral leukocytes, and enduring microgliosis. Our data suggest that a single exposure to a foreign antigen such as HIV-1 Tat can lead to long-lasting disruption of normal neuroimmune homeostasis with deleterious consequences for synaptic architecture, and further suggest a possible mechanism for enduring neuroinflammation in the absence of productive viral replication in the CNS.

  6. Crystal structure of HIV-1 Tat complexed with human P-TEFb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahirov, Tahir H.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Varzavand, Katayoun; Cooper, Jeffrey J.; Sedore, Stanley C.; Price, David H. (Nebraska-Med); (Iowa)

    2010-08-23

    Regulation of the expression of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome is accomplished in large part by controlling transcription elongation. The viral protein Tat hijacks the host cell's RNA polymerase II elongation control machinery through interaction with the positive transcription elongation factor, P-TEFb, and directs the factor to promote productive elongation of HIV mRNA. Here we describe the crystal structure of the Tat-P-TEFb complex containing HIV-1 Tat, human Cdk9 (also known as CDK9), and human cyclin T1 (also known as CCNT1). Tat adopts a structure complementary to the surface of P-TEFb and makes extensive contacts, mainly with the cyclin T1 subunit of P-TEFb, but also with the T-loop of the Cdk9 subunit. The structure provides a plausible explanation for the tolerance of Tat to sequence variations at certain sites. Importantly, Tat induces significant conformational changes in P-TEFb. This finding lays a foundation for the design of compounds that would specifically inhibit the Tat-P-TEFb complex and block HIV replication.

  7. Shutdown of HIV-1 Transcription in T Cells by Nullbasic, a Mutant Tat Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongping Jin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nullbasic is a derivative of the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat protein that strongly inhibits HIV-1 replication in lymphocytes. Here we show that lentiviral vectors that constitutively express a Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1 fusion protein by the eEF1α promoter led to robust long-term inhibition of HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells. Although Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells were infected by HIV-1, no virus production could be detected and addition of phorbol ester 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and JQ1 had no effect, while suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA modestly stimulated virus production but at levels 300-fold lower than those seen in HIV-1-infected Jurkat-ZSG1 cells. Virus replication was not recovered by coculture of HIV-1-infected Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells with uninfected Jurkat cells. Latently infected Jurkat latent 6.3 and ACH2 cells treated with latency-reversing agents produced measurable viral capsid (CA, but little or none was made when they expressed NB-ZSG1. When Jurkat cells chronically infected with HIV-1 were transduced with lentiviral virus-like particles conveying NB-ZSG1, a >3-log reduction in CA production was observed. Addition of PMA increased virus CA production but at levels 500-fold lower than those seen in nontransduced Jurkat cells. Transcriptome sequencing analysis confirmed that HIV-1 mRNA was strongly inhibited by NB-ZSG1 but indicated that full-length viral mRNA was made. Analysis of HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells expressing NB-ZSG1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that recruitment of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII and histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation were inhibited. The reduction of HIV-1 promoter-associated RNAPII and epigenetic changes in viral nucleosomes indicate that Nullbasic can inhibit HIV-1 replication by enforcing viral silencing in cells.

  8. Determining the Functions of HIV-1 Tat and a Second Magnesium Ion in the CDK9/Cyclin T1 Complex: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Xiao Jin

    Full Text Available The current paradigm of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK regulation based on the well-established CDK2 has been recently expanded. The determination of CDK9 crystal structures suggests the requirement of an additional regulatory protein, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Tat, to exert its physiological functions. In most kinases, the exact number and roles of the cofactor metal ions remain unappreciated, and the repertoire has thus gained increasing attention recently. Here, molecular dynamics (MD simulations were implemented on CDK9 to explore the functional roles of HIV-1 Tat and the second Mg2+ ion at site 1 (Mg12+. The simulations unveiled that binding of HIV-1 Tat to CDK9 not only stabilized hydrogen bonds (H-bonds between ATP and hinge residues Asp104 and Cys106, as well as between ATP and invariant Lys48, but also facilitated the salt bridge network pertaining to the phosphorylated Thr186 at the activation loop. By contrast, these H-bonds cannot be formed in CDK9 owing to the absence of HIV-1 Tat. MD simulations further revealed that the Mg12+ ion, coupled with the Mg22+ ion, anchored to the triphosphate moiety of ATP in its catalytic competent conformation. This observation indicates the requirement of the Mg12+ ion for CDK9 to realize its function. Overall, the introduction of HIV-1 Tat and Mg12+ ion resulted in the active site architectural characteristics of phosphorylated CDK9. These data highlighted the functional roles of HIV-1 Tat and Mg12+ ion in the regulation of CDK9 activity, which contributes an important complementary understanding of CDK molecular underpinnings.

  9. Functional analysis of the Tat trans activator of human immunodeficiency virus type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Fenrick, R; Malim, M H; Hauber, J; Le, S.Y.; Maizel, J; Cullen, B R

    1989-01-01

    The trans-activator (Tat) proteins of the related but distinct type 1 and type 2 human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) display incomplete functional reciprocity. One possible explanation of this observation, suggested by computer analysis of potential RNA secondary structures within the viral trans-activation response (TAR) elements, is that HIV-2 Tat requires the presentation of two viral RNA stem-loop sequences for full activity whereas HIV-1 Tat is maximally active upon presenta...

  10. UV and X-ray structural studies of a 101-residue long Tat protein from a HIV-1 primary isolate and of its mutated, detoxified, vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Marine; Mayol, Katia; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Bussat, Marie-Claire; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine; Verrier, Bernard; Beck, Alain; Haser, Richard; Gouet, Patrice; Guillon, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    The 101-residue long Tat protein of primary isolate 133 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), wt-Tat(133) displays a high transactivation activity in vitro, whereas the mutant thereof, STLA-Tat(133), a vaccine candidate for HIV-1, has none. These two proteins were chemically synthesized and their biological activity was validated. Their structural properties were characterized using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence emission, gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. SAXS studies revealed that both proteins were extended and belong to the family of intrinsically unstructured proteins. CD measurements showed that wt-Tat(133) or STLA-Tat(133) underwent limited structural rearrangements when complexed with specific fragments of antibodies. Crystallization trials have been performed on the two forms, assuming that the Tat(133) proteins might have a better propensity to fold in supersaturated conditions, and small crystals have been obtained. These results suggest that biologically active Tat protein is natively unfolded and requires only a limited gain of structure for its function.

  11. Design and SAR of new substituted purines bearing aryl groups at N9 position as HIV-1 Tat-TAR interaction inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Ruifang; Zhang, Chunlei; Yuan, Dekai; Yang, Ming

    2008-09-01

    Twenty-four purine derivatives bearing aryl groups at N9 position were designed and synthesized as HIV-1 Tat-TAR interaction inhibitors. All the compounds showed high antiviral activities in inhibiting the formation of SIV-induced syncytium in CEM174 cells. Ten of them with low cytotoxicities were evaluated by Tat dependent HIV-1 LTR-driven CAT gene expression colorimetric enzyme assay in human 293T cells at a concentration of 30 microM, indicating effective inhibitory activities of blocking the Tat-TAR interaction. The aryl groups at N9 position affected the binding affinities between compounds and TAR RNA, showing some specificities of aryl groups to TAR RNA.

  12. Inhibition of both HIV-1 reverse transcription and gene expression by a cyclic peptide that binds the Tat-transactivating response element (TAR RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Lalonde

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The RNA response element TAR plays a critical role in HIV replication by providing a binding site for the recruitment of the viral transactivator protein Tat. Using a structure-guided approach, we have developed a series of conformationally-constrained cyclic peptides that act as structural mimics of the Tat RNA binding region and block Tat-TAR interactions at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. Here we show that these compounds block Tat-dependent transcription in cell-free systems and in cell-based reporter assays. The compounds are also cell permeable, have low toxicity, and inhibit replication of diverse HIV-1 strains, including both CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic primary HIV-1 isolates of the divergent subtypes A, B, C, D and CRF01_AE. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the cyclic peptidomimetic L50 exhibited an IC(50 ∼250 nM. Surprisingly, inhibition of LTR-driven HIV-1 transcription could not account for the full antiviral activity. Timed drug-addition experiments revealed that L-50 has a bi-phasic inhibition curve with the first phase occurring after HIV-1 entry into the host cell and during the initiation of HIV-1 reverse transcription. The second phase coincides with inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. Reconstituted reverse transcription assays confirm that HIV-1 (- strand strong stop DNA synthesis is blocked by L50-TAR RNA interactions in-vitro. These findings are consistent with genetic evidence that TAR plays critical roles both during reverse transcription and during HIV gene expression. Our results suggest that antiviral drugs targeting TAR RNA might be highly effective due to a dual inhibitory mechanism.

  13. Selective Vulnerability of Striatal D2 versus D1 Dopamine Receptor-Expressing Medium Spiny Neurons in HIV-1 Tat Transgenic Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schier, Christina J; Marks, William D; Paris, Jason J; Barbour, Aaron J; McLane, Virginia D; Maragos, William F; McQuiston, A Rory; Knapp, Pamela E; Hauser, Kurt F

    2017-06-07

    Despite marked regional differences in HIV susceptibility within the CNS, there has been surprisingly little exploration into the differential vulnerability among neuron types and the circuits they underlie. The dorsal striatum is especially susceptible, harboring high viral loads and displaying marked neuropathology, with motor impairment a frequent manifestation of chronic infection. However, little is known about the response of individual striatal neuron types to HIV or how this disrupts function. Therefore, we investigated the morphological and electrophysiological effects of HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription (Tat) in dopamine subtype 1 (D1) and dopamine subtype 2 (D2) receptor-expressing striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) by breeding transgenic Tat-expressing mice to Drd1a-tdTomato- or Drd2-eGFP-reporter mice. An additional goal was to examine neuronal vulnerability early during the degenerative process to gain insight into key events underlying the neuropathogenesis. In D2 MSNs, exposure to HIV-1 Tat reduced dendritic spine density significantly, increased dendritic damage (characterized by swellings/varicosities), and dysregulated neuronal excitability (decreased firing at 200-300 pA and increased firing rates at 450 pA), whereas insignificant morphologic and electrophysiological consequences were observed in Tat-exposed D1 MSNs. These changes were concomitant with an increased anxiety-like behavioral profile (lower latencies to enter a dark chamber in a light-dark transition task, a greater frequency of light-dark transitions, and reduced rearing time in an open field), whereas locomotor behavior was unaffected by 2 weeks of Tat induction. Our findings suggest that D2 MSNs and a specific subset of neural circuits within the dorsal striatum are preferentially vulnerable to HIV-1.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), neurocognitive disorders afflict 30-50% of HIV-infected individuals and synaptodendritic injury

  14. CTL Responses to Regulatory Proteins Tat and Rev in HIV-1 B'/C Virus-Infected Individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING-MING JIA; KUN-XUE HONG; JIAN-PING CHEN; HONG-WEI LIU; SHA LIU; XIAO-QING ZHANG; HONG-JING ZHAO; YI-MING SHAO

    2008-01-01

    To characterize HIV-1 specific CTL responses to regulatory proteins Tat and Rev in HIV-B'/C vires-infected ART-naive individuals. Methods HIV-1-specific CTL responses were analyzed by IFN-γ ELISPOT assay using overlapping peptides spanning the consensus sequences of HIV-1 clade C Tat and Rev proteins. Statistical analysis and graphical presentation were performed using SIGMAPLOT 10.0 and SIGMASTAT 3.5. For samples with a positive response, the magnitude of CTL responses was compared between HIV-1 C proteins by Wilcoxon rank sum test, and the significance threshold was P<0.05. Results Tat and Rev were frequently recognized, with 23% and 52% of the tested individuals having detectable responses to these proteins, respectively. Several immunodominant regions were detected in Rev. No significant correlation was observed between the magnitude and breadth of CTL responses to regulatory proteins and the control of virus replication in this study. Conclusion Tat and Rev can serve as targets for HIV-1-specific CTL, and several immunodominant regions are detectable in Rev. Further characterization of epitopes and their role in virus control may shed light on pathogenesis of HIV-1 natural infection and also be useful for the design and testing of candidate vaccines.

  15. Endocannabinoids affect innate immunity of Muller glia during HIV-1 Tat cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Gopinath; Chatterjee, Nivedita

    2014-03-01

    In the retina, increased inflammatory response can cause visual impairment during HIV infection in spite of successful anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). The HIV-1 Tat protein is implicated in neurodegeneration by eliciting a cytokine response in cells of the CNS, including glia. The current study investigated whether innate immune response in human retinal Muller glia could be immune-modulated to combat inflammation. Endocannabinoids, N-arachidonoylethanolamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol are used to alleviate Tat-induced cytotoxicity and rescue retinal cells. The neuroprotective mechanism involved suppression in production of pro-inflammatory and increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines, mainly through the MAPK pathway. The MAPK regulation was primarily by MKP-1. Both endocannabinoids regulated cytokine production by affecting at the transcriptional level the NF-κB complex, including IRAK1BP1 and TAB2. Stability of cytokine mRNA is likely to have been influenced through tristetraprolin. These findings have direct relevance in conditions like immune-recovery uveitis where anti-retroviral therapy has helped immune reconstitution. In such conditions drugs to combat overwhelming inflammatory response would need to supplement HAART. Endocannabinoids and their agonists may be thought of as neurotherapeutic during certain conditions of HIV-1 induced inflammation.

  16. Molecular and Genetic Characterization of HIV-1 Tat Exon-1 Gene from Cameroon Shows Conserved Tat HLA-Binding Epitopes: Functional Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teto, Georges; Fonsah, Julius Y.; Tagny, Claude T.; Mbanya, Dora; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Leopoldine; Fokam, Joseph; Njamnshi, Dora M.; Kouanfack, Charles; Njamnshi, Alfred K.; Kanmogne, Georgette D.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays a critical role in viral transactivation. Subtype-B Tat has potential use as a therapeutic vaccine. However, viral genetic diversity and population genetics would significantly impact the efficacy of such a vaccine. Over 70% of the 37-million HIV-infected individuals are in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and harbor non-subtype-B HIV-1. Using specimens from 100 HIV-infected Cameroonians, we analyzed the sequences of HIV-1 Tat exon-1, its functional domains, post-translational modifications (PTMs), and human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-binding epitopes. Molecular phylogeny revealed a high genetic diversity with nine subtypes, CRF22_01A1/CRF01_AE, and negative selection in all subtypes. Amino acid mutations in Tat functional domains included N24K (44%), N29K (58%), and N40K (30%) in CRF02_AG, and N24K in all G subtypes. Motifs and phosphorylation analyses showed conserved amidation, N-myristoylation, casein kinase-2 (CK2), serine and threonine phosphorylation sites. Analysis of HLA allelic frequencies showed that epitopes for HLAs A*0205, B*5301, Cw*0401, Cw*0602, and Cw*0702 were conserved in 58%–100% of samples, with B*5301 epitopes having binding affinity scores > 100 in all subtypes. This is the first report of N-myristoylation, amidation, and CK2 sites in Tat; these PTMs and mutations could affect Tat function. HLA epitopes identified could be useful for designing Tat-based vaccines for highly diverse HIV-1 populations, as in SSA. PMID:27438849

  17. Depicting Binding-Mediated Translocation of HIV-1 Tat Peptides in Living Cells with Nanoscale Pens of Tat-Conjugated Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can translocate across cell membranes, and thus have great potential for the cellular delivery of macromolecular cargoes. However, the mechanism of this cellular uptake process is not yet fully understood. In this study, a time-lapse single-particle light-sheet microscopy technique was implemented to obtain a parallel visualization of the translocating process of individual human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) transactivator of transcription (Tat) peptide conjugated quantum dots (TatP-QDs) in complex cellular terrains. Here, TatP-QDs served as nanoscale dynamic pens, which depict remarkable trajectory aggregates of TatP-QDs on the cell surface. Spectral-embedding analysis of the trajectory aggregates revealed a manifold formed by isotropic diffusion and a fraction of directed movement, possibly caused by interaction between the Tat peptides and heparan sulfate groups on the plasma membrane. Further analysis indicated that the membrane deformation induced by Tat-peptide attachment increased with the disruption of the actin framework in cytochalasin D (cyto D)-treated cells, yielding higher interactions on the TatP-QDs. In native cells, the Tat peptides can remodel the actin framework to reduce their interaction with the local membrane environment. Characteristic hot spots for interaction were detected on the membrane, suggesting that a funnel passage may have formed for the Tat-coated particles. This finding offers valuable insight into the cellular delivery of nanoscale cargo, suggesting an avenue for direct therapeutic delivery. PMID:28208588

  18. Structure-based design of ligands for protein basic domains: Application to the HIV-1 Tat protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikov, Anton V.; James, Thomas L.

    1998-05-01

    A methodology has been developed for designing ligands to bind a flexible basic protein domain where the structure of the domain is essentially known. It is based on an empirical binding free energy function developed for highly charged complexes and on Monte Carlo simulations in internal coordinates with both the ligand and the receptor being flexible. HIV-1 encodes a transactivating regulatory protein called Tat. Binding of the basic domain of Tat to TAR RNA is required for efficient transcription of the viral genome. The structure of a biologically active peptide containing the Tat basic RNA-binding domain is available from NMR studies. The goal of the current project is to design a ligand which will bind to that basic domain and potentially inhibit the TAR-Tat interaction. The basic domain contains six arginine and two lysine residues. Our strategy was to design a ligand for arginine first and then a superligand for the basic domain by joining arginine ligands with a linker. Several possible arginine ligands were obtained by searching the Available Chemicals Directory with DOCK 3.5 software. Phytic acid, which can potentially bind multiple arginines, was chosen as a building block for the superligand. Calorimetric binding studies of several compounds to methylguanidine and Arg-/Lys-containing peptides were performed. The data were used to develop an empirical binding free energy function for prediction of affinity of the ligands for the Tat basic domain. Modeling of the conformations of the complexes with both the superligand and the basic domain being flexible has been carried out via Biased Probability Monte Carlo (BPMC) simulations in internal coordinates (ICM 2.6 suite of programs). The simulations used parameters to ensure correct folding, i.e., consistent with the experimental NMR structure of a 25-residue Tat peptide, from a random starting conformation. Superligands for the basic domain were designed by joining together two molecules of phytic acid with

  19. On the role of the second coding exon of the HIV-1 Tat protein in virus replication and MHC class I downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, K; Bauer, M; Meyerhans, A; Berkhout, B

    1998-11-20

    Tat is an essential protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and activates transcription from the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. The tat gene is composed of two coding exons of which the first, corresponding to the N-terminal 72 amino acid residues, has been reported to be sufficient for its transcription function. We introduced a stop codon at the end of the first Tat-coding exon in an expression vector that produces a truncated 71-amino acid Tat protein. This Q72stop mutant displays reduced transcriptional activity of approximately 54% in transient LTR-CAT transfection assays. To test the contribution of the second Tat-coding exon to virus replication, the Q72stop mutation was also introduced in the infectious pLAI molecular clone. The effect on virus replication was analyzed in primary cells and in a transformed T cell line. The fitness of the mutant virus was calculated to be approximately 75% compared with the wild-type control. Thus, a small contribution of the C-terminal Tat domain to viral fitness was measured. It has been proposed that the second Tat-coding exon is involved in transcriptional downregulation of the MHC class I gene of the infected host cell. Cell surface expression of the MHC protein was analyzed in T cells infected with the wild-type LAI virus and the replication-competent Q72stop mutant. MHC expression was transiently reduced on infection with either virus, indicating that the second Tat-coding exon is not involved in this downregulation.

  20. In Vivo Microdialysis in Awake, Freely Moving Rats Demonstrates HIV-1 Tat-Induced Alterations in Dopamine Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Mark J.; Frederick-Duus, Danielle; Fadel, Jim; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may develop neuropsychological impairment, and a modest percentage may progress to HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Research using human and nonhuman, in vitro and in vivo models, demonstrates that subcortical dopamine (DA) systems may be particularly vulnerable to HIV-induced neurodegeneration. The goal of the current investigation is to provide an understanding of the extent to which the HIV-1 protein Tat induces alterations in striatal DA transmission using in vivo brain microdialysis in awake, freely moving rats. The current study was designed to investigate Tat-induced neuronal dysfunction between 24-h and 48-h post-Tat administration, and demonstrates a reduction in evoked DA for the Tat-treated group relative to vehicle-treated group at 24 and 48 h. The Tat-induced reduction of DA overflow by 24 h suggests dysfunction of nerve terminals, and a compromised DA system in Tat-treated animals. Furthermore, the current study provides direct support for HIV-associated decline of DA function at a systemic level, helping to characterize the functional outcome of the relatively large amount of research on the molecular and behavioral levels of HIV-induced neurotoxicity. This initial study may provide additional characteristics of Tat-induced neuronal dysfunction to inform research on therapeutic intervention, and it provides a springboard for future in vivo research currently needed in the field. PMID:19086089

  1. Effect of HIV-1 Tat on Secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β by U87 Cells in AIDS Patients with or without AIDS Dementia Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Li; PUShuangShuang; GAO WenHua; CHIYuanYuan; WENHong Ling; WANG Zhi Yu; SONGYanYan; YU Xue Jie

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveToexplore the role of HIV-1 tat gene variations in AIDSdementia complex(ADC) pathogenesis. MethodsHIV-1tat genes derived from peripheral spleen and central basal ganglia of anAIDSpatient with ADC and anAIDSpatientwithoutADC were cloned for sequence analysis. HIV-1 tat genesequence alignmentwasperformed by using CLUSTAL W andthephylogentic analysiswas conductedbyusing Neighbor-joining with MEGA4 software.All tat genes wereused to construct recombinant retroviral expressing vector MSCV-IRES-GFP/tat. The MSCV-IRES-GFP/tat was cotransfected into 293T cells with pCMV-VSV-G and pUMVC vectorsto assemble the recombinant retrovirus. After infection of gliomas U87 cells with equal amount of the recombinant retrovirus, TNF-α, and IL-1β concentrations inthe supernatant of U87 cells were determined with ELISA. ResultsHIV-1tat genes derived from peripheral spleen and central basal ganglia ofthe AIDS patient with ADC andtheother onewithoutADCexhibited genetic variations.Tat variations and amino acid mutation sites existed mainly at Tat protein core functional area (38-47aa). All Tat proteinscould induce U87 cells to produce TNF-α and IL-1β, but thelevel of IL-1β production was different among Tatproteins derived fromtheADC patient’s spleen, basal ganglia, andthenon-ADC patient’s spleen.The level ofTat proteinsderived fromtheADC patient’s spleen,basal ganglia, andthenon-ADC patient’sspleen were obviously higher thanthat fromthe non-ADC patient’s basal ganglia. ConclusionTat protein core functional area (38-47aa) mayserve as the key area of enhancing the secretion of IL-1β.This may be related with the neurotoxicity of HIV-1 Tat. ObjectiveToexplore the role of HIV-1 tat gene variations in AIDSdementia complex(ADC) pathogenesis. MethodsHIV-1tat genes derived from peripheral spleen and central basal ganglia of anAIDSpatient with ADC and anAIDSpatientwithoutADC were cloned for sequence analysis. HIV-1 tat genesequence alignmentwasperformed by using CLUSTAL W

  2. The 73 kDa subunit of the CPSF complex binds to the HIV-1 LTR promoter and functions as a negative regulatory factor that is inhibited by the HIV-1 Tat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Laureano; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Fresno, Manuel; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Muñoz, Eduardo; Calzado, Marco A

    2007-09-14

    Gene expression in eukaryotes requires the post-transcriptional cleavage of mRNA precursors into mature mRNAs. The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) is critical for this process and its 73 kDa subunit (CPSF-73) mediates cleavage coupled to polyadenylation and histone pre-mRNA processing. Using CPSF-73 over-expression and siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments, this study identifies CPSF-73 as an important regulatory protein that represses the basal transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Similar results were found with over-expression of the CPSF-73 homologue RC-68, but not with CPSF 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100) and RC-74. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed the physical interaction of CPSF-73 with the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Further experiments revealed indirect CPSF-73 binding to the region between -275 to -110 within the 5' upstream region. Functional assays revealed the importance for the 5' upstream region (-454 to -110) of the LTR for CPSF-73-mediated transcription repression. We also show that HIV-1 Tat protein interacts with CPSF-73 and counteracts its repressive activity on the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Our results clearly show a novel function for CPSF-73 and add another candidate protein for explaining the molecular mechanisms underlying HIV-1 latency.

  3. The effects of CpG-ODNs and Chitosan adjuvants on the elicitation of immune responses induced by the HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Samira; Mahdavi, Atiyeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2017-03-01

    HIV1-Tat-based vaccines could elicit broad, durable and neutralizing immune responses and are considered as potential AIDS vaccines. The present study aims to formulate CpG-ODNs adjuvant and Chitosan with Tat protein to enhance the immunogenicity of HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines and to investigate their efficacies in mice. To this end, we added CpG-ODNs, Chitosan and Alum as adjuvants to the Tat-based candidate vaccine formulations. Then, we compared frequency and magnitude of both humoral and cellular immune responses from mice immunized with the adjuvant-formulated Tat candidate vaccines against those obtained from mice immunized with recombinant Tat protein alone. Mice were subcutaneously immunized three times at 2-week intervals with the candidate vaccines. Measurements of anti-Tat immune responses showed that all vaccinated groups had a good immunity compared to the control groups and developed high levels of both humoral and cellular responses. However, immunized mice with CpG-ODNs, and Chitosan-adjuvanted Tat vaccines elicited stronger T-cell responses (both humoral and cellular immunity) compared to the others. These data suggest that co-administration of recombinant Tat protein with CpG-ODNs and Chitosan may serve as a potential formulation for enhancing of the Tat vaccine-induced immunity and might have effects on shaping Th polarization induced by HIV1-Tat protein vaccines. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Antiretroviral (HIV-1) activity of azulene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Julia; Selyutina, Anastasia; Bredihhin, Aleksei

    2016-04-15

    The antiretroviral activity of azulene derivatives was detected for the first time. A series of eighteen diversely substituted azulenes was synthesized and tested in vitro using HIV-1 based virus-like particles (VLPs) and infectious HIV-1 virus in U2OS and TZM-bl cell lines. Among the compounds tested, the 2-hydroxyazulenes demonstrated the most significant activity by inhibiting HIV-1 replication with IC50 of 2-10 and 8-20 μM for the VLPs and the infectious virus, respectively. These results indicate that azulene derivatives may be potentially useful candidates for the development of antiretroviral agents.

  5. Determination of the minimal amount of Tat activity required for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, K; Koper, M; Berkhout, B

    1997-10-27

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a potent trans-activator of transcription from the viral LTR promoter. Previous mutagenesis studies have identified domains within Tat responsible for binding to its TAR RNA target and for transcriptional activation. The minimal Tat activation domain is composed of the N-terminal 48 residues, and mutational analyses identified a cluster of critical cysteines. The importance of four highly conserved aromatic amino acids within the activation domain has not been thoroughly investigated. We have systematically substituted these aromatic residues (Y26, F32, F38, Y47) of the HIV-1 LAI Tat protein with other aromatic residues (conservative mutation) or alanine (nonconservative mutation). The activity of the mutant Tat constructs was measured in different cell lines by transfection with a LTR-CAT reporter plasmid. The range of transcriptional activities measured for this set of Tat mutants allowed careful assessment of the level of Tat activity required for optimal viral replication. To test this, the mutant Tat genes were introduced into the pLAI infectious molecular clone and tested for their effect on virus replication in a T-cell line. We found that a twofold reduction in Tat activity already affects viral replication, and no virus replication was measured for Tat mutants with less than 15% activity. This strict correlation between Tat activity and viral replication demonstrates the importance of the Tat function to viral fitness. Interestingly, a less pronounced replication defect was observed in primary cell types. This finding may correlate with the frequent detection of proviruses with Tat-inactivating mutations in clinical samples. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  6. An attenuated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 encoding the HIV-1 Tat protein protects mice from a deadly mucosal HSV1 challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaconcetta Sicurella

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2 are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat. In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ, induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1

  7. HIV-1 Tat C-mediated regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-3 by microRNA 32 in human microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Ritu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Tat protein is known to be associated with neuroinflammation, a condition that develops in almost half of patients infected with HIV-1. HIV-1 Tat can alter glial neuroprotective functions, leading to neurotoxicity within the CNS. HIV-1 Tat is known to be secreted from productively infected cells and can affect neighboring uninfected cells by modulating cellular gene expression in a bystander fashion. Methods We were interested to study whether exogenous exposure to HIV-1 Tat-C protein perturbs the microRNA (miRNA expression profile of human microglial cells, leading to altered protein expression. We used protein expression and purification, miRNA overexpression, miRNA knockdown, transfection, site-directed mutagenesis, real-time PCR, luciferase assay and western blotting techniques to perform our study. Results HIV-1 Tat-C treatment of human microglial cells resulted in a dose-dependent increase in miR-32 expression. We found that tumor necrosis factor-receptor–associated factor 3 TRAF3 is a direct target for miR-32, and overexpression of miR-32 in CHME3 cells decreased TRAF3 both at the mRNA and the protein level. Recovery of TRAF3 protein expression after transfection of anti-miR-32 and the results of the luciferase reporter assay provided direct evidence of TRAF3 regulation by miR-32. We found that the regulation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 and IRF7 is controlled by cellular levels of TRAF3 protein in microglial cells, as after overexpression of miR-32 and application of anti-miR-32, expression levels of IRF3 and IRF7 were inversely regulated by expression levels of TRAF3. Thus, our results suggest a novel miRNA mediated mechanism for regulation of TRAF3 in human microglial cells exposed to HIV-1 Tat C protein. These results may help to elucidate the detrimental neuroinflammatory consequences of HIV-1 Tat C protein in bystander fashion. Conclusion HIV-1 Tat protein can modulate TRAF3 expression through

  8. HIV-1 Tat promotes Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV vIL-6-induced angiogenesis and tumorigenesis by regulating PI3K/PTEN/AKT/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhou

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is etiologically associated with KS, the most common AIDS-related malignancy. KS is characterized by vast angiogenesis and hyperproliferative spindle cells. We have previously reported that HIV-1 Tat can trigger KSHV reactivation and accelerate Kaposin A-induced tumorigenesis. Here, we explored Tat promotion of KSHV vIL-6-induced angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Tat promotes vIL-6-induced cell proliferation, cellular transformation, vascular tube formation and VEGF production in culture. Tat enhances vIL-6-induced angiogenesis and tumorigenesis of fibroblasts and human endothelial cells in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM model. In an allograft model, Tat promotes vIL-6-induced tumorigenesis and expression of CD31, CD34, SMA, VEGF, b-FGF, and cyclin D1. Mechanistic studies indicated Tat activates PI3K and AKT, and inactivates PTEN and GSK-3β in vIL-6 expressing cells. LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3K, effectively impaired Tat's promotion of vIL-6-induced tumorigenesis. Together, these results provide the first evidence that Tat might contribute to KS pathogenesis by synergizing with vIL-6, and identify PI3K/AKT pathway as a potential therapeutic target in AIDS-related KS patients.

  9. Insights into HIV-1 proviral transcription from integrative structure and dynamics of the Tat:AFF4:P-TEFb:TAR complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Echeverria, Ignacia; Stjepanovic, Goran; Bai, Yun; Lu, Huasong; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Doudna, Jennifer A; Zhou, Qiang; Sali, Andrej; Hurley, James H

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat hijacks the human superelongation complex (SEC) to promote proviral transcription. Here we report the 5.9 Å structure of HIV-1 TAR in complex with HIV-1 Tat and human AFF4, CDK9, and CycT1. The TAR central loop contacts the CycT1 Tat-TAR recognition motif (TRM) and the second Tat Zn2+-binding loop. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) shows that AFF4 helix 2 is stabilized in the TAR complex despite not touching the RNA, explaining how it enhances TAR binding to the SEC 50-fold. RNA SHAPE and SAXS data were used to help model the extended (Tat Arginine-Rich Motif) ARM, which enters the TAR major groove between the bulge and the central loop. The structure and functional assays collectively support an integrative structure and a bipartite binding model, wherein the TAR central loop engages the CycT1 TRM and compact core of Tat, while the TAR major groove interacts with the extended Tat ARM. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15910.001 PMID:27731797

  10. HIV Tat Impairs Neurogenesis through Functioning As a Notch Ligand and Activation of Notch Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yan; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Jinhui; Liu, Ying; He, Johnny J

    2016-11-02

    Alterations in adult neurogenesis have been noted in the brain of HIV-infected individuals and are likely linked to HIV-associated neurocognitive deficits, including those in learning and memory. But the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In the study, we took advantage of doxycycline-inducible and astrocyte-specific HIV-1 Tat transgenic mice (iTat) and determined the relationship between Tat expression and neurogenesis. Tat expression in astrocytes was associated with fewer neuron progenitor cells (NPCs), fewer immature neurons, and fewer mature neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of the mouse brain. In vitro NPC-derived neurosphere assays showed that Tat-containing conditioned media from astrocytes or recombinant Tat protein inhibited NPC proliferation and migration and altered NPC differentiation, while immunodepletion of Tat from Tat-containing conditioned media or heat inactivation of recombinant Tat abrogated those effects. Notch signaling downstream gene Hes1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter gene assay and Western blotting showed that recombinant Tat or Tat-containing conditioned media activated Hes1 transcription and protein expression, which were abrogated by Tat heat inactivation, immunodepletion, and cysteine mutation at position 30. Last, Notch signaling inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) significantly rescued Tat-impaired NPC differentiation in vitro and neurogenesis in vivo Together, these results show that Tat adversely affects NPCs and neurogenesis through Notch signaling and point to the potential of developing Notch signaling inhibitors as HIV/neuroAIDS therapeutics.

  11. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huang

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  12. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Yu, Jie; Zhu, Lei; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  13. Systematic Analysis of the Functions of Lysine Acetylation in the Regulation of Tat Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghao He

    Full Text Available The Tat protein of HIV-1 has several well-known properties, such as nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, transactivation of transcription, interaction with tubulin, regulation of mitotic progression, and induction of apoptosis. Previous studies have identified a couple of lysine residues in Tat that are essential for its functions. In order to analyze the functions of all the lysine residues in Tat, we mutated them individually to alanine, glutamine, and arginine. Through systematic analysis of the lysine mutants, we discovered several previously unidentified characteristics of Tat. We found that lysine acetylation could modulate the subcellular localization of Tat, in addition to the regulation of its transactivation activity. Our data also revealed that lysine mutations had distinct effects on microtubule assembly and Tat binding to bromodomain proteins. By correlation analysis, we further found that the effects of Tat on apoptosis and mitotic progression were not entirely attributed to its effect on microtubule assembly. Our findings suggest that Tat may regulate diverse cellular activities through binding to different proteins and that the acetylation of distinct lysine residues in Tat may modulate its interaction with various partners.

  14. Design and synthesis of á,á-trehalose derivatives bearing guanidino groups as inhibitors for the Tat Protein-TAR RNA interaction of HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Min; Xu Zhidong; Tu Pengfei; Xiao Sulong; Yu Xiaolin; Yang Ming

    2004-01-01

    Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires specific interactions of Tat protein with the transactivation responsive region (TAR) RNA. Disruption of Tat-TAR RNA interaction could inhibit HIV-1 replication. Here four target compounds were designed and synthesized to bind to TAR RNA for blocking the interaction of Tat-TAR RNA. The core molecule 6,6′-diamino-6,6′ -dideoxy-á,á-trehalose was obtained from selective bromination of a,a-trehalose at C-6,6′, followed by acetylation, azide displacement, deacetylation and reduction.Coupling of the core molecule with the protected amino acid, then deprotection and guanidinylation generated 6,6′-bis(L-arginylamino)-6,6′-dideoxy-á,á-trehalose,6,6′-bisguanidino-6,6′-dideoxy-á ,á-trehalose, 6,6′-bis [((a)-guanidinobutyryl)amino]-6,6′-dideoxy-á,á-trehalose and 6,6′-bis(guanidinoacetylamino)-6,6′-dideoxy-á,á-trehalose, respectively.Their abilities to inhibit Tat-TAR RNA interaction were determined by a Tat-dependent HIV-1LTR-driven CAT assays.

  15. Thermodynamic studies of a series of homologous HIV-1 TAR RNA ligands reveal that loose binders are stronger Tat competitors than tight ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Lise; Azoulay, Stéphane; Di Giorgio, Audrey; Zenacker, Laura; Gaysinski, Marc; Clayette, Pascal; Patino, Nadia

    2013-06-01

    RNA is a major drug target, but the design of small molecules that modulate RNA function remains a great challenge. In this context, a series of structurally homologous 'polyamide amino acids' (PAA) was studied as HIV-1 trans-activating response (TAR) RNA ligands. An extensive thermodynamic study revealed the occurence of an enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon resulting in very close TAR affinities for all PAA. However, their binding modes and their ability to compete with the Tat fragment strongly differ according to their structure. Surprisingly, PAA that form loose complexes with TAR were shown to be stronger Tat competitors than those forming tight ones, and thermal denaturation studies demonstrated that loose complexes are more stable than tight ones. This could be correlated to the fact that loose and tight ligands induce distinct RNA conformational changes as revealed by circular dichroism experiments, although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments showed that the TAR binding site is the same in all cases. Finally, some loose PAA also display promising inhibitory activities on HIV-infected cells. Altogether, these results lead to a better understanding of RNA interaction modes that could be very useful for devising new ligands of relevant RNA targets.

  16. Characterization of the HIV-1 TAR RNA-Tat peptide and drug interactions by on-line acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassew, Nardos Gobena

    This thesis presents the application of the thickness shear-mode (TSM) acoustic wave sensor to the study of RNA-protein and RNA-drug interactions at the solid-liquid interface. The binding of the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 Tat protein to the trans-activation responsive RNA element (TAR) has been studied using this sensor. Data from such measurements show that the sensor is able to discriminate between different Tat peptides derived from the parent protein based on size. The effects of mutations introduced at specific sites in the protein and RNA on the TAR-Tat binding have also been examined in detail. Reduced level of response in acoustic parameters due to mutations was observed indicating that the decrease in binding in response to site specific mutations can be acoustically detected. Data from acoustic wave sensor measurements indicate that the TAR-Tat binding is also affected by ionic strength. Both the frequency and motional resistance signals show periodic responses when varying concentrations of salt are introduced on a TAR-modified surface. The binding of the two molecules seems to be a function of the response of the nucleic acid to salt concentrations. The kinetics of binding of Tat peptides to TAR RNA and to a bulge mutant analogue (MTAR) is also examined from the rate of change of the series resonant frequency. Results from such analysis illustrate longer Tat peptides formed more stable complexes with TAR RNA and exhibited increased discrimination between mutant and wild type TAR. The binding of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, neomycin and streptomycin, to TAR RNA and their effectiveness in preventing TAR-Tat complex formation has been studied in detail. Binding affinity is directly correlated with the inhibitory potency of these molecules and the TSM sensor shows that neomycin exhibits at least a ten fold greater affinity to TAR and that it is also a more potent inhibitor than streptomycin. The results from this research involving TAR-Tat and

  17. Broad activation of latent HIV-1 in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Winckelmann, Anni;

    2016-01-01

    The 'shock and kill' approach to cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) includes transcriptional induction of latent HIV-1 proviruses using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) with targeted immunotherapy to purge infected cells. The administration of LRAs (panobinostat or vorinostat) to HIV-1-infected...... individuals on antiretroviral therapy induces a significant increase in cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1 RNA from CD4(+) T cells. However, it is important to discern whether the increases in CA-US HIV-1 RNA are due to limited or broad activation of HIV-1 proviruses. Here we use single-genome sequencing...... to find that the RNA transcripts observed following LRA administration are genetically diverse, indicating activation of transcription from an extensive range of proviruses. Defective sequences are more frequently found in CA HIV-1 RNA than in HIV-1 DNA, which has implications for developing an accurate...

  18. Expression of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain is down regulated on the surface of CD4 T-cells by the HIV-1 Tat protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny McLaughlin

    Full Text Available HIV infection elicits defects in CD4 T-cell homeostasis in both a quantitative and qualitative manner. Interleukin-7 (IL-7 is essential to T-cell homeostasis and several groups have shown reduced levels of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain (CD127 on both CD4 and CD8 T-cells in viremic HIV+ patients. We have shown previously that soluble HIV Tat protein specifically down regulates cell surface expression of CD127 on human CD8 T-cells in a paracrine fashion. The effects of Tat on CD127 expression in CD4 T-cells has yet to be described. To explore this effect, CD4 T-cells were isolated from healthy individuals and expression levels of CD127 were examined on cells incubated in media alone or treated with Tat protein. We show here that, similar to CD8 T-cells, the HIV-1 Tat protein specifically down regulates CD127 on primary human CD4 T-cells and directs the receptor to the proteasome for degradation. Down regulation of CD127 in response to Tat was seen on both memory and naive CD4 T-cell subsets and was blocked using either heparin or anti-Tat antibodies. Tat did not induce apoptosis in cultured primary CD4 T-cells over 72 hours as determined by Annexin V and PI staining. Pre-incubation of CD4 T-cells with HIV-1 Tat protein did however reduce the ability of IL-7 to up regulate Bcl-2 expression. Similar to exogenous Tat, endogenously expressed HIV Tat protein also suppressed CD127 expression on primary CD4 T-cells. In view of the important role IL-7 plays in lymphocyte proliferation, homeostasis and survival, down regulation of CD127 by Tat likely plays a central role in immune dysregulation and CD4 T-cell decline. Understanding this effect could lead to new approaches to mitigate the CD4 T-cell loss evident in HIV infection.

  19. Opiate addiction therapies and HIV-1 Tat: interactive effects on glial [Ca²⁺]i, oxyradical and neuroinflammatory chemokine production and correlative neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Sylvia; Zou, Shiping; El-Hage, Nazira; Suzuki, Masami; Paris, Jason J; Schier, Christina J; Rodríguez, José W; Rodriguez, Myosotys; Knapp, Pamela E; Hauser, Kurt F

    2014-01-01

    Few preclinical studies have compared the relative therapeutic efficacy of medications used to treat opiate addiction in relation to neuroAIDS. Here we compare the ability of methadone and buprenorphine, and the prototypic opiate morphine, to potentiate the neurotoxic and proinflammatory ([Ca²⁺]i, ROS, H₂O₂, chemokines) effects of HIV-1 Tat in neuronal and/or mixed-glial co-cultures. Repeated observations of neurons during 48 h exposure to combinations of Tat, equimolar concentrations (500 nM) of morphine, methadone, or buprenorphine exacerbated neurotoxicity significantly above levels seen with Tat alone. Buprenorphine alone displayed marked neurotoxicity at 500 nM, prompting additional studies of its neurotoxic effects at 5 nM and 50 nM concentrations ± Tat. In combination with Tat, buprenorphine displayed paradoxical, concentration-dependent, neurotoxic and neuroprotective actions. Buprenorphine neurotoxicity coincided with marked elevations in [Ca²⁺]i, but not increases in glial ROS or chemokine release. Tat by itself elevated the production of CCL5/RANTES, CCL4/MIP-1β, and CCL2/MCP-1. Methadone and buprenorphine alone had no effect, but methadone interacted with Tat to further increase production of CCL5/RANTES. In combination with Tat, all drugs significantly increased glial [Ca²⁺]i, but ROS was only significantly increased by co-exposure with morphine. Taken together, the increases in glial [Ca²⁺]i, ROS, and neuroinflammatory chemokines were not especially accurate predictors of neurotoxicity. Despite similarities, opiates displayed differences in their neurotoxic and neuroinflammatory interactions with Tat. Buprenorphine, in particular, was partially neuroprotective at a low concentration, which may result from its unique pharmacological profile at multiple opioid receptors. Overall, the results reveal differences among addiction medications that may impact neuroAIDS.

  20. HIV-1 tat promotes integrin-mediated HIV transmission to dendritic cells by binding Env spikes and competes neutralization by anti-HIV antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Monini

    Full Text Available Use of Env in HIV vaccine development has been disappointing. Here we show that, in the presence of a biologically active Tat subunit vaccine, a trimeric Env protein prevents in monkeys virus spread from the portal of entry to regional lymph nodes. This appears to be due to specific interactions between Tat and Env spikes that form a novel virus entry complex favoring R5 or X4 virus entry and productive infection of dendritic cells (DCs via an integrin-mediated pathway. These Tat effects do not require Tat-transactivation activity and are blocked by anti-integrin antibodies (Abs. Productive DC infection promoted by Tat is associated with a highly efficient virus transmission to T cells. In the Tat/Env complex the cysteine-rich region of Tat engages the Env V3 loop, whereas the Tat RGD sequence remains free and directs the virus to integrins present on DCs. V2 loop deletion, which unshields the CCR5 binding region of Env, increases Tat/Env complex stability. Of note, binding of Tat to Env abolishes neutralization of Env entry or infection of DCs by anti-HIV sera lacking anti-Tat Abs, which are seldom present in natural infection. This is reversed, and neutralization further enhanced, by HIV sera containing anti-Tat Abs such as those from asymptomatic or Tat-vaccinated patients, or by sera from the Tat/Env vaccinated monkeys. Thus, both anti-Tat and anti-Env Abs are required for efficient HIV neutralization. These data suggest that the Tat/Env interaction increases HIV acquisition and spreading, as a mechanism evolved by the virus to escape anti-Env neutralizing Abs. This may explain the low effectiveness of Env-based vaccines, which are also unlikely to elicit Abs against new Env epitopes exposed by the Tat/Env interaction. As Tat also binds Envs from different clades, new vaccine strategies should exploit the Tat/Env interaction for both preventative and therapeutic interventions.

  1. Extracellular HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Lin; YANG Yi-da; LU Guo-cai; SALVATO Maria S

    2005-01-01

    In our previous work we reported that HIV Tat and 6 cysteine rich peptides of Tat induce tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) in human monocytes (Yang et al., 2003). Here our results showed that HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in human monocytes, and this activity is inhibited by rabbit anti-Tat. Boiled Tat does not increase CCR5 expression in monocytes. These results provide insight into a new mechanism by which HIV Tat plays a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  2. HTLV-1 Tax activates HIV-1 transcription in latency models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Victor Emmanuel Viana; José, Diego Pandeló; Leal, Fabio E; Nixon, Douglas F; Tanuri, Amilcar; Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2017-04-01

    HIV-1 latency is a major obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Coinfection with HTLV-1 has been associated with faster progression to AIDS. HTLV-1 encodes the transactivator Tax which can activate both HTLV-1 and HIV-1 transcription. Here, we demonstrate that Tax activates HIV transcription in latent CD4(+) T cells. Tax promotes the activation of P-TEFb, releasing CDK9 and Cyclin T1 from inactive forms, promoting transcription elongation and reactivation of latent HIV-1. Tax mutants lacking interaction with the HIV-1-LTR promoter were not able to activate P-TEFb, with no subsequent activation of latent HIV. In HIV-infected primary resting CD4(+) T cells, Tax-1 reactivated HIV-1 transcription up to five fold, confirming these findings in an ex vivo latency model. Finally, our results confirms that HTLV-1/Tax hijacks cellular partners, promoting HIV-1 transcription, and this interaction should be further investigated in HIV-1 latency studies in patients with HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fractalkine/CX3CL1 protects striatal neurons from synergistic morphine and HIV-1 Tat-induced dendritic losses and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Masami

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractalkine/CX3CL1 and its cognate receptor CX3CR1 are abundantly expressed in the CNS. Fractalkine is an unusual C-X3-C motif chemokine that is important in neuron-microglial communication, a co-receptor for HIV infection, and can be neuroprotective. To assess the effects of fractalkine on opiate-HIV interactive neurotoxicity, wild-type murine striatal neurons were co-cultured with mixed glia from the striata of wild-type or Cx3cr1 knockout mice ± HIV-1 Tat and/or morphine. Time-lapse digital images were continuously recorded at 20 min intervals for up to 72 h using computer-aided microscopy to track the same cells repeatedly. Results Co-exposure to Tat and morphine caused synergistic increases in neuron death, dendritic pruning, and microglial motility as previously reported. Exogenous fractalkine prevented synergistic Tat and morphine-induced dendritic losses and neuron death even though the inflammatory mediator TNF-α remained significantly elevated. Antibody blockade of CX3CR1 mimicked the toxic effects of morphine plus Tat, but did not add to their toxicity; while fractalkine failed to protect wild-type neurons co-cultured with Cx3cr1-/--null glia against morphine and Tat toxicity. Exogenous fractalkine also normalized microglial motility, which is elevated by Tat and morphine co-exposure, presumably limiting microglial surveillance that may lead to toxic effects on neurons. Fractalkine immunofluorescence was expressed in neurons and to a lesser extent by other cell types, whereas CX3CR1 immunoreactivity or GFP fluorescence in cells cultured from the striatum of Cx3cr1-/- (Cx3cr1GFP/GFP mice were associated with microglia. Immunoblotting shows that fractalkine levels were unchanged following Tat and/or morphine exposure and there was no increase in released fractalkine as determined by ELISA. By contrast, CX3CR1 protein levels were markedly downregulated. Conclusions The results suggest that deficits in fractalkine

  4. Molecular Mechanisms in Activation of Latent HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Rafati (Haleh)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Finding a cure for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is extremely challenging. Development of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), transformed HIV-1 infection from an acute syndrome into chronic disease. Although using HAART results in suppressio

  5. HIV-1 activates macrophages independent of Toll-like receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph N Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages provide an interface between innate and adaptive immunity and are important long-lived reservoirs for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1. Multiple genetic networks involved in regulating signal transduction cascades and immune responses in macrophages are coordinately modulated by HIV-1 infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate complex interrelated processes and to assemble an integrated view of activated signaling networks, a systems biology strategy was applied to genomic and proteomic responses by primary human macrophages over the course of HIV-1 infection. Macrophage responses, including cell cycle, calcium, apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK, and cytokines/chemokines, to HIV-1 were temporally regulated, in the absence of cell proliferation. In contrast, Toll-like receptor (TLR pathways remained unaltered by HIV-1, although TLRs 3, 4, 7, and 8 were expressed and responded to ligand stimulation in macrophages. HIV-1 failed to activate phosphorylation of IRAK-1 or IRF-3, modulate intracellular protein levels of Mx1, an interferon-stimulated gene, or stimulate secretion of TNF, IL-1beta, or IL-6. Activation of pathways other than TLR was inadequate to stimulate, via cross-talk mechanisms through molecular hubs, the production of proinflammatory cytokines typical of a TLR response. HIV-1 sensitized macrophage responses to TLR ligands, and the magnitude of viral priming was related to virus replication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1 induced a primed, proinflammatory state, M1(HIV, which increased the responsiveness of macrophages to TLR ligands. HIV-1 might passively evade pattern recognition, actively inhibit or suppress recognition and signaling, or require dynamic interactions between macrophages and other cells, such as lymphocytes or endothelial cells. HIV-1 evasion of TLR recognition and simultaneous priming of macrophages may represent a strategy for viral survival, contribute

  6. In vitro inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus replication by purified porcine Mx1 protein fused to HIV-1 Tat protein transduction domain (PTD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-min; He, Dan-Ni; Zhou, Bin; Pang, Ran; Liu, Ke; Zhao, Jin; Chen, Pu-yan

    2013-08-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the causative agent of Vesicular stomatitis (VS), a highly contagious fatal disease of human and pigs. Few effective antiviral drugs are currently available against VSV infection. Mx proteins are interferon (IFN)-induced dynamin-like GTPases present in all vertebrates with a range of antiviral activities. Previous studies have shown that the transfected cell lines expressing either porcine Mx1 or human MxA acquired a high degree of resistance to VSV. To explore the feasibility of taking porcine Mx1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli as an antiviral agent, we applied the pCold system to express this fusion protein (PTD-poMx1), which consisted of an N-terminal HIV-1 Tat protein transduction domain (PTD) and the full-length porcine Mx1, and investigated its effects on the replication of VSV in Vero cells. The results demonstrated that the purified PTD-poMx1 fusion proteins could transduct into cells after incubated for 5h and had no cytotoxic. Furthermore, plaque reduction assay, determination of TCID50, real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were carried out to confirm the antiviral activity of purified fusion proteins in VSV-infected Vero cells. Altogether, these data suggested that PTD-poMx1 fusion proteins might be applicable to inhibit VSV replication as a novel antiviral therapeutic agent.

  7. The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus-1 enhances hepatitis C virus replication through interferon gamma-inducible protein-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Jing

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV is associated with faster progression of liver disease and an increase in HCV persistence. However, the mechanism by which HIV-1 accelerates the progression of HCV liver disease remains unknown. Results HIV-1/HCV co-infection is associated with increased expression of interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. HCV RNA levels were higher in PBMCs of patients with HIV-1/HCV co-infection than in patients with HCV mono-infection. HIV-1 Tat and IP-10 activated HCV replication in a time-dependent manner, and HIV-1 Tat induced IP-10 production. In addition, the effect of HIV-1 Tat on HCV replication was blocked by anti-IP-10 monoclonal antibody, demonstrating that the effect of HIV-1 Tat on HCV replication depends on IP-10. Taken together, these results suggest that HIV-1 Tat protein activates HCV replication by upregulating IP-10 production. Conclusions HIV-1/HCV co-infection is associated with increased expression of IP-10 mRNA and replication of HCV RNA. Furthermore, both HIV-1 Tat and IP-10 activate HCV replication. HIV-1 Tat activates HCV replication by upregulating IP-10 production. These results expand our understanding of HIV-1 in HCV replication and the mechanism involved in the regulation of HCV replication mediated by HIV-1 during co-infection.

  8. A Novel Bromodomain Inhibitor Reverses HIV-1 Latency through Specific Binding with BRD4 to Promote Tat and P-TEFb Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huachao Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available While combinatory antiretroviral therapy (cART can effectively reduce HIV-1 viremia, it cannot eliminate HIV-1 infection. In the presence of cART, viral reservoirs remain latent, impeding the cure of HIV-1/AIDS. Recently, latency-reversing agents (LRAs have been developed with the intent of purging latent HIV-1, providing an intriguing strategy for the eradication of the residual viral reservoirs. Our earlier studies show that the first-generation, methyl-triazolo bromodomain, and extra-terminal domain inhibitor (BETi, JQ1, facilitates the reversal of HIV-1 latency. BETis have emerged as a new class of compounds that are promising for this HIV-1 “shock and kill” eradication approach. However, when used as a single drug, JQ1 only modestly reverses HIV-1 latency, which complicates studying the underlining mechanisms. Meanwhile, it has been widely discussed that the induction of latent proviruses is stochastic (Ho et al., 2013. Thus, new BETis are currently under active development with focus on improving potency, ease of synthesis and structural diversity. Using fluorous-tagged multicomponent reactions, we developed a novel second-generation, 3,5-dimethylisoxazole BETi based on an imidazo[1,2-a] pyrazine scaffold, UMB-32. Furthermore, we screened 37 UMB-32 derivatives and identified that one, UMB-136, reactivates HIV-1 in multiple cell models of HIV-1 latency with better efficiency than either JQ1 or UMB-32. UMB-136 enhances HIV-1 transcription and increases viral production through the release of P-TEFb. Importantly, UMB-136 enhances the latency-reversing effects of PKC agonists (prostratin, bryostatin-1 in CD8-depleted PBMCs containing latent viral reservoirs. Our results illustrate that structurally improved BETis, such as UMB-136, may be useful as promising LRAs for HIV-1 eradication.

  9. Intracerebroventricular administration of HIV-1 Tat induces brain cytokine and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression: a possible mechanism for AIDS comorbid depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Marcus A; Kelley, Keith W; Dantzer, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a major public health concern despite a large education effort during the past 25 years. A persistent problem with HIV infection is the high comorbity rate of clinical depression. We previously established that increasing proinflammatory cytokines within the brain of mice induces sickness that can culminate in depressive-like behavior. Here we investigated the role of the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein in activation of brain cytokine signaling and subsequent induction of depressive-like behavior in a murine model. Adult Balb/c mice were administered a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Tat (40 ng). Social investigation of a novel juvenile was measured at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h post-treatment. Mice treated with Tat did not display signs of sickness, as measured by either decreased social investigation or loss of body weight. At 24 h post-injection, mice were subjected to the forced swim test (FST). ICV administration of Tat to Balb/c mice increased immobility in the FST at 24 h post injection. A different strain of mice, C57BL/6J, responded similarly in the FST. Furthermore, adult C57BL/6J mice injected with Tat and tested in a two-bottle 1% sucrose preference test displayed reduced preference for sucrose during the 24 h post-injection period. Subsequently, brain tissues from Tat-treated and control C57BL/6J mice were collected at 4 and 24 h post injection. CNS tissue from Tat-treated mice had increased expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IDO mRNAs at 4 h post injection. These data demonstrate that a single exposure to Tat in the brain is sufficient to induce brain cytokine signaling that culminates in depressive-like behavior. The results reveal a potential role for Tat in the development of comorbid depression in HIV-infected individuals.

  10. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: From activation to deactivation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varin Audrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1 induced in particular by IFN-γ display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2 induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM. Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  11. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  12. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Pasetto

    Full Text Available HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic, H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic, and the dual tropic (X4R5 HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  13. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  15. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  16. Interplay between Structure and Charge as a Key to Allosteric Modulation of Human 20S Proteasome by the Basic Fragment of HIV-1 Tat Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Karpowicz

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a giant protease responsible for degradation of the majority of cytosolic proteins. Competitive inhibitors of the proteasome are used against aggressive blood cancers. However, broadening the use of proteasome-targeting drugs requires new mechanistic approaches to the enzyme's inhibition. In our previous studies we described Tat1 peptide, an allosteric inhibitor of the proteasome derived from a fragment of the basic domain of HIV-Tat1 protein. Here, we attempted to dissect the structural determinants of the proteasome inhibition by Tat1. Single- and multiple- alanine walking scans were performed. Tat1 analogs with stabilized beta-turn conformation at positions 4-5 and 8-9, pointed out by the molecular dynamics modeling and the alanine scan, were synthesized. Structure of Tat1 analogs were analyzed by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies, supplemented by molecular dynamics simulations. Biological activity tests and structural studies revealed that high flexibility and exposed positive charge are hallmarks of Tat1 peptide. Interestingly, stabilization of a beta-turn at the 8-9 position was necessary to significantly improve the inhibitory potency.

  17. Cellular penetration and nuclear importation properties of {sup 111}In-labeled and {sup 123}I-labeled HIV-1 tat peptide immunoconjugates in BT-474 human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelissen, Bart [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Hu, Meiduo [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); McLarty, Kristin [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Costantini, Dan [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada) and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada) and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada) and Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada)]. E-mail: raymond.reilly@utoronto.ca

    2007-01-15

    Introduction: Our objective was to compare the cell penetration and nuclear importation properties of {sup 111}In-labeled and {sup 123}I-labeled immunoconjugates (ICs) composed of 16-mer peptides (GRKKRRQRRRPPQGYG) derived from HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (tat) protein and anti-mouse IgG (mIgG) in BT-474 breast cancer (BC) cells. Methods: [{sup 111}In]tat ICs were constructed by site-specific conjugation of tat peptides to NaIO{sub 4} {sup -}-oxidized carbohydrates in the Fc domain of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic-acid-modified anti-mIgG antibodies. Immunoreactivity against mIgG was assessed in a competition assay. The kinetics of the accumulation of [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat IC and [{sup 123}I]anti-mIgG-tat ICs in BT-474 cells and the elimination of radioactivity from cells, cytoplasm or nuclei were determined. The effects of excess tat peptides or NH{sub 4}Cl (an inhibitor of endosomal acidification) on cellular uptake and nuclear importation of [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat were measured. Results: [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat was >97% radiochemically pure and exhibited preserved immunoreactivity with mIgG epitopes. [{sup 123}I]Anti-mIgG-tat penetrated BT-474 cells more rapidly than [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat ICs and achieved a 1.5-fold to a 2-fold higher uptake in cells and nuclei. Cell penetration and nuclear uptake of [{sup 111}In]anti-mIgG-tat were inhibited by excess tat peptides and NH{sub 4}Cl. Elimination of radioactivity from BT-474 cells and nuclei was more rapid and complete for {sup 123}I-labeled than for {sup 111}In-labeled anti-mIgG-tat ICs. Conclusion: Tat peptides derived from HIV-1 tat protein promoted the penetration and nuclear uptake of radioactivity following the incubation of {sup 111}In-labeled and {sup 123}I-labeled anti-mIgG antibodies with BT-474 human BC cells. {sup 111}In-labeled tat ICs are feasible for inserting radionuclides into cancer cells with potential for targeting intracellular and, particularly, nuclear epitopes for

  18. Association of Tat with promoters of PTEN and PP2A subunits is key to transcriptional activation of apoptotic pathways in HIV-infected CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayoung Kim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis in HIV-1-infected CD4+ primary T cells is triggered by the alteration of the PI3K and p53 pathways, which converge on the FOXO3a transcriptional activator. Tat alone can cause activation of FOXO3a and of its proapoptotic target genes. To understand how Tat affects this pathway, we carried out ChIP-Chip experiments with Tat. Tat associates with the promoters of PTEN and two PP2A subunit genes, but not with the FOXO3a promoter. PTEN and PP2A encode phosphatases, whose levels and activity are increased when Tat is expressed. They counteract phosphorylation of Akt1 and FOXO3a, and so activate transcriptional activity of FOXO3a. FOXO3a promotes increased transcription of Egr-1, which can further stimulate the transcription of PTEN, thereby reinforcing the pathway that leads to FOXO3a transcriptional activation. RNAi experiments support the role of PTEN and PP2A in the initiation of the Tat-mediated cascade, which is critical to apoptosis. The increased accumulation of PTEN and PP2A subunit mRNAs during Tat expression is more likely to be the result of increased transcription initiation and not relief of promoter-proximal pausing of RNAPII. The Tat-PTEN and -PP2A promoter interactions provide a mechanistic explanation of Tat-mediated apoptosis in CD4+ T cells.

  19. B-oligomer of pertussis toxin inhibits HIV-1 LTR-driven transcription through suppression of NF-kappaB p65 subunit activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Iordanskaya, Tatyana; Quivy, Vincent; Van Lint, Carine; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2002-10-10

    The binding subunit of pertussis toxin (PTX-B) has been shown recently to inhibit the entry and postentry events in HIV-1 replication in primary T lymphocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. While the effect of PTX-B on HIV-1 entry was shown to involve CCR5 desensitization, the mechanism of postentry inhibition remained unclear. In T lymphocytes, PTX-B affected transcription or stability of Tat-stimulated HIV-1 mRNAs. In this study, we sought to identify the mechanism of postentry inhibition of HIV-1 replication by PTX-B in U-937 promonocytic cells. We demonstrate that in these cells PTX-B inhibits expression of luciferase reporter gene controlled by the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This effect is Tat-independent and is not restricted to the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Instead, PTX-B activity is mediated through suppression of the cellular transcription factor, NF-kappaB. PTX-B inhibits phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. This effect is independent of the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB inhibitor, IkappaBalpha, as PTX-B stimulates phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of this protein. The suppressive activity of PTX-B on NF-kappaB p65 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation is delayed, suggesting that PTX-B signaling might initiate synthesis and cytoplasmic accumulation of a p65 phosphorylation inhibitor.

  20. A cell-penetrating antibody fragment against HIV-1 Rev has high antiviral activity: characterization of the paratope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Stahl, Stephen J; Watts, Norman R; DiMattia, Michael A; Steven, Alasdair C; Wingfield, Paul T

    2014-07-18

    The HIV-1 protein Rev oligomerizes on viral transcripts and directs their nuclear export. Previously, a Fab against Rev generated by phage display was used to crystallize and solve the structure of the Rev oligomerization domain. Here we have investigated the capability of this Fab to block Rev oligomerization and inhibit HIV-1 replication. The Fab itself did not have antiviral activity, but when a Tat-derived cell-penetrating peptide was appended, the resulting molecule (FabRev1-Tat) was strongly inhibitory of three different CCR5-tropic HIV-1 isolates (IC50 = 0.09-0.44 μg/ml), as assessed by suppression of reverse transcriptase activity in infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and had low cell toxicity (TC50 > 100 μg/ml). FabRev1-Tat was taken up by both peripheral blood mononuclear and HEK293T cells, appearing in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, as shown by immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy. Computational alanine scanning was used to identify key residues in the complementarity-determining regions to guide mutagenesis experiments. Residues in the light chain CDR3 (LCDR3) were assessed to be important. Residues in LCDR3 were mutated, and LCDR3-Tyr(92) was found to be critical for binding to Rev, as judged by surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy. Peptides corresponding to all six CDR regions were synthesized and tested for Rev binding. None of the linear peptides had significant affinity for Rev, but four of the amide-cyclic forms did. Especially cyclic-LCDR3 (LGGYPAASYRTA) had high affinity for Rev and was able to effectively depolymerize Rev filaments, as shown by both surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy.

  1. Anti-HIV-1 Activities of 4 Telomerase Restrictors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xin; WANG Jinghui; de Giuli Morghen; Radaelli A; Zanotto C; Beggio P

    2007-01-01

    MTT Cell Proliferation Assay was used to optimize the concentration of Telomerase Restrictors(TRs) with minimum toxicity to the selected cells. FACSort flow cytometer and Innotest P24 HIV(Human immunodeficiency Virus) antigen mAb ELISA Kit were used to investigate the anti-HIV-1 activities of TRs. The results showed that TRs had low cytotoxicity to the PBMC (Peripheral Blood mononuclear cells) and CEM/GFP if the concentration of TRs was at 50 μmol/L or below, and the supernatant from PBMC pretreated with SHIV and TR1-001 /TR1-002 could not infect the PBMC, while can infect the C8166 with reduced infectivity, which suggested that the TRs may be one of the novel resources for screening anti-HIV-1 agents.

  2. Innate immune activation in primary HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J Judy; Altfeld, Marcus

    2010-10-15

    There is growing evidence that highlights the role of the immune response during acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the control or development of disease. The adaptive immune responses do not appear until after HIV-1 infection is already well established, so the role of earlier and faster-responding innate immunity needs to be more closely scrutinized. In particular, 2 aspects of innate immunity for which there are growing research developments will be examined in this review: the actions of type I interferons and natural killer cells. These two components of the innate immune response contribute to viral control both by killing infected cells and by modulating other immune cells that develop. However, the role of interferon α in immune activation is a double-edged sword, causing recruitment of adaptive immune cells that can assist in viral control but concurrently contributing to immune activation-dependent disease progression. Understanding the complexity of how innate responses affect the outcome of HIV-1 infection will help in the development of vaccines that can use innate immunity to enhance viral control with minimal pathogenesis.

  3. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A. (UMASS, MED)

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  4. Structural mechanism of trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E H Tran

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection begins with the binding of trimeric viral envelope glycoproteins (Env to CD4 and a co-receptor on target T-cells. Understanding how these ligands influence the structure of Env is of fundamental interest for HIV vaccine development. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we describe the contrasting structural outcomes of trimeric Env binding to soluble CD4, to the broadly neutralizing, CD4-binding site antibodies VRC01, VRC03 and b12, or to the monoclonal antibody 17b, a co-receptor mimic. Binding of trimeric HIV-1 BaL Env to either soluble CD4 or 17b alone, is sufficient to trigger formation of the open quaternary conformation of Env. In contrast, VRC01 locks Env in the closed state, while b12 binding requires a partial opening in the quaternary structure of trimeric Env. Our results show that, despite general similarities in regions of the HIV-1 gp120 polypeptide that contact CD4, VRC01, VRC03 and b12, there are important differences in quaternary structures of the complexes these ligands form on native trimeric Env, and potentially explain differences in the neutralizing breadth and potency of antibodies with similar specificities. From cryo-electron microscopic analysis at ∼9 Å resolution of a cleaved, soluble version of trimeric Env, we show that a structural signature of the open Env conformation is a three-helix motif composed of α-helical segments derived from highly conserved, non-glycosylated N-terminal regions of the gp41 trimer. The three N-terminal gp41 helices in this novel, activated Env conformation are held apart by their interactions with the rest of Env, and are less compactly packed than in the post-fusion, six-helix bundle state. These findings suggest a new structural template for designing immunogens that can elicit antibodies targeting HIV at a vulnerable, pre-entry stage.

  5. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  6. Antiretroviral treatment effect on immune activation reduces cerebrospinal fluid HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Elizabeth; Ronquillo, Rollie; Lollo, Nicole; Deeks, Steven G; Hunt, Peter; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Spudich, Serena; Price, Richard W

    2008-04-15

    To define the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on activation of T cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood, and interactions of this activation with CSF HIV-1 RNA concentrations. Cross-sectional analysis of 14 HIV-negative subjects and 123 neuroasymptomatic HIV-1-infected subjects divided into 3 groups: not on ART (termed "offs"), on ART with plasma HIV-1 RNA >500 copies/mL ("failures"), and on ART with plasma HIV-1 RNA activation was measured by coexpression of CD38 and human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR). Other measurements included CSF neopterin and white blood cell (WBC) counts. CD8 T-cell activation in CSF and blood was highly correlated across all subjects and was highest in the offs, lower in the failures, and lower still in the successes. While CD8 activation was reduced in failures compared to offs across the range of plasma HIV-1, it maintained a coincident relation to CSF HIV-1 in both viremic groups. In addition to correlation with CSF HIV-1 concentrations, CD8 activation in blood and CSF correlated with CSF WBCs and CSF neopterin. Multivariate analysis confirmed the association of blood CD8 T-cell activation, along with plasma HIV-1 RNA and CSF neopterin, with CSF HIV-1 RNA levels. The similarity of CD8 T-cell activation in blood and CSF suggests these cells move from blood to CSF with only minor changes in CD38/HLA-DR expression. Differences in the relation of CD8 activation to HIV-1 concentrations in the blood and CSF in the 2 viremic groups suggest that changes in immune activation not only modulate CSF HIV-1 replication but also contribute to CSF treatment effects. The magnitude of systemic HIV-1 infection and intrathecal macrophage activation are also important determinants of CSF HIV-1 RNA levels.

  7. Innate Immune Activation in Primary HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J. Judy; Altfeld, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence highlighting the role of the immune response during acute HIV-1 infection on the control or development of disease. The adaptive immune responses do not appear until after the HIV-1 infection is already well established and as such the role of the earlier and faster responding innate immunity needs to be more closely scrutinized. In particular, two aspects of the innate immunity with growing developments will be examined in this review; type I IFNs and NK cells. Both...

  8. Discovery of BMS-955176, a Second Generation HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitor with Broad Spectrum Antiviral Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yan; Sin, Ny; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Swidorski, Jacob J; Chen, Jie; Venables, Brian L; Zhu, Juliang; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Lin, Zeyu; Terry, Brian; Samanta, Himadri; Zhang, Sharon; Li, Zhufang; Beno, Brett R; Huang, Xiaohua S; Rahematpura, Sandhya; Parker, Dawn D; Haskell, Roy; Jenkins, Susan; Santone, Kenneth S; Cockett, Mark I; Krystal, Mark; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Dicker, Ira B

    2016-06-09

    HIV-1 maturation inhibition (MI) has been clinically validated as an approach to the control of HIV-1 infection. However, identifying an MI with both broad polymorphic spectrum coverage and good oral exposure has been challenging. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and preclinical characterization of a potent, orally active, second generation HIV-1 MI, BMS-955176 (2), which is currently in Phase IIb clinical trials as part of a combination antiretroviral regimen.

  9. Integrase and integration: biochemical activities of HIV-1 integrase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deprez Eric

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Integration of retroviral DNA is an obligatory step of retrovirus replication because proviral DNA is the template for productive infection. Integrase, a retroviral enzyme, catalyses integration. The process of integration can be divided into two sequential reactions. The first one, named 3'-processing, corresponds to a specific endonucleolytic reaction which prepares the viral DNA extremities to be competent for the subsequent covalent insertion, named strand transfer, into the host cell genome by a trans-esterification reaction. Recently, a novel specific activity of the full length integrase was reported, in vitro, by our group for two retroviral integrases (HIV-1 and PFV-1. This activity of internal cleavage occurs at a specific palindromic sequence mimicking the LTR-LTR junction described into the 2-LTR circles which are peculiar viral DNA forms found during viral infection. Moreover, recent studies demonstrated the existence of a weak palindromic consensus found at the integration sites. Taken together, these data underline the propensity of retroviral integrases for binding symmetrical sequences and give perspectives for targeting specific sequences used for gene therapy.

  10. Inhibitory effect of aqueous dandelion extract on HIV-1 replication and reverse transcriptase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Huamin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, which is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, is an immunosuppressive disease that results in life-threatening opportunistic infections. The general problems in current therapy include the constant emergence of drug-resistant HIV strains, adverse side effects and the unavailability of treatments in developing countries. Natural products from herbs with the abilities to inhibit HIV-1 life cycle at different stages, have served as excellent sources of new anti-HIV-1 drugs. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anti-HIV-1 activity of aqueous dandelion extract. Methods The pseudotyped HIV-1 virus has been utilized to explore the anti-HIV-1 activity of dandelion, the level of HIV-1 replication was assessed by the percentage of GFP-positive cells. The inhibitory effect of the dandelion extract on reverse transcriptase activity was assessed by the reverse transcriptase assay kit. Results Compared to control values obtained from cells infected without treatment, the level of HIV-1 replication and reverse transcriptase activity were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The data suggest that dandelion extract has a potent inhibitory activity against HIV-1 replication and reverse transcriptase activity. The identification of HIV-1 antiviral compounds from Taraxacum officinale should be pursued. Conclusions The dandelion extract showed strong activity against HIV-1 RT and inhibited both the HIV-1 vector and the hybrid-MoMuLV/MoMuSV retrovirus replication. These findings provide additional support for the potential therapeutic efficacy of Taraxacum officinale. Extracts from this plant may be regarded as another starting point for the development of an antiretroviral therapy with fewer side effects.

  11. Synthesis and antiviral activity of new dimeric inhibitors against HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danel, Krzysztof; Larsen, Louise M.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.

    2008-01-01

    by Sonogashira reaction, ‘click' chemistry or Pd-catalyzed oxidative coupling. The iodo precursor 5 turned out as a potent compound against wild type and mutated HIV-1 virus. All dimeric compounds showed lower activity against HIV-1 than MKC-442, except the asymmetric dimer of AZT and 1a which showed an activity...

  12. Potent Intratype Neutralizing Activity Distinguishes Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) from HIV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Holmgren, Birgitta; da Silva, Zacarias; Nielsen, Jens; Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Månsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Sören; Norrgren, Hans; Aaby, Peter; Jansson, Marianne; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2012-01-01

    HIV-2 has a lower pathogenicity and transmission rate than HIV-1. Neutralizing antibodies could be contributing to these observations. Here we explored side by side the potency and breadth of intratype and intertype neutralizing activity (NAc) in plasma of 20 HIV-1-, 20 HIV-2-, and 11 dually HIV-1/2 (HIV-D)-seropositive individuals from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Panels of primary isolates, five HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates, were tested in a plaque reduction assay using U87.CD4-CCR5 cells a...

  13. Structural basis for ELL2 and AFF4 activation of HIV-1 proviral transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shiqian; Li, Zichong; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Stjepanovic, Goran; Zhou, Qiang; Hurley, James H

    2017-01-30

    The intrinsically disordered scaffold proteins AFF1/4 and the transcription elongation factors ELL1/2 are core components of the super elongation complex required for HIV-1 proviral transcription. Here we report the 2.0-Å resolution crystal structure of the human ELL2 C-terminal domain bound to its 50-residue binding site on AFF4, the ELLBow. The ELL2 domain has the same arch-shaped fold as the tight junction protein occludin. The ELLBow consists of an N-terminal helix followed by an extended hairpin that we refer to as the elbow joint, and occupies most of the concave surface of ELL2. This surface is important for the ability of ELL2 to promote HIV-1 Tat-mediated proviral transcription. The AFF4-ELL2 interface is imperfectly packed, leaving a cavity suggestive of a potential binding site for transcription-promoting small molecules.

  14. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4+ T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4+ T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4+ T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  15. Nef alleles from all major HIV-1 clades activate Src-family kinases and enhance HIV-1 replication in an inhibitor-sensitive manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purushottam S Narute

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 accessory factor Nef is essential for high-titer viral replication and AIDS progression. Nef function requires interaction with many host cell proteins, including specific members of the Src kinase family. Here we explored whether Src-family kinase activation is a conserved property of Nef alleles from a wide range of primary HIV-1 isolates and their sensitivity to selective pharmacological inhibitors. Representative Nef proteins from the major HIV-1 subtypes A1, A2, B, C, F1, F2, G, H, J and K strongly activated Hck and Lyn as well as c-Src to a lesser extent, demonstrating for the first time that Src-family kinase activation is a highly conserved property of primary M-group HIV-1 Nef isolates. Recently, we identified 4-amino substituted diphenylfuropyrimidines (DFPs that selectively inhibit Nef-dependent activation of Src-family kinases as well as HIV replication. To determine whether DFP compounds exhibit broad-spectrum Nef-dependent antiretroviral activity against HIV-1, we first constructed chimeric forms of the HIV-1 strain NL4-3 expressing each of the primary Nef alleles. The infectivity and replication of these Nef chimeras was indistinguishable from that of wild-type virus in two distinct cell lines (U87MG astroglial cells and CEM-T4 lymphoblasts. Importantly, the 4-aminopropanol and 4-aminobutanol derivatives of DFP potently inhibited the replication of all chimeric forms of HIV-1 in both U87MG and CEM-T4 cells in a Nef-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effects of these compounds correlated with inhibition of Nef-dependent activation of endogenous Src-family kinases in the HIV-infected cells. Our results demonstrate that the activation of Hck, Lyn and c-Src by Nef is highly conserved among all major clades of HIV-1 and that selective targeting of this pathway uniformly inhibits HIV-1 replication.

  16. Innate immunity and chronic immune activation in HCV/HIV-1 co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Veronica D; Landay, Alan L; Sandberg, Johan K

    2010-04-01

    Innate immune responses are critical in the defense against viral infections. NK cells, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and invariant CD1d-restricted NKT cells mediate both effector and regulatory functions in this early immune response. In chronic uncontrolled viral infections such as HCV and HIV-1, these essential immune functions are compromised and can become a double edged sword contributing to the immunopathogenesis of viral disease. In particular, recent findings indicate that innate immune responses play a central role in the chronic immune activation which is a primary driver of HIV-1 disease progression. HCV/HIV-1 co-infection is affecting millions of people and is associated with faster viral disease progression. Here, we review the role of innate immunity and chronic immune activation in HCV and HIV-1 infection, and discuss how mechanisms of innate immunity may influence protection as well as immunopathogenesis in the HCV/HIV-1 co-infected human host.

  17. Design, synthesis and biological activity of aromatic diketone derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liming; Li, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhanyang; Liu, Gengxin; He, Xianzhuo; Wang, Xiaoli; Zeng, Chengchu

    2015-01-01

    A series of aromatic diketone derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors and evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit the strand transfer process of HIV-1 integrase. The results indicate that (Z)-1-(3-acetyl-2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(substituted)phenylprop-2-en-1-one (5a-5d) can moderately inhibit HIV-1 integrase. The cyclization and condensation products (6a-6c and 7e-7f) of compounds 5a-5d show poor inhibitory activity against HIV-1 integrase. The molecular docking results indicate that the different types of compounds act on HIV-1 integrase in different ways, and these results can explain the differences in the inhibitory activities.

  18. Cyclin T1-dependent genes in activated CD4 T and macrophage cell lines appear enriched in HIV-1 co-factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendong Yu

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is dependent upon cellular co-factors to mediate its replication cycle in CD4(+ T cells and macrophages, the two major cell types infected by the virus in vivo. One critical co-factor is Cyclin T1, a subunit of a general RNA polymerase II elongation factor known as P-TEFb. Cyclin T1 is targeted directly by the viral Tat protein to activate proviral transcription. Cyclin T1 is up-regulated when resting CD4(+ T cells are activated and during macrophage differentiation or activation, conditions that are also necessary for high levels of HIV-1 replication. Because Cyclin T1 is a subunit of a transcription factor, the up-regulation of Cyclin T1 in these cells results in the induction of cellular genes, some of which might be HIV-1 co-factors. Using shRNA depletions of Cyclin T1 and transcriptional profiling, we identified 54 cellular mRNAs that appear to be Cyclin T1-dependent for their induction in activated CD4(+ T Jurkat T cells and during differentiation and activation of MM6 cells, a human monocytic cell line. The promoters for these Cyclin T1-dependent genes (CTDGs are over-represented in two transcription factor binding sites, SREBP1 and ARP1. Notably, 10 of these CTDGs have been reported to be involved in HIV-1 replication, a significant over-representation of such genes when compared to randomly generated lists of 54 genes (p value<0.00021. The results of siRNA depletion and dominant-negative protein experiments with two CTDGs identified here, CDK11 and Casein kinase 1 gamma 1, suggest that these genes are involved either directly or indirectly in HIV-1 replication. It is likely that the 54 CTDGs identified here include novel HIV-1 co-factors. The presence of CTDGs in the protein space that was available for HIV-1 to sample during its evolution and acquisition of Tat function may provide an explanation for why CTDGs are enriched in viral co-factors.

  19. Abrogation of contaminating RNA activity in HIV-1 Gag VLPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shephard Enid G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Gag virus like particles (VLPs used as candidate vaccines are regarded as inert particles as they contain no replicative nucleic acid, although they do encapsidate cellular RNAs. During HIV-1 Gag VLP production in baculovirus-based expression systems, VLPs incorporate the baculovirus Gp64 envelope glycoprotein, which facilitates their entry into mammalian cells. This suggests that HIV-1 Gag VLPs produced using this system facilitate uptake and subsequent expression of encapsidated RNA in mammalian cells - an unfavourable characteristic for a vaccine. Methods HIV-1 Gag VLPs encapsidating reporter chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT RNA, were made in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system. The presence of Gp64 on the VLPs was verified by western blotting and RT-PCR used to detect and quantitate encapsidated CAT RNA. VLP samples were heated to inactivate CAT RNA. Unheated and heated VLPs incubated with selected mammalian cell lines and cell lysates tested for the presence of CAT protein by ELISA. Mice were inoculated with heated and unheated VLPs using a DNA prime VLP boost regimen. Results HIV-1 Gag VLPs produced had significantly high levels of Gp64 (~1650 Gp64 molecules/VLP on their surfaces. The amount of encapsidated CAT RNA/μg Gag VLPs ranged between 0.1 to 7 ng. CAT protein was detected in 3 of the 4 mammalian cell lines incubated with VLPs. Incubation with heated VLPs resulted in BHK-21 and HeLa cell lysates showing reduced CAT protein levels compared with unheated VLPs and HEK-293 cells. Mice inoculated with a DNA prime VLP boost regimen developed Gag CD8 and CD4 T cell responses to GagCAT VLPs which also boosted a primary DNA response. Heating VLPs did not abrogate these immune responses but enhanced the Gag CD4 T cell responses by two-fold. Conclusions Baculovirus-produced HIV-1 Gag VLPs encapsidating CAT RNA were taken up by selected mammalian cell lines. The presence of CAT protein indicates

  20. Human Herpesvirus 8 Lytic Cycle Relication and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat%HIV-1 Tat蛋白对人类疱疹病毒8型复制的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢春; 黄丽; 贾雪梅; 曾怡

    2003-01-01

    用HindⅢ将HIV-1 Tat101蛋白编码基因从pEV质粒中切出,BamHI、NotⅠ将绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)编码基因从表达质粒pcDNA3.1 + /GFP中切出,分别插入到质粒LZRSpBM N-Z中,构建成重组反转录病毒表达质粒LZRS-Tat101和LZRS- GFP.采用磷酸钙转染法将两重组质粒转染到含反转录病毒env、gal 和pol编码基因的包装细胞Phoenix(ΦNX)中,嘌呤霉素筛选获得稳定细胞系.分别收集稳定细胞系分泌的病毒上清,并感染体外培养的原发性渗出性淋巴瘤(PEL)BCBL-1细胞.收集LZRS-GFP重组病毒感染的BCBL-1细胞进行流式细胞计数,检测GFP表达水平.收集L ZRS-Tat101重组病毒感染的BCBL-1细胞,提取蛋白作Wes tern blot,检测Tat蛋白表达状况;取细胞总RNA作Nort hern blot和定量PCR,检查HHV-8次要衣壳蛋白ORF26 mRNA转录水平.重组LZRS-Tat101病毒进一步感染HL3T1 细胞(HeLa细胞包含HIV-1-LTR/CAT报告基因),收集感染细胞提取蛋白,检测CAT活性,评价Tat生物学功能.PCR扩增H HV-8复制和转录激活蛋白Rta启动子区上游序列,并克隆至pGL-3 载体中,构建Rta启动子+虫荧光素酶(Luciferase)报告基因重组质粒.此重组质粒进一步电转染预先感染了LZRS-Tat101病毒的BC-3细胞,TPA刺激后收集细胞,检测Luciferase活性 .结果显示:①重组反转录病毒感染BCBL-1细胞,一次感染效率达56 %;②重组LZRS-Tat101病毒能够在其感染的BCBL-1细胞中表达Tat蛋白,且表达蛋白具有转录激活功能;③Tat蛋白不能有效上调 HHV-8 Rta启动子活性;④细胞内HIV-1 Tat蛋白诱导HH V-8可溶性周期复制的能力较弱.提示,单纯HIV-1 Tat蛋白并不能激活潜伏感染的HHV-8.

  1. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Behbahani

    Full Text Available Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50 values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies.

  2. Anti-HIV-1 activity of eight monofloral Iranian honey types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrated that monofloral honeys from Petro selinum sativum, Nigella sativa, Citrus sinensis, Zataria multiflora, Citrus aurantium and Zizyphus mauritiana flowers had potent anti-HIV-1 activity with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 37.5, 88, 70, 88, 105 and 5 µg/ml respectively. However, monofloral Iranian honeys from Astragalus gummifer and Chamaemelum nobile flowers had weak anti-HIV-1 activity. The frequency and intensity of CD4 expression on PBMCs increased in the presence of all honey types. CD19 marker were also increased after the treatment with monofloral honeys from Z. multiflora and N. sativa. The anti-HIV-1 agent in monofloral honeys from P. sativum, N. sativa, Z. multiflora and Z. mauritiana flowers was detected by spectroscopic analysis as methylglyoxal. Time of drug addition studies demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is higher on the late stage of HIV-1 infection. The result demonstrated that methylglyoxal isolated from monofloral honey types is a good candidate for preclinical evaluation of anti-HIV-1 therapies.

  3. Destabilization of the TAR hairpin leads to extension of the polyA hairpin and inhibition of HIV-1 polyadenylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrolijk, M.M.; Harwig, A.; Berkhout, B.; Das, A.T.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Two hairpin structures that are present at both the 5' and 3' end of the HIV-1 RNA genome have important functions in the viral life cycle. The TAR hairpin binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. The adjacent polyA hairpin

  4. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Chaves Valadão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine’s potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V. Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine.

  5. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent.

  6. Anti-HIV-1 activity of anionic polymers: a comparative study of candidate microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP in soluble form blocks coreceptor binding sites on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120 and elicits gp41 six-helix bundle formation, processes involved in virus inactivation. CAP is not soluble at pH Methods Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were used to (1 study HIV-1 IIIB and BaL binding to micronized CAP; (2 detect virus disintegration; and (3 measure gp41 six-helix bundle formation. Cells containing integrated HIV-1 LTR linked to the β-gal gene and expressing CD4 and coreceptors CXCR4 or CCR5 were used to measure virus infectivity. Results 1 HIV-1 IIIB and BaL, respectively, effectively bound to micronized CAP. 2 The interaction between HIV-1 and micronized CAP led to: (a gp41 six-helix bundle formation; (b virus disintegration and shedding of envelope glycoproteins; and (c rapid loss of infectivity. Polymers other than CAP, except Carbomer 974P, elicited gp41 six-helix bundle formation in HIV-1 IIIB but only poly(napthalene sulfonate, in addition to CAP, had this effect on HIV-1 BaL. These polymers differed with respect to their virucidal activities, the differences being more pronounced for HIV-1 BaL. Conclusions Micronized CAP is the only candidate topical microbicide with the capacity to remove rapidly by adsorption from physiological fluids HIV-1 of both the X4 and R5 biotypes and is likely to prevent virus contact with target cells. The interaction between micronized CAP and HIV-1 leads to rapid virus inactivation. Among other anionic polymers, cellulose sulfate, BufferGel and aryl sulfonates appear most effective in this respect.

  7. Anti-HIV-1 activity of propolis in CD4(+) lymphocyte and microglial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekker, Genya; Hu, Shuxian; Spivak, Marla; Lokensgard, James R; Peterson, Phillip K

    2005-11-14

    An urgent need for additional agents to treat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection led us to assess the anti-HIV-1 activity of the natural product propolis in CD4(+) lymphocytes and microglial cell cultures. Propolis inhibited viral expression in a concentration-dependent manner (maximal suppression of 85 and 98% was observed at 66.6 microg/ml propolis in CD4(+) and microglial cell cultures, respectively). Similar anti-HIV-1 activity was observed with propolis samples from several geographic regions. The mechanism of propolis antiviral property in CD4(+) lymphocytes appeared to involve, in part, inhibition of viral entry. While propolis had an additive antiviral effect on the reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine, it had no noticeable effect on the protease inhibitor indinavir. The results of this in vitro study support the need for clinical trials of propolis or one or more of its components in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  8. Role of seminal plasma in the anti-HIV-1 activity of candidate microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of microbicides for prevention of HIV-1 infection in macaque models for vaginal infection has indicated that the concentrations of active compounds needed for protection by far exceed levels sufficient for complete inhibition of infection in vitro. These experiments were done in the absence of seminal plasma (SP, a vehicle for sexual transmission of the virus. To gain insight into the possible effect of SP on the performance of selected microbicides, their anti-HIV-1 activity in the presence, and absence of SP, was determined. Methods The inhibitory activity of compounds against the X4 virus, HIV-1 IIIB, and the R5 virus, HIV-1 BaL was determined using TZM-bl indicator cells and quantitated by measuring β-galactosidase induced by infection. The virucidal properties of cellulose acetate 1,2-benzene-dicarboxylate (CAP, the only microbicide provided in water insoluble, micronized form, in the presence of SP was measured. Results The HIV-1 inhibitory activity of the polymeric microbicides, poly(naphthalene sulfonate, cellulose sulfate, carrageenan, CAP (in soluble form and polystyrene sulfonate, respectively, was considerably (range ≈ 4 to ≈ 73-fold diminished in the presence of SP (33.3%. Formulations of micronized CAP, providing an acidic buffering system even in the presence of an SP volume excess, effectively inactivated HIV-1 infectivity. Conclusion The data presented here suggest that the in vivo efficacy of polymeric microbicides, acting as HIV-1 entry inhibitors, might become at least partly compromised by the inevitable presence of SP. These possible disadvantages could be overcome by combining the respective polymers with acidic pH buffering systems (built-in for formulations of micronized CAP or with other anti-HIV-1 compounds, the activity of which is not affected by SP, e.g. reverse transcriptase and zinc finger inhibitors.

  9. The HIV-1 associated protein, Tat1–86, impairs dopamine transporters and interacts with cocaine to reduce nerve terminal function: a no-net-flux microdialysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Mark J.; Frederick-Duus, Danielle; Fadel, Jim; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2009-01-01

    Injection drug use accounts for approximately one-third of HIV-infections in the United States. HIV associated proteins have been shown to interact with various drugs of abuse to incite concerted neurotoxicity. One common area for their interaction is the nerve terminal, including dopamine transporter (DAT) systems. However, results regarding DAT function and regulation in HIV-infection, regardless of drug use, are mixed. Thus, the present experiments were designed to explicitly control Tat and cocaine administration in an in vivo model in order to reconcile differences that exist in the literature to date. We examined Tat plus cocaine-induced alterations using no-net-flux microdialysis, which is sensitive to alterations in DAT function, in order to test the potential for DAT as an early mediator of HIV-induced oxidative stress and neurodegeneration in vivo. Within 5 hours of intra-accumbal administration of the HIV-associated protein, Tat, we noted a significant reduction in local DAT efficiency with little change in DA overflow/release dynamics. Further, at 48 hrs post-Tat administration, we demonstrated a concerted effect of the HIV-protein Tat with cocaine on both uptake and release function. Finally, we discuss the extent to which DAT dysfunction may be considered a predecessor to generalized nerve terminal dysfunction. Characterization of DAT dysfunction in vivo may provide an early pharamacotherapeutic target, which in turn may prevent or attenuate downstream mediators of neurotoxicity (i.e., reactive species) to DA systems occurring in NeuroAIDS. PMID:19344635

  10. Digoxin reveals a functional connection between HIV-1 integration preference and T-cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zhyvoloup

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrates more frequently into transcribed genes, however the biological significance of HIV-1 integration targeting has remained elusive. Using a selective high-throughput chemical screen, we discovered that the cardiac glycoside digoxin inhibits wild-type HIV-1 infection more potently than HIV-1 bearing a single point mutation (N74D in the capsid protein. We confirmed that digoxin repressed viral gene expression by targeting the cellular Na+/K+ ATPase, but this did not explain its selectivity. Parallel RNAseq and integration mapping in infected cells demonstrated that digoxin inhibited expression of genes involved in T-cell activation and cell metabolism. Analysis of >400,000 unique integration sites showed that WT virus integrated more frequently than N74D mutant within or near genes susceptible to repression by digoxin and involved in T-cell activation and cell metabolism. Two main gene networks down-regulated by the drug were CD40L and CD38. Blocking CD40L by neutralizing antibodies selectively inhibited WT virus infection, phenocopying digoxin. Thus the selectivity of digoxin depends on a combination of integration targeting and repression of specific gene networks. The drug unmasked a functional connection between HIV-1 integration and T-cell activation. Our results suggest that HIV-1 evolved integration site selection to couple its early gene expression with the status of target CD4+ T-cells, which may affect latency and viral reactivation.

  11. IL-15 promotes activation and expansion of CD8+ T cells in HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Freeman, Michael L.; Mudd, Joseph C.; Shive, Carey L.; Reynaldi, Arnold; Estes, Jacob D.; Deleage, Claire; Lucero, Carissa; Anderson, Jodi; Schacker, Timothy W.; Davenport, Miles P.; McCune, Joseph M.; Hunt, Peter W.; Lee, Sulggi A.; Debernardo, Robert L.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Canaday, David H.; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Sieg, Scott F.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-1–infected patients, increased numbers of circulating CD8+ T cells are linked to increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Here, we identified a bystander mechanism that promotes CD8 T cell activation and expansion in untreated HIV-1–infected patients. Compared with healthy controls, untreated HIV-1–infected patients have an increased population of proliferating, granzyme B+, CD8+ T cells in circulation. Vβ expression and deep sequencing of CDR3 revealed that in untreated HIV-1 infection, cycling memory CD8 T cells possess a broad T cell repertoire that reflects the repertoire of the resting population. This suggests that cycling is driven by bystander activation, rather than specific antigen exposure. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with IL-15 induced a cycling, granzyme B+ phenotype in CD8+ T cells. Moreover, elevated IL-15 expression in the lymph nodes of untreated HIV-1–infected patients correlated with circulating CD8+ T cell counts and was normalized in these patients following antiretroviral therapy. Together, these results suggest that IL-15 drives bystander activation of CD8+ T cells, which predicts disease progression in untreated HIV-1–infected patients and suggests that elevated IL-15 may also drive CD8+ T cell expansion that is linked to increased morbidity and mortality in treated patients. PMID:27322062

  12. Anti-HIV-1 activity of a new scorpion venom peptide derivative Kn2-7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoqing Chen

    Full Text Available For over 30 years, HIV/AIDS has wreaked havoc in the world. In the absence of an effective vaccine for HIV, development of new anti-HIV agents is urgently needed. We previously identified the antiviral activities of the scorpion-venom-peptide-derived mucroporin-M1 for three RNA viruses (measles viruses, SARS-CoV, and H5N1. In this investigation, a panel of scorpion venom peptides and their derivatives were designed and chosen for assessment of their anti-HIV activities. A new scorpion venom peptide derivative Kn2-7 was identified as the most potent anti-HIV-1 peptide by screening assays with an EC(50 value of 2.76 µg/ml (1.65 µM and showed low cytotoxicity to host cells with a selective index (SI of 13.93. Kn2-7 could inhibit all members of a standard reference panel of HIV-1 subtype B pseudotyped virus (PV with CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 PV strain. Furthermore, it also inhibited a CXCR4-tropic replication-competent strain of HIV-1 subtype B virus. Binding assay of Kn2-7 to HIV-1 PV by Octet Red system suggested the anti-HIV-1 activity was correlated with a direct interaction between Kn2-7 and HIV-1 envelope. These results demonstrated that peptide Kn2-7 could inhibit HIV-1 by direct interaction with viral particle and may become a promising candidate compound for further development of microbicide against HIV-1.

  13. Acquisition of HIV-1 resistance in T lymphocytes using an ACA-specific E. coli mRNA interferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Hideto; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Saito, Naoki; Lee, Karim; Kim, Sujeong; Shibata, Hiroaki; Ageyama, Naohide; Terao, Keiji; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Mineno, Junichi; Kim, Sunyoung; Inouye, Masayori; Kato, Ikunoshin

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of gene expression directed by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of HIV-1 requires both the transactivation response element (TAR) and Tat protein. HIV-1 mutants lacking a functional tat gene are not able to proliferate. Here we take a genetic approach to suppress HIV-1 replication based on Tat-dependent production of MazF, an ACA-specific endoribonuclease (mRNA interferase) from Escherichia coli. When induced, MazF is known to cause Bak- and NBK-dependent apoptotic cell death in mammalian cells. We first constructed a retroviral vector, in which the mazF (ACA-less) gene was inserted under the control of the HIV-1 LTR, which was then transduced into CD4+ T-lymphoid CEM-SS cells in such a way that, upon HIV-1 infection, the mazF gene is induced to destroy the infecting HIV-1 mRNA, preventing HIV-1 replication. Indeed, when the transduced cells were infected with HIV-1 IIIB, the viral replication was effectively inhibited, as HIV-1 IIIB p24 could not be detected in the culture medium. Consistently, not only cell growth but also the CD4 level was not affected by the infection. These results suggest that the HIV-1-LTR-regulated mazF gene was effectively induced upon HIV-1 IIIB infection, which is sufficient enough to destroy the viral mRNA from the infected HIV-1 IIIB to completely block viral proliferation in the cells, but not to affect normal cell growth. These results indicate that the T cells transduced with the HIV-1-LTR-regulated mazF gene acquire HIV-1 resistance, providing an intriguing potential for the use of the HIV-1-LTR-regulated mazF gene in anti-HIV gene therapy.

  14. Epigenetic modulations in activated cells early after HIV-1 infection and their possible functional consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana T Maricato

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications refer to a number of biological processes which alter the structure of chromatin and its transcriptional activity such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational processing. Studies have tried to elucidate how the viral genome and its products are affected by epigenetic modifications imposed by cell machinery and how it affects the ability of the virus to either, replicate and produce a viable progeny or be driven to latency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate epigenetic modifications in PBMCs and CD4+ cells after HIV-1 infection analyzing three approaches: (i global DNA- methylation; (ii qPCR array and (iii western blot. HIV-1 infection led to methylation increases in the cellular DNA regardless the activation status of PBMCs. The analysis of H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 suggested a trend towards transcriptional repression in activated cells after HIV-1 infection. Using a qPCR array, we detected genes related to epigenetic processes highly modulated in activated HIV-1 infected cells. SETDB2 and RSK2 transcripts showed highest up-regulation levels. SETDB2 signaling is related to transcriptional silencing while RSK2 is related to either silencing or activation of gene expression depending on the signaling pathway triggered down-stream. In addition, activated cells infected by HIV-1 showed lower CD69 expression and a decrease of IL-2, IFN-γ and metabolism-related factors transcripts indicating a possible functional consequence towards global transcriptional repression found in HIV-1 infected cells. Conversely, based on epigenetic markers studied here, non-stimulated cells infected by HIV-1, showed signs of global transcriptional activation. Our results suggest that HIV-1 infection exerts epigenetic modulations in activated cells that may lead these cells to transcriptional repression with important functional consequences. Moreover, non-stimulated cells seem to increase gene transcription after HIV-1 infection

  15. Oxaliplatin antagonizes HIV-1 latency by activating NF-κB without causing global T cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Liu, Sijie; Wang, Pengfei; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Hanxian [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, Huabiao [Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhu, Huanzhang, E-mail: hzzhu@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 in this cell line model of HIV-1 latency. • Reactivation is synergized when oxaliplatin is used in combination with valproic acid. • Oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 through activation of NF-kB and does not induce T cell activation. - Abstract: Reactivation of latent HIV-1 is a promising strategy for the clearance of the viral reservoirs. Because of the limitations of current agents, identification of new latency activators is urgently required. Using an established model of HIV-1 latency, we examined the effect of Oxaliplatin on latent HIV-1 reactivation. We showed that Oxaliplatin, alone or in combination with valproic acid (VPA), was able to reactivate HIV-1 without inducing global T cell activation. We also provided evidence that Oxaliplatin reactivated HIV-1 expression by inducing nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Our results indicated that Oxaliplatin could be a potential drug candidate for anti-latency therapies.

  16. Treatment of primary HIV-1 infection with cyclosporin A coupled with highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzardi, G. Paolo; Harari, Alexandre; Capiluppi, Brunella; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Ellefsen, Kim; Ciuffreda, Donatella; Champagne, Patrick; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Chave, Jean-Philippe; Lazzarin, Adriano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    Primary HIV-1 infection causes extensive immune activation, during which CD4+ T cell activation supports massive HIV-1 production. We tested the safety and the immune-modulating effects of combining cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during primary HIV-1 infection. Nine adults with primary HIV-1 infection were treated with CsA along with HAART. At week 8, all patients discontinued CsA but maintained HAART. Viral replication was suppressed to a comparable extent in the CsA + HAART cohort and in 29 control patients whose primary infection was treated with HAART alone. CsA restored normal CD4+ T cell levels, both in terms of percentage and absolute numbers. The increase in CD4+ T cells was apparent within a week and persisted throughout the study period. CsA was not detrimental to virus-specific CD8+ or CD4+ T cell responses. At week 48, the proportion of IFN-γ–secreting CD4+ and CD4+CCR7– T cells was significantly higher in the CsA + HAART cohort than in the HAART-alone cohort. In conclusion, rapid shutdown of T cell activation in the early phases of primary HIV-1 infection can have long-term beneficial effects and establish a more favorable immunologic set-point. Appropriate, immune-based therapeutic interventions may represent a valuable complement to HAART for treating HIV infection. PMID:11877476

  17. Inhibition of ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Julieta; Delgado, Kelly Valcárcel; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Nucleotides and nucleosides are secreted into extracellular media at different concentrations as a consequence of different physiologic and pathological conditions. Ecto-nucleotidases, enzymes present on the surface of most cells, hydrolyze these extracellular nucleotides and reduce the concentration of them, thus affecting the activation of different nucleotide and nucleoside receptors. Also, ecto-nucleotidases are present in a number of microorganisms and play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. Here, we characterized the ecto-ATPase activities present on the surface of HIV-1 particle and human macrophages as well. We found that the kinetic properties of HIV-1 and macrophage ecto-ATPases are similar, suggesting that the enzyme is the same. This ecto-ATPase activity was increased in macrophages infected in vitro with HIV-1. Using three different non-related ecto-ATPase inhibitors-POM-1, ARL67156 and BG0-we showed that the inhibition of these macrophage and viral ecto-ATPase activities impairs HIV-1 infection. In addition, we also found that elevated extracellular concentrations of ATP inhibit HIV-1 production by infected macrophages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of HIV-1 in Vitro by Combination of Vpr and Tat Specific Short Hairpin RNA via Lentiviral Vectors%慢病毒介导双shRNA靶向于HIV的抑制作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝彦哲; 滕智平; 杨怡姝; 孙晓娜; 马晶; 金孝华; 曾毅

    2013-01-01

    RNA干扰可以有效地抑制特定基因的表达,在HIV基因治疗中成为一种重要的方法.为了防止病毒逃逸株的出现,本研究分别构建了靶向于HIV-1调控蛋白基因vpr和tat的shRNA重组慢病毒载体以及含有这两种shRNA的双表达重组慢病毒载体,分别由U6和H1两种启动子启动,通过与靶向基因tat和vpr表达质粒在293T细胞中进行共转染,采用荧光定量PCR方法测定细胞内靶向基因的表达丰度,结果显示双表达shRNA的重组慢病毒载体对vpr和tat的表达抑制率分别可以达到89.20%和62.00%.与pNL4-3病毒包装质粒共转染,P24ELISA显示plvx-vpr-tat shRNA对病毒包装产量的抑制率可以达到99.05%,比单个shRNA的抑制率都要强,HIV-1 NL4-3体外对MT4细胞攻毒实验表明双shRNA重组慢病毒载体具有很强的抑制病毒复制的能力.%Gene therapy offers the promise of curing the HIV-infected patients. Specific, potent, and sustained short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated gene silencing is crucial for the successful application of RNA interference technology to therapeutic interventions. To reduce the probability of viral escape mutants, in this study, we constructed lentiviral vector containing vpr and tat shRNA, respectively, furthermore the bispecific lentiviral vector harboring vpr and tat shRNA expression cassettes from U6 pro-motor and H1 promotor was cotransfected with recombinant plasmid expressing the vpr and tat gene. The result showed that the bispecific lentiviral vector plvx-vpr-tatshRNA could inhibit the vpr and tat effectively, with ratios of 89. 20% and 62. 00% respectively. When cotransfected with pNL4-3 in 293T cell, plvx-vpr-tatshRNA showed higher efficacy in down regulating the HIV NL4-3 packaging production than the plvx-vprshRNA or plvx-tatshRNA individually. MT4 cell clones transduced with recombinant lentiviral vectors were screened and challenged with HIV NL4-3. P24 ELISA test showed that MT4 transduced with the

  19. Hydroxytyrosol: a new class of microbicide displaying broad anti-HIV-1 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Luis M.; Beltrán, Manuela; Obregón-Calderón, Patricia; García-Pérez, Javier; de la Torre, Humberto E.; González, Nuria; Pérez-Olmeda, Mayte; Auñón, David; Capa, Laura; Gómez-Acebo, Eduardo; Alcamí, José

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity and activity against HIV of 5-hydroxytyrosol as a potential microbicide. Design: The anti-HIV-1 activity of 5-hydroxytyrosol, a polyphenolic compound, was tested against wild-type HIV-1 and viral clones resistant to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors. In addition to its activity against founder viruses, different viral subtypes and potential synergy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, lamivudine and emtricitabine was also tested. 5-Hydroxytyrosol toxicity was evaluated in vivo in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Methods: We have cloned pol gene from drug-resistant HIV-1 isolated from infected patients and env gene from Fiebeg III/IV patients or A, C, D, E, F and G subtypes in the NL4.3-Ren backbone. 5-Hydroxytyrosol anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated in infections of MT-2, U87-CCR5 or peripheral blood mononuclear cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin + interleukin-2 with viruses obtained through 293T transfections. Inhibitory concentration 50% and cytotoxic concentration 50% were calculated. Synergy was analysed according to Chou and Talalay method. In-vivo toxicity was evaluated for 14 days in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Results: 5-Hydroxytyrosol inhibited HIV-1 infections of recombinant or wild-type viruses in all the target cells tested. Moreover, 5-hydroxytyrosol showed similar inhibitory concentration 50% values for infections with NRTIs, NNRTIs, protease inhibitors and INIs resistant viruses; founder viruses and all the subtypes tested. Combination of 5-hydroxytyrosol with tenofovir was found to be synergistic, whereas it was additive with lamivudine and emtricitabine. In-vivo toxicity of 5-hydroxytyrosol was very low even at the highest tested doses. Conclusion: 5-Hydroxytyrosol displayed a broad anti-HIV-1 activity in different cells systems in the absent of in-vivo toxicity, therefore supporting its

  20. The NRTIs Lamivudine, Stavudine and Zidovudine Have Reduced HIV-1 Inhibitory Activity in Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Tachedjian, Gilda; Ellett, Anne M.; Roche, Michael J.; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Brew, Bruce J.; Turville, Stuart G.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 establishes infection in astrocytes and macroage-lineage cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Certain antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) can penetrate the CNS, and are therefore often used in neurologically active combined antiretroviral therapy (Neuro-cART) regimens, but their relative activity in the different susceptible CNS cell populations is unknown. Here, we determined the HIV-1 inhibitory activity of CNS-penetrating ARVs in astrocytes and macrophage-lineage cells. Primary human fetal astrocytes (PFA) and the SVG human astrocyte cell line were used as in vitro models for astrocyte infection, and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were used as an in vitro model for infection of macrophage-lineage cells. The CNS-penetrating ARVs tested were the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) abacavir (ABC), lamivudine (3TC), stavudine (d4T) and zidovudine (ZDV), the non-NRTIs efavirenz (EFV), etravirine (ETR) and nevirapine (NVP), and the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL). Drug inhibition assays were performed using single-round HIV-1 entry assays with luciferase viruses pseudotyped with HIV-1 YU-2 envelope or vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G). All the ARVs tested could effectively inhibit HIV-1 infection in macrophages, with EC90s below concentrations known to be achievable in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Most of the ARVs had similar potency in astrocytes, however the NRTIs 3TC, d4T and ZDV had insufficient HIV-1 inhibitory activity in astrocytes, with EC90s 12-, 187- and 110-fold greater than achievable CSF concentrations, respectively. Our data suggest that 3TC, d4T and ZDV may not adequately target astrocyte infection in vivo, which has potential implications for their inclusion in Neuro-cART regimens. PMID:23614033

  1. The NRTIs lamivudine, stavudine and zidovudine have reduced HIV-1 inhibitory activity in astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan R Gray

    Full Text Available HIV-1 establishes infection in astrocytes and macroage-lineage cells of the central nervous system (CNS. Certain antiretroviral drugs (ARVs can penetrate the CNS, and are therefore often used in neurologically active combined antiretroviral therapy (Neuro-cART regimens, but their relative activity in the different susceptible CNS cell populations is unknown. Here, we determined the HIV-1 inhibitory activity of CNS-penetrating ARVs in astrocytes and macrophage-lineage cells. Primary human fetal astrocytes (PFA and the SVG human astrocyte cell line were used as in vitro models for astrocyte infection, and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM were used as an in vitro model for infection of macrophage-lineage cells. The CNS-penetrating ARVs tested were the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs abacavir (ABC, lamivudine (3TC, stavudine (d4T and zidovudine (ZDV, the non-NRTIs efavirenz (EFV, etravirine (ETR and nevirapine (NVP, and the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL. Drug inhibition assays were performed using single-round HIV-1 entry assays with luciferase viruses pseudotyped with HIV-1 YU-2 envelope or vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G. All the ARVs tested could effectively inhibit HIV-1 infection in macrophages, with EC90s below concentrations known to be achievable in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF. Most of the ARVs had similar potency in astrocytes, however the NRTIs 3TC, d4T and ZDV had insufficient HIV-1 inhibitory activity in astrocytes, with EC90s 12-, 187- and 110-fold greater than achievable CSF concentrations, respectively. Our data suggest that 3TC, d4T and ZDV may not adequately target astrocyte infection in vivo, which has potential implications for their inclusion in Neuro-cART regimens.

  2. Novel 2-Chloro-8-arylthiomethyldipyridodiazepinone Derivatives with Activity against HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supanna Techasakul

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the molecular modeling analysis against Y181CHIV-1 RT, dipyridodiazepinone derivatives containing an unsubstituted lactamnitrogen and 2-chloro-8-arylthiomethyl were synthesized via an efficientroute. Some of them were evaluated for their antiviral activity against HIV-1RT subtype E and were found to exhibit virustatic activity comparable to some clinically usedtherapeutic agents.

  3. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Thang, Pham Hong; Rethi, Bence; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    One important pathogenic feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells was reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  4. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eRuffin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is characterized by continuous antigenic stimulation, chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells has previously been reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for mounting and maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development which are impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  5. Structure-activity relationship studies on clinically relevant HIV-1 NNRTIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, R K; Murugesan, V; Katti, S B

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have contributed significantly in the treatment of HIV-1 infections. More than 60 structurally different classes of compounds have been identified as NNRTIs, which are specifically inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Five NNRTIs (nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine and rilpivirine) have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use. The NNRTIs bind with a specific 'pocket' site of HIV-1 RT (allosteric site) that is closely associated with the NRTI binding site. Due to mutations of the amino acid residues surrounding the NNRTI-binding site, NNRTIs are notorious for rapidly eliciting resistance. Though, the emergence of resistant HIV strains can be circumvented if the NNRTIs are used either alone or in combination with NRTIs (AZT, 3TC, ddI, ddC, TVD or d4T) and PIs (Indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, ritonavir and lopinavir etc.) as shown by both a decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and increased CD4 T-cells. Here we are going to discuss recent advances in structure activity relationship studies on nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine, rilpivirine and 4-thiazolidinones (privileged scaffold) HIV-1 NNRTIs.

  6. Semi-synthesis of oxygenated dolabellane diterpenes with highly in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Vargas, Alonso; Ramos, Freddy A; Cirne-Santos, Claudio Cesar; Stephens, Paulo Roberto; Paixão, Izabel Christina Palmer; Teixeira, Valeria Laneuville; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-09-15

    Research on dolabellane diterpenes of brown algae Dictyota spp. has shown that these diterpenoids have strong anti-HIV-1 activity, but there are not data about antiviral activity of dolabellane diterpenes isolated from octocorals, which are antipodes of those isolated from the brown algae. Dolabellanes 13-keto-1(R),11(S)-dolabella-3(E),7(E),12(18)-triene (1) and β-Araneosene (2) were isolated from the Caribbean octocoral Eunicea laciniata, and both showed low anti-HIV-1 activity and low toxicity. Since it was shown that oxygenated dolabellanes from algae have better anti-HIV-1 activity, in this work some derivatives of the main dolabellane of E. laciniata1 were obtained by epoxidation (3), epoxide opening (4), and allylic oxidation (5). The derivatives showed significant improvement in the anti-HIV-1potency (100-fold), being compounds 3 and 5 the most active ones. Their high antiviral activities, along with their low cytotoxicity, make them promissory antiviral compounds; and it is worth noting that the absolute configuration at the ring junction in the dolabellane skeleton does not seem to be determinant in the antiviral potency of these diterpeneoids.

  7. Binding affinity and inhibitory potency of neomycin and streptomycin on the Tat peptide interaction with HIV-1 TAR RNA detected by on-line acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassew, Nardos; Thompson, Michael

    2003-10-07

    The binding of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, neomycin and streptomycin, to a segment of the transactivation responsive region (TAR) RNA of the human immunodeficiency virus, and their inhibitory potency to disrupt the interaction of the RNA with a regulatory Tat protein-derived peptide, have been studied using a flow-through acoustic wave detector system. Binding affinity is directly correlated with the inhibitory potency of these molecules and the acoustic wave detection system shows that neomycin exhibits at least a ten-fold greater affinity for TAR RNA and that it is also a more potent inhibitor than streptomycin. These results are in agreement with previous studies. However, unlike the time-consuming batch-based assays, use of the flow-through format offers considerable potential for the rapid screening of the chemistry of relatively small-molecule-nucleic acid binding events.

  8. Anti-HIV-1 protease activities of crude extracts of some Garcinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-22

    Mar 22, 2010 ... developing countries (UN-AIDS Report, 2005 and 2007). The causative organism in AIDS ... target in HIV drug development (Kohl et al., 1988). HIV-1. PR function as a ..... Chen SX, Wan M, Loh BN (1996). Active constituents ...

  9. The Effect of Chloroquine on Immune Activation and Interferon Signatures Associated with HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Bosinger, Steven E; Kang, Minhee; Belaunzaran-Zamudio, Pablo; Matining, Roy M; Wilson, Cara C; Flexner, Charles; Clagett, Brian; Plants, Jill; Read, Sarah; Purdue, Lynette; Myers, Laurie; Boone, Linda; Tebas, Pablo; Kumar, Princy; Clifford, David; Douek, Daniel; Silvestri, Guido; Landay, Alan L; Lederman, Michael M

    2016-07-01

    Immune activation associated with HIV-1 infection contributes to morbidity and mortality. We studied whether chloroquine, through Toll-like receptor (TLR) antagonist properties, could reduce immune activation thought to be driven by TLR ligands, such as gut-derived bacterial elements and HIV-1 RNAs. AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5258 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 33 HIV-1-infected participants off antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 37 participants on ART. Study participants in each cohort were randomized 1:1 to receive chloroquine 250 mg orally for the first 12 weeks then cross over to placebo for 12 weeks or placebo first and then chloroquine. Combining the periods of chloroquine use in both arms of the on-ART cohort yielded a modest reduction in the proportions of CD8 T cells co-expressing CD38 and DR (median decrease = 3.0%, p = .003). The effect on immune activation in the off-ART cohort was likely confounded by increased plasma HIV-1 RNA during chloroquine administration (median 0.29 log10 increase, p < .001). Transcriptional analyses in the off-ART cohort showed decreased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in 5 of 10 chloroquine-treated participants and modest decreases in CD38 and CCR5 RNAs in all chloroquine-treated participants. Chloroquine modestly reduced immune activation in ART-treated HIV-infected participants. Clinical Trials Registry Number: NCT00819390.

  10. Silibinin inhibits HIV-1 infection by reducing cellular activation and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C; Coombs, Robert W; Polyak, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects.

  11. Silibinin inhibits HIV-1 infection by reducing cellular activation and proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janela McClure

    Full Text Available Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum block hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL, a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects.

  12. Rapid turnover of 2-LTR HIV-1 DNA during early stage of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite prolonged treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, the infectious HIV-1 continues to replicate and resides latently in the resting memory CD4+ T lymphocytes, which blocks the eradication of HIV-1. The viral persistence of HIV-1 is mainly caused by its proviral DNA being either linear nonintegrated, circular nonintegrated, or integrated. Previous reports have largely focused on the dynamics of HIV-1 DNA from the samples collected with relatively long time intervals during the process of disease and HAART treatment, which may have missed the intricate changes during the intervals in early treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the dynamics of HIV-1 DNA in patients during the early phase of HARRT treatment. Using optimized real time PCR, we observed significant changes in 2-LTR during the first 12-week of treatment, while total and integrated HIV-1 DNA remained stable. The doubling time and half-life of 2-LTR were not correlated with the baseline and the rate of changes in plasma viral load and various CD4+ T-cell populations. Longitudinal analyses on 2-LTR sequences and plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS levels did not reveal any significant changes in the same treatment period. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study revealed the rapid changes in 2-LTR concentration in a relatively large number of patients during the early HAART treatment. The rapid changes indicate the rapid infusion and clearance of cells bearing 2-LTR in the peripheral blood. Those changes are not expected to be caused by the blocking of viral integration, as our study did not include the integrase inhibitor raltegravir. Our study helps better understand the dynamics of HIV-DNA and its potential role as a biomarker for the diseases and for the treatment efficacy of HAART.

  13. Efficient propagation of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-type JC virus in COS-7-derived cell lines stably expressing Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukuzuma, Souichi; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Kameoka, Masanori; Sugiura, Shigeki; Nukuzuma, Chiyoko; Miyoshi, Isao; Takegami, Tsutomu

    2010-12-01

    The high incidence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in AIDS patients compared with many other immunosuppressive diseases suggests that HIV-1 infection is strictly related to the activation of JC virus (JCV) propagation. In this report, propagation of PML-type JCV in COS-7-derived cell lines stably expressing HIV-1 Tat (COS-tat cells) has been examined. In COS-tat cells, production of viral particles and replication of genomic DNA were markedly increased compared to COS-7 cells, as judged by HA and real-time PCR analyses. These results demonstrate that COS-tat cells provide a useful model system for studying HIV-1 Tat-mediated propagation of PML-type JCV.

  14. Tat-APE1/ref-1 protein inhibits TNF-alpha-induced endothelial cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun Jeong; Lee, Ji Young; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Hyo Shin; Lee, Sang Ki; Lee, Kwon Ho; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2008-03-28

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/ref-1) is a multifunctional protein involved both in DNA base excision repair and redox regulation. In this study we evaluated the protective role of Tat-mediated APE1/ref-1 transduction on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-activated endothelial activation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. To construct Tat-APE1/ref-1 fusion protein, human full length of APE1/ref-1 was fused with Tat-protein transduction domain. Purified Tat-APE1/ref-1 fusion protein efficiently transduced cultured endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner and reached maximum expression at 1h after incubation. Transduced Tat-APE1/ref-1 showed inhibitory activity on the TNF-alpha-induced monocyte adhesion and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in cultured endothelial cells. These results suggest Tat-APE1/ref-1 might be useful to reduce vascular endothelial activation or vascular inflammatory disorders.

  15. Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship of TIBO HIV-1 Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Hong; ZHANG Rui-Zhou; CHENG Xin-Lu; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was used to calculate a set of molecular descriptors (properties) for 14 TIBO derivatives with anti-HIV activity. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were employed in order to reduce dimensionality and investigate which subset of variables should be more effective for classifying TIBO derivatives according to their degree of anti-HIV activity. The PCA showed that the EHOMO, μ, LogP, QA, QB and MR variables are responsible for the separation between compounds with higher and lower anti-HIV activity. The HCA results are similar to those obtained with PCA. By using the chemometric results, four synthetic compounds were analyzed through PCA and HCA and three of them are proposed as active molecules against HIV, which is consistent with the results of clinic experiments. The methodologies of PCA and HCA provide a reliable rule for classifying new TIBO derivatives with anti-HIV activity. The model obtained showed not only statistical significance but also predictive ability.

  16. The HIV-1 Nef protein and phagocyte NADPH oxidase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhardt, Frederik; Plastre, Olivier; Sawada, Makoto;

    2002-01-01

    -regulation of phagocyte NADPH oxidase subunits. Nef mutants lacking motifs involved in the interaction with Vav and PAK failed to reproduce the effects of wild type Nef, suggesting a role for the Vav/Rac/PAK signaling pathway. The following results suggest a key role for Rac in the priming effect of Nef. (i) Inactivation...... of Rac by Clostridium difficile toxin B abolished the Nef effect. (ii) The fraction of activated Rac1 was increased in Nef-transduced cells, and (iii) the dominant positive Rac1(V12) mutant mimicked the effect of Nef. These results are to our knowledge the first analysis of the effect of Rac activation...

  17. In Vivo Molecular Dissection of the Effects of HIV-1 in Active Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy C K Bell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Increased risk of tuberculosis (TB associated with HIV-1 infection is primarily attributed to deficient T helper (Th1 immune responses, but most people with active TB have robust Th1 responses, indicating that these are not sufficient to protect against disease. Recent findings suggest that favourable outcomes following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection arise from finely balanced inflammatory and regulatory pathways, achieving pathogen control without immunopathology. We hypothesised that HIV-1 and antiretroviral therapy (ART exert widespread changes to cell mediated immunity, which may compromise the optimal host protective response to TB and provide novel insights into the correlates of immune protection and pathogenesis. We sought to define these effects in patients with active TB by transcriptional profiling of tuberculin skin tests (TST to make comprehensive molecular level assessments of in vivo human immune responses at the site of a standardised mycobacterial challenge. We showed that the TST transcriptome accurately reflects the molecular pathology at the site of human pulmonary TB, and used this approach to investigate immune dysregulation in HIV-1/TB co-infected patients with distinct clinical phenotypes associated with TST reactivity or anergy and unmasking TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS after initiation of ART. HIV-1 infected patients with positive TSTs exhibited preserved Th1 responses but deficient immunoregulatory IL10-inducible responses. Those with clinically negative TSTs revealed profound anergy of innate as well as adaptive immune responses, except for preservation of type 1 interferon activity, implicated in impaired anti-mycobacterial immunity. Patients with unmasking TB IRIS showed recovery of Th1 immunity to normal levels, but exaggerated Th2-associated responses specifically. These mechanisms of immune dysregulation were localised to the tissue microenvironment and not evident in peripheral

  18. 7,8-secolignans from Schisandra neglecta and their anti-HIV-1 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xuemei; Mu, Huaixue; Hu, Qiufen, E-mail: huqiufena@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemistry in Ethnic Medicinal Resources, State Ethnic Affairs Commission and Ministry of Education, Yunnan University of Nationalities (China); Wang, Ruirui; Yang, Liumeng; Zheng, Yongtang [Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Sun, Handong; Xiao, Weilie, E-mail: xwl@mail.kib.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China)

    2012-10-15

    Four new 7,8-secolignans (neglectahenols A-D), together with two known 7,8-secolignans, were isolated from leaves and stems of Schisandra neglecta. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive one and two dimension NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) techniques. 7,8-Secolignans and neglectahenols A-D were also tested for their anti-HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) activities, and all of them showed modest activities. (author)

  19. Anti-HIV-1 activity and structure-activity relationship of pyranocoumarin analogs%吡喃香豆素衍生物对HIV-1的抑制作用及其构效关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董飚; 马涛; 章天; 周春梅; 刘刚; 王琳; 陶佩珍; 张兴权

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)/protease (PR) activity and inhibition of virus replication in cell cultures of novel coumarin analogs and determine their structure-activity relationship. Coumarin derivatives have been demonstrated to inhibit the activity of HIV-1 RT/PR in cell free system. It also shows inhibition effects to HIV-1 replication in cell culture. Based on the Chinese traditional pharmacological characteristics and protein three dimension computer aided design, analogs of tetracyclic dipyranocoumarin were synthesized from natural leading compounds. We studied the relationship of antiviral effects and chemical structures via HIV-1 PR/RT enzyme models and cell culture model system. Seven compounds were designed and tested. Several compounds showed anti-HIV-1 activity in varying degrees, especially V0201 showed much higher anti-HIV-1 activity with 3.56 and 0.78 μmol·L-1 of IC50 against HIV-1 PR/RT and 0.036 μmol·L-1 against HIV-1 replication in PBMC cultures. V0201 with a novel structure may be a new leading compound. These new compounds are valuable for development of new anti-HIV drugs in the future.%研究香豆素衍生物对人类免疫缺陷病毒l型逆转录酶(HIV-1 RT)、蛋白酶(HIV-1 PR)和细胞内复制的抑制作用及其构效关系.不同香豆素衍生物具有抑制HIV-1 RT、HIV-1 PR活性,且在细胞内显示出抑制HIV-1复制的作用已见报道.本课题根据国内传统药学的特点,考察以天然产物为先导化合物、结合HIV-1蛋白酶三维结构计算机辅助药物设计、合成的四环双吡喃香豆素及其类似物.以HIV-1 RT及HIV-1 PR以及细胞内病毒复制为靶点,利用酶学模型和细胞培养模型进行药物筛选及其构效关系研究,设计合成的7个化合物的药效学实验结果显示.部分化合物显示了不同程度的抗HIV-1活性.其中V0201作用最强,它对HIV-1 PR和HIV-1 RT的IC50分别为3.56和0.78 μmol·L-1;

  20. BAG3 protein regulates caspase-3 activation in HIV-1-infected human primary microglial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Alessandra; Khalili, Kamel; Deshmane, Satish L.; Radhakrishnan, Sujatha; Pascale, Maria; Turco, M. Caterina; Marzullo, Liberato

    2015-01-01

    BAG3, a member of the BAG co-chaperones family, is expressed in several cell types subjected to stressful conditions, such as exposure to high temperature, heavy metals, drugs. Furthermore, it is constitutively expressed in some tumors. Among the biological activities of the protein, there is apoptosis downmodulation; this appears to be exerted through BAG3 interaction with the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70, that influences cell apoptosis at several levels. We recently reported that BAG3 protein was detectable in the cytoplasm of reactive astrocytes in HIV-1-associated encephalopathy biopsies. Here we report that downmodulation of BAG3 protein levels allows caspase-3 activation by HIV-1 infection in human primary microglial cells. This is the first reported evidence of a role for BAG3 in the balance of death versus survival during viral infection. PMID:18821563

  1. Anti-HIV-1 integrase activity of medicinal plants used as self medication by AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopa Kummee

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The extracts of selected medicinal plants used as self medication by AIDS patients were investigated for their inhibitory activities against HIV-1 integrase (HIV-1 IN using the multiplate integration assay (MIA. Of these, the water extract of Eclipta prostrata (whole plant exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.8 μg/ml, followed by the methanol extract of Eclipta prostrata (whole plant, IC50 = 21.1 μg/ ml, the water extract of Barleria lupulina (stem, IC50 = 26.4 μg/ml, the chloroform extract of Barleria lupulina (stem, IC50 = 33.0 μg/ml, the methanol extract of Barleria lupulina (stem, IC50 = 38.2 μg/ml and the chloroform extract of Piper betle (leaf, IC50 = 39.3 μg/ml, respectively.

  2. Changes in Natural Killer cell activation and function during primary HIV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Naranbhai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent reports suggest that Natural Killer (NK cells may modulate pathogenesis of primary HIV-1 infection. However, HIV dysregulates NK-cell responses. We dissected this bi-directional relationship to understand how HIV impacts NK-cell responses during primary HIV-1 infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Paired samples from 41 high-risk, initially HIV-uninfected CAPRISA004 participants were analysed prior to HIV acquisition, and during viraemic primary HIV-1 infection. At the time of sampling post-infection five women were seronegative, 11 women were serodiscordant, and 25 women were seropositive by HIV-1 rapid immunoassay. Flow cytometry was used to measure NK and T-cell activation, NK-cell receptor expression, cytotoxic and cytokine-secretory functions, and trafficking marker expression (CCR7, α(4β(7. Non-parametric statistical tests were used. Both NK cells and T-cells were significantly activated following HIV acquisition (p = 0.03 and p<0.0001, respectively, but correlation between NK-cell and T-cell activation was uncoupled following infection (pre-infection r = 0.68;p<0.0001; post-infection, during primary infection r = 0.074;p = 0.09. Nonetheless, during primary infection NK-cell and T-cell activation correlated with HIV viral load (r = 0.32'p = 0.04 and r = 0.35;p = 0.02, respectively. The frequency of Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptor-expressing (KIR(pos NK cells increased following HIV acquisition (p = 0.006, and KIR(pos NK cells were less activated than KIR(neg NK cells amongst individuals sampled while seronegative or serodiscordant (p = 0.001;p<0.0001 respectively. During HIV-1 infection, cytotoxic NK cell responses evaluated after IL-2 stimulation alone, or after co-culture with 721 cells, were impaired (p = 0.006 and p = 0.002, respectively. However, NK-cell IFN-y secretory function was not significantly altered. The frequency of CCR7+ NK cells was elevated

  3. Molecular dynamics and MM/GBSA-integrated protocol probing the correlation between biological activities and binding free energies of HIV-1 TAR RNA inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat with its cognate transactivation response (TAR) RNA has emerged as a promising target for developing antiviral compounds and treating HIV infection, since it is a crucial step for efficient transcription and replication. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and MM/GBSA calculations have been performed on a series of neamine derivatives in order to estimate appropriate MD simulation time for acceptable correlation between ΔGbind and experimental pIC50 values. Initially, all inhibitors were docked into the active site of HIV-1 TAR RNA. Later to explore various conformations and examine the docking results, MD simulations were carried out. Finally, binding free energies were calculated using MM/GBSA method and were correlated with experimental pIC50 values at different time scales (0-1 to 0-10 ns). From this study, it is clear that in case of neamine derivatives as simulation time increased the correlation between binding free energy and experimental pIC50 values increased correspondingly. Therefore, the binding energies which can be interpreted at longer simulation times can be used to predict the bioactivity of new neamine derivatives. Moreover, in this work, we have identified some plausible critical nucleotide interactions with neamine derivatives that are responsible for potent inhibitory activity. Furthermore, we also provide some insights into a new class of oxadiazole-based back bone cyclic peptides designed by incorporating the structural features of neamine derivatives. On the whole, this approach can provide a valuable guidance for designing new potent inhibitors and modify the existing compounds targeting HIV-1 TAR RNA.

  4. Molecular Mechanism of Macrocyclic Polyamines with Anti-HIV-1 Activity to Recognize RNA and Its Effect on Apoptosis%抗HIV-1活性的大环多胺类化合物与RNA的识别作用及其对细胞凋亡的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝美荣; 杨铭; 卜显和

    2002-01-01

    研究了具有抗HIV-1活性的大环多胺类化合物与RNA的识别作用,以及其对 cos-7细胞凋亡的影响,以进一步探讨其抗HIV-1的作用机理.实验采用琼脂糖凝胶电泳方法, 观察化合物与RNA的识别作用;通过流式细胞计数法探讨其对cos-7细胞凋亡的影响; 运用计算机分子模型, 从理论上Docking计算化合物与TAR RNA结合的可能性.结果表明, 大环多胺类化合物MP-1、MP-2和MP-3不仅具有断裂RNA的作用,并可抑制Tat-RNA的相互作用, 还可影响cos-7细胞亚二倍体的含量; 理论化学计算数据与实验结果基本一致.这一结果提示化合物的抗HIV-1活性可能通过作用于病毒基因组RNA而发挥作用,是多靶作用的结果.%The molecular recognition of macrocyclic polyamines (MP-1 ,MP-2 and MP-3) to RNA, and its effects on apoptosis of cos-7 cells were stu died in order to explore their mechanism of anti-HIV-1 activity. Cleavage of R NA was observed by agarose electrophoresis; and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry assay. Computer modeling was used to investigate the theoretical poss ibility of compounds binding to TAR RNA. Results showed that: (1) Compounds MP -1,MP-2 and MP-3 could not only cleave the polyA *polyU and TAR RNA, but al so inhibit the interaction of Tat-RNA. (2) Compounds could affect the percentag e of hypodiploid cell. It is proposed that compounds MP-1,MP-2 and MP-3 cou ld recognize the polyA*polyU and TAR RNA molecules and cleave them, and affect the interaction of Tat-RNA. The compounds may affect the apoptosis of cos-7 ce lls.

  5. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Klase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  6. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klase, Zachary; Yedavalli, Venkat S R K; Houzet, Laurent; Perkins, Molly; Maldarelli, Frank; Brenchley, Jason; Strebel, Klaus; Liu, Paul; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2014-03-01

    A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat) to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  7. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs. PMID:23803414

  8. Deciphering structure-activity relationships in a series of Tat/TAR inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Lise; González, Alejandro López; Di Giorgio, Audrey; Gaysinski, Marc; Teixido Closa, Jordi; Tejedor, Roger Estrada; Azoulay, Stéphane; Patino, Nadia

    2016-11-01

    A series of pentameric "Polyamide Amino Acids" (PAAs) compounds derived from the same trimeric precursor have been synthesized and investigated as HIV TAR RNA ligands, in the absence and in the presence of a Tat fragment. All PAAs bind TAR with similar sub-micromolar affinities but their ability to compete efficiently with the Tat fragment strongly differs, IC50 ranging from 35 nM to >2 μM. While NMR and CD studies reveal that all PAA interact with TAR at the same site and induce globally the same RNA conformational change upon binding, a comparative thermodynamic study of PAA/TAR equilibria highlights distinct TAR binding modes for Tat competitor and non-competitor PAAs. This led us to suggest two distinct interaction modes that have been further validated by molecular modeling studies. While the binding of Tat competitor PAAs induces a contraction at the TAR bulge region, the binding of non-competitor ones widens it. This could account for the distinct PAA ability to compete with Tat fragment. Our work illustrates how comparative thermodynamic studies of a series of RNA ligands of same chemical family are of value for understanding their binding modes and for rationalizing structure-activity relationships.

  9. Chloroquine modulates HIV-1-induced plasmacytoid dendritic cell alpha interferon: implication for T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Jeffrey A; Montoya, Carlos J; Usuga, Xiomara; Ronquillo, Rollie; Landay, Alan L; Desai, Seema N

    2010-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) contribute to antiviral immunity mainly through recognition of microbial products and viruses via intracellular Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) or TLR9, resulting in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although interferons reduce the viral burden in the acute phase of infection, their role in the chronic phase is unclear. The presence of elevated plasma IFN-alpha levels in advanced HIV disease and its association with microbial translocation in chronic HIV infection lead us to hypothesize that IFN-alpha could contribute to immune activation. Blocking of IFN-alpha production using chloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, was tested in a novel in vitro model system with the aim of characterizing the effects of chloroquine on HIV-1-mediated TLR signaling, IFN-alpha production, and T-cell activation. Our results indicate that chloroquine blocks TLR-mediated activation of pDC and MyD88 signaling, as shown by decreases in the levels of the downstream signaling molecules IRAK-4 and IRF-7 and by inhibition of IFN-alpha synthesis. Chloroquine decreased CD8 T-cell activation induced by aldrithiol-2-treated HIV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In addition to blocking pDC activation, chloroquine also blocked negative modulators of the T-cell response, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1). Our results indicate that TLR stimulation and production of IFN-alpha by pDC contribute to immune activation and that blocking of these pathways using chloroquine may interfere with events contributing to HIV pathogenesis. Our results suggests that a safe, well-tolerated drug such as chloroquine can be proposed as an adjuvant therapeutic candidate along with highly active antiretroviral therapy to control immune activation in HIV-1 infection.

  10. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates interfere with the HIV-1 Tat–TAR RNA interaction critical for viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Jaroslav; Hannon, Michael J.; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat and TAR (transactivation responsive region) RNA, plays a critical role in HIV-1 transcription. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates were evaluated for their in vitro activity to inhibit Tat–TAR RNA interaction using UV melting studies, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and RNase A footprinting. The results demonstrate that iron(II) supramolecular helicates inhibit Tat-TAR interaction at nanomolar concentrations by binding to TAR RNA. These studies provide a new insight into the biological potential of metallosupramolecular helicates.

  11. Neurotoxic Activity of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein: Activation of Protein Kinase C in Rat Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Adebayo

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Envelope glycoprotein (gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1, has adverse effects on glial cells and neurons. This study reports on the direct effect of recombinant gp120 (r-gp120 produced from different expression systems on protein kinase C, as a measure of relative neurotoxicity. Brain cells were grown in vitro from explants of the cerebral cortex of newborn rats, and recombinant gp120 preparations expressed in mammalian cell/vaccinia virus and insect cell/baculovirus systems were applied to astrocyte-enriched cultures. The gp120 preparations activated protein kinase C (PKC to similar levels in these cells. Mutant recombinant gp120 lacking the amino-terminal 29 amino acids produced from the mammalian and insect cells also activated PKC to similar levels as did the full-length protein. The recombinant proteins specifically activated PKC β and ζ, suggesting that they are able to induce both Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent isoforms of this enzyme. Alteration of PKC activity in astrocytes by gp120 indicates its ability to modulate gene expression, which is associated with the neurotoxicity of this protein. Furthermore, the results suggest that the deletion of the first 29 residues of NH2-terminal end of the gp120 does not affect the functional activity of this protein with regard to modulation of signal transduction in astrocytes.

  12. HIV-1 Nef impairs key functional activities in human macrophages through CD36 downregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Olivetta

    Full Text Available Monocytes and macrophages utilize the class A and B scavenger receptors to recognize and perform phagocytosis of invading microbes before a pathogen-specific immune response is generated. HIV-1 Nef protein affects the innate immune system impairing oxidative burst response and phagocytic capacity of macrophages. Our data show that exogenous recombinant myristoylated Nef protein induces a marked CD36 downregulation in monocytes from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages (MDMs differentiated by cytokines and in MDMs contained in a mixed culture obtained expanding PBMCs under Human Erythroid Massive Amplification condition. Under the latter culture condition we identify three main populations after 6 days of expansion: lymphocytes (37.8 ± 14.7%, erythroblasts (46.7±6.1% and MDMs (15.7 ± 7.5%. The Nef addition to the cell culture significantly downregulates CD36 expression in MDMs, but not in erythroid cells. Furthermore, CD36 inhibition is highly specific since it does not modify the expression levels of other MDM markers such as CD14, CD11c, CD86, CD68, CD206, Toll-like Receptor 2 and Toll-like Receptor 4. Similar results were obtained in MDMs infected with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1-expressing Nef. The reduced CD36 membrane expression is associated with decrease of correspondent CD36 mRNA transcript. Furthermore, Nef-induced CD36 downregulation is linked to both impaired scavenger activity with reduced capability to take up oxidized lipoproteins and to significant decreased phagocytosis of fluorescent beads and GFP-expressing Salmonella tiphymurium. In addition we observed that Nef induces TNF-α release in MDMs. Although these data suggest a possible involvement of TNF-α in mediating Nef activity, our results exclude a possible relationship between Nef-induced TNF-α release and Nef-mediated CD36 downregulation. The present work shows that HIV-1 Nef protein may have a role in the strategies elaborated by HIV-1 to

  13. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hoffmann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122 recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL and CD4 T cell count and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy. To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of 'exhaustion' or 'immune checkpoint' markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

  14. Could low level laser therapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy lead to complete eradication of HIV-1 in vitro?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lugongolo, Masixole Y

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection remains a major health problem despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which has greatly reduced mortality rates. Due to the unavailability of an effective vaccine or a...

  15. Ferrocenyl chalcone difluoridoborates inhibit HIV-1 integrase and display low activity towards cancer and endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrat, Jean-Philippe; Al-Safi, Rasha I; Tiwari, Keshri Nath; Quentin, Lionel; Chabot, Guy G; Vessières, Anne; Jaouen, Gérard; Neamati, Nouri; Hillard, Elizabeth A

    2011-10-15

    We report here the discovery of a potent series of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors based on the ferrocenyl chalcone difluoridoborate structure. Ten new compounds have been synthesized and were generally found to have similar inhibitory activities against the IN 3' processing and strand transfer (ST) processes. IC(50) values were found to be in the low micromolar range, and significantly lower than those found for the non-coordinated ferrocenyl chalcones and other ferrocene molecules. The ferrocenyl chalcone difluoridoborates furthermore exhibited low cytotoxicity against cancer cells and low morphological activity against epithelial cells.

  16. Reduced CD4 T cell activation and in vitro susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in exposed uninfected Central Africans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanet Arnaud

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmentally driven immune activation was suggested to contribute to high rates of HIV-1 infection in Africa. We report here a study of immune activation markers and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro of forty-five highly exposed uninfected partners (EUs of HIV-1 infected individuals in Central African Republic, in comparison with forty-four low-risk blood donors (UCs. Results Analysis of T lymphocyte subsets and activation markers in whole blood showed that the absolute values and the percentage of HLA-DR+CD4 T cells and of CCR5+CD4 T cells were lower in the EUs than in the UCs (p = 0.0001. Mutations in the CCR5 coding region were not found in either group. Susceptibility to in vitro infection of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, prior of PHA activation, was decreased in EUs compared to UCs, either using a CXCR4-tropic or a CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strain (p = 0.02 and p = 0.05, respectively. Levels of MIP-1β, but not of MIP-1α or RANTES, in the supernatants of PHA-activated PBMC, were higher in the EUs than in the UCs (p = 0.007. Conclusion We found low levels of CD4 T cell activation and reduced PBMC susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in Central African EUs, indicating that both may contribute to the resistance to HIV-1 infection.

  17. Characteristics of HIV-1-specific CD8 T-cell responses and their role in loss of viremia in children chronically infected with HIV-1 undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zheng; ZHAO Qing-xia; FU Jun-liang; YAO Jin-xia; HE Yun; JIN Lei; WANG Fu-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epitope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses in children. To address this issue, we characterized epitope-specific CTL responses and analyzed the determinants that may affect CTL responses before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in children with HIV-1 infection.Methods A total of 22 HIV-1-infected children and 23 uninfected healthy children as control were enrolled in the study. Circulating CD4 T cells and HIV-1 RNA load in plasma were routinely measured. Peripheral HIV-1-specific CTL frequency and HIV-1 epitope-specific, interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing T lymphocytes were measured using tetramer staining and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, respectively.Circulating dendritic cell (DC) subsets were monitored with FACS analysis.Results More than 80% of the children with HIV-1 infection exhibited a positive HIV-1-epitope-specific CTL response at baseline, but HIV-specific CTLs and IFN-γ-producing lymphocytes decreased in patients who responded to HAART in comparison with non-responders and HAART-naive children. The duration of virus suppression resulted from HAART was inversely correlated with CTL frequency. While in HAART-naive children, HIV-1-specific CTL frequency was positively correlated with myeloid DC (mDC) frequency,although the cause and effect relationship between the DCs and CTLs remains unknown.Conclusions HIV-1-epitope-specific CTL responses are dependent on antigenic stimulation. The impaired DC subsets in blood might result in a defect in DC-mediated T cell responses. These findings may provide insight into understanding the factors and related mechanisms that influence the outcome of HIV-1 carriers to HAART or future antiviral therapies.

  18. Expression of an RNA glycosidase inhibits HIV-1 transactivation of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutky, Meherzad; Hudak, Katalin A

    2017-09-01

    HIV-1 transcription is primarily controlled by the virally encoded Tat protein and its interaction with the viral TAR RNA element. Specifically, binding of a Tat-containing complex to TAR recruits cellular factors that promote elongation of the host RNA polymerase engaging the viral DNA template. Disruption of this interaction halts viral RNA transcription. In this study, we investigated the effect of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), an RNA glycosidase (EC#: 3.2.2.22) synthesized by the pokeweed plant ( Phytolacca americana ), on transcription of HIV-1 mRNA. We show that co-expression of PAP with a proviral clone in culture cells resulted in a Tat-dependent decrease in viral mRNA levels. PAP reduced HIV-1 transcriptional activity by inhibiting Tat protein synthesis. The effects of PAP expression on host factors AP-1, NF-κB and SP-1, which modulate HIV-1 transcription by binding to the viral LTR, were also investigated. Only AP-1 showed a modest JNK pathway-dependent increase in activity in the presence of PAP; however, this activation was not sufficient to significantly enhance transcription from a partial viral LTR containing AP-1 binding sites. Therefore, the primary effect of PAP on HIV-1 transcription is to reduce viral RNA synthesis by decreasing the abundance of Tat. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed decrease in viral RNAs in cells expressing PAP and contribute to our understanding of the antiviral effects of this plant protein. ©2017 The Author(s).

  19. Tat gets the "green" light on transcription initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashanchi Fatah

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Tat transactivation is an essential step in the viral life cycle. Over the past several years, it has become widely accepted that Tat exerts its transcriptional effect by binding the transactivation-responsive region (TAR and enhancing transcriptional elongation. Consistent with this hypothesis, it has been shown that Tat promotes the binding of P-TEFb, a transcription elongation factor composed of cyclin T1 and cdk9, and the interaction of Tat with P-TEFb and TAR leads to hyperphosphorylation of the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNA Pol II and increased processivity of RNA Pol II. A recent report, however, has generated renewed interest that Tat may also play a critical role in transcription complex (TC assembly at the preinitiation step. Using in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, the authors reported that the HIV TC contains TBP but not TBP-associated factors. The stimulatory effect involved the direct interaction of Tat and P-TEFb and was evident at the earliest step of TC assembly, the TBP-TATA box interaction. In this article, we will review this data in context of earlier data which also support Tat's involvement in transcriptional complex assembly. Specifically, we will discuss experiments which demonstrated that Tat interacted with TBP and increased transcription initiation complex stability in cell free assays. We will also discuss studies which demonstrated that over expression of TBP alone was sufficient to obtain Tat activated transcription in vitro and in vivo. Finally, studies using self-cleaving ribozymes which suggested that Tat transactivation was not compatible with pausing of the RNA Pol II at the TAR site will be discussed.

  20. BCL11B is a general transcriptional repressor of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in T lymphocytes through recruitment of the NuRD complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismasiu, Valeriu B; Paskaleva, Elena; Suman Daya, Sneha; Canki, Mario; Duus, Karen; Avram, Dorina

    2008-10-25

    In this study we provide evidence that the transcription factor BCL11B represses expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) in T lymphocytes through direct association with the HIV-1 LTR. We also demonstrate that the NuRD corepressor complex mediates BCL11B transcriptional repression of the HIV-1 LTR. In addition, BCL11B and the NuRD complex repressed TAT-mediated transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR in T lymphocytes, pointing to a potential role in initiation of silencing. In support of all the above results, we demonstrate that BCL11B affects HIV-1 replication and virus production, most likely by blocking LTR transcriptional activity. BCL11B showed specific repression for the HIV-1 LTR sequences isolated from seven different HIV-1 subtypes, demonstrating that it is a general transcriptional repressor for all LTRs.

  1. Systemic Immune Activation Profiles of HIV-1 Subtype C-Infected Children and Their Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinyiko G. Makhubele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about immune activation profiles of children infected with HIV-1 subtype C. The current study compared levels of selected circulating biomarkers of immune activation in HIV-1 subtype C-infected untreated mothers and their children with those of healthy controls. Multiplex bead array, ELISA, and immunonephelometric procedures were used to measure soluble CD14 (sCD14, beta-2 microglobulin (β2M, CRP, MIG, IP-10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1. Levels of all 6 biomarkers were significantly elevated in the HIV-infected mothers and, with the exception of MIG, in their children (P<0.01–P<0.0001. The effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART and maternal smoking on these biomarkers were also assessed. With the exception of TGF-β1, which was unchanged in the children 12 months after therapy, initiation of ART was accompanied by decreases in the other biomarkers. Regression analysis revealed that although most biomarkers were apparently unaffected by smoking, exposure of children to maternal smoking was associated with a significant increase in IP-10. These findings demonstrate that biomarkers of immune activation are elevated in HIV-infected children pre-ART and decline, with the exception of TGF-β1, after therapy. Although preliminary, elevation of IP-10 in smoke-exposed infants is consistent with a higher level of immune activation in this group.

  2. Inhibition of Reverse Transcriptase Activity Increases Stability of the HIV-1 Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Fricke, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed that HIV-1 reverse transcription occurs during or before uncoating, linking mechanistically reverse transcription with uncoating. Here we show that inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) during HIV-1 infection by pharmacologic or genetic means increased the stability of the HIV-1 core during infection. Interestingly, HIV-1 particles with increased core stability were resistant to the core-destabilizing effects of rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5αrh). Collectively, this work implies that the surface of the HIV-1 core is dynamic and changes upon the ongoing processes within the core. PMID:23077298

  3. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase activity increases stability of the HIV-1 core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed that HIV-1 reverse transcription occurs during or before uncoating, linking mechanistically reverse transcription with uncoating. Here we show that inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) during HIV-1 infection by pharmacologic or genetic means increased the stability of the HIV-1 core during infection. Interestingly, HIV-1 particles with increased core stability were resistant to the core-destabilizing effects of rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5α(rh)). Collectively, this work implies that the surface of the HIV-1 core is dynamic and changes upon the ongoing processes within the core.

  4. A Conserved GPG-Motif in the HIV-1 Nef Core Is Required for Principal Nef-Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martínez-Bonet

    Full Text Available To find out new determinants required for Nef activity we performed a functional alanine scanning analysis along a discrete but highly conserved region at the core of HIV-1 Nef. We identified the GPG-motif, located at the 121-137 region of HIV-1 NL4.3 Nef, as a novel protein signature strictly required for the p56Lck dependent Nef-induced CD4-downregulation in T-cells. Since the Nef-GPG motif was dispensable for CD4-downregulation in HeLa-CD4 cells, Nef/AP-1 interaction and Nef-dependent effects on Tf-R trafficking, the observed effects on CD4 downregulation cannot be attributed to structure constraints or to alterations on general protein trafficking. Besides, we found that the GPG-motif was also required for Nef-dependent inhibition of ring actin re-organization upon TCR triggering and MHCI downregulation, suggesting that the GPG-motif could actively cooperate with the Nef PxxP motif for these HIV-1 Nef-related effects. Finally, we observed that the Nef-GPG motif was required for optimal infectivity of those viruses produced in T-cells. According to these findings, we propose the conserved GPG-motif in HIV-1 Nef as functional region required for HIV-1 infectivity and therefore with a potential interest for the interference of Nef activity during HIV-1 infection.

  5. FACT Proteins, SUPT16H and SSRP1, Are Transcriptional Suppressors of HIV-1 and HTLV-1 That Facilitate Viral Latency*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huachao; Santoso, Netty; Power, Derek; Simpson, Sydney; Dieringer, Michael; Miao, Hongyu; Gurova, Katerina; Giam, Chou-Zen; Elledge, Stephen J.; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Our functional genomic RNAi screens have identified the protein components of the FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) complex, SUPT16H and SSRP1, as top host factors that negatively regulate HIV-1 replication. FACT interacts specifically with histones H2A/H2B to affect assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes, as well as transcription elongation. We further investigated the suppressive role of FACT proteins in HIV-1 transcription. First, depletion of SUPT16H or SSRP1 protein enhances Tat-mediated HIV-1 LTR (long terminal repeat) promoter activity. Second, HIV-1 Tat interacts with SUPT16H but not SSRP1 protein. However, both SUPT16H and SSRP1 are recruited to LTR promoter. Third, the presence of SUPT16H interferes with the association of Cyclin T1 (CCNT1), a subunit of P-TEFb, with the Tat-LTR axis. Removing inhibitory mechanisms to permit HIV-1 transcription is an initial and key regulatory step to reverse post-integrated latent HIV-1 proviruses for purging of reservoir cells. We therefore evaluated the role of FACT proteins in HIV-1 latency and reactivation. Depletion of SUPT16H or SSRP1 protein affects both HIV-1 transcriptional initiation and elongation and spontaneously reverses latent HIV-1 in U1/HIV and J-LAT cells. Similar effects were observed with a primary CD4+ T cell model of HIV-1 latency. FACT proteins also interfere with HTLV-1 Tax-LTR-mediated transcription and viral latency, indicating that they may act as general transcriptional suppressors for retroviruses. We conclude that FACT proteins SUPT16H and SSRP1 play a key role in suppressing HIV-1 transcription and promoting viral latency, which may serve as promising gene targets for developing novel HIV-1 latency-reversing agents. PMID:26378236

  6. Drug 9AA reactivates p21/Waf1 and Inhibits HIV-1 progeny formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubrovsky Larisa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been demonstrated that the p53 pathway plays an important role in HIV-1 infection. Previous work from our lab has established a model demonstrating how p53 could become inactivated in HIV-1 infected cells through binding to Tat. Subsequently, p53 was inactivated and lost its ability to transactivate its downstream target gene p21/waf1. P21/waf1 is a well-known cdk inhibitor (CKI that can lead to cell cycle arrest upon DNA damage. Most recently, the p21/waf1 function was further investigated as a molecular barrier for HIV-1 infection of stem cells. Therefore, we reason that the restoration of the p53 and p21/waf1 pathways could be a possible theraputical arsenal for combating HIV-1 infection. In this current study, we show that a small chemical molecule, 9-aminoacridine (9AA at low concentrations, could efficiently reactivate p53 pathway and thereby restoring the p21/waf1 function. Further, we show that the 9AA could significantly inhibit virus replication in activated PBMCs, likely through a mechanism of inhibiting the viral replication machinery. A mechanism study reveals that the phosphorylated p53ser15 may be dissociated from binding to HIV-1 Tat protein, thereby activating the p21/waf1 gene. Finally, we also show that the 9AA-activated p21/waf1 is recruited to HIV-1 preintegration complex, through a mechanism yet to be elucidated.

  7. Antiviral activity of α-helical stapled peptides designed from the HIV-1 capsid dimerization domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowburn David

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C-terminal domain (CTD of HIV-1 capsid (CA, like full-length CA, forms dimers in solution and CTD dimerization is a major driving force in Gag assembly and maturation. Mutations of the residues at the CTD dimer interface impair virus assembly and render the virus non-infectious. Therefore, the CTD represents a potential target for designing anti-HIV-1 drugs. Results Due to the pivotal role of the dimer interface, we reasoned that peptides from the α-helical region of the dimer interface might be effective as decoys to prevent CTD dimer formation. However, these small peptides do not have any structure in solution and they do not penetrate cells. Therefore, we used the hydrocarbon stapling technique to stabilize the α-helical structure and confirmed by confocal microscopy that this modification also made these peptides cell-penetrating. We also confirmed by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, sedimentation equilibrium and NMR that these peptides indeed disrupt dimer formation. In in vitro assembly assays, the peptides inhibited mature-like virus particle formation and specifically inhibited HIV-1 production in cell-based assays. These peptides also showed potent antiviral activity against a large panel of laboratory-adapted and primary isolates, including viral strains resistant to inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease. Conclusions These preliminary data serve as the foundation for designing small, stable, α-helical peptides and small-molecule inhibitors targeted against the CTD dimer interface. The observation that relatively weak CA binders, such as NYAD-201 and NYAD-202, showed specificity and are able to disrupt the CTD dimer is encouraging for further exploration of a much broader class of antiviral compounds targeting CA. We cannot exclude the possibility that the CA-based peptides described here could elicit additional effects on virus replication not directly linked to their ability to bind

  8. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented.

  9. Impact of gender on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Impact of gender on time to initiation, response to and risk of modification of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-1 infected individuals is still controversial. METHODS: From a nationwide cohort of Danish HIV infected individuals we identified all heterosex......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Impact of gender on time to initiation, response to and risk of modification of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-1 infected individuals is still controversial. METHODS: From a nationwide cohort of Danish HIV infected individuals we identified all...... counts (adjusted p=0.21). We observed no delay in time to initiation of HAART in women compared to men (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.79-1.06). There were no gender differences in risk of treatment modification of the original HAART regimen during the first year of therapy for either toxicity (IRR 0.97 95% CI 0.......66-1.44) or other/unknown reasons (IRR 1.18 95% CI 0.76-1.82). Finally, CD4 counts and the risk of having a detectable viral load at 1, 3 and 6 years did not differ between genders. CONCLUSIONS: In a setting with free access to healthcare and HAART, gender does neither affect time from eligibility to HAART...

  10. The role of G protein gene GNB3 C825T Polymorphism in HIV-1 acquisition, progression and immune activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juno Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The GNB3 C825T polymorphism is associated with increased G protein-mediated signal transduction, SDF-1α-mediated lymphocyte chemotaxis, accelerated HIV-1 progression, and altered responses to antiretroviral therapy among Caucasian subjects. The GNB3 825T allele is highly prevalent in African populations, and as such any impact on HIV-1 acquisition or progression rates could have a dramatic impact. This study examines the association of the 825T polymorphism with HIV-1 acquisition, disease progression and immune activation in two African cohorts. GNB3 825 genotyping was performed for enrolees in both a commercial sex worker cohort and a perinatal HIV transmission (PHT cohort in Nairobi, Kenya. Ex vivo immune activation was quantified by flow cytometry, and plasma chemokine levels were assessed by cytokine bead array. Results GNB3 genotype was not associated with sexual or vertical HIV-1 acquisition within these cohorts. Within the Pumwani cohort, GNB3 genotype did not affect HIV-1 disease progression among seroconverters or among HIV-1-positive individuals after adjustment for baseline CD4 count. Maternal CD4 decline and viral load increase in the PHT cohort did not differ between genotypes. Multi-parametric flow cytometry assessment of T cell activation (CD69, HLA-DR, CD38 and Treg frequency (CD25+FOXP3+ found no differences between genotype groups. Plasma SDF-1α, MIP-1β and TRAIL levels quantified by cytokine bead array were also similar between groups. Conclusions In contrast to previous reports, we were unable to provide evidence to suggest that the GNB3 C825T polymorphism affects HIV-1 acquisition or disease progression within African populations. Ex vivo immune activation and plasma chemokine levels were similarly unaffected by GNB3 genotype in both HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive individuals. The paucity of studies investigating the impact of GNB3 polymorphism among African populations and the lack of mechanistic

  11. A HIV-Tat/C4-binding protein chimera encoded by a DNA vaccine is highly immunogenic and contains acute EcoHIV infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Garrod, Tamsin; Li, Yanrui; Gray, Lachlan; Churchill, Melissa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines are cost-effective to manufacture on a global scale and Tat-based DNA vaccines have yielded protective outcomes in preclinical and clinical models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), highlighting the potential of such vaccines. However, Tat-based DNA vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, and despite the administration of multiple doses and/or the addition of adjuvants, these vaccines are not in general use. In this study, we improved Tat immunogenicity by fusing it with the oligomerisation domain of a chimeric C4-binding protein (C4b-p), termed IMX313, resulting in Tat heptamerisation and linked Tat to the leader sequence of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) to ensure that the bulk of heptamerised Tat is secreted. Mice vaccinated with secreted Tat fused to IMX313 (pVAX-sTat-IMX313) developed higher titres of Tat-specific serum IgG, mucosal sIgA and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and showed superior control of EcoHIV infection, a surrogate murine HIV challenge model, compared with animals vaccinated with other test vaccines. Given the crucial contribution of Tat to HIV-1 pathogenesis and the precedent of Tat-based DNA vaccines in conferring some level of protection in animal models, we believe that the virologic control demonstrated with this novel multimerised Tat vaccine highlights the promise of this vaccine candidate for humans. PMID:27358023

  12. A naturally occurring Vif mutant (I107T) attenuates anti-APOBEC3G activity and HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinyu; Ao, Zhujun; Matthews, Chris; Wang, Xiaoxia; Ramdahin, Sue; Chen, Xi; Li, Junhua; Chen, Liyu; He, Jianmei; Ball, Blake; Fowke, Keith; Plummer, Frank; Embree, Joanne; Yao, Xiaojian

    2013-08-23

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vif protein counteracts the antiviral activity of the apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) family of proteins by targeting the proteins for degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Previous mutagenic studies have shown that multiple domains of Vif are required for interacting with APOBEC3G proteins and the proteasome pathway. However, very few mutagenesis and functional analyses of patient-derived Vif proteins have been conducted. In this study, we amplified and cloned the HIV-1 vif genes from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of five HIV-1-infected individuals in Nairobi and further tested the impact of the genes on anti-A3G activity and HIV-1 replication. The gene sequence analysis revealed high genetic variation of vif genes from different HIV-1-infected individuals. Interestingly, the Vif proteins derived from two of the three long-term survivors (LTSs) displayed a significantly impaired ability to mediate the degradation of A3G. In particular, a single amino acid change (I107T) in one of the non-functional LTS Vif variants, which has not been previously identified in the Los Alamos databases of vif sequences, was found to be responsible for the lack of anti-A3G activity. Further study demonstrated that HIV-1 carrying an I107T Vif mutation displayed significantly reduced fitness in A3G(+) T cells and PBMCs. Moreover, co-infecting A3G(+) T cells with both the wild-type and I107T Vif viruses resulted in decreased viral replication. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the HIV-1 Vif residue I107 is important for its anti-APOBEC3G activity and viral replication, which may have implications for viral fitness in vivo.

  13. Tat peptide-mediated soluble expression of the membrane protein LSECtin-CRD in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofu Dong

    Full Text Available The human liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin (hLSECtin, a type II integral membrane protein, containing a Ca(2+-dependent carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD, has a well-established biological activity, yet its three-dimensional structure is unknown due to low expression yields and aggregation into inclusion bodies. Previous study has demonstrated that the HIV-1 virus-encoded Tat peptide ('YGRKKRRQRRR' can increase the yields and the solubility of heterologous proteins. However, whether the Tat peptide could promote the high-yield and soluble expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli is not known. Therefore, the prokaryotic expression vector pET28b-Tat-hLSECtin-CRD (using pET28b and pET28b-hLSECtin-CRD as controls was constructed, and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3 cells and induced with isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG followed with identifying by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Subsequently, the bacterial subcellular structure, in which overexpressed the heterologous proteins Tat-hLSECtin-CRD and Tat-free hLSECtin-CRD, was analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM respectively, and the mannose-binding activity of Tat-hLSECtin-CRD was also determined. Expectedly, the solubility of Tat-LSECtin-CRD significantly increased compared to Tat-free LSECtin-CRD (**p < 0.01 with prolonged time, and the Tat-LSECtin-CRD had a significant mannose-binding activity. The subcellular structure analysis indicated that the bacterial cells overexpressed Tat-hLSECtin-CRD exhibited denser region compared with controls, while dot denser region aggregated in the two ends of bacterial cells overexpressed Tat-free hLSECtin-CRD. This study provided a novel method for improving the soluble expression of membrane proteins in prokaryotic systems by fusion with the Tat peptide, which may be potentially expanded to the expression of other membrane proteins.

  14. Serum neutralizing activities from a Beijing homosexual male cohort infected with different subtypes of HIV-1 in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingshun Zhang

    Full Text Available Protective antibodies play a critical role in an effective HIV vaccine; however, eliciting antibodies to block infection by viruses from diverse genetic subtypes remains a major challenge. As the world's most populous country, China has been under the threat of at least three major subtypes of circulating HIV-1 viruses. Understanding the cross reactivity and specificities of serum antibody responses that mediate broad neutralization of the virus in HIV-1 infected Chinese patients will provide valuable information for the design of vaccines to prevent HIV-1 transmission in China. Sera from a cohort of homosexual men, who have been managed by a major HIV clinical center in Beijing, China, were analyzed for cross-sectional neutralizing activities against pseudotyped viruses expressing Env antigens of the major subtype viruses (AE, BC and B subtypes circulating in China. Neutralizing activities in infected patients' blood were most capable of neutralizing viruses in the homologous subtype; however, a subset of blood samples was able to achieve broad neutralizing activities across different subtypes. Such cross neutralizing activity took 1-2 years to develop and CD4 binding site antibodies were critical components in these blood samples. Our study confirmed the presence of broadly neutralizing sera in China's HIV-1 patient population. Understanding the specificity and breadth of these neutralizing activities can guide efforts for the development of HIV vaccines against major HIV-1 viruses in China.

  15. Bryostatin activates HIV-1 latent expression in human astrocytes through a PKC and NF-ĸB-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Laura; Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Sánchez, Javier; Fernández-Pineda, Alejandra; Jiménez, José Luis; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Álvarez, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Ángeles

    2015-07-22

    Multiple studies have shown that HIV-1 patients may develop virus reservoirs that impede eradication; these reservoirs include the central nervous system (CNS). Despite an undetectable viral load in patients treated with potent antiretrovirals, current therapy is unable to purge the virus from these latent reservoirs. To broaden the inhibitory range and effectiveness of current antiretrovirals, the potential of bryostatin was investigated as a latent HIV-1 activator. We used primary astrocytes, NHA cells, and astrocytoma cells U-87. Infected cells with HIV-1(NL4.3) were treated with bryostatin alone or in combination with different inhibitors. HIV-1 production was quantified by using ELISA. Transcriptional activity was measured using luciferase reporter gene assays by using lipofectin. We performed cotransfection experiments of the LTR promoter with the active NF-κB member p65/relA. To confirm the NF-κB role, Western blot and confocal microscopy were performed. Bryostatin reactivates latent viral infection in the NHA and U87 cells via activation of protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha and -delta, because the PKC inhibitors rottlerin and GF109203X abrogated the bryostatin effect. No alteration in cell proliferation was found. Moreover, bryostatin strongly stimulated LTR transcription by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Bryostatin could be a beneficial adjunct to the treatment of HIV-1 brain infection.

  16. RNAP II processivity is a limiting step for HIV-1 transcription independent of orientation to and activity of endogenous neighboring promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek Michaels, Katarzyna; Wolschendorf, Frank; Schiralli Lester, Gillian M; Natarajan, Malini; Kutsch, Olaf; Henderson, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Since HIV-1 has a propensity to integrate into actively expressed genes, transcriptional interference from neighboring host promoters has been proposed to contribute to the establishment and maintenance HIV-1 latency. To gain insights into how endogenous promoters influence HIV-1 transcription we utilized a set of inducible T cell lines and characterized whether there were correlations between expression of endogenous genes, provirus and long terminal repeat architecture. We show that neighboring promoters are active but have minimal impact on HIV-1 transcription, in particular, expression of the endogenous gene did not prevent expression of HIV-1 following induction of latent provirus. We also demonstrate that releasing paused RNAP II by diminishing negative elongation factor (NELF) is sufficient to reactivate transcriptionally repressed HIV-1 provirus regardless of the integration site and orientation of the provirus suggesting that NELF-mediated RNAP II pausing is a common mechanism of maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  17. Anti-HIV-1 integrase and anti-allergic activities of Bauhinia strychnifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingkan Bunluepuech

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A stem ethanol extract of Bauhinia strychnifolia and its compounds were investigated for their anti-HIV-1 integrase (IN and anti-allergic activities. From bioassay-guided isolation, five compounds including quercetin (1, 3,5,7,3',5' pentahydroxyflavanonol-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (2, 3,5,7-trihydroxychromone-3-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (3 and a mixture of β-sitosterol (4 and stigmasterol (5 were isolated. Of the tested samples, compound 1 (quercetin showed the highest activity against HIV-1 IN with an IC50 value of 15.2 µM, followed by 3 (3,5,7-trihydroxychromone-3-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, 4+5 (mixture of β-sitosterol and stigmasterol and 2 (3,5,7,3',5'-pentahydroxyflavanonol-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside with % inhibition of 28.2, 26.2 and 6.7 at 100 µM, respectively. With regard to anti-allergic activity, quercetin (1 possessed the highest anti-allergic activity with an IC50 of 8.1 µM, followed by 3 (3,5,7-trihydroxychromone-3-α-L-rhamnopyranoside and 4+5 (mixture of β-sitosterol and stigmasterol with IC50 values of 52.1 and 77.5 µM, respectively. Whereas compound 2 (3,5,7,3',5'-pentahydroxyflavanonol-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside was inactive. The present study is the first report of chemical constituents and biological activities of Bauhinia strychnifolia.

  18. QSAR study for anti-HIV-1 activities of HEPT derivatives using MLR and PLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A QSAR study using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR and a Partial Least Squares (PLS methodology was performed for a series of 127 derivatives of 1-(2-hydroxy-ethoxymethyl]-6-(phenylthio-timine (HEPT, a potent inhibitor of the of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT. To explore the relationship between a pool of HEPT derivative descriptors (as independent variables and anti-HIV-1 activity expressed as log (1/EC50, as dependent variable MLR and PLS methods have been employed. Using Dragon descriptors, the present study aims to develop a predictive and robust QSAR model for predicting anti-HIV activity of the HEPT derivatives for better understanding the molecular features of these compounds important for their biological activity. According to the squared correlation coefficients, which had values between 0.826 and 0.809 for the MLR and PLS methods, the results demonstrate almost identical qualities and good predictive ability for both MLR and PLS models. After dividing the dataset into training and test sets, the model predictability was tested by several parameters, including the Golbraikh-Tropsha external criteria and the goodness of fit tested with the Y-randomization test. [Acknowledgements. This project was financially supported by Project 1.1 and 1.2 of the Institute of Chemistry of the Romanian Academy. STATISTICA, MobyDigs and SIMCA-P+ acquisition was funded by Ministerul Educatiei, Cercetarii si Tineretului - Autoritatea Nationala pentru Cercetare Stiintifica (MedC-ANCS, contract grant number: 71GR/2006

  19. Synthesis, Antimicrobial, and Anti-HIV1 Activity of Quinazoline-4(3H-one Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vijayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to synthesize 11 compounds of quinazoline-1 derivatives and to test their antimicrobial and anti-HIV1 activities. A quick-witted method was developed for the synthesis of novel substituted quinazolinone derivatives by summarizing diverse diamines with benzoxazine reactions, and it demonstrated the benefits of typical reactions, handy operation, and outstanding product yields. These compounds were confirmed by elemental analysis, I R, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and mass spectra. Then antimicrobial and anti-HIV1 activities of the compounds were tested in-vitro. It was found that compounds 7–11 possessed a wide range of anti microbial and anti-HIV1 activity.

  20. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Weekly or Biweekly Treatment with Subcutaneous PRO 140, a CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Lalezari, Jacob P.; Saag, Michael S.; Zingman, Barry S.; D’Ambrosio, Paul; Stambler, Nancy; Rotshteyn, Yakov; Marozsan, Andre J.; Maddon, Paul J.; Morris, Stephen A.; Olson, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Background PRO 140 is a humanized CCR5 monoclonal antibody that has demonstrated potent antiviral activity when administered intravenously to adults infected with CCR5-tropic (R5) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This study is the first to evaluate subcutaneous (SC) administration. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 subjects with HIV-1 RNA > 5,000 copies/mL, CD4+ cells > 300/μL, no antiretroviral therapy for ≥12 weeks, and only R5 HIV-1 detectable. Subjects received placebo, 162mg PRO 140, or 324mg PRO 140 weekly for three weeks or 324mg PRO 140 every other week for two doses by SC infusion. Subjects were monitored for 58 days for safety, antiviral effects and PRO 140 serum concentrations. Results SC PRO 140 demonstrated potent and prolonged antiretroviral activity. Mean log10 reductions in HIV-1 RNA were 0.23, 0.99 (p=0.0093), 1.37 (p=0.0001), and 1.65 (pPRO 140 offers the potential for significant dose-dependent HIV-1 RNA suppression and infrequent patient self-administration. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov register NCT00642707 PMID:20377413

  1. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampey, Gavin C; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M; Zadeh, Mohammad Asad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-15

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/μl were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-β, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5' and 3' stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART.

  2. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia K Bialek

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs, act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5' long terminal repeat (LTR, for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination.

  3. Activation of the HIV-1 enhancer by the LEF-1 HMG protein on nucleosome-assembled DNA in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, P L; Sheline, C T; Cannon, K; Voz, M L; Pazin, M J; Kadonaga, J T; Jones, K A

    1995-09-01

    Lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1) is a regulatory high mobility group (HMG) protein that activates the T cell receptor alpha (TCR alpha) enhancer in a context-restricted manner in T cells. In this paper we demonstrate that the distal region of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enhancer, which contains DNA-binding sites for LEF-1 and Ets-1, also provides a functional context for activation by LEF-1. First, we show that mutations in the LEF-1-binding site inhibit the activity of multimerized copies of the HIV-1 enhancer in Jurkat T cells, and that LEF-1/GAL4 can activate a GAL4-substituted HIV-1 enhancer 80- to 100-fold in vivo. Second, recombinant LEF-1 is shown to activate HIV-1 transcription on chromatin-assembled DNA in vitro. By using a nucleosome-assembly system derived from Drosophila embryos, we find that the packaging of DNA into chromatin in vitro strongly represses HIV-1 transcription and that repression can be counteracted efficiently by preincubation of the DNA with LEF-1 (or LEF-1 and Ets-1) supplemented with fractions containing the promoter-binding protein, Sp1. Addition of TFE-3, which binds to an E-box motif upstream of the LEF-1 and Ets-1 sites, further augments transcription in this system. Individually or collectively, none of the three enhancer-binding proteins (LEF-1, Ets-1, and TFE-3) could activate transcription in the absence of Sp1. A truncation mutant of LEF-1 (HMG-88), which contains the HMG box but lacks the trans-activation domain, did not activate transcription from nucleosomal DNA, indicating that bending of DNA by the HMG domain is not sufficient to activate transcription in vitro. We conclude that transcription activation by LEF-1 in vitro is a chromatin-dependent process that requires a functional trans-activation domain in addition to the HMG domain.

  4. Similar Neutralizing Activity in the HIV-1 Infected Long Term Non-progressors(LTNPs) and Typical Progressors(TPs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wang; Si-yang Liu; Lin Li; Tian-yi Li; Jing-yun Li; Li-li Chen; Yong-jian Liu; Han-ping Li; Zuo-yi Bao; Xiao-lin Wang; Dao-min Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are considered to be an important protective parameter used in HIV-l vaccine evaluation.However,the exact role that neutralizing antibodies plays in controlling the disease progression of HIV-1 infected peoples is still undetermined.In this paper,we compared the protective function of the neutralizing antibody response in the plasma from LTNP and TP against clade B and clade C pseudoviruses.No difference in the neutralizing activities between the plasma from LTNP and TP was found,which was consistent with the most recent reports.In addition,no correlations between the titer or breadth and CD4+ or viral load in HIV-1 infected individuals were found.The protective roles played by neutralizing antibodies in controlling disease progression of HIV-1 infected people need to be considered in a new viewpoint.

  5. Soluble urokinase receptor levels in plasma during 5 years of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Piironen, Timo;

    2004-01-01

    High blood levels of the soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) strongly predict increased mortality in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients. This study investigated the plasma concentration of suPAR in 29 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients during 5 years treatment with highly...... active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Plasma suPAR decreased after introducing HAART, most pronounced during the first treatment year. The change in plasma suPAR was independent of changes in viral replication and CD4+ cells but it was strongly correlated with plasma levels of the soluble TNF receptor...... is linked to inflammation in untreated as well as HAART-treated HIV-1-infected patients....

  6. The C-terminal sequence of IFITM1 regulates its anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Jia

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins inhibit a wide range of viruses. We previously reported the inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strain BH10 by human IFITM1, 2 and 3. It is unknown whether other HIV-1 strains are similarly inhibited by IFITMs and whether there exists viral countermeasure to overcome IFITM inhibition. We report here that the HIV-1 NL4-3 strain (HIV-1NL4-3 is not restricted by IFITM1 and its viral envelope glycoprotein is partly responsible for this insensitivity. However, HIV-1NL4-3 is profoundly inhibited by an IFITM1 mutant, known as Δ(117-125, which is deleted of 9 amino acids at the C-terminus. In contrast to the wild type IFITM1, which does not affect HIV-1 entry, the Δ(117-125 mutant diminishes HIV-1NL4-3 entry by 3-fold. This inhibition correlates with the predominant localization of Δ(117-125 to the plasma membrane where HIV-1 entry occurs. In spite of strong conservation of IFITM1 among most species, mouse IFITM1 is 19 amino acids shorter at its C-terminus as compared to human IFITM1 and, like the human IFITM1 mutant Δ(117-125, mouse IFITM1 also inhibits HIV-1 entry. This is the first report illustrating the role of viral envelope protein in overcoming IFITM1 restriction. The results also demonstrate the importance of the C-terminal region of IFITM1 in modulating the antiviral function through controlling protein subcellular localization.

  7. A novel ribonuclease with potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from cultured mushroom Schizophyllum commune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-Chang; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Wang, He-Xiang

    2011-10-01

    A 20-kDa ribonuclease (RNase) was purified from fresh fruiting bodies of cultured Schizophyllum commune mushrooms. The RNase was not adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel but adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose. It exhibited maximal RNase activity at pH 6.0 and 70°C. It demonstrated the highest ribonucleolytic activity toward poly (U) (379.5 μ/mg), the second highest activity toward poly (C) (244.7 μ/mg), less activity toward poly (A) (167.4 μ/mg), and much weaker activity toward poly (G) (114.5 μ/mg). The RNase inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 65 μM. No effect on [(3)H-methyl]-thymidine uptake by lymphoma MBL2 cells and leukemia L1210 cells was observed at 100 μM concentration of the RNase. A comparison of RNases from S. commune and Volvariella volvacea revealed that they demonstrated some similarities in N-terminal amino acid sequence, optimum pH and polyhomoribonucleotide specificity. However, some differences in chromatographic behavior and molecular mass were observed.

  8. Impaired plant growth and development caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueno, Marni E; Hibi, Yurina; Imai, Kenichi; Laurena, Antonio C; Okamoto, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    Previous attempts to express the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) Tat (trans-activator of transcription) protein in plants resulted in a number of physiological abnormalities, such as stunted growth and absence of seed formation, that could not be explained. In the study reported here, we expressed Tat in tomato and observed phenotypic abnormalities, including stunted growth, absence of root formation, chlorosis, and plant death, as a result of reduced cytokinin levels. These reduced levels were ascribed to a differentially expressed CKO35 in Tat-bombarded tomato. Of the two CKO isoforms that are naturally expressed in tomato, CKO43 and CKO37, only the expression of CKO37 was affected by Tat. Our analysis of the Tat confirmed that the Arg-rich and RGD motifs of Tat have functional relevance in tomato and that independent mutations at these motifs caused inhibition of the differentially expressed CKO isoform and the extracellular secretion of the Tat protein, respectively, in our Tat-bombarded tomato samples.

  9. HIV-1 structural proteins serve as PAMPs for TLR2 heterodimers significantly increasing infection and innate immune activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lee Rosenthal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Immune activation is critical to HIV infection and pathogenesis; however, our understanding of HIV innate immune activation remains incomplete. Recently we demonstrated that soluble TLR2 (sTLR2 physically inhibited HIV-induced, NFκB activation and inflammation, as well as HIV-1 infection. In light of these findings, we hypothesized that HIV-1 structural proteins may serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs for cellular TLR2 heterodimers. These studies made use of primary human T cells and TZMbl cells stably transformed to express TLR2 (TZMbl-2. Our results demonstrated that cells expressing TLR2 showed significantly increased proviral DNA compared to cells lacking TLR2, and mechanistically this may be due to a TLR2-mediated increased CCR5 expression. Importantly, we show that HIV-1 structural proteins, p17, p24, and gp41 act as viral PAMPs signalling through TLR2 and its heterodimers leading to significantly increased immune activation via the NFκB signaling pathway. Using co-immunoprecipitation and a dot blot method, we demonstrated direct protein interactions between these viral PAMPs and TLR2, while only p17 and gp41 bound to TLR1. Specifically, TLR2/1 heterodimer recognized p17 and gp41, while p24 lead to immune activation through TLR2/6. These results were confirmed using TLR2/1 siRNA knock down assays which ablated p17 and gp41-induced cellular activation and through studies of HEK293 cells expressing selected TLRs. Interestingly, our results show in the absence of TLR6, p24 bound to TLR2 and blocked p17 and gp41-induced activation, thus providing a novel mechanism by which HIV-1 can manipulate innate sensing. Taken together, our results identified, for the first time, novel HIV-1 PAMPs that play a role in TLR2-mediated cellular activation and increased proviral DNA. These findings have important implications for our fundamental understanding of HIV-1 immune activation and pathogenesis, as well as HIV-1 vaccine development.

  10. Identification of peptides from human pathogens able to cross-activate an HIV-1-gag-specific CD4+ T cell clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Sara; Allicotti, Gina; Zhao, Yindong; Simon, Richard; Burton, Dennis R; Pinilla, Clemencia; Poignard, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Antigen recognition by T cells is degenerate both at the MHC and the TCR level. In this study, we analyzed the cross-reactivity of a human HIV-1 gag p24-specific CD4(+) T cell clone obtained from an HIV-1-seronegative donor using a positional scanning synthetic combinatorial peptide library (PS-SCL)-based biometrical analysis. A number of decapeptides able to activate the HIV-1 gag-specific clone were identified and shown to correspond to sequences found in other human pathogens. Two of these peptides activated the T cell clone with the same stimulatory potency as the original HIV-1 gag p24 peptide. These findings show that an HIV-1-specific human T helper clone can react efficiently with peptides from other pathogens and suggest that cellular immune responses identified as being specific for one human pathogen (HIV-1) could arise from exposure to other pathogens.

  11. HIV-1 Nef enhances dendritic cell-mediated viral transmission to CD4+ T cells and promotes T-cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corine St Gelais

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Nef enhances dendritic cell (DC-mediated viral transmission to CD4(+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. It is also unknown whether HIV-1 infected DCs play a role in activating CD4(+ T cells and enhancing DC-mediated viral transmission. Here we investigated the role of HIV-1 Nef in DC-mediated viral transmission and HIV-1 infection of primary CD4(+ T cells using wild-type HIV-1 and Nef-mutated viruses. We show that HIV-1 Nef facilitated DC-mediated viral transmission to activated CD4(+ T cells. HIV-1 expressing wild-type Nef enhanced the activation and proliferation of primary resting CD4(+ T cells. However, when co-cultured with HIV-1-infected autologous DCs, there was no significant trend for infection- or Nef-dependent proliferation of resting CD4(+ T cells. Our results suggest an important role of Nef in DC-mediated transmission of HIV-1 to activated CD4(+ T cells and in the activation and proliferation of resting CD4(+ T cells, which likely contribute to viral pathogenesis.

  12. Effect of HIV-1-related protein expression on cardiac and skeletal muscles from transgenic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidot David M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and the consequent acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS has protean manifestations, including muscle wasting and cardiomyopathy, which contribute to its high morbidity. The pathogenesis of these myopathies remains partially understood, and may include nutritional deficiencies, biochemical abnormalities, inflammation, and other mechanisms due to viral infection and replication. Growing evidence has suggested that HIV-1-related proteins expressed by the host in response to viral infection, including Tat and gp120, may also be involved in the pathophysiology of AIDS, particularly in cells or tissues that are not directly infected with HIV-1. To explore the potentially independent effects of HIV-1-related proteins on heart and skeletal muscles, we used a transgenic rat model that expresses several HIV-1-related proteins (e.g., Tat, gp120, and Nef. Outcome measures included basic heart and skeletal muscle morphology, glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress, and gene expressions of atrogin-1, muscle ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1 and Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGFβ1, three factors associated with muscle catabolism. Results Consistent with HIV-1 associated myopathies in humans, HIV-1 transgenic rats had increased relative heart masses, decreased relative masses of soleus, plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles, and decreased total and myosin heavy chain type-specific plantaris muscle fiber areas. In both tissues, the levels of cystine (Cyss, the oxidized form of the anti-oxidant cysteine (Cys, and Cyss:Cys ratios were significantly elevated, and cardiac tissue from HIV-1 transgenic rats had altered glutathione metabolism, all reflective of significant oxidative stress. In HIV-1 transgenic rat hearts, MuRF-1 gene expression was increased. Further, HIV-1-related protein expression also increased atrogin-1 (~14- and ~3-fold and TGFβ1 (~5-fold and ~3-fold in heart and

  13. HIV-1 gp120 activates the STAT3/interleukin-6 axis in primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cornò, Manuela; Donninelli, Gloria; Varano, Barbara; Da Sacco, Letizia; Masotti, Andrea; Gessani, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are fundamental for the initiation of immune responses and are important players in AIDS immunopathogenesis. The modulation of DC functional activities represents a strategic mechanism for HIV-1 to evade immune surveillance. Impairment of DC function may result from bystander effects of HIV-1 envelope proteins independently of direct HIV-1 infection. In this study, we report that exposure of immature monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to HIV-1 R5 gp120 resulted in the CCR5-dependent production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/NF-κB pathways. IL-6 in turn activated STAT3 by an autocrine loop. Concomitantly, gp120 promoted an early activation of STAT3 that further contributed to IL-6 induction. This activation paralleled a concomitant upregulation of the STAT3 inhibitor PIAS3. Notably, STAT3/IL-6 pathway activation was not affected by the CCR5-specific ligand CCL4. These results identify STAT3 as a key signaling intermediate activated by gp120 in MDDCs and highlight the existence of a virus-induced dysregulation of the IL-6/STAT3 axis. HIV-1 gp120 signaling through STAT3 may provide an explanation for the impairment of DC function observed upon HIV exposure. This study provides new evidence for the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggered by HIV-1 gp120 in human DCs in the absence of productive infection, emphasizing a role of aberrant signaling in early virus-host interaction, contributing to viral pathogenesis. We identified STAT3 as a key component in the gp120-mediated signaling cascade involving MAPK and NF-κB components and ultimately leading to IL-6 secretion. STAT3 now is recognized as a key regulator of DC functions. Thus, the identification of this transcription factor as a signaling molecule mediating some of gp120's biological effects unveils a new mechanism by which HIV-1 may deregulate DC functions and contribute to AIDS pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology

  14. Epitope Mapping of Ibalizumab, a Humanized Anti-CD4 Monoclonal Antibody with Anti-HIV-1 Activity in Infected Patients▿

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ruijiang; Franco, David; Kao, Chia-Ying; Yu, Faye; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). With its unique specificity for domain 2 of CD4, this antibody potently and broadly blocks HIV-1 infection in vitro by inhibiting a postbinding step required for viral entry but without interfering with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-mediated immune function. In clinical trials, ibalizumab has demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity in patients...

  15. Randomized phase I: safety, immunogenicity and mucosal antiviral activity in young healthy women vaccinated with HIV-1 Gp41 P1 peptide on virosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Geert Leroux-Roels; Cathy Maes; Frédéric Clement; Frank van Engelenburg; Marieke van den Dobbelsteen; Michael Adler; Mario Amacker; Lucia Lopalco; Morgane Bomsel; Anick Chalifour; Sylvain Fleury

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Mucosal antibodies harboring various antiviral activities may best protect mucosal surfaces against early HIV-1 entry at mucosal sites and they should be ideally induced by prophylactic HIV-1 vaccines for optimal prevention of sexually transmitted HIV-1. A phase I, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in twenty-four healthy HIV-uninfected young women. The study objectives were to assess the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of virosomes harboring ...

  16. Acute plasma biomarkers of T cell activation set-point levels and of disease progression in HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Liovat

    Full Text Available T cell activation levels, viral load and CD4(+ T cell counts at early stages of HIV-1 infection are predictive of the rate of progression towards AIDS. We evaluated whether the inflammatory profile during primary HIV-1 infection is predictive of the virological and immunological set-points and of disease progression. We quantified 28 plasma proteins during acute and post-acute HIV-1 infection in individuals with known disease progression profiles. Forty-six untreated patients, enrolled during primary HIV-1 infection, were categorized into rapid progressors, progressors and slow progressors according to their spontaneous progression profile over 42 months of follow-up. Already during primary infection, rapid progressors showed a higher number of increased plasma proteins than progressors or slow progressors. The plasma levels of TGF-β1 and IL-18 in primary HIV-1 infection were both positively associated with T cell activation level at set-point (6 months after acute infection and together able to predict 74% of the T cell activation variation at set-point. Plasma IP-10 was positively and negatively associated with, respectively, T cell activation and CD4(+ T cell counts at set-point and capable to predict 30% of the CD4(+ T cell count variation at set-point. Moreover, plasma IP-10 levels during primary infection were predictive of rapid progression. In primary infection, IP-10 was an even better predictor of rapid disease progression than viremia or CD4(+ T cell levels at this time point. The superior predictive capacity of IP-10 was confirmed in an independent group of 88 HIV-1 infected individuals. Altogether, this study shows that the inflammatory profile in primary HIV-1 infection is associated with T cell activation levels and CD4(+ T cell counts at set-point. Plasma IP-10 levels were of strong predictive value for rapid disease progression. The data suggest IP-10 being an earlier marker of disease progression than CD4(+ T cell counts or

  17. Lignosulfonic acid exhibits broadly anti-HIV-1 activity--potential as a microbicide candidate for the prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Qiu

    Full Text Available Some secondary metabolites from plants show to have potent inhibitory activities against microbial pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus (HSV, Treponema pallidum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, etc. Here we report that lignosulfonic acid (LSA, a polymeric lignin derivative, exhibits potent and broad activity against HIV-1 isolates of diverse subtypes including two North America strains and a number of Chinese clinical isolates values ranging from 21.4 to 633 nM. Distinct from other polyanions, LSA functions as an entry inhibitor with multiple targets on viral gp120 as well as on host receptor CD4 and co-receptors CCR5/CXCR4. LSA blocks viral entry as determined by time-of-drug addiction and cell-cell fusion assays. Moreover, LSA inhibits CD4-gp120 interaction by blocking the binding of antibodies specific for CD4-binding sites (CD4bs and for the V3 loop of gp120. Similarly, LSA interacts with CCR5 and CXCR4 via its inhibition of specific anti-CCR5 and anti-CXCR4 antibodies, respectively. Interestingly, the combination of LSA with AZT and Nevirapine exhibits synergism in viral inhibition. For the purpose of microbicide development, LSA displays low in vitro cytotoxicity to human genital tract epithelial cells, does not stimulate NF-κB activation and has no significant up-regulation of IL-1α/β and IL-8 as compared with N-9. Lastly, LSA shows no adverse effect on the epithelial integrity and the junctional protein expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that LSA can be a potential candidate for tropical microbicide.

  18. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moncla, Bernard; Russo, Julie; Cost, Marilyn; Wang, Lin; Uranker, Kevin; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P; Pryke, Kara; Pickett, Jim; Leblanc, Marc-André; Rohan, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9), KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm.

  19. Is wetter better? An evaluation of over-the-counter personal lubricants for safety and anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene S Dezzutti

    Full Text Available Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC aqueous- (n = 10, lipid- (n = 2, and silicone-based (n = 2 products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmolar. Evaluation of the panel of products showed Gynol II (a spermicidal gel containing 2% nonoxynol-9, KY Jelly, and Replens were toxic to Lactobacillus. Two nearly iso-osmolar aqueous- and both silicone-based gels were not toxic toward epithelial cell lines or ectocervical or colorectal explant tissues. Hyperosmolar lubricants demonstrated reduction of tissue viability and epithelial fracture/sloughing while the nearly iso-osmolar and silicon-based lubricants showed no significant changes in tissue viability or epithelial modifications. While most of the lubricants had no measurable anti-HIV-1 activity, three lubricants which retained cell viability did demonstrate modest anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. To determine if this would result in protection of mucosal tissue or conversely determine if the epithelial damage associated with the hyperosmolar lubricants increased HIV-1 infection ex vivo, ectocervical tissue was exposed to selected lubricants and then challenged with HIV-1. None of the lubricants that had a moderate to high therapeutic index protected the mucosal tissue. These results show hyperosmolar lubricant gels were associated with cellular toxicity and epithelial damage while showing no anti-viral activity. The two iso-osmolar lubricants, Good Clean Love and PRÉ, and both silicone-based lubricants, Female Condom 2 lubricant and Wet Platinum, were the safest in our testing algorithm.

  20. Identification of a Small Molecular Anti - HIV - 1 Compound that Interferes with Formation of the Fusion - active gp41 Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV - 1 ) envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays a critical role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes. The gp41 extracellular domain, which contains fusion peptide (FP), N - and C - terminal hydrophobic heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions,designated N- and C- peptides, respectively, can interact with each other to form a six - stranded coiled - coil domain, representing the fusion-active gp41 core. Our previous studies demonstrated that the C- peptides have potent inhibitory activity against HIV- 1 infection.These peptides inhibit HIV- 1 -mediated membrane fusion by binding to NHR regions for preventing the formation of fusion- active gp41 core. One of the C - peptides, T - 20, which is in the phase Ⅲ clinical trails, is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion.Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non -peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having similar mechanism of action as the C- peptides. We have established an ELISA- based screening assay using a unique monoclonal antibody, NC- 1, which can specifically bind to a conformational epitope on the gp41 core domain. Using this screening assay, we have identified a small molecular anti- HIV- 1 compound,named ADS-Jl, which inhibits HIV- 1- mediated membrane fusion by blocking the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form the fusion - active gp41 core. This compound will be used as a lead to design and develop novel HIV fusion inhibitors as new drugs for the treatment of HIV infection and/or AIDS.

  1. Penetration enhancement in mouse skin and lipolysis in adipocytes by TAT-GKH, a new cosmetic ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun Man; Chang, Min Youl; Park, Sun Gyoo; Kang, Nae Gyu; Song, Young Sook; Lee, Young Hwa; Yoo, Young Chang; Cho, Wan Goo; Choi, Soo Young; Kang, She Hoon

    2003-01-01

    Since the basic domain of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein was reported to possess the ability to traverse biological membranes efficiently, various therapeutic proteins have been attached to TAT for the purpose of therapy. In this study, the tripeptide GKH (glycine-lysine-histidine) derived from parathyroid hormone (PTH), known as lipolytic peptide, was attached to 9-poly lysine (TAT) to be used as a cosmetic ingredient in slimming products. TAT-GKH at 10(-5) M induced approximately 37.6% and 41.5% maximal lipolytic effects in cultured 3T3-L1 differentiated adipocytes and in epididymal adipocytes isolated from rats, respectively, compared with basal lipolysis. The lipolytic effect of GKH was not changed by TAT-GKH fusion. In cytotoxicity tests, there was no cytotoxicity in any dose concentration of TAT-GKH. We confirmed that TAT-GKH induced lipolytic activity by GKH without cytotoxicity and with the possibility of its use as a safe cosmetic ingredient. TAT-GKH elevated penetration into excised hairless mice skin 36 times more efficiently than GKH. TAT-GKH can be used as a cosmetic ingredient in slimming products, with both penetration enhancement and lipolytic effect without cytotoxicity.

  2. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W McNatt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh, African green monkeys (agm and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  3. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNatt, Matthew W; Zang, Trinity; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bartlett, Mackenzie; Fofana, Ismael Ben; Johnson, Welkin E; Neil, Stuart J D; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2009-02-01

    Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh), African green monkeys (agm) and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin: an informative biomarker of central nervous system immune activation in HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestetti Arabella

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV-1 invades the central nervous system (CNS in the context of acute infection, persists thereafter in the absence of treatment, and leads to chronic intrathecal immunoactivation that can be measured by the macrophage activation marker, neopterin, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. In this review we describe our experience with CSF neopterin measurements in 382 untreated HIV-infected patients across the spectrum of immunosuppression and HIV-related neurological diseases, in 73 untreated AIDS patients with opportunistic CNS infections, and in 233 treated patients. In untreated patients, CSF neopterin concentrations are almost always elevated and increase progressively as immunosuppression worsens and blood CD4 cell counts fall. However, patients with HIV dementia exhibit particularly high CSF neopterin concentrations, above those of patients without neurological disease, though patients with CNS opportunistic infections, including CMV encephalitis and cryptococcal meningitis, also exhibit high levels of CSF neopterin. Combination antiretroviral therapy, with its potent effect on CNS HIV infection and CSF HIV RNA, mitigates both intrathecal immunoactivation and lowers CSF neopterin. However, despite suppression of plasma and CSF HIV RNA to below the detection limits of clinical assays ( Although nonspecific, CSF neopterin can serve as a useful biomarker in the diagnosis of HIV dementia in the setting of confounding conditions, in monitoring the CNS inflammatory effects of antiretroviral treatment, and give valuable information to the cause of ongoing brain injury.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of orally active small molecule HIV-1 Nef antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Loughran, H Marie; Shi, Haibin; Kulp, John L; Shu, Sherry T; Zhao, Jielu; Day, Billy W; Wrobel, Jay E; Reitz, Allen B; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    The HIV-1 Nef accessory factor enhances viral replication and promotes immune system evasion of HIV-infected cells, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. Recently we described a novel class of diphenylpyrazolodiazene compounds that bind directly to Nef in vitro and inhibit Nef-dependent HIV-1 infectivity and replication in cell culture. However, these first-generation Nef antagonists have several structural liabilities, including an azo linkage that led to poor oral bioavailability. The azo group was therefore replaced with either a one- or two-carbon linker. The resulting set of non-azo analogs retained nanomolar binding affinity for Nef by surface plasmon resonance, while inhibiting HIV-1 replication with micromolar potency in cell-based assays without cytotoxicity. Computational docking studies show that these non-azo analogs occupy the same predicted binding site within the HIV-1 Nef dimer interface as the original azo compound. Computational methods also identified a hot spot for inhibitor binding within this site that is defined by conserved HIV-1 Nef residues Asp108, Leu112, and Pro122. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the non-azo B9 analogs in mice showed that replacement of the azo linkage dramatically enhanced oral bioavailability without substantially affecting plasma half-life or clearance. The improved oral bioavailability of non-azo diphenylpyrazolo Nef antagonists provides a starting point for further drug lead optimization in support of future efficacy testing in animal models of HIV/AIDS.

  6. Could low level laser therapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy lead to complete eradication of HIV-1 in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugongolo, Masixole Yvonne; Manoto, Sello Lebohang; Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2017-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection remains a major health problem despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which has greatly reduced mortality rates. Due to the unavailability of an effective vaccine or a treatment that would completely eradicate the virus, the quest for new and combination therapies continues. In this study we explored the influence of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells. Literature reports LLLT as widely used to treat different medical conditions such as diabetic wounds, sports injuries and others. The technique involves exposure of cells or tissue to low levels of red and near infrared laser light. Both HIV infected and uninfected cells were laser irradiated at a wavelength of 640 nm with fluencies ranging from 2 to 10 J/cm2 and cellular responses were assessed 24 hours post laser treatment. In our studies, laser therapy had no inhibitory effects in HIV-1 uninfected cells as was indicated by the cell morphology and proliferation results. However, laser irradiation enhanced cell apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells as the laser fluencies increased. This led to further studies in which laser irradiation would be conducted in the presence of HAART to determine whether HAART would minimise the detrimental effects of laser irradiation in infected cells.

  7. Strategic addition of an N-linked glycan to a monoclonal antibody improves its HIV-1-neutralizing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruijiang; Oren, Deena A; Franco, David; Seaman, Michael S; Ho, David D

    2013-11-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4--a key receptor for HIV--and blocks HIV-1 infection. However, HIV-1 strains with mutations resulting in loss of an N-linked glycan from the V5 loop of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 are resistant to ibalizumab. Previous structural analysis suggests that this glycan fills a void between the gp120 V5 loop and the ibalizumab light chain, perhaps causing steric hindrance that disrupts viral entry. If this void contributes to HIV-1 resistance to ibalizumab, we reasoned that 'refilling' it by engineering an N-linked glycan into the ibalizumab light chain at a position spatially proximal to gp120 V5 may restore susceptibility to ibalizumab. Indeed, one such ibalizumab variant neutralized 100% of 118 diverse HIV-1 strains tested in vitro, including 10 strains resistant to parental ibalizumab. These findings demonstrate that the strategic placement of a glycan in the variable region of a monoclonal antibody can substantially enhance its activity.

  8. Trans-activated interferon-alpha2 delivered to T cells by SV40 inhibits early stages in the HIV-1 replicative cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordelier, Pierre; Calarota, Sandra A; Strayer, David S

    2002-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a potential major role for interferon (IFN) in controlling HIV-1 replication. However, this inhibition is moderate and is reversible upon IFN removal. To achieve prolonged high concentrations of IFN at the site of infection, we devised an SV40-based vector, SV[HIVLTR]IFN, to direct the synthesis of human IFN-alpha2, by employing a virus-trans-activated human IFN-alpha2 gene to be transcribed in response to HIV-1 infection. Expression of IFN-alpha2 was confirmed by Northern and Western blotting, in SV[HIVLTR]IFN-transduced, HIV-1-challenged human lymphocyte lines and primary human lymphocytes. SV[HIVLTR]IFN-transduced cells showed no evidence of HIV-1-related cytophatic effects when challenged with high doses of HIV-1(NL4-3). As measured by supernatant HIV-1 p24 antigen concentration, IFN-alpha2-expressing cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were protected from high-dose challenges of HIV-1. rSV40-delivered IFN-alpha2 inhibited gp120 protein synthesis and expression of HIV-1 mRNAs. Finally, Southern analysis revealed that levels of proviral DNA were markedly reduced in SV[HIVLTR]IFN-transduced cells compared to control cultures. IFN-alpha2 expression driven by HIVLTR delivered by an rSV40 vector thus strongly inhibits HIV-1 replication, probably by blocking a preintegration step in HIV-1 infection. Targeted expression of IFN-alpha2 delivered by SV40 can thus repress HIV-1 replication, and may be a useful approach to HIV-1 treatment.

  9. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); El-Hage, Nazira [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah [George Mason University, Manassas, VA (United States); Ochem, Alex [ICGEB, Wernher and Beit Building, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa); Simon, Gary L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Karn, Jonathan [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hauser, Kurt F. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Tyagi, Mudit, E-mail: tmudit@email.gwu.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR.

  10. Treatment intensification does not reduce residual HIV-1 viremia in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinoso, J B; Kim, S Y; Wiegand, A M; Palmer, S E; Gange, S J; Cranmer, L; O'Shea, A; Callender, M; Spivak, A; Brennan, T; Kearney, M F; Proschan, M A; Mican, J M; Rehm, C A; Coffin, J M; Mellors, J W; Siliciano, R F; Maldarelli, F

    2009-06-09

    In HIV-1-infected individuals on currently recommended antiretroviral therapy (ART), viremia is reduced to controversy over whether the residual viremia results from ongoing cycles of viral replication. To address this question, we conducted 2 prospective studies to assess the effect of ART intensification with an additional potent drug on residual viremia in 9 HIV-1-infected individuals on successful ART. By using an HIV-1 RNA assay with single-copy sensitivity, we found that levels of viremia were not reduced by ART intensification with any of 3 different antiretroviral drugs (efavirenz, lopinavir/ritonavir, or atazanavir/ritonavir). The lack of response was not associated with the presence of drug-resistant virus or suboptimal drug concentrations. Our results suggest that residual viremia is not the product of ongoing, complete cycles of viral replication, but rather of virus output from stable reservoirs of infection.

  11. Programming of neurotoxic cofactor CXCL-10 in HIV-1-associated dementia: abrogation of CXCL-10-induced neuro-glial toxicity in vitro by PKC activator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 50% of patients undergoing lifelong suppressive antiviral treatment for HIV-1 infection develop minor HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Neurological complications during HIV-1 infection are the result of direct neuronal damage by proinflammatory products released from HIV-1-infected or -uninfected activated lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, microglia and astrocytes. The specific pro-inflammatory products and their roles in neurotoxicity are far from clear. We investigated proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV-demented (HIV-D) and HIV-nondemented (HIV-ND) patients and studied their affect on neuroglial toxicity. Methods and results Bioplex array showed elevated levels of signatory chemokines or cytokines (IL-6, IFN-γ, CXCL10, MCP-1 and PDGF) in the CSF of HIV-D patients (n = 7) but not in that of HIV-ND patients (n = 7). Among the signatory cytokines and chemokines, CXCL10 was distinctly upregulated in-vitro in HIV-1 (NLENG1)-activated human fetal astrocytes, HIV-1 (Ba-L)-infected macrophages, and HIV-1 (NLENG1)-infected lymphocytes. Virus-infected macrophages also had increased levels of TNF-α. Consistently, human fetal astrocytes treated with HIV-1 and TNF-α induced the signatory molecules. CXCL10 in combination with HIV-1 synergistically enhanced neuronal toxicity and showed chemotactic activity (~ 40 fold) for activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), suggesting the intersection of signaling events imparted by HIV-1 and CXCL10 after binding to their respective surface receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR3, on neurons. Blocking CXCR3 and its downstream MAP kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway suppressed combined CXCL10 and HIV-1-induced neurotoxicity. Bryostatin, a PKC modulator and suppressor of CXCR4, conferred neuroprotection against combined insult with HIV-1 and CXCL10. Bryostatin also suppressed HIV-1 and CXCL10-induced PBMC chemotaxis. Although, therapeutic targeting of chemokines in

  12. Programming of neurotoxic cofactor CXCL-10 in HIV-1-associated dementia: abrogation of CXCL-10-induced neuro-glial toxicity in vitro by PKC activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehla Rajeev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 50% of patients undergoing lifelong suppressive antiviral treatment for HIV-1 infection develop minor HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Neurological complications during HIV-1 infection are the result of direct neuronal damage by proinflammatory products released from HIV-1-infected or -uninfected activated lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, microglia and astrocytes. The specific pro-inflammatory products and their roles in neurotoxicity are far from clear. We investigated proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of HIV-demented (HIV-D and HIV-nondemented (HIV-ND patients and studied their affect on neuroglial toxicity. Methods and results Bioplex array showed elevated levels of signatory chemokines or cytokines (IL-6, IFN-γ, CXCL10, MCP-1 and PDGF in the CSF of HIV-D patients (n = 7 but not in that of HIV-ND patients (n = 7. Among the signatory cytokines and chemokines, CXCL10 was distinctly upregulated in-vitro in HIV-1 (NLENG1-activated human fetal astrocytes, HIV-1 (Ba-L-infected macrophages, and HIV-1 (NLENG1-infected lymphocytes. Virus-infected macrophages also had increased levels of TNF-α. Consistently, human fetal astrocytes treated with HIV-1 and TNF-α induced the signatory molecules. CXCL10 in combination with HIV-1 synergistically enhanced neuronal toxicity and showed chemotactic activity (~ 40 fold for activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, suggesting the intersection of signaling events imparted by HIV-1 and CXCL10 after binding to their respective surface receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR3, on neurons. Blocking CXCR3 and its downstream MAP kinase (MAPK signaling pathway suppressed combined CXCL10 and HIV-1-induced neurotoxicity. Bryostatin, a PKC modulator and suppressor of CXCR4, conferred neuroprotection against combined insult with HIV-1 and CXCL10. Bryostatin also suppressed HIV-1 and CXCL10-induced PBMC chemotaxis. Although, therapeutic targeting

  13. Prediction of activity for nonnucleoside inhibitors with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase based on Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Robert C; Udier-Blagović, Marina; Wang, De-Ping; Watkins, Edward K; Kroeger Smith, Marilyn B; Smith, Richard H; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2002-07-04

    Results of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for more than 200 nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs) representing eight diverse chemotypes have been correlated with their anti-HIV activities in an effort to establish simulation protocols and methods that can be used in the development of more effective drugs. Each inhibitor was modeled in a complex with the protein and by itself in water, and potentially useful descriptors of binding affinity were collected during the MC simulations. A viable regression equation was obtained for each data set using an extended linear response approach, which yielded r(2) values between 0.54 and 0.85 and an average unsigned error of only 0.50 kcal/mol. The most common descriptors confirm that a good geometrical match between the inhibitor and the protein is important and that the net loss of hydrogen bonds with the inhibitor upon binding is unfavorable. Other physically reasonable descriptors of binding are needed on a chemotype case-by-case basis. By including descriptors in common from the individual fits, combination regressions that include multiple data sets were also developed. This procedure led to a refined "master" regression for 210 NNRTIs with an r(2) of 0.60 and a cross-validated q(2) of 0.55. The computed activities show an rms error of 0.86 kcal/mol in comparison with experiment and an average unsigned error of 0.69 kcal/mol. Encouraging results were obtained for the predictions of 27 NNRTIs, representing a new chemotype not included in the development of the regression model. Predictions for this test set using the master regression yielded a q(2) value of 0.51 and an average unsigned error of 0.67 kcal/mol. Finally, additional regression analysis reveals that use of ligand-only descriptors leads to models with much diminished predictive ability.

  14. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M.; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection. PMID:26157174

  15. The HIV-1 Vpu protein induces apoptosis in Drosophila via activation of JNK signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Marchal

    Full Text Available The genome of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes the canonical retroviral proteins, as well as additional accessory proteins that enhance the expression of viral genes, the infectivity of the virus and the production of virions. The accessory Viral Protein U (Vpu, in particular, enhances viral particle production, while also promoting apoptosis of HIV-infected human T lymphocytes. Some Vpu effects rely on its interaction with the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system, but the mechanisms responsible for its pro-apoptotic effects in vivo are complex and remain largely to be elucidated.We took advantage of the Drosophila model to study the effects of Vpu activity in vivo. Expression of Vpu in the developing Drosophila wing provoked tissue loss due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, Vpu induced expression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper, known to down-regulate Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs which are caspase-antagonizing E3 ubiquitin ligases. Indeed, Vpu also reduced accumulation of Drosophila IAP1 (DIAP1. Though our results demonstrate a physical interaction between Vpu and the proteasome-addressing SLIMB/β-TrCP protein, as in mammals, both SLIMB/βTrCP-dependent and -independent Vpu effects were observed in the Drosophila wing. Lastly, the pro-apoptotic effect of Vpu in this tissue was abrogated upon inactivation of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK pathway. Our results in the fly thus provide the first functional evidence linking Vpu pro-apoptotic effects to activation of the conserved JNK pathway.

  16. The HIV-1 Vpu protein induces apoptosis in Drosophila via activation of JNK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Christelle; Vinatier, Gérald; Sanial, Matthieu; Plessis, Anne; Pret, Anne-Marie; Limbourg-Bouchon, Bernadette; Théodore, Laurent; Netter, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    The genome of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes the canonical retroviral proteins, as well as additional accessory proteins that enhance the expression of viral genes, the infectivity of the virus and the production of virions. The accessory Viral Protein U (Vpu), in particular, enhances viral particle production, while also promoting apoptosis of HIV-infected human T lymphocytes. Some Vpu effects rely on its interaction with the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system, but the mechanisms responsible for its pro-apoptotic effects in vivo are complex and remain largely to be elucidated.We took advantage of the Drosophila model to study the effects of Vpu activity in vivo. Expression of Vpu in the developing Drosophila wing provoked tissue loss due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, Vpu induced expression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper, known to down-regulate Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) which are caspase-antagonizing E3 ubiquitin ligases. Indeed, Vpu also reduced accumulation of Drosophila IAP1 (DIAP1). Though our results demonstrate a physical interaction between Vpu and the proteasome-addressing SLIMB/β-TrCP protein, as in mammals, both SLIMB/βTrCP-dependent and -independent Vpu effects were observed in the Drosophila wing. Lastly, the pro-apoptotic effect of Vpu in this tissue was abrogated upon inactivation of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway. Our results in the fly thus provide the first functional evidence linking Vpu pro-apoptotic effects to activation of the conserved JNK pathway.

  17. Anti-HIV-1 activity of myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid (IP6) and myo-inositol hexasulfate(IS6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, T; Mori, H; Morimoto, M; Miyano, K; Ueba, N; Oishi, I; Kunita, N; Kurimura, T

    1999-01-01

    It is known that polysulfates have some anti-HIV-1 activity. We investigated the anti-HIV-1 activity of myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid (IP6) and myo-inositol hexasulfate(IS6), low molecular weight carbohydrates. IP6 and IS6 inhibited the replication of HIV-1 in a T cell line as well as that of a freshly isolated strain in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Neither substance inhibited HIV-1-induced giant cell formation, but addition of IS6 when infecting cells with HIV-1 inhibited the replication of HIV-1. Neither substance inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity in vitro and no influence on late stage replication was noted. Although the mechanisms of IP6 and IS6 action remain unclear, it can be speculated that they act on HIV-1 early replicative stage. Although it is not possible to develop IP6 and IS6 themselves as anti-AIDS drugs, studies of these anti-HIV agents might be expected to provide seed for eventual production of superior drugs for AIDS treatment.

  18. HIV-1 Encephalopathy among Perinatally Infected Children: Neuropathogenesis and Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 encephalopathy among perinatally infected children in the United States was initially defined by a classic triad of findings that included: (1) developmental delay, (2) secondary or acquired microcephaly, and (3) pyramidal tract neuromotor deficits. The most severe form of this disorder typically occurred among young children who developed…

  19. Is the central nervous system a reservoir of HIV-1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Roche, Michael; Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review To summarize the evidence in the literature that supports the CNS as a viral reservoir for HIV-1 and to prioritise future research efforts. Recent findings HIV-1 DNA has been detected in brain tissue of patients with undetectable viral load or neurocognitive disorders, and is associated with long-lived cells such as astrocytes and microglia. In neurocognitively normal patients, HIV-1 can be found at high frequency in these cells (4% of astrocytes and 20% of macrophages). CNS cells have unique molecular mechanisms to suppress viral replication and induce latency, which include increased expression of dominant negative transcription factors and suppressive epigenetic factors. There is also evidence of continued inflammation in patients lacking a CNS viral load, suggesting the production and activity of viral neurotoxins (for example Tat). Summary Together, these findings provide evidence that the CNS can potentially act as a viral reservoir of HIV-1. However, the majority of these studies were performed in historical cohorts (absence of cART or presence of viral load) which do not reflect modern day patients (cART-treated and undetectable viral load). Future studies will need to examine patient samples with these characteristics to conclusively determine if the CNS represents a relevant and important viral reservoir. PMID:25203642

  20. Aaptamine Derivatives with Antifungal and Anti-HIV-1 Activities from the South China Sea Sponge Aaptos aaptos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Bing Yu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Five new alkaloids of aaptamine family, compounds (1–5 and three known derivatives (6–8, have been isolated from the South China Sea sponge Aaptos aaptos. The structures of all compounds were unambiguously elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, as well as by comparison with the literature data. Compounds 1–2 are characterized with triazapyrene lactam skeleton, whereas compounds 4–5 share an imidazole-fused aaptamine moiety. These compounds were evaluated in antifungal and anti-HIV-1 assays. Compounds 3, 7, and 8 showed antifungal activity against six fungi, with MIC values in the range of 4 to 64 μg/mL. Compounds 7–8 exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity, with inhibitory rates of 88.0% and 72.3%, respectively, at a concentration of 10 μM.

  1. Gnidimacrin, a Potent Anti-HIV Diterpene, Can Eliminate Latent HIV-1 Ex Vivo by Activation of Protein Kinase C β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Weihong; Huang, Li; Zhu, Lei; Ferrari, Guido; Chan, Cliburn; Li, Wei; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2015-11-12

    HIV-1-latency-reversing agents, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs), were ineffective in reducing latent HIV-1 reservoirs ex vivo using CD4 cells from patients as a model. This deficiency poses a challenge to current pharmacological approaches for HIV-1 eradication. The results of this study indicated that gnidimacrin (GM) was able to markedly reduce the latent HIV-1 DNA level and the frequency of latently infected cells in an ex vivo model using patients peripheral blood mononuclear cells. GM induced approximately 10-fold more HIV-1 production than the HDACI SAHA or romidepsin, which may be responsible for the effectiveness of GM in reducing latent HIV-1 levels. GM achieved these effects at low picomolar concentrations by selective activation of protein kinase C βI and βII. Notably, GM was able to reduce the frequency of HIV-1 latently infected cells at concentrations without global T cell activation or stimulating inflammatory cytokine production. GM merits further development as a clinical trial candidate for latent HIV-1 eradication.

  2. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, M; Sayedipour, S; Pourazar, A; Shanehsazzadeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside isolated from Securigera securidaca showed potent anti-HSV activity. In the present study the anti-HIV-1 activities of kaempferol and kaempferol-7-O-glucoside are investigated at different concentrations (100, 50, 25 and 10 μg/ml) using HIV-1 p24 Antigen kit. Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was also used for quantification of full range of virus load observed in treated and untreated cells. According to the results of RT- PCR, tested compounds at a concentration of 100 μg/ml exerted potent inhibitory effect. Time of drug addition experiments demonstrated that these compounds exerted their inhibitory effects on the early stage of HIV infection. The results also showed potent anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity. Antiviral activity of kaempferol-7-O-glucoside was more pronounced than that of kaempferol. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol-7-O-glucoside could be considered as a new potential drug candidate for the treatment of HIV infection which requires further assessments.

  3. Phosphorylation of SAMHD1 by Cyclin A2/CDK1 Regulates Its Restriction Activity toward HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Cribier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication in myeloid and quiescent CD4+ T cells. Here, we show that SAMHD1 restriction activity is regulated by phosphorylation. SAMHD1 interacts with cyclin A2/cdk1 only in cycling cells. Cyclin A2/CDK1 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at the Threonine 592 residue both in vitro and in vivo. Phosphorylation of SAMHD1 Thr592 correlates with loss of its ability to restrict HIV-1. Indeed, while PMA treatment of proliferating THP1 cells results in reduced Thr592 phosphorylation, activation of resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and purified quiescent CD4+ T cells results in increased phosphorylation of SAMHD1 Thr592. Interestingly, we found that treatment of cells by type 1 interferon reduced Thr592 phosphorylation, reinforcing the link between the phosphorylation of SAMHD1 and its antiviral activity. Unlike wild-type SAMHD1, a phosphorylation-defective mutant was able to restrict HIV-1 replication in both PMA-treated and untreated cells. Our results uncover the phosphorylation of SAMHD1 at Thr592 by cyclin A2/CDK1 as a key regulatory mechanism of its antiviral activity.

  4. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-02-24

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype.

  5. Enhanced anti-HIV-1 activity of G-quadruplexes comprising locked nucleic acids and intercalating nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Nielsen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Two G-quadruplex forming sequences, 50-TGGGAG and the 17-mer sequence T30177, which exhibit anti-HIV-1 activity on cell lines, were modified using either locked nucleic acids (LNA) or via insertions of (R)-1-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyl)glycerol (intercalating nucleic acid, INA) or (R)-1-O-[4-(1-pyrenylet......Two G-quadruplex forming sequences, 50-TGGGAG and the 17-mer sequence T30177, which exhibit anti-HIV-1 activity on cell lines, were modified using either locked nucleic acids (LNA) or via insertions of (R)-1-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyl)glycerol (intercalating nucleic acid, INA) or (R)-1-O-[4......-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylmethyl]glycerol (twisted intercalating nucleic acid, TINA). Incorporation of LNA or INA/TINA monomers provide as much as 8-fold improvement of anti-HIV-1 activity. We demonstrate for the first time a detailed analysis of the effect the incorporation of INA/TINA monomers in quadruplex forming...

  6. Immune Activation at Sites of HIV/TB Co-Infection Contributes to the Pathogenesis of HIV-1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglai; Sayin, Ismail; Canaday, David H.; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Baseke, Joy; Toossi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Systemic immune activation is critical to the pathogenesis of HIV-1 disease, and is accentuated in HIV/TB co-infected patients. The contribution of immune activation at sites of HIV/TB co-infection to viral activity, CD4 T cell count, and productive HIV-1 infection remain unclear. In this study, we measured markers of immune activation both in pleural fluid and plasma, and in T cells in pleural fluid mononuclear cell (PFMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) in HIV/TB co-infected subjects. The relationship between soluble and T cell activation markers with viral load in pleural fluid and blood CD4 T cell count were assessed. The T cell phenotype and activation status of HIV-1 p24 + T cells in PFMC and PBMC from HIV/TB patients were determined. We found that T cell and macrophage-specific and non-specific soluble markers of immune activation, sCD27, sCD163, IL1Ra, and sCD14, were higher in pleural fluid as compared to plasma from HIV/TB co-infected subjects, and higher as compared to pleural fluid from TB mono-infected subjects. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, a marker of intestinal tract damage, in plasma from HIV/TB co-infected patients was not different than that in HIV+ subjects. Expression of HLADR and CD38 double positive (HLADR/CD38) on CD4 T cells, and CD69+ on CD8 T cells correlated with pleural fluid viral load, and inversely with blood CD4 T cell count. Higher expression of HLADR/CD38 and CCR5 on CD4 T cells, and HLADR/CD38 and CD69 on CD8 T cells in PFMC were limited to effector memory populations. HIV-1 p24+ CD8 negative (includes CD4 + and double negative T cells) effector memory T cells in PFMC had higher expression of HLADR/CD38, Ki67, and CCR5 compared to HIV-1 p24- CD8 negative PFMC. Cumulatively, these data indicate that sites of HIV/TB co-infection are the source of intense immune activation. PMID:27870882

  7. Opening of the TAR hairpin in the HIV-1 genome causes aberrant RNA dimerization and packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Atze T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TAR hairpin is present at both the 5′ and 3′ end of the HIV-1 RNA genome. The 5′ element binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. We recently observed that complete TAR deletion is allowed in the context of an HIV-1 variant that does not depend on this Tat-TAR axis for transcription. Mutations that open the 5′ stem-loop structure did however affect the leader RNA conformation and resulted in a severe replication defect. In this study, we set out to analyze which step of the HIV-1 replication cycle is affected by this conformational change of the leader RNA. Results We demonstrate that opening the 5′ TAR structure through a deletion in either side of the stem region caused aberrant dimerization and reduced packaging of the unspliced viral RNA genome. In contrast, truncation of the TAR hairpin through deletions in both sides of the stem did not affect RNA dimer formation and packaging. Conclusions These results demonstrate that, although the TAR hairpin is not essential for RNA dimerization and packaging, mutations in TAR can significantly affect these processes through misfolding of the relevant RNA signals.

  8. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 activity of a new iridoid glycoside isolated from Avicenna marina, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to check the efficacy of methanol seed extract of Avicenna marina and its column chromatographic fractions on Peripheral Blood Mono nuclear Cells (PBMCs) toxicity and HIV-1 replication. The anti-HIV-1 activities of crude methanol extract and its fractions were performed by use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and HIV-1 p24 antigen kit. A time of drug addiction approach was also done to identify target of anti-HIV compound. The activity of the extracts on CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 expression in lymphocytes population was performed by use of flow cytometry. The most active anti-HIV agent was detected by spectroscopic analysis as 2'-O-(4-methoxycinnamoyl) mussaenosidic acid. The apparent effective concentrations for 50% virus replication (EC50) of methanol extract and iridoid glycoside were 45 and 0.1 μg/ml respectively. The iridoid glycoside also did not have any observable effect on the proportion of CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 cells or on the intensity of their expressions on PBMCs. In addition, the expression level of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) on CD4(+) T cells were decreased in cells treated with this iridoid glycoside. The reduction of these two HIV coreceptors and the result of time of addition study demonstrated that this iridoid glycoside restricts HIV-1 replication on the early stage of HIV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Crystal structure of the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3F: the catalytically active and HIV-1 Vif-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Albin, John S; Kouno, Takahide; Anderson, Brett D; McDougle, Rebecca M; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Evans, Leah; Davis, Ahkillah N; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Yongjian; Somasundaran, Mohan; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S; Schiffer, Celia A

    2013-06-04

    Human APOBEC3F is an antiretroviral single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, susceptible to degradation by the HIV-1 protein Vif. In this study the crystal structure of the HIV Vif binding, catalytically active, C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F (A3F-CTD) was determined. The A3F-CTD shares structural motifs with portions of APOBEC3G-CTD, APOBEC3C, and APOBEC2. Residues identified to be critical for Vif-dependent degradation of APOBEC3F all fit within a predominantly negatively charged contiguous region on the surface of A3F-CTD. Specific sequence motifs, previously shown to play a role in Vif susceptibility and virion encapsidation, are conserved across APOBEC3s and between APOBEC3s and HIV-1 Vif. In this structure these motifs pack against each other at intermolecular interfaces, providing potential insights both into APOBEC3 oligomerization and Vif interactions.

  10. Gut Dendritic Cell Activation Links an Altered Colonic Microbiome to Mucosal and Systemic T Cell Activation in Untreated HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; McManus, MC; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; McCarter, MD; Wilson, CC

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c+ and CD1cneg) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percent of CD83+CD1c+ mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of IFN-γ-producing colon CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and P. stercorea, but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c+ mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  11. Novel 3′-Processing Integrase Activity Assay by Real-Time PCR for Screening and Identification of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supachai Sakkhachornphop

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3′-end processing (3′P of each viral long terminal repeat (LTR during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 integration is a vital step in the HIV life cycle. Blocking the 3′P using 3′P inhibitor has recently become an attractive strategy for HIV-1 therapeutic intervention. Recently, we have developed a novel real-time PCR based assay for the detection of 3′P activity in vitro. The methodology usually involves biotinylated HIV-1 LTR, HIV-1 integrase (IN, and specific primers and probe. In this novel assay, we designed the HIV-1 LTR substrate based on a sequence with a homology to HIV-1 LTR labeled at its 3′ end with biotin on the sense strand. Two nucleotides at the 3′ end were subsequently removed by IN activity. Only two nucleotides labeled biotin were captured on an avidin-coated tube; therefore, inhibiting the binding of primers and probe results in late signals in the real-time PCR. This novel assay has successfully detected both the 3′P activity of HIV-1 IN and the anti-IN activity by Raltegravir and sodium azide agent. This real-time PCR assay has been shown to be effective and inexpensive for a high-throughput screening of novel IN inhibitors.

  12. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  13. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity in various U937 cell subclones with different susceptibility to HIV-1 infection: its dramatic decrease following persistent virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Yoshihara, K; Kojima, K; Itaya, A; Kameoka, M; Ikuta, K; Kamiya, T

    1995-08-04

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a nuclear enzyme, is suggested to be involved in apoptotic cell death. It is also known that apoptotic cell death following HIV-1 infection is the most important feature of AIDS pathogenesis. Thus, to evaluate the relations between the enzyme and HIV-1 infection, we examined the enzyme activity of several subclones of human promonocytic cell line U937, which showed different susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. The nuclear extracts of two "high type clones" (possessing high susceptibility to HIV-1 infection) contained approximately 4 to 7-fold less enzyme than two low type clones when assayed under a full activation of enzyme. Parent clone, possessing an intermediate susceptibility to HIV-1, showed an intermediate enzyme level, suggesting that low level of this enzyme in cells is important for an effective infection of HIV-1. Furthermore, when these U937 subclones persistently infected with HIV-1 were examined, a dramatic decrease of the enzyme activity, reaching 2 to 16% of uninfected cells, was observed in all of these clones. The levels of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in these clones were relativity unchanged. Activity gel analysis and immunoblotting of the enzyme in the clones revealed that the low enzyme activities observed in uninfected "high type clones" and all HIV-1-infected clones were due to a marked decrease of the enzyme protein itself. All of these results suggest that HIV-1 infection involves some mechanism to downregulate cellular poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and that a lower level of the enzyme may be essential for an effective production of the virus and/or for a stable virus/host interaction.

  14. ASK1 restores the antiviral activity of APOBEC3G by disrupting HIV-1 Vif-mediated counteraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Kei; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Matsuzawa, Atsushi; Morishita, Ryo; Kudoh, Ayumi; Shindo, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Masaru; Sato, Hironori; Kimura, Hirokazu; Tamura, Tomohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ichijo, Hidenori; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-04-22

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is an innate antiviral restriction factor that strongly inhibits the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vif, hijacks the host ubiquitin-proteasome system to execute A3G degradation. Identification of the host pathways that obstruct the action of Vif could provide a new strategy for blocking viral replication. We demonstrate here that the host protein ASK1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1) interferes with the counteraction by Vif and revitalizes A3G-mediated viral restriction. ASK1 binds the BC-box of Vif, thereby disrupting the assembly of the Vif-ubiquitin ligase complex. Consequently, ASK1 stabilizes A3G and promotes its incorporation into viral particles, ultimately reducing viral infectivity. Furthermore, treatment with the antiretroviral drug AZT (zidovudine) induces ASK1 expression and restores the antiviral activity of A3G in HIV-1-infected cells. This study thus demonstrates a distinct function of ASK1 in restoring the host antiviral system that can be enhanced by AZT treatment.

  15. Synthesis, antiinflammatory and HIV-1 integrase inhibitory activities of 1,2-bis[5-thiazolyl]ethane-1,2-dione derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on principles of pharmacophore delineation and drug designing, compounds containing diketofunctionallity namely 1,2-bis[5-thiazolyl]ethane-1,2-diones were designed and synthesized as antiinflammatory agents. The compounds were evaluated in carrageenan-induced rat-paw edema method. G-3, G-6, G-17, G-20, G-23, G-22, L-708 and 906 showed good antiinflammatory activity. In addition as diketo functionality containing compounds are reported to have HIV-1 integrase inhibitory property, and these compounds contains diketo functionality, so these compounds were screened in assay for HIV-1 integrase inhibition. Few compounds showed weak HIV-1 integrase Inhibitory activity.

  16. The microvesicle component of HIV-1 inocula modulates dendritic cell infection and maturation and enhances adhesion to and activation of T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Mercier

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is taken up by immature monocyte derived dendritic cells (iMDDCs into tetraspanin rich caves from which the virus can either be transferred to T lymphocytes or enter into endosomes resulting in degradation. HIV-1 binding and fusion with the DC membrane results in low level de novo infection that can also be transferred to T lymphocytes at a later stage. We have previously reported that HIV-1 can induce partial maturation of iMDDCs at both stages of trafficking. Here we show that CD45⁺ microvesicles (MV which contaminate purified HIV-1 inocula due to similar size and density, affect DC maturation, de novo HIV-1 infection and transfer to T lymphocytes. Comparing iMDDCs infected with CD45-depleted HIV-1BaL or matched non-depleted preparations, the presence of CD45⁺ MVs was shown to enhance DC maturation and ICAM-1 (CD54 expression, which is involved in DC∶T lymphocyte interactions, while restricting HIV-1 infection of MDDCs. Furthermore, in the DC culture HIV-1 infected (p24⁺ MDDCs were more mature than bystander cells. Depletion of MVs from the HIV-1 inoculum markedly inhibited DC∶T lymphocyte clustering and the induction of alloproliferation as well as limiting HIV-1 transfer from DCs to T lymphocytes. The effects of MV depletion on these functions were reversed by the re-addition of purified MVs from activated but not non-activated SUPT1.CCR5-CL.30 or primary T cells. Analysis of the protein complement of these MVs and of these HIV-1 inocula before and after MV depletion showed that Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs and nef were the likely DC maturation candidates. Recombinant HSP90α and β and nef all induced DC maturation and ICAM-1 expression, greater when combined. These results suggest that MVs contaminating HIV-1 released from infected T lymphocytes may be biologically important, especially in enhancing T cell activation, during uptake by DCs in vitro and in vivo, particularly as MVs have been detected in the circulation of HIV-1

  17. Activity of the HIV-1 Attachment Inhibitor BMS-626529, the Active Component of the Prodrug BMS-663068, against CD4-Independent Viruses and HIV-1 Envelopes Resistant to Other Entry Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhufang; Zhou, Nannan; Sun, Yongnian; Ray, Neelanjana; Lataillade, Max; Hanna, George J.; Krystal, Mark

    2013-01-01

    BMS-626529 is a novel small-molecule HIV-1 attachment inhibitor active against both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic viruses. BMS-626529 functions by preventing gp120 from binding to CD4. A prodrug of this compound, BMS-663068, is currently in clinical development. As a theoretical resistance pathway to BMS-663068 could be the development of a CD4-independent phenotype, we examined the activity of BMS-626529 against CD4-independent viruses and investigated whether resistance to BMS-626529 could be asso...

  18. HIV-1 and IL-1β regulate astrocytic CD38 through mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB signaling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamik Manmeet K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 leads to some form of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND in approximately half of the cases. The mechanisms by which astrocytes contribute to HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD, the most severe form of HAND, still remain unresolved. HIV-1-encephalitis (HIVE, a pathological correlate of HAD, affects an estimated 9-11% of the HIV-1-infected population. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that HIVE brain tissues show significant upregulation of CD38, an enzyme involved in calcium signaling, in astrocytes. We also reported an increase in CD38 expression in interleukin (IL-1β-activated astrocytes. In the present investigation, we studied regulatory mechanisms of CD38 gene expression in astrocytes activated with HIV-1-relevant stimuli. We also investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and nuclear factor (NF-κB in astrocyte CD38 regulation. Methods Cultured human astrocytes were transfected with HIV-1YU-2 proviral clone and levels of CD38 mRNA and protein were measured by real-time PCR gene expression assay, western blot analysis and immunostaining. Astrocyte activation by viral transfection was determined by analyzing proinflammatory chemokine levels using ELISA. To evaluate the roles of MAPKs and NF-κB in CD38 regulation, astrocytes were treated with MAPK inhibitors (SB203580, SP600125, U0126, NF-κB interfering peptide (SN50 or transfected with dominant negative IκBα mutant (IκBαM prior to IL-1β activation. CD38 gene expression and CD38 ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity assays were performed to analyze alterations in CD38 levels and function, respectively. Results HIV-1YU-2-transfection significantly increased CD38 mRNA and protein expression in astrocytes (p YU-2-transfected astrocytes significantly increased HIV-1 gene expression (p Conclusion The present findings demonstrate a direct involvement of HIV-1 and virus

  19. Unperturbed posttranscriptional regulatory Rev protein function and HIV-1 replication in astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Chauhan

    Full Text Available Astrocytes protect neurons, but also evoke proinflammatory responses to injury and viral infections, including HIV. There is a prevailing notion that HIV-1 Rev protein function in astrocytes is perturbed, leading to restricted viral replication. In earlier studies, our finding of restricted viral entry into astrocytes led us to investigate whether there are any intracellular restrictions, including crippled Rev function, in astrocytes. Despite barely detectable levels of DDX3 (Rev-supporting RNA helicase and TRBP (anti-PKR in primary astrocytes compared to astrocytic cells, Rev function was unperturbed in wild-type, but not DDX3-ablated astrocytes. As in permissive cells, after HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes, viral-encoded Tat and Rev proteins had robust regulatory activities, leading to efficient viral replication. Productive HIV-1 infection in astrocytes persisted for several weeks. Our findings on HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes demonstrated that the intracellular environment is conducive to viral replication and that Tat and Rev functions are unperturbed.

  20. Epigenetic analysis of HIV-1 proviral genomes from infected individuals: predominance of unmethylated CpG's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stefanie; Weiser, Barbara; Kemal, Kimdar S; Burger, Harold; Ramirez, Christina M; Korn, Klaus; Anastos, Kathryn; Kaul, Rupert; Kovacs, Colin; Doerfler, Walter

    2014-01-20

    Efforts to cure HIV-1 infections aim at eliminating proviral DNA. Integrated DNA from various viruses often becomes methylated de novo and transcriptionally inactivated. We therefore investigated CpG methylation profiles of 55 of 94 CpG's (58.5%) in HIV-1 proviral genomes including ten CpG's in each LTR and additional CpG's in portions of gag, env, nef, rev, and tat genes. We analyzed 33 DNA samples from PBMC's of 23 subjects representing a broad spectrum of HIV-1 disease. In 22 of 23 HIV-1-infected individuals, there were only unmethylated CpG's regardless of infection status. In one long term nonprogressor, however, methylation of proviral DNA varied between 0 and 75% over an 11-year period although the CD4+ counts remained stable. Hence levels of proviral DNA methylation can fluctuate. The preponderance of unmethylated CpG's suggests that proviral methylation is not a major factor in regulating HIV-1 proviral activity in PBMC's. Unmethylated CpG's may play a role in HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Activation and inflammation markers in HIV-1-infected patients in dependency of treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ehret

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: HIV-1-infected patients have elevated levels of immune activation and systemic inflammatory markers which are partially strong predictors of disease progression or are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The dependency of anti-retroviral treatment (ART, the usage of NNRTI or PI-based and the application of non-nuc regimens is analysed here on the basis of a dataset (Chronic Inflammation Dependency on TREatment: CIDRE cohort from 1500 patients in Berlin. Methods: In a retrospective analysis we compared relative CD4+ cell counts, viral load, relative CD8+CD38+DR-and CD3+DR+cells, concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in therapy-naïve or treated patients dependent on usage or non-usage of NUCs, PI or NNRTI. Statistics were performed with R (R Core Team; 2012; R: A language and environment for statistical computing using Wilcoxon rank sum test in two-sided analysis. Summary of results: As to expect, ART-naïve patients (n=190 had significantly higher viral loads and lower CD4+cell counts (p: both<0.05 and showed higher activation levels than treated patient (CD8+CD38+DR- and CD3+DR+both<0.05. But no significant difference was calculated for hsCRP or IL-6. Nuc-sparing regimen (n=46 did not show any distinction compared to nuc-containing therapies (n=1249 for the analysed parameters. Significant differences were detected for PI-regimen (n=711 with lower CD4+ cell counts and higher activation (CD8+38+DR-, CD3+DR+ and IL-6 (p: all<0.05 but not for hsCRP (p=0.39. The opposite was true for NNRTI-based therapies (n=445 with higher CD4+ cell percentages and lower activation and inflammation markers (p: all<0.05 and as well no difference in hsCRP (p=0.97 compared with all other treated patients. Conclusions: The lack of differences between therapy-naïve patients and patients on ART for inflammation markers may be due to the relative good immunological state of the first group

  2. Features of Recently Transmitted HIV-1 Clade C Viruses that Impact Antibody Recognition: Implications for Active and Passive Immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Rademeyer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of biomedical interventions to reduce acquisition of HIV-1 infection remains a global priority, however their potential effectiveness is challenged by very high HIV-1 envelope diversity. Two large prophylactic trials in high incidence, clade C epidemic regions in southern Africa are imminent; passive administration of the monoclonal antibody VRC01, and active immunization with a clade C modified RV144-like vaccines. We have created a large representative panel of C clade viruses to enable assessment of antibody responses to vaccines and natural infection in Southern Africa, and we investigated the genotypic and neutralization properties of recently transmitted clade C viruses to determine how viral diversity impacted antibody recognition. We further explore the implications of these findings for the potential effectiveness of these trials. A panel of 200 HIV-1 Envelope pseudoviruses was constructed from clade C viruses collected within the first 100 days following infection. Viruses collected pre-seroconversion were significantly more resistant to serum neutralization compared to post-seroconversion viruses (p = 0.001. Over 13 years of the study as the epidemic matured, HIV-1 diversified (p = 0.0009 and became more neutralization resistant to monoclonal antibodies VRC01, PG9 and 4E10. When tested at therapeutic levels (10ug/ml, VRC01 only neutralized 80% of viruses in the panel, although it did exhibit potent neutralization activity against sensitive viruses (IC50 titres of 0.42 μg/ml. The Gp120 amino acid similarity between the clade C panel and candidate C-clade vaccine protein boosts (Ce1086 and TV1 was 77%, which is 8% more distant than between CRF01_AE viruses and the RV144 CRF01_AE immunogen. Furthermore, two vaccine signature sites, K169 in V2 and I307 in V3, associated with reduced infection risk in RV144, occurred less frequently in clade C panel viruses than in CRF01_AE viruses from Thailand. Increased resistance of

  3. Features of Recently Transmitted HIV-1 Clade C Viruses that Impact Antibody Recognition: Implications for Active and Passive Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademeyer, Cecilia; Korber, Bette; Seaman, Michael S.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Thebus, Ruwayhida; Robles, Alexander; Sheward, Daniel J.; Wagh, Kshitij; Carey, Brittany R.; Gao, Hongmei; Greene, Kelli M.; Tang, Haili; Marais, Jinny C.; Diphoko, Thabo E.; Hraber, Peter; Tumba, Nancy; Moore, Penny L.; Gray, Glenda E.; Kublin, James; McElrath, M. Juliana; Vermeulen, Marion; Middelkoop, Keren; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Hoelscher, Michael; Maboko, Leonard; Makhema, Joseph; Robb, Merlin L.; Abdool Karim, Salim; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Kim, Jerome H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Gao, Feng; Swanstrom, Ronald; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David C.; Williamson, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The development of biomedical interventions to reduce acquisition of HIV-1 infection remains a global priority, however their potential effectiveness is challenged by very high HIV-1 envelope diversity. Two large prophylactic trials in high incidence, clade C epidemic regions in southern Africa are imminent; passive administration of the monoclonal antibody VRC01, and active immunization with a clade C modified RV144-like vaccines. We have created a large representative panel of C clade viruses to enable assessment of antibody responses to vaccines and natural infection in Southern Africa, and we investigated the genotypic and neutralization properties of recently transmitted clade C viruses to determine how viral diversity impacted antibody recognition. We further explore the implications of these findings for the potential effectiveness of these trials. A panel of 200 HIV-1 Envelope pseudoviruses was constructed from clade C viruses collected within the first 100 days following infection. Viruses collected pre-seroconversion were significantly more resistant to serum neutralization compared to post-seroconversion viruses (p = 0.001). Over 13 years of the study as the epidemic matured, HIV-1 diversified (p = 0.0009) and became more neutralization resistant to monoclonal antibodies VRC01, PG9 and 4E10. When tested at therapeutic levels (10ug/ml), VRC01 only neutralized 80% of viruses in the panel, although it did exhibit potent neutralization activity against sensitive viruses (IC50 titres of 0.42 μg/ml). The Gp120 amino acid similarity between the clade C panel and candidate C-clade vaccine protein boosts (Ce1086 and TV1) was 77%, which is 8% more distant than between CRF01_AE viruses and the RV144 CRF01_AE immunogen. Furthermore, two vaccine signature sites, K169 in V2 and I307 in V3, associated with reduced infection risk in RV144, occurred less frequently in clade C panel viruses than in CRF01_AE viruses from Thailand. Increased resistance of pre

  4. Rationally designed interfacial peptides are efficient in vitro inhibitors of HIV-1 capsid assembly with antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Bocanegra

    Full Text Available Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces involved in formation of the mature HIV-1 capsid through polymerization of the capsid protein CA were targeted. We had previously designed a peptide, CAC1, that represents CA helix 9 (a major part of the dimerization interface and binds the CA C-terminal domain in solution. Here we have mapped the binding site of CAC1, and shown that it substantially overlaps with the CA dimerization interface. We have also rationally modified CAC1 to increase its solubility and CA-binding affinity, and designed four additional peptides that represent CA helical segments involved in other CA interfaces. We found that peptides CAC1, its derivative CAC1M, and H8 (representing CA helix 8 were able to efficiently inhibit the in vitro assembly of the mature HIV-1 capsid. Cocktails of several peptides, including CAC1 or CAC1M plus H8 or CAI (a previously discovered inhibitor of CA polymerization, or CAC1M+H8+CAI, also abolished capsid assembly, even when every peptide was used at lower, sub-inhibitory doses. To provide a preliminary proof that these designed capsid assembly inhibitors could eventually serve as lead compounds for development of anti-HIV-1 agents, they were transported into cultured cells using a cell-penetrating peptide, and tested for antiviral activity. Peptide cocktails that drastically inhibited capsid assembly in vitro were also able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 infection ex vivo. This study validates a novel, entirely rational approach for the design of capsid

  5. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  6. HIV-1 integrase inhibitory activity of endophytic fungi from five species of medicinal Dendrobium%五种药用石斛内生真菌抑制HIV-1整合酶活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁婧; 张大为; 陈娟; 康永; 郭顺星

    2013-01-01

    目的 评价5种药用石斛内生真菌发酵产物抑制HIV-1整合酶的活性.方法 将分离自石斛的202株内生真菌提取物共404个采用高通量ELISA法评价其抑制HIV-l整合酶活性;对抑制活性大于100%的样品进行量效关系考察并进行体外抑制肿瘤细胞活性筛选.结果 筛选得到19个对HIV-l整合酶抑制活性大于80%的样品,其中样品5119F、5297F、5097F、5140J和5211F的抑制率分别达到117.96%、113.53%、108.62%、103.74%和109.02%,其对应的IC50值分别为0.02024、0.003125、0.00862、0.01007 和 0.01192 mg/ml.结论石斛属药用植物内生真菌是一个潜在的、丰富的用于筛选HIV-1整合酶抑制剂的资源库,值得进一步研究和开发.%Objective To evaluate the HIV integrase inhibitory activity of endophvtic fungi in five species of medicinal Dendrobium.Methods The HIV-1 integrase inhibitory activity was detected with high-throughput ELISA.The samples that displayed more than 100% inhibitory effect for HIV-1 integrase were selected for dose-response experiments and anticancer activity screening.Results Among all the tested samples,19 samples inhibited the HIV-1 integrase activity by more than 80%.Specially,the samples 5119F,5297F,5097F,5140J and 5211F inhibited the enzyme activity by 117.96%,113.53%,108.62%,103.74% and 109.02% respectively.The IC50 of the five samples was 0.02024,0.003125,0.00862,0.01007 and 0.01192 mg/ml respectively.Conclusion Endophytic fungi of medicinal Dendrobium are potential and abundant reservoir for the screening of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and are worthy of further study.

  7. CDK2 Regulates HIV-1 Transcription by Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Serine 90

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breuer Denitra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 transcription is activated by the viral Tat protein that recruits host positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb containing CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. P-TEFb in the cells exists as a lower molecular weight CDK9/cyclin T1 dimer and a high molecular weight complex of 7SK RNA, CDK9/cyclin T1, HEXIM1 dimer and several additional proteins. Our previous studies implicated CDK2 in HIV-1 transcription regulation. We also found that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators leads to the inhibition of CDK9 activity, suggesting a functional link between CDK2 and CDK9. Here, we investigate whether CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 and regulates its activity. Results The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CDK2 inhibited CDK9 kinase activity and reduced CDK9 phosphorylation. Stable shRNA-mediated CDK2 knockdown inhibited HIV-1 transcription, but also increased the overall level of 7SK RNA. CDK9 contains a motif (90SPYNR94 that is consensus CDK2 phosphorylation site. CDK9 was phosphorylated on Ser90 by CDK2 in vitro. In cultured cells, CDK9 phosphorylation was reduced when Ser90 was mutated to an Ala. Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Ser90 was also detected with phospho-specific antibodies and it was reduced after the knockdown of CDK2. CDK9 expression decreased in the large complex for the CDK9-S90A mutant and was correlated with a reduced activity and an inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. In contrast, the CDK9-S90D mutant showed a slight decrease in CDK9 expression in both the large and small complexes but induced Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcription. Molecular modeling showed that Ser 90 of CDK9 is located on a flexible loop exposed to solvent, suggesting its availability for phosphorylation. Conclusion Our data indicate that CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 on Ser 90 and thereby contributes to HIV-1 transcription. The phosphorylation of Ser90 by CDK2 represents a novel mechanism of HIV-1 regulated transcription and provides a new strategy for

  8. Activity of the HIV-1 attachment inhibitor BMS-626529, the active component of the prodrug BMS-663068, against CD4-independent viruses and HIV-1 envelopes resistant to other entry inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhufang; Zhou, Nannan; Sun, Yongnian; Ray, Neelanjana; Lataillade, Max; Hanna, George J; Krystal, Mark

    2013-09-01

    BMS-626529 is a novel small-molecule HIV-1 attachment inhibitor active against both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic viruses. BMS-626529 functions by preventing gp120 from binding to CD4. A prodrug of this compound, BMS-663068, is currently in clinical development. As a theoretical resistance pathway to BMS-663068 could be the development of a CD4-independent phenotype, we examined the activity of BMS-626529 against CD4-independent viruses and investigated whether resistance to BMS-626529 could be associated with a CD4-independent phenotype. Finally, we evaluated whether cross-resistance exists between BMS-626529 and other HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Two laboratory-derived envelopes with a CD4-independent phenotype (one CXCR4 tropic and one CCR5 tropic), five envelopes from clinical isolates with preexisting BMS-626529 resistance, and several site-specific mutant BMS-626529-resistant envelopes were examined for their dependence on CD4 for infectivity or susceptibility to BMS-626529. Viruses resistant to other entry inhibitors (enfuvirtide, maraviroc, and ibalizumab) were also examined for susceptibility to BMS-626529. Both CD4-independent laboratory isolates retained sensitivity to BMS-626529 in CD4(-) cells, while HIV-1 envelopes from viruses resistant to BMS-626529 exhibited no evidence of a CD4-independent phenotype. BMS-626529 also exhibited inhibitory activity against ibalizumab- and enfuvirtide-resistant envelopes. While there appeared to be some association between maraviroc resistance and reduced susceptibility to BMS-626529, an absolute correlation cannot be presumed, since some CCR5-tropic maraviroc-resistant envelopes remained sensitive to BMS-626529. Clinical use of the prodrug BMS-663068 is unlikely to promote resistance via generation of CD4-independent virus. No cross-resistance between BMS-626529 and other HIV entry inhibitors was observed, which could allow for sequential or concurrent use with different classes of entry inhibitors.

  9. 含双环哌啶结构HIV-1抑制剂的设计合成及生物活性研究%Design, synthesis and biological activity of bicyclic piperidine-based HIV-1 inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛文祥; 董铭心; 朱卫国; 姜世勃; 戴秋云

    2011-01-01

    目的 设计合成一系列具有新型结构特征的双环哌啶类C-C族趋化因子受体5(CCR5)抑制剂并测定其抗HIV-1活性.方法 以HIV-1辅助受体CCR5抑制剂Vicriviroc的结构为模板,通过改变左侧哌嗪结构、取代基位置等方法设计并合成一系列新化合物.并利用MS及1H-NMR谱对这些化合物进行结构表征.结果 与结论合成了15个新结构化合物,活性测试结果表明,该系列化合物具有较强的抗HIV-1 R5病毒株的活性(IC50=1.20~66.24μmol·L-1).当R1为芳基结构且两个氮原子满足标准的丙二胺结构时,化合物的活性更好.%CCR5 is a major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into human cells and is also a good target for antiHIV-1 drug design. Based on the chemical structure of Vicriviroc, a CCR5 antagonist, a series of new compounds were designed by changing its piperazine loop and other group substitutions. In the present study,15 bicyclic piperidine-based compounds were synthesized using a convergent synthetic route, and the structures of the target compounds were confirmed by MS and 1H-NMR. The synthetic routes were as follows:N-Bocpiperidine-4-carboxylic acid, N-Boc-pyrro-3-carboxylic acid and N-Boc-ethylenediamine were coupled with theamine derivatives to give the corresponding compounds 1a- 1d,2a- 2c,3a- 3c,4-piperidinone hydrochloride reacted with 2,6-dimethylbenzoyl chloride,2,6-dichlorobenzoyl chloride and 2,4,6-trimethyl-5-pyrimidine carbonyl chloride to obtain the compounds 4a -4c. Then 4a -4c was reacted with 1a - 1d,2a -2c ,3a - 3c to give the target compounds I 1 - I 15. Furthermore, the antiviral activity and cell cytotoxicity of these compounds were evaluated with HIV-1 R5 strain in vitro. The results showed that all the target compounds exhibited potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 R5 strain( IC50 = 1.20 -66. 24 μmol· L-1 ). Preliminary analysis of the structure-activity relationship showed that some compounds with an aryl group and the 1,3-diamino

  10. Novel Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity of 2-Arylthio-6-benzyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrimidin-4-ones (Aryl S-DABOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aly, Youssef L.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.; La Colla, Paolo;

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis and the anti-HIV-1 activity of a series of 2-arylthio-6-benzyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrimidin-4-ones (aryl S-DABOs) are reported. These compounds were synthesized via a coupling reaction of the corresponding 6-benzyl-2-thiouracils with aryl iodides in the presence of neocuproine hydrate......, copper(I) iodide, and sodium tert-butoxide. Target compounds showed moderate activity against HIV-1....

  11. Phosphoramidate derivatives of acyclovir: synthesis and antiviral activity in HIV-1 and HSV-1 models in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Natalia F; Shipitsyn, Alexander V; Jasko, Maxim V; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Andronova, Valeria L; Galegov, Georgiy A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Kochetkov, Sergey N

    2012-10-01

    The antiviral activity against HIV and HSV and the chemical stability of ACV phosphoramidate derivatives were studied. The phosphoramidates of ACV demonstrated moderate activity. The best compound appeared to be 9-(2-hydroxymethyl)guanine phosphoromonomorpholidate (7), which inhibited virus replication in pseudo-HIV-1 particles by 50% at 50 μM. It also inhibited replication of wild-type HSV-1 (9.7 μM) as well as an acyclovir-resistant strain (25 μM). None of the synthesised compounds showed any cytotoxicity.

  12. Prime-boost immunization of rabbits with HIV-1 gp120 elicits potent neutralization activity against a primary viral isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Narayan

    Full Text Available Development of a vaccine for HIV-1 requires a detailed understanding of the neutralizing antibody responses that can be experimentally elicited to difficult-to-neutralize primary isolates. Rabbits were immunized with the gp120 subunit of HIV-1 JR-CSF envelope (Env using a DNA-prime protein-boost regimen. We analyzed five sera that showed potent autologous neutralizing activity (IC50s at ∼10(3 to 10(4 serum dilution against pseudoviruses containing Env from the primary isolate JR-CSF but not from the related isolate JR-FL. Pseudoviruses were created by exchanging each variable and constant domain of JR-CSF gp120 with that of JR-FL or with mutations in putative N-glycosylation sites. The sera contained different neutralizing activities dependent on C3 and V5, C3 and V4, or V4 regions located on the glycan-rich outer domain of gp120. All sera showed enhanced neutralizing activity toward an Env variant that lacked a glycosylation site in V4. The JR-CSF gp120 epitopes recognized by the sera are generally distinct from those of several well characterized mAbs (targeting conserved sites on Env or other type-specific responses (targeting V1, V2, or V3 variable regions. The activity of one serum requires specific glycans that are also important for 2G12 neutralization and this serum blocked the binding of 2G12 to gp120. Our findings show that different fine specificities can achieve potent neutralization of HIV-1, yet this strong activity does not result in improved breadth.

  13. A new synthetic protein, TAT-RH, inhibits tumor growth through the regulation of NFκB activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leggiero Eleonora

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on its role in angiogenesis and apoptosis, the inhibition of NFκB activity is considered an effective treatment for cancer, hampered by the lack of selective and safe inhibitors. We recently demonstrated that the RH domain of GRK5 (GRK5-RH inhibits NFκB, thus we evaluated its effects on cancer growth. Methods The role of GRK5-RH on tumor growth was assessed in a human cancer cell line (KAT-4. RH overexpression was induced by adenovirus mediated gene transfer; alternatively we administered a synthetic protein reproducing the RH domain of GRK5 (TAT-RH, actively transported into the cells. Results In vitro, adenovirus mediated GRK5-RH overexpression (AdGRK5-NT in human tumor cells (KAT-4 induces IκB accumulation and inhibits NFκB transcriptional activity leading to apoptotic events. In BALB/c nude mice harboring KAT-4 induced neoplasias, intra-tumor delivery of AdGRK5-NT reduces in a dose-dependent fashion tumor growth, with the highest doses completely inhibiting it. This phenomenon is paralleled by a decrease of NFκB activity, an increase of IκB levels and apoptotic events. To move towards a pharmacological setup, we synthesized the TAT-RH protein. In cultured KAT-4 cells, different dosages of TAT-RH reduced cell survival and increased apoptosis. In BALB/c mice, the anti-proliferative effects of TAT-RH appear to be dose-dependent and highest dose completely inhibits tumor growth. Conclusion Our data suggest that GRK5-RH inhibition of NFκB is a novel and effective anti-tumoral strategy and TAT-RH could be an useful tool in the fighting of cancer.

  14. Retinoblastoma protein induction by HIV viremia or CCR5 in monocytes exposed to HIV-1 mediates protection from activation-induced apoptosis: ex vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekonge, Bethsebah; Raymond, Andrea D; Yin, Xiangfan; Kostman, Jay; Mounzer, Karam; Collman, Ronald G; Showe, Louise; Montaner, Luis J

    2012-08-01

    We have previously described an antiapoptotic steady-state gene expression profile in circulating human monocytes from asymptomatic viremic HIV(+) donors, but the mechanism associated with this apoptosis resistance remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we show that Rb1 activation is a dominant feature of apoptosis resistance in monocytes exposed to HIV-1 in vivo (as measured ex vivo) and in vitro. Monocytes from asymptomatic viremic HIV(+) individuals show a positive correlation between levels of hypophosphorylated (active) Rb1 and VL in conjunction with increases in other p53-inducible proteins associated with antiapoptosis regulation, such as p21 and PAI-1 (SERPINE1), when compared with circulating monocytes from uninfected donors. Monocytes exposed in vitro to HIV-1 R5 isolates but not X4 isolates showed lower caspase-3 activation after apoptosis induction, indicating a role for the CCR5 signaling pathway. Moreover, monocytes exposed to R5 HIV-1 or MIP-1 β induced Rb1 and p21 expression and an accumulation of autophagy markers, LC3 and Beclin. The inhibition of Rb1 activity in HIV-1 R5 viral-exposed monocytes using siRNA led to increased apoptosis sensitivity, thereby confirming a central role for Rb1 in the antiapoptotic phenotype. Our data identify Rb1 induction in chronic asymptomatic HIV-1 infection as a mediator of apoptosis resistance in monocytes in association with protective autophagy and contributing to monocyte survival during immune activation and/or HIV-1 viremia.

  15. Antiviral activity of derivatized dextrans on HIV-1 infection of primary macrophages and blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddiki, N; Mbemba, E; Letourneur, D; Ylisastigui, L; Benjouad, A; Saffar, L; Gluckman, J C; Jozefonvicz, J; Gattegno, L

    1997-11-28

    The present study demonstrates at the molecular level that dextran derivatives carboxymethyl dextran benzylamine (CMDB) and carboxymethyl dextran benzylamine sulfonate (CMDBS), characterized by a statistical distribution of anionic carboxylic groups, hydrophobic benzylamide units, and/or sulfonate moieties, interact with HIV-1 LAI gp120 and V3 consensus clades B domain. Only limited interaction was observed with carboxy-methyl dextran (CMD) or dextran (D) under the same conditions. CMDBS and CMDB (1 microM) strongly inhibited HIV-1 infection of primary macrophages and primary CD4+ lymphocytes by macrophage-tropic and T lymphocyte-tropic strains, respectively, while D or CMD had more limited effects on M-tropic infection of primary macrophages and exert no inhibitory effect on M- or T-tropic infection of primary lymphocytes. CMDBS and CMDB (1 microM) had limited but significant effect on oligomerized soluble recombinant gp120 binding to primary macrophages while they clearly inhibit (> 50%) such binding to primary lymphocytes. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect of CMDB and the CMDBS, is observed for HIV M- and T-tropic strain infections of primary lymphocytes and macrophages which indicates that these compounds interfere with steps of HIV replicative cycle which neither depend on the virus nor on the cell.

  16. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  17. Phospholipase D1 Couples CD4+ T Cell Activation to c-Myc-Dependent Deoxyribonucleotide Pool Expansion and HIV-1 Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry E Taylor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quiescent CD4+ T cells restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection at early steps of virus replication. Low levels of both deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs and the biosynthetic enzymes required for their de novo synthesis provide one barrier to infection. CD4+ T cell activation induces metabolic reprogramming that reverses this block and facilitates HIV-1 replication. Here, we show that phospholipase D1 (PLD1 links T cell activation signals to increased HIV-1 permissivity by triggering a c-Myc-dependent transcriptional program that coordinates glucose uptake and nucleotide biosynthesis. Decreasing PLD1 activity pharmacologically or by RNA interference diminished c-Myc-dependent expression during T cell activation at the RNA and protein levels. PLD1 inhibition of HIV-1 infection was partially rescued by adding exogenous deoxyribonucleosides that bypass the need for de novo dNTP synthesis. Moreover, the data indicate that low dNTP levels that impact HIV-1 restriction involve decreased synthesis, and not only increased catabolism of these nucleotides. These findings uncover a unique mechanism of action for PLD1 inhibitors and support their further development as part of a therapeutic combination for HIV-1 and other viral infections dependent on host nucleotide biosynthesis.

  18. Tat-CBR1 inhibits inflammatory responses through the suppressions of NF-κB and MAPK activation in macrophages and TPA-induced ear edema in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Nam [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Won [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Research Institute of Oral Sciences, College of Dentistry, Kangnung-Wonju National University, Kangneung 210-702 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hyo Sang; Shin, Min Jea; Ahn, Eun Hee; Ryu, Eun Ji; Yong, Ji In; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Youn, Jong Kyu; Hwang, Jae Hyeok [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ji-Heon; Kim, Duk-Soo [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan-Si 330-090 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinseu [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Eum, Won Sik, E-mail: wseum@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) plays a crucial role in cell survival and protects against oxidative stress response. However, its anti-inflammatory effects are not yet clearly understood. In this study, we examined whether CBR1 protects against inflammatory responses in macrophages and mice using a Tat-CBR1 protein which is able to penetrate into cells. The results revealed that purified Tat-CBR1 protein efficiently transduced into Raw 264.7 cells and inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) expression levels. In addition, Tat-CBR1 protein leads to decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression through suppression of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Furthermore, Tat-CBR1 protein inhibited inflammatory responses in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation when applied topically. These findings indicate that Tat-CBR1 protein has anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo through inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK activation, suggesting that Tat-CBR1 protein may have potential as a therapeutic agent against inflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • Transduced Tat-CBR1 reduces LPS-induced inflammatory mediators and cytokines. • Tat-CBR1 inhibits MAPK and NF-κB activation. • Tat-CBR1 ameliorates inflammation response in vitro and in vivo. • Tat-CBR1 may be useful as potential therapeutic agent for inflammation.

  19. Activity of superior interferon α against HIV-1 in severe combined immunodeficient mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; TONG Xiao; Tadashi Nakasone; YUE Xue-tian; Naoki Yamamoto; LIU Xin-yuan; YANG Rong-ge

    2011-01-01

    Background Interferon (IFN) can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro and in clinic.However, IFN therapy for HIV infection was limited by its moderate antiviral efficacy and its frequent adverse effects. In the present study we evaluated the anti-HIV efficacy of a novel synthesized superior interferon α (slFNα).Methods We performed in vitro experiments with HIV-1 IIB infected MT4 cells, and evaluated in vivo anti-HIV efficacy of slFNα in severe combined immunodeficient (SClD) mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes (hu-PBL-SClD mice).Results We found that the 50% effective concentrations (EC5o) of slFNα against the replication of HIV-1 in MT4 cells was 0.06 ng/ml, representing stronger antiviral activity than interferon-α in vitro. In the hu-PBL-SCID mice, a dose-dependent protection pattern was observed: with 0.45 μg and 1.35 μg slFNα daily treatments, parts of SCID mice were protected from HIV infection, whereas 2.25 μg sIFNα daily treatments resulted in a terminally complete protection.Conclusions slFNα shows good anti-HIV activity both in vitro and in SCID mice, may be a promising anti-HIV agent deserving clinical investigation, especially considering the potential of IFN-α to inhibit HIV replication in patients infected with drug-resistant variants or co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  20. An assay to monitor HIV-1 protease activity for the identification of novel inhibitors in T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett J Hilton

    Full Text Available The emergence of resistant HIV strains, together with the severe side-effects of existing drugs and lack of development of effective anti-HIV vaccines highlight the need for novel antivirals, as well as innovative methods to facilitate their discovery. Here, we have developed an assay in T-cells to monitor the proteolytic activity of the HIV-1 protease (PR. The assay is based on the inducible expression of HIV-1 PR fused within the Gal4 DNA-binding and transactivation domains. The fusion protein binds to the Gal4 responsive element and activates the downstream reporter, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP gene only in the presence of an effective PR Inhibitor (PI. Thus, in this assay, eGFP acts as a biosensor of PR activity, making it ideal for flow cytometry based screening. Furthermore, the assay was developed using retroviral technology in T-cells, thus providing an ideal environment for the screening of potential novel PIs in a cell-type that represents the natural milieu of HIV infection. Clones with the highest sensitivity, and robust, reliable and reproducible reporter activity, were selected. The assay is easily adaptable to other PR variants, a multiplex platform, as well as to high-throughput plate reader based assays and will greatly facilitate the search for novel peptide and chemical compound based PIs in T-cells.

  1. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein. Importance of the C-terminal unstructured tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisne, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55(Gag), reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNA(Lys) 3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity.

  2. Tat-DJ-1 enhances cell survival by inhibition of oxidative stress, NF-κB and MAPK activation in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Yeo, Eun Ji; Shin, Min Jea; Choi, Yeon Joo; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2017-04-01

    To identify the protective effect of DJ-1 protein against oxidative stress-induced HepG2 cell death, we used cell-permeable wild type (WT) and a mutant (C106A Tat-DJ-1) protein. By using western blotting and fluorescence microscopy, we observed WT and C106A Tat-DJ-1 proteins were efficiently transduced into HepG2 cells. Transduced WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins increased cell survival and protected against DNA fragmentation and intracellular ROS generation levels in H2O2-exposed HepG2 cells. At the same time, transduced WT Tat-DJ-1 protein significantly inhibited NF-κB and MAPK (JNK and p38) activation as well as regulated the Bcl-2 and Bax expression levels. However, C106A Tat-DJ-1 protein did not show any protective effect against cell death responses in H2O2-exposed HepG2 cells. Oxidative stress-induced HepG2 cell death was significantly reduced by transduced WT Tat-DJ-1 protein, not by C106A Tat-DJ-1 protein. Thus, transduction of WT Tat-DJ-1 protein could be a novel strategy for promoting cell survival in situations of oxidative stress-induced HepG2 cell death.

  3. 新疆紫草提取物抗HIV-1体外活性研究(Ⅱ)%Activity of extracts from Arnebia Euchroma (Royle) Johnst. to HIV-1 key enzymes in vitro.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    买尔旦·马合木提; 古丽仙·胡加; 秦冬梅

    2009-01-01

    目的:研究新疆紫草水溶性组分Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ、Ⅳ对HIV-1 3个关键酶的体外活性.方法: 分别选用HIV-1整合酶(HIV-1 ingrase,HIV-1 IN),HIV-1蛋白酶 (HIV-1 protease ,HIV-1 PR) ,HIV-1逆转录酶(HIV-1 reverse transcriptase,HIV-1 RT)体外药效筛选模型,观察组分Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ和Ⅳ对以上酶的抑制作用.结果: 新疆紫草水溶性组分Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ和Ⅳ对HIV-1 IN具有一定的抑制活性,50%有效浓度(EC50)分别为2.21、 14.71、5.71和66.08 μg/ml.组分Ⅰ对HIV-1 RT的抑制活性小,EC50为5.63 μg/ml.结论: 新疆紫草水溶性提取物对HIV-1 IN具有抑制活性,对HIV-1 PR均无抑制活性.

  4. Human Paraoxonase-1 Activity Is Related to the Number of CD4+ T-Cells and Is Restored by Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Morganti Ferreira Maselli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1 activity is suggested to be altered in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1. We investigated PON1 activity in individuals receiving different regimens of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Methods. PON1 activity was evaluated in 91 HIV-1 seronegative and 624 HIV-1 infected individuals (115 were not undergoing therapy (ART-naïve, and 509 were receiving HAART. HIV-1 infected individuals were treated with the following: efavirenz (EFV; n=195 or nevirapine (NVP; n=95 or lopinavir/ritonavir (LOP/r; n=219. Serum levels of total cholesterol (TC, HDL, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL fractions and the atherogenic indices (AI, TC : HDL, and LDL : HDL ratios were determined. Results. PON1 activity (U/L was lower in the ART-naïve group compared with the other groups. PON1 activity correlated with CD4+ T-cell number of ART-naïve group (r=0,121; P=0,014. The LOP/r group showed a reduction in HDL and an increase in AI (TC : HDL ratio in comparison with other groups. Conclusion. PON1 activity was reduced in untreated individuals, but not in individuals receiving HAART. PON1 activity correlated with the number of CD4+ T-cells. The findings suggest that the activity of PON1 is associated with the immune status of HIV-1 infected individuals.

  5. Predefined GPGRAFY-Epitope-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies with Different Activities for Recognizing Native HIV-1 gp120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝灿辉; 田海军; 陈应华

    2004-01-01

    A seven-amino acid epitope GPGRAFY at the tip of the V3 loop in HIV-1 gp120 is the principal neutralizing epitope,and a subset of anti-V3 antibodies specific for this epitope shows a broad range of neutralizing activity.GPGRAFY-epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies were produced using predefined GPGRAFY-epitope-specific peptides instead of a natural or recombinant gp120 bearing this epitope.All six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) could recognize the GPGRAFY-epitope on peptides and two of the antibodies,9D8 and 2D7,could recognize recombinant gp120 in enzymelinked immunosorkentassy (ELISA) assays.In the flow cytometry analysis,the mAbs 9D8 and 2D7 could bind to HIV-Env+ CHO-WT cells and the specific bindings could be inhibited by the GPGRAFY-epitope peptide,which suggests that these two mAbs could recognize the native envelope protein gp120 expressed on the cell membrane.However,in syncytium assays,none of the mAbs was capable of inhibiting HIV-Env-mediated cell membrane fusion.The different activities for recognizing native HIV-1 gp120 might be associated with different antibody affinities against the epitopes.The development of conformational mimics of the neutralization epitope in the gp120 V3 loop could elicit neutralizing mAbs with high affinity.

  6. HIV-1-infected and immune-activated macrophages induce astrocytic differentiation of human cortical neural progenitor cells via the STAT3 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    Full Text Available Diminished adult neurogenesis is considered a potential mechanism in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD. In HAD, HIV-1-infected and immune-activated brain mononuclear phagocytes (MP; perivascular macrophages and microglia drive central nervous system (CNS inflammation and may alter normal neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS activated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM inhibit human neural progenitor cell (NPC neurogenesis, while enhancing astrogliogenesis through the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, in vitro and in vivo. Here we further test the hypothesis that HIV-1-infected/activated MDM promote NPC astrogliogenesis via activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, a critical factor for astrogliogenesis. Our results show that LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS-MCM and HIV-infected/LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS+HIV-MCM induced Janus kinase 1 (Jak1 and STAT3 activation. Induction of the Jak-STAT3 activation correlated with increased glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expression, demonstrating an induction of astrogliogenesis. Moreover, STAT3-targeting siRNA (siSTAT3 decreased MCM-induced STAT3 activation and NPC astrogliogenesis. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines (including IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α produced by LPS-activated and/or HIV-1-infected MDM may contribute to MCM-induced STAT3 activation and astrocytic differentiation. These observations were confirmed in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice with HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE. In HIVE mice, siRNA control (without target sequence, sicon pre-transfected NPCs injected with HIV-1-infected MDM showed more astrocytic differentiation and less neuronal differentiation of NPCs as compared to NPC injection alone. siSTAT3 abrogated HIV-1-infected MDM-induced astrogliogenesis of injected NPCs. Collectively, these

  7. Plasma levels of soluble CD27: a simple marker to monitor immune activation during potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE MILITO, A; ALEMAN, S; MARENZI, R; SÖNNERBORG, A; FUCHS, D; ZAZZI, M; CHIODI, F

    2002-01-01

    Plasma levels of soluble CD27 (sCD27) are elevated in diseases characterized by T cell activation and are used as a marker of immune activation. We assessed the usefulness of determining plasma sCD27 as a marker for monitoring immune activation in HIV-1-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A first cross-sectional examination of 68 HIV-1-infected and 18 normal subjects showed high levels of sCD27 in HIV-1 infection; plasma sCD27 was correlated to HIV-1 viraemia and inversely correlated to CD4+ T cell count. Twenty-six HIV-1-infected patients undergoing HAART were studied at baseline and after 6, 12, 18 and 24 months of therapy. Seven additional patients under HAART were analysed at baseline, during and after interruption of therapy. In the total population, HAART induced a significant and progressive reduction, but not a normalization, of plasma levels of sCD27 after 24 months. A full normalization of plasma sCD27 was observed in the virological responders (undetectable HIV-1 RNA at months 18 and 24) and also in patients with moderate immunodeficiency at baseline (CD4+ T cell count >200 cells/mm3). Changes in plasma neopterin paralleled the changes in sCD27 but only baseline sCD27 levels were predictive of a greater increase in CD4+ T cell count during the follow-up. Discontinuation of therapy resulted in a rapid increase of sCD27 plasma levels associated with viraemia rebound and drop in CD4+ T cell count. Our findings suggest that plasma sCD27 may represent an alternative and simple marker to monitor immune activation during potent antiretroviral therapy. HIV-1-induced immune activation can be normalized by HAART in successfully treated patients where the disease is not advanced. PMID:11966765

  8. Overcoming HIV-1 resistance to RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Daniel; Pusch, Oliver; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2007-05-01

    RNAi refers to the sequence-specific degradation of RNA that follows the cellular introduction of homologous short interfering (si) RNA. RNAi has emerged as a powerful tool to probe the function of genes of known sequence in vitro and in vivo. Advances in vector design permit the effective expression of siRNA in human cells. Numerous recent investigations have described the ability of RNAi to decrease the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in lymphocytic cells using siRNA targeting viral (e.g. tat, gag, rev) and host (e.g. CCR5, CD4) proteins. Can RNAi be used as a form of genetic therapy for HIV-1 infection? Recent data indicate that the dynamic replication kinetics of HIV-1 pose a considerable barrier to achieving durable virus suppression by RNAi with the rapid emergence of HIV-1 mutants resistant to siRNA. This review summarizes recent work on HIV-1 specific RNAi with a focus on potential strategies to overcome HIV-1 resistance to RNAi.

  9. Immune evasion activities of accessory proteins Vpu, Nef and Vif are conserved in acute and chronic HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlcochova, Petra; Apolonia, Luis; Kluge, Silvia F; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Kirchhoff, Frank; Malim, Michael H; Sauter, Daniel; Gupta, Ravindra K

    2015-08-01

    Heterosexual HIV-1 transmission has been identified as a genetic bottleneck and a single transmitted/founder (T/F) variant with reduced sensitivity to type I interferon initiates productive infection in most cases. We hypothesized that particularly active accessory protein(s) may confer T/F viruses with a selective advantage in establishing HIV infection. Thus, we tested vpu, vif and nef alleles from six T/F and six chronic (CC) viruses in assays for 9 immune evasion activities involving the counteraction of interferon-stimulated genes and modulation of ligands known to activate innate immune cells. All functions were highly conserved with no significant differences between T/F and CC viruses, suggesting that these accessory protein functions are important throughout the course of infection.

  10. Chronic immune activation in HIV-1 infection contributes to reduced interferon alpha production via enhanced CD40:CD40 ligand interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Donhauser

    Full Text Available Although a signature of increased interferon (IFN-alpha production is observed in HIV-1 infection, the response of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC to Toll-like receptor ligand stimulation is substantially impaired. This functional PDC deficit, which we specifically observed in HIV-1 infected individuals with less than 500 CD4+ T cells/µl, is not well understood. We provide evidence that the peripheral IFN-alpha production in HIV-1 infection is actively suppressed by the enhanced interaction of CD40 ligand (CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor family, and its receptor CD40, which are both upregulated upon immune activation. Plasma levels of soluble CD40L were significantly higher in untreated HIV-1 infected individuals (n = 52 than in subjects on long-term antiretroviral therapy (n = 62, p<0.03 and in uninfected control donors (n = 16, p<0.001. Concomitantly, cell-associated CD40L and the expression of the receptor CD40 on the PDC were significantly upregulated in HIV-1 infection (p<0.05. Soluble and cell-associated CD40L inhibited the PDC-derived IFN-alpha production by CpG oligodeoxynucleotides dose-dependently. This suppressive effect was observed at much lower, physiological CD40L concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of HIV-1 infected individuals compared to controls (p<0.05. The CpG-induced IFN-alpha production in PBMC of HIV-1 infected donors was directly correlated with PDC and CD4+ T cell counts, and inversely correlated with the viral loads (p<0.001. In HIV-1 infected donors with less than 500 CD4+ T cells/µl, the CpG-induced IFN-alpha production was significantly correlated with the percentage of CD40-expressing PDC and the level of CD40 expression on these cells (p<0.05, whereas CD40L plasma levels played a minor role. In addition, low-dose CD40L contributed to the enhanced production of interleukin 6 and 8 in PBMC of HIV-1 infected donors compared to controls. Our data support

  11. A WXW motif is required for the anticancer activity of the TAT-RasGAP317-326 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barras, David; Chevalier, Nadja; Zoete, Vincent; Dempsey, Rosemary; Lapouge, Karine; Olayioye, Monilola A; Michielin, Olivier; Widmann, Christian

    2014-08-22

    TAT-RasGAP317-326, a cell-permeable 10-amino acid-long peptide derived from the N2 fragment of p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP), sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis induced by various anticancer therapies. This RasGAP-derived peptide, by targeting the deleted in liver cancer-1 (DLC1) tumor suppressor, also hampers cell migration and invasion by promoting cell adherence and by inhibiting cell movement. Here, we systematically investigated the role of each amino acid within the RasGAP317-326 sequence for the anticancer activities of TAT-RasGAP317-326. We report here that the first three amino acids of this sequence, tryptophan, methionine, and tryptophan (WMW), are necessary and sufficient to sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and to reduce cell migration. The WMW motif was found to be critical for the binding of fragment N2 to DLC1. These results define the interaction mode between the active anticancer sequence of RasGAP and DLC1. This knowledge will facilitate the design of small molecules bearing the tumor-sensitizing and antimetastatic activities of TAT-RasGAP317-326.

  12. A WXW Motif Is Required for the Anticancer Activity of the TAT-RasGAP317–326 Peptide*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barras, David; Chevalier, Nadja; Zoete, Vincent; Dempsey, Rosemary; Lapouge, Karine; Olayioye, Monilola A.; Michielin, Olivier; Widmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    TAT-RasGAP317–326, a cell-permeable 10-amino acid-long peptide derived from the N2 fragment of p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP), sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis induced by various anticancer therapies. This RasGAP-derived peptide, by targeting the deleted in liver cancer-1 (DLC1) tumor suppressor, also hampers cell migration and invasion by promoting cell adherence and by inhibiting cell movement. Here, we systematically investigated the role of each amino acid within the RasGAP317–326 sequence for the anticancer activities of TAT-RasGAP317–326. We report here that the first three amino acids of this sequence, tryptophan, methionine, and tryptophan (WMW), are necessary and sufficient to sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and to reduce cell migration. The WMW motif was found to be critical for the binding of fragment N2 to DLC1. These results define the interaction mode between the active anticancer sequence of RasGAP and DLC1. This knowledge will facilitate the design of small molecules bearing the tumor-sensitizing and antimetastatic activities of TAT-RasGAP317–326. PMID:25008324

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat increases the expression of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 73-kilodalton subunit modulating cellular and viral expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Marco A; Sancho, Rocío; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein, which is essential for HIV gene expression and viral replication, is known to mediate pleiotropic effects on various cell functions. For instance, Tat protein is able to regulate the rate of transcription of host cellular genes and to interact with the signaling machinery, leading to cellular dysfunction. To study the effect that HIV-1 Tat exerts on the host cell, we identified several genes that were up- or down-regulated in tat-expressing cell lines by using the differential display method. HIV-1 Tat specifically increases the expression of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) 73-kDa subunit (CPSF3) without affecting the expression of the 160- and 100-kDa subunits of the CPSF complex. This complex comprises four subunits and has a key function in the 3'-end processing of pre-mRNAs by a coordinated interaction with other factors. CPSF3 overexpression experiments and knockdown of the endogenous CPSF3 by mRNA interference have shown that this subunit of the complex is an important regulatory protein for both viral and cellular gene expression. In addition to the known CPSF3 function in RNA polyadenylation, we also present evidence that this protein exerts transcriptional activities by repressing the mdm2 gene promoter. Thus, HIV-1-Tat up-regulation of CPSF3 could represent a novel mechanism by which this virus increases mRNA processing, causing an increase in both cell and viral gene expression.

  14. Complement lysis activity in autologous plasma is associated with lower viral loads during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Huber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the possibility that antibody-mediated complement lysis contributes to viremia control in HIV-1 infection, we measured the activity of patient plasma in mediating complement lysis of autologous primary virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sera from two groups of patients-25 with acute HIV-1 infection and 31 with chronic infection-were used in this study. We developed a novel real-time PCR-based assay strategy that allows reliable and sensitive quantification of virus lysis by complement. Plasma derived at the time of virus isolation induced complement lysis of the autologous virus isolate in the majority of patients. Overall lysis activity against the autologous virus and the heterologous primary virus strain JR-FL was higher at chronic disease stages than during the acute phase. Most strikingly, we found that plasma virus load levels during the acute but not the chronic infection phase correlated inversely with the autologous complement lysis activity. Antibody reactivity to the envelope (Env proteins gp120 and gp41 were positively correlated with the lysis activity against JR-FL, indicating that anti-Env responses mediated complement lysis. Neutralization and complement lysis activity against autologous viruses were not associated, suggesting that complement lysis is predominantly caused by non-neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively our data provide evidence that antibody-mediated complement virion lysis develops rapidly and is effective early in the course of infection; thus it should be considered a parameter that, in concert with other immune functions, steers viremia control in vivo.

  15. Selective histonedeacetylase inhibitor M344 intervenes in HIV-1 latency through increasing histone acetylation and activation of NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors present an exciting new approach to activate HIV production from latently infected cells to potentially enhance elimination of these cells and achieve a cure. M344, a novel HDAC inhibitor, shows robust activity in a variety of cancer cells and relatively low toxicity compared to trichostatin A (TSA. However, little is known about the effects and action mechanism of M344 in inducing HIV expression in latently infected cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Jurkat T cell model of HIV latency, we demonstrate that M344 effectively reactivates HIV-1 gene expression in latently infected cells. Moreover, M344-mediated activation of the latent HIV LTR can be strongly inhibited by a NF-κB inhibitor aspirin. We further show that M344 acts by increasing the acetylation of histone H3 and histone H4 at the nucleosome 1 (nuc-1 site of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR and by inducing NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and direct RelA DNA binding at the nuc-1 region of the HIV-1 LTR. We also found that M344 synergized with prostratin to activate the HIV-1 LTR promoter in latently infected cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest the potential of M344 in anti-latency therapies and an important role for histone modifications and NF-κB transcription factors in regulating HIV-1 LTR gene expression.

  16. P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) activity decreases raltegravir disposition in primary CD4+P-gphigh cells and correlates with HIV-1 viral load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuesa, Gerard; Arimany-Nardi, Cristina; Erkizia, Itziar; Cedeño, Samandhy; Moltó, José; Clotet, Bonaventura; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug-resistant-protein 1 (MRP1) on raltegravir intracellular drug disposition in CD4+ T cells, investigate the effect of HIV-1 infection on P-gp expression and correlate HIV-1 viraemia with P-gp activity in primary CD4+ T cell subsets. Methods The cellular accumulation ratio of [3H]raltegravir was quantified in CD4+ T cell lines overexpressing either P-gp (CEM-P-gp) or MRP1 (CEM-MRP1) and in primary CD3+CD4+ T cells with high (P-gphigh) and low P-gp activity (P-gplow); inhibition of efflux transporters was confirmed by the intracellular retention of calcein-AM. The correlation of P-gp activity with HIV-1 viraemia was assessed in naive and memory T cell subsets from 21 HIV-1-infected treatment-naive subjects. Results [3H]Raltegravir cellular accumulation ratio decreased in CEM-P-gp cells (P < 0.0001). XR9051 (a P-gp inhibitor) and HIV-1 PIs reversed this phenomenon. Primary CD4+P-gphigh cells accumulated less raltegravir (38.4% ± 9.6%) than P-gplow cells, whereas XR9051 also reversed this effect. In vitro HIV-1 infection of PBMCs and stimulation of CD4+ T cells increased P-gp mRNA and P-gp activity, respectively, while primary CD4+P-gphigh T cells sustained a higher HIV-1 replication than P-gplow cells. A significant correlation between HIV-1 viraemia and P-gp activity was found in different CD4+ T cell subsets, particularly memory CD4+ T cells (r = 0.792, P < 0.0001). Conclusions Raltegravir is a substrate of P-gp in CD4+ T cells. Primary CD4+P-gphigh T cells eliminate intracellular raltegravir more readily than P-gplow cells and HIV-1 viraemia correlates with P-gp overall activity. Specific CD4+P-gphigh T cell subsets could facilitate the persistence of viral replication in vivo and ultimately promote the appearance of drug resistance. PMID:27334660

  17. Structure-activity relationships of novel HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide CP32M%新型HIV-1gp41融合抑制剂CP32M的构效关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王孝花; 成健伟; 朱卫国; 董铭心; 种辉辉; 何玉先; 戴秋云

    2012-01-01

    Objective To probe the effect of length, electric charge and fragment replacement of the key domain VEWNEMT and other residues in CP32M on its inhibitory activity to HIV-1 gp41 fusion. Methods Based on CP32M, a series of polypeptides of varied lengths and with electric charges and other functional fragments were designed and synthe-sized. The anti-HIV-1 activities were tested using HIV-1 ⅢB virus, and interaction with N36 was determined by circular di-chroism spectrum and size-exclusion HPLC. Results Truncation and partial residue replacement in the fragment VEWNEMT or introduction of i to i + 4 Glu-Lys ion pair interaction in the center or at C terminus of CP32M resulted in a decrease in the anti-HIV-1 activity of gp41 and the content of a-helix. The substitution of VEWNEMT by the fragment NEKDLLE derived from C terminus of C34 and a gpl20 binding peptide RINNIPWSEAM rescued the inhibitory activity. Conclusion VEWNEMT is the key fragment for CP32M, and residues VE and MT are crucial functional amino acids. The replacement of VEWNEMT by other functional domain retains high anti-HIV-1 activity and high content of helical structure, suggesting that this fragment contains a commons binding area.%目的 研究新型融合多肽CP32M中VEWNEMT序列的长短、残基的极性及其他部位残基的极性对其抑制gp41融合活性的影响.方法 在多肽CP32M的基础上,通过对前7个氨基酸序列进行截取、部分替换、全部替换及改变其他位置氨基酸残基的极性设计合成系列多肽,测定多肽抑制HIV-1融合活性.应用圆二色谱、分子排阻色谱测定多肽与N36的结合功能.结果 截取、替换氨基酸后的肽抑制gp41融合的活性都不同程度降低,与N36结合形成六束螺旋的能力减弱.在CP32M中部及C端I与I+4位置引入Lys增加Glu-Lys离子对作用后,肽活性降低.用C34的C端氨基酸序列NEKDLLE及可与gp120结合的序列RINNIPWSEAM置换QIWNNMT后,多肽仍有很高活性.结论 片

  18. Symmetrical 1-pyrrolidineacetamide showing anti-HIV activity through a new binding site on HIV-1 integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li DU; Ya-xue ZHAO; Liu-meng YANG; Yong-tang ZHENG; Yun TANG; Xu SHEN; Hua-liang JIANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To characterize the functional and pharmacological features of a symmetrical 1-pyrrolidineacetamide,N,N'-(methylene-di-4,1-phenylene) bis-1-pyrrolidineacetamide,as a new anti-HIV compound which could competitively inhibit HIV-1 integrase (IN) binding to viral DNA.Methods:A surface plasma resonance (SPR)-based competitive assay was employed to determine the compound's inhibitory activity,and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell assay was used to qualify the antiviral activity.The potential binding sites were predicted by molecular modeling and determined by site-directed mutagenesis and a SPR binding assay.Results:l-pyrrolidineacetamide,N,N'-(methylene-di-4,1-phenylene) bis-1-pyrrolidineacetamide could competitively inhibit IN binding to viral DNA with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 7.29±0.68 μmol/L as investigated by SPR-based investigation.Another antiretroviral activity assay showed that this compound exhibited inhibition against HⅣ-Ⅰ(ⅢB) replication with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) value of 40.54 μmol/L in C8166 cells,and cytotoxicity with a cytotoxic concentration value of 173.84 μmol/L in mock-infected C8166 cells.Molecular docking predicted 3 potential residues as 1-pyrrolidineacetamide,N,N'-(methylene-di-4,1-phenylene)bis-1-pyrrolidineacetamide binding sites.The importance of 3 key amino acid residues (Lys103,Lys173,and Thr174) involved in the binding was further identified by site-directed mutagenesis and a SPR binding assay.Conclusion:This present work identified a new anti-HIV compound through a new IN-binding site which is expected to supply new potential drug-binding site information for HIV-1 integrase inhibitor discovery and development.

  19. Cardiac Dysfunction in HIV-1 Transgenic Mouse: Role of Stress and BAG3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Joseph Y; Gordon, Jennifer; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Tilley, Douglas G; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Klotman, Paul E; Khalili, Kamel; Feldman, Arthur M

    2015-08-01

    Since highly active antiretroviral therapy improved long-term survival of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, AIDS cardiomyopathy has become an increasingly relevant clinical problem. We used human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transgenic (Tg26) mouse to explore molecular mechanisms of AIDS cardiomyopathy. Tg26 mice had significantly lower left ventricular (LV) mass and smaller end-diastolic and end-systolic LV volumes. Under basal conditions, cardiac contractility and relaxation and single myocyte contraction dynamics were not different between wild-type (WT) and Tg26 mice. Ten days after open heart surgery, contractility and relaxation remained significantly depressed in Tg26 hearts, suggesting that Tg26 mice did not tolerate surgical stress well. To simulate heart failure in which expression of Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is reduced, we down-regulated BAG3 by small hairpin ribonucleic acid in WT and Tg26 hearts. BAG3 down-regulation significantly reduced contractility in Tg26 hearts. BAG3 overexpression rescued contractile abnormalities in myocytes expressing the HIV-1 protein Tat. We conclude: (i) Tg26 mice exhibit normal contractile function at baseline; (ii) Tg26 mice do not tolerate surgical stress well; (iii) BAG3 down-regulation exacerbated cardiac dysfunction in Tg26 mice; (iv) BAG3 overexpression rescued contractile abnormalities in myocytes expressing HIV-1 protein Tat; and (v) BAG3 may occupy a role in pathogenesis of AIDS cardiomyopathy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. HIV-1 Protein Nef Inhibits Activity of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 by Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennelle, Lucas; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Sviridov, Dmitri; Popratiloff, Anastas; Brichacek, Beda; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, in part due to an altered high density lipoprotein profile exacerbated by down-modulation and impairment of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) activity by the HIV-1 protein Nef. However, the mechanisms of this Nef effect remain unknown. Here, we show that Nef interacts with an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calnexin, which regulates folding and maturation of glycosylated proteins. Nef disrupted interaction between calnexin and ABCA1 but increased affinity and enhanced interaction of calnexin with HIV-1 gp160. The Nef mutant that did not bind to calnexin did not affect the calnexin-ABCA1 interaction. Interaction with calnexin was essential for functionality of ABCA1, as knockdown of calnexin blocked the ABCA1 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, reduced ABCA1 abundance, and inhibited cholesterol efflux; the same effects were observed after Nef overexpression. However, the effects of calnexin knockdown and Nef on cholesterol efflux were not additive; in fact, the combined effect of these two factors together did not differ significantly from the effect of calnexin knockdown alone. Interestingly, gp160 and ABCA1 interacted with calnexin differently; although gp160 binding to calnexin was dependent on glycosylation, glycosylation was of little importance for the interaction between ABCA1 and calnexin. Thus, Nef regulates the activity of calnexin to stimulate its interaction with gp160 at the expense of ABCA1. This study identifies a mechanism for Nef-dependent inactivation of ABCA1 and dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25170080

  1. Species-specific activity of SIV Nef and HIV-1 Vpu in overcoming restriction by tetherin/BST2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Jia

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin, also known as BST2, CD317 or HM1.24, was recently identified as an interferon-inducible host-cell factor that interferes with the detachment of virus particles from infected cells. HIV-1 overcomes this restriction by expressing an accessory protein, Vpu, which counteracts tetherin. Since lentiviruses of the SIV(smm/mac/HIV-2 lineage do not have a vpu gene, this activity has likely been assumed by other viral gene products. We found that deletion of the SIV(mac239 nef gene significantly impaired virus release in cells expressing rhesus macaque tetherin. Virus release could be restored by expressing Nef in trans. However, Nef was unable to facilitate virus release in the presence of human tetherin. Conversely, Vpu enhanced virus release in the presence of human tetherin, but not in the presence of rhesus tetherin. In accordance with the species-specificity of Nef in mediating virus release, SIV Nef downregulated cell-surface expression of rhesus tetherin, but did not downregulate human tetherin. The specificity of SIV Nef for rhesus tetherin mapped to four amino acids in the cytoplasmic domain of the molecule that are missing from human tetherin, whereas the specificity of Vpu for human tetherin mapped to amino acid differences in the transmembrane domain. Nef alleles of SIV(smm, HIV-2 and HIV-1 were also able to rescue virus release in the presence of both rhesus macaque and sooty mangabey tetherin, but were generally ineffective against human tetherin. Thus, the ability of Nef to antagonize tetherin from these Old World primates appears to be conserved among the primate lentiviruses. These results identify Nef as the viral gene product of SIV that opposes restriction by tetherin in rhesus macaques and sooty mangabeys, and reveal species-specificity in the activities of both Nef and Vpu in overcoming tetherin in their respective hosts.

  2. Epigenetic analysis of HIV-1 proviral genomes from infected individuals: Predominance of unmethylated CpG’s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stefanie; Weiser, Barbara; Kemal, Kimdar S.; Burger, Harold; Ramirez, Christina M.; Korn, Klaus; Anastos, Kathryn; Kaul, Rupert; Kovacs, Colin; Doerfler, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to cure HIV-1 infections aim at eliminating proviral DNA. Integrated DNA from various viruses often becomes methylated de novo and transcriptionally inactivated. We therefore investigated CpG methylation profiles of 55 of 94 CpG’s (58.5%) in HIV-1 proviral genomes including ten CpG’s in each LTR and additional CpG’s in portions of gag, env, nef, rev, and tat genes. We analyzed 33 DNA samples from PBMC’s of 23 subjects representing a broad spectrum of HIV-1 disease. In 22 of 23 HIV-1-infected individuals, there were only unmethylated CpG’s regardless of infection status. In one long term nonprogressor, however, methylation of proviral DNA varied between 0 and 75% over an 11-year period although the CD4+ counts remained stable. Hence levels of proviral DNA methylation can fluctuate. The preponderance of unmethylated CpG’s suggests that proviral methylation is not a major factor in regulating HIV-1 proviral activity in PBMC’s. Unmethylated CpG’s may play a role in HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. PMID:24418551

  3. Updates: Routine screening for antibodies to HIV-1, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    During routine testing of civilian applicants for U.S. military service, the overall seroprevalence of antibodies to HIV-1 was lower in 2010 than in any year since 1990. Among members of the active components of the U.S. Army and Air Force, HIV-1 seroprevalences were higher in 2008-2010 than in recent prior years. Among members of the active components of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, the Marine Corps Reserve, and the Army National Guard, HIV-1 seroprevalences have slightly declined or remained relatively stable for at least ten years. In the reserve components of most of the service branches, it is difficult to discern long-term trends because of instability of seroprevalences observed in the relatively small numbers of reserve component members tested each year.

  4. Co-delivery of paclitaxel and TOS-cisplatin via TAT-targeted solid lipid nanoparticles with synergistic antitumor activity against cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Han, Li; Liu, Junyan; Han, Shumei; Chen, Zhen; Jiang, Lixi

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is a major world health problem for women. Currently, cancer research focuses on improving therapy for cervical cancer using various treatment options such as co-delivery of chemotherapeutic agents by nanocarriers. Purpose The aim of this study was to develop trans-activating transcriptional activator (TAT)-modified solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) for co-delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) and α-tocopherol succinate-cisplatin prodrug (TOS-CDDP) (TAT PTX/TOS-CDDP SLNs) in order to achieve synergistic antitumor activity against cervical cancer. Methods Lipid prodrug of CDDP (TOS-CDDP) and TAT-containing polyethylene glycol-distearoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (TAT-PEG-DSPE) were synthesized. TAT PTX/TOS-CDDP SLNs were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation method. Physicochemical characteristics of SLNs such as size, morphology, and release profiles were explored. In vitro and in vivo studies were carried out to assess the efficacy of their antitumor activity in target cells. Results TAT PTX/TOS-CDDP SLNs could be successfully internalized by HeLa cells and showed a synergistic effect in the suppression of cervical tumor cell growth. They exhibited high tumor tissue accumulation, superior antitumor efficiency, and much lower toxicity in vivo. Conclusion The present study indicates that the co-delivery system provides a promising platform as a combination therapy for the treatment of cervical cancer, and possibly other types of cancer as well. PMID:28203075

  5. Reversible and efficient activation of HIV-1 cell entry by a tyrosine-sulfated peptide dissects endocytic entry and inhibitor mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Gomes, Michelle M; Kabat, David

    2014-04-01

    HIV-1 membranes contain gp120-gp41 trimers. Binding of gp120 to CD4 and a coreceptor (CCR5 or CXCR4) reduces the constraint on metastable gp41, enabling a series of conformational changes that cause membrane fusion. An analytic difficulty occurs because these steps occur slowly and asynchronously within cohorts of adsorbed virions. We previously isolated HIV-1JRCSF variants that efficiently use CCR5 mutants severely damaged in the tyrosine-sulfated amino terminus or extracellular loop 2. Surprisingly, both independent adaptations included gp120 mutations S298N, F313L, and N403S, supporting other evidence that they function by weakening gp120's grip on gp41 rather than by altering gp120 binding to specific CCR5 sites. Although several natural HIV-1 isolates reportedly use CCR5(Δ18) (CCR5 with a deletion of 18 N-terminal amino acids, including the tyrosine-sulfated region) when the soluble tyrosine-sulfated peptide is present, we show that HIV-1JRCSF with the adaptive mutations [HIV-1JRCSF(Ad)] functions approximately 100 times more efficiently and that coreceptor activation is reversible, enabling synchronous efficient entry control under physiological conditions. This system revealed that three-stranded gp41 folding intermediates susceptible to the inhibitor enfuvirtide form slowly and asynchronously on cell surface virions but resolve rapidly, with virions generally forming only one target. Adsorbed virions asynchronously and transiently become competent for entry at 37°C but are inactivated if the CCR5 peptide is absent during their window of opportunity. This competency is conferred by endocytosis, which results in inactivation if the peptide is absent. For both wild-type and adapted HIV-1 isolates, early gp41 refolding steps obligatorily occur on cell surfaces, whereas the final step(s) is endosomal. This system powerfully dissects HIV-1 entry and inhibitor mechanisms. We present a powerful means to reversibly and efficiently activate or terminate HIV-1 entry

  6. Novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors screened by the cytoprotective function of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Kim

    Full Text Available The PI3K/Akt pathway regulates various stress-related cellular responses such as cell survival, cell proliferation, metabolism and protein synthesis. Many cancer cell types display the activation of this pathway, and compounds inhibiting this cell survival pathway have been extensively evaluated as anti-cancer agents. In addition to cancers, several human viruses, such as HTLV, HPV, HCV and HIV-1, also modulate this pathway, presumably in order to extend the life span of the infected target cells for productive viral replication. The expression of HIV-1 Tat protein exhibited the cytoprotective effect in macrophages and a human microglial cell line by inhibiting the negative regulator of this pathway, PTEN. This cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 appears to contribute to the long-term survival and persistent HIV-1 production in human macrophage reservoirs. In this study we exploited the PI3K/Akt dependent cytoprotective effect of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. We screened a collection of compounds known to modulate inflammation, and identified three novel compounds: Lancemaside A, Compound K and Arctigenin that abolished the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. All three compounds antagonized the kinase activity of Akt. Further detailed signaling studies revealed that each of these three compounds targeted different steps of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Arctigenin regulates the upstream PI3K enzyme from converting PIP2 to PIP3. Lancemaside A1 inhibited the movement of Akt to the plasma membrane, a critical step for Akt activation. Compound K inhibited Akt phosphorylation. This study supports that Tat-expressing CHME5 cells are an effective model system for screening novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors.

  7. Novel PI3K/Akt Inhibitors Screened by the Cytoprotective Function of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Baek

    2011-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt pathway regulates various stress-related cellular responses such as cell survival, cell proliferation, metabolism and protein synthesis. Many cancer cell types display the activation of this pathway, and compounds inhibiting this cell survival pathway have been extensively evaluated as anti-cancer agents. In addition to cancers, several human viruses, such as HTLV, HPV, HCV and HIV-1, also modulate this pathway, presumably in order to extend the life span of the infected target cells for productive viral replication. The expression of HIV-1 Tat protein exhibited the cytoprotective effect in macrophages and a human microglial cell line by inhibiting the negative regulator of this pathway, PTEN. This cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 appears to contribute to the long-term survival and persistent HIV-1 production in human macrophage reservoirs. In this study we exploited the PI3K/Akt dependent cytoprotective effect of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. We screened a collection of compounds known to modulate inflammation, and identified three novel compounds: Lancemaside A, Compound K and Arctigenin that abolished the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. All three compounds antagonized the kinase activity of Akt. Further detailed signaling studies revealed that each of these three compounds targeted different steps of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Arctigenin regulates the upstream PI3K enzyme from converting PIP2 to PIP3. Lancemaside A1 inhibited the movement of Akt to the plasma membrane, a critical step for Akt activation. Compound K inhibited Akt phosphorylation. This study supports that Tat-expressing CHME5 cells are an effective model system for screening novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors. PMID:21765914

  8. Synthesis of a new class of HIV-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farese-Di Giorgio, A; Pairot, S; Patino, N; Condom, R; Di Giorgio, C; Aumelas, A; Aubertin, A M; Guedj, R

    1999-02-01

    A new family of molecules potentially inhibitors of the HIV-1 Tat-TAR complex was prepared. These compounds are constituted by dinucleotide analogs (PNA dimer) bound, through a linker, to an arginine residue. In this series, several molecules inhibit viral development in cell culture with a micromolar IC50 and without cellular toxicity until 200 microM concentration.

  9. Activity of phosphino palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes against HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Ntombenhle H; Elkhadir, Afag Y F; Gordhan, Bhavna G; Kana, Bavesh D; Darkwa, James; Meyer, Debra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is currently complicated by increased prevalence of co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The development of drug candidates that offer the simultaneous management of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) would be of great benefit in the holistic treatment of HIV/AIDS, especially in sub-Saharan Africa which has the highest global prevalence of HIV-TB coinfection. Bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylpalladium(II) chloride (1), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-pyridylplatinum(II) chloride (2), bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylpalladium(II) chloride (3) and bis(diphenylphosphino)-2-ethylpyridylplatinum(II) (4) were investigated for the inhibition of HIV-1 through interactions with the viral protease. The complexes were subsequently assessed for biological potency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv by determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) using broth microdilution. Complex (3) showed the most significant and competitive inhibition of HIV-1 protease (p = 0.014 at 100 µM). Further studies on its in vitro effects on whole virus showed reduced viral infectivity by over 80 % at 63 µM (p < 0.05). In addition, the complex inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at an MIC of 5 µM and was non-toxic to host cells at all active concentrations (assessed by tetrazolium dye and real time cell electronic sensing). In vitro evidence is provided here for the possibility of utilizing a single metal-based compound for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and TB.

  10. New soluble-formazan assay for HIV-1 cytopathic effects: application to high-flux screening of synthetic and natural products for AIDS-antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weislow, O S; Kiser, R; Fine, D L; Bader, J; Shoemaker, R H; Boyd, M R

    1989-04-19

    We have developed an effective and optimally safe microculture method for rapid and convenient assay of the in vitro cytopathic effects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) on human lymphoblastoid or other suitable host cells. The assay procedure is applicable to the evaluation of drug effects on in vitro infections induced directly in cultured host cells by cell-free HIV-1 or by coculture with H9 cells chronically infected with HIV-1. The assay uses a newly developed tetrazolium reagent that is metabolically reduced by viable cells to yield a soluble, colored formazan product measurable by conventional colorimetric techniques. This simple microassay minimizes the number of plate manipulations typically required with other assay methods and, coupled with computerized data collection and analysis, facilitates large-scale screening of agents for potential antiviral activity. To support and enhance the discovery of new anti-HIV-1 agents, the National Cancer Institute is offering investigators worldwide the opportunity to submit new candidate agents for anti-HIV-1 screening with this method.

  11. Aqueous extracts from peppermint, sage and lemon balm leaves display potent anti-HIV-1 activity by increasing the virion density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumann Ingo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aqueous extracts from leaves of well known species of the Lamiaceae family were examined for their potency to inhibit infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. Results Extracts from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., peppermint (Mentha × piperita L., and sage (Salvia officinalis L. exhibited a high and concentration-dependent activity against the infection of HIV-1 in T-cell lines, primary macrophages, and in ex vivo tonsil histocultures with 50% inhibitory concentrations as low as 0.004%. The aqueous Lamiaceae extracts did not or only at very high concentrations interfere with cell viability. Mechanistically, extract exposure of free virions potently and rapidly inhibited infection, while exposure of surface-bound virions or target cells alone had virtually no antiviral effect. In line with this observation, a virion-fusion assay demonstrated that HIV-1 entry was drastically impaired following treatment of particles with Lamiaceae extracts, and the magnitude of this effect at the early stage of infection correlated with the inhibitory potency on HIV-1 replication. Extracts were active against virions carrying diverse envelopes (X4 and R5 HIV-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, ecotropic murine leukemia virus, but not against a non-enveloped adenovirus. Following exposure to Lamiaceae extracts, the stability of virions as well as virion-associated levels of envelope glycoprotein and processed Gag protein were unaffected, while, surprisingly, sucrose-density equilibrium gradient analyses disclosed a marked increase of virion density. Conclusion Aqueous extracts from Lamiaceae can drastically and rapidly reduce the infectivity of HIV-1 virions at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An extract-induced enhancement of the virion's density prior to its surface engagement appears to be the most likely mode of action. By harbouring also a strong activity against herpes simplex virus type 2, these extracts may provide a basis

  12. CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygosity, HIV-1 Reservoir Size, and Lymphocyte Activation in Individuals Receiving Long-term Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hanhauser, Emily; Harrison, Linda J; Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Jost, Stephanie; Bosch, Ronald J; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study of the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reservoir size, lymphocyte activation, and CCR5 expression in 114 CCR5(Δ32/WT) and 177 wild-type CCR5 AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Overall, no significant differences were found between groups for any of these parameters. However, higher levels of CCR5 expression correlated with lower amounts of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA. The relationship between CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity, CCR5 expression, and markers of HIV-1 persistence is likely to be complex and may be influenced by factors such as the duration of ART.

  13. 2B4 expression on natural killer cells increases in HIV-1 infected patients followed prospectively during highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Ullum, H; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection influences natural killer (NK) cell expression of inhibitory NK receptors and activating natural cytotoxicity receptors. It is unknown whether expression of the co-stimulatory NK cell receptor 2B4 (CD244) on NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells are affected...... expression on CD3- CD16+ NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells, proviral-DNA and plasma soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor (sTNFr)-II were investigated 6-monthly. For comparison, 2B4 expression was investigated in 20 healthy individuals. The concentration of 2B4+ NK cells was initially reduced in HIV-1 infected...... patients (P cells in HIV-1 infected patients was normal and did not change during follow-up. The relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) of 2B4 increased on both NK cells and CD3+ CD8+ cells during...

  14. Inhibition of the ribonuclease H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by GSK5750 correlates with slow enzyme-inhibitor dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Ngure, Marianne; Johns, Brian A; DeAnda, Felix; Gerondelis, Peter; Götte, Matthias

    2014-06-06

    Compounds that efficiently inhibit the ribonuclease (RNase) H activity of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) have yet to be developed. Here, we demonstrate that GSK5750, a 1-hydroxy-pyridopyrimidinone analog, binds to the enzyme with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of ~400 nM. Inhibition of HIV-1 RNase H is specific, as DNA synthesis is not affected. Moreover, GSK5750 does not inhibit the activity of Escherichia coli RNase H. Order-of-addition experiments show that GSK5750 binds to the free enzyme in an Mg(2+)-dependent fashion. However, as reported for other active site inhibitors, binding of GSK5750 to a preformed enzyme-substrate complex is severely compromised. The bound nucleic acid prevents access to the RNase H active site, which represents a possible biochemical hurdle in the development of potent RNase H inhibitors. Previous studies suggested that formation of a complex with the prototypic RNase H inhibitor β-thujaplicinol is slow, and, once formed, it dissociates rapidly. This unfavorable kinetic behavior can limit the potency of RNase H active site inhibitors. Although the association kinetics of GSK5750 remains slow, our data show that this compound forms a long lasting complex with HIV-1 RT. We conclude that slow dissociation of the inhibitor and HIV-1 RT improves RNase H active site inhibitors and may circumvent the obstacle posed by the inability of these compounds to bind to a preformed enzyme-substrate complex.

  15. Strategic addition of an N-linked glycan to a monoclonal antibody improves its HIV-1-neutralizing activity

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ruijiang; Oren, Deena A.; Franco, David; Seaman, Michael S; Ho, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4—a key receptor for HIV—and blocks HIV-1 infection. However, HIV-1 strains with mutations resulting in loss of an N-linked glycan from the V5 loop of the envelope protein gp120 are resistant to ibalizumab. Previous structural analysis suggests that this glycan fills a void between the gp120 V5 loop and the ibalizumab L chain, perhaps causing steric hindrance that disrupts viral entry. If this void contributes to HIV-1 resistanc...

  16. HIV-1 Vpr protein activates the NF-κB pathway to promote G2/M cell cycle arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhibin Liang; Ruikang Liu; Yongquan Lin; Chen Liang; Juan Tan; Wentao Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Viral protein R(Vpr) plays an important role in the replication and pathogenesis of Human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1). Some of the various functions attributed to Vpr, including the induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest, activating the NF-κB pathway, and promoting viral reverse transcription, might be interrelated. To test this hypothesis, a panel of Vpr mutants were investigated for their ability to induce G2/M arrest and to activate the NF-κB pathway. The results showed that the Vpr mutants that failed to activate NF-κB also lost the activity to induce G2/M arrest, which suggests that inducing G2/M arrest via Vpr depends at least partially on the activation of NF-κB. This latter possibility is supported by data showing that knocking down the key factors in the NF-κB pathway – p65, Rel B, IKKα, or IKKβ– partially rescued the G2/M arrest induced by Vpr.Our results suggest that the NF-κB pathway is probably involved in Vpr-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest.

  17. Independent evolution of Fc- and Fab-mediated HIV-1-specific antiviral antibody activity following acute infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Tonelli, Andrew; Suscovich, Todd J.; Licht, Anna F.; Mikell, Iliyana; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Streeck, Hendrik; Klasse, P.J.; Moore, John P.; Alter, Galit

    2014-01-01

    Fc-related antibody activities, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), or more broadly, antibody-mediated cellular viral inhibition (ADCVI), play a role in curbing early SIV viral replication, are enriched in human long-term infected non-progressors, and could potentially contribute to protection from infection. However, little is known about the mechanism by which such humoral immune responses are naturally induced following infection. Here we focused on the early evolution of the functional antibody response, largely driven by the Fc portion of the antibody, in the context of the evolving binding and neutralizing antibody response, which is driven mainly by the antibody binding fragment (Fab). We show that ADCVI/ADCC-inducing responses in humans are rapidly generated following acute HIV-1 infection, peak at approximately 6 months post-infection, but decay rapidly in the setting of persistent immune activation, as Fab-related activities persistently increase. Moreover, the loss of Fc activity occurred in synchrony with a loss of HIV-specific IgG3 responses. Our data strongly suggest that Fc- and Fab-related antibody functions are modulated in a distinct manner following acute HIV infection. Vaccination strategies intended to optimally induce both sets of antiviral antibody activities may, therefore, require a fine-tuning of the inflammatory response. PMID:25043633

  18. HIV-1 infection ex vivo accelerates measles virus infection by upregulating signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) in CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuki, Yu-ya; Terahara, Kazutaka; Shibusawa, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tsuchiya, Takatsugu; Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Ishige, Masayuki; Okada, Seiji; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Morikawa, Yuko; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Takeda, Makoto; Yanagi, Yusuke; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2012-07-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection in children harboring human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is often fatal, even in the presence of neutralizing antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between HIV-1 and wild-type MV (MVwt) or an MV vaccine strain (MVvac) during dual infection. The results showed that the frequencies of MVwt- and MVvac-infected CD4(+) T cells within the resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were increased 3- to 4-fold after HIV-1 infection, and this was associated with a marked upregulation of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) expression on CD4(+) T cells but not on CD8(+) T cells. SLAM upregulation was induced by infection with a replication-competent HIV-1 isolate comprising both the X4 and R5 types and to a lesser extent by a pseudotyped HIV-1 infection. Notably, SLAM upregulation was observed in HIV-infected as well as -uninfected CD4(+) T cells and was abrogated by the removal of HLA-DR(+) cells from the PBMC culture. Furthermore, SLAM upregulation did not occur in uninfected PBMCs cultured together with HIV-infected PBMCs in compartments separated by a permeable membrane, indicating that no soluble factors were involved. Rather, CD4(+) T cell activation mediated through direct contact with dendritic cells via leukocyte function-associated molecule 1 (LFA-1)/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and LFA-3/CD2 was critical. Thus, HIV-1 infection induces a high level of SLAM expression on CD4(+) T cells, which may enhance their susceptibility to MV and exacerbate measles in coinfected individuals.

  19. Expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells promotes differentiation of regulatory T cells in HIV-1+ individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Zhao, Juan; Ren, Jun P; Wu, Xiao Y; Morrison, Zheng D; Elgazzar, Mohamed A; Ning, Shun B; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2016-06-19

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) contribute to HIV-1 disease progression by impairing antiviral immunity; however, the precise mechanisms responsible for the development of Tregs in the setting of HIV-1 infection are incompletely understood. In this study, we provide evidence that HIV-induced expansion of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) promote the differentiation of Foxp3 Tregs. We measured MDSC induction and cytokine expression by flow cytometry and analyzed their functions by coculturing experiments. We observed a dramatic increase in M-MDSC frequencies in the peripheral blood of HIV-1 seropositive (HIV-1) individuals, even in those on antiretroviral therapy with undetectable viremia, when compared with healthy participants. We also observed increases in M-MDSCs after incubating healthy peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with HIV-1 proteins (gp120 or Tat) or Toll-like receptor 4 ligand lipopolysaccharides in vitro, an effect that could be abrogated in the presence of the phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 inhibitor, STA-21. Functional analyses indicated that M-MDSCs from HIV-1 individuals express higher levels of IL-10, tumor growth factor-β, IL-4 receptor α, p47, programmed death-ligand 1, and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 - all of which are known mediators of myelopoiesis and immunosuppression. Importantly, incubation of healthy CD4 T cells with MDSCs derived from HIV-1 individuals significantly increased differentiation of Foxp3 Tregs. In addition, depletion of MDSCs from PBMCs of HIV-1 individuals led to a significant reduction of Foxp3 Tregs and increase of IFNγ production by CD4 T effector cells. These results suggest that HIV-induced MDSCs promote Treg cell development and inhibit T cell function - a hallmark of many chronic infectious diseases.

  20. HIV-1 Nef binds the DOCK2-ELMO1 complex to activate rac and inhibit lymphocyte chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Janardhan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The infectious cycle of primate lentiviruses is intimately linked to interactions between cells of the immune system. Nef, a potent virulence factor, alters cellular environments to increase lentiviral replication in the host, yet the mechanisms underlying these effects have remained elusive. Since Nef likely functions as an adaptor protein, we exploited a proteomic approach to directly identify molecules that Nef targets to subvert the signaling machinery in T cells. We purified to near homogeneity a major Nef-associated protein complex from T cells and identified by mass spectroscopy its subunits as DOCK2-ELMO1, a key activator of Rac in antigen- and chemokine-initiated signaling pathways, and Rac. We show that Nef activates Rac in T cell lines and in primary T cells following infection with HIV-1 in the absence of antigenic stimuli. Nef activates Rac by binding the DOCK2-ELMO1 complex, and this interaction is linked to the abilities of Nef to inhibit chemotaxis and promote T cell activation. Our data indicate that Nef targets a critical switch that regulates Rac GTPases downstream of chemokine- and antigen-initiated signaling pathways. This interaction enables Nef to influence multiple aspects of T cell function and thus provides an important mechanism by which Nef impacts pathogenesis by primate lentiviruses.

  1. Active cAMP-dependent protein kinase incorporated within highly purified HIV-1 particles is required for viral infectivity and interacts with viral capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Christine; Hemonnot, Bénédicte; Gay, Bernard; Bardy, Martine; Sanchiz, Céline; Devaux, Christian; Briant, Laurence

    2003-09-12

    Host cell components, including protein kinases such as ERK-2/mitogen-activated protein kinase, incorporated within human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions play a pivotal role in the ability of HIV to infect and replicate in permissive cells. The present work provides evidence that the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (C-PKA) is packaged within HIV-1 virions as demonstrated using purified subtilisin-digested viral particles. Virus-associated C-PKA was shown to be enzymatically active and able to phosphorylate synthetic substrate in vitro. Suppression of virion-associated C-PKA activity by specific synthetic inhibitor had no apparent effect on viral precursor maturation and virus assembly. However, virus-associated C-PKA activity was demonstrated to regulate HIV-1 infectivity as assessed by single round infection assays performed by using viruses produced from cells expressing an inactive form of C-PKA. In addition, virus-associated C-PKA was found to co-precipitate with and to phosphorylate the CAp24gag protein. Altogether our results indicate that virus-associated C-PKA regulates HIV-1 infectivity, possibly by catalyzing phosphorylation of the viral CAp24gag protein.

  2. Bulk culture levels of specific cytotoxic T-cell activity against HIV-1 proteins are not associated with risk of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aladdin, H; Ullum, H; Lepri, A Cozzi

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to control and influence the outcome of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is not fully understood. The association between HIV-CTL activity and disease progression was evaluated prospectively in 36 HIV-1-infected individuals with a median fo...

  3. Early preservation of CXCR5+ PD-1+ helper T cells and B cell activation predict the breadth of neutralizing antibody responses in chronic HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Kristen; Altfeld, Marcus; Alter, Galit; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2014-11-01

    Much is known about the characteristics of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) generated during HIV-1 infection, but little is known about immunological mechanisms responsible for their development in only a minority of those infected by HIV-1. By monitoring longitudinally a cohort of HIV-1-infected subjects, we observed that the preservation of CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T helper cell frequencies and activation status of B cells during the first year of infection correlates with the maximum breadth of plasma neutralizing antibody responses during chronic infection independently of viral load. Although, during the first year of infection, no differences were observed in the abilities of peripheral CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T helper cells to induce antibody secretion by autologous naive B cells, higher frequencies of class-switched antibodies were detected in cocultures of CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T and B cells from the subjects who later developed broadly neutralizing antibody responses than those who did not. Furthermore, B cells from the former subjects had higher expression of AICDA than B cells from the latter subjects, and transcript levels correlated with the frequency of CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells. Thus, the early preservation of CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells and B cell function are central to the development of bNAbs. Our study provides a possible explanation for their infrequent generation during HIV-1 infection. Broadly neutralizing antibodies are developed by HIV-1-infected subjects, but so far (and despite intensive efforts over the past 3 decades) they have not been elicited by immunization. Understanding how bNAbs are generated during natural HIV-1 infection and why only some HIV-1-infected subjects generate such antibodies will assist our efforts to elicit bNAbs by immunization. CXCR5(+) PD-1(+) CD4(+) T cells are critical for the development of high-affinity antigen-specific antibody responses. In our study, we found that the HIV-1-infected subjects who develop bNAbs have a higher

  4. Genome-wide innate immune responses in HIV-1-infected macrophages are preserved despite attenuation of the NF-kappa B activation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Tsang, Jhen; Miller, Robert F; Straschewski, Sarah; Kellam, Paul; Chain, Benjamin M; Katz, David R

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 infection at many levels. They provide permissive cells at the site of inoculation, augment virus transfer to T cells, generate long-lived viral reservoirs, and cause bystander cell apoptosis. A body of evidence suggests that the role of macrophages in cellular host defense is also compromised by HIV-1 infection. In this respect, macrophages are potent cells of the innate immune system that initiate and regulate wide-ranging immunological responses. This study focuses on the effect of HIV-1 infection on innate immune responses by macrophages at the level of signal transduction, whole genome transcriptional profiling, and cytokine secretion. We show that in an ex vivo model, M-CSF-differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages uniformly infected with replicating CCR5-tropic HIV-1, without cytopathic effect, exhibit selective attenuation of the NF-kappaB activation pathway in response to TLR4 and TLR2 stimulation. However, functional annotation clustering analysis of genome-wide transcriptional responses to LPS stimulation suggests substantial preservation of gene expression changes at the systems level, with modest attenuation of a subset of up-regulated LPS-responsive genes, and no effect on a selection of inflammatory cytokine responses at the protein level. These results extend existing reports of inhibitory interactions between HIV-1 accessory proteins and NF-kappaB signaling pathways, and whole genome expression profiling provides comprehensive assessment of the consequent effects on immune response gene expression. Unexpectedly, our data suggest innate immune responses are broadly preserved with limited exceptions, and pave the way for further study of the complex relationship between HIV-1 and immunological pathways within macrophages.

  5. Persistent Inflammation and Endothelial Activation in HIV-1 Infected Patients after 12 Years of Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ullum, Henrik; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART).......The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART)....

  6. Monitoring CD27 expression to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity in HIV-1 infected individuals in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Alexandra; Haule, Antelmo; Reither, Klaus; Ngwenyama, Njabulo; Rachow, Andrea; Meyerhans, Andreas; Maboko, Leonard; Koup, Richard A; Hoelscher, Michael; Geldmacher, Christof

    2011-01-01

    The level of bacterial activity is only poorly defined during asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. The objective was to study the capacity of a new biomarker, the expression of the T cell maturation marker CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cells, to identify active tuberculosis (TB) disease in subjects from a MTB and HIV endemic region. The frequency and CD27 expression of circulating MTB-specific CD4 T cells was determined in 96 study participants after stimulation with purified protein derivative (PPD) using intracellular cytokine staining for IFNgamma (IFNγ). Subjects were then stratified by their TB and HIV status. Within PPD responders, a CD27(-) phenotype was associated with active TB in HIV(-) (p = 0.0003) and HIV(+) (p = 0.057) subjects, respectively. In addition, loss of CD27 expression preceded development of active TB in one HIV seroconverter. Interestingly, in contrast to HIV(-) subjects, MTB-specific CD4 T cell populations from HIV(+) TB-asymptomatic subjects were often dominated by CD27(-) cells. These data indicate that down-regulation of CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cell could be used as a biomarker of active TB, potentially preceding clinical TB disease. Furthermore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that late, chronic HIV infection is frequently associated with increased mycobacterial activity in vivo. The analysis of T cell maturation and activation markers might thus be a useful tool to monitor TB disease progression.

  7. Monitoring CD27 expression to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity in HIV-1 infected individuals in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Schuetz

    Full Text Available The level of bacterial activity is only poorly defined during asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection. The objective was to study the capacity of a new biomarker, the expression of the T cell maturation marker CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cells, to identify active tuberculosis (TB disease in subjects from a MTB and HIV endemic region. The frequency and CD27 expression of circulating MTB-specific CD4 T cells was determined in 96 study participants after stimulation with purified protein derivative (PPD using intracellular cytokine staining for IFNgamma (IFNγ. Subjects were then stratified by their TB and HIV status. Within PPD responders, a CD27(- phenotype was associated with active TB in HIV(- (p = 0.0003 and HIV(+ (p = 0.057 subjects, respectively. In addition, loss of CD27 expression preceded development of active TB in one HIV seroconverter. Interestingly, in contrast to HIV(- subjects, MTB-specific CD4 T cell populations from HIV(+ TB-asymptomatic subjects were often dominated by CD27(- cells. These data indicate that down-regulation of CD27 on MTB-specific CD4 T cell could be used as a biomarker of active TB, potentially preceding clinical TB disease. Furthermore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that late, chronic HIV infection is frequently associated with increased mycobacterial activity in vivo. The analysis of T cell maturation and activation markers might thus be a useful tool to monitor TB disease progression.

  8. Suppression of Foxo1 activity and down-modulation of CD62L (L-selectin) in HIV-1 infected resting CD4 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinité, Benjamin; Chan, Chi N; Lee, Caroline S; Mahajan, Saurabh; Luo, Yang; Muesing, Mark A; Folkvord, Joy M; Pham, Michael; Connick, Elizabeth; Levy, David N

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 hijacks and disrupts many processes in the cells it infects in order to suppress antiviral immunity and to facilitate its replication. Resting CD4 T cells are important early targets of HIV-1 infection in which HIV-1 must overcome intrinsic barriers to viral replication. Although resting CD4 T cells are refractory to infection in vitro, local environmental factors within lymphoid and mucosal tissues such as cytokines facilitate viral replication while maintaining the resting state. These factors can be utilized in vitro to study HIV-1 replication in resting CD4 T cells. In vivo, the migration of resting naïve and central memory T cells into lymphoid tissues is dependent upon expression of CD62L (L-selectin), a receptor that is subsequently down-modulated following T cell activation. CD62L gene transcription is maintained in resting T cells by Foxo1 and KLF2, transcription factors that maintain T cell quiescence and which regulate additional cellular processes including survival, migration, and differentiation. Here we report that HIV-1 down-modulates CD62L in productively infected naïve and memory resting CD4 T cells while suppressing Foxo1 activity and the expression of KLF2 mRNA. Partial T cell activation was further evident as an increase in CD69 expression. Several other Foxo1- and KLF2-regulated mRNA were increased or decreased in productively infected CD4 T cells, including IL-7rα, Myc, CCR5, Fam65b, S1P1 (EDG1), CD52, Cyclin D2 and p21CIP1, indicating a profound reprogramming of these cells. The Foxo1 inhibitor AS1842856 accelerated de novo viral gene expression and the sequella of infection, supporting the notion that HIV-1 suppression of Foxo1 activity may be a strategy to promote replication in resting CD4 T cells. As Foxo1 is an investigative cancer therapy target, the development of Foxo1 interventions may assist the quest to specifically suppress or activate HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  9. Suppression of Foxo1 activity and down-modulation of CD62L (L-selectin in HIV-1 infected resting CD4 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Trinité

    Full Text Available HIV-1 hijacks and disrupts many processes in the cells it infects in order to suppress antiviral immunity and to facilitate its replication. Resting CD4 T cells are important early targets of HIV-1 infection in which HIV-1 must overcome intrinsic barriers to viral replication. Although resting CD4 T cells are refractory to infection in vitro, local environmental factors within lymphoid and mucosal tissues such as cytokines facilitate viral replication while maintaining the resting state. These factors can be utilized in vitro to study HIV-1 replication in resting CD4 T cells. In vivo, the migration of resting naïve and central memory T cells into lymphoid tissues is dependent upon expression of CD62L (L-selectin, a receptor that is subsequently down-modulated following T cell activation. CD62L gene transcription is maintained in resting T cells by Foxo1 and KLF2, transcription factors that maintain T cell quiescence and which regulate additional cellular processes including survival, migration, and differentiation. Here we report that HIV-1 down-modulates CD62L in productively infected naïve and memory resting CD4 T cells while suppressing Foxo1 activity and the expression of KLF2 mRNA. Partial T cell activation was further evident as an increase in CD69 expression. Several other Foxo1- and KLF2-regulated mRNA were increased or decreased in productively infected CD4 T cells, including IL-7rα, Myc, CCR5, Fam65b, S1P1 (EDG1, CD52, Cyclin D2 and p21CIP1, indicating a profound reprogramming of these cells. The Foxo1 inhibitor AS1842856 accelerated de novo viral gene expression and the sequella of infection, supporting the notion that HIV-1 suppression of Foxo1 activity may be a strategy to promote replication in resting CD4 T cells. As Foxo1 is an investigative cancer therapy target, the development of Foxo1 interventions may assist the quest to specifically suppress or activate HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  10. High-Density Array of Well-Ordered HIV-1 Spikes on Synthetic Liposomal Nanoparticles Efficiently Activate B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jidnyasa Ingale

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A major step toward an HIV-1 vaccine is an immunogen capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies. Envelope glycoprotein (Env mimetics, such as the NFL and SOSIP designs, generate native-like, well-ordered trimers and elicit tier 2 homologous neutralization (SOSIPs. We reasoned that the display of well-ordered trimers by high-density, particulate array would increase B cell activation compared to soluble trimers. Here, we present the design of liposomal nanoparticles displaying well-ordered Env spike trimers on their surface. Biophysical analysis, cryo- and negative stain electron microscopy, as well as binding analysis with a panel of broadly neutralizing antibodies confirm a high-density, well-ordered trimer particulate array. The Env-trimer-conjugated liposomes were superior to soluble trimers in activating B cells ex vivo and germinal center B cells in vivo. In addition, the trimer-conjugated liposomes elicited modest tier 2 homologous neutralizing antibodies. The trimer-conjugated liposomes represent a promising initial lead toward the development of more effective HIV vaccine immunogens.

  11. Vaccination with TAT-antigen fusion protein induces protective, CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity against Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Katharina; Brosch, Sven; Butsch, Florian; Tada, Yayoi; Shibagaki, Naotaka; Udey, Mark C; von Stebut, Esther

    2010-11-01

    In murine leishmaniasis, healing is mediated by IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Thus, an efficacious vaccine should induce Th1 and Tc1 cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with exogenous proteins primarily induce strong CD4-dependent immunity; induction of CD8 responses has proven to be difficult. We evaluated the immunogenicity of fusion proteins comprising the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT and the Leishmania antigen LACK (Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated C kinase), as TAT-fusion proteins facilitate major histocompatibility complex class I-dependent antigen presentation. In vitro, TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs induced stronger proliferation of Leishmania-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with DCs incubated with LACK alone. Vaccination with TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs or fusion proteins plus adjuvant in vivo significantly improved disease outcome in Leishmania major-infected mice and was superior to vaccination with DCs treated with LACK alone. Vaccination with DC+TAT-LACK resulted in stronger proliferation of CD8(+) T cells when compared with immunization with DC+LACK. Upon depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells, TAT-LACK-mediated protection was lost. TAT-LACK-pulsed IL-12p40-deficient DCs did not promote protection in vivo. In summary, these data show that TAT-fusion proteins are superior in activating Leishmania-specific Tc1 cells when compared with antigen alone and suggest that IL-12-dependent preferential induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cells promotes significant protection against this important human pathogen.

  12. Biocompatible anionic polymeric microspheres as priming delivery system for effetive HIV/AIDS Tat-based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Titti

    Full Text Available Here we describe a prime-boost regimen of vaccination in Macaca fascicularis that combines priming with novel anionic microspheres designed to deliver the biologically active HIV-1 Tat protein and boosting with Tat in Alum. This regimen of immunization modulated the IgG subclass profile and elicited a balanced Th1-Th2 type of humoral and cellular responses. Remarkably, following intravenous challenge with SHIV89.6Pcy243, vaccinees significantly blunted acute viremia, as compared to control monkeys, and this control was associated with significantly lower CD4+ T cell depletion rate during the acute phase of infection and higher ability to resume the CD4+ T cell counts in the post-acute and chronic phases of infection. The long lasting control of viremia was associated with the persistence of high titers anti-Tat antibodies whose profile clearly distinguished vaccinees in controllers and viremics. Controllers, as opposed to vaccinated and viremic cynos, exhibited significantly higher pre-challenge antibody responses to peptides spanning the glutamine-rich and the RGD-integrin-binding regions of Tat. Finally, among vaccinees, titers of anti-Tat IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 subclasses had a significant association with control of viremia in the acute and post-acute phases of infection. Altogether these findings indicate that the Tat/H1D/Alum regimen of immunization holds promise for next generation vaccines with Tat protein or other proteins for which maintenance of the native conformation and activity are critical for optimal immunogenicity. Our results also provide novel information on the role of anti-Tat responses in the prevention of HIV pathogenesis and for the design of new vaccine candidates.

  13. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 predicts myocardial infarction in HIV-1-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Katzenstein, Terese L; Benfield, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    of antiretroviral therapy, sex, smoking and no known cardiovascular disease. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, soluble endothelial selectin, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule, matrix metalloprotease 9, myeloperoxidase, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1...

  14. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  15. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  16. Antiretroviral effect of lovastatin on HIV-1-infected individuals without highly active antiretroviral therapy (The LIVE study: a phase-II randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoya Carlos J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy produces a significant decrease in HIV-1 replication and allows an increase in the CD4 T-cell count, leading to a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections and mortality. However, the cost, side effects and complexity of antiretroviral regimens have underscored the immediate need for additional therapeutic approaches. Statins exert pleiotropic effects through a variety of mechanisms, among which there are several immunoregulatory effects, related and unrelated to their cholesterol-lowering activity that can be useful to control HIV-1 infection. Methods/design Randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled, single-center, phase-II clinical trial. One hundred and ten chronically HIV-1-infected patients, older than 18 years and naïve for antirretroviral therapy (i.e., without prior or current management with antiretroviral drugs will be enrolled at the outpatient services from the most important centres for health insurance care in Medellin-Colombia. The interventions will be lovastatin (40 mg/day, orally, for 12 months; 55 patients or placebo (55 patients. Our primary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on viral replication. The secondary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on CD4+ T-cell count in peripheral blood. As tertiary aims we will explore differences in CD8+ T-cell count, expression of activation markers (CD38 and HLA-DR on CD4 and CD8 T cells, cholesterol metabolism, LFA-1/ICAM-1 function, Rho GTPases function and clinical evolution between treated and not treated HIV-1-infected individuals. Discussion Preliminary descriptive studies have suggested that statins (lovastatin may have anti HIV-1 activity and that their administration is safe, with the potential effect of controlling HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals who had not received antiretroviral medications. Considering that there is limited clinical data available on

  17. Randomized Phase I: Safety, Immunogenicity and Mucosal Antiviral Activity in Young Healthy Women Vaccinated with HIV-1 Gp41 P1 Peptide on Virosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert Leroux-Roels

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Mucosal antibodies harboring various antiviral activities may best protect mucosal surfaces against early HIV-1 entry at mucosal sites and they should be ideally induced by prophylactic HIV-1 vaccines for optimal prevention of sexually transmitted HIV-1. A phase I, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in twenty-four healthy HIV-uninfected young women. The study objectives were to assess the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of virosomes harboring surface HIV-1 gp41-derived P1 lipidated peptides (MYM-V101. Participants received placebo or MYM-V101 vaccine at 10 μg/dose or 50 μg/dose intramuscularly at week 0 and 8, and intranasally at week 16 and 24. MYM-V101 was safe and well-tolerated at both doses administered by the intramuscular and intranasal routes, with the majority of subjects remaining free of local and general symptoms. P1-specific serum IgGs and IgAs were induced in all high dose recipients after the first injection. After the last vaccination, vaginal and rectal P1-specific IgGs could be detected in all high dose recipients. Approximately 63% and 43% of the low and high dose recipients were respectively tested positive for vaginal P1-IgAs, while 29% of the subjects from the high dose group tested positive for rectal IgAs. Serum samples had total specific IgG and IgA antibody concentrations ≥ 0.4 μg/mL, while mucosal samples were usually below 0.01 μg/mL. Vaginal secretions from MYM-V101 vaccinated subjects were inhibiting HIV-1 transcytosis but had no detectable neutralizing activity. P1-specific Th1 responses could not be detected on PBMC. This study demonstrates the excellent safety and tolerability of MYM-V101, eliciting systemic and mucosal antibodies in the majority of subjects. Vaccine-induced mucosal anti-gp41 antibodies toward conserved gp41 motifs were harboring HIV-1 transcytosis inhibition activity and may contribute to reduce sexually-transmitted HIV-1. TRIAL

  18. Persistent inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV-1 infected patients after 12 years of antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederikke F Rönsholt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART. METHODS: Inflammation and endothelial activation were assessed by measuring levels of immunoglobulins, β2-microglobulin, interleukin (IL 8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, sE-Selectin, and sP-Selectin. RESULTS: HIV infected patients had higher levels of β2-microglobulin, IL-8, TNFα, and sICAM-1 than uninfected controls, and HIV infected patients lacked correlation between platelet counts and sP-Selectin levels found in uninfected controls. CONCLUSION: Discrete signs of systemic and vascular inflammation persist even after very long term cART.

  19. Anticancer molecule AS1411 exhibits low nanomolar antiviral activity against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Amrane, Samir; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Andreola, Marie-Line

    2015-11-01

    During clinical trials, a number of fully characterized molecules are dropped along the way because they do not provide enough benefit for the patient. Some of them show limited side effects and might be of great use for other applications. AS1411 is a nucleolin-targeting aptamer that underwent phase II clinical trials as anticancer agent. Here, we show that AS1411 exhibits extremely potent antiviral activity and is therefore an attractive new lead as anti-HIV agent.

  20. Cellular antisense activity of peptide nucleic acid (PNAs) targeted to HIV-1 polypurine tract (PPT) containing RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutimah-Hamoudi, Fatima; Leforestier, Erwan; Sénamaud-Beaufort, Catherine; Nielsen, Peter E; Giovannangeli, Carine; Saison-Behmoaras, Tula Ester

    2007-01-01

    DNA and RNA oligomers that contain stretches of guanines can associate to form stable secondary structures including G-quadruplexes. Our study shows that the (UUAAAAGAAAAGGGGGGAU) RNA sequence, from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 polypurine tract or PPT sequence) forms in vitro a stable folded structure involving the G-run. We have investigated the ability of pyrimidine peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers targeted to the PPT sequence to invade the folded RNA and exhibit biological activity at the translation level in vitro and in cells. We find that PNAs can form stable complexes even with the structured PPT RNA target at neutral pH. We show that T-rich PNAs, namely the tridecamer-I PNA (C4T4CT4) forms triplex structures whereas the C-rich tridecamer-II PNA (TC6T4CT) likely forms a duplex with the target RNA. Interestingly, we find that both C-rich and T-rich PNAs arrested in vitro translation elongation specifically at the PPT target site. Finally, we show that T-rich and C-rich tridecamer PNAs that have been identified as efficient and specific blockers of translation elongation in vitro, specifically inhibit translation in streptolysin-O permeabilized cells where the PPT target sequence has been introduced upstream the reporter luciferase gene.

  1. Antimycobacterial and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Activity of Julianaceae and Clusiaceae Plant Species from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Gómez-Cansino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracts of 14 Julianaceae and 5 Clusiaceae species growing in Mexico were tested in vitro (50 µg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and HIV reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT. The Julianaceae bark and leaf extracts inhibited M. tuberculosis (>84.67% and HIV-RT (58.3% and >67.6%, respectively. The IC50 values for six selected extracts and their cytotoxicity (50 µg/mL to human macrophages were then determined. Amphipterygium glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium fairly inhibited M. tuberculosis with IC50 of 1.87–2.35 µg/mL; but their IC50 against HIV-RT was 59.25–97.83 µg/mL. Calophyllum brasiliense, Vismia baccifera, and Vismia mexicana effect on M. tuberculosis was noteworthy (IC50 3.02–3.64 µg/mL and also inhibited RT-HIV (IC50 26.24–35.17 µg/mL. These 6 extracts (50 µg/mL presented low toxicity to macrophages (<23.8%. The HPLC profiles of A. glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium indicated that their antimycobacterial activity cannot be related to masticadienonic, 3α, or 3β-hydromasticadienonic acids, suggesting that other compounds may be responsible for the observed activity or this might be a synergy result. The anti-HIV-RT and antimycobacterial activities induced by C. brasiliense can be attributed to the content of calanolides A, B, as well as soulatrolide.

  2. Antimycobacterial and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Activity of Julianaceae and Clusiaceae Plant Species from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cansino, Rocio; Espitia-Pinzón, Clara Inés; Campos-Lara, María Guadalupe; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Silvia Laura; Segura-Salinas, Erika; Echeverría-Valencia, Gabriela; Torras-Claveria, Laura; Cuevas-Figueroa, Xochitl Marisol; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The extracts of 14 Julianaceae and 5 Clusiaceae species growing in Mexico were tested in vitro (50 µg/mL) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and HIV reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT). The Julianaceae bark and leaf extracts inhibited M. tuberculosis (>84.67%) and HIV-RT (Clusiaceae leaves extracts also inhibited both targets (>58.3% and >67.6%), respectively. The IC50 values for six selected extracts and their cytotoxicity (50 µg/mL) to human macrophages were then determined. Amphipterygium glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium fairly inhibited M. tuberculosis with IC50 of 1.87-2.35 µg/mL; but their IC50 against HIV-RT was 59.25-97.83 µg/mL. Calophyllum brasiliense, Vismia baccifera, and Vismia mexicana effect on M. tuberculosis was noteworthy (IC50 3.02-3.64 µg/mL) and also inhibited RT-HIV (IC50 26.24-35.17 µg/mL). These 6 extracts (50 µg/mL) presented low toxicity to macrophages (<23.8%). The HPLC profiles of A. glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium indicated that their antimycobacterial activity cannot be related to masticadienonic, 3α, or 3β-hydromasticadienonic acids, suggesting that other compounds may be responsible for the observed activity or this might be a synergy result. The anti-HIV-RT and antimycobacterial activities induced by C. brasiliense can be attributed to the content of calanolides A, B, as well as soulatrolide.

  3. Antimycobacterial and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Activity of Julianaceae and Clusiaceae Plant Species from Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cansino, Rocio; Espitia-Pinzón, Clara Inés; Campos-Lara, María Guadalupe; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Silvia Laura; Segura-Salinas, Erika; Echeverría-Valencia, Gabriela; Torras-Claveria, Laura; Cuevas-Figueroa, Xochitl Marisol; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The extracts of 14 Julianaceae and 5 Clusiaceae species growing in Mexico were tested in vitro (50 µg/mL) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and HIV reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT). The Julianaceae bark and leaf extracts inhibited M. tuberculosis (>84.67%) and HIV-RT (58.3% and >67.6%), respectively. The IC50 values for six selected extracts and their cytotoxicity (50 µg/mL) to human macrophages were then determined. Amphipterygium glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium fairly inhibited M. tuberculosis with IC50 of 1.87–2.35 µg/mL; but their IC50 against HIV-RT was 59.25–97.83 µg/mL. Calophyllum brasiliense, Vismia baccifera, and Vismia mexicana effect on M. tuberculosis was noteworthy (IC50 3.02–3.64 µg/mL) and also inhibited RT-HIV (IC50 26.24–35.17 µg/mL). These 6 extracts (50 µg/mL) presented low toxicity to macrophages (<23.8%). The HPLC profiles of A. glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium indicated that their antimycobacterial activity cannot be related to masticadienonic, 3α, or 3β-hydromasticadienonic acids, suggesting that other compounds may be responsible for the observed activity or this might be a synergy result. The anti-HIV-RT and antimycobacterial activities induced by C. brasiliense can be attributed to the content of calanolides A, B, as well as soulatrolide. PMID:25983849

  4. Increased Intrathecal Immune Activation in Virally Suppressed HIV-1 Infected Patients with Neurocognitive Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvid Edén

    Full Text Available Although milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND remain prevalent, a correlation to neuronal injury has not been established in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART. We examined the relationship between mild HAND and CSF neurofilament light protein (NFL, a biomarker of neuronal injury; and CSF neopterin, a biomarker of CNS immunoactivation, in virally suppressed patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART.We selected 99 subjects on suppressive ART followed longitudinally from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER study. Based on standardized comprehensive neurocognitive performance (NP testing, subjects were classified as neurocognitively normal (NCN; n = 29 or impaired (NCI; n = 70. The NCI group included subjects with asymptomatic (ANI; n = 37 or mild (MND; n = 33 HAND. CSF biomarkers were analyzed on two occasions.Geometric mean CSF neopterin was 25% higher in the NCI group (p = 0.04 and NFL and neopterin were significantly correlated within the NCI group (r = 0.30; p<0.001 but not in the NCN group (r = -0.13; p = 0.3. Additionally, a trend towards higher NFL was seen in the NCI group (p = 0.06.Mild HAND was associated with increased intrathecal immune activation, and the correlation between neopterin and NFL found in NCI subjects indicates an association between neurocognitive impairment, CNS inflammation and neuronal damage. Together these findings suggest that NCI despite ART may represent an active pathological process within the CNS that needs further characterization in prospective studies.

  5. Increased Intrathecal Immune Activation in Virally Suppressed HIV-1 Infected Patients with Neurocognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edén, Arvid; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Franklin, Donald; Price, Richard W.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Gisslén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remain prevalent, a correlation to neuronal injury has not been established in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined the relationship between mild HAND and CSF neurofilament light protein (NFL), a biomarker of neuronal injury; and CSF neopterin, a biomarker of CNS immunoactivation, in virally suppressed patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design and Methods We selected 99 subjects on suppressive ART followed longitudinally from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Based on standardized comprehensive neurocognitive performance (NP) testing, subjects were classified as neurocognitively normal (NCN; n = 29) or impaired (NCI; n = 70). The NCI group included subjects with asymptomatic (ANI; n = 37) or mild (MND; n = 33) HAND. CSF biomarkers were analyzed on two occasions. Results Geometric mean CSF neopterin was 25% higher in the NCI group (p = 0.04) and NFL and neopterin were significantly correlated within the NCI group (r = 0.30; pNFL was seen in the NCI group (p = 0.06). Conclusions Mild HAND was associated with increased intrathecal immune activation, and the correlation between neopterin and NFL found in NCI subjects indicates an association between neurocognitive impairment, CNS inflammation and neuronal damage. Together these findings suggest that NCI despite ART may represent an active pathological process within the CNS that needs further characterization in prospective studies. PMID:27295036

  6. Pharmacodynamic activity of Dapivirine and Maraviroc single entity and combination topical gels for HIV-1 prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Yandura, Sarah; Wang, Lin; Moncla, Bernard; Teeple, Elizabeth A.; Devlin, Brid; Nuttall, Jeremy; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dapivirine (DPV), a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist, were formulated into aqueous gels designed to prevent mucosal HIV transmission. Methods 0.05% DPV, 0.1% MVC, 0.05% DPV/0.1% MVC and placebo gels were evaluated for pH, viscosity, osmolality, and in vitro release. In vitro assays and mucosal tissues were used to evaluate anti-HIV activity. Viability (Lactobacilli only) and epithelial integrity in cell lines and mucosal tissues defined safety. Results The gels were acidic and viscous. DPV gel had an osmolality of 893 mOsm/kg while the other gels had an osmolality of <100 mOsm/kg. MVC release was similar from the single and combination gels (~5 μg/cm2/min1/2), while DPV release was 10-fold less from the single as compared to the combination gel (0.4331 μg/cm2/min1/2). Titrations of the gels showed 10-fold more drug was needed to protect ectocervical than colonic tissue. The combination gel showed ~10- and 100-fold improved activity as compared to DPV and MVC gel, respectively. All gels were safe. Conclusions The DPV/MVC gel showed a benefit blocking HIV infection of mucosal tissue compared to the single entity gels. Combination products with drugs affecting unique steps in the viral replication cycle would be advantageous for HIV prevention. PMID:26078001

  7. High levels of T lymphocyte activation in Leishmania-HIV-1 co-infected individuals despite low HIV viral load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grinsztejn Beatriz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concomitant infections may influence HIV progression by causing chronic activation leading to decline in T-cell function. In the Americas, visceral (AVL and tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL have emerged as important opportunistic infections in HIV-AIDS patients and both of those diseases have been implicated as potentially important co-factors in disease progression. We investigated whether leishmaniasis increases lymphocyte activation in HIV-1 co-infected patients. This might contribute to impaired cellular immune function. Methods To address this issue we analyzed CD4+ T absolute counts and the proportion of CD8+ T cells expressing CD38 in Leishmania/HIV co-infected patients that recovered after anti-leishmanial therapy. Results We found that, despite clinical remission of leishmaniasis, AVL co-infected patients presented a more severe immunossupression as suggested by CD4+ T cell counts under 200 cells/mm3, differing from ATL/HIV-AIDS cases that tends to show higher lymphocytes levels (over 350 cells/mm3. Furthermore, five out of nine, AVL/HIV-AIDS presented low CD4+ T cell counts in spite of low or undetectable viral load. Expression of CD38 on CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in AVL or ATL/HIV-AIDS cases compared to HIV/AIDS patients without leishmaniasis or healthy subjects. Conclusions Leishmania infection can increase the degree of immune system activation in individuals concomitantly infected with HIV. In addition, AVL/HIV-AIDS patients can present low CD4+ T cell counts and higher proportion of activated T lymphocytes even when HIV viral load is suppressed under HAART. This fact can cause a misinterpretation of these laboratorial markers in co-infected patients.

  8. Galantamine and nicotine have a synergistic effect on inhibition of microglial activation induced by HIV-1 gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, B; Ehrhart, J; Townsend, K; Sun, N; Vendrame, M; Shytle, D; Tan, J; Fernandez, F

    2004-08-30

    Chronic brain inflammation is the common final pathway in the majority of neurodegenerative diseases and central to this phenomenon is the immunological activation of brain mononuclear phagocyte cells, called microglia. This inflammatory mechanism is a central component of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). In the healthy state, there are endogenous signals from neurons and astrocytes, which limit excessive central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. However, the signals controlling this process have not been fully elucidated. Studies on the peripheral nervous system suggest that a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway regulates systemic inflammatory response by way of acetylcholine acting at the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR) found on blood-borne macrophages. Recent data from our laboratory indicates that cultured microglial cells also express this same receptor and that microglial anti-inflammatory properties are mediated through it and the p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) system. Here we report for the first time the creation of an in vitro model of HAD composed of cultured microglial cells synergistically activated by the addition of IFN-gamma and the HIV-1 coat glycoprotein, gp120. Furthermore, this activation, as measured by TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) release, is synergistically attenuated through the alpha7 nAChR and p44/42 MAPK system by pretreatment with nicotine, and the cholinesterase inhibitor, galantamine. Our findings suggest a novel therapeutic combination to treat or prevent the onset of HAD through this modulation of the microglia inflammatory mechanism.

  9. Synergistic Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Bryostatin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Clemente, Maria Isabel; Serramía, Maria Jesús; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Ángeles

    2015-11-13

    Viral reactivation from latently infected cells has become a promising therapeutic approach to eradicate HIV. Due to the complexity of the viral latency, combinations of efficient and available drugs targeting different pathways of latency are needed. In this work, we evaluated the effect of various combinations of bryostatin-1 (BRY) and novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) on HIV-reactivation and on cellular phenotype. The lymphocyte (J89GFP) or monocyte/macrophage (THP89GFP) latently infected cell lines were treated with BRY, panobinostat (PNB) and romidepsin (RMD) either alone or in combination. Thus, the effect on the viral reactivation was evaluated. We calculated the combination index for each drug combination; the BRY/HDACIs showed a synergistic HIV-reactivation profile in the majority of the combinations tested, whereas non-synergistic effects were observed when PNB was mixed with RMD. Indeed, the 75% effective concentrations of BRY, PNB and RMD were reduced in these combinations. Moreover, primary CD4 T cells treated with such drug combinations presented similar activation and proliferation profiles in comparison with single drug treated cells. Summing up, combinations between BRY, PNB and/or RMD presented a synergistic profile by inducing virus expression in HIV-latently infected cells, rendering these combinations an attractive novel and safe option for future clinical trials.

  10. Toxicity and in vitro activity of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents in primary CNS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R; On, Hung; Roberts, Emma; Lu, Hao K; Moso, Michael A; Raison, Jacqueline A; Papaioannou, Catherine; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Purcell, Damian F J; Wesselingh, Steve L; Gorry, Paul R; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J

    2016-08-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV persists in long lived latently infected cells in the blood and tissue, and treatment is required lifelong. Recent clinical studies have trialed latency-reversing agents (LRA) as a method to eliminate latently infected cells; however, the effects of LRA on the central nervous system (CNS), a well-known site of virus persistence on cART, are unknown. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity and potency of a panel of commonly used and well-known LRA (panobinostat, romidepsin, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, hexamethylene bisacetamide [HMBA], and JQ-1) in primary fetal astrocytes (PFA) as well as monocyte-derived macrophages as a cellular model for brain perivascular macrophages. We show that most LRA are non-toxic in these cells at therapeutic concentrations. Additionally, romidepsin, JQ-1, and panobinostat were the most potent at inducing viral transcription, with greater magnitude observed in PFA. In contrast, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, and HMBA all demonstrated little or no induction of viral transcription. Together, these data suggest that some LRA could potentially activate transcription in latently infected cells in the CNS. We recommend that future trials of LRA also examine the effects of these agents on the CNS via examination of cerebrospinal fluid.

  11. SIRT1 regulates HIV transcription via Tat deacetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pagans

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV Tat protein is acetylated by the transcriptional coactivator p300, a necessary step in Tat-mediated transactivation. We report here that Tat is deacetylated by human sirtuin 1 (SIRT1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent class III protein deacetylase in vitro and in vivo. Tat and SIRT1 coimmunoprecipitate and synergistically activate the HIV promoter. Conversely, knockdown of SIRT1 via small interfering RNAs or treatment with a novel small molecule inhibitor of the SIRT1 deacetylase activity inhibit Tat-mediated transactivation of the HIV long terminal repeat. Tat transactivation is defective in SIRT1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and can be rescued by expression of SIRT1. These results support a model in which cycles of Tat acetylation and deacetylation regulate HIV transcription. SIRT1 recycles Tat to its unacetylated form and acts as a transcriptional coactivator during Tat transactivation.

  12. Developmental regulators containing the I-mfa domain interact with T cyclins and Tat and modulate transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Young, Tara M; Mathews, Michael B; Pe'ery, Tsafi

    2007-03-30

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complexes, composed of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and cyclin T1 or T2, are engaged by many cellular transcription regulators that activate or inhibit transcription from specific promoters. The related I-mfa (inhibitor of MyoD family a) and HIC (human I-mfa-domain-containing) proteins function in myogenic differentiation and embryonic development by participating in the Wnt signaling pathway. We report that I-mfa is a novel regulator of P-TEFb. Both HIC and I-mfa interact through their homologous I-mfa domains with cyclin T1 and T2 at two binding sites. One site is the regulatory histidine-rich domain that interacts with CDK9 substrates including RNA polymerase II. The second site contains a lysine and arginine-rich motif that is highly conserved between the two T cyclins. This site overlaps and includes the previously identified Tat/TAR recognition motif of cyclin T1 required for activation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transcription. HIC and I-mfa can serve as substrates for P-TEFb. Their I-mfa domains also bind the activation domain of HIV-1 Tat and inhibit Tat- and P-TEFb-dependent transcription from the HIV-1 promoter. This transcriptional repression is cell-type specific and can operate via Tat and cyclin T1. Genomic and sequence comparisons indicate that the I-mf and HIC genes, as well as flanking genes, diverged from a duplicated chromosomal region. Our findings link I-mfa and HIC to viral replication, and suggest that P-TEFb is modulated in the Wnt signaling pathway.

  13. QSAR studies on diarypyrimidines as inhibiting activity of HIV-1 virus wildtype%DAPY类化合物抑制野生型HIV-1活性的QSAR研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石春雨; 聂长明; 刘慧杰; 宁左云

    2012-01-01

    Molecular mechanics and semi-empirical quantum RM1 methods were used to refine,optimize the geometry of 31 DAPY(diarylpyrimidine) derivatives and then extracted physicochemical properties parameters, molecular parameters,geometric parmeter from the geometric model along with combined indicator parameter to established the QSAR model for diarylpyrimidines against HIV-1 reverse tran-scriptase wild-type. Based on the multiple linear regression analysis,sorts of descriptors was invested and finally selected the dihedral (0) .molecular volume (V) and combined indicator parameters (I) to build a significant QSAR equation:It reveal that the hydrophobicity index logP is actually not important as preciously reported in the prediction of inhibition activity of DAPYs. Decrease the volume,increase the dihedral between the left phenyl ring and pyrimidine ring can enhance the activity of inhibition. The -CN group on the left phenyl ring is important for inhibiting activity. Ph,NO2 group at the Rl substitute can decrease the inhibiting activity rapidly.%应用分子力学、半经验量子化学RM1方法优化了32个抗野生型HIV-1病毒毒株的二芳基嘧啶类(DAPYs)化合物分子结构,从分子构象模型中提取了多种参数并结合疏水性参数与指示性参数建立QSAR多元线性回归方程.回归方程显示:分子体积V的增大会降低其抑制活性,而左苯环与嘧啶环间二面角θ增大可以提高抑制活性.同时指示性参数I表明左苯环CN基团加入可以明显增加抑制活性,嘧啶环上R1位置苯基与硝基的加入可以极大降低抑制活性.

  14. Destabilization of the TAR hairpin leads to extension of the polyA hairpin and inhibition of HIV-1 polyadenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolijk, Martine M; Harwig, Alex; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2009-02-11

    Two hairpin structures that are present at both the 5' and 3' end of the HIV-1 RNA genome have important functions in the viral life cycle. The TAR hairpin binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. The adjacent polyA hairpin encompasses the polyadenylation signal AAUAAA and is important for the regulation of polyadenylation. Specifically, this RNA structure represses polyadenylation at the 5' side, and enhancer elements on the 3' side overcome this suppression. We recently described that the replication of an HIV-1 variant that does not need TAR for transcription was severely impaired by destabilization of the TAR hairpin, even though a complete TAR deletion was acceptable. In this study, we show that the TAR-destabilizing mutations result in reduced 3' polyadenylation of the viral transcripts due to an extension of the adjacent polyA hairpin. Thus, although the TAR hairpin is not directly involved in polyadenylation, mutations in TAR can affect this process. The stability of the HIV-1 TAR hairpin structure is important for the proper folding of the viral RNA transcripts. This study illustrates how mutations that are designed to study the function of a specific RNA structure can change the structural presentation of other RNA domains and thus affect viral replication in an indirect way.

  15. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  16. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Activity Evaluation for Novel 3a,6a-Dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazole-4,6-dione Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Nan Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The search for new molecular constructs that resemble the critical two-metal binding pharmacophore and the halo-substituted phenyl functionality required for HIV-1 integrase (IN inhibition represents a vibrant area of research within drug discovery. As reported herein, we have modified our recently disclosed 1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl]-pyrrole-2,5-dione scaffolds to design 35 novel compounds with improved biological activities against HIV-1. These new compounds show single-digit micromolar antiviral potencies against HIV-1 and low toxicity. Among of them, compound 9g and 15i had potent anti-HIV-1 activities (EC50 < 5 μM and excellent therapeutic index (TI, CC50/EC50 > 100. These two compounds have potential as lead compounds for further optimization into clinical anti-HIV-1 agents.

  17. Imperatorin inhibits HIV-1 replication through an Sp1-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Rocío; Márquez, Nieves; Gómez-Gonzalo, Marta; Calzado, Marco A; Bettoni, Giorgio; Coiras, Maria Teresa; Alcamí, José; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Appendino, Giovanni; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-09-03

    Coumarins and structurally related compounds have been recently shown to present anti-human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) activity. Among them, the dietary furanocoumarin imperatorin is present in citrus fruits, in culinary herbs, and in some medicinal plants. In this study we report that imperatorin inhibits either vesicular stomatitis virus-pseudotyped or gp160-enveloped recombinant HIV-1 infection in several T cell lines and in HeLa cells. These recombinant viruses express luciferase as a marker of viral replication. Imperatorin did not inhibit the reverse transcription nor the integration steps in the viral cell cycle. Using several 5' long terminal repeat-HIV-1 constructs where critical response elements were either deleted or mutated, we found that the transcription factor Sp1 is critical for the inhibitory activity of imperatorin induced by both phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and HIV-1 Tat. Moreover in transient transfections imperatorin specifically inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced transcriptional activity of the Gal4-Sp1 fusion protein. Since Sp1 is also implicated in cell cycle progression we further studied the effect of imperatorin on cyclin D1 gene transcription and protein expression and in HeLa cell cycle progression. We found that imperatorin strongly inhibited cyclin D1 expression and arrested the cells at the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. These results highlight the potential of Sp1 transcription factor as a target for natural anti-HIV-1 compounds such as furanocoumarins that might have a potential therapeutic role in the management of AIDS.

  18. Making a Short Story Long: Regulation of P-TEFb and HIV-1 Transcriptional Elongation in CD4+ T Lymphocytes and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Rice

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Productive transcription of the integrated HIV-1 provirus is restricted by cellular factors that inhibit RNA polymerase II elongation. The viral Tat protein overcomes this by recruiting a general elongation factor, P-TEFb, to the TAR RNA element that forms at the 5’ end of nascent viral transcripts. P-TEFb exists in multiple complexes in cells, and its core consists of a kinase, Cdk9, and a regulatory subunit, either Cyclin T1 or Cyclin T2. Tat binds directly to Cyclin T1 and thereby targets the Cyclin T1/P-TEFb complex that phosphorylates the CTD of RNA polymerase II and the negative factors that inhibit elongation, resulting in efficient transcriptional elongation. P-TEFb is tightly regulated in cells infected by HIV-1—CD4+ T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. A number of mechanisms have been identified that inhibit P-TEFb in resting CD4+ T lymphocytes and monocytes, including miRNAs that repress Cyclin T1 protein expression and dephosphorylation of residue Thr186 in the Cdk9 T-loop. These repressive mechanisms are overcome upon T cell activation and macrophage differentiation when the permissivity for HIV-1 replication is greatly increased. This review will summarize what is currently known about mechanisms that regulate P-TEFb and how this regulation impacts HIV-1 replication and latency.

  19. Hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship and comparative molecular field analysis studies within a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Uiaran de Oliveira; Souza, Alessandra Mendonça Teles de; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Brito, Monique Araújo de; Bello, Murilo Lamim; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel

    2013-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is a public health problem worldwide caused by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment with antiretroviral drugs is the best option for viral suppression, reducing morbidity and mortality. However, viral resistance in HIV-1 therapy has been reported. HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for effective viral replication and an attractive target for the development of new inhibitors. In the study reported here, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (2D/3D-QSAR) studies, applying hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship (HQSAR) and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) methods, respectively, were performed on a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 IN inhibitors. The best HQSAR model (q (2) = 0.802, r (2) = 0.972) was obtained using atoms, bonds, and connectivity as the fragment distinction, a fragment size of 2-5 atoms, hologram length of 61 bins, and six components. The best CoMFA model (q (2) = 0.748, r (2) = 0.974) was obtained with alignment of all atoms of the tricyclic phthalimide moiety (alignment II). The HQSAR contribution map identified that the carbonyl-hydroxy-aromatic nitrogen motif made a positive contribution to the activity of the compounds. Furthermore, CoMFA contour maps suggested that bulky groups in meta and para positions in the phenyl ring would increase the biological activity of this class. The conclusions of this work may lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 IN inhibition and contribute to the design of new and more potent derivatives.

  20. Metabolic and immune activation effects of treatment interruption in chronic HIV-1 infection: implications for cardiovascular risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Tebas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Concern about costs and antiretroviral therapy (ART-associated toxicities led to the consideration of CD4 driven strategies for the management of HIV. That approach was evaluated in the SMART trial that reported an unexpected increase of cardiovascular events after treatment interruption (TI. Our goal was to evaluate fasting metabolic changes associated with interruption of antiretroviral therapy and relate them to changes of immune activation markers and cardiovascular risk. METHODOLOGY: ACTG 5102 enrolled 47 HIV-1-infected subjects on stable ART, with or=500 cells/microL. Subjects were randomly assigned to continue ART for 18 weeks with or without 3 cycles of interleukin-2 (IL-2 (cycle = 4.5 million IU sc BID x 5 days every 8 weeks. After 18 weeks ART was discontinued in all subjects until the CD4 cell count dropped below 350 cells/microL. Glucose and lipid parameters were evaluated every 8 weeks initially and at weeks 2, 4, 8 and every 8 weeks after TI. Immune activation was evaluated by flow-cytometry and soluble TNFR2 levels. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By week 8 of TI, levels of total cholesterol (TC (median (Q1, Q3 (-0.73 (-1.19, -0.18 mmol/L, p<0.0001, LDL, HDL cholesterol (-0.36(-0.73,-0.03mmol/L, p = 0.0007 and -0.05(-0.26,0.03, p = 0.0033, respectively and triglycerides decreased (-0.40 (-0.84, 0.07 mmol/L, p = 0.005. However the TC/HDL ratio remained unchanged (-0.09 (-1.2, 0.5, p = 0.2. Glucose and insulin levels did not change (p = 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. After TI there was marked increase in immune activation (CD8+/HLA-DR+/CD38+ cells, 34% (13, 43, p<0.0001 and soluble TNFR2 (1089 ng/L (-189, 1655, p = 0.0008 coinciding with the rebound of HIV viremia. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that interrupting antiretroviral therapy does not reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD risk, as the improvements in lipid parameters are modest and overshadowed by the decreased HDL levels. Increased immune cell activation and systemic

  1. Circulating Biomarkers of Immune Activation Distinguish Viral Suppression from Nonsuppression in HAART-Treated Patients with Advanced HIV-1 Subtype C Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Malherbe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have examined immune activation profiles in patients with advanced HIV-1 subtype C infection or assessed their potential to predict responsiveness to HAART. BioPlex, ELISA, and nephelometric procedures were used to measure plasma levels of inflammatory biomarkers in HIV-1 subtype C-infected patients sampled before and after 6 months of successful HAART (n=20; in patients failing HAART (n=30; and in uninfected controls (n=8. Prior to HAART, CXCL9, CXCL10, β2M, sTNF-R1, TGF-β1, IFN-γ, IL-6, TNF, and sCD14 were significantly elevated in HIV-1-infected patients compared to controls (P<0.01. All of these markers, with the exception of sTNF-R1, were also elevated in patients failing HAART (P<0.05. The persistently elevated levels of CXCL9, CXCL10, and β2M in patients failing therapy in the setting of a marked reduction in these markers in patients on successful HAART suggest that they may be useful not only to monitor immune activation during HAART, but also to distinguish between good and poor responders. In the case of sCD14 and TGF-β1, the levels of these biomarkers remained persistently elevated despite HAART-induced virological suppression, a finding that is consistent with ongoing monocyte-macrophage activation, underscoring a potential role for adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapy.

  2. Sequence-specific activation of the DNA sensor cGAS by Y-form DNA structures as found in primary HIV-1 cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Hagmann, Cristina Amparo; Goldeck, Marion; Wolter, Steven; Kübler, Kirsten; Wittmann, Sabine; Gramberg, Thomas; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Mertens, Christina; Zillinger, Thomas; Jin, Tengchuan; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bartok, Eva; Coch, Christoph; Ackermann, Damian; Hornung, Veit; Ludwig, Janos; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic DNA that emerges during infection with a retrovirus or DNA virus triggers antiviral type I interferon responses. So far, only double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over 40 base pairs (bp) in length has been considered immunostimulatory. Here we found that unpaired DNA nucleotides flanking short base-paired DNA stretches, as in stem-loop structures of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), activated the type I interferon-inducing DNA sensor cGAS in a sequence-dependent manner. DNA structures containing unpaired guanosines flanking short (12- to 20-bp) dsDNA (Y-form DNA) were highly stimulatory and specifically enhanced the enzymatic activity of cGAS. Furthermore, we found that primary HIV-1 reverse transcripts represented the predominant viral cytosolic DNA species during early infection of macrophages and that these ssDNAs were highly immunostimulatory. Collectively, our study identifies unpaired guanosines in Y-form DNA as a highly active, minimal cGAS recognition motif that enables detection of HIV-1 ssDNA.

  3. Risk of progression to AIDS and death in women infected with HIV-1 initiating highly active antiretroviral treatment at different stages of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastos, Kathryn; Barrón, Yolanda; Miotti, Paolo; Weiser, Barbara; Young, Mary; Hessol, Nancy; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Cohen, Mardge; Augenbraun, Michael; Levine, Alexandra; Muñoz, Alvaro

    2002-09-23

    The optimal virologic and immunologic stage at which to initiate antiretroviral therapy in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is undefined. Among 1054 HIV-1-infected women in a prospective cohort study, we determined the time from initiation of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and death. Median follow-up was 3.4 years. Of 553 women without AIDS at HAART initiation, 62 (11%) developed AIDS. Compared with women with CD4(+) cell counts greater than 350/microL at HAART initiation, women with cell counts of 200 to 350/microL and less than 200/microL had relative hazards (RHs) for progression to AIDS of 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46-1.86) and 2.48 (95% CI, 1.39-4.42), respectively. Compared with those with HIV-1 RNA values less than 5000 copies/mL, women with 5000 to 50,000 copies/mL and greater than 50,000 copies/mL had RHs of 1.39 (95% CI, 0.74-2.64) and 2.09 (95% CI, 1.09-3.99), respectively. Among women with AIDS at HAART initiation (n = 501), RHs of death were 1.97 (95% CI, 0.84-4.66) and 3.35 (95% CI, 1.59-7.08) with CD4(+) cell counts of 200 to 350/microL and less than 200/microL, respectively, relative to those with greater than 350/microL, and 1.90 (95% CI, 0.84-4.30) and 3.70 (95% CI, 1.81-7.54) for those with HIV-1 RNA values of 5000 to 50,000 and greater than 50,000 copies/mL, respectively, relative to those with less than 5000 copies/mL. Progression to AIDS and death was predicted by pre-HAART values of less than 200/microL for CD4(+) cells and greater than 50,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, indicating that deferral of HAART until the CD4(+) cell count is between 350 and 200/microL is a valid strategy in the clinical management of HIV-1 infection.

  4. Evidence that levels of the dimeric cellular transcription factor CP2 play little role in the activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in vivo or following superinfection with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, F; Swendeman, S L; Popik, W; Pitha, P M; Sheffery, M

    1994-08-19

    The dimeric transcription factor CP2 binds a sequence element found near the transcription start site of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) long terminal repeat. Several groups have suggested that cellular factors binding this element might play a role in modulating HIV-1 promoter activity in vivo. For example, induction of latent HIV-1 gene expression in response to superinfection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or cytomegalovirus is thought to be mediated, in part, by factors binding the CP2 site. In this report we began to examine directly the relationship between CP2 and expression of the HIV-1 promoter. First, we tested what effect HSV-1 infection of T cells had on the cellular levels of CP2. The results showed that HSV-1 infection led to a significant reduction in the level of CP2 DNA binding activity and protein within 20 h. Next, we tested the effect of overexpressing either the wild-type factor or a dominant negative variant of CP2 on HIV-1 promoter activity in vivo. The results showed that CP2 had little effect or slightly repressed HIV-1 promoter activity in vivo. In addition, these expression constructs had little effect on the induction of HIV-1 promoter activity elicited by HSV-1 infection.

  5. Relation of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression with antibody response to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigi, Alberto; Pensieroso, Simone; Ruffin, Nicolas; Sammicheli, Stefano; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hejdeman, Bo; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-04-26

    The relevance of CD4+T-cells, viral load and age in the immunological response to influenza infection and vaccination in HIV-1 infected individuals has previously been pointed out. Our study aimed at assessing, in the setting of 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccination, whether quantification of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression in blood B-cells may provide additional indications for predicting antibody response to vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients with similar CD4+T-cell counts and age. Forty-seven healthy controls, 37 ART-treated and 17 treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected patients were enrolled in the study. Blood was collected prior to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and at 1, 3 and 6 months after vaccination. Antibody titers to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay while the mRNA expression levels of AID were measured by quantitative real time PCR. Upon B-cell activation in vitro, AID increase correlated to antibody response to the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 1 month after vaccination in all individuals. In addition, the maximum expression levels of AID were significantly higher in those individuals who still carried protective levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies after 6 months from vaccination. No correlation was found between CD4+T-cell counts or age at vaccination or HIV-1 viral load and levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies. Assessing AID expression before vaccination may be an additional useful tool for defining a vaccination strategy in immune-compromised individuals at risk of immunization failure.

  6. Epitope Mapping of Ibalizumab, a Humanized Anti-CD4 Monoclonal Antibody with Anti-HIV-1 Activity in Infected Patients▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruijiang; Franco, David; Kao, Chia-Ying; Yu, Faye; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). With its unique specificity for domain 2 of CD4, this antibody potently and broadly blocks HIV-1 infection in vitro by inhibiting a postbinding step required for viral entry but without interfering with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-mediated immune function. In clinical trials, ibalizumab has demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity in patients without causing immunosuppression. Thus, a characterization of the ibalizumab epitope was conducted in an attempt to gain insight into the underlying mechanism of its antiviral activity as well as its safety profile. By studying mouse/human chimeric CD4 molecules and site-directed point mutants of CD4, amino acids L96, P121, P122, and Q163 in domain 2 were found to be important for ibalizumab binding, with E77 and S79 in domain 1 also contributing. All these residues appear to cluster on the interface between domains 1 and 2 of human CD4 on a surface opposite the site where gp120 and the MHC-II molecule bind on domain 1. Separately, the epitope of M-T441, a weakly neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody that competes with ibalizumab, was localized entirely within domain 2 on residues 123 to 125 and 138 to 140. The results reported herein not only provide an appreciation for why ibalizumab has not had significant adverse immunological consequences in infected patients to date but also raise possible steric hindrance mechanisms by which this antibody blocks HIV-1 entry into a CD4-positive cell. PMID:20463063

  7. Epitope mapping of ibalizumab, a humanized anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody with anti-HIV-1 activity in infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruijiang; Franco, David; Kao, Chia-Ying; Yu, Faye; Huang, Yaoxing; Ho, David D

    2010-07-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4, the primary receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). With its unique specificity for domain 2 of CD4, this antibody potently and broadly blocks HIV-1 infection in vitro by inhibiting a postbinding step required for viral entry but without interfering with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-mediated immune function. In clinical trials, ibalizumab has demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity in patients without causing immunosuppression. Thus, a characterization of the ibalizumab epitope was conducted in an attempt to gain insight into the underlying mechanism of its antiviral activity as well as its safety profile. By studying mouse/human chimeric CD4 molecules and site-directed point mutants of CD4, amino acids L96, P121, P122, and Q163 in domain 2 were found to be important for ibalizumab binding, with E77 and S79 in domain 1 also contributing. All these residues appear to cluster on the interface between domains 1 and 2 of human CD4 on a surface opposite the site where gp120 and the MHC-II molecule bind on domain 1. Separately, the epitope of M-T441, a weakly neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody that competes with ibalizumab, was localized entirely within domain 2 on residues 123 to 125 and 138 to 140. The results reported herein not only provide an appreciation for why ibalizumab has not had significant adverse immunological consequences in infected patients to date but also raise possible steric hindrance mechanisms by which this antibody blocks HIV-1 entry into a CD4-positive cell.

  8. Rationally Designed Interfacial Peptides Are Efficient In Vitro Inhibitors of HIV-1 Capsid Assembly with Antiviral Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rebeca Bocanegra; María Nevot; Rosa Doménech; Inmaculada López; Olga Abián; Alicia Rodríguez-Huete; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Adrián Velázquez-Campoy; Javier Gómez; Miguel Ángel Martínez; José Luis Neira; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2011-01-01

    Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces in...

  9. Residual viraemia in HIV-1-infected patients with plasma viral load activation markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Katzenstein, T L; Pedersen, B K;

    2008-01-01

    -count, CD4+HLA-DR+, CD8+HLA-DR+CD38+, CD4+CD45RA-CD45RO+, CD8+CD45RA-CD45RO+, CD4+CD45RA+CD62L+, CD8+CD45RA+CD62L+ T cells, IgG or IgM. In conclusion, RV was associated with increased blood levels of soluble immune activation markers in HAART-treated HIV-1-infected patients. The finding that RV......)-microglobulin (+22 nmol/l, P = 0.016) and time-points with PCR-RV were also associated with higher IgA (+0.82 micromol/l, P = 0.035) and CD8-count (+1.18-fold, P = 0.001). Patients with TMA-RV in the study-period had higher HIV-1 RNA pre-HAART (P = 0.032). RV was not associated with proviral-HIV-1-DNA, CD4...

  10. Second-site suppressors of HIV-1 capsid mutations: restoration of intracellular activities without correction of intrinsic capsid stability defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ruifeng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disassembly of the viral capsid following penetration into the cytoplasm, or uncoating, is a poorly understood stage of retrovirus infection. Based on previous studies of HIV-1 CA mutants exhibiting altered capsid stability, we concluded that formation of a capsid of optimal intrinsic stability is crucial for HIV-1 infection. Results To further examine the connection between HIV-1 capsid stability and infectivity, we isolated second-site suppressors of HIV-1 mutants exhibiting unstable (P38A or hyperstable (E45A capsids. We identified the respective suppressor mutations, T216I and R132T, which restored virus replication in a human T cell line and markedly enhanced the fitness of the original mutants as revealed in single-cycle infection assays. Analysis of the corresponding purified N-terminal domain CA proteins by NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the E45A and R132T mutations induced structural changes that are localized to the regions of the mutations, while the P38A mutation resulted in changes extending to neighboring regions in space. Unexpectedly, neither suppressor mutation corrected the intrinsic viral capsid stability defect associated with the respective original mutation. Nonetheless, the R132T mutation rescued the selective infectivity impairment exhibited by the E45A mutant in aphidicolin-arrested cells, and the double mutant regained sensitivity to the small molecule inhibitor PF74. The T216I mutation rescued the impaired ability of the P38A mutant virus to abrogate restriction by TRIMCyp and TRIM5α. Conclusions The second-site suppressor mutations in CA that we have identified rescue virus infection without correcting the intrinsic capsid stability defects associated with the P38A and E45A mutations. The suppressors also restored wild type virus function in several cell-based assays. We propose that while proper HIV-1 uncoating in target cells is dependent on the intrinsic stability of the viral capsid, the

  11. Hierarchy Low CD4+/CD8+ T-Cell Counts and IFN-γ Responses in HIV-1+ Individuals Correlate with Active TB and/or M.tb Co-Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lingyun; Zhang, Xinyun; Gao, Yan; Xu, Yunya; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Shenglei; Weng, Xinhua; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W; Jiang, Weimin; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    Detailed studies of correlation between HIV-M.tb co-infection and hierarchy declines of CD8+/CD4+ T-cell counts and IFN-γ responses have not been done. We conducted case-control studies to address this issue. 164 HIV-1-infected individuals comprised of HIV-1+ATB, HIV-1+LTB and HIV-1+TB- groups were evaluated. Immune phenotyping and complete blood count (CBC) were employed to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts; T.SPOT.TB and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) were utilized to detect ESAT6, CFP10 or PPD-specific IFN-γ responses. There were significant differences in median CD4+ T-cell counts between HIV-1+ATB (164/μL), HIV-1+LTB (447/μL) and HIV-1+TB- (329/μL) groups. Hierarchy low CD4+ T-cell counts (500/μL) were correlated significantly with active TB but not M.tb co-infection. Interestingly, hierarchy low CD8+ T-cell counts were not only associated significantly with active TB but also with M.tb co-infection (PHierarchy low CD8+ T-cell counts and effector function in HIV-1-infected individuals are correlated with both M.tb co-infection and active TB. Hierarchy low CD4+ T-cell counts and Th1 effector function in HIV-1+ individuals are associated with increased frequencies of active TB, but not M.tb co-infection.

  12. Antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected individuals with CD4 count below 100 cells/mm3 results in differential recovery of monocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Sean C; Azzoni, Livio; Joseph, Jocelin; Fair, Matthew G; Sierra-Madero, Juan G; Rassool, Mohammed S; Sanne, Ian; Montaner, Luis J

    2016-07-01

    Reversal of monocyte and macrophage activation and the relationship to viral suppression and T cell activation are unknown in patients with advanced HIV-1 infection, initiating antiretroviral therapy. This study aimed to determine whether reduction in biomarkers of monocyte and macrophage activation would be reduced in conjunction with viral suppression and resolution of T cell activation. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the addition of CCR5 antagonism (by maraviroc) would mediate greater reduction of monocyte/macrophage activation markers than suppressive antiretroviral therapy alone. In the CCR5 antagonism to decrease the incidence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome study, antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients received maraviroc or placebo in addition to standard antiretroviral therapy. PBMCs and plasma from 65 patients were assessed during 24 wk of antiretroviral therapy for biomarkers of monocyte and macrophage activation. Markers of monocyte and macrophage activation were reduced significantly by 24 wk, including CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes (P CCR5-positive monocytes in PBMC. HIV-1 suppression after 24 wk of antiretroviral therapy, with or without maraviroc, demonstrates robust recovery in monocyte subset activation markers, whereas soluble markers of activation demonstrate minimal decrease, qualitatively differentiating markers of monocyte/macrophage activation in advanced disease.

  13. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  14. Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry by targeting gp41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin L(U); Shu-wen LIU; Shi-bo JIANG; Shu-guang WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism by which tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells. METHODS: The inhibitory activity of tannin on HIV-1 replication and entry was detected by p24 production and HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, respectively. The inhibitory activity on the gp41 six-helix bundle formation was determined by an improved sandwich ELISA. RESULTS: Tannins from different sources showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 replication,HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, and the gp4 six-helix bundle formation. CONCLUSION: Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells by interfering with the gp41 six-helix bundle formation, thus blocking HIV-1 fusion with the target cell.

  15. Combined chronic blockade of hyper-active L-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors ameliorates HIV-1 associated hyper-excitability of mPFC pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodr, Christina E; Chen, Lihua; Dave, Sonya; Al-Harthi, Lena; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2016-10-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection induces neurological and neuropsychological deficits, which are associated with dysregulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other vulnerable brain regions. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection in the mPFC and the therapeutic potential of targeting over-active voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (L-channel) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR), as modeled in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the membrane properties and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) potentials (Ca(2+) influx) in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Neurons from HIV-1 Tg rats displayed reduced rheobase, spike amplitude and inwardly-rectifying K(+) influx, increased numbers of action potentials, and a trend of aberrant firing compared to those from non-Tg control rats. Neuronal hyper-excitation was associated with abnormally-enhanced Ca(2+) influx (independent of NMDAR), which was eliminated by acute L-channel blockade. Combined chronic blockade of over-active L-channels and NMDARs with open-channel blockers abolished HIV effects on spiking, aberrant firing and Ca(2+) potential half-amplitude duration, though not the reduced inward rectification. In contrast, individual chronic blockade of over-active L-channels or NMDARs did not alleviate HIV-induced mPFC hyper-excitability. These studies demonstrate that HIV alters mPFC neuronal activity by dysregulating membrane excitability and Ca(2+) influx through the L-channels. This renders these neurons more susceptible and vulnerable to excitatory stimuli, and could contribute to HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. Combined targeting of over-active L-channels/NMDARs alleviates HIV-induced dysfunction of mPFC pyramidal neurons, emphasizing a potential novel therapeutic strategy that may effectively decrease HIV-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation in the mPFC.

  16. HIV-1 vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure. PMID:24637946

  17. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Nunzio, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.di-nunzio@pasteur.fr [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Fricke, Thomas [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Miccio, Annarita [University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Centro di Medicina Rigenerativa, Modena (Italy); Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Souque, Philippe [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco [Institute of Biomedical Technologies, CNR, Milano (Italy); Mavilio, Fulvio [University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Centro di Medicina Rigenerativa, Modena (Italy); Genethon, Evry (France); Charneau, Pierre [Molecular Virology and Vaccinology unit, CNRS URA 3015, Department of Virology, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Dr. Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Diaz-Griffero, Felipe, E-mail: felipe.diaz-griffero@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  18. Evolution of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing activity: therapy-associated decline, positive association with detectable viremia, and partial restoration of B-cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carolina B; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Llano, Anuska; Pérez, Ignacio; Crespo, Isabel; Llinas, Laia; Garcia, Felipe; Gatell, Jose M; Yuste, Eloisa; Sanchez-Merino, Victor

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the stability of HIV-1 cross-neutralizing responses. Taking into account the fact that neutralization breadth has been positively associated with plasma viral load, there is no explanation for the presence of broadly neutralizing responses in a group of patients on treatment with undetectable viremia. In addition, the B-cell profile responsible for broadly cross-neutralizing responses is unknown. Here we studied the evolution of neutralizing responses and the B-cell subpopulation distribution in a group of patients with broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing activity. We studied neutralization breadth evolution in a group of six previously identified broadly cross-neutralizing patients and six control patients during a 6-year period with a previously described minipanel of recombinant viruses from five different subtypes. B-cell subpopulation distribution during the study was also determined by multiparametric flow cytometry. Broadly cross-neutralizing activity was transient in four broad cross-neutralizers and stable, up to 4.6 years, in the other two. In four out of five broad cross-neutralizers who initiated treatment, a neutralization breadth loss occurred after viremia had been suppressed for as much as 20 months. B-cell subpopulation analyses revealed a significant increase in the frequency of naive B cells in broadly cross-reactive samples, compared with samples with less neutralization breadth (increased from 44% to 62%). We also observed a significant decrease in tissue-like and activated memory B cells (decreased from 19% to 12% and from 17% to 9%, respectively). Our data suggest that HIV-1 broadly cross-neutralizing activity is variable over time and associated with detectable viremia and partial B-cell restoration.

  19. Identification of Env-specific Monoclonal Antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 Infected Person by B cell Activation and RT-PCR Cloning%利用B细胞培养和RT-PCR技术从我国HIV-1感染者中筛选膜蛋白特异性单克隆抗体的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪慧敏; 管永军; 曾毅; 徐柯; 余双庆; 丁林林; 罗海艳; Robin Flinko; George K lewis; 冯霞; 邵继荣

    2012-01-01

    To obtain protective human monoclonal antibody from HIV-1 infected person, we adapted a technology for isolating antigen specific monoclonal antibody from human memory B cells through in vitro B cell activation coupled with RT-PCT and expression cloning. Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs of HIV-1 infected individuals and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads. Two hundred memory B cells per well were cultured in 96-well round-bottom plates with feeder cells in medium containing EBV and CpG. Env-specific antibodies in supernatants were screened by ELISA after 1~2 weeks' culture. Cells from positive wells of Env-specific antibody were harvested and total RNA was isolated. Human VH and Vκ or VX genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into IgG1 and κ or γ expressing vectors. Functional VH and Vk or VX were identified by cotransfecting 293T cells with individual heavy chain and light chain clones followed by analysis of culture supernatants by ELISA for Env-specific antibodies. Finally, corresponding mAb was produced by transient transfection of 293T cells with the identified VH and V κ/γ pair and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. Purified monocolonal antibodies were used for HIV-1 specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and neutralizing activity assay. Four monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 subtype B' infected individual. Two of them showed strong ADCC activity and one showed weak neutralizing activity against HIV-1. Its further studies on their application in therapeutic or prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 should be grounded.%本研究通过采集1型人类免疫缺陷病毒(Human immunodeficiency virus-1,HIV-1)感染者抗凝全血,分离出外周血单个核细胞,然后用磁珠分选纯化记忆性B细胞和体外活化记忆性B细胞,促使其分泌抗体,用ELISA法识别阳性B细胞克隆,并提取阳性B细胞

  20. Molecular Understanding of HIV-1 Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been an important breakthrough in the treatment of HIV-1 infection and has also a powerful tool to upset the equilibrium of viral production and HIV-1 pathogenesis. Despite the advent of potent combinations of this therapy, the long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs like cells from monocyte-macrophage lineage and resting memory CD4+ T cells which are established early during primary infection constitute a major obstacle to virus eradication. Further HAART interruption leads to immediate rebound viremia from latent reservoirs. This paper focuses on the essentials of the molecular mechanisms for the establishment of HIV-1 latency with special concern to present and future possible treatment strategies to completely purge and target viral persistence in the reservoirs.

  1. Anti-HIV-1 activity of salivary MUC5B and MUC7 mucins from HIV patients with different CD4 counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roux Paul

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that MUC5B and MUC7 mucins from saliva of HIV negative individuals inhibit HIV-1 activity by 100% in an in vitro assay. The purpose of this subsequent study was to investigate whether MUC5B and MUC7 from saliva of HIV patients or with full blown AIDS had a similar inhibitory activity against the virus. Methods Salivary MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV patients with different CD4 counts ( 400 were incubated with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells. Cells were then cultured and viral replication was measured by a qualitative p24 antigen assay. The size, charge and immunoreactivity of mucins from HIV negative and positive individuals was also analysed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA respectively. Results It was shown that irrespective of their CD4 counts both MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV patients, unlike the MUC5B and MUC7 from HIV negative individuals, did not inhibit HIV-1 activity. Size, charge and immunoreactivity differences between the mucins from HIV negative and positive individuals and among the mucins from HIV patients of different CD4 count was observed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA. Conclusions Purified salivary mucins from HIV positive patients do not inhibit the AIDS virus in an in vitro assay. Although the reason for the inability of mucins from infected individuals to inhibit the virus is not known, it is likely that there is an alteration of the glycosylation pattern, and therefore of charge of mucin, in HIV positive patients. The ability to inhibit the virus by aggregation by sugar chains is thus diminished.

  2. Correlation of increases in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D during vitamin D therapy with activation of CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1-infected males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Ulrich; Kolte, Lilian; Hitz, Mette; Dam Nielsen, Susanne; Schierbeck, Louise Lind; Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Mathiesen, Lars; Benfield, Thomas; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

    2012-01-01

    In HIV-1-infected individuals, levels of CD4+ T lymphocytes are depleted and regulatory T-lymphocytes (Tregs) are elevated. In vitro studies have demonstrated effects of vitamin D on the growth and differentiation of these cells. We speculated whether supplementation with vitamin D could have an effect on CD4+ T lymphocytes or Tregs in HIV-1-infected males. We conducted a placebo-controlled randomized study that ran for 16 weeks and included 61 HIV-1-infected males, of whom 51 completed the protocol. The participants were randomized to 1 of 3 daily treatments: (1) 0.5-1.0 µg calcitriol and 1200 IU (30 µg) cholecalciferol, (2) 1200 IU cholecalciferol, (3) placebo. Percentages of the following T-lymphocyte subsets were determined: naïve CD4+ and CD8+ cells, activated CD4+ and CD8+ cells, and CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127low Tregs. Furthermore 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and parathyroid hormone were measured. No significant changes of the studied T-lymphocyte subsets occurred in the treatment groups compared to the placebo group. Increases in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were associated with increases in activated CD4+ T lymphocytes (P = .001) and Tregs (P = .01) in adjusted models. Changes in parathyroid hormone correlated inversely with Tregs (P = .02). Smokers had higher levels of naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes (37% vs 25%;P = .01), naïve CD8+ T lymphocytes (28% vs 19%; P = .03), and Tregs (9% vs 7%; P = .03). Cholecalciferol and calcitriol administered during 16 weeks did not change the levels of T-lymphocyte fractions compared to placebo. However, increases in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were associated with an expansion of activated CD4+ cells and Tregs.

  3. A Novel Aspartic Protease with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Fresh Fruiting Bodies of the Wild Mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Xiu Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel aspartic protease with HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity was isolated and characterized from fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon. The purification protocol comprised distilled water homogenization and extraction step, three ion exchange chromatographic steps (on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and CM-cellulose in succession, and final purification was by FPLC on Superdex 75. The protease was adsorbed on all the three ion exchangers. It was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and FPLC. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was HYTELLSQVV, which exhibited no sequence homology to other proteases reported. The activity of the protease was adversely affected by Pepstatin A, indicating that it is an aspartic protease. The protease activity was maximal or nearly so in the pH range 6–8 and in the temperature range 35–60°C. The purified enzyme exhibited HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 8.3 μM, but was devoid of antifungal, ribonuclease, and hemagglutinating activities.

  4. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells suppress HIV-1 replication but contribute to HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis in humanized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. HIV-1 infection in the humanized mouse model leads to persistent HIV-1 infection and immunopathogenesis, including type I interferons (IFN-I induction, immune-activation and depletion of human leukocytes, including CD4 T cells. We developed a monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes human pDC in all lymphoid organs in humanized mice. When pDC were depleted prior to HIV-1 infection, the induction of IFN-I and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs were abolished during acute HIV-1 infection with either a highly pathogenic CCR5/CXCR4-dual tropic HIV-1 or a standard CCR5-tropic HIV-1 isolate. Consistent with the anti-viral role of IFN-I, HIV-1 replication was significantly up-regulated in pDC-depleted mice. Interestingly, the cell death induced by the highly pathogenic HIV-1 isolate was severely reduced in pDC-depleted mice. During chronic HIV-1 infection, depletion of pDC also severely reduced the induction of IFN-I and ISGs, associated with elevated HIV-1 replication. Surprisingly, HIV-1 induced depletion of human immune cells including T cells in lymphoid organs, but not the blood, was reduced in spite of the increased viral replication. The increased cell number in lymphoid organs was associated with a reduced level of HIV-induced cell death in human leukocytes including CD4 T cells. We conclude that pDC play opposing roles in suppressing HIV-1 replication and in promoting HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis. These findings suggest that pDC-depletion and IFN-I blockade will provide novel strategies for treating those HIV-1 immune non-responsive patients with persistent immune activation despite effective anti-retrovirus treatment.

  5. The naive CD4+ count in HIV-1-infected patients at time of initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy is strongly associated with the level of immunological recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, OG; Kirk, O; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    2002-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy can induce considerable, sustained viral suppression followed by immunological recovery, in which naive CD4 + cells are important. Long-term immunological recovery was investigated during the first 3 y of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 210 HIV-1...... was sustained. There was no association between plasma viral load and the increase in naive CD4 + cell count. Importantly, baseline naive CD4 + cell count was significantly associated with the change in naive CD4 + cell count, suggesting that the naive cell count at baseline does influence the immunological...

  6. Hologram quantitative structure–activity relationship and comparative molecular field analysis studies within a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalhães UO

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Uiaran de Oliveira Magalhães,1 Alessandra Mendonça Teles de Souza,1 Magaly Girão Albuquerque,2 Monique Araújo de Brito,3 Murilo Lamim Bello,1 Lucio Mendes Cabral,4 Carlos Rangel Rodrigues1 1Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Faculdade de Farmácia, Laboratório de Modelagem Molecular and QSAR (ModMolQSAR, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; 2Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Instituto de Química, Laboratório de Modelagem Molecular (LabMMol, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; 3Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF, Faculdade de Farmácia, Laboratório de Química Medicinal Computacional (LabQMC, Niterói, RJ, Brazil; 4Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Faculdade de Farmácia, Laboratório de Tecnologia Farmacêutica Industrial (LabTIF, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil Abstract: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is a public health problem worldwide caused by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Treatment with antiretroviral drugs is the best option for viral suppression, reducing morbidity and mortality. However, viral resistance in HIV-1 therapy has been reported. HIV-1 integrase (IN is an essential enzyme for effective viral replication and an attractive target for the development of new inhibitors. In the study reported here, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure–activity relationship (2D/3D-QSAR studies, applying hologram quantitative structure–activity relationship (HQSAR and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA methods, respectively, were performed on a series of tricyclic phthalimide HIV-1 IN inhibitors. The best HQSAR model (q2 = 0.802, r2 = 0.972 was obtained using atoms, bonds, and connectivity as the fragment distinction, a fragment size of 2–5 atoms, hologram length of 61 bins, and six components. The best CoMFA model (q2 = 0.748, r2 = 0.974 was obtained with alignment of all atoms of the tricyclic phthalimide moiety (alignment II. The HQSAR contribution map identified that the carbonyl

  7. Differential in vitro inhibitory activity against HIV-1 of alpha-(1-3- and alpha-(1-6-D-mannose specific plant lectins : Implication for microbicide development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balzarini Jan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant lectins such as Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA and Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA are natural proteins able to link mannose residues, and therefore inhibit HIV-target cell interactions. Plant lectins are candidate for microbicide development. Objective To evaluate the activity against HIV of the mannose-specific plant lectins HHA and GNA at the cellular membrane level of epithelial cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC, two potential target cells of HIV at the genital mucosal level. Methods The inhibitory effects of HHA and GNA were evaluated on HIV adsorption to genital epithelial HEC-1A cell line, on HIV transcytosis throughout a monolayer of polarized epithelial HEC-1A cells, on HIV adsorption to MDDC and on transfer of HIV from MDDC to autologous T lymphocytes. Results HHA faintly inhibited attachment to HEC-1A cells of the R5-tropic HIV-1Ba-L strain, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas GNA moderately inhibited HIV adsorption in the same context, but only at high drug doses. Only HHA, but not GNA, inhibited HIV-1JR-CSF transcytosis in a dose-dependent manner. By confocal microscopy, HHA, but not GNA, was adsorbed at the epithelial cell surface, suggesting that HHA interacts specifically with receptors mediating HIV-1 transcytosis. Both plant lectins partially inhibited HIV attachment to MDDC. HHA inhibited more efficiently the transfer of HIV from MDDC to T cell, than GNA. Both HHA and GNA lacked toxicity below 200 μg/ml irrespective the cellular system used and do not disturb the monolayer integrity of epithelial cells. Conclusion These observations demonstrate higher inhibitory activities of the lectin plant HHA by comparison to GNA, on HIV adsorption to HEC-1A cell line, HIV transcytosis through HEC-1A cell line monolayer, HIV adsorption to MDDC and HIV transfer from MDDC to T cells, highlighting the potential interest of HHA as effective microbicide against HIV.

  8. Activation of the DNA Damage Response Is a Conserved Function of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr That Is Independent of SLX4 Recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver I. Fregoso

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There has been extraordinary progress in understanding the roles of lentiviral accessory proteins in antagonizing host antiviral defense proteins. However, the precise primary function of the accessory gene Vpr remains elusive. Here we suggest that engagement with the DNA damage response is an important function of primate lentiviral Vpr proteins because of its conserved function among diverse lentiviral lineages. In contrast, we show that, for HIV-1, HIV-2, and related Vpr isolates and orthologs, there is a lack of correlation between DNA damage response activation and interaction with the host SLX4 protein complex of structure specific endonucleases; some Vpr proteins are able to interact with SLX4, but the majority are not. Using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9 method to knock out SLX4, we formally showed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr orthologs can still activate the DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest in the absence of SLX4. Together, our data suggest that activation of the DNA damage response, but not SLX4 interaction, is conserved and therefore indicative of an important function of Vpr. Our data also indicate that Vpr activates the DNA damage response through an SLX4-independent mechanism that remains uncharacterized.

  9. TatBC-independent TatA/Tat substrate interactions contribute to transport efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Taubert

    Full Text Available The Tat system can transport folded, signal peptide-containing proteins (Tat substrates across energized membranes of prokaryotes and plant plastids. A twin-arginine motif in the signal peptide of Tat substrates is recognized by TatC-containing complexes, and TatA permits the membrane passage. Often, as in the model Tat systems of Escherichia coli and plant plastids, a third component - TatB - is involved that resembles TatA but has a higher affinity to TatC. It is not known why most TatA dissociates from TatBC complexes in vivo and distributes more evenly in the membrane. Here we show a TatBC-independent substrate-binding to TatA from Escherichia coli, and we provide evidence that this binding enhances Tat transport. First hints came from in vivo cross-linking data, which could be confirmed by affinity co-purification of TatA with the natural Tat substrates HiPIP and NrfC. Two positions on the surface of HiPIP could be identified that are important for the TatA interaction and transport efficiency, indicating physiological relevance of the interaction. Distributed TatA thus may serve to accompany membrane-interacting Tat substrates to the few TatBC spots in the cells.

  10. A novel ribonuclease with antiproliferative activity toward leukemia and lymphoma cells and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from the mushroom, Hohenbuehelia serotina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Liyan; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a 27-kDa ribonuclease (RNase) was purified from the dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom, Hohenbuehelia serotina. The isolation protocol involved anion exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography, cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration in succession. The RNase was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose, but was adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-cellulose. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was TVGGSLAEKGN which showed homology to other fungal RNases to a certain degree. The RNase exhibited maximal RNase activity at pH 5 and 80˚C. It demonstrated the highest ribonucleolytic activity toward poly(C), a relatively high activity toward poly(U), and a considerably weaker activity toward poly(A) and (G). The RNase inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 50 µM and reduced [3H-methyl]-thymidine uptake by L1210 leukemia cells and MBL2 lymphoma cells with an IC50 of 25 µM and 40 µM, respectively.

  11. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  12. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa N. Madison

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  13. The anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin protects the genital mucosal epithelial barrier from disruption and blocks replication of HIV-1 and HSV-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H Ferreira

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a known mechanism that facilitates HIV acquisition and the spread of infection. In this study, we evaluated whether curcumin, a potent and safe anti-inflammatory compound, could be used to abrogate inflammatory processes that facilitate HIV-1 acquisition in the female genital tract (FGT and contribute to HIV amplification. Primary, human genital epithelial cells (GECs were pretreated with curcumin and exposed to HIV-1 or HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120, both of which have been shown to disrupt epithelial tight junction proteins, including ZO-1 and occludin. Pre-treatment with curcumin prevented disruption of the mucosal barrier by maintaining ZO-1 and occludin expression and maintained trans-epithelial electric resistance across the genital epithelium. Curcumin pre-treatment also abrogated the gp120-mediated upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL-6, which mediate barrier disruption, as well as the chemokines IL-8, RANTES and interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10, which are capable of recruiting HIV target cells to the FGT. GECs treated with curcumin and exposed to the sexually transmitted co-infecting microbes HSV-1, HSV-2 and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were unable to elicit innate inflammatory responses that indirectly induced activation of the HIV promoter and curcumin blocked Toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated induction of HIV replication in chronically infected T-cells. Finally, curcumin treatment resulted in significantly decreased HIV-1 and HSV-2 replication in chronically infected T-cells and primary GECs, respectively. All together, our results suggest that the use of anti-inflammatory compounds such as curcumin may offer a viable alternative for the prevention and/or control of HIV replication in the FGT.

  14. Pre-clinical development as microbicide of zinc tetra-ascorbo-camphorate, a novel terpenoid derivative: Potent in vitro inhibitory activity against both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1 strains without significant in vivo mucosal toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannarini Aurèle

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terpenoid derivatives originating from many plants species, are interesting compounds with numerous biological effects, such as anti-HIV-1 activity. The zinc tetra-ascorbo-camphorate complex (or "C14", a new monoterpenoid derivative was evaluated in vitro for its anti-HIV-1 activity on both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection of primary target cells (macrophages, dendritic cells and T cells and on HIV-1 transfer from dendritic cells to T cells. Results The toxicity study was carried out in vitro and also with the New Zealand White rabbit vaginal irritation model. C14 was found to be no cytotoxic at high concentrations (CC50 > 10 μM and showed to be a potential HIV-1 inhibitor of infection of all the primary cells tested (EC50 = 1 μM. No significant changes could be observed in cervicovaginal tissue of rabbit exposed during 10 consecutive days to formulations containing up to 20 μM of C14. Conclusion Overall, these preclinical studies suggest that zinc tetra-ascorbo-camphorate derivative is suitable for further testing as a candidate microbicide to prevent male-to-female heterosexual acquisition of HIV-1.

  15. Binding of human prothymosin alpha to the leucine-motif/activation domains of HTLV-I Rex and HIV-1 Rev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, S; Adachi, Y; Copeland, T D; Oroszlan, S

    1995-10-01

    Rex of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) and Rev of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) are post-transcriptional regulators of viral gene expression. By means of affinity chromatography, we purified an 18-kDa cellular protein that bound to the conserved leucine-motif/activation domain of HTLV-I Rex or HIV-1 Rev. The protein that was purified through a Rev-affinity column was found to bind to Rex immunoprecipitated with anti-Rex IgG from an HTLV-I-producing cell line. We analyzed the purified approximately 18-kDa protein biochemically and identified it as prothymosin alpha. The binding activity of prothymosin alpha to Rev or Rex was completely abolished when the epsilon-amino groups of its lysine residues were chemically modified by N-succinimidyl-3-(4-hydroxy-3,5-diodo- phenyl)propionate. The functional relationship between the nuclear protein prothymosin alpha and Rex-Rev is discussed.

  16. An important role for type Ⅲ interferon(IFN-lambda) in anti-HIV activity%新型干扰素——IFN-λ抗HIV-1感染

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵颖岚; 孙黎; 王旭; 侯炜; 霍文哲

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine whether IFN-λ has the ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection of blood monocyte-derived macrophages and its mechanism(s). Methods Macrophages were pretreated with IFN-λ/ IFN-λ2 for 24 h before infected by HIV-1 R5 strains (Bal, Jago, and JRFL). And then the culture supernatants were detected HIV-1 reverse transcription (RT) activity and p24 protein expression by HIV-1 BT assay and ELISA. The expressions of IFN-λ receptor, CD4, CCRS, CXCR4 were evaluated by real-time PCR. Results Both IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ2, when added to macrophage cultures, inhibited HIV-1 infection and replication. This IFN-λ-mediated anti-HIV-I activity is broad, as IFN-λ could inhibit infection by both laboratory-adapted and clinical strains of HIV-1. Investigations of mechanism(s) responsible for the IFN-λ action showed that although IFN-λ had little effect on HIV-1 entry receptor CD4 and co-receptor CCR5 and CXCR4 expression, IFN-λ inhibited HIV-I infection of macrophages through connecting with IFN-λ recep-tor. Conclusion IFN-λ could inhibit HIV-I replication in macrophages. These findings indicate that IFN-λ may have a therapeutic value in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.%目的 研究干扰素λ(IFN-λ)是否对HIV-1感染人臣噬细胞有抑制作用,并对可能介导IFN-λ抗HIV-1作用的受体和辅助受体表达水平进行研究,初步探讨其抗HIV-1感染的机制.方法 HIV-1毒株感染人巨噬细胞前用IFN-λ处理细胞24 h,感染后第4天、第8天以及第12天分别检测感染细胞上清中HIV-1逆转录酶(RT)活性和p24蛋白水平,并用实时定量PCR检测细胞上IFN-λ受体、CD4、CCR5、CXCR4的表达.结果 IFN-λ对HIV-1感染人巨噬细胞具有明显抑制作用,且此作用与其剂量及作用时间呈正相关.但IFN-λ对CD4、CCR5、CXCR4的表达影响无统计学意义.结论 IFN-λ能有效抑制HIV-1感染人口噬细胞,并证实这一作用是通过其受体发挥功能的.但IFN-λ介导的抗HIV-1

  17. Identification of HIV-1 specific T lymphocyte responses in highly exposed persistently seronegative Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-wei; SHAO Yi-ming; HONG Kun-xue; MA Jun; YUAN Lin; LIU Sha; CHEN Jian-ping; ZHANG Yuan-zhi; RUAN Yu-hua; XU Jian-qing

    2006-01-01

    Background Studies of highly exposed persistently seronegative (HEPS) individuals may provide valuable information on mechanisms of protection and on vaccine design. Cellular immune responses play a critical role in containing human immunodeficiency virus. However, the cellular immune responses in HEPS individuals have not been thoroughly assessed at the entire viral genome level.Methods Ten HEPS Chinese with a history of frequent penetrative vaginal intercourse (mean frequency, at least once a week), with some unprotected sexual contact occurring in the weeks or days immediately before enrollment, 25 HIV-1 seropositive individuals, 10 HIV-1-seronegative healthy individuals with low-risk sexual behavior and no history suggestive of exposure to HIV-1 infection were enrolled. HIV-1-specific T cell responses were comprehensively analyzed by an interferon- γ Elispot assay against 770 overlapping peptides spanning all HIV-1 proteins.Results HIV-1-specific T-cell responses of interferon- γ secretion were identified in 3 (30%) out of 10 HEPS individuals; the specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes were targeted at Pol (2/10), Env (2/10), and Tat (1/10).HIV-1-specific T-cell responses of interferon- γ secretion were identified in 20 (80%) out of 25 seropositive intravenous drug users (IDUs), revealing that all HIV-1 proteins and protein subunits could serve as targets for HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses with 85% recognizing Gag, 80% recognizing Nef, 75% recognizing Pol,60% recognizing Env, 55% recognizing Vpu, 45% recognizing Vpr, 20% recognizing Vif, 20% recognizing Tat and 15% recognizing Rev in these seropositive individuals. None of the seronegative healthy individuals gave the positive T-cell responses.Conclusions About 30% of HEPS Chinese mounted HIV-1 specific T cell immune responses. Cell-mediated immunity against HIV-1 may be developed through non-productive infections.

  18. PACAP27 is protective against Tat-induced neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzi, Summer J.; Borelli, Giulia; Ryan, Kerry; Steiner, Joseph P.; Reglodi, Dora; Mocchetti, Italo; Avdoshina, Valeriya

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) infection of the central nervous system promotes neuronal injury and apoptosis that culminate in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Viral proteins, such as transactivator of transcription (Tat), have emerged as leading candidates to explain HIV-mediated neurotoxicity, though the mechanism remains unclear. To determine the effects of Tat, rat cortical neurons were exposed to nanomolar concentrations of Tat for various time points. Within a few hours, Tat induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and other indices of mitochondrial destabilization. In addition, we observed a significant induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by Tat. We next investigated the neuroprotective activity of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide 27 (PACAP27) against these cardinal features of Tat-induced neurodegeneration. PACAP27 (100 nM) inhibited all Tat-mediated toxic effects including DNA DSBs. Importantly, PACAP27 prevented the induction of neuronal loss induced by Tat. The neuroprotective effect of PACAP27 is correlated with its ability to release the anti-apoptotic chemok