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Sample records for hiv-1 gp120 induces

  1. Curcumin improves synaptic plasticity impairment induced by HIV-1gp120 V3 loop

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    Ling-ling Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin has been shown to significantly improve spatial memory impairment induced by HIV-1 gp120 V3 in rats, but the electrophysiological mechanism remains unknown. Using extracellular microelectrode recording techniques, this study confirmed that the gp120 V3 loop could suppress long-term potentiation in the rat hippocampal CA1 region and synaptic plasticity, and that curcumin could antagonize these inhibitory effects. Using a Fura-2/AM calcium ion probe, we found that curcumin resisted the effects of the gp120 V3 loop on hippocampal synaptosomes and decreased Ca 2+ concentration in synaptosomes. This effect of curcumin was identical to nimodipine, suggesting that curcumin improved the inhibitory effects of gp120 on synaptic plasticity, ameliorated damage caused to the central nervous system, and might be a potential neuroprotective drug.

  2. Antioxidant enzyme gene delivery to protect from HIV-1 gp120-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, L; Louboutin, J-P; Reyes, B A S; Van Bockstaele, E J; Strayer, D S

    2006-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to neuronal loss and progressively deteriorating CNS function: HIV-1 gene products, especially gp120, induce free radical-mediated apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), are among the potential mediators of these effects. Neurons readily form ROS after gp120 exposure, and so might be protected from ROS-mediated injury by antioxidant enzymes such as Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and/or glutathione peroxidase (GPx1). Both enzymes detoxify oxygen free radicals. As they are highly efficient gene delivery vehicles for neurons, recombinant SV40-derived vectors were used for these studies. Cultured mature neurons derived from NT2 cells and primary fetal neurons were transduced with rSV40 vectors carrying human SOD1 and/or GPx1 cDNAs, then exposed to gp120. Apoptosis was measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Transduction efficiency of both neuron populations was >95%, as assayed by immunostaining. Transgene expression was also ascertained by Western blotting and direct assays of enzyme activity. Gp120 induced apoptosis in a high percentage of unprotected NT2-N. Transduction with SV(SOD1) and SV(GPx1) before gp120 challenge reduced neuronal apoptosis by >90%. Even greater protection was seen in cells treated with both vectors in sequence. Given singly or in combination, they protect neuronal cells from HIV-1-gp120 induced apoptosis. We tested whether rSV40 s can deliver antioxidant enzymes to the CNS in vivo: intracerebral injection of SV(SOD1) or SV(GPx1) into the caudate putamen of rat brain yielded excellent transgene expression in neurons. In vivo transduction using SV(SOD1) also protected neurons from subsequent gp120-induced apoptosis after injection of both into the caudate putamen of rat brain. Thus, SOD1 and GPx1 can be delivered by SV40 vectors in vitro or in vivo. This approach may merit consideration for

  3. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

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    Chen, Weizao, E-mail: chenw3@mail.nih.gov [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Feng, Yang [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Wang, Yanping [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); The Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S. [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  4. HIV-1 gp120 induces NFAT nuclear translocation in resting CD4+ T-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicala, Claudia; Arthos, James; Censoplano, Nina; Cruz, Catherine; Chung, Eva; Martinelli, Elena; Lempicki, Richard A.; Natarajan, Ven; VanRyk, Donald; Daucher, Marybeth; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2006-01-01

    The replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in CD4+ T-cells is strongly dependent upon the state of activation of infected cells. Infection of sub-optimally activated cells is believed to play a critical role in both the transmission of virus and the persistence of CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. There is accumulating evidence that HIV can modulate signal-transduction pathways in a manner that may facilitate replication in such cells. We previously demonstrated that HIV gp120 induces virus replication in resting CD4+ T cells isolated from HIV-infected individuals. Here, we show that in resting CD4+ T-cells, gp120 activates NFATs and induces their translocation into the nucleus. The HIV LTR encodes NFAT recognition sites, and NFATs may play a critical role in promoting viral replication in sub-optimally activated cells. These observations provide insight into a potential mechanism by which HIV is able to establish infection in resting cells, which may have implications for both transmission of HIV and the persistence of viral reservoirs

  5. Binding of HIV-1 gp120 to DC-SIGN promotes ASK-1-dependent activation-induced apoptosis of human dendritic cells.

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    Yongxiong Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During disease progression to AIDS, HIV-1 infected individuals become increasingly immunosuppressed and susceptible to opportunistic infections. It has also been demonstrated that multiple subsets of dendritic cells (DC, including DC-SIGN⁺ cells, become significantly depleted in the blood and lymphoid tissues of AIDS patients, which may contribute to the failure in initiating effective host immune responses. The mechanism for DC depletion, however, is unclear. It is also known that vast quantities of viral envelope protein gp120 are shed from maturing HIV-1 virions and form circulating immune complexes in the serum of HIV-1-infected individuals, but the pathological role of gp120 in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains elusive. Here we describe a previously unrecognized mechanism of DC death in chronic HIV-1 infection, in which ligation of DC-SIGN by gp120 sensitizes DC to undergo accelerated apoptosis in response to a variety of activation stimuli. The cultured monocyte-derived DC and also freshly-isolated DC-SIGN⁺ blood DC that were exposed to either cross-linked recombinant gp120 or immune-complex gp120 in HIV⁺ serum underwent considerable apoptosis after CD40 ligation or exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS or pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL-1β. Furthermore, circulating DC-SIGN⁺ DC that were isolated directly from HIV-1⁺ individuals had actually been pre-sensitized by serum gp120 for activation-induced exorbitant apoptosis. In all cases the DC apoptosis was substantially inhibited by DC-SIGN blockade. Finally, we showed that accelerated DC apoptosis was a direct consequence of excessive activation of the pro-apoptotic molecule ASK-1 and transfection of siRNA against ASK-1 significantly prevented the activation-induced excessive DC death. Our study discloses a previously unknown mechanism of immune modulation by envelope protein gp120, provides new insights into HIV immunopathogenesis, and suggests potential

  6. Prediction of the Secondary Structure of HIV-1 gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Jens O.

    1996-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The predicted secondary structure of gp120 compared well with data from NMR analysis of synthetic peptides from the V3 loop and the C4 region. As a first step towards modeling the tertiary structure of gp120, the predicted secondary structure may guide the design......The secondary structure of HIV-1 gp120 was predicted using multiple alignment and a combination of two independent methods based on neural network and nearest-neighbor algorithms. The methods agreed on the secondary structure for 80% of the residues in BH10 gp120. Six helices were predicted in HIV...

  7. HIV-1 subtype C unproductively infects human cardiomyocytes in vitro and induces apoptosis mitigated by an anti-Gp120 aptamer.

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    Lopes de Campos, Walter R; Chirwa, Nthato; London, Grace; Rotherham, Lia S; Morris, Lynn; Mayosi, Bongani M; Khati, Makobetsa

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated cardiomyopathy (HIVCM) is of clinical concern in developing countries because of a high HIV-1 prevalence, especially subtype C, and limited access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). For these reasons, we investigated the direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 subtype C infection of cultured human cardiomyocytes and the mechanisms leading to cardiomyocytes damage; as well as a way to mitigate the damage. We evaluated a novel approach to mitigate HIVCM using a previously reported gp120 binding and HIV-1 neutralizing aptamer called UCLA1. We established a cell-based model of HIVCM by infecting human cardiomyocytes with cell-free HIV-1 or co-culturing human cardiomyocytes with HIV-infected monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). We discovered that HIV-1 subtype C unproductively (i.e. its life cycle is arrested after reverse transcription) infects cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, we found that HIV-1 initiates apoptosis of cardiomyocytes through caspase-9 activation, preferentially via the intrinsic or mitochondrial initiated pathway. CXCR4 receptor-using viruses were stronger inducers of apoptosis than CCR5 utilizing variants. Importantly, we discovered that HIV-1 induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes was mitigated by UCLA1. However, UCLA1 had no protective effective on cardiomyocytes when apoptosis was triggered by HIV-infected MDM. When HIV-1 was treated with UCLA1 prior to infection of MDM, it failed to induce apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. These data suggest that HIV-1 causes a mitochondrial initiated apoptotic cascade, which signal through caspase-9, whereas HIV-1 infected MDM causes apoptosis predominantly via the death-receptor pathway, mediated by caspase-8. Furthermore the data suggest that UCLA1 protects cardiomyocytes from caspase-mediated apoptosis, directly by binding to HIV-1 and indirectly by preventing infection of MDM.

  8. Characterization of HIV-1 gp120 antibody specificities induced in anogenital secretions of RV144 vaccine recipients after late boost immunizations.

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    Siriwat Akapirat

    Full Text Available Sexual transmission is the principal driver of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV pandemic. Understanding HIV vaccine-induced immune responses at mucosal surfaces can generate hypotheses regarding mechanisms of protection, and may influence vaccine development. The RV144 (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00223080 efficacy trial showed protection against HIV infections but mucosal samples were not collected, therefore, the contribution of mucosal antibodies to preventing HIV-1 acquisition is unknown. Here, we report the generation, magnitude and persistence of antibody responses to recombinant gp120 envelope and antigens including variable one and two loop scaffold antigens (gp70V1V2 previously shown to correlate with risk in RV144. We evaluated antibody responses to gp120 A244gD and gp70V1V2 92TH023 (both CRF01_AE and Case A2 (subtype B in cervico-vaginal mucus (CVM, seminal plasma (SP and rectal secretions (RS from HIV-uninfected RV144 vaccine recipients, who were randomized to receive two late boosts of ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX®B/E, AIDSVAX®B/E, or ALVAC-HIV alone at 0 and 6 months. Late vaccine boosting increased IgG geometric mean titers (GMT to gp120 A244gD in AIDSVAX®B/E and ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX®B/E CVM (28 and 17 fold, respectively, followed by SP and RS. IgG to gp70V1V2 92TH023 increased in AIDSVAX®B/E and ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX®B/E CVM (11-17 fold and SP (2 fold two weeks post first boost. IgG to Case A2 was only detected in AIDSVAX®B/E and ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX®B/E CVM. Mucosal IgG to gp120 A244gD (CVM, SP, RS, gp70V1V2 92TH023 (CVM, SP, and Case A2 (CVM correlated with plasma IgG levels (p<0.001. Although the magnitude of IgG responses declined after boosting, anti-gp120 A244gD IgG responses in CVM persisted for 12 months post final vaccination. Further studies in localization, persistence and magnitude of envelope specific antibodies (IgG and dimeric IgA in anogenital secretions will help determine their role in preventing mucosal HIV acquisition.

  9. Structure-based stabilization of HIV-1 gp120 enhances humoral immune responses to the induced co-receptor binding site.

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    Barna Dey

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, possesses conserved binding sites for interaction with the primary virus receptor, CD4, and also for the co-receptor, generally CCR5. Although gp120 is a major target for virus-specific neutralizing antibodies, the gp120 variable elements and its malleable nature contribute to evasion of effective host-neutralizing antibodies. To understand the conformational character and immunogenicity of the gp120 receptor binding sites as potential vaccine targets, we introduced structure-based modifications to stabilize gp120 core proteins (deleted of the gp120 major variable regions into the conformation recognized by both receptors. Thermodynamic analysis of the re-engineered core with selected ligands revealed significant stabilization of the receptor-binding regions. Stabilization of the co-receptor-binding region was associated with a marked increase in on-rate of ligand binding to this site as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Rabbit immunization studies showed that the conformational stabilization of core proteins, along with increased ligand affinity, was associated with strikingly enhanced humoral immune responses against the co-receptor-binding site. These results demonstrate that structure-based approaches can be exploited to stabilize a conformational site in a large functional protein to enhance immunogenic responses specific for that region.

  10. Curcumin protects microglia and primary rat cortical neurons against HIV-1 gp120-mediated inflammation and apoptosis.

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    Luyan Guo

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a molecule found in turmeric root that has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor properties and has been widely used as both an herbal drug and a food additive to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. To explore whether curcumin is able to ameliorate HIV-1-associated neurotoxicity, we treated a murine microglial cell line (N9 and primary rat cortical neurons with curcumin in the presence or absence of neurotoxic HIV-1 gp120 (V3 loop protein. We found that HIV-1 gp120 profoundly induced N9 cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. HIV-1 gp120 also induced apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin exerted a powerful inhibitory effect against HIV-1 gp120-induced neuronal damage, reducing the production of ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 by N9 cells and inhibiting apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin may exert its biological activities through inhibition of the delayed rectification and transient outward potassium (K(+ current, as curcumin effectively reduced HIV-1 gp120-mediated elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current in neurons. We conclude that HIV-1 gp120 increases ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 production in microglia, and induces cortical neuron apoptosis by affecting the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current. Curcumin reduces production of ROS and inflammatory mediators in HIV-1-gp120-stimulated microglia, and protects cortical neurons against HIV-1-mediated apoptosis, most likely through inhibition of HIV-1 gp120-induced elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ current.

  11. Binding kinetics of aptamers to gp120 derived from HIV-1 subtype C

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Millroy, L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available aptamers with specific and strong affinity to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 and act as novel HIV-1 entry inhibitor drugs or as targeted drug delivery systems to HIV-1 infected cells. Prior to any downstream applications, novel gp120 aptamers need...

  12. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

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    Burastero, Samuele E; Frigerio, Barbara; Lopalco, Lucia; Sironi, Francesca; Breda, Daniela; Longhi, Renato; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Canevari, Silvana; Figini, Mariangela; Lusso, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env) bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ) was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  13. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

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    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  14. HIV-1 subtype C unproductively infects human cardiomyocytes in vitro and induces apoptosis mitigated by an anti-Gp120 aptamer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rangel Lopes de Campos, W

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available - surface receptors, the CXCR4 chemokine receptor and the TNF- R1 death receptor. The predominant apoptotic pathway varied from CXCR4-triggered, mitochondrion-initiated to CD95/Fas- ligand initiated, depending on the culture conditions as previously reported... virus type 1 gp120 to CXCR4 induces mitochondrial transmembrane depolarization and cytochrome c- mediated apoptosis independently of Fas signaling. J Virol 75: 7637–7650. 26. Bottarel F, Feito MJ, Bragardo M, Bonissoni S, Buonfiglio D, et al. (1999...

  15. Structure-based, targeted deglycosylation of HIV-1 gp120 and effects on neutralization sensitivity and antibody recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Markus; Pancera, Marie; Kwong, Peter D.; Kolchinsky, Peter; Grundner, Christoph; Wang Liping; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, mediates receptor binding and is the major target for neutralizing antibodies. Primary HIV-1 isolates are characteristically more resistant to broadly neutralizing antibodies, although the structural basis for this resistance remains obscure. Most broadly neutralizing antibodies are directed against functionally conserved gp120 regions involved in binding to either the primary virus receptor, CD4, or the viral coreceptor molecules that normally function as chemokine receptors. These antibodies are known as CD4 binding site (CD4BS) and CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, respectively. Inspection of the gp120 crystal structure reveals that although the receptor-binding regions lack glycosylation, sugar moieties lie proximal to both receptor-binding sites on gp120 and thus in proximity to both the CD4BS and the CD4i epitopes. In this study, guided by the X-ray crystal structure of gp120, we deleted four N-linked glycosylation sites that flank the receptor-binding regions. We examined the effects of selected changes on the sensitivity of two prototypic HIV-1 primary isolates to neutralization by antibodies. Surprisingly, removal of a single N-linked glycosylation site at the base of the gp120 third variable region (V3 loop) increased the sensitivity of the primary viruses to neutralization by CD4BS antibodies. Envelope glycoprotein oligomers on the cell surface derived from the V3 glycan-deficient virus were better recognized by a CD4BS antibody and a V3 loop antibody than were the wild-type glycoproteins. Absence of all four glycosylation sites rendered a primary isolate sensitive to CD4i antibody-mediated neutralization. Thus, carbohydrates that flank receptor-binding regions on gp120 protect primary HIV-1 isolates from antibody-mediated neutralization

  16. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 with gp41-interactive region reveals layered envelope architecture and basis of conformational mobility.

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    Pancera, Marie; Majeed, Shahzad; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Chen, Lei; Huang, Chih-chin; Kong, Leopold; Kwon, Young Do; Stuckey, Jonathan; Zhou, Tongqing; Robinson, James E; Schief, William R; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D

    2010-01-19

    The viral spike of HIV-1 is composed of three gp120 envelope glycoproteins attached noncovalently to three gp41 transmembrane molecules. Viral entry is initiated by binding to the CD4 receptor on the cell surface, which induces large conformational changes in gp120. These changes not only provide a model for receptor-triggered entry, but affect spike sensitivity to drug- and antibody-mediated neutralization. Although some of the details of the CD4-induced conformational change have been visualized by crystal structures and cryoelectron tomograms, the critical gp41-interactive region of gp120 was missing from previous atomic-level characterizations. Here we determine the crystal structure of an HIV-1 gp120 core with intact gp41-interactive region in its CD4-bound state, compare this structure to unliganded and antibody-bound forms to identify structurally invariant and plastic components, and use ligand-oriented cryoelectron tomograms to define component mobility in the viral spike context. Newly defined gp120 elements proximal to the gp41 interface complete a 7-stranded beta-sandwich, which appeared invariant in conformation. Loop excursions emanating from the sandwich form three topologically separate--and structurally plastic--layers, topped off by the highly glycosylated gp120 outer domain. Crystal structures, cryoelectron tomograms, and interlayer chemistry were consistent with a mechanism in which the layers act as a shape-changing spacer, facilitating movement between outer domain and gp41-associated beta-sandwich and providing for conformational diversity used in immune evasion. A "layered" gp120 architecture thus allows movement among alternative glycoprotein conformations required for virus entry and immune evasion, whereas a beta-sandwich clamp maintains gp120-gp41 interaction and regulates gp41 transitions.

  17. Structural Basis for Species Selectivity in the HIV-1 gp120-CD4 Interaction: Restoring Affinity to gp120 in Murine CD4 Mimetic Peptides

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    Kristin Kassler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The first step of HIV-1 infection involves interaction between the viral glycoprotein gp120 and the human cellular receptor CD4. Inhibition of the gp120-CD4 interaction represents an attractive strategy to block HIV-1 infection. In an attempt to explore the known lack of affinity of murine CD4 to gp120, we have investigated peptides presenting the putative gp120-binding site of murine CD4 (mCD4. Molecular modeling indicates that mCD4 protein cannot bind gp120 due to steric clashes, while the larger conformational flexibility of mCD4 peptides allows an interaction. This finding is confirmed by experimental binding assays, which also evidenced specificity of the peptide-gp120 interaction. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the mCD4-peptide stably interacts with gp120 via an intermolecular β-sheet, while an important salt-bridge formed by a C-terminal lysine is lost. Fixation of the C-terminus by introducing a disulfide bridge between the N- and C-termini of the peptide significantly enhanced the affinity to gp120.

  18. HIV-1 gp120 and drugs of abuse: interactions in the central nervous system.

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    Silverstein, Peter S; Shah, Ankit; Weemhoff, James; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, D P; Kumar, Anil

    2012-07-01

    HIV-1 infection is a global public health problem with more than 34 million people living with HIV infection. Although great strides have been made in treating this epidemic with therapeutic agents, the increase in patient life span has been coincident with an increase in the prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). HAND is thought to result from the neurotoxic effects of viral proteins that are shed from HIV-infected microglial cells. One of the primary neurotoxins responsible for this effect is the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. Exposure of neurons to gp120 has been demonstrated to cause apoptosis in neurons, as well as numerous indirect effects such as an increase in inflammatory cytokines, an increase in oxidative stress, and an increase in permeability of the blood-brain barrier. In many patients, the use of drugs of abuse (DOA) exacerbates the neurotoxic effects of gp120. Cocaine, methamphetamine and morphine are three DOAs that are commonly used by those infected with HIV-1. All three of these DOAs have been demonstrated to increase oxidative stress in the CNS as well as to increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier. Numerous model systems have demonstrated that these DOAs have the capability of exacerbating the neurotoxic effects of gp120. This review will summarize the neurotoxic effects of gp120, the deleterious effects of cocaine, methamphetamine and morphine on the CNS, and the combined effects of gp120 in the context of these drugs.

  19. Human CNS cultures exposed to HIV-1 gp120 reproduce dendritic injuries of HIV-1-associated dementia

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    Hammond Robert R

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV-1-associated dementia remains a common subacute to chronic central nervous system degeneration in adult and pediatric HIV-1 infected populations. A number of viral and host factors have been implicated including the HIV-1 120 kDa envelope glycoprotein (gp120. In human post-mortem studies using confocal scanning laser microscopy for microtubule-associated protein 2 and synaptophysin, neuronal dendritic pathology correlated with dementia. In the present study, primary human CNS cultures exposed to HIV-1 gp120 at 4 weeks in vitro suffered gliosis and dendritic damage analogous to that described in association with HIV-1-associated dementia.

  20. Molecular docking guided structure based design of symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea/thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors.

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    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Vangala, Radhika; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2013-08-01

    Induced fit molecular docking studies were performed on BMS-806 derivatives reported as small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding. Comprehensive study of protein-ligand interactions guided in identification and design of novel symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea and thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors. These molecules were synthesized in aqueous medium using microwave irradiation. Synthesized molecules were screened for their inhibitory ability by HIV-1 gp120-CD4 capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Designed compounds were found to inhibit HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding in micromolar (0.013-0.247 μM) concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Irvin, Susan C.; Kennedy, Steven C.; Guo, Feng; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells

  2. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

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    Costantini, Lindsey M. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Irvin, Susan C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kennedy, Steven C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Guo, Feng [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Snapp, Erik L., E-mail: erik-lee.snapp@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  3. HIV-1 and recombinant gp120 affect the survival and differentiation of human vessel wall-derived mesenchymal stem cells

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    Pasquinelli Gianandrea

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infection elicits the onset of a progressive immunodeficiency and also damages several other organs and tissues such as the CNS, kidney, heart, blood vessels, adipose tissue and bone. In particular, HIV infection has been related to an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases and derangement in the structure of blood vessels in the absence of classical risk factors. The recent characterization of multipotent mesenchymal cells in the vascular wall, involved in regulating cellular homeostasis, suggests that these cells may be considered a target of HIV pathogenesis. This paper investigated the interaction between HIV-1 and vascular wall resident human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Results MSCs were challenged with classical R5 and X4 HIV-1 laboratory strains demonstrating that these strains are able to enter and integrate their retro-transcribed proviral DNA in the host cell genome. Subsequent experiments indicated that HIV-1 strains and recombinant gp120 elicited a reliable increase in apoptosis in sub-confluent MSCs. Since vascular wall MSCs are multipotent cells that may be differentiated towards several cell lineages, we challenged HIV-1 strains and gp120 on MSCs differentiated to adipogenesis and endotheliogenesis. Our experiments showed that the adipogenesis is increased especially by upregulated PPARγ activity whereas the endothelial differentiation induced by VEGF treatment was impaired with a downregulation of endothelial markers such as vWF, Flt-1 and KDR expression. These viral effects in MSC survival and adipogenic or endothelial differentiation were tackled by CD4 blockade suggesting an important role of CD4/gp120 interaction in this context. Conclusions The HIV-related derangement of MSC survival and differentiation may suggest a direct role of HIV infection and gp120 in impaired vessel homeostasis and in genesis of vessel damage observed in HIV-infected patients.

  4. Insight derived from molecular dynamics simulations into molecular motions, thermodynamics and kinetics of HIV-1 gp120.

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    Peng Sang

    Full Text Available Although the crystal structures of the HIV-1 gp120 core bound and pre-bound by CD4 are known, the details of dynamics involved in conformational equilibrium and transition in relation to gp120 function have remained elusive. The homology models of gp120 comprising the N- and C-termini and loops V3 and V4 in the CD4-bound and CD4-unbound states were built and subjected to molecular dynamics (MD simulations to investigate the differences in dynamic properties and molecular motions between them. The results indicate that the CD4-bound gp120 adopted a more compact and stable conformation than the unbound form during simulations. For both the unbound and bound gp120, the large concerted motions derived from essential dynamics (ED analyses can influence the size/shape of the ligand-binding channel/cavity of gp120 and, therefore, were related to its functional properties. The differences in motion direction between certain structural components of these two forms of gp120 were related to the conformational interconversion between them. The free energy calculations based on the metadynamics simulations reveal a more rugged and complex free energy landscape (FEL for the unbound than for the bound gp120, implying that gp120 has a richer conformational diversity in the unbound form. The estimated free energy difference of ∼-6.0 kJ/mol between the global minimum free energy states of the unbound and bound gp120 indicates that gp120 can transform spontaneously from the unbound to bound states, revealing that the bound state represents a high-probability "ground state" for gp120 and explaining why the unbound state resists crystallization. Our results provide insight into the dynamics-and-function relationship of gp120, and facilitate understandings of the thermodynamics, kinetics and conformational control mechanism of HIV-1 gp120.

  5. Gp120 stability on HIV-1 virions and Gag-Env pseudovirions is enhanced by an uncleaved Gag core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammonds, Jason; Chen Xuemin; Ding Lingmei; Fouts, Timothy; De Vico, Anthony; Megede, Jan zur; Barnett, Susan; Spearman, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) particles incorporate a trimeric envelope complex (Env) made of gp120 (SU) and gp41 (TM) heterodimers. It has been previously established that soluble CD4 (sCD4) interaction leads to shedding of gp120 from viral particles, and that gp120 may also be easily lost from virions during incubation or particle purification procedures. In the design of HIV particle or pseudovirion-based HIV vaccines, it may be important to develop strategies to maximize the gp120 content of particles. We analyzed the gp120 retention of HIV-1 laboratory-adapted isolates and primary isolates following incubation with sCD4 and variations in temperature. NL4-3 shed gp120 readily in a temperature- and sCD4-dependent manner. Surprisingly, inactivation of the viral protease led to markedly reduced shedding of gp120. Gp120 shedding was shown to vary markedly between HIV-1 strains, and was not strictly determined by whether the isolate was adapted to growth on immortalized T cell lines or was a primary isolate. Pseudovirions produced by expression of codon-optimized gag and env genes also demonstrated enhanced gp120 retention when an immature core structure was maintained. Pseudovirions of optimal stability were produced through a combination of an immature Gag protein core and a primary isolate Env. These results support the feasibility of utilizing pseudovirion particles as immunogens for the induction of humoral responses directed against native envelope structures

  6. Human antibody response to a strain-specific HIV-1 gp120 epitope associated with cell fusion inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; Boucher, C. A.; Meloen, R. H.; Epstein, L. G.; Smit, L.; van der Hoek, L.; Bakker, M.

    1988-01-01

    PEPSCAN analysis, performed using 536 overlapping nonapeptides derived from the HTLV-III B nucleotide sequence of the region encoding the external envelope protein of 120 kDa (gp120), identified in the V3 region of gp120 a major binding site for antibodies of HIV-1-infected humans. The minimal amino

  7. Structure and dynamics of the gp120 V3 loop that confers noncompetitive resistance in R5 HIV-1(JR-FL to maraviroc.

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    Yuzhe Yuan

    Full Text Available Maraviroc, an (HIV-1 entry inhibitor, binds to CCR5 and efficiently prevents R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 from using CCR5 as a coreceptor for entry into CD4(+ cells. However, HIV-1 can elude maraviroc by using the drug-bound form of CCR5 as a coreceptor. This property is known as noncompetitive resistance. HIV-1(V3-M5 derived from HIV-1(JR-FLan is a noncompetitive-resistant virus that contains five mutations (I304V/F312W/T314A/E317D/I318V in the gp120 V3 loop alone. To obtain genetic and structural insights into maraviroc resistance in HIV-1, we performed here mutagenesis and computer-assisted structural study. A series of site-directed mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that combinations of V3 mutations are required for HIV-1(JR-FLan to replicate in the presence of 1 µM maraviroc, and that a T199K mutation in the C2 region increases viral fitness in combination with V3 mutations. Molecular dynamic (MD simulations of the gp120 outer domain V3 loop with or without the five mutations showed that the V3 mutations induced (i changes in V3 configuration on the gp120 outer domain, (ii reduction of an anti-parallel β-sheet in the V3 stem region, (iii reduction in fluctuations of the V3 tip and stem regions, and (iv a shift of the fluctuation site at the V3 base region. These results suggest that the HIV-1 gp120 V3 mutations that confer maraviroc resistance alter structure and dynamics of the V3 loop on the gp120 outer domain, and enable interactions between gp120 and the drug-bound form of CCR5.

  8. Natural mannosylation of HIV-1 gp120 imposes no immunoregulatory effects in primary human plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sondergaard, J.N.; Vinner, L.; Brix, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a vital role in activation of anti-HIV-1 immunity, and suppression of pDCs might mitigate immune responses against HIV-1. HIV-1 gp120 high-mannose has been attributed immunosuppressive roles in human myeloid DCs, but no receptors for high-mannose have so far

  9. HIV-1 gp120 Upregulates Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Expression in BV2 Cells via the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongdi; Liao, Jinxu; Tang, Shao-Jun; Shu, Jianhong; Zhang, Wenping

    2017-06-01

    HIV-1 gp120 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated pain, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. This study aims to determine the effect and possible mechanism of HIV-1 gp120 on BDNF expression in BV2 cells (a murine-derived microglial cell line). We observed that gp120 (10 ng/ml) activated BV2 cells in cultures and upregulated proBDNF/mBDNF. Furthermore, gp120-treated BV2 also accumulated Wnt3a and β-catenin, suggesting the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. We demonstrated that activation of the pathway by Wnt3a upregulated BDNF expression. In contrast, inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by either DKK1 or IWR-1 attenuated BDNF upregulation induced by gp120 or Wnt3a. These findings collectively suggest that gp120 stimulates BDNF expression in BV2 cells via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  10. CD4-binding site alterations in CCR5-using HIV-1 envelopes influencing gp120-CD4 interactions and fusogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterjovski, Jasminka; Churchill, Melissa J.; Roche, Michael; Ellett, Anne; Farrugia, William; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    CD4-binding site (CD4bs) alterations in gp120 contribute to different pathophysiological phenotypes of CCR5-using (R5) HIV-1 strains, but the potential structural basis is unknown. Here, we characterized functionally diverse R5 envelope (Env) clones (n = 16) to elucidate potential structural alterations within the gp120 CD4bs that influence Env function. Initially, we showed that the magnitude of gp120-CD4-binding correlates with increased fusogenicity and reduced CD4 dependence. Analysis of three-dimensional gp120 structural models revealed two CD4bs variants, D279 and N362, that were associated with reduced CD4 dependence. Further structural analysis showed that a wider aperture of the predicted CD4bs cavity, as constrained by the inner-most atoms at the gp120 V1V2 stem and the V5 loop, was associated with amino acid alterations within V5 and correlated with increased gp120-CD4 binding and increased fusogenicity. Our results provide evidence that the gp120 V5 loop may alter CD4bs conformation and contribute to increased gp120-CD4 interactions and Env fusogenicity.

  11. HIV-1 gp120 neurotoxicity proximally and at a distance from the point of exposure: protection by rSV40 delivery of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Agrawal, Lokesh; Reyes, Beverly A S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Strayer, David S

    2009-06-01

    Toxicity of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120) for substantia nigra (SN) neurons may contribute to the Parkinsonian manifestations often seen in HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). We studied the neurotoxicity of gp120 for dopaminergic neurons and potential neuroprotection by antioxidant gene delivery. Rats were injected stereotaxically into their caudate-putamen (CP); CP and (substantia nigra) SN neuron loss was quantified. The area of neuron loss extended several millimeters from the injection site, approximately 35% of the CP area. SN neurons, outside of this area of direct neurotoxicity, were also severely affected. Dopaminergic SN neurons (expressing tyrosine hydroxylase, TH, in the SN and dopamine transporter, DAT, in the CP) were mostly affected: intra-CP gp120 caused approximately 50% DAT+ SN neuron loss. Prior intra-CP gene delivery of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) or glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) protected SN neurons from intra-CP gp120. Thus, SN dopaminergic neurons are highly sensitive to HIV-1 gp120-induced neurotoxicity, and antioxidant gene delivery, even at a distance, is protective.

  12. Mimicking protein-protein interactions through peptide-peptide interactions: HIV-1 gp120 and CXCR4

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    Andrea eGross

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We have recently designed a soluble synthetic peptide that functionally mimics the HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4, which is a chemokine receptor that belongs to the family of seven-transmembrane GPCRs. This CXCR4 mimetic peptide, termed CX4-M1, presents the three extracellular loops (ECLs of the receptor. In binding assays involving recombinant proteins, as well as in cellular infection assays, CX4-M1 was found to selectively recognize gp120 from HIV-1 strains that use CXCR4 for cell entry (X4 tropic HIV-1. Furthermore, anti-HIV-1 antibodies modulate this interaction in a molecular mechanism related to that of their impact on the gp120-CXCR4 interaction. We could now show that the selectivity of CX4-M1 pertains not only to gp120 from X4 tropic HIV-1, but also to synthetic peptides presenting the V3 loops of these gp120 proteins. The V3 loop is thought to be an essential part of the coreceptor binding site of gp120 that contacts the second ECL of the coreceptor. We were able to experimentally confirm this notion in binding assays using substitution analogs of CX4-M1 and the V3 loop peptides, respectively, as well as in cellular infection assays. These results indicate that interactions of the HIV-1 Env with coreceptors can be mimicked by synthetic peptides, which may be useful to explore these interactions at the molecular level in more detail.

  13. Reduced expression of glutamate transporter EAAT2 and impaired glutamate transport in human primary astrocytes exposed to HIV-1 or gp120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhuying; Pekarskaya, Olga; Bencheikh, Meryem; Chao Wei; Gelbard, Harris A.; Ghorpade, Anuja; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Volsky, David J.

    2003-01-01

    L-Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Astrocytes maintain low levels of synaptic glutamate by high-affinity uptake and defects in this function may lead to neuronal cell death by excitotoxicity. We tested the effects of HIV-1 and its envelope glycoprotein gp120 upon glutamate uptake and expression of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 in fetal human astrocytes in vitro. Astrocytes isolated from fetal tissues between 16 and 19 weeks of gestation expressed EAAT1 and EAAT2 RNA and proteins as detected by Northern blot analysis and immunoblotting, respectively, and the cells were capable of specific glutamate uptake. Exposure of astrocytes to HIV-1 or gp120 significantly impaired glutamate uptake by the cells, with maximum inhibition within 6 h, followed by gradual decline during 3 days of observation. HIV-1-infected cells showed a 59% reduction in V max for glutamate transport, indicating a reduction in the number of active transporter sites on the cell surface. Impaired glutamate transport after HIV-1 infection or gp120 exposure correlated with a 40-70% decline in steady-state levels of EAAT2 RNA and protein. EAAT1 RNA and protein levels were less affected. Treatment of astrocytes with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) decreased the expression of both EAAT1 and EAAT2, but neither HIV-1 nor gp120 were found to induce TNF-α production by astrocytes. These findings demonstrate that HIV-1 and gp120 induce transcriptional downmodulation of the EAAT2 transporter gene in human astrocytes and coordinately attenuate glutamate transport by the cells. Reduction of the ability of HIV-1-infected astrocytes to take up glutamate may contribute to the development of neurological disease

  14. Binding of the mannose-specific lectin, griffithsin, to HIV-1 gp120 exposes the CD4-binding site

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available of the lectin griffithsin (GRFT) with HIV-1 gp120 and its effects on exposure of the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that GRFT enhanced the binding of HIV-1 onto plates coated with anti-CD4bs antibodies b12, b6 or the CD4 receptor mimetic, CD4-IgG2...

  15. Conformational alterations in the CD4 binding cavity of HIV-1 gp120 influencing gp120-CD4 interactions and fusogenicity of HIV-1 envelopes derived from brain and other tissues

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    Ramsland Paul A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD4-binding site (CD4bs alterations in gp120 contribute to HIV-1 envelope (Env mediated fusogenicity and the ability of gp120 to utilize low levels of cell-surface CD4. In a recent study, we constructed three-dimensional models of gp120 to illustrate CD4bs conformations associated with enhanced fusogenicity and enhanced CD4-usage of a modestly-sized panel of blood-derived HIV-1 Envs (n = 16. These conformations were characterized by a wider aperture of the CD4bs cavity, as constrained by the inner-most atoms at the gp120 V1V2 stem and the V5 loop. Here, we sought to provide further validation of the utility of these models for understanding mechanisms that influence Env function, by characterizing the structure-function relationships of a larger panel of Envs derived from brain and other tissues (n = 81. Findings Three-dimensional models of gp120 were generated by our recently validated homology modelling protocol. Analysis of predicted CD4bs structures showed correlations between the aperture width of the CD4bs cavity and ability of the Envs to mediate cell-cell fusion, scavenge low-levels of cell-surface CD4, bind directly to soluble CD4, and bind to the Env mAb IgG1b12 whose epitope overlaps the gp120 CD4bs. These structural alterations in the CD4bs cavity were associated with repositioning of the V5 loop. Conclusions Using a large, independent panel of Envs, we can confirm the utility of three-dimensional gp120 structural models for illustrating CD4bs alterations that can affect Env function. Furthermore, we now provide new evidence that these CD4bs alterations augment the ability of gp120 to interact with CD4 by increasing the exposure of the CD4bs.

  16. Sieve analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in HVTN 505 identifies vaccine pressure targeting the CD4 binding site of Env-gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deCamp, Allan C; Rolland, Morgane; Edlefsen, Paul T; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Hall, Breana; Magaret, Craig A; Fiore-Gartland, Andrew J; Juraska, Michal; Carpp, Lindsay N; Karuna, Shelly T; Bose, Meera; LePore, Steven; Miller, Shana; O'Sullivan, Annemarie; Poltavee, Kultida; Bai, Hongjun; Dommaraju, Kalpana; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Kim; Chen, Lennie; Ahmed, Hasan; Goodman, Derrick; Tay, Matthew Z; Gottardo, Raphael; Koup, Richard A; Bailer, Robert; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Roederer, Mario; O'Connell, Robert J; Michael, Nelson L; Robb, Merlin L; Adams, Elizabeth; D'Souza, Patricia; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Geraghty, Daniel E; Frahm, Nicole; Tomaras, Georgia D; McElrath, M Juliana; Frenkel, Lisa; Styrchak, Sheila; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott M; Kim, Jerome H; Mullins, James I; Gilbert, Peter B

    2017-01-01

    Although the HVTN 505 DNA/recombinant adenovirus type 5 vector HIV-1 vaccine trial showed no overall efficacy, analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in participants can help determine whether vaccine-induced immune responses impacted viruses that caused infection. We analyzed 480 HIV-1 genomes sampled from 27 vaccine and 20 placebo recipients and found that intra-host HIV-1 diversity was significantly lower in vaccine recipients (P ≤ 0.04, Q-values ≤ 0.09) in Gag, Pol, Vif and envelope glycoprotein gp120 (Env-gp120). Furthermore, Env-gp120 sequences from vaccine recipients were significantly more distant from the subtype B vaccine insert than sequences from placebo recipients (P = 0.01, Q-value = 0.12). These vaccine effects were associated with signatures mapping to CD4 binding site and CD4-induced monoclonal antibody footprints. These results suggest either (i) no vaccine efficacy to block acquisition of any viral genotype but vaccine-accelerated Env evolution post-acquisition; or (ii) vaccine efficacy against HIV-1s with Env sequences closest to the vaccine insert combined with increased acquisition due to other factors, potentially including the vaccine vector.

  17. Induction of a protein-targeted catalytic response in autoimmune prone mice: antibody-mediated cleavage of HIV-1 glycoprotein GP120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Alexandrova, Elena S; Reshetnyak, Andrew V; Telegin, Georgy B; Khaidukov, Sergey V; Avalle, Bérangère; Karavanov, Alexander; Morse, Herbert C; Thomas, Daniel; Friboulet, Alain; Gabibov, Alexander G

    2006-01-10

    We have induced a polyclonal IgG that degrades the HIV-1 surface antigen, glycoprotein gp120, by taking advantage of the susceptibility of SJL mice to a peptide-induced autoimmune disorder, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Specific pathogen-free SJL mice were immunized with structural fragments of gp120, fused in-frame with encephalitogenic peptide MBP(85-101). It has resulted in a pronounced disease-associated immune response against antigens. A dramatic increase of gp120 degradation level by purified polyclonal IgG from immunized versus nonimmunized mice has been demonstrated by a newly developed fluorescence-based assay. This activity was inhibited by anti-mouse immunoglobulin antibodies as well as by Ser- and His-reactive covalent inhibitors. A dominant proteolysis site in recombinant gp120 incubated with purified polyclonal IgG from immunized mice was shown by SDS-PAGE. The SELDI-based mass spectrometry revealed that these antibodies exhibited significant specificity toward the Pro484-Leu485 peptide bond. The sequence surrounding this site is present in nearly half of the HIV-I variants. This novel strategy can be generalized for creating a catalytic vaccine against viral pathogens.

  18. Clustering of HIV-1 Subtypes Based on gp120 V3 Loop electrostatic properties

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    López de Victoria Aliana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The V3 loop of the glycoprotein gp120 of HIV-1 plays an important role in viral entry into cells by utilizing as coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4, and is implicated in the phenotypic tropisms of HIV viruses. It has been hypothesized that the interaction between the V3 loop and CCR5 or CXCR4 is mediated by electrostatics. We have performed hierarchical clustering analysis of the spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials and charges of V3 loop structures containing consensus sequences of HIV-1 subtypes. Results Although the majority of consensus sequences have a net charge of +3, the spatial distribution of their electrostatic potentials and charges may be a discriminating factor for binding and infectivity. This is demonstrated by the formation of several small subclusters, within major clusters, which indicates common origin but distinct spatial details of electrostatic properties. Some of this information may be present, in a coarse manner, in clustering of sequences, but the spatial details are largely lost. We show the effect of ionic strength on clustering of electrostatic potentials, information that is not present in clustering of charges or sequences. We also make correlations between clustering of electrostatic potentials and net charge, coreceptor selectivity, global prevalence, and geographic distribution. Finally, we interpret coreceptor selectivity based on the N6X7T8|S8X9 sequence glycosylation motif, the specific positive charge location according to the 11/24/25 rule, and the overall charge and electrostatic potential distribution. Conclusions We propose that in addition to the sequence and the net charge of the V3 loop of each subtype, the spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials and charges may also be important factors for receptor recognition and binding and subsequent viral entry into cells. This implies that the overall electrostatic potential is responsible for long-range recognition of the V3

  19. Clustering of HIV-1 Subtypes Based on gp120 V3 Loop electrostatic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López de Victoria, Aliana; Kieslich, Chris A; Rizos, Apostolos K; Krambovitis, Elias; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    The V3 loop of the glycoprotein gp120 of HIV-1 plays an important role in viral entry into cells by utilizing as coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4, and is implicated in the phenotypic tropisms of HIV viruses. It has been hypothesized that the interaction between the V3 loop and CCR5 or CXCR4 is mediated by electrostatics. We have performed hierarchical clustering analysis of the spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials and charges of V3 loop structures containing consensus sequences of HIV-1 subtypes. Although the majority of consensus sequences have a net charge of +3, the spatial distribution of their electrostatic potentials and charges may be a discriminating factor for binding and infectivity. This is demonstrated by the formation of several small subclusters, within major clusters, which indicates common origin but distinct spatial details of electrostatic properties. Some of this information may be present, in a coarse manner, in clustering of sequences, but the spatial details are largely lost. We show the effect of ionic strength on clustering of electrostatic potentials, information that is not present in clustering of charges or sequences. We also make correlations between clustering of electrostatic potentials and net charge, coreceptor selectivity, global prevalence, and geographic distribution. Finally, we interpret coreceptor selectivity based on the N 6 X 7 T 8 |S 8 X 9 sequence glycosylation motif, the specific positive charge location according to the 11/24/25 rule, and the overall charge and electrostatic potential distribution. We propose that in addition to the sequence and the net charge of the V3 loop of each subtype, the spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials and charges may also be important factors for receptor recognition and binding and subsequent viral entry into cells. This implies that the overall electrostatic potential is responsible for long-range recognition of the V3 loop with coreceptors CCR5/CXCR4, whereas the charge

  20. Strategies for induction of catalytic antibodies toward HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 in autoimmune prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durova, Oxana M; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Smirnov, Ivan V; Reshetnyak, Andrew V; Telegin, Georgy B; Shamborant, Olga G; Orlova, Nadezda A; Genkin, Dmitry D; Bacon, Andrew; Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Friboulet, Alain; Gabibov, Alexander G

    2009-11-01

    Tremendous efforts to produce an efficient vaccine for HIV infection have been unsuccessful. The ability of HIV to utilize sophisticated mechanisms to escape killing by host immune system rises dramatic problems in the development of antiviral therapeutics. The HIV infection proceeds by interaction of coat viral glycoprotein gp120 trimer with CD4(+) receptor of the lymphocyte. Thus this surface antigen may be regarded as a favorable target for immunotherapy. In the present study, we have developed three different strategies to produce gp120-specific response in autoimmune prone mice (SJL strain) as potential tools for production "catalytic vaccine". Therefore (i) reactive immunization by peptidylphosphonate, structural part of the coat glycoprotein, (ii) immunization by engineered fused epitopes of gp120 and encephalogenic peptide, a part of myelin basic protein, and (iii) combined vaccination by DNA and corresponding gp120 fragments incorporated into liposomes were investigated. In the first two cases monoclonal antibodies and their recombinant fragments with amidolytic and gp120-specific proteolytic activities were characterized. In the last case, catalytic antibodies with virus neutralizing activity proved in cell line models were harvested.

  1. Natural mannosylation of HIV-1 gp120 imposes no immunoregulatory effects in primary human plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Vinner, Lasse; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a vital role in activation of anti-HIV-1 immunity, and suppression of pDCs might mitigate immune responses against HIV-1. HIV-1 gp120 high-mannose has been attributed immunosuppressive roles in human myeloid DCs, but no receptors for high-mannose have so far...... or viable HIV-1 particles with various degrees of mannosylation were cultured with pDCs. Activation of pDCs was determined by assaying secretion of IFN-alpha, viability, and upregulation of several pDC-activation markers: CD40, CD86, HLA-DR, CCR7, and PD-L1. The level of activation negatively correlated...

  2. Anti-gp120 minibody gene transfer to female genital epithelial cells protects against HIV-1 virus challenge in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ussama M Abdel-Motal

    Full Text Available Although cervico-vaginal epithelial cells of the female lower genital tract provide the initial defense system against HIV-1 infection, the protection is sometimes incomplete. Thus, enhancing anti-HIV-1 humoral immunity at the mucosal cell surface by local expression of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAb that block HIV-1 entry would provide an important new intervention that could slow the spread of HIV/AIDS.This study tested the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV-BnAb gene transfer to cervico-vaginal epithelial cells will lead to protection against HIV-1. Accordingly, a recombinant AAV vector that encodes human b12 anti-HIV gp120 BnAb as a single-chain variable fragment Fc fusion (scFvFc, or "minibody" was constructed. The secreted b12 minibody was shown to be biologically functional in binding to virus envelope protein, neutralizing HIV-1 and importantly, blocking transfer and infectivity of HIV-1(bal in an organotypic human vaginal epithelial cell (VEC model. Furthermore, cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells were found to be efficiently transduced by the optimal AAV serotype mediated expression of GFP.This study provides the foundation for a novel microbicide strategy to protect against sexual transmission of HIV-1 by AAV transfer of broadly neutralizing antibody genes to cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells that could replenish b12 BnAb secreting cells through multiple menstrual cycles.

  3. Structure-guided Design and Immunological Characterization of Immunogens Presenting the HIV-1 gp120 V3 Loop on a CTB Scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Totrov; X Jiang; X Kong; S Cohen; C Krachmarov; A Salomon; C Williams; M Seaman; R Abagyan; et al.

    2011-12-31

    V3 loop is a major neutralizing determinant of the HIV-1 gp120. Using 3D structures of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), complete V3 in the gp120 context, and V3 bound to a monoclonal antibody (mAb), we designed two V3-scaffold immunogen constructs (V3-CTB). The full-length V3-CTB presenting the complete V3 in a structural context mimicking gp120 was recognized by the large majority of our panel of 24 mAbs. The short V3-CTB presenting a V3 fragment in the conformation observed in the complex with the 447-52D Fab, exhibited high-affinity binding to this mAb. The immunogens were evaluated in rabbits using DNA-prime/protein-boost protocol. Boosting with the full-length V3-CTB induced high anti-V3 titers in sera that potently neutralize multiple HIV virus strains. The short V3-CTB was ineffective. The results suggest that very narrow antigenic profile of an immunogen is associated with poor Ab response. An immunogen with broader antigenic activity elicits robust Ab response.

  4. Levels of HIV1 gp120 3D B-cell epitopes mutability and variability: searching for possible vaccine epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich

    2010-01-01

    We used a DiscoTope 1.2 (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/DiscoTope/), Epitopia (http://epitopia.tau.ac.il/) and EPCES (http://www.t38.physik.tu-muenchen.de/programs.htm) algorithms to map discontinuous B-cell epitopes in HIV1 gp120. The most mutable nucleotides in HIV genes are guanine (because of G to A hypermutagenesis) and cytosine (because of C to U and C to A mutations). The higher is the level of guanine and cytosine usage in third (neutral) codon positions and the lower is their level in first and second codon positions of the coding region, the more stable should be an epitope encoded by this region. We compared guanine and cytosine usage in regions coding for five predicted 3D B-cell epitopes of gp120. To make this comparison we used GenBank resource: 385 sequences of env gene obtained from ten HIV1-infected individuals were studied (http://www.barkovsky.hotmail.ru/Data/Seqgp120.htm). The most protected from nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations of guanine and cytosine 3D B-cell epitope is situated in the first conserved region of gp120 (it is mapped from 66th to 86th amino acid residue). We applied a test of variability to confirm this finding. Indeed, the less mutable predicted B-cell epitope is the less variable one. MEGA4 (standard PAM matrix) was used for the alignments and "VVK Consensus" algorithm (http://www.barkovsky.hotmail.ru) was used for the calculations.

  5. Indirect detection of an epitope-specific response to HIV-1 gp120 immunization in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Shmelkov

    Full Text Available A specific response of human serum neutralizing antibodies (nAb to a conformational epitope as a result of vaccination of human subjects with the surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120 of HIV-1 has not previously been documented. Here, we used computational analysis to assess the epitope-specific responses of human subjects, which were immunized with recombinant gp120 immunogens in the VAX003 and VAX004 clinical trials. Our computational methodology--a variation of sieve analysis--compares the occurrence of specific nAb targeted conformational 3D epitopes on viruses from infected individuals who received vaccination to the occurrence of matched epitopes in the viruses infecting placebo subjects. We specifically studied seven crystallographically defined nAb targeted conformational epitopes in the V3 loop, an immunogenic region of gp120. Of the six epitopes present in the immunogens and targeted by known monoclonal neutralizing antibodies, only the one targeted by the anti-V3 nAb 2219 exhibited a significant reduction in occurrence in vaccinated subjects compared to the placebo group. This difference occurred only in the VAX003 Thailand cohort. No difference was seen between vaccinated and placebo groups for the occurrence of an epitope that was not present in the immunogen. Thus, it can be theorized that a specific 2219-like human neutralizing antibody immune response to AIDSVAX immunization occurred in the VAX003 cohort, and that this response protected subjects from a narrow subset of HIV-1 viruses circulating in Thailand in the 1990s and bearing the conformational epitope targeted by the neutralizing antibody 2219.

  6. A single gp120 residue can affect HIV-1 tropism in macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Q Del Prete

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Species-dependent variation in proteins that aid or limit virus replication determines the ability of lentiviruses to jump between host species. Identifying and overcoming these differences facilitates the development of animal models for HIV-1, including models based on chimeric SIVs that express HIV-1 envelope (Env glycoproteins, (SHIVs and simian-tropic HIV-1 (stHIV strains. Here, we demonstrate that the inherently poor ability of most HIV-1 Env proteins to use macaque CD4 as a receptor is improved during adaptation by virus passage in macaques. We identify a single amino acid, A281, in HIV-1 Env that consistently changes during adaptation in macaques and affects the ability of HIV-1 Env to use macaque CD4. Importantly, mutations at A281 do not markedly affect HIV-1 Env neutralization properties. Our findings should facilitate the design of HIV-1 Env proteins for use in non-human primate models and thus expedite the development of clinically relevant reagents for testing interventions against HIV-1.

  7. The Effects of IGF-1 on Trk Expressing DRG Neurons with HIV-gp120- Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Zhen; Chi, Heng; Bi, Yanwen; Song, Lijun; Liu, Huaxiang

    2016-01-01

    HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 is the main protein that causes HIVassociated sensory neuropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms of gp120-induced neurotoxicity are still unclear. There are lack effective treatments for relieving HIV-related neuropathic symptoms caused by gp120-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, tyrosine kinase receptor (Trk)A, TrkB, and TrkC expression in primary cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with gp120-induced neurotoxicity was investigated. The effects of IGF-1 on distinct Trk-positive DRG neurons with gp120-induced neurotoxicity were also determined. The results showed that gp120 not only dose-dependently induced DRG neuronal apoptosis and inhibited neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth, but also decreased distinct Trk expression levels. IGF-1 rescued DRG neurons from apoptosis and improved neuronal survival of gp120 neurotoxic DRG neurons in vitro. IGF-1 also improved TrkA and TrkB, but not TrkC, expression in gp120 neurotoxic conditions. The effects of IGF-1 could be blocked by preincubation with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002. These results suggested that gp120 may have a wide range of neurotoxicity on different subpopulations of DRG neurons, while IGF-1 might only relieve some subpopulations of DRG neurons with gp120-induced neurotoxicity. These data provide novel information of mechanisms of gp120 neurotoxicity on primary sensory neurons and the potential therapeutic effects of IGF-1 on gp120-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Heterologous HIV-1gp120 Gene Expression Disruption in Mycobacterium bovis BCG Host Strain: A Critical Issue for Engineering Mycobacterial Based-Vaccine Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joan; Fernández-Lloris, Raquel; Pezzat, Elías; Saubi, Narcís; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Mothe, Beatriz; Gatell, Josep Maria

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) as a live vector of recombinant bacterial vaccine is a promising system to be used. In this study, we evaluate the disrupted expression of heterologous HIV-1gp120 gene in BCG Pasteur host strain using replicative vectors pMV261 and pJH222. pJH222 carries a lysine complementing gene in BCG lysine auxotrophs. The HIV-1 gp120 gene expression was regulated by BCG hsp60 promoter (in plasmid pMV261) and Mycobacteria spp. α-antigen promoter (in plasmid pJH222). Among 14 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pMV261) colonies screened, 12 showed a partial deletion and two showed a complete deletion. However, deletion was not observed in all 10 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pJH222) colonies screened. In this study, we demonstrated that E. coli/Mycobacterial expression vectors bearing a weak promoter and lysine complementing gene in a recombinant lysine auxotroph of BCG could prevent genetic rearrangements and disruption of HIV 1gp120 gene expression, a key issue for engineering Mycobacterial based vaccine vectors. PMID:20617151

  9. Molecular Characterization of Heterologous HIV-1gp120 Gene Expression Disruption in Mycobacterium bovis BCG Host Strain: A Critical Issue for Engineering Mycobacterial Based-Vaccine Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG as a live vector of recombinant bacterial vaccine is a promising system to be used. In this study, we evaluate the disrupted expression of heterologous HIV-1gp120 gene in BCG Pasteur host strain using replicative vectors pMV261 and pJH222. pJH222 carries a lysine complementing gene in BCG lysine auxotrophs. The HIV-1 gp120 gene expression was regulated by BCG hsp60 promoter (in plasmid pMV261 and Mycobacteria spp. α-antigen promoter (in plasmid pJH222. Among 14 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pMV261 colonies screened, 12 showed a partial deletion and two showed a complete deletion. However, deletion was not observed in all 10 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pJH222 colonies screened. In this study, we demonstrated that E. coli/Mycobacterial expression vectors bearing a weak promoter and lysine complementing gene in a recombinant lysine auxotroph of BCG could prevent genetic rearrangements and disruption of HIV 1gp120 gene expression, a key issue for engineering Mycobacterial based vaccine vectors.

  10. HIV-1 and its gp120 inhibits the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 life cycle in an IFITM3-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Milene; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Sacramento, Carolina Q; Abrantes, Juliana L; Costa, Eduardo; Temerozo, Jairo R; Siqueira, Marilda M; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Souza, Thiago Moreno L

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-infected patients co-infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 surprisingly presented benign clinical outcome. The knowledge that HIV-1 changes the host homeostatic equilibrium, which may favor the patient resistance to some co-pathogens, prompted us to investigate whether HIV-1 infection could influence A(H1N1)pdm09 life cycle in vitro. We show here that exposure of A(H1N1)pdm09-infected epithelial cells to HIV-1 viral particles or its gp120 enhanced by 25% the IFITM3 content, resulting in a decrease in influenza replication. This event was dependent on toll-like receptor 2 and 4. Moreover, knockdown of IFITM3 prevented HIV-1 ability to inhibit A(H1N1)pdm09 replication. HIV-1 infection also increased IFITM3 levels in human primary macrophages by almost 100%. Consequently, the arrival of influenza ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to nucleus of macrophages was inhibited, as evaluated by different approaches. Reduction of influenza RNPs entry into the nucleus tolled A(H1N1)pdm09 life cycle in macrophages earlier than usual, limiting influenza's ability to induce TNF-α. As judged by analysis of the influenza hemagglutin (HA) gene from in vitro experiments and from samples of HIV-1/A(H1N1)pdm09 co-infected individuals, the HIV-1-induced reduction of influenza replication resulted in delayed viral evolution. Our results may provide insights on the mechanisms that may have attenuated the clinical course of Influenza in HIV-1/A(H1N1)pdm09 co-infected patients during the recent influenza form 2009/2010.

  11. HIV-1 and its gp120 inhibits the influenza A(H1N1pdm09 life cycle in an IFITM3-dependent fashion.

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    Milene Mesquita

    Full Text Available HIV-1-infected patients co-infected with A(H1N1pdm09 surprisingly presented benign clinical outcome. The knowledge that HIV-1 changes the host homeostatic equilibrium, which may favor the patient resistance to some co-pathogens, prompted us to investigate whether HIV-1 infection could influence A(H1N1pdm09 life cycle in vitro. We show here that exposure of A(H1N1pdm09-infected epithelial cells to HIV-1 viral particles or its gp120 enhanced by 25% the IFITM3 content, resulting in a decrease in influenza replication. This event was dependent on toll-like receptor 2 and 4. Moreover, knockdown of IFITM3 prevented HIV-1 ability to inhibit A(H1N1pdm09 replication. HIV-1 infection also increased IFITM3 levels in human primary macrophages by almost 100%. Consequently, the arrival of influenza ribonucleoproteins (RNPs to nucleus of macrophages was inhibited, as evaluated by different approaches. Reduction of influenza RNPs entry into the nucleus tolled A(H1N1pdm09 life cycle in macrophages earlier than usual, limiting influenza's ability to induce TNF-α. As judged by analysis of the influenza hemagglutin (HA gene from in vitro experiments and from samples of HIV-1/A(H1N1pdm09 co-infected individuals, the HIV-1-induced reduction of influenza replication resulted in delayed viral evolution. Our results may provide insights on the mechanisms that may have attenuated the clinical course of Influenza in HIV-1/A(H1N1pdm09 co-infected patients during the recent influenza form 2009/2010.

  12. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark [NIH

    2015-10-15

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml-1. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml-1, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design.

  13. Correlation between carbohydrate structures on the envelope glycoprotein gp120 of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and syncytium inhibition with lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C M; Nielsen, C

    1989-01-01

    The binding of 13 different lectins to gp120 partially purified from two HIV-1 isolates and one HIV-2 isolate was studied by in situ staining on electrophoretically separated and electroblotted HIV antigens. The lectins concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin, Lens culinaris agglutinin, Vicia faba...

  14. Systematic Protein-Protein Docking and Molecular Dynamics Studies of HIV-1 gp120 and CD4: Insights for New Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rizman-Idid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: The interactions between HIV-1 gp120 and mutated CD4 proteins were investigated in order to identify a lead structure for therapy based on competitive blocking of the HIV binding receptor for human T-cells. Crystal structures of HIV gp120-CD4 complexes reveal a close interaction of the virus receptor with CD4 Phe43, which is embedded in a pocket of the virus protein.Methods: This study applies computer simulations to determine the best binding of amino acid 43 CD4 mutants to HIV gp120. Besides natural CD4, three mutants carrying alternate aromatic residues His, Trp and Tyr at position 43 were investigated. Several docking programs were applied on isolated proteins based on selected crystal structures of gp120-CD4 complexes, as well as a 5 ns molecular dynamics study on the protein complexes. The initial structures were minimized in Gromacs to avoid crystal packing effects, and then subjected to docking experiments using AutoDock4, FireDock, ClusPro and ZDock. In molecular dynamics, the Gibbs free binding energy was calculated for the gp120-CD4 complexes. The docking outputs were analyzed on energy within the respective docking software.Results and conclusion: Visualization and hydrogen bonding analysis were performed using the Swiss-PdbViewer. Strong binding to HIV gp120 can be achieved with an extended aromatic group (Trp. However, the sterical demand of the interaction affects the binding kinetics. In conclusion, a ligand for an efficient blocking of HIV gp120 should involve an extended but conformational flexible aromatic group, i.e. a biphenyl. A docking study on biphenylalanine-43 confirms this expectation

  15. A Peptide Derived from the HIV-1 gp120 Coreceptor-Binding Region Promotes Formation of PAP248-286 Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

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    Jinquan Chen

    Full Text Available Semen is a major vehicle for HIV transmission. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fragments, such as PAP248-286, in human semen can form amyloid fibrils to enhance HIV infection. Other endogenous or exogenous factors present during sexual intercourse have also been reported to promote the formation of seminal amyloid fibrils.Here, we demonstrated that a synthetic 15-residue peptide derived from the HIV-1 gp120 coreceptor-binding region, designated enhancing peptide 2 (EP2, can rapidly self-assemble into nanofibers. These EP2-derivated nanofibers promptly accelerated the formation of semen amyloid fibrils by PAP248-286, as shown by Thioflavin T (ThT and Congo red assays. The amyloid fibrils presented similar morphology, assessed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM, in the presence or absence of EP2. Circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy revealed that EP2 accelerates PAP248-286 amyloid fibril formation by promoting the structural transition of PAP248-286 from a random coil into a cross-β-sheet. Newly formed semen amyloid fibrils effectively enhanced HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl cells and U87 cells by promoting the binding of HIV-1 virions to target cells.Nanofibers composed of EP2 promote the formation of PAP248-286 amyloid fibrils and enhance HIV-1 infection.

  16. In silico analysis of HIV-1 Env-gp120 reveals structural bases for viral adaptation in growth-restrictive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eYokoyama

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Variable V1/V2 and V3 loops on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope-gp120 core play key roles in modulating viral competence to recognize two infection receptors, CD4 and chemokine-receptors. However, molecular bases for the modulation largely remain unclear. To address these issues, we constructed structural models for a full-length gp120 in CD4-free and -bound states. The models showed topologies of gp120 surface loop that agree with those in reported structural data. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that in the unliganded state, V1/V2 loop settled into a thermodynamically stable arrangement near V3 loop for conformational masking of V3 tip, a potent neutralization epitope. In the CD4-bound state, however, V1/V2 loop was rearranged near the bound CD4 to support CD4 binding. In parallel, cell-based adaptation in the absence of anti-viral antibody pressures led to the identification of amino acid substitutions that individually enhance viral entry and growth efficiencies in association with reduced sensitivity to CCR5 antagonist TAK-779. Notably, all these substitutions were positioned on the receptors binding surfaces in V1/V2 or V3 loop. In silico structural studies predicted some physical changes of gp120 by substitutions with alterations in viral replication phenotypes. These data suggest that V1/V2 loop is critical for creating a gp120 structure that masks co-receptor binding site compatible with maintenance of viral infectivity, and for tuning a functional balance of gp120 between immune escape ability and infectivity to optimize HIV-1 replication fitness.

  17. The Ixodes scapularis Salivary Protein, Salp15, Prevents the Association of HIV-1 gp120 and CD4

    OpenAIRE

    Juncadella, Ignacio J.; Garg, Renu; Bates, Tonya C.; Olivera, Elias R.; Anguita, Juan

    2007-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis salivary protein, Salp15, inhibits CD4+ T cell activation by binding to the most-extracellular domains of the CD4 molecule, potentially overlapping with the gp120-binding region. We now show that Salp15 inhibits the interaction of gp120 and CD4. Furthermore, Salp15 prevents syncytia formation between HL2/3 (a stable HeLa cell line expressing the envelope protein) and CD4-expressing cells. Salp15 prevented gp120-CD4 interaction at least partially through its direct interactio...

  18. Characterization of a Large Panel of Rabbit Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV-1 gp120 and Isolation of Novel Neutralizing Antibodies against the V3 Loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Qin

    Full Text Available We recently reported the induction of potent, cross-clade neutralizing antibodies (nAbs against Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1 in rabbits using gp120 based on an M-group consensus sequence. To better characterize these antibodies, 93 hybridomas were generated, which represent the largest panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs ever generated from a vaccinated rabbit. The single most frequently recognized epitope of the isolated mAbs was at the very C-terminal end of the protein (APTKAKRRVVEREKR, followed by the V3 loop. A total of seven anti-V3 loop mAbs were isolated, two of which (10A3 and 10A37 exhibited neutralizing activity. In contrast to 10A3 and most other anti-V3 loop nAbs, 10A37 was atypical with its epitope positioned more towards the C-terminal half of the loop. To our knowledge, 10A37 is the most potent and broadly neutralizing anti-V3 loop mAb induced by vaccination. Interestingly, all seven anti-V3 loop mAbs competed with PGT121, suggesting a possibility that early induction of potent anti-V3 loop antibodies could prevent induction of more broadly neutralizing PGT121-like antibodies that target the conserved base of the V3 loop stem.

  19. Structure and Recognition of a Novel HIV-1 gp120-gp41 Interface Antibody that Caused MPER Exposure through Viral Escape

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    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Bhiman, Jinal N.; Sheward, Daniel J.; Elliott, Debra H.; Rouelle, Julie; Smira, Ashley; Joyce, M. Gordon; Ndabambi, Nonkululeko; Druz, Aliaksandr; Asokan, Mangai; Burton, Dennis R.; Connors, Mark; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Robinson, James E.; Ward, Andrew B.; Williamson, Carolyn; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn; Moore, Penny L.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2017-01-11

    A comprehensive understanding of the regions on HIV-1 envelope trimers targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies may contribute to rational design of an HIV-1 vaccine. We previously identified a participant in the CAPRISA cohort, CAP248, who developed trimer-specific antibodies capable of neutralizing 60% of heterologous viruses at three years post-infection. Here, we report the isolation by B cell culture of monoclonal antibody CAP248-2B, which targets a novel membrane proximal epitope including elements of gp120 and gp41. Despite low maximum inhibition plateaus, often below 50% inhibitory concentrations, the breadth of CAP248-2B significantly correlated with donor plasma. Site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and negative-stain electron microscopy 3D reconstructions revealed how CAP248-2B recognizes a cleavage-dependent epitope that includes the gp120 C terminus. While this epitope is distinct, it overlapped in parts of gp41 with the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT151, VRC34, 35O22, 3BC315, and 10E8. CAP248-2B has a conformationally variable paratope with an unusually long 19 amino acid light chain third complementarity determining region. Two phenylalanines at the loop apex were predicted by docking and mutagenesis data to interact with the viral membrane. Neutralization by CAP248-2B is not dependent on any single glycan proximal to its epitope, and low neutralization plateaus could not be completely explained by N- or O-linked glycosylation pathway inhibitors, furin co-transfection, or pre-incubation with soluble CD4. Viral escape from CAP248-2B involved a cluster of rare mutations in the gp120-gp41 cleavage sites. Simultaneous introduction of these mutations into heterologous viruses abrogated neutralization by CAP248-2B, but enhanced neutralization sensitivity to 35O22, 4E10, and 10E8 by 10-100-fold. Altogether, this study expands the region of the HIV-1 gp120-gp41 quaternary interface that is a target for broadly neutralizing

  20. Glial TNFα in the spinal cord regulates neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application in rats

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    Ouyang Handong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN is one of the most common forms of peripheral neuropathy, affecting about 30% of people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS. The symptoms of HIV-SN are dominated by neuropathic pain. Glia activation in the spinal cord has become an attractive target for attenuating chronic pain. This study will investigate the role of spinal TNFα released from glia in HIV-related neuropathic pain. Results Peripheral gp120 application into the rat sciatic nerve induced mechanical allodynia for more than 7 weeks, and upregulated the expression of spinal TNFα in the mRNA and the protein levels at 2 weeks after gp120 application. Spinal TNFα was colocalized with GFAP (a marker of astrocytes and Iba1 (a marker of microglia in immunostaining, suggesting that glia produce TNFα in the spinal cord in this model. Peripheral gp120 application also increased TNFα in the L4/5 DRG. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of TNFα siRNA or soluble TNF receptor reduced gp120 application-induced mechanical allodynia. Conclusions Our results indicate that TNFα in the spinal cord and the DRG are involved in neuropathic pain, following the peripheral HIV gp120 application, and that blockade of the glial product TNFα reverses neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application.

  1. Identification of an N-linked glycan in the V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120 influencing neutralization by anti-V3 antibodies and soluble CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, G J; Hemming, A; Bolmstedt, A

    1994-01-01

    Glycosylation is necessary for HIV-1 gp120 to attain a functional conformation, and individual N-linked glycans of gp120 are important, but not essential, for replication of HIV-1 in cell culture. We have constructed a mutant HIV-1 infectious clone lacking a signal for N-linked glycosylation...... in the V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120. Lack of an N-linked glycan was verified by a mobility enhancement of mutant gp120 in SDS-gel electrophoresis. The mutated virus showed no differences in either gp120 content per infectious unit or infectivity, indicating that the N-linked glycan was neither essential nor...... affecting viral infectivity in cell culture. We found that the mutated virus lacking an N-linked glycan in the V1-loop of gp120 was more resistant to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies to the V3-loop and neutralization by soluble recombinant CD4 (sCD4). Both viruses were equally well neutralized by Con...

  2. Accurate and efficient gp120 V3 loop structure based models for the determination of HIV-1 co-receptor usage

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    Vaisman Iosif I

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 targets human cells expressing both the CD4 receptor, which binds the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120, as well as either the CCR5 (R5 or CXCR4 (X4 co-receptors, which interact primarily with the third hypervariable loop (V3 loop of gp120. Determination of HIV-1 affinity for either the R5 or X4 co-receptor on host cells facilitates the inclusion of co-receptor antagonists as a part of patient treatment strategies. A dataset of 1193 distinct gp120 V3 loop peptide sequences (989 R5-utilizing, 204 X4-capable is utilized to train predictive classifiers based on implementations of random forest, support vector machine, boosted decision tree, and neural network machine learning algorithms. An in silico mutagenesis procedure employing multibody statistical potentials, computational geometry, and threading of variant V3 sequences onto an experimental structure, is used to generate a feature vector representation for each variant whose components measure environmental perturbations at corresponding structural positions. Results Classifier performance is evaluated based on stratified 10-fold cross-validation, stratified dataset splits (2/3 training, 1/3 validation, and leave-one-out cross-validation. Best reported values of sensitivity (85%, specificity (100%, and precision (98% for predicting X4-capable HIV-1 virus, overall accuracy (97%, Matthew's correlation coefficient (89%, balanced error rate (0.08, and ROC area (0.97 all reach critical thresholds, suggesting that the models outperform six other state-of-the-art methods and come closer to competing with phenotype assays. Conclusions The trained classifiers provide instantaneous and reliable predictions regarding HIV-1 co-receptor usage, requiring only translated V3 loop genotypes as input. Furthermore, the novelty of these computational mutagenesis based predictor attributes distinguishes the models as orthogonal and complementary to previous methods that utilize sequence

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus envelope protein Gp120 induces proliferation but not apoptosis in osteoblasts at physiologic concentrations.

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    Nathan W Cummins

    Full Text Available Patients with HIV infection have decreased numbers of osteoblasts, decreased bone mineral density and increased risk of fracture compared to uninfected patients; however, the molecular mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. We questioned whether Gp120, a component of the envelope protein of HIV capable of inducing apoptosis in many cell types, is able to induce cell death in bone-forming osteoblasts. We show that treatment of immortalized osteoblast-like cells and primary human osteoblasts with exogenous Gp120 in vitro at physiologic concentrations does not result in apoptosis. Instead, in the osteoblast-like U2OS cell line, cells expressing CXCR4, a receptor for Gp120, had increased proliferation when treated with Gp120 compared to control (P<0.05, which was inhibited by pretreatment with a CXCR4 inhibitor and a G-protein inhibitor. This suggests that Gp120 is not an inducer of apoptosis in human osteoblasts and likely does not directly contribute to osteoporosis in infected patients by this mechanism.

  4. Asn 362 in gp120 contributes to enhanced fusogenicity by CCR5-restricted HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein variants from patients with AIDS

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    Wang Bin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CCR5-restricted (R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 variants cause CD4+ T-cell loss in the majority of individuals who progress to AIDS, but mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of R5 strains are poorly understood. To better understand envelope glycoprotein (Env determinants contributing to pathogenicity of R5 viruses, we characterized 37 full-length R5 Envs from cross-sectional and longitudinal R5 viruses isolated from blood of patients with asymptomatic infection or AIDS, referred to as pre-AIDS (PA and AIDS (A R5 Envs, respectively. Results Compared to PA-R5 Envs, A-R5 Envs had enhanced fusogenicity in quantitative cell-cell fusion assays, and reduced sensitivity to inhibition by the fusion inhibitor T-20. Sequence analysis identified the presence of Asn 362 (N362, a potential N-linked glycosylation site immediately N-terminal to CD4-binding site (CD4bs residues in the C3 region of gp120, more frequently in A-R5 Envs than PA-R5 Envs. N362 was associated with enhanced fusogenicity, faster entry kinetics, and increased sensitivity of Env-pseudotyped reporter viruses to neutralization by the CD4bs-directed Env mAb IgG1b12. Mutagenesis studies showed N362 contributes to enhanced fusogenicity of most A-R5 Envs. Molecular models indicate N362 is located adjacent to the CD4 binding loop of gp120, and suggest N362 may enhance fusogenicity by promoting greater exposure of the CD4bs and/or stabilizing the CD4-bound Env structure. Conclusion Enhanced fusogenicity is a phenotype of the A-R5 Envs studied, which was associated with the presence of N362, enhanced HIV-1 entry kinetics and increased CD4bs exposure in gp120. N362 contributes to fusogenicity of R5 Envs in a strain dependent manner. Our studies suggest enhanced fusogenicity of A-R5 Envs may contribute to CD4+ T-cell loss in subjects who progress to AIDS whilst harbouring R5 HIV-1 variants. N362 may contribute to this effect in some individuals.

  5. Structural delineation of a quaternary, cleavage-dependent epitope at the gp41-gp120 interface on intact HIV-1 Env trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattner, Claudia; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sliepen, Kwinten; Derking, Ronald; Falkowska, Emilia; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; van Gils, Marit; Lee, Peter S; Peng, Wenjie; Paulson, James C; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R; Moore, John P; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B

    2014-05-15

    All previously characterized broadly neutralizing antibodies to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) target one of four major sites of vulnerability. Here, we define and structurally characterize a unique epitope on Env that is recognized by a recently discovered family of human monoclonal antibodies (PGT151-PGT158). The PGT151 epitope is comprised of residues and glycans at the interface of gp41 and gp120 within a single protomer and glycans from both subunits of a second protomer and represents a neutralizing epitope that is dependent on both gp120 and gp41. Because PGT151 binds only to properly formed, cleaved trimers, this distinctive property, and its ability to stabilize Env trimers, has enabled the successful purification of mature, cleaved Env trimers from the cell surface as a complex with PGT151. Here we compare the structural and functional properties of membrane-extracted Env trimers from several clades with those of the soluble, cleaved SOSIP gp140 trimer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Binding of the mannose-specific lectin, Griffithsin, to HIV-1 gp120 exposes the CD4-binding site

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available development. Anti- microb. Agents Chemother. 41:1521?1530. 7. Buchacher, A., et al. 1994. Generation of human monoclonal antibodies against HIV-1 proteins; electrofusion and Epstein-Barr virus transformation for peripheral blood lymphocyte immortalization...

  7. Energetics of dendrimer binding to HIV-1 gp120-CD4 complex and mechanismic aspects of its role as an entry-inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saurabh, Suman; Sahoo, Anil Kumar; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments and computational studies have established that de-protonated dendrimers (SPL7013 and PAMAM) act as entry-inhibitors of HIV. SPL7013 based Vivagel is currently under clinical development. The dendrimer binds to gp120 in the gp120-CD4 complex, destabilizes it by breaking key contacts between gp120 and CD4 and prevents viral entry into target cells. In this work, we provide molecular details and energetics of the formation of the SPL7013-gp120-CD4 ternary complex and decipher modes of action of the dendrimer in preventing viral entry. It is also known from experiments that the dendrimer binds weakly to gp120 that is not bound to CD4. It binds even more weakly to the CD4-binding region of gp120 and thus cannot directly block gp120-CD4 complexation. In this work, we examine the feasibility of dendrimer binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4 and directly blocking gp120-CD4 complex formation. We find that the process of the dendrimer binding to CD4 can compete with gp120-CD4 binding due to comparable free energy change for the two processes, thus creating a possibility for the dendrimer to directly block gp120-CD4 complexation by binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4. (paper)

  8. Energetics of dendrimer binding to HIV-1 gp120-CD4 complex and mechanismic aspects of its role as an entry-inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Suman; Sahoo, Anil Kumar; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and computational studies have established that de-protonated dendrimers (SPL7013 and PAMAM) act as entry-inhibitors of HIV. SPL7013 based Vivagel is currently under clinical development. The dendrimer binds to gp120 in the gp120-CD4 complex, destabilizes it by breaking key contacts between gp120 and CD4 and prevents viral entry into target cells. In this work, we provide molecular details and energetics of the formation of the SPL7013-gp120-CD4 ternary complex and decipher modes of action of the dendrimer in preventing viral entry. It is also known from experiments that the dendrimer binds weakly to gp120 that is not bound to CD4. It binds even more weakly to the CD4-binding region of gp120 and thus cannot directly block gp120-CD4 complexation. In this work, we examine the feasibility of dendrimer binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4 and directly blocking gp120-CD4 complex formation. We find that the process of the dendrimer binding to CD4 can compete with gp120-CD4 binding due to comparable free energy change for the two processes, thus creating a possibility for the dendrimer to directly block gp120-CD4 complexation by binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4.

  9. Structure-based lead optimization to improve antiviral potency and ADMET properties of phenyl-1H-pyrrole-carboxamide entry inhibitors targeted to HIV-1 gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Francesca; Belov, Dmitry S; Kwon, Young Do; Ramesh, Ranjith; Furimsky, Anna M; O'Loughlin, Kathleen; Byrge, Patricia C; Iyer, Lalitha V; Mirsalis, Jon C; Kurkin, Alexander V; Altieri, Andrea; Debnath, Asim K

    2018-05-12

    We are continuing our concerted effort to optimize our first lead entry antagonist, NBD-11021, which targets the Phe43 cavity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120, to improve antiviral potency and ADMET properties. In this report, we present a structure-based approach that helped us to generate working hypotheses to modify further a recently reported advanced lead entry antagonist, NBD-14107, which showed significant improvement in antiviral potency when tested in a single-cycle assay against a large panel of Env-pseudotyped viruses. We report here the synthesis of twenty-nine new compounds and evaluation of their antiviral activity in a single-cycle and multi-cycle assay to derive a comprehensive structure-activity relationship (SAR). We have selected three inhibitors with the high selectivity index for testing against a large panel of 55 Env-pseudotyped viruses representing a diverse set of clinical isolates of different subtypes. The antiviral activity of one of these potent inhibitors, 55 (NBD-14189), against some clinical isolates was as low as 63 nM. We determined the sensitivity of CD4-binding site mutated-pseudoviruses to these inhibitors to confirm that they target HIV-1 gp120. Furthermore, we assessed their ADMET properties and compared them to the clinical candidate attachment inhibitor, BMS-626529. The ADMET data indicate that some of these new inhibitors have comparable ADMET properties to BMS-626529 and can be optimized further to potential clinical candidates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular interaction of gp120 and B40 aptamer: A potential new HIV-1 entry inhibitor drug

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baron, MK

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection and its concomitant disease – Aids, remain major public health problems in southern Africa. While current antiretroviral drugs have prolonged the quality of life for many HIV-positive individuals, they do not eliminate the virus (2...

  11. Identification of an N-linked glycan in the V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120 influencing neutralization by anti-V3 antibodies and soluble CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, G J; Hemming, A; Bolmstedt, A

    1994-01-01

    affecting viral infectivity in cell culture. We found that the mutated virus lacking an N-linked glycan in the V1-loop of gp120 was more resistant to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies to the V3-loop and neutralization by soluble recombinant CD4 (sCD4). Both viruses were equally well neutralized by Con...... in the V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120. Lack of an N-linked glycan was verified by a mobility enhancement of mutant gp120 in SDS-gel electrophoresis. The mutated virus showed no differences in either gp120 content per infectious unit or infectivity, indicating that the N-linked glycan was neither essential nor...

  12. HIV gp120 binds to mannose receptor on vaginal epithelial cells and induces production of matrix metalloproteinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sashaina E Fanibunda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During sexual transmission of HIV in women, the virus breaches the multi-layered CD4 negative stratified squamous epithelial barrier of the vagina, to infect the sub-epithelial CD4 positive immune cells. However the mechanisms by which HIV gains entry into the sub-epithelial zone is hitherto unknown. We have previously reported human mannose receptor (hMR as a CD4 independent receptor playing a role in HIV transmission on human spermatozoa. The current study was undertaken to investigate the expression of hMR in vaginal epithelial cells, its HIV gp120 binding potential, affinity constants and the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs downstream of HIV gp120 binding to hMR. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human vaginal epithelial cells and the immortalized vaginal epithelial cell line Vk2/E6E7 were used in this study. hMR mRNA and protein were expressed in vaginal epithelial cells and cell line, with a molecular weight of 155 kDa. HIV gp120 bound to vaginal proteins with high affinity, (Kd = 1.2±0.2 nM for vaginal cells, 1.4±0.2 nM for cell line and the hMR antagonist mannan dose dependently inhibited this binding. Both HIV gp120 binding and hMR exhibited identical patterns of localization in the epithelial cells by immunofluorescence. HIV gp120 bound to immunopurified hMR and affinity constants were 2.9±0.4 nM and 3.2±0.6 nM for vaginal cells and Vk2/E6E7 cell line respectively. HIV gp120 induced an increase in MMP-9 mRNA expression and activity by zymography, which could be inhibited by an anti-hMR antibody. CONCLUSION: hMR expressed by vaginal epithelial cells has high affinity for HIV gp120 and this binding induces production of MMPs. We propose that the induction of MMPs in response to HIV gp120 may lead to degradation of tight junction proteins and the extracellular matrix proteins in the vaginal epithelium and basement membrane, leading to weakening of the epithelial barrier; thereby facilitating transport of HIV across the

  13. Identification of N-phenyl-N'-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-4-yl)-oxalamides as a new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors that prevent gp120 binding to CD4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Qian; Ma Liying; Jiang Shibo; Lu Hong; Liu Shuwen; He Yuxian; Strick, Nathan; Neamati, Nouri; Debnath, Asim Kumar

    2005-01-01

    We have identified two N-phenyl-N'-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-4-yl)-oxalamide analogs as a novel class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry inhibitors that block the gp120-CD4 interaction, using database screening techniques. The lead compounds, NBD-556 and NBD-557, are small molecule organic compounds with drug-like properties. These compounds showed potent cell fusion and virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity at low micromolar levels. A systematic study showed that these compounds target viral entry by inhibiting the binding of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular receptor CD4 but did not inhibit reverse transcriptase, integrase, or protease, indicating that they do not target the later stages of the HIV-1 life cycle to inhibit HIV-1 infection. These compounds were equally potent inhibitors of both X4 and R5 viruses tested in CXCR4 and CCR5 expressing cell lines, respectively, indicating that their anti-HIV-1 activity is not dependent on the coreceptor tropism of the virus. A surface plasmon resonance study, which measures binding affinity, clearly demonstrated that these compounds bind to unliganded HIV-1 gp120 but not to the cellular receptor CD4. NBD-556 and NBD-557 were active against HIV-1 laboratory-adapted strains including an AZT-resistant strain and HIV-1 primary isolates, indicating that these compounds can potentially be further modified to become potent HIV-1 entry inhibitors

  14. Conformational preferences of a chimeric peptide HIV-1 immunogen from the C4-V3 domains of gp120 envelope protein of HIV-1 CAN0A based on solution NMR: comparison to a related immunogenic peptide from HIV-1 RF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, H M; de Lorimier, R; Moody, M A; Haynes, B F; Spicer, L D

    1996-04-23

    A critical problem to overcome on HIV vaccine design is the variability among HIV strains. One strategy to solve this problem is the construction of multicomponent immunogens reflective of common HIV motifs. Currently, it is not known if these motifs should be based primarily on amino acid sequence or higher-order structure of the viral proteins of a combination of the two. In this paper, we report NMR-derived solution conformations for a sympathetic peptide taken from the C4 and V3 domains of HIV-1 CAN0A gp120 envelope protein. This peptide, designated T1-SP10CAN0(A), is compared to a recently reported C4-V3 peptide. T1-SP10RF(A) from the HIV-1 RF strain [de Lorimier et al. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 2055-2062], in terms of conformational features and immune responses in mice [Haynes et al. (1995) AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 11, 211-221]. The T1 segment of 16 amino acids from the gp120 C4 domain is identical in both peptides and exhibits nascent helical character. The SP10 region, taken from the gp120 V3 loop, differs from that of T1-SP10RF(A) in both sequence and conformations. A reverse turn is observed at the conserved GPGX sequence. The rest of the Sp10 domain is extended with the exception of the last three residues which show evidence for a helical arrangement. Modeling of the turn region of the T1-SP10CAN0(A) peptide shows exposure of a continuous apolar stretch of side chains similar to that reported in the crystal structure of a V3 peptide from HIV-1 MN complexed with a monoclonal antibody [Rini et al. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 6325-6329]. this hydrophobic patch is interrupted by a charged Lys residue in the T1-SP10RF(A) peptide. This observation suggests that the HIV-1 CAN0A and HIV-1 RF C4-V3 peptides can induce widely different anti-HIV antibodies. consistent with immunogenic results.

  15. Prolonged expression of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody to the female rhesus macaque lower genital tract by AAV gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Motal, U M; Harbison, C; Han, T; Pudney, J; Anderson, D J; Zhu, Q; Westmoreland, S; Marasco, W A

    2014-09-01

    Topical microbicides are a leading strategy for prevention of HIV mucosal infection to women; however, numerous pharmacokinetic limitations associated with coitally related dosing strategy have contributed to their limited success. Here we test the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated delivery of the b12 human anti-HIV-1 gp120 minibody gene to the lower genital tract of female rhesus macaques (Rh) can provide prolonged expression of b12 minibodies in the cervical-vaginal secretions. Gene transfer studies demonstrated that, of various green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing AAV serotypes, AAV-6 most efficiently transduced freshly immortalized and primary genital epithelial cells (PGECs) of female Rh in vitro. In addition, AAV-6-b12 minibody transduction of Rh PGECs led to inhibition of SHIV162p4 transmigration and virus infectivity in vitro. AAV-6-GFP could also successfully transduce vaginal epithelial cells of Rh when applied intravaginally, including p63+ epithelial stem cells. Moreover, intravaginal application of AAV-6-b12 to female Rh resulted in prolonged minibody detection in their vaginal secretions throughout the 79-day study period. These data provide proof of principle that AAV-6-mediated delivery of anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody (BnAb) genes to the lower genital tract of female Rh results in persistent minibody detection for several months. This strategy offers promise that an anti-HIV-1 genetic microbicide strategy may be possible in which topical application of AAV vector, with periodic reapplication as needed, may provide sustained local BnAb expression and protection.

  16. Probing hydrogen bonds in the antibody-bound HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop by solid state NMR REDOR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbach, John J. [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Yang Jun; Weliky, David P. [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Steinbach, Peter J. [National Institutes of Health, Center for Molecular Modeling, Center for Information Technology (United States); Tugarinov, Vitali; Anglister, Jacob [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Structural Biology (Israel); Tycko, Robert [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2000-04-15

    We describe solid state NMR measurements on frozen solutions of the complex of the 24-residue HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop peptide RP135 with the Fab fragment of the anti-gp120 antibody 0.5{beta}, using rotational echo double resonance (REDOR). In order to probe possible hydrogen bonding between arginine side chains and glycine backbone carbonyls in the region of the conserved Gly-Pro-Gly-Arg (GPGR) motif of the V3 loop, RP135 samples were prepared with {sup 15}N labels at the {eta} nitrogen positions of arginine side chains and {sup 13}C labels at glycine carbonyl positions and {sup 13}C-detected {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N REDOR measurements were performed on peptide/antibody complexes of these labeled samples. Such hydrogen bonding was previously observed in a crystal structure of the V3 loop peptide/antibody complex RP142/59.1 [Ghiara et al. (1994) Science, 264, 82-85], but is shown by the REDOR measurements to be absent in the RP135/0.5{beta} complex. These results confirm the antibody-dependent conformational differences in the GPGR motif suggested by previously reported solid state NMR measurements of {phi} and {psi} backbone dihedral angles in the RP135/0.5{beta} complex. In addition, we describe REDOR measurements on the helical synthetic peptide MB(i+4)EK in frozen solution that establish our ability to detect {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipole-dipole couplings in the distance range appropriate to these hydrogen bonding studies. We also report the results of molecular modeling calculations on the central portion RP135, using a combination of the solid state NMR restraints of Weliky et al. [Nat. Struct. Biol., 6, 141-145, 1999] and the liquid state NMR restraints of Tugarinov et al. (Nat. Struct. Biol., 6, 331-335, 1999]. The dynamics calculations demonstrate the mutual compatibility of the two sets of experimental structural restraints and reduce ambiguities in the solid state NMR restraints that result from symmetry and signal-to-noise considerations.

  17. Probing hydrogen bonds in the antibody-bound HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop by solid state NMR REDOR measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbach, John J.; Yang Jun; Weliky, David P.; Steinbach, Peter J.; Tugarinov, Vitali; Anglister, Jacob; Tycko, Robert

    2000-01-01

    We describe solid state NMR measurements on frozen solutions of the complex of the 24-residue HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop peptide RP135 with the Fab fragment of the anti-gp120 antibody 0.5β, using rotational echo double resonance (REDOR). In order to probe possible hydrogen bonding between arginine side chains and glycine backbone carbonyls in the region of the conserved Gly-Pro-Gly-Arg (GPGR) motif of the V3 loop, RP135 samples were prepared with 15 N labels at the η nitrogen positions of arginine side chains and 13 C labels at glycine carbonyl positions and 13 C-detected 13 C- 15 N REDOR measurements were performed on peptide/antibody complexes of these labeled samples. Such hydrogen bonding was previously observed in a crystal structure of the V3 loop peptide/antibody complex RP142/59.1 [Ghiara et al. (1994) Science, 264, 82-85], but is shown by the REDOR measurements to be absent in the RP135/0.5β complex. These results confirm the antibody-dependent conformational differences in the GPGR motif suggested by previously reported solid state NMR measurements of φ and Ψ backbone dihedral angles in the RP135/0.5β complex. In addition, we describe REDOR measurements on the helical synthetic peptide MB(i+4)EK in frozen solution that establish our ability to detect 13 C- 15 N dipole-dipole couplings in the distance range appropriate to these hydrogen bonding studies. We also report the results of molecular modeling calculations on the central portion RP135, using a combination of the solid state NMR restraints of Weliky et al. [Nat. Struct. Biol., 6, 141-145, 1999] and the liquid state NMR restraints of Tugarinov et al. (Nat. Struct. Biol., 6, 331-335, 1999]. The dynamics calculations demonstrate the mutual compatibility of the two sets of experimental structural restraints and reduce ambiguities in the solid state NMR restraints that result from symmetry and signal-to-noise considerations

  18. The Protective Effects of IGF-1 on Different Subpopulations of DRG Neurons with Neurotoxicity Induced by gp120 and Dideoxycytidine In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Dong, Haixia; Liu, Guixiang; Yuan, Bin; Li, Yizhao; Liu, Huaxiang

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy is not only difficult to distinguish in clinical practice, but also difficult to relieve the pain symptoms by analgesics because of the severity of the disease at the later stage. Hence, to explore the mechanisms of HIV-related neuropathy and find new therapeutic options are particularly important for relieving neuropathic pain symptoms of the patients. In the present study, primary cultured embryonic rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were used to determine the neurotoxic effects of HIV-gp120 protein and/or antiretroviral drug dideoxycytidine (ddC) and the therapeutic actions of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on gp120- or ddC-induced neurotoxicity. DRG neurons were exposed to gp120 (500 pmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), respectively, for 72 hours. The results showed that gp120 and/or ddC caused neurotoxicity of primary cultured DRG neurons. Interestingly, the severity of neurotoxicity induced by gp120 and ddC was different in different subpopulation of DRG neurons. gp120 mainly affected large diameter DRG neurons (>25 μm), whereas ddC mainly affected small diameter DRG neurons (≤25 μm). IGF-1 could reverse the neurotoxicity induced by gp120 and/or ddC on small, but not large, DRG neurons. These data provide new insights in elucidating the pathogenesis of HIV infection- or antiretroviral therapy-related peripheral neuropathy and facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies.

  19. Limonene reduces hyperalgesia induced by gp120 and cytokines by modulation of IL-1 β and protein expression in spinal cord of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Ana Claudia; Morato, Priscila Neder; Dos Santos Barbosa, Marcelo; Croda, Julio; Sampson, Jared; Kong, Xiangpeng; Konkiewitz, Elisabete Castelon; Ziff, Edward B; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the antihyperalgesic effects of limonene in mice that received intrathecal injection of gp120. Male Swiss mice received gp120, IL-1β or TNF-α intrathecally or sterile saline as a control. A mechanical sensitivity test was performed at 2 and 3h after the injection. Spinal cord and blood samples were isolated for protein quantification. Intrathecal administration of gp120 increased mechanical sensitivity measured with an electronic Von Frey apparatus, at 2 and 3h after the injections. Limonene administered orally prior to gp120 administration significantly decreased this mechanical sensitivity at 3h after the gp120 injection. In addition, intrathecal injection of gp120 increased IL-1β and IL-10 in serum, and limonene prevented the ability of gp120 to increase these cytokines. Limonene also inhibited TNF-α and IL-1β-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Western blot assay demonstrated limonene was capable of increasing SOD expression in the cytoplasm of cells from spinal cord at 4h after intrathecal IL-1β injection. These results demonstrate that gp120 causes mechanical hyperalgesia and a peripheral increase in IL-1β and IL-10, and that prior administration of limonene inhibits these changes. Also limonene modulates the activation of SOD expression in the spinal cord after spinal IL-1β application. The ability of limonene to inhibit the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by gp120, TNF-α and IL-1β emphasizes the anti-inflammatory action of limonene, specifically its ability to inhibit cytokine production and its consequences. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. HIV-1 specific IgA detected in vaginal secretions of HIV uninfected women participating in a microbicide trial in Southern Africa are primarily directed toward gp120 and gp140 specificities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E Seaton

    Full Text Available Many participants in microbicide trials remain uninfected despite ongoing exposure to HIV-1. Determining the emergence and nature of mucosal HIV-specific immune responses in such women is important, since these responses may contribute to protection and could provide insight for the rational design of HIV-1 vaccines.We first conducted a pilot study to compare three sampling devices (Dacron swabs, flocked nylon swabs and Merocel sponges for detection of HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in vaginal secretions. IgG antibodies from HIV-1-positive women reacted broadly across the full panel of eight HIV-1 envelope (Env antigens tested, whereas IgA antibodies only reacted to the gp41 subunit. No Env-reactive antibodies were detected in the HIV-negative women. The three sampling devices yielded equal HIV-1-specific antibody titers, as well as total IgG and IgA concentrations. We then tested vaginal Dacron swabs archived from 57 HIV seronegative women who participated in a microbicide efficacy trial in Southern Africa (HPTN 035. We detected vaginal IgA antibodies directed at HIV-1 Env gp120/gp140 in six of these women, and at gp41 in another three women, but did not detect Env-specific IgG antibodies in any women.Vaginal secretions of HIV-1 infected women contained IgG reactivity to a broad range of Env antigens and IgA reactivity to gp41. In contrast, Env-binding antibodies in the vaginal secretions of HIV-1 uninfected women participating in the microbicide trial were restricted to the IgA subtype and were mostly directed at HIV-1 gp120/gp140.

  1. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of RV144 Vaccine AIDSVAX Clade E Envelope Immunogen Is Enhanced by a gp120 N-Terminal Deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Haiyan; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Bowman, Cindy; Sutherland, Laura; Jeffries, Thomas L.; Kozink, Daniel M.; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Parks, Robert; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Sinangil, Faruk; Berman, Phillip W.; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Karasavva, Nicos; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Santra, Sampa; Letvin, Norman L.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    An immune correlates analysis of the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial revealed that antibody responses to the gp120 V1/V2 region correlated inversely with infection risk. The RV144 protein immunogens (A244-rp120 and MN-rgp120) were modified by an N-terminal 11-amino-acid deletion (Δ11) and addition of a herpes simplex virus (HSV) gD protein-derived tag (gD). We investigated the effects of these modifications on gp120 expression, antigenicity, and immunogenicity by comparing unmodified A244 gp120 with both Δ11 deletion and gD tag and with Δ11 only. Analysis of A244 gp120, with or without Δ11 or gD, demonstrated that the Δ11 deletion, without the addition of gD, was sufficient for enhanced antigenicity to gp120 C1 region, conformational V2, and V1/V2 gp120 conformational epitopes. RV144 vaccinee serum IgGs bound more avidly to A244 gp120 Δ11 than to the unmodified gp120, and their binding was blocked by C1, V2, and V1/V2 antibodies. Rhesus macaques immunized with the three different forms of A244 gp120 proteins gave similar levels of gp120 antibody titers, although higher antibody titers developed earlier in A244 Δ11 gp120-immunized animals. Conformational V1/V2 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) gave significantly higher levels of blocking of plasma IgG from A244 Δ11 gp120-immunized animals than IgG from animals immunized with unmodified A244 gp120, thus indicating a qualitative difference in the V1/V2 antibodies induced by A244 Δ11 gp120. These results demonstrate that deletion of N-terminal residues in the RV144 A244 gp120 immunogen improves both envelope antigenicity and immunogenicity. PMID:23175357

  2. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridgette Janine Connell

    Full Text Available Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1-7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1.

  3. Neutralization of several adult and paediatric HIV-1 subtype C isolates using a shortened synthetic derivative of gp120 binding aptamer called UCLA1.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present a chemically synthesised derivative of the B40 parental aptamer, called UCLA1 (Cohen et al., 2008), was used for neutralization of endemic subtype C clinical isolates of HIV-1 from adult and paediatric patients and subtype B lab...

  4. Epitope mapping and characterization of a novel CD4-induced human monoclonal antibody capable of neutralizing primary HIV-1 strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Shihua; Wang Liping; Abreu, Mariam; Huang, C.-C.; Kwong, Peter D.; Rosenberg, Eric; Robinson, James E.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) enters target cells by binding its gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and one of the chemokine receptors, CCR5 or CXCR4. CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies bind gp120 more efficiently after CD4 binding and block the interaction with the chemokine receptor. Examples of CD4i antibodies are limited, and the prototypes of the CD4i antibodies exhibit only weak neutralizing activity against primary, clinical HIV-1 isolates. Here we report the identification of a novel antibody, E51, that exhibits CD4-induced binding to gp120 and neutralizes primary HIV-1 more efficiently than the prototypic CD4i antibodies. The E51 antibody blocks the interaction of gp120-CD4 complexes with CCR5 and binds to a highly conserved, basic gp120 element composed of the β19-strand and surrounding structures. Thus, on primary HIV-1 isolates, this gp120 region, which has been previously implicated in chemokine receptor binding, is accessible to a subset of CD4i antibodies

  5. IL-10 mediated by herpes simplex virus vector reduces neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 combined with ddC in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenwen; Huang, Wan; Liu, Shue; Levitt, Roy C; Candiotti, Keith A; Lubarsky, David A; Hao, Shuanglin

    2014-07-30

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy affects over 50% of HIV patients and is a common peripheral nerve complication of HIV infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Evidence shows that painful HIV sensory neuropathy is influenced by neuroinflammatory events that include the proinflammatory molecules, MAP Kinase, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), stromal cell-derived factor 1-α (SDF1α), and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4). However, the exact mechanisms of painful HIV sensory neuropathy are not known, which hinders our ability to develop effective treatments. In this study, we investigated whether inhibition of proinflammatory factors reduces the HIV-associated neuropathic pain state. Neuropathic pain was induced by peripheral HIV coat protein gp120 combined with 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC, one of the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)). Mechanical threshold was tested using von Frey filament fibers. Non-replicating herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors expressing interleukin 10 (IL10) were inoculated into the hindpaws of rats. The expression of TNFα, SDF1α, and CXCR4 in the lumbar spinal cord and L4/5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was examined using western blots. IL-10 expression mediated by the HSV vectors resulted in a significant elevation of mechanical threshold. The anti-allodynic effect of IL-10 expression mediated by the HSV vectors lasted more than 3 weeks. The area under the effect-time curves (AUC) in mechanical threshold in rats inoculated with the HSV vectors expressing IL-10, was increased compared with the control vectors, indicating antinociceptive effect of the IL-10 vectors. The HSV vectors expressing IL-10 also concomitantly reversed the upregulation of p-p38, TNFα, SDF1α, and CXCR4 induced by gp120 in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn and/or the DRG at 2 and/or 4 weeks. The blocking of the signaling of these proinflammatory molecules is able to reduce HIV-related neuropathic pain, which provide a novel

  6. Gene Transfer of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 67 by Herpes Simplex Virus Vectors Suppresses Neuropathic Pain Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp120 Combined with ddC in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao, Megumi; Kanda, Hirotsugu; Huang, Wan; Liu, Shue; Yi, Hyun; Candiotti, Keith A; Lubarsky, David A; Levitt, Roy C; Hao, Shuanglin

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related painful sensory neuropathies primarily consist of the HIV infection-related distal sensory polyneuropathy and antiretroviral toxic neuropathies. Pharmacotherapy provides only partial relief of pain in patients with HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome because little is known about the exact neuropathological mechanisms for HIV-associated neuropathic pain (NP). Hypofunction of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) GABAergic inhibitory mechanisms has been reported after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that HIV gp120 combined with antiretroviral therapy reduces spinal GABAergic inhibitory tone and that restoration of GABAergic inhibitory tone will reduce HIV-related NP in a rat model. The application of recombinant HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 into the sciatic nerve plus systemic ddC (one antiretroviral drug) induced mechanical allodynia. The hind paws of rats were inoculated with replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors genetically encoding gad1 gene to express glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), an enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of glutamate to GABA. Mechanical threshold was tested using von Frey filaments before and after treatments with the vectors. The expression of GAD67 in both the lumbar spinal cord and the L4-5 dorsal root ganglia was examined using western blots. The expression of mitochondrial superoxide in the spinal dorsal horn was examined using MitoSox imaging. The immunoreactivity of spinal GABA, pCREB, and pC/EBPβ was tested using immunohistochemistry. In the gp120 with ddC-induced neuropathic pain model, GAD67 expression mediated by the HSV vector caused an elevation of mechanical threshold that was apparent on day 3 after vector inoculation. The antiallodynic effect of the single HSV vector inoculation expressing GAD67 lasted >28 days. The area under the time-effect curves in the HSV vector expressing GAD67 was increased compared with that in the

  7. Vaccine induced antibodies to the first variable loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120, mediate antibody-dependent virus inhibition in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialuk, Izabela; Whitney, Stephen; Andresen, Vibeke; Florese, Ruth H; Nacsa, Janos; Cecchinato, Valentina; Valeri, Valerio W; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Gordon, Shari; Parks, Robyn Washington; Montefiori, David C; Venzon, David; Demberg, Thorsten; Guroff, Marjorie Robert-; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-12-09

    The role of antibodies directed against the hyper variable envelope region V1 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has not been thoroughly studied. We show that a vaccine able to elicit strain-specific non-neutralizing antibodies to this region of gp120 is associated with control of highly pathogenic chimeric SHIV(89.6P) replication in rhesus macaques. The vaccinated animal that had the highest titers of antibodies to the amino terminus portion of V1, prior to challenge, had secondary antibody responses that mediated cell killing by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as early as 2 weeks after infection and inhibited viral replication by antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), by 4 weeks after infection. There was a significant inverse correlation between virus level and binding antibody titers to the envelope protein, (R=-0.83, p=0.015), and ADCVI (R=-0.84 p=0.044). Genotyping of plasma virus demonstrated in vivo selection of three SHIV(89.6P) variants with changes in potential N-linked glycosylation sites in V1. We found a significant inverse correlation between virus levels and titers of antibodies that mediated ADCVI against all the identified V1 virus variants. A significant inverse correlation was also found between neutralizing antibody titers to SHIV(89.6) and virus levels (R=-0.72 p=0.0050). However, passive inoculation of purified immunoglobulin from animal M316, the macaque that best controlled virus, to a naïve macaque, resulted in a low serum neutralizing antibodies and low ADCVI activity that failed to protect from SHIV(89.6P) challenge. Collectively, while our data suggest that anti-envelope antibodies with neutralizing and non-neutralizing Fc(R-dependent activities may be important in the control of SHIV replication, they also demonstrate that low levels of these antibodies alone are not sufficient to protect from infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A comparative immunogenicity study in rabbits of disulfide-stabilized, proteolytically cleaved, soluble trimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp140, trimeric cleavage-defective gp140 and monomeric gp120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddows, Simon; Franti, Michael; Dey, Antu K.; Kirschner, Marc; Iyer, Sai Prasad N.; Fisch, Danielle C.; Ketas, Thomas; Yuste, Eloisa; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Klasse, Per Johan; Maddon, Paul J.; Olson, William C.; Moore, John P.

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex, a homotrimer containing gp120 surface glycoprotein and gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein subunits, mediates the binding and fusion of the virus with susceptible target cells. The Env complex is the target for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and is the basis for vaccines intended to induce NAbs. Early generation vaccines based on monomeric gp120 subunits did not confer protection from infection; one alternative approach is therefore to make and evaluate soluble forms of the trimeric Env complex. We have directly compared the immunogenicity in rabbits of two forms of soluble trimeric Env and monomeric gp120 based on the sequence of HIV-1 JR-FL . Both protein-only and DNA-prime, protein-boost immunization formats were evaluated, DNA-priming having little or no influence on the outcome. One form of trimeric Env was made by disrupting the gp120-gp41 cleavage site by mutagenesis (gp140 UNC ), the other contains an intramolecular disulfide bond to stabilize the cleaved gp120 and gp41 moieties (SOSIP.R6 gp140). Among the three immunogens, SOSIP.R6 gp140 most frequently elicited neutralizing antibodies against the homologous, neutralization-resistant strain, HIV-1 JR-FL . All three proteins induced NAbs against more sensitive strains, but the breadth of activity against heterologous primary isolates was limited. When antibodies able to neutralize HIV-1 JR-FL were detected, antigen depletion studies showed they were not directed at the V3 region but were targeted at other, undefined gp120 and also non-gp120 epitopes

  9. HIV-gp120 and physical dependence to buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, J; Abood, M E; Benamar, K

    2015-05-01

    Opioids are among the most effective and commonly used analgesics in clinical practice for severe pain. However, the use of opioid medications is clinically limited by several adverse properties including dependence. While opioid dependence is a complex health condition, the treatment of HIV-infected individuals with opioid dependence presents additional challenges. The goal of this study was to examine the physical dependence to buprenorphine in the context of HIV. Young adult male rats (Sprague-Dawley) were pretreated with HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) injected into the periaqueductal gray area (PAG) and we examined the impact on physical dependence to opioid. It was found that the physical dependence to methadone occurred earlier than that to buprenorphine, and that gp120 did not enhance or precipitate the buprenorphine withdrawal. The results suggest that buprenorphine could be the better therapeutic option to manage opioid dependence in HIV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Interferon-β induced in female genital epithelium by HIV-1 glycoprotein 120 via Toll-like-receptor 2 pathway acts to protect the mucosal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazli, Aisha; Dizzell, Sara; Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Ferreira, Victor H; Kafka, Jessica; Woods, Matthew William; Ouellet, Michel; Ashkar, Ali A; Tremblay, Michel J; Bowdish, Dawn Me; Kaushic, Charu

    2018-03-19

    More than 40% of HIV infections occur via female reproductive tract (FRT) through heterosexual transmission. Epithelial cells that line the female genital mucosa are the first line of defense against HIV-1 and other sexually transmitted pathogens. These sentient cells recognize and respond to external stimuli by induction of a range of carefully balanced innate immune responses. Previously, we have shown that in response to HIV-1 gp120, the genital epithelial cells (GECs) from upper reproductive tract induce an inflammatory response that may facilitate HIV-1 translocation and infection. In this study, we report that the endometrial and endocervical GECs simultaneously induce biologically active interferon-β (IFNβ) antiviral responses following exposure to HIV-1 that act to protect the epithelial tight junction barrier. The innate antiviral response was directly induced by HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 and addition of gp120 neutralizing antibody inhibited IFNβ production. Interferon-β was induced by gp120 in upper GECs through Toll-like receptor 2 signaling and required presence of heparan sulfate on epithelial cell surface. The induction of IFNβ was dependent upon activation of transcription factor IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3). The IFNβ was biologically active, had a protective effect on epithelial tight junction barrier and was able to inhibit HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl indicator cells and HIV-1 replication in T cells. This is the first report that recognition of HIV-1 by upper GECs leads to induction of innate antiviral pathways. This could explain the overall low infectivity of HIV-1 in the FRT and could be exploited for HIV-1 prophylaxis.Cellular and Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 19 March 2018; doi:10.1038/cmi.2017.168.

  11. Expression of HIV gp120 protein increases sensitivity to the rewarding properties of methamphetamine in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P.; Hubbard, David T.; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection induce neuropathological changes in corticolimbic brain areas involved in reward and cognitive function. Little is known about the combined effects of methamphetamine and HIV infection on cognitive and reward processes. The HIV/gp120 protein induces neurodegeneration in mice, similar to HIV-induced pathology in humans. We investigated the effects of gp120 expression on associative learning, preference for methamphetamine and non-drug reinforcers, and sensitivity to the conditioned rewarding properties of methamphetamine in transgenic (tg) mice expressing HIV/gp120 protein (gp120-tg). gp120-tg mice learned the operant response for food at the same rate as non-tg mice. In the two-bottle choice procedure with restricted access to drugs, gp120-tg mice exhibited greater preference for methamphetamine and saccharin than non-tg mice, whereas preference for quinine was similar between genotypes. Under conditions of unrestricted access to methamphetamine, the mice exhibited a decreased preference for increasing methamphetamine concentrations. However, male gp120-tg mice showed a decreased preference for methamphetamine at lower concentrations than non-tg male mice. gp120-tg mice developed methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference at lower methamphetamine doses compared with non-tg mice. No differences in methamphetamine pharmacokinetics were found between genotypes. These results indicate that gp120-tg mice exhibit no deficits in associative learning or reward/motivational function for a natural reinforcer. Interestingly, gp120 expression resulted in increased preference for methamphetamine and a highly palatable non-drug reinforcer (saccharin) and increased sensitivity to methamphetamine-induced conditioned reward. These data suggest that HIV-positive individuals may have increased sensitivity to methamphetamine, leading to high methamphetamine abuse potential in this population. PMID

  12. Glycans Flanking the Hypervariable Connecting Peptide between the A and B Strands of the V1/V2 Domain of HIV-1 gp120 Confer Resistance to Antibodies That Neutralize CRF01_AE Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Rourke, Sara M.; Sutthent, Ruengpung; Phung, Pham; Mesa, Kathryn A.; Frigon, Normand L.; To, Briana; Horthongkham, Navin; Limoli, Kay; Wrin, Terri; Berman, Phillip W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance to neutralizing antibodies is critical for the development of vaccines designed to prevent HIV infection. In this study, we used a genetic approach to characterize naturally occurring polymorphisms in the HIV envelope protein that conferred neutralization sensitivity or resistance. Libraries of closely related envelope genes, derived from virus quasi-species, were constructed from individuals infected with CRF01_AE viruses. The libraries were screened with plasma containing broadly neutralizing antibodies, and neutralization sensitive and resistant variants were selected for sequence analysis. In vitro mutagenesis allowed us to identify single amino acid changes in three individuals that conferred resistance to neutralization by these antibodies. All three mutations created N-linked glycosylation sites (two at N136 and one at N149) proximal to the hypervariable connecting peptide between the C-terminus of the A strand and the N-terminus of the B strand in the four-stranded V1/V2 domain β-sheet structure. Although N136 has previously been implicated in the binding of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, this glycosylation site appears to inhibit the binding of neutralizing antibodies in plasma from HIV-1 infected subjects. Previous studies have reported that the length of the V1/V2 domain in transmitted founder viruses is shorter and possesses fewer glycosylation sites compared to viruses isolated from chronic infections. Our results suggest that vaccine immunogens based on recombinant envelope proteins from clade CRF01_AE viruses might be improved by inclusion of envelope proteins that lack these glycosylation sites. This strategy might improve the efficacy of the vaccines used in the partially successful RV144 HIV vaccine trial, where the two CRF01_AE immunogens (derived from the A244 and TH023 isolates) both possessed glycosylation sites at N136 and N149. PMID:25793890

  13. Conserved region at the COOH terminus of human immunodeficiency virus gp120 envelope protein contains an immunodominant epitope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palker, T.J.; Matthews, T.J.; Clark, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    A highly immunogenic epitope from a conserved COOH-terminal region of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 envelope protein has been identified with antisera from HIV-seropositive subjects and a synthetic peptide (SP-22) containing 15 amino acids from this region (Ala-Pro-Thr-Lys-Ala-Lys-Arg-Arg-Val-Val-Gln-Arg-Glu-Lys-Arg). Peptide SP-22 absorbed up to 100% of anti-gp120 antibody reactivity from select HIV + patient sera in immunoblot assays and up to 79% of serum anti-gp120 antibody reactivity in competition RIA. In RIA, 45% of HIV-seropositive subjects had antibodies that bound to peptide SP-22. Human anti-SP-22 antibodies that bound to and were eluted from an SP-22 affinity column reacted with gp120 in RIA and immunoblot assays but did not neutralize HIV or inhibit HIV-induced syncytium formation in vitro, even though these antibodies comprised 70% of all anti-gp120 antibodies in the test serum. In contrast, the remaining 30% of SP-22 nonreactive anti-gp120 antibodies did not react with gp120 in immunoblot assays but did react in RIA and neutralized HIV in vitro. Thus, ≅ 50% of HIV-seropositive patients make high titers of nonneutralizing antibodies to an immunodominant antigen on gp120 defined by SP-22. Moreover, the COOH terminus of gp120 contains the major antigen or antigens identified by human anti-gp120 antibodies in immunoblot assays

  14. Improved humoral and cellular immune response against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatites B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A.; Nielsen, H.V.; Bryder, K.

    1998-01-01

    response and a uniform strong anti-HBs CTL response already 1 week p.i. in all mice. DNA vaccination with the chimeric MN V2/HBsAg plasmid elicited humoral responses against both viruses within 3-6 weeks which peaked at 6-12 weeks and remained stable for at least 25 weeks. In addition, specific CTL...... responses were induced in all mice against both MN V3 and HBsAg already within the first 3 weeks, lasting at least 11 weeks. Thus, HBsAg acts as a `genetic vaccine adjuvant' augmenting and accelerating the cellular and humoral immune response against the inserted MN V3 loop. Such chimeric HIV-HbsAg plasmid...

  15. Improved humoral and cellular immune responses against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatitis B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A; Nielsen, H V; Bryder, K

    1998-01-01

    response and a uniform strong anti-HBs CTL response already 1 week p.i. in all mice. DNA vaccination with the chimeric MN V3/HBsAg plasmid elicited humoral responses against both viruses within 3-6 weeks which peaked at 6-12 weeks and remained stable for at least 25 weeks. In addition, specific CTL...... responses were induced in all mice against both MN V3 and HBsAg already within the first 3 weeks, lasting at least 11 weeks. Thus, HBsAg acts as a 'genetic vaccine adjuvant' augmenting and accelerating the cellular and humoral immune response against the inserted MN V3 loop. Such chimeric HIV-HBsAg plasmid...

  16. Cognitive deficits associated with combined HIV gp120 expression and chronic methamphetamine exposure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P.; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse is common among individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Neurocognitive outcomes tend to be worse in methamphetamine users with HIV. However, it is unclear whether discrete cognitive domains are susceptible to impairment after combined HIV infection and methamphetamine abuse. The expression of HIV/gp120 protein induces neuropathology in mice similar to HIV-induced pathology in humans. We investigated the separate and combined effects of methamphetamine exposure and gp120 expression on cognitive function in transgenic (gp120-tg) and control mice. The mice underwent an escalating methamphetamine binge regimen and were tested in novel object/location recognition, object-in-place recognition, and Barnes maze tests. gp120 expression disrupted performance in the object-in-place test (i.e., similar time spent with all objects, regardless of location), indicating deficits in associative recognition memory. gp120 expression also altered reversal learning in the Barnes maze, suggesting impairments in executive function. Methamphetamine exposure impaired spatial strategy in the Barnes maze, indicating deficits in spatial learning. Methamphetamine-exposed gp120-tg mice had the lowest spatial strategy scores in the final acquisition trials in the Barnes maze, suggesting greater deficits in spatial learning than all of the other groups. Although HIV infection involves interactions between multiple proteins and processes, in addition to gp120, our findings in gp120-tg mice suggest that humans with the dual insult of HIV infection and methamphetamine abuse may exhibit a broader spectrum of cognitive deficits than those with either factor alone. Depending on the cognitive domain, the combination of both insults may exacerbate deficits in cognitive performance compared with each individual insult. PMID:25476577

  17. Sialoadhesin expressed on IFN-induced monocytes binds HIV-1 and enhances infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Rempel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14(+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1, a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases.We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14(+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-alpha and interferon-gamma but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection.Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14(+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells.

  18. Antiviral Activity of HIV gp120 Targeting Bispecific T Cell Engager (BiTE®) Antibody Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozy, Johannes; Schlaepfer, Erika; Mueller, Christina K S; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Rampini, Silvana K; Myburgh, Renier; Raum, Tobias; Kufer, Peter; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Muenz, Markus; Speck, Roberto F

    2018-05-02

    Today's gold standard in HIV therapy is the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). It requires strict adherence by patients and life-long medication, which can lower the viral load below detection limits and prevent HIV-associated immunodeficiency, but cannot cure patients. The bispecific T cell engaging (BiTE®) antibody technology has demonstrated long-term relapse-free outcomes in patients with relapsed and refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia. We here generated BiTE® antibody constructs that target the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 (HIV gp120) using either the scFv B12 or VRC01, the first two extracellular domains (1+2) of human CD4 alone or joined to the single chain variable fragment (scFv) of the antibody 17b fused to an anti-human CD3ϵ scFv. These engineered human BiTE® antibody constructs showed engagement of T cells for redirected lysis of HIV gp120-transfected CHO cells. Furthermore, they substantially inhibited HIV-1 replication in PBMCs as well as in macrophages co-cultured with autologous CD8+ T-cells, the most potent being the human CD4(1+2) BiTE® antibody construct and the CD4(1+2)L17b BiTE® antibody construct. The CD4(1+2) h BiTE® antibody construct promoted HIV infection of human CD4-/CD8+ T cells. In contrast, the neutralizing B12 and the VRC01 BiTE® antibody constructs as well as the CD4(1+2)L17b BiTE® antibody construct did not. Thus, BiTE® antibody constructs targeting HIV gp120 are very promising for constraining HIV and warrant further development as novel antiviral therapy with curative potential. Importance HIV is a chronic infection well controlled with the current cART. However, we lack cure of HIV, and the HIV pandemic goes on. Here we showed in vitro and ex vivo t hat a bispecific T-cell engaging (BiTE®) antibody construct targeting HIV gp120 resulted in substantially reduced HIV replication. In addition, these BiTE® antibody constructs display efficient killing of gp120 expressing cells and inhibited replication in ex vivo

  19. Internalization and Axonal Transport of the HIV Glycoprotein gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berth, Sarah; Caicedo, Hector Hugo; Sarma, Tulika; Morfini, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    The HIV glycoprotein gp120, a neurotoxic HIV glycoprotein that is overproduced and shed by HIV-infected macrophages, is associated with neurological complications of HIV such as distal sensory polyneuropathy, but interactions of gp120 in the peripheral nervous system remain to be characterized. Here, we demonstrate internalization of extracellular gp120 in a manner partially independent of binding to its coreceptor CXCR4 by F11 neuroblastoma cells and cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Immunocytochemical and pharmacological experiments indicate that gp120 does not undergo trafficking through the endolysosomal pathway. Instead, gp120 is mainly internalized through lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent manner, with a minor fraction being internalized by fluid phase pinocytosis. Experiments using compartmentalized microfluidic chambers further indicate that, after internalization, endocytosed gp120 selectively undergoes retrograde but not anterograde axonal transport from axons to neuronal cell bodies. Collectively, these studies illuminate mechanisms of gp120 internalization and axonal transport in peripheral nervous system neurons, providing a novel framework for mechanisms for gp120 neurotoxicity. PMID:25636314

  20. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M.

    2004-01-01

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d 3 ) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 . In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d 3 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 -DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d

  1. Comparative Glycoprofiling of HIV gp120 Immunogens by Capillary Electrophoresis and MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Miklós; Váradi, Csaba; Lee, Kelly K.; Guttman, András

    2015-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the primary antigenic feature on the surface of the virus and is of key importance in HIV vaccinology. Vaccine trials with the gp120 subunit of Env are ongoing with the recent RV144 trial showing moderate efficacy. gp120 is densely covered with N-linked glycans that are thought to help evade the host's humoral immune response. To assess how the global glycosylation patterns vary between gp120 constructs, the glycan profiles of several gp120s were examined by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection and MALDI-MS. The glycosylation profiles were found to be similar for chronic vs. transmitter/founder isolates and only varied moderately between gp120s from different clades. This study revealed that the addition of specific tags, such as the gD tag used in the RV144 trial, had significant effects on the overall glycosylation patterns. Such effects are likely to influence the immunogenicity of various Env immunogens and should be considered for future vaccine strategies, emphasizing the importance of the glycosylation analysis approach described in this paper. PMID:25809283

  2. Identification of gene products suppressed by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection or gp120 exposure of primary human astrocytes by rapid subtraction hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zao-Zhong; Kang, Dong-Chul; Chen, Yinming; Pekarskaya, Olga; Chao, Wei; Volsky, David J; Fisher, Paul B

    2003-06-01

    Neurodegeneration and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia (HAD) are the major disease manifestations of HIV-1 colonization of the central nervous system (CNS). In the brain, HIV-1 replicates in microglial cells and infiltrating macrophages and it persists in a low-productive, noncytolytic state in astrocytes. Astrocytes play critical roles in the maintenance of the brain microenvironment, responses to injury, and in neuronal signal transmission, and disruption of these functions by HIV-1 could contribute to HAD. To better understand the potential effects of HIV-1 on astrocyte biology, the authors investigated changes in gene expression using an efficient and sensitive rapid subtraction hybridization approach, RaSH. Primary human astrocytes were isolated from abortus brain tissue, low-passage cells were infected with HIV-1 or mock infected, and total cellular RNAs were isolated at multiple time points over a period of 1 week. This approach is designed to identify gene products modulated early and late after HIV-1 infection and limits the cloning of genes displaying normal cell-cycle fluctuations in astrocytes. By subtracting temporal cDNAs derived from HIV-1-infected astrocytes from temporal cDNAs made from uninfected cells, 10 genes displaying reduced expression in infected cells, termed astrocyte suppressed genes (ASGs), were identified and their suppression was confirmed by Northern blot hybridization. Both known and novel ASGs, not reported in current DNA databases, that are down-regulated by HIV-1 infection are described. Northern blotting confirms suppression of the same panel of ASGs by treatment of astrocytes with recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120. These results extend our previous analysis of astrocyte genes induced or enhanced by HIV-1 infection and together they suggest that HIV-1 and viral proteins have profound effects on astrocyte physiology, which may influence their function in the CNS.

  3. N-acetylcysteine prevents HIV gp 120-related damage of human cultured astrocytes: correlation with glutamine synthase dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Nicola

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV envelope gp 120 glycoprotein is released during active HIV infection of brain macrophages thereby generating inflammation and oxidative stress which contribute to the development of the AIDS-Dementia Complex (ADC. Gp120 has also been found capable to generate excitotoxic effect on brain tissue via enhancement of glutamatergic neurotransmission, leading to neuronal and astroglial damage, though the mechanism is still to be better understood. Here we investigated on the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, on gp120-induced damage in human cultured astroglial cells and the possible contribution of gp120-related reacting oxygen species (ROS in the imbalanced activity of glutamine synthase (GS, the enzyme that metabolizes glutamate into glutamine within astroglial cells playing a neuroprotective role in brain disorders. Results Incubation of Lipari human cultured astroglial cells with gp 120 (0.1–10 nM produced a significant reduction of astroglial cell viability and apoptosis as evaluated by TUNEL reaction and flow cytometric analysis (FACS. This effect was accompanied by lipid peroxidation as detected by means of malondialdehyde assay (MDA. In addition, gp 120 reduced both glutamine concentration in astroglial cell supernatants and GS expression as detected by immunocytochemistry and western blotting analysis. Pre-treatment of cells with NAC (0.5–5 mM, dose-dependently antagonised astroglial apoptotic cell death induced by gp 120, an effect accompanied by significant attenuation of MDA accumulation. Furthermore, both effects were closely associated with a significant recovery of glutamine levels in cell supernatants and by GS expression, thus suggesting that overproduction of free radicals might contribute in gp 120-related dysfunction of GS in astroglial cells. Conclusion In conclusion, the present experiments demonstrate that gp 120 is toxic to astroglial cells, an effect accompanied by lipid peroxidation and by altered

  4. Synergistic cooperation between methamphetamine and HIV-1 gsp120 through the P13K/Akt pathway induces IL-6 but not IL-8 expression in astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Shah

    Full Text Available HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 has been extensively studied for neurotoxic effects that have been attributed to the increased expression of various proinflammatory cytokines in the CNS. Recently we have shown that methamphetamine (MA also increases expression of proinflammatory cytokines in astrocytes. However, combined effect of gp120 and MA is not known. The present study was undertaken to determine cumulative effect and the mechanism(s/pathways involved in the functional interaction between gp120 and MA in SVGA astrocytes. Our results clearly suggest that gp120 and MA affect IL-6 but not IL-8 in a synergistic manner and this synergy was mediated by PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways. Inhibition of either of these pathways could abrogate the increased expression of IL-6 due to MA or gp120 alone, as well as the increased expression of IL-6 when the astrocytes were treated with both gp120 and MA. These results were confirmed by both, using chemical inhibitors/siRNA as well as western blotting. This study therefore provides novel information regarding the interaction between MA and gp120 in terms of the expression of IL-6 and the mechanisms underlying potential synergy between MA and gp120 in astrocytes.

  5. A mechanistic understanding of allosteric immune escape pathways in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Sethi

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope (Env spike, which consists of a compact, heterodimeric trimer of the glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, is the target of neutralizing antibodies. However, the high mutation rate of HIV-1 and plasticity of Env facilitates viral evasion from neutralizing antibodies through various mechanisms. Mutations that are distant from the antibody binding site can lead to escape, probably by changing the conformation or dynamics of Env; however, these changes are difficult to identify and define mechanistically. Here we describe a network analysis-based approach to identify potential allosteric immune evasion mechanisms using three known HIV-1 Env gp120 protein structures from two different clades, B and C. First, correlation and principal component analyses of molecular dynamics (MD simulations identified a high degree of long-distance coupled motions that exist between functionally distant regions within the intrinsic dynamics of the gp120 core, supporting the presence of long-distance communication in the protein. Then, by integrating MD simulations with network theory, we identified the optimal and suboptimal communication pathways and modules within the gp120 core. The results unveil both strain-dependent and -independent characteristics of the communication pathways in gp120. We show that within the context of three structurally homologous gp120 cores, the optimal pathway for communication is sequence sensitive, i.e. a suboptimal pathway in one strain becomes the optimal pathway in another strain. Yet the identification of conserved elements within these communication pathways, termed inter-modular hotspots, could present a new opportunity for immunogen design, as this could be an additional mechanism that HIV-1 uses to shield vulnerable antibody targets in Env that induce neutralizing antibody breadth.

  6. Prime-Boost Vaccination Using Chemokine-Fused gp120 DNA and HIV Envelope Peptides Activates Both Immediate and Long-Term Memory Cellular Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV vaccine candidates with improved immunogenicity and induction of mucosal T-cell immunity are needed. A prime-boost strategy using a novel HIV glycoprotein 120 DNA vaccine was employed to immunize rhesus macaques. The DNA vaccine encoded a chimeric gp120 protein in fusion with monocyte chemoattractant protein-3, which was hypothesized to improve the ability of antigen-presenting cells to capture viral antigen through chemokine receptor-mediated endocytosis. DNA vaccination induced virus-reactive T cells in peripheral blood, detectable by T cell proliferation, INFγ ELISPOT and sustained IL-6 production, without humoral responses. With a peptide-cocktail vaccine containing a set of conserved polypeptides of HIV-1 envelope protein, given by nasogastric administration, primed T-cell immunity was significantly boosted. Surprisingly, long-term and peptide-specific mucosal memory T-cell immunity was detected in both vaccinated macaques after one year. Therefore, data from this investigation offer proof-of-principle for potential effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy with a chemokine-fused gp120 DNA and warrant further testing in the nonhuman primate models for developing as a potential HIV vaccine candidate in humans.

  7. Analysis of V2 antibody responses induced in vaccinees in the ALVAC/AIDSVAX HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial.

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    Susan Zolla-Pazner

    Full Text Available The RV144 clinical trial of a prime/boost immunizing regimen using recombinant canary pox (ALVAC-HIV and two gp120 proteins (AIDSVAX B and E was previously shown to have a 31.2% efficacy rate. Plasma specimens from vaccine and placebo recipients were used in an extensive set of assays to identify correlates of HIV-1 infection risk. Of six primary variables that were studied, only one displayed a significant inverse correlation with risk of infection: the antibody (Ab response to a fusion protein containing the V1 and V2 regions of gp120 (gp70-V1V2. This finding prompted a thorough examination of the results generated with the complete panel of 13 assays measuring various V2 Abs in the stored plasma used in the initial pilot studies and those used in the subsequent case-control study. The studies revealed that the ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX vaccine induced V2-specific Abs that cross-react with multiple HIV-1 subgroups and recognize both conformational and linear epitopes. The conformational epitope was present on gp70-V1V2, while the predominant linear V2 epitope mapped to residues 165-178, immediately N-terminal to the putative α4β7 binding motif in the mid-loop region of V2. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated to compare the risk of infection with data from 12 V2 assays, and in 11 of these, the ORs were ≤1, reaching statistical significance for two of the variables: Ab responses to gp70-V1V2 and to overlapping V2 linear peptides. It remains to be determined whether anti-V2 Ab responses were directly responsible for the reduced infection rate in RV144 and whether anti-V2 Abs will prove to be important with other candidate HIV vaccines that show efficacy, however, the results support continued dissection of Ab responses to the V2 region which may illuminate mechanisms of protection from HIV-1 infection and may facilitate the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

  8. Modeling HIV-1 Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice: Role of Platelets in Mediating Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction.

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    Letitia D Jones

    Full Text Available The number of HIV-1 positive individuals developing some form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND is increasing. In these individuals, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is compromised due to an increase in exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators, viral proteins, and virus released from infected cells. It has been shown that soluble CD40L (sCD40L is released upon platelet activation and is an important mediator of the pathogenesis of HAND but the underlying mechanisms are unclear, emphasizing the need of an effective animal model. Here, we have utilized a novel animal model in which wild-type (WT mice were infected with EcoHIV; a derivative of HIV-1 that contains a substitution of envelope protein gp120 with that of gp80 derived from murine leukemia virus-1 (MuLV-1. As early as two-weeks post-infection, EcoHIV led to increased permeability of the BBB associated with decreased expression of tight junction protein claudin-5, in CD40L and platelet activation-dependent manner. Treatment with an antiplatelet drug, eptifibatide, in EcoHIV-infected mice normalized BBB function, sCD40L release and platelet activity, thus implicating platelet activation and platelet-derived CD40L in virally induced BBB dysfunction. Our results also validate and underscore the importance of EcoHIV infection mouse model as a tool to explore therapeutic targets for HAND.

  9. HIV-1 protein induced modulation of primary human osteoblast differentiation and function via a Wnt/β-catenin-dependent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Butler, Joseph S

    2013-02-01

    HIV infection is associated with metabolic bone disease resulting in bone demineralization and reduced bone mass. The molecular mechanisms driving this disease process have yet to be elucidated. Wnt\\/β-catenin signaling plays a key role in bone development and remodeling. We attempted to determine the effects of the HIV-1 protein, gp120, on Wnt\\/β-catenin signaling at an intracellular and transcriptional level in primary human osteoblasts (HOBs). This work, inclusive of experimental controls, was part of a greater project assessing the effects of a variety of different agents on Wnt\\/β-catenin signaling (BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2010;11:210).We examined the phenotypic effects of silencing and overexpressing the Wnt antagonist, Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) in HOBs treated with gp120. HOBs exposed to gp120 displayed a significant reduction in alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) activity and cell proliferation and increased cellular apoptosis over a 48 h time course. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated a significant reduction in intracytosolic and intranuclear β-catenin in response to HIV-1 protein exposure. These changes were associated with a reduction of TCF\\/LEF-mediated transcription, the transcriptional outcome of canonical Wnt β-catenin signaling. Silencing Dkk1 expression in HOBs exposed to gp120 resulted in increased ALP activity and cell proliferation, and decreased cellular apoptosis relative to scrambled control. Dkk1 overexpression exacerbated the inhibitory effect of gp120 on HOB function, with decreases in ALP activity and cell proliferation and increased cellular apoptosis relative to vector control. Wnt\\/β-catenin signaling plays a key regulatory role in HIV-associated bone loss, with Dkk1, aputative central mediator in this degenerative process. © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 31: 218-226, 2013.

  10. A Directed Molecular Evolution Approach to Improved Immunogenicity of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Sean X.; Xu, Li; Zhang, Wenge; Tang, Susan; Boenig, Rebecca I.; Chen, Helen; Mariano, Ellaine B.; Zwick, Michael B.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wrin, Terri; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Ballantyne, John A.; Chambers, Michael; Whalen, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    A prophylactic vaccine is needed to slow the spread of HIV-1 infection. Optimization of the wild-type envelope glycoproteins to create immunogens that can elicit effective neutralizing antibodies is a high priority. Starting with ten genes encoding subtype B HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoproteins and using in vitro homologous DNA recombination, we created chimeric gp120 variants that were screened for their ability to bind neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Hundreds of variants were identified with novel antigenic phenotypes that exhibit considerable sequence diversity. Immunization of rabbits with these gp120 variants demonstrated that the majority can induce neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1. One novel variant, called ST-008, induced significantly improved neutralizing antibody responses when assayed against a large panel of primary HIV-1 isolates. Further study of various deletion constructs of ST-008 showed that the enhanced immunogenicity results from a combination of effective DNA priming, an enhanced V3-based response, and an improved response to the constant backbone sequences. PMID:21738594

  11. Reduction of cerebral glucose utilization by the HIV envelope glycoprotein Gp-120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimes, A.S.; London, E.D.; Szabo, G.; Raymon, L.; Tabakoff, B. (Neuropharmacology Laboratory, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Gp-120 is a glycoprotein constituent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope. The effects of gp-120 on cerebral glucose utilization in rats were studied by the quantitative 2-deoxy-D-(1-14C) glucose method. Intracerebroventricular injection of gp-120 significantly reduced glucose utilization in the lateral habenula and the suprachiasmatic nucleus and decreased the global cerebral metabolic rate for glucose. The findings suggest that gp-120 and closely related peptides can alter neuronal function, thereby contributing to the sequelae of HIV infection.

  12. Reduction of cerebral glucose utilization by the HIV envelope glycoprotein Gp-120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimes, A.S.; London, E.D.; Szabo, G.; Raymon, L.; Tabakoff, B.

    1991-01-01

    Gp-120 is a glycoprotein constituent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope. The effects of gp-120 on cerebral glucose utilization in rats were studied by the quantitative 2-deoxy-D-[1-14C] glucose method. Intracerebroventricular injection of gp-120 significantly reduced glucose utilization in the lateral habenula and the suprachiasmatic nucleus and decreased the global cerebral metabolic rate for glucose. The findings suggest that gp-120 and closely related peptides can alter neuronal function, thereby contributing to the sequelae of HIV infection

  13. R5-SHIV induces multiple defects in T cell function during early infection of rhesus macaques including accumulation of T reg cells in lymph nodes.

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    Michael Santosuosso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is a pathogen that T cell responses fail to control. HIV-1gp120 is the surface viral envelope glycoprotein that interacts with CD4 T cells and mediates entry. HIV-1gp120 has been implicated in immune dysregulatory functions that may limit anti-HIV antigen-specific T cell responses. We hypothesized that in the context of early SHIV infection, immune dysregulation of antigen-specific T-effector cell and regulatory functions would be detectable and that these would be associated or correlated with measurable concentrations of HIV-1gp120 in lymphoid tissues.Rhesus macaques were intravaginally inoculated with a Clade C CCR5-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV-1157ipd3N4. HIV-1gp120 levels, antigen-specificity, levels of apoptosis/anergy and frequency and function of Tregs were examined in lymph node and blood derived T cells at 5 and 12 weeks post inoculation.We observed reduced responses to Gag in CD4 and gp120 in CD8 lymph node-derived T cells compared to the peripheral blood at 5 weeks post-inoculation. Reduced antigen-specific responses were associated with higher levels of PD-1 on lymph node-derived CD4 T cells as compared to peripheral blood and uninfected lymph node-derived CD4 T cells. Lymph nodes contained increased numbers of Tregs as compared to peripheral blood, which positively correlated with gp120 levels; T regulatory cell depletion restored CD8 T cell responses to Gag but not to gp120. HIV gp120 was also able to induce T regulatory cell chemotaxis in a dose-dependent, CCR5-mediated manner. These studies contribute to our broader understanding of the ways in which HIV-1 dysregulates T cell function and localization during early infection.

  14. Antigenic properties of the human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp120 on virions bound to target cells.

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    Meron Mengistu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, undergoes multiple molecular interactions and structural rearrangements during the course of host cell attachment and viral entry, which are being increasingly defined at the atomic level using isolated proteins. In comparison, antigenic markers of these dynamic changes are essentially unknown for single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Such markers should indicate how neutralizing and/or non-neutralizing antibodies might interdict infection by either blocking infection or sensitizing host cells for elimination by Fc-mediated effector function. Here we address this deficit by imaging fluorescently labeled CCR5-tropic HIV-1 pseudoviruses using confocal and superresolution microscopy to track the exposure of neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes as they appear on single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Epitope exposure was followed under conditions permissive or non-permissive for viral entry to delimit changes associated with virion binding from those associated with post-attachment events. We find that a previously unexpected array of gp120 epitopes is exposed rapidly upon target cell binding. This array comprises both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, the latter being hidden on free virions yet capable of serving as potent targets for Fc-mediated effector function. Under non-permissive conditions for viral entry, both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitope exposures were relatively static over time for the majority of bound virions. Under entry-permissive conditions, epitope exposure patterns changed over time on subsets of virions that exhibited concurrent variations in virion contents. These studies reveal that bound virions are distinguished by a broad array of both neutralizing and non-neutralizing gp120 epitopes that potentially sensitize a freshly engaged target cell for destruction by Fc-mediated effector function and/or for direct neutralization at a post-binding step

  15. B cell recognition of the conserved HIV-1 co-receptor binding site is altered by endogenous primate CD4.

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    Mattias N E Forsell

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds to CD4 on the target cell surface to induce the co-receptor binding site on gp120 as the initial step in the entry process. The binding site is comprised of a highly conserved region on the gp120 core, as well as elements of the third variable region (V3. Antibodies against the co-receptor binding site are abundantly elicited during natural infection of humans, but the mechanism of elicitation has remained undefined. In this study, we investigate the requirements for elicitation of co-receptor binding site antibodies by inoculating rabbits, monkeys and human-CD4 transgenic (huCD4 rabbits with envelope glycoprotein (Env trimers possessing high affinity for primate CD4. A cross-species comparison of the antibody responses showed that similar HIV-1 neutralization breadth was elicited by Env trimers in monkeys relative to wild-type (WT rabbits. In contrast, antibodies against the co-receptor site on gp120 were elicited only in monkeys and huCD4 rabbits, but not in the WT rabbits. This was supported by the detection of high-titer co-receptor antibodies in all sera from a set derived from human volunteers inoculated with recombinant gp120. These findings strongly suggest that complexes between Env and (high-affinity primate CD4 formed in vivo are responsible for the elicitation of the co-receptor-site-directed antibodies. They also imply that the naïve B cell receptor repertoire does not recognize the gp120 co-receptor site in the absence of CD4 and illustrate that conformational stabilization, imparted by primary receptor interaction, can alter the immunogenicity of a type 1 viral membrane protein.

  16. B cell recognition of the conserved HIV-1 co-receptor binding site is altered by endogenous primate CD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsell, Mattias N E; Dey, Barna; Mörner, Andreas; Svehla, Krisha; O'dell, Sijy; Högerkorp, Carl-Magnus; Voss, Gerald; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Shaw, George M; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2008-10-03

    The surface HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds to CD4 on the target cell surface to induce the co-receptor binding site on gp120 as the initial step in the entry process. The binding site is comprised of a highly conserved region on the gp120 core, as well as elements of the third variable region (V3). Antibodies against the co-receptor binding site are abundantly elicited during natural infection of humans, but the mechanism of elicitation has remained undefined. In this study, we investigate the requirements for elicitation of co-receptor binding site antibodies by inoculating rabbits, monkeys and human-CD4 transgenic (huCD4) rabbits with envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers possessing high affinity for primate CD4. A cross-species comparison of the antibody responses showed that similar HIV-1 neutralization breadth was elicited by Env trimers in monkeys relative to wild-type (WT) rabbits. In contrast, antibodies against the co-receptor site on gp120 were elicited only in monkeys and huCD4 rabbits, but not in the WT rabbits. This was supported by the detection of high-titer co-receptor antibodies in all sera from a set derived from human volunteers inoculated with recombinant gp120. These findings strongly suggest that complexes between Env and (high-affinity) primate CD4 formed in vivo are responsible for the elicitation of the co-receptor-site-directed antibodies. They also imply that the naïve B cell receptor repertoire does not recognize the gp120 co-receptor site in the absence of CD4 and illustrate that conformational stabilization, imparted by primary receptor interaction, can alter the immunogenicity of a type 1 viral membrane protein.

  17. HIV-1 induces DCIR expression in CD4+ T cells.

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    Alexandra A Lambert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin receptor DCIR, which has been shown very recently to act as an attachment factor for HIV-1 in dendritic cells, is expressed predominantly on antigen-presenting cells. However, this concept was recently challenged by the discovery that DCIR can also be detected in CD4(+ T cells found in the synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Given that RA and HIV-1 infections share common features such as a chronic inflammatory condition and polyclonal immune hyperactivation status, we hypothesized that HIV-1 could promote DCIR expression in CD4(+ T cells. We report here that HIV-1 drives DCIR expression in human primary CD4(+ T cells isolated from patients (from both aviremic/treated and viremic/treatment naive persons and cells acutely infected in vitro (seen in both virus-infected and uninfected cells. Soluble factors produced by virus-infected cells are responsible for the noticed DCIR up-regulation on uninfected cells. Infection studies with Vpr- or Nef-deleted viruses revealed that these two viral genes are not contributing to the mechanism of DCIR induction that is seen following acute infection of CD4(+ T cells with HIV-1. Moreover, we report that DCIR is linked to caspase-dependent (induced by a mitochondria-mediated generation of free radicals and -independent intrinsic apoptotic pathways (involving the death effector AIF. Finally, we demonstrate that the higher surface expression of DCIR in CD4(+ T cells is accompanied by an enhancement of virus attachment/entry, replication and transfer. This study shows for the first time that HIV-1 induces DCIR membrane expression in CD4(+ T cells, a process that might promote virus dissemination throughout the infected organism.

  18. Selected HIV-1 Env trimeric formulations act as potent immunogens in a rabbit vaccination model.

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    Leo Heyndrickx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ten to 30% of HIV-1 infected subjects develop broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs during chronic infection. We hypothesized that immunizing rabbits with viral envelope glycoproteins (Envs from these patients may induce bNAbs, when formulated as a trimeric protein and in the presence of an adjuvant. METHODS: Based on in vitro neutralizing activity in serum, patients with bNAbs were selected for cloning of their HIV-1 Env. Seven stable soluble trimeric gp140 proteins were generated from sequences derived from four adults and two children infected with either clade A or B HIV-1. From one of the clade A Envs both the monomeric and trimeric Env were produced for comparison. Rabbits were immunized with soluble gp120 or trimeric gp140 proteins in combination with the adjuvant dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium/trehalose dibehenate (CAF01. Env binding in rabbit immune serum was determined using ELISAs based on gp120-IIIB protein. Neutralizing activity of IgG purified from rabbit immune sera was measured with the pseudovirus-TZMbl assay and a PBMC-based neutralization assay for selected experiments. RESULTS: It was initially established that gp140 trimers induce better antibody responses over gp120 monomers and that the adjuvant CAF01 was necessary for such strong responses. Gp140 trimers, based on HIV-1 variants from patients with bNAbs, were able to elicit both gp120IIIB specific IgG and NAbs to Tier 1 viruses of different subtypes. Potency of NAbs closely correlated with titers, and an gp120-binding IgG titer above a threshold of 100,000 was predictive of neutralization capability. Finally, peptide inhibition experiments showed that a large fraction of the neutralizing IgG was directed against the gp120 V3 region. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the strategy of reverse immunology based on selected Env sequences is promising when immunogens are delivered as stabilized trimers in CAF01 adjuvant and that the rabbit is a valuable model

  19. Selected HIV-1 Env trimeric formulations act as potent immunogens in a rabbit vaccination model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyndrickx, Leo; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Jansson, Marianne; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Bowles, Emma; Buonaguro, Luigi; Grevstad, Berit; Vinner, Lasse; Vereecken, Katleen; Parker, Joe; Ramaswamy, Meghna; Biswas, Priscilla; Vanham, Guido; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Ten to 30% of HIV-1 infected subjects develop broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) during chronic infection. We hypothesized that immunizing rabbits with viral envelope glycoproteins (Envs) from these patients may induce bNAbs, when formulated as a trimeric protein and in the presence of an adjuvant. Based on in vitro neutralizing activity in serum, patients with bNAbs were selected for cloning of their HIV-1 Env. Seven stable soluble trimeric gp140 proteins were generated from sequences derived from four adults and two children infected with either clade A or B HIV-1. From one of the clade A Envs both the monomeric and trimeric Env were produced for comparison. Rabbits were immunized with soluble gp120 or trimeric gp140 proteins in combination with the adjuvant dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium/trehalose dibehenate (CAF01). Env binding in rabbit immune serum was determined using ELISAs based on gp120-IIIB protein. Neutralizing activity of IgG purified from rabbit immune sera was measured with the pseudovirus-TZMbl assay and a PBMC-based neutralization assay for selected experiments. It was initially established that gp140 trimers induce better antibody responses over gp120 monomers and that the adjuvant CAF01 was necessary for such strong responses. Gp140 trimers, based on HIV-1 variants from patients with bNAbs, were able to elicit both gp120IIIB specific IgG and NAbs to Tier 1 viruses of different subtypes. Potency of NAbs closely correlated with titers, and an gp120-binding IgG titer above a threshold of 100,000 was predictive of neutralization capability. Finally, peptide inhibition experiments showed that a large fraction of the neutralizing IgG was directed against the gp120 V3 region. Our results indicate that the strategy of reverse immunology based on selected Env sequences is promising when immunogens are delivered as stabilized trimers in CAF01 adjuvant and that the rabbit is a valuable model for HIV vaccine studies.

  20. Alemtuzumab-induced elimination of HIV-1-infected immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Krause, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no drug known that is able to eradicate either HIV or HIV-infected host cells. The effectiveness of all available treatments is based on the prevention of viral replication. We investigated whether the monoclonal, CD52 receptor-targeting antibody, alemtuzumab, which is currently approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, is able to eliminate HIV-infected immune cells. In blood samples from healthy donors and from HIV-1-infected subjects who were either treatment-naïve or resistant to HAART, we studied whether the CD52 expression on T cells and their subsets (CD3, CD4, CD8), B cells (CD19), dendritic cells (CD123) and monocytes (CD11c) is retained in HIV-1 infection and whether alemtuzumab is able to eradicate infected cells, using four-colour flow cytometry. We found that CD52 expression on immune cells is retained in HIV-1 infection regardless of CD4 cell count, viral load and treatment status, and is amenable to alemtuzumab-induced depletion. For the first time it could be shown in vitro that HIV-1-infected immune cells can be eliminated by using the monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab.

  1. Dendritic cells exposed to MVA-based HIV-1 vaccine induce highly functional HIV-1-specific CD8(+ T cell responses in HIV-1-infected individuals.

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    Núria Climent

    Full Text Available Currently, MVA virus vectors carrying HIV-1 genes are being developed as HIV-1/AIDS prophylactic/therapeutic vaccines. Nevertheless, little is known about the impact of these vectors on human dendritic cells (DC and their capacity to present HIV-1 antigens to human HIV-specific T cells. This study aimed to characterize the interaction of MVA and MVA expressing the HIV-1 genes Env-Gag-Pol-Nef of clade B (referred to as MVA-B in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC and the subsequent processes of HIV-1 antigen presentation and activation of memory HIV-1-specific T lymphocytes. For these purposes, we performed ex vivo assays with MDDC and autologous lymphocytes from asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. Infection of MDDC with MVA-B or MVA, at the optimal dose of 0.3 PFU/MDDC, induced by itself a moderate degree of maturation of MDDC, involving secretion of cytokines and chemokines (IL1-ra, IL-7, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-15, IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, IP-10, MIG, and IFN-α. MDDC infected with MVA or MVA-B and following a period of 48 h or 72 h of maturation were able to migrate toward CCL19 or CCL21 chemokine gradients. MVA-B infection induced apoptosis of the infected cells and the resulting apoptotic bodies were engulfed by the uninfected MDDC, which cross-presented HIV-1 antigens to autologous CD8(+ T lymphocytes. MVA-B-infected MDDC co-cultured with autologous T lymphocytes induced a highly functional HIV-specific CD8(+ T cell response including proliferation, secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, MIP-1β, MIP-1α, RANTES and IL-6, and strong cytotoxic activity against autologous HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T lymphocytes. These results evidence the adjuvant role of the vector itself (MVA and support the clinical development of prophylactic and therapeutic anti-HIV vaccines based on MVA-B.

  2. Absence of cytotoxic antibody to human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in humans and its induction in animals after infection or immunization with purified envelope glycoprotein gp120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, P.L.; Robey, W.G.; Gonda, M.A.; Carter, S.G.; Fischinger, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) was assessed in humans and chimpanzees, which are capable of infection with human immunodeficiency virus isolate HTLV-IIIb, and examined in the goat after immunization with the major viral glycoprotein (gp120) of HTLV-IIIb. In infected humans no antibody mediating ACC was observed regardless of the status of disease. Even healthy individuals with high-titer, broadly reactive, neutralizing antibodies has no ACC. In contrast, chimpanzees infected with HTLV-IIIb, from whom virus could be isolated, not only had neutralizing antibody but also antibodies broadly reactive in ACC, even against distantly related human immunodeficiency virus isolates, as well as against their own reisolated virus. In the goat, the gp120 of HTLV-IIIb induced a highly type-specific response as measured by both ACC and flow cytofluorometry of live infected H9 cells. Normal human cells were not subject to ACC by animal anti-HTLV-III gp120-specific sera. Induction of ACC and neutralizing antibody were closely correlated in the animal experimental models but not in humans. The presence of ACC in gp120-inoculated goats and HTLV-III-infected chimpanzees represent a qualitative difference that may be important in the quest for the elicitation of a protective immunity in humans

  3. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4 + and T8 + cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4 + cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo

  4. Creatine protects against mitochondrial dysfunction associated with HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Patrick R.; Gawryluk, Jeremy W.; Hui, Liang; Chen, Xuesong; Geiger, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infected individuals are living longer but experiencing a prevalence rate of over 50% for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) for which no effective treatment is available. Viral and cellular factors secreted by HIV-1 infected cells leads to neuronal injury and HIV-1 Tat continues to be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND. Here we tested the hypothesis that creatine protected against HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal injury by preventing mitochondrial bioenergetic crisis and/or redox catastrophe. Creatine blocked HIV-1 Tat1-72-induced increases in neuron cell death and synaptic area loss. Creatine protected against HIV-1 Tat-induced decreases in ATP. Creatine and creatine plus HIV-1 Tat increased cellular levels of creatine, and creatine plus HIV-1 Tat further decreased ratios of phosphocreatine to creatine observed with creatine or HIV-1 Tat treatments alone. Additionally, creatine protected against HIV-1 Tat-induced mitochondrial hypopolarization and HIV-1 Tat-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. Thus, creatine may be a useful adjunctive therapy against HAND. PMID:25613139

  5. HIV-1 impairs human retinal pigment epithelial barrier function: possible association with the pathogenesis of HIV-associated retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Suiyi; Duan, Heng; Xun, Tianrong; Ci, Wei; Qiu, Jiayin; Yu, Fei; Zhao, Xuyan; Wu, Linxuan; Li, Lin; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen

    2014-07-01

    The breakdown of human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) barrier is considered as the etiology of retinopathy, which affects the quality of life of HIV/AIDS patients. Here we demonstrate that HIV-1 could directly impair HRPE barrier function, which leads to the translocation of HIV-1 and bacteria. HRPE cells (D407) were grown to form polarized, confluent monolayers and treated with different HIV-1 infectious clones. A significant increase of monolayer permeability, as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and apical-basolateral movements of sodium fluorescein, was observed. Disrupted tightness of HRPE barrier was associated with the downregulation of several tight junction proteins in D407 cells, including ZO-1, Occludin, Claudin-1, Claudin-2, Claudin-3, Claudin-4, and Claudin-5, after exposure to HIV-1, without affecting the viability of cells. HIV-1 gp120 was shown to participate in the alteration of barrier properties, as evidenced by decreased TEER and weakened expression of tight junction proteins in D407 monolayers after exposure to pseudotyped HIV-1, UV-inactivated HIV-1, and free gp120, but not to an envelope (Env)-defective mutant of HIV. Furthermore, exposure to HIV-1 particles could induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in D407, including IL-6 and MCP-1, both of which downregulated the expression of ZO-1 in the HRPE barrier. Disrupted HRPE monolayer allowed translocation of HIV-1 and bacteria across the epithelium. Overall, these findings suggest that HIV-1 may exploit its Env glycoprotein to induce an inflammatory state in HRPE cells, which could result in impairment of HRPE monolayer integrity, allowing virus and bacteria existing in ocular fluids to cross the epithelium and penetrate the HRPE barrier. Our study highlights the role of HIV-1 in the pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS-related retinopathy and suggests potential therapeutic targets for this ocular complication.

  6. Genetic signatures in the envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1 that associate with broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gnanakaran

    Full Text Available A steady increase in knowledge of the molecular and antigenic structure of the gp120 and gp41 HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env is yielding important new insights for vaccine design, but it has been difficult to translate this information to an immunogen that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies. To help bridge this gap, we used phylogenetically corrected statistical methods to identify amino acid signature patterns in Envs derived from people who have made potently neutralizing antibodies, with the hypothesis that these Envs may share common features that would be useful for incorporation in a vaccine immunogen. Before attempting this, essentially as a control, we explored the utility of our computational methods for defining signatures of complex neutralization phenotypes by analyzing Env sequences from 251 clonal viruses that were differentially sensitive to neutralization by the well-characterized gp120-specific monoclonal antibody, b12. We identified ten b12-neutralization signatures, including seven either in the b12-binding surface of gp120 or in the V2 region of gp120 that have been previously shown to impact b12 sensitivity. A simple algorithm based on the b12 signature pattern was predictive of b12 sensitivity/resistance in an additional blinded panel of 57 viruses. Upon obtaining these reassuring outcomes, we went on to apply these same computational methods to define signature patterns in Env from HIV-1 infected individuals who had potent, broadly neutralizing responses. We analyzed a checkerboard-style neutralization dataset with sera from 69 HIV-1-infected individuals tested against a panel of 25 different Envs. Distinct clusters of sera with high and low neutralization potencies were identified. Six signature positions in Env sequences obtained from the 69 samples were found to be strongly associated with either the high or low potency responses. Five sites were in the CD4-induced coreceptor binding site of gp120, suggesting an

  7. Novel engineered HIV-1 East African Clade-A gp160 plasmid construct induces strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthumani, Karuppiah; Zhang Donghui; Dayes, Nathanael S.; Hwang, Daniel S.; Calarota, Sandra A.; Choo, Andrew Y.; Boyer, Jean D.; Weiner, David B.

    2003-01-01

    HIV-1 sequences are highly diverse due to the inaccuracy of the viral reverse transcriptase. This diversity has been studied and used to categorize HIV isolates into subtypes or clades, which are geographically distinct. To develop effective vaccines against HIV-1, immunogens representing different subtypes may be important for induction of cross-protective immunity, but little data exist describing and comparing the immunogenicity induced by different subtype-based vaccines. This issue is further complicated by poor expression of HIV structural antigens due to rev dependence. One costly approach is to codon optimize each subtype construct to be examined. Interestingly, cis-acting transcriptional elements (CTE) can also by pass rev restriction by a rev independent export pathway. We reasoned that rev+CTE constructs might have advantages for such expression studies. A subtype A envelope sequence from a viral isolate from east Africa was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the CMV-IE promoter. The utility of inclusion of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPV)-CTE with/without rev for driving envelope expression and immunogenicity was examined. Expression of envelope (gp120) was confirmed by immunoblot analysis and by pseudotype virus infectivity assays. The presence of rev and the CTE together increased envelope expression and viral infection. Furthermore the CTE+rev construct was significantly more immunogenic then CTE alone vector. Isotype analysis and cytokine profiles showed strong Th1 response in plasmid-immunized mice, which also demonstrated the superior nature of the rev+CTE construct. These responses were of similar or greater magnitude to a codon-optimized construct. The resulting cellular immune responses were highly cross-reactive with a HIV-1 envelope subtype B antigen. This study suggests a simple strategy for improving the expression and immunogenicity of HIV subtype-specific envelope antigens as plasmid or vector

  8. Molecular determinants of the V3 loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 glycoprotein gp120 responsible for controlling cell tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavda, S C; Griffin, P; Han-Liu, Z; Keys, B; Vekony, M A; Cann, A J

    1994-11-01

    We and others have identified the major determinant of cell tropism in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as the V3 loop of glycoprotein gp120. We have conducted a detailed study of two molecularly cloned isolates of HIV-1, HIVJR-CSF and HIVNL4-3, that differ in their tropism for immortalized CD4+ cell lines, by constructing a series of site-directed mutations within the V3 loop of HIVJR-CSF based on the sequence of HIVNL4-3. The phenotypes of these mutants fall into two classes, those which are viable and those which are not. A spontaneous mutant with significantly altered growth properties was also recovered and found to have an additional single amino acid change in the V3 loop sequence. The carboxy-terminal beta-strand part of the V3 loop is the major determinant of cell tropism. However, the results presented here indicate that the functional role of the V3 loop sequences can only be interpreted properly in the context of the original gp120 backbone from which they were derived. These findings show that over-simplistic interpretation of sequence data derived from unknown mixtures of HIV variants in infected persons may be highly misleading.

  9. DMPD: Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited signalingpathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960231 Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited sign...82. Epub 2003 Jul 22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-media...on through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited signalingpathways. Authors Lee C, Liu QH, Tomkowicz B, Yi

  10. Spinal CPEB-mtROS-CBP signaling pathway contributes to perineural HIV gp120 with ddC-related neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takafumi; Yi, Hyun; Liu, Shue; Huang, Wan; Kanda, Hirotsugu; Lubarsky, David A; Hao, Shuanglin

    2016-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients treated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), have been known to develop neuropathic pain. While there has been a major shift away from some neurotoxic NRTIs in current antiretroviral therapy, a large number of HIV patients alive today have previously received them, and many have developed painful peripheral neuropathy. The exact mechanisms by which HIV with NRTIs contribute to the development of neuropathic pain are not known. Previous studies suggest that cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein (CPEB), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP), are involved in the neuroimmunological diseases including inflammatory/neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated the role of CPEB, mitochondrial ROS (mtROS), or CBP in neuropathic pain induced by HIV envelope protein gp120 combined with antiretroviral drug. The application of recombinant gp120 into the sciatic nerve plus systemic ddC (one of NRTIs) induced mechanical allodynia. Knockdown of CPEB or CBP using intrathecal antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-ODN) reduced mechanical allodynia. Intrathecal mitochondrial superoxide scavenger mito-tempol (Mito-T) increased mechanical withdrawal threshold. Knockdown of CPEB using intrathecal AS-ODN, reduced the up-regulated mitochondrial superoxide in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with gp120 combined with ddC. Intrathecal Mito-T lowered the increased expression of CBP in the spinal dorsal horn. Immunostaining studies showed that neuronal CPEB positive cells were co-localized with MitoSox positive profiles, and that MitoSox positive profiles were co-localized with neuronal CBP. Our studies suggest that neuronal CPEB-mtROS-CBP pathway in the spinal dorsal horn, plays an important role in the gp120/ddC-induced neuropathic pain in rats. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription in latently-infected cells. • IR enhances activating effect of bryostatin 1 on HIV-1 transcription in monocytes. • IR induces apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells via phosphorylation of p53 Ser46. • IR of HIV-1 infected humanized mice increases HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain.

  12. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    (IR) increases HIV-1 transcription in latently-infected cells. • IR enhances activating effect of bryostatin 1 on HIV-1 transcription in monocytes. • IR induces apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells via phosphorylation of p53 Ser46. • IR of HIV-1 infected humanized mice increases HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain.

  13. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Induces HIV-1 Proteasomal Degradation in Mucosal Langerhans Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomsel, Morgane; Ganor, Yonatan

    2017-12-01

    The neuroimmune dialogue between peripheral neurons and Langerhans cells (LCs) within mucosal epithelia protects against incoming pathogens. LCs rapidly internalize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) upon its sexual transmission and then trans -infect CD4 + T cells. We recently found that the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), secreted mucosally from peripheral neurons, inhibits LC-mediated HIV-1 trans -infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of CGRP-induced inhibition, focusing on HIV-1 degradation in LCs and its interplay with trans -infection. We first show that HIV-1 degradation occurs in endolysosomes in untreated LCs, and functionally blocking such degradation with lysosomotropic agents results in increased trans -infection. We demonstrate that CGRP acts via its cognate receptor and at a viral postentry step to induce faster HIV-1 degradation, but without affecting the kinetics of endolysosomal degradation. We reveal that unexpectedly, CGRP shifts HIV-1 degradation from endolysosomes toward the proteasome, providing the first evidence for functional HIV-1 proteasomal degradation in LCs. Such efficient proteasomal degradation significantly inhibits the first phase of trans -infection, and proteasomal, but not endolysosomal, inhibitors abrogate CGRP-induced inhibition. Together, our results establish that CGRP controls the HIV-1 degradation mode in LCs. The presence of endogenous CGRP within innervated mucosal tissues, especially during the sexual response, to which CGRP contributes, suggests that HIV-1 proteasomal degradation predominates in vivo Hence, proteasomal, rather than endolysosomal, HIV-1 degradation in LCs should be enhanced clinically to effectively restrict HIV-1 trans -infection. IMPORTANCE During sexual transmission, HIV-1 is internalized and degraded in LCs, the resident antigen-presenting cells in mucosal epithelia. Yet during trans -infection, infectious virions escaping degradation are transferred

  14. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate......-binding activity and was dependent on glycosylation of gp120. Native dodecameric SP-D bound to HIV gp120 more strongly than native trimeric SP-D. Since one common polymorphic form of SP-D is predominantly expressed as trimers and associated with lower blood levels, these individuals may have less effective innate...

  15. HDAC inhibition induces HIV-1 protein and enables immune-based clearance following latency reversal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guoxin; Swanson, Michael; Talla, Aarthi

    2017-01-01

    Promising therapeutic approaches for eradicating HIV include transcriptional activation of provirus from latently infected cells using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) and immune-mediated clearance to purge reservoirs. Accurate detection of cells capable of producing viral antigens and virions......, and the measurement of clearance of infected cells, is essential to assessing therapeutic efficacy. Here, we apply enhanced methodology extending the sensitivity limits for the rapid detection of subfemtomolar HIV gag p24 capsid protein in CD4+ T cells from ART-suppressed HIV+ individuals, and we show viral protein...... induction following treatment with LRAs. Importantly, we demonstrate that clinical administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis; vorinostat and panobinostat) induced HIV gag p24, and ex vivo stimulation produced sufficient viral antigen to elicit immune-mediated cell killing using anti-gp120/CD3...

  16. A glycoconjugate antigen based on the recognition motif of a broadly neutralizing human immunodeficiency virus antibody, 2G12, is immunogenic but elicits antibodies unable to bind to the self glycans of gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astronomo, Rena D; Lee, Hing-Ken; Scanlan, Christopher N

    2008-01-01

    The glycan shield of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 contributes to viral evasion from humoral immune responses. However, the shield is recognized by the HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody (Ab), 2G12, at a relatively conserved cluster of oligomannose glycans. The discovery of 2G......12 raises the possibility that a carbohydrate immunogen may be developed that could elicit 2G12-like neutralizing Abs and contribute to an AIDS vaccine. We have previously dissected the fine specificity of 2G12 and reported that the synthetic tetramannoside (Man(4)) that corresponds to the D1 arm...

  17. Aggregate complexes of HIV-1 induced by multimeric antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieh, Daniel J; King, Deborah F; Klein, Katja; Liu, Pinghuang; Shen, Xiaoying; Hwang, Kwan Ki; Ferrari, Guido; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Michael, Nelson L; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Denny, Thomas N; Tomaras, Georgia D; Shattock, Robin J

    2014-10-02

    Antibody mediated viral aggregation may impede viral transfer across mucosal surfaces by hindering viral movement in mucus, preventing transcytosis, or reducing inter-cellular penetration of epithelia thereby limiting access to susceptible mucosal CD4 T cells and dendritic cells. These functions may work together to provide effective immune exclusion of virus from mucosal tissue; however little is known about the antibody characteristics required to induce HIV aggregation. Such knowledge may be critical to the design of successful immunization strategies to facilitate viral immune exclusion at the mucosal portals of entry. The potential of neutralizing and non-neutralizing IgG and IgA monoclonals (mAbs) to induce HIV-1 aggregation was assessed by Dynamic light scattering (DLS). Although neutralizing and non-neutralizing IgG mAbs and polyclonal HIV-Ig efficiently aggregated soluble Env trimers, they were not capable of forming viral aggregates. In contrast, dimeric (but not monomeric) IgA mAbs induced stable viral aggregate populations that could be separated from uncomplexed virions. Epitope specificity influenced both the degree of aggregation and formation of higher order complexes by dIgA. IgA purified from serum of uninfected RV144 vaccine trial responders were able to efficiently opsonize viral particles in the absence of significant aggregation, reflective of monomeric IgA. These results collectively demonstrate that dIgA is capable of forming stable viral aggregates providing a plausible basis for testing the effectiveness of aggregation as a potential protection mechanism at the mucosal portals of viral entry.

  18. Determining the Structure of an Unliganded and Fully Glycosylated SIV gp120 Envelope Glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bing; Vogan, Erik M.; Gong, Haiyun; Skehel, John J.; Wiley, Don C.; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (NIMR)

    2010-07-13

    HIV/SIV envelope glycoproteins mediate the first steps in viral infection. They are trimers of a membrane-anchored polypeptide chain, cleaved into two fragments known as gp120 and gp41. The structure of HIV gp120 bound with receptor (CD4) has been known for some time. We have now determined the structure of a fully glycosylated SIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein in an unliganded conformation by X-ray crystallography at 4.0 {angstrom} resolution. We describe here our experimental and computational approaches, which may be relevant to other resolution-limited crystallographic problems. Key issues were attention to details of beam geometry mandated by small, weakly diffracting crystals, and choice of strategies for phase improvement, starting with two isomorphous derivatives and including multicrystal averaging. We validated the structure by analyzing composite omit maps, averaged among three distinct crystal lattices, and by calculating model-based, SeMet anomalous difference maps. There are at least four ordered sugars on many of the thirteen oligosaccharides.

  19. Resistance of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor can involve sequence changes in both gp120 and gp41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Depetris, Rafael S.; Thomas, Antonia M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe the genetic pathways taken by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate, D101.12, to become resistant to the small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, vicriviroc (VCV), in vitro. Resistant D101.12 variants contained at least one substitution in the gp120 V3 region (H308P), plus one of two patterns of gp41 sequence changes involving the fusion peptide (FP) and a downstream residue: G514V+V535M or M518V+F519L+V535M. Studies of Env-chimeric and point-substituted viruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TZM-bl cells showed that resistance can arise from the cooperative action of gp120 and gp41 changes, while retaining CCR5 usage. Modeling the VCV inhibition data from the two cell types suggests that D101.12 discriminates between high- and low-VCV affinity forms of CCR5 less than D1/85.16, a resistant virus with three FP substitutions.

  20. HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by native-like envelope trimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Rogier W.; van Gils, Marit J.; Derking, Ronald; Sok, Devin; Ketas, Thomas J.; Burger, Judith A.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Simonich, Cassandra; Goo, Leslie; Arendt, Heather; Kim, Helen J.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Pugach, Pavel; Williams, Melissa; Debnath, Gargi; Moldt, Brian; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Isik, Gözde; Medina-Ramírez, Max; Back, Jaap Willem; Koff, Wayne C.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Rakasz, Eva G.; Seaman, Michael S.; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K.; Klasse, Per Johan; Labranche, Celia; Schief, William R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Overbaugh, Julie; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Montefiori, David C.; Dean, Hansi; Moore, John P.

    2015-01-01

    A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is the difficulty of inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (tier 2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation, BG505

  1. A novel antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity epitope in gp120 is identified by two monoclonal antibodies isolated from a long-term survivor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsmadi, O; Herz, R; Murphy, E; Pinter, A; Tilley, S A

    1997-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 42F and 43F, were isolated some 14 months apart from a single long-term survivor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. These MAbs were found to be indistinguishable in terms of their isotypes, specificities, affinities, and biological activities. Both 42F and 43F directed substantial antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against cells infected with four divergent lab-adapted strains of HIV-1, but no neutralizing activity against these strains was detectable. The ability of MAbs 42F and 43F, as well as that of MAbs against two other gp120 epitopes, to direct ADCC against uninfected CD4+ cells to which recombinant gp120SF2 had been adsorbed (i.e., "innocent bystanders") was demonstrated to be less efficient by at least an order of magnitude than their ability to direct ADCC against HIV-1-infected cells. Flow cytometry analyses showed that 42F and 43F also bind to native primary isolate Envs from clades B and E expressed on cell surfaces. By direct binding and competition assays, it was demonstrated that the 42F/43F epitope lies in a domain of gp120 outside the previously described CD4-binding site and V3 loop ADCC epitope clusters. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the 42F/43F epitope is not dependent on disulfide bonds or N-linked glycans in gp120. Epitope mapping of 42F and 43F by binding to linear peptides demonstrated specificity of these MAbs for a sequence of 10 amino acids in the C5 domain comprising residues 491 to 500 (Los Alamos National Laboratory numbering for the HXB2 strain). Thus, 42F and 43F define a new ADCC epitope in gp120. Because of the relative conservation of this epitope and the fact that it appears to have been significantly immunogenic in the individual from which these MAbs were derived, it may prove to be a useful component of HIV vaccines. Furthermore, these MAbs may be used as tools to probe the potential importance of ADCC as an antiviral activity in HIV-1 infection. PMID

  2. Receptor-targeted aptamer-siRNA conjugate-directed transcriptional regulation of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Lazar, Daniel; Li, Haitang; Xia, Xin; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Charlins, Paige; O'Mealy, Denis; Akkina, Ramesh; Saayman, Sheena; Weinberg, Marc S.; Rossi, John J.; Morris, Kevin V.

    2018-01-01

    Gene-based therapies represent a promising therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of HIV-1, as they have the potential to maintain sustained viral inhibition with reduced treatment interventions. Such an option may represent a long-term treatment alternative to highly active antiretroviral therapy. Methods: We previously described a therapeutic approach, referred to as transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), whereby small noncoding RNAs directly inhibit the transcriptional activity of HIV-1 by targeting sites within the viral promoter, specifically the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR). TGS differs from traditional RNA interference (RNAi) in that it is characterized by concomitant silent-state epigenetic marks on histones and DNA. To deliver TGS-inducing RNAs, we developed functional RNA conjugates based on the previously reported dual function of the gp120 (A-1) aptamer conjugated to 27-mer Dicer-substrate anti-HIV-1 siRNA (dsiRNA), LTR-362. Results: We demonstrate here that high levels of processed guide RNAs localize to the nucleus in infected T lymphoblastoid CEM cell line and primary human CD4+ T-cells. Treatment of the aptamer-siRNA conjugates induced TGS with an ~10-fold suppression of viral p24 levels as measured at day 12 post infection. To explore the silencing efficacy of aptamer-siRNA conjugates in vivo, HIV-1-infected humanized NOD/SCID/IL2 rγnull mice (hu-NSG) were treated with the aptamer-siRNA conjugates. Systemic delivery of the A-1-stick-LTR-362 27-mer siRNA conjugates suppressed HIV-1 infection and protected CD4+ T cell levels in viremia hu-NSG mice. Principle conclusions: Collectively these data suggest that the gp120 aptamer-dsiRNA conjugate design is suitable for systemic delivery of small RNAs that can be used to suppress HIV-1. PMID:29556342

  3. Stepping toward a Macaque Model of HIV-1 Induced AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason T. Kimata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 exhibits a narrow host range, hindering the development of a robust animal model of pathogenesis. Past studies have demonstrated that the restricted host range of HIV-1 may be largely due to the inability of the virus to antagonize and evade effector molecules of the interferon response in other species. They have also guided the engineering of HIV-1 clones that can replicate in CD4 T-cells of Asian macaque species. However, while replication of these viruses in macaque hosts is persistent, it has been limited and without progression to AIDS. In a new study, Hatziioannou et al., demonstrate for the first time that adapted macaque-tropic HIV-1 can persistently replicate at high levels in pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina, but only if CD8 T-cells are depleted at the time of inoculation. The infection causes rapid disease and recapitulates several aspects of AIDS in humans. Additionally, the virus undergoes genetic changes to further escape innate immunity in association with disease progression. Here, the importance of these findings is discussed, as they relate to pathogenesis and model development.

  4. Timing of the HIV-1 subtype C epidemic in Ethiopia based on early virus strains and subsequent virus diversification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abebe, A.; Lukashov, V. V.; Pollakis, G.; Kliphuis, A.; Fontanet, A. L.; Goudsmit, J.; Rinke de Wit, T. F.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To trace the introduction of HIV-1 subtype C into Ethiopia based on virus diversification during the epidemic. DESIGN: A set of 474 serum samples obtained in Ethiopia in 1982-1985 was tested for HIV-1. HIV-1 env gp120 V3 and gag or pol regions were sequenced and analysed together with

  5. HIV-1 subtype C primary isolates exhibit high sensitivity to an anti-gp120 RNA aptamer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available or color figure charges ? Immediate publication on acceptance ? Inclusion in PubMed, CAS, Scopus and Google Scholar ? Research which is freely available for redistribution Submit your manuscript at www.biomedcentral.com/submit1Council for Scientific...

  6. HIV-1 vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure. PMID:24637946

  7. Interferon-Inducible CD169/Siglec1 Attenuates Anti-HIV-1 Effects of Alpha Interferon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Hisashi; Ramirez, Nora-Guadalupe Pina; Gibson, Gregory; Kline, Christopher; Watkins, Simon; Ambrose, Zandrea

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hallmark of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in vivo is chronic immune activation concomitant with type I interferon (IFN) production. Although type I IFN induces an antiviral state in many cell types, HIV-1 can replicate in vivo via mechanisms that have remained unclear. We have recently identified a type I IFN-inducible protein, CD169, as the HIV-1 attachment factor on dendritic cells (DCs) that can mediate robust infection of CD4+ T cells in trans. Since CD169 expression on macrophages is also induced by type I IFN, we hypothesized that type I IFN-inducible CD169 could facilitate productive HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells in cis and CD4+ T cells in trans and thus offset antiviral effects of type I IFN. In support of this hypothesis, infection of HIV-1 or murine leukemia virus Env (MLV-Env)-pseudotyped HIV-1 particles was enhanced in IFN-α-treated THP-1 monocytoid cells, and this enhancement was primarily dependent on CD169-mediated enhancement at the virus entry step, a phenomenon phenocopied in HIV-1 infections of IFN-α-treated primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Furthermore, expression of CD169, a marker of type I IFN-induced immune activation in vivo, was enhanced in lymph nodes from pigtailed macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) carrying HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT-SHIV), compared to uninfected macaques, and interestingly, there was extensive colocalization of p27gag and CD169, suggesting productive infection of CD169+ myeloid cells in vivo. While cell-free HIV-1 infection of IFN-α-treated CD4+ T cells was robustly decreased, initiation of infection in trans via coculture with CD169+ IFN-α-treated DCs restored infection, suggesting that HIV-1 exploits CD169 in cis and in trans to attenuate a type I IFN-induced antiviral state. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 infection in humans causes immune activation characterized by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFN

  8. Computational study of HIV gp120 as a target for polyanionic entry inhibitors: Exploiting the V3 loop region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis R Hollingsworth

    Full Text Available Multiple approaches are being utilized to develop therapeutics to treat HIV infection. One approach is designed to inhibit entry of HIV into host cells, with a target being the viral envelope glycoprotein, gp120. Polyanionic compounds have been shown to be effective in inhibiting HIV entry, with a mechanism involving electrostatic interactions with the V3 loop of gp120 being proposed. In this study, we applied computational methods to elucidate molecular interactions between the repeat unit of the precisely alternating polyanion, Poly(4,4'-stilbenedicarboxylate-alt-maleic acid (DCSti-alt-MA and the V3 loop of gp120 from strains of HIV against which these polyanions were previously tested (IIIb, BaL, 92UG037, JR-CSF as well as two strains for which gp120 crystal structures are available (YU2, 2B4C. Homology modeling was used to create models of the gp120 proteins. Using monomers of the gp120 protein, we applied extensive molecular dynamics simulations to obtain dominant morphologies that represent a variety of open-closed states of the V3 loop to examine the interaction of 112 ligands of the repeating units of DCSti-alt-MA docked to the V3 loop and surrounding residues. Using the distance between the V1/V2 and V3 loops of gp120 as a metric, we revealed through MD simulations that gp120 from the lab-adapted strains (BaL and IIIb, which are more susceptible to inhibition by DCSti-alt-MA, clearly transitioned to the closed state in one replicate of each simulation set, whereas none of the replicates from the Tier II strains (92UG037 and JR-CSF did so. Docking repeat unit microspecies to the gp120 protein before and after MD simulation enabled identification of residues that were key for binding. Notably, only a few residues were found to be important for docking both before and after MD simulation as a result of the conformational heterogeneity provided by the simulations. Consideration of the residues that were consistently involved in interactions

  9. Envelope conformational changes induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 attachment inhibitors prevent CD4 binding and downstream entry events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsu-Tso; Fan, Li; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; McAuliffe, Brian; Li, Chang-Ben; Yamanaka, Gregory; Zhou, Nannan; Fang, Hua; Dicker, Ira; Dalterio, Richard; Gong, Yi-Fei; Wang, Tao; Yin, Zhiwei; Ueda, Yasutsugu; Matiskella, John; Kadow, John; Clapham, Paul; Robinson, James; Colonno, Richard; Lin, Pin-Fang

    2006-04-01

    BMS-488043 is a small-molecule human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CD4 attachment inhibitor with demonstrated clinical efficacy. The compound inhibits soluble CD4 (sCD4) binding to the 11 distinct HIV envelope gp120 proteins surveyed. Binding of BMS-488043 and that of sCD4 to gp120 are mutually exclusive, since increased concentrations of one can completely block the binding of the other without affecting the maximal gp120 binding capacity. Similarly, BMS-488043 inhibited virion envelope trimers from binding to sCD4-immunoglobulin G (IgG), with decreasing inhibition as the sCD4-IgG concentration increased, and BMS-488043 blocked the sCD4-induced exposure of the gp41 groove in virions. In both virion binding assays, BMS-488043 was active only when added prior to sCD4. Collectively, these results indicate that obstruction of gp120-sCD4 interactions is the primary inhibition mechanism of this compound and that compound interaction with envelope must precede CD4 binding. By three independent approaches, BMS-488043 was further shown to induce conformational changes within gp120 in both the CD4 and CCR5 binding regions. These changes likely prevent gp120-CD4 interactions and downstream entry events. However, BMS-488043 could only partially inhibit CD4 binding to an HIV variant containing a specific envelope truncation and altered gp120 conformation, despite effectively inhibiting the pseudotyped virus infection. Taken together, BMS-488043 inhibits viral entry primarily through altering the envelope conformation and preventing CD4 binding, and other downstream entry events could also be inhibited as a result of these induced conformational changes.

  10. Elucidating a Key Anti-HIV-1 and Cancer-Associated Axis: The Structure of CCL5 (Rantes) in Complex with CCR5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-06-01

    CCL5 (RANTES) is an inflammatory chemokine which binds to chemokine receptor CCR5 and induces signaling. The CCL5:CCR5 associated chemotactic signaling is of critical biological importance and is a potential HIV-1 therapeutic axis. Several studies provided growing evidence for the expression of CCL5 and CCR5 in non-hematological malignancies. Therefore, the delineation of the CCL5:CCR5 complex structure can pave the way for novel CCR5-targeted drugs. We employed a computational protocol which is primarily based on free energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, and report, what is to our knowledge, the first computationally derived CCL5:CCR5 complex structure which is in excellent agreement with experimental findings and clarifies the functional role of CCL5 and CCR5 residues which are associated with binding and signaling. A wealth of polar and non-polar interactions contributes to the tight CCL5:CCR5 binding. The structure of an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop in complex with CCR5 has recently been derived through a similar computational protocol. A comparison between the CCL5 : CCR5 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structures depicts that both the chemokine and the virus primarily interact with the same CCR5 residues. The present work provides insights into the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 by CCL5.

  11. Binding of recombinant HIV coat protein gp120 to human monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finbloom, D.S.; Hoover, D.L.; Meltzer, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Inasmuch as the exact level of CD4 Ag expression on macrophages is controversial and because HIV may interact with macrophages in a manner different from that on T cells, we analyzed the binding of gp120 to freshly isolated and cultured monocytes. rgp120 was iodinated using the lactoperoxidase method to a sp. act. of 600 Ci/mmol. Highly purified monocytes (greater than 90%) were isolated from the leukapheresed blood of normal volunteers by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation followed by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation and cultured 7 days in DMEM supplemented with 1000 U/ml macrophage CSF in 10% human serum. Whereas MOLT/4 cells consistently bound freshly prepared 125I-rgp120 at 80% specificity with 5100 +/- 700 mol/cell, MCSF cultured monocytes bound rgp120 at only 0 to 20% specificity and 420 +/- 200 mol/cell. Most of the radioactivity bound by these cells could not be blocked by the addition of unlabeled rgp120. In contrast, the U937 myeloid cell line bound rgp120 with 50% specificity and about 2500 mol/cell. Whereas the antibody OKT4a (anti-CD4) blocked 80% of the binding on MOLT/4 cells and 50% on U937 cells, binding was only inhibited on the average of 6% on cultured monocytes. When soluble rCD4 was used as an inhibitor, binding to MOLT/4 cells was blocked by 80%. In contrast, binding to cultured monocytes was inhibited by 28%. HIV infectivity was blocked by similar concentrations of OKT4a. These observations suggest that although most binding of gp120 to cultured monocytes is not to the CD4 determinant, several hundred molecules do bind to a CD4-like molecule which promotes virus entry and replication

  12. Functional Antibody Response Against V1V2 and V3 of HIV gp120 in the VAX003 and VAX004 Vaccine Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Preetha; Williams, Constance; Shapiro, Mariya B; Sinangil, Faruk; Higgins, Keith; Nádas, Arthur; Totrov, Maxim; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Fiore-Gartland, Andrew J; Haigwood, Nancy L; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Hioe, Catarina E

    2018-01-11

    Immunization with HIV AIDSVAX gp120 vaccines in the phase III VAX003 and VAX004 trials did not confer protection. To understand the shortcomings in antibody (Ab) responses induced by these vaccines, we evaluated the kinetics of Ab responses to the V1V2 and V3 regions of gp120 and the induction of Ab-mediated antiviral functions during the course of 7 vaccinations over a 30.5-month period. Plasma samples from VAX003 and VAX004 vaccinees and placebo recipients were measured for ELISA-binding Abs and for virus neutralization, Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Ab responses to V1V2 and V3 peaked after 3 to 4 immunizations and declined after 5 to 7 immunizations. The deteriorating responses were most evident against epitopes in the underside of the V1V2 β-barrel and in the V3 crown. Correspondingly, vaccinees demonstrated higher neutralization against SF162 pseudovirus sensitive to anti-V1V2 and anti-V3 Abs after 3 or 4 immunizations than after 7 immunizations. Higher levels of ADCP and ADCC were also observed at early or mid-time points as compared with the final time point. Hence, VAX003 and VAX004 vaccinees generated V1V2- and V3-binding Abs and functional Abs after 3 to 4 immunizations, but subsequent boosts did not maintain these responses.

  13. Comprehensive sieve analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlefsen, Paul T; Rolland, Morgane; Hertz, Tomer; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Gartland, Andrew J; deCamp, Allan C; Magaret, Craig A; Ahmed, Hasan; Gottardo, Raphael; Juraska, Michal; McCoy, Connor; Larsen, Brendan B; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Carrico, Chris; Menis, Sergey; Kijak, Gustavo H; Bose, Meera; Arroyo, Miguel A; O'Connell, Robert J; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L; Kirys, Tatsiana; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwong, Peter D; Scheffler, Konrad; Pond, Sergei L Kosakovsky; Carlson, Jonathan M; Michael, Nelson L; Schief, William R; Mullins, James I; Kim, Jerome H; Gilbert, Peter B

    2015-02-01

    The RV144 clinical trial showed the partial efficacy of a vaccine regimen with an estimated vaccine efficacy (VE) of 31% for protecting low-risk Thai volunteers against acquisition of HIV-1. The impact of vaccine-induced immune responses can be investigated through sieve analysis of HIV-1 breakthrough infections (infected vaccine and placebo recipients). A V1/V2-targeted comparison of the genomes of HIV-1 breakthrough viruses identified two V2 amino acid sites that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Here we extended the V1/V2 analysis to the entire HIV-1 genome using an array of methods based on individual sites, k-mers and genes/proteins. We identified 56 amino acid sites or "signatures" and 119 k-mers that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Of those, 19 sites and 38 k-mers were located in the regions comprising the RV144 vaccine (Env-gp120, Gag, and Pro). The nine signature sites in Env-gp120 were significantly enriched for known antibody-associated sites (p = 0.0021). In particular, site 317 in the third variable loop (V3) overlapped with a hotspot of antibody recognition, and sites 369 and 424 were linked to CD4 binding site neutralization. The identified signature sites significantly covaried with other sites across the genome (mean = 32.1) more than did non-signature sites (mean = 0.9) (p analysis of the breakthrough infections in the RV144 trial, this work describes a set of statistical methods and tools applicable to analysis of breakthrough infection genomes in general vaccine efficacy trials for diverse pathogens.

  14. Apoptosis and telomeres shortening related to HIV-1 induced oxidative stress in an astrocytoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollace Vincenzo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress plays a key role in the neuropathogenesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 infection causing apoptosis of astroglia cells and neurons. Recent data have shown that oxidative stress is also responsible for the acceleration of human fibroblast telomere shortening in vitro. In the present study we analyzed the potential relations occurring between free radicals formation and telomere length during HIV-1 mediated astroglial death. Results To this end, U373 human astrocytoma cells have been directly exposed to X4-using HIV-1IIIB strain, for 1, 3 or 5 days and treated (where requested with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a cysteine donor involved in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH, a cellular antioxidant and apoptosis has been evaluated by FACS analysis. Quantitative-FISH (Q-FISH has been employed for studying the telomere length while intracellular reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio has been determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. Incubation of U373 with HIV-1IIIB led to significant induction of cellular apoptosis that was reduced in the presence of 1 mM NAC. Moreover, NAC improved the GSH/GSSG, a sensitive indicator of oxidative stress, that significantly decreased after HIV-1IIIB exposure in U373. Analysis of telomere length in HIV-1 exposed U373 showed a statistically significant telomere shortening, that was completely reverted in NAC-treated U373. Conclusion Our results support the role of HIV-1-mediated oxidative stress in astrocytic death and the importance of antioxidant compounds in preventing these cellular damages. Moreover, these data indicate that the telomere structure, target for oxidative damage, could be the key sensor of cell apoptosis induced by oxidative stress after HIV infection.

  15. Interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is associated with viremia of early HIV-1 infection in Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, SoYong; Chung, Yoon-Seok; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Shin, YoungHyun; Kim, SeungHyun; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Sung Soon

    2015-05-01

    Cytokines/chemokines play key roles in modulating disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although it is known that early HIV-1 infection is associated with increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, the relationship between cytokine levels and HIV-1 pathogenesis is not clear. The concentrations of 18 cytokines/chemokines in 30 HIV-1 negative and 208 HIV-1 positive plasma samples from Korean patients were measured by the Luminex system. Early HIV-1 infection was classified according to the Fiebig stage (FS) based on the characteristics of the patients infected with HIV-1. Concentrations of interleukin-12 (IL-12), interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and regulated upon activation, normal T cells expressed and secreted (RANTES) were increased significantly during the early stage of HIV-1 infection (FS II-IV) compared with the HIV-1-negative group. Of these cytokines, an elevated level of IP-10 was the only factor to be correlated positively with a higher viral load during the early stages of HIV-1 infection (FS II-IV) in Koreans (R = 0.52, P IP-10 may be an indicator for HIV-1 viremia and associated closely with viral replication in patients with early HIV-1 infection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Structural improvement of unliganded simian immunodeficiency virus gp120 core by normal-mode-based X-ray crystallographic refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiaorui; Lu, Mingyang; Poon, Billy K.; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng

    2009-01-01

    The structural model of the unliganded and fully glycosylated simian immunodeficiency virus gp120 core determined to 4.0 Å resolution was substantially improved using a recently developed normal-mode-based anisotropic B-factor refinement method. The envelope protein gp120/gp41 of simian and human immunodeficiency viruses plays a critical role in viral entry into host cells. However, the extraordinarily high structural flexibility and heavy glycosylation of the protein have presented enormous difficulties in the pursuit of high-resolution structural investigation of some of its conformational states. An unliganded and fully glycosylated gp120 core structure was recently determined to 4.0 Å resolution. The rather low data-to-parameter ratio limited refinement efforts in the original structure determination. In this work, refinement of this gp120 core structure was carried out using a normal-mode-based refinement method that has been shown in previous studies to be effective in improving models of a supramolecular complex at 3.42 Å resolution and of a membrane protein at 3.2 Å resolution. By using only the first four nonzero lowest-frequency normal modes to construct the anisotropic thermal parameters, combined with manual adjustments and standard positional refinement using REFMAC5, the structural model of the gp120 core was significantly improved in many aspects, including substantial decreases in R factors, better fitting of several flexible regions in electron-density maps, the addition of five new sugar rings at four glycan chains and an excellent correlation of the B-factor distribution with known structural flexibility. These results further underscore the effectiveness of this normal-mode-based method in improving models of protein and nonprotein components in low-resolution X-ray structures

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Warfarin-induced skin necrosis in HIV-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F Bhaijee, H Wainwright, G Meintjes, R J Wilkinson, G Todd, E de Vries, D J Pepper. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis (WISN) is a rare complication of warfarin ..... first few days of warfarin therapy.2,11 Warfarin is a vitamin K antagonist and ...

  18. Specific assay measuring binding of /sup 125/I-Gp 120 from HIV to T4/sup +//CD4/sup +/ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, K.; Nygren, A.; Ramstedt, U.; Gidlund, M.; Wigzell, H.; Arthur, L.O.; Robey, W.G.; Morein, B.

    1987-02-26

    The HIV (HTLV-III) envelope glycoprotein, Gp120, was isolated from virus-infected tissue culture cells using affinity chromatography. A radioimmunoassay was developed to determine the degree of iodinated Gp120 to target CD4/sup +/ (T4/sup +/) cells. /sup 125/I-Gp120 could be shown to selectively bind to CD4/sup +/ cells only. The Gp120 remained bound to these cells after repeated washes. Monoclonal anti-CD4 antibodies block the binding of Gp120 to CD4/sup +/ cells. Monoclonal antibodies to other cell surface components do not interfere with /sup 125/I-Gp120 binding. All IgG antibodies from HIV seropositive donors tested block /sup 125/I-GP120 binding, though with variable titers. The authors believe that this assay provides further proof for the use of CD4 (T4) as a component of the receptor for HIV. It represents a safe, objective and sensitive method for the analysis of Gp120-CD4 interactions, as well as the potential of antibodies to interfere with this binding. (Auth.). 24 refs.; 2 figs.; 8 tabs.

  19. HIV-1-infected macrophages induce astrogliosis by SDF-1α and matrix metalloproteinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Mika; Wang, Xin; Baba, Masanori

    2005-01-01

    Brain macrophages/microglia and astrocytes are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). To clarify their interaction and contribution to the pathogenesis, HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages were used as a model of brain macrophages/microglia, and their effects on human astrocytes in vitro were examined. The culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages induced significant astrocyte proliferation, which was annihilated with a neutralizing antibody to stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α or a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor. In these astrocytes, CXCR4, MMP, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase mRNA expression and SDF-1α production were significantly up-regulated. The supernatants of infected macrophages were always more effective than those of uninfected cells. Moreover, the enhanced production of SDF-1α was suppressed by the MMP inhibitor. These results indicate that the activated and HIV-1-infected macrophages can indirectly induce astrocyte proliferation through up-regulating SDF-1α and MMP production, which implies a mechanism of astrogliosis in HAD

  20. Antibodies with High Avidity to the gp120 Envelope Protein in Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251 Acquisition in an Immunization Regimen That Mimics the RV-144 Thai Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegu, Poonam; Vaccari, Monica; Gordon, Shari; Keele, Brandon F.; Doster, Melvin; Guan, Yongjun; Ferrari, Guido; Pal, Ranajit; Ferrari, Maria Grazia; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Billings, Erik; Rao, Mangala; Montefiori, David; Tomaras, Georgia; Alam, S. Munir; Fenizia, Claudio; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Stablein, Donald; Tartaglia, Jim; Michael, Nelson; Kim, Jerome; Venzon, David

    2013-01-01

    The recombinant canarypox vector, ALVAC-HIV, together with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 envelope glycoprotein, has protected 31.2% of Thai individuals from HIV acquisition in the RV144 HIV vaccine trial. This outcome was unexpected, given the limited ability of the vaccine components to induce CD8+ T-cell responses or broadly neutralizing antibodies. We vaccinated macaques with an immunization regimen intended to mimic the RV144 trial and exposed them intrarectally to a dose of the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac251 that transmits few virus variants, similar to HIV transmission to humans. Vaccination induced anti-envelope antibodies in all vaccinees and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. Three of the 11 macaques vaccinated with ALVAC-SIV/gp120 were protected from SIVmac251 acquisition, but the result was not significant. The remaining vaccinees were infected and progressed to disease. The magnitudes of vaccine-induced SIVmac251-specific T-cell responses and binding antibodies were not significantly different between protected and infected animals. However, sera from protected animals had higher avidity antibodies to gp120, recognized the variable envelope regions V1/V2, and reduced SIVmac251 infectivity in cells that express high levels of α4β7 integrins, suggesting a functional role of antibodies to V2. The current results emphasize the utility of determining the titer of repeated mucosal challenge in the preclinical evaluation of HIV vaccines. PMID:23175374

  1. Antibodies with high avidity to the gp120 envelope protein in protection from simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(mac251) acquisition in an immunization regimen that mimics the RV-144 Thai trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegu, Poonam; Vaccari, Monica; Gordon, Shari; Keele, Brandon F; Doster, Melvin; Guan, Yongjun; Ferrari, Guido; Pal, Ranajit; Ferrari, Maria Grazia; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Billings, Erik; Rao, Mangala; Montefiori, David; Tomaras, Georgia; Alam, S Munir; Fenizia, Claudio; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Stablein, Donald; Tartaglia, Jim; Michael, Nelson; Kim, Jerome; Venzon, David; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2013-02-01

    The recombinant canarypox vector, ALVAC-HIV, together with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 envelope glycoprotein, has protected 31.2% of Thai individuals from HIV acquisition in the RV144 HIV vaccine trial. This outcome was unexpected, given the limited ability of the vaccine components to induce CD8(+) T-cell responses or broadly neutralizing antibodies. We vaccinated macaques with an immunization regimen intended to mimic the RV144 trial and exposed them intrarectally to a dose of the simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(mac251) that transmits few virus variants, similar to HIV transmission to humans. Vaccination induced anti-envelope antibodies in all vaccinees and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses. Three of the 11 macaques vaccinated with ALVAC-SIV/gp120 were protected from SIV(mac251) acquisition, but the result was not significant. The remaining vaccinees were infected and progressed to disease. The magnitudes of vaccine-induced SIV(mac251)-specific T-cell responses and binding antibodies were not significantly different between protected and infected animals. However, sera from protected animals had higher avidity antibodies to gp120, recognized the variable envelope regions V1/V2, and reduced SIV(mac251) infectivity in cells that express high levels of α(4)β(7) integrins, suggesting a functional role of antibodies to V2. The current results emphasize the utility of determining the titer of repeated mucosal challenge in the preclinical evaluation of HIV vaccines.

  2. Exogenous HIV-1 Nef upsets the IFN-γ-induced impairment of human intestinal epithelial integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Quaranta

    Full Text Available The mucosal tissues play a central role in the transmission of HIV-1 infection as well as in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Despite several clinical studies reported intestinal dysfunction during HIV infection, the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced impairments of mucosal epithelial barrier are still unclear. It has been postulated that HIV-1 alters enterocytic function and HIV-1 proteins have been detected in several cell types of the intestinal mucosa. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on human epithelial cell line.We used unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated Caco-2 cells, as a model for homeostatic and inflamed gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. We investigated the effect of exogenous recombinant Nef on monolayer integrity analyzing its uptake, transepithelial electrical resistance, permeability to FITC-dextran and the expression of tight junction proteins. Moreover, we measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators. Exogenous Nef was taken up by Caco-2 cells, increased intestinal epithelial permeability and upset the IFN-γ-induced reduction of transepithelial resistance, interfering with tight junction protein expression. Moreover, Nef inhibited IFN-γ-induced apoptosis and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-3α production by Caco-2 cells while down-regulated IL-10 production. The simultaneous exposure of Caco-2 cells to Nef and IFN-γ did not affect cytokine secretion respect to untreated cells. Finally, we found that Nef counteracted the IFN-γ induced arachidonic acid cascade.Our findings suggest that exogenous Nef, perturbing the IFN-γ-induced impairment of intestinal epithelial cells, could prolong cell survival, thus allowing for accumulation of viral particles. Our results may improve the understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, supporting the discovery of new therapeutic interventions.

  3. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2015-09-01

    HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1 receptor antagonist, NF

  4. HIV-1 Tat protein induces glial cell autophagy through enhancement of BAG3 protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Anna Paola; De Simone, Francesca Isabella; Iorio, Vittoria; De Marco, Margot; Khalili, Kamel; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Capunzo, Mario; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Rosati, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    BAG3 protein has been described as an anti-apoptotic and pro-autophagic factor in several neoplastic and normal cells. We previously demonstrated that BAG3 expression is elevated upon HIV-1 infection of glial and T lymphocyte cells. Among HIV-1 proteins, Tat is highly involved in regulating host cell response to viral infection. Therefore, we investigated the possible role of Tat protein in modulating BAG3 protein levels and the autophagic process itself. In this report, we show that transfection with Tat raises BAG3 levels in glioblastoma cells. Moreover, BAG3 silencing results in highly reducing Tat- induced levels of LC3-II and increasing the appearance of sub G0/G1 apoptotic cells, in keeping with the reported role of BAG3 in modulating the autophagy/apoptosis balance. These results demonstrate for the first time that Tat protein is able to stimulate autophagy through increasing BAG3 levels in human glial cells.

  5. The VNTR Polymorphism of the DC-SIGNR Gene and Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hui; Yu, Xiao-Min; Wang, Jia-Xin; Hong, Ze-Hui; Tang, Nelson Leung-Sang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin related (DC-SIGNR) can bind to the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope glycoprotein and is thus important for the host-pathogen interaction in HIV-1 infection. Studies of the association between the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism of the DC-SIGNR gene and HIV-1 susceptibility have produced controversial results. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a meta-analysis of th...

  6. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies: peripheral glycosylation of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 may be a target for virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    ), and the cell type used as the infection target (MT4, PMC, or selected T4 lymphocytes). Inhibition was observed when viruses were preincubated with MAbs but not when cells were preincubated with MAbs before inoculation, and the MAbs were shown to precipitate 125I-labeled gp120. The MAbs therefore define...... carbohydrate structures expressed by the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120, indicating that glycans of the viral envelope are possible targets for immunotherapy or vaccine development or both....

  7. HIV-1 vaccine-induced T-cell responses cluster in epitope hotspots that differ from those induced in natural infection with HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Tomer; Ahmed, Hasan; Friedrich, David P; Casimiro, Danilo R; Self, Steven G; Corey, Lawrence; McElrath, M Juliana; Buchbinder, Susan; Horton, Helen; Frahm, Nicole; Robertson, Michael N; Graham, Barney S; Gilbert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Several recent large clinical trials evaluated HIV vaccine candidates that were based on recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd-5) vectors expressing HIV-derived antigens. These vaccines primarily elicited T-cell responses, which are known to be critical for controlling HIV infection. In the current study, we present a meta-analysis of epitope mapping data from 177 participants in three clinical trials that tested two different HIV vaccines: MRKAd-5 HIV and VRC-HIVAD014-00VP. We characterized the population-level epitope responses in these trials by generating population-based epitope maps, and also designed such maps using a large cohort of 372 naturally infected individuals. We used these maps to address several questions: (1) Are vaccine-induced responses randomly distributed across vaccine inserts, or do they cluster into immunodominant epitope hotspots? (2) Are the immunodominance patterns observed for these two vaccines in three vaccine trials different from one another? (3) Do vaccine-induced hotspots overlap with epitope hotspots induced by chronic natural infection with HIV-1? (4) Do immunodominant hotspots target evolutionarily conserved regions of the HIV genome? (5) Can epitope prediction methods be used to identify these hotspots? We found that vaccine responses clustered into epitope hotspots in all three vaccine trials and some of these hotspots were not observed in chronic natural infection. We also found significant differences between the immunodominance patterns generated in each trial, even comparing two trials that tested the same vaccine in different populations. Some of the vaccine-induced immunodominant hotspots were located in highly variable regions of the HIV genome, and this was more evident for the MRKAd-5 HIV vaccine. Finally, we found that epitope prediction methods can partially predict the location of vaccine-induced epitope hotspots. Our findings have implications for vaccine design and suggest a framework by which different

  8. HIV-1 envelope sequence-based diversity measures for identifying recent infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Kafando

    Full Text Available Identifying recent HIV-1 infections is crucial for monitoring HIV-1 incidence and optimizing public health prevention efforts. To identify recent HIV-1 infections, we evaluated and compared the performance of 4 sequence-based diversity measures including percent diversity, percent complexity, Shannon entropy and number of haplotypes targeting 13 genetic segments within the env gene of HIV-1. A total of 597 diagnostic samples obtained in 2013 and 2015 from recently and chronically HIV-1 infected individuals were selected. From the selected samples, 249 (134 from recent versus 115 from chronic infections env coding regions, including V1-C5 of gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain of HIV-1, were successfully amplified and sequenced by next generation sequencing (NGS using the Illumina MiSeq platform. The ability of the four sequence-based diversity measures to correctly identify recent HIV infections was evaluated using the frequency distribution curves, median and interquartile range and area under the curve (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC. Comparing the median and interquartile range and evaluating the frequency distribution curves associated with the 4 sequence-based diversity measures, we observed that the percent diversity, number of haplotypes and Shannon entropy demonstrated significant potential to discriminate recent from chronic infections (p<0.0001. Using the AUC of ROC analysis, only the Shannon entropy measure within three HIV-1 env segments could accurately identify recent infections at a satisfactory level. The env segments were gp120 C2_1 (AUC = 0.806, gp120 C2_3 (AUC = 0.805 and gp120 V3 (AUC = 0.812. Our results clearly indicate that the Shannon entropy measure represents a useful tool for predicting HIV-1 infection recency.

  9. Origin and dynamics of HIV-1 subtype C infection in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengli Shen

    Full Text Available To investigate the geographical origin and evolution dynamics of HIV-1 subtype C infection in India.Ninety HIV-1 subtype C env gp120 subtype C sequences from India were compared with 312 env gp120 reference subtype C sequences from 27 different countries obtained from Los Alamos HIV database. All the HIV-1 subtype C env gp120 sequences from India were used for the geographical origin analysis and 61 subtype C env gp120 sequences with known sampling year (from 1991 to 2008 were employed to determine the origin of HIV infection in India.Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 env sequences was used to investigate the geographical origin and tMRCA of Indian HIV-1 subtype C. Evolutionary parameters including origin date and demographic growth patterns of Indian subtype C were estimated using a Bayesian coalescent-based approach under relaxed molecular clock models.The majority of the analyzed Indian and South African HIV-1 subtype C sequences formed a single monophyletic cluster. The most recent common ancestor date was calculated to be 1975.56 (95% HPD, 1968.78-1981.52. Reconstruction of the effective population size revealed three phases of epidemic growth: an initial slow growth, followed by exponential growth, and then a plateau phase approaching present time. Stabilization of the epidemic growth phase correlated with the foundation of National AIDS Control Organization in India.Indian subtype C originated from a single South African lineage in the middle of 1970s. The current study emphasizes not only the utility of HIV-1 sequence data for epidemiological studies but more notably highlights the effectiveness of community or government intervention strategies in controlling the trend of the epidemic.

  10. UV-induced transcription from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat and UV-induced secretion of an extracellular factor that induces HIV-1 transcription in nonirradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, B.; Kraemer, M.R.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Ponta, H.; Herrlich, P.

    1989-01-01

    UV irradiation, but not visible sunlight, induces the transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Chimeric constructs carrying all or parts of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat linked to an indicator gene were transfected into HeLa cells or murine and human T-cell lines, and their response to irradiation was tested. The cis-acting element conferring UV responsiveness is identical to the sequence binding transcription factor NF kappa B. UV irradiation enhances NF kappa B binding activity as assayed by gel retardation experiments. Interestingly, the requirement for UV irradiation can be replaced by cocultivation of transfected cells with UV-irradiated nontransfected (HIV-1-negative) cells. A UV-induced extracellular protein factor is detected in the culture medium conditioned by UV-treated cells. The factor is produced upon UV irradiation by several murine and human cell lines, including HeLa, Molt-4, and Jurkat, and acts on several cells. These data suggest that the UV response of keratinocytes in human skin can be magnified and spread to deeper layers that are more shielded, including the Langerhans cells, and that this indirect UV response may contribute to the activation of HIV-1 in humans

  11. Maturation Pathways of Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimiter S. Dimitrov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Several human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs and antibody fragments, including the best characterized in terms of structure-function b12 and Fab X5, exhibit relatively potent and broad HIV-1 neutralizing activity. However, the elicitation of b12 or b12-like antibodies in vivo by vaccine immunogens based on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env has not been successful. B12 is highly divergent from the closest corresponding germline antibody while X5 is less divergent. We have hypothesized that the relatively high degree of specific somatic hypermutations may preclude binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env to closest germline antibodies, and that identifying antibodies that are intermediates in the pathways to maturation could help design novel vaccine immunogens to guide the immune system for their enhanced elicitation. In support of this hypothesis we have previously found that a germline-like b12 (monovalent and bivalent scFv as an Fc fusion protein or IgG lacks measurable binding to an Env as measured by ELISA with a sensitivity in the μM range [1]; here we present evidence confirming and expanding these findings for a panel of Envs. In contrast, a germline-like scFv X5 bound Env with high (nM affinity. To begin to explore the maturation pathways of these antibodies we identified several possible b12 intermediate antibodies and tested their neutralizing activity. These intermediate antibodies neutralized only some HIV-1 isolates and with relatively weak potency. In contrast, germline-like scFv X5 neutralized a subset of the tested HIV-1 isolates with comparable efficiencies to that of the mature X5. These results could help explain the relatively high immunogenicity of the coreceptor binding site on gp120 and the abundance of CD4-induced (CD4i antibodies in HIV-1-infected patients (X5 is a CD4i antibody as well as the maturation pathway of X5. They also can help identify antigens that can bind specifically to b12 germline and

  12. Anti-HIV double variable domain immunoglobulins binding both gp41 and gp120 for targeted delivery of immunoconjugates.

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    Ryan B Craig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-HIV immunoconjugates targeted to the HIV envelope protein may be used to eradicate the latent reservoir of HIV infection using activate-and-purge protocols. Previous studies have identified the two target epitopes most effective for the delivery of cytotoxic immunoconjugates the CD4-binding site of gp120, and the hairpin loop of gp41. Here we construct and test tetravalent double variable domain immunoglobulin molecules (DVD-Igs that bind to both epitopes. METHODS: Synthetic genes that encode DVD-Igs utilizing V-domains derived from human anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 Abs were designed and expressed in 293F cells. A series of constructs tested different inter-V-linker domains and orientations of the two V domains. Antibodies were tested for binding to recombinant Ag and native Env expressed on infected cells, for neutralization of infectious HIV, and for their ability to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates to infected cells. FINDINGS: The outer V-domain was the major determinant of binding and functional activity of the DVD-Ig. Function of the inner V-domain and bifunctional binding required at least 15 AA in the inter-V-domain linker. A molecular model showing the spatial orientation of the two epitopes is consistent with this observation. Linkers that incorporated helical domains (A[EAAAK](nA resulted in more effective DVD-Igs than those based solely on flexible domains ([GGGGS](n. In general, the DVD-Igs outperformed the less effective parental antibody and equaled the activity of the more effective. The ability of the DVD-Igs to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates in the absence of soluble CD4 was improved over that of either parent. CONCLUSIONS: DVD-Igs can be designed that bind to both gp120 and gp41 on the HIV envelope. DVD-Igs are effective in delivering cytotoxic immunoconjugates. The optimal design of these DVD-Igs, in which both domains are fully functional, has not yet been achieved.

  13. Ninety-five- and 25-kDa fragments of the human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp120 bind to the CD4 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, A.; Bergman, T.; Matthews, T.; Joernvall, H.; Wigzell, H.

    1988-01-01

    Iodine-125-labeled gp120 (120-kDa envelope glycoprotein) from the BH10 isolate of human immunodeficiency virus is cleaved to a limited extend with the glutamate-specific protease from Staphylococcus aureus. After disulfide bond reduction, fragments with approximate molecular masses of 95, 60, 50, and 25 kDa are produced. Tests for binding to CD4-positive cells show that only two fragments, the 95- and 25- kDa peptides, are observed in cleavage products that retain the selective binding capacity of gp120. Radiosequence analysis of the fragments after sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electroblotting demonstrates that the 95-kDa fragment lacks the N-terminal region of gp120 and starts at position 143 of the mature envelope protein. The 50-kDa fragment starts at the same position. The 25-kDa binding fragment was similarly deduced to be generated as a small fragment from a cleavage site in the C-terminal part of gp120. The identifications of these fragments demonstrate that radiosequence analysis utilizing 125 I-labeled tyrosine residues can function as a useful and reliable method for small-scale determination of cleavage sites in proteins. Combined, the data suggest domain-like subdivisions of gp120, define at least two intervening segments especially sensitive to proteolytic cleavage, and demonstrate the presence of a functional region for receptor binding in the C-terminal part of the molecule

  14. Comprehensive sieve analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial.

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    Paul T Edlefsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The RV144 clinical trial showed the partial efficacy of a vaccine regimen with an estimated vaccine efficacy (VE of 31% for protecting low-risk Thai volunteers against acquisition of HIV-1. The impact of vaccine-induced immune responses can be investigated through sieve analysis of HIV-1 breakthrough infections (infected vaccine and placebo recipients. A V1/V2-targeted comparison of the genomes of HIV-1 breakthrough viruses identified two V2 amino acid sites that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Here we extended the V1/V2 analysis to the entire HIV-1 genome using an array of methods based on individual sites, k-mers and genes/proteins. We identified 56 amino acid sites or "signatures" and 119 k-mers that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Of those, 19 sites and 38 k-mers were located in the regions comprising the RV144 vaccine (Env-gp120, Gag, and Pro. The nine signature sites in Env-gp120 were significantly enriched for known antibody-associated sites (p = 0.0021. In particular, site 317 in the third variable loop (V3 overlapped with a hotspot of antibody recognition, and sites 369 and 424 were linked to CD4 binding site neutralization. The identified signature sites significantly covaried with other sites across the genome (mean = 32.1 more than did non-signature sites (mean = 0.9 (p < 0.0001, suggesting functional and/or structural relevance of the signature sites. Since signature sites were not preferentially restricted to the vaccine immunogens and because most of the associations were insignificant following correction for multiple testing, we predict that few of the genetic differences are strongly linked to the RV144 vaccine-induced immune pressure. In addition to presenting results of the first complete-genome analysis of the breakthrough infections in the RV144 trial, this work describes a set of statistical methods and tools applicable to analysis of breakthrough infection genomes in general vaccine

  15. Identification of a D-amino acid decapeptide HIV-1 entry inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggiano, Cesar; Jiang Shibo; Lu Hong; Zhao Qian; Liu Shuwen; Binley, James; Blondelle, Sylvie E.

    2006-01-01

    Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virion into host cells involves three major steps, each being a potential target for the development of entry inhibitors: gp120 binding to CD4, gp120-CD4 complex interacting with a coreceptor, and gp41 refolding to form a six-helix bundle. Using a D-amino acid decapeptide combinatorial library, we identified peptide DC13 as having potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory activity, and effectively inhibiting infection by several laboratory-adapted and primary HIV-1 strains. While DC13 did not block binding of gp120 to CD4, nor disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle formation, it effectively blocked the binding of an anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody and chemokine SDF-1α to CXCR4-expressing cells. However, because R5-using primary viruses were also neutralized, the antiviral activity of DC13 implies additional mode(s) of action. These results suggest that DC13 is a useful HIV-1 coreceptor antagonist for CXCR4 and, due to its biostability and simplicity, may be of value for developing a new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors

  16. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin-Xu; Mellon, Michael; Bowder, Dane; Quinn, Meghan; Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. - Highlights: • Designed single-chain VRC01 antibody was demonstrated to bind HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Single-chain VRC01 antibody was successfully displayed on the surface of E. coli. • Engineered bacteria can absorb HIV-1 particles and prevent HIV-1 infection in cell culture

  17. Generation and characterization of a stable cell population releasing fluorescent HIV-1-based Virus Like Particles in an inducible way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Valerie

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of cell lines releasing fluorescent viral particles can significantly support a variety of investigations, including the study of virus-cell interaction and the screening of antiviral compounds. Regarding HIV-1, the recovery of such biologic reagents represents a very hard challenge due to the intrinsic cytotoxicity of many HIV-1 products. We sought to overcome such a limitation by using a cell line releasing HIV-1 particles in an inducible way, and by exploiting the ability of a HIV-1 Nef mutant to be incorporated in virions at quite high levels. Results Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a HIV-1 packaging cell line, termed 18-4s, able to release valuable amounts of fluorescent HIV-1 based Virus-Like Particles (VLPs in an inducible way. 18-4s cells were recovered by constitutively expressing the HIV-1 NefG3C mutant fused with the enhanced-green fluorescent protein (NefG3C-GFP in a previously isolated inducible HIV-1 packaging cell line. The G3C mutation creates a palmitoylation site which results in NefG3C-GFP incorporation into virions greatly exceeding that of the wild type counterpart. Upon induction of 18-4s cells with ponasterone A and sodium butyrate, up to 4 μg/ml of VLPs, which had incorporated about 150 molecules of NefG3C-GFP per viral particle, were released into the culture supernatant. Due to their intrinsic strong fluorescence, the 18-4s VLPs were easily detectable by a novel cytofluorometric-based assay developed here. The treatment of target cells with fluorescent 18-4 VLPs pseudotyped with different glycoprotein receptors resulted in these becoming fluorescent as early as two hours post-challenge. Conclusion We created a stable cell line releasing fluorescent HIV-1 based VLPs upon induction useful for several applications including the study of virus-cell interactions and the screening of antiviral compounds.

  18. Bioinformatic analysis of neurotropic HIV envelope sequences identifies polymorphisms in the gp120 bridging sheet that increase macrophage-tropism through enhanced interactions with CCR5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mefford, Megan E.; Kunstman, Kevin; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages express low levels of the CD4 receptor compared to T-cells. Macrophage-tropic HIV strains replicating in brain of untreated patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) express Envs that are adapted to overcome this restriction through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here, bioinformatic analysis of env sequence datasets together with functional studies identified polymorphisms in the β3 strand of the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that increase M-tropism. D197, which results in loss of an N-glycan located near the HIV Env trimer apex, was detected in brain in some HAD patients, while position 200 was estimated to be under positive selection. D197 and T/V200 increased fusion and infection of cells expressing low CD4 by enhancing gp120 binding to CCR5. These results identify polymorphisms in the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that overcome the restriction to macrophage infection imposed by low CD4 through enhanced gp120–CCR5 interactions, thereby promoting infection of brain and other macrophage-rich tissues. - Highlights: • We analyze HIV Env sequences and identify amino acids in beta 3 of the gp120 bridging sheet that enhance macrophage tropism. • These amino acids at positions 197 and 200 are present in brain of some patients with HIV-associated dementia. • D197 results in loss of a glycan near the HIV Env trimer apex, which may increase exposure of V3. • These variants may promote infection of macrophages in the brain by enhancing gp120–CCR5 interactions

  19. Bioinformatic analysis of neurotropic HIV envelope sequences identifies polymorphisms in the gp120 bridging sheet that increase macrophage-tropism through enhanced interactions with CCR5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mefford, Megan E., E-mail: megan_mefford@hms.harvard.edu [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Kunstman, Kevin, E-mail: kunstman@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Wolinsky, Steven M., E-mail: s-wolinsky@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Gabuzda, Dana, E-mail: dana_gabuzda@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Neurology (Microbiology and Immunobiology), Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Macrophages express low levels of the CD4 receptor compared to T-cells. Macrophage-tropic HIV strains replicating in brain of untreated patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) express Envs that are adapted to overcome this restriction through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here, bioinformatic analysis of env sequence datasets together with functional studies identified polymorphisms in the β3 strand of the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that increase M-tropism. D197, which results in loss of an N-glycan located near the HIV Env trimer apex, was detected in brain in some HAD patients, while position 200 was estimated to be under positive selection. D197 and T/V200 increased fusion and infection of cells expressing low CD4 by enhancing gp120 binding to CCR5. These results identify polymorphisms in the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that overcome the restriction to macrophage infection imposed by low CD4 through enhanced gp120–CCR5 interactions, thereby promoting infection of brain and other macrophage-rich tissues. - Highlights: • We analyze HIV Env sequences and identify amino acids in beta 3 of the gp120 bridging sheet that enhance macrophage tropism. • These amino acids at positions 197 and 200 are present in brain of some patients with HIV-associated dementia. • D197 results in loss of a glycan near the HIV Env trimer apex, which may increase exposure of V3. • These variants may promote infection of macrophages in the brain by enhancing gp120–CCR5 interactions.

  20. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Bae, Yong Soo; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction

  1. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyangshuk [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Medical Life Sciences, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Yong Soo [Department of Biological Science, College of Natural Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinseu, E-mail: jinpark@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  2. Hairpin-induced tRNA-mediated (HITME) recombination in HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantinova, Pavlina; de Haan, Peter; Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2006-01-01

    Recombination due to template switching during reverse transcription is a major source of genetic variability in retroviruses. In the present study we forced a recombination event in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by electroporation of T cells with DNA from a molecular HIV-1 clone that

  3. HIV-1 Env DNA vaccine plus protein boost delivered by EP expands B- and T-cell responses and neutralizing phenotype in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar Muthumani

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will most likely require the induction of strong T-cell responses, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, and the elicitation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Previously, we demonstrated the induction of strong HIV/SIV cellular immune responses in macaques and humans using synthetic consensus DNA immunogens delivered via adaptive electroporation (EP. However, the ability of this improved DNA approach to prime for relevant antibody responses has not been previously studied. Here, we investigate the immunogenicity of consensus DNA constructs encoding gp140 sequences from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and D in a DNA prime-protein boost vaccine regimen. Mice and guinea pigs were primed with single- and multi-clade DNA via EP and boosted with recombinant gp120 protein. Sera were analyzed for gp120 binding and induction of neutralizing antibody activity. Immunization with recombinant Env protein alone induced low-titer binding antibodies with limited neutralization breath. In contrast, the synthetic DNA prime-protein boost protocol induced significantly higher antibody binding titers. Furthermore, sera from DNA prime-protein boost groups were able to neutralize a broader range of viruses in a panel of tier 1 clade B viruses as well as multiple tier 1 clade A and clade C viruses. Further investigation of synthetic DNA prime plus adaptive EP plus protein boost appears warranted.

  4. Differential contributions of ubiquitin-modified APOBEC3G lysine residues to HIV-1 Vif-induced degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Tiffany; Shao, Qiujia; Wang, Weiran; Wang, Yudi; Wang, Chenliang; Kinlock, Ballington; Liu, Bindong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (A3G) is a host restriction factor that impedes HIV-1 replication. Viral integrity is salvaged by HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif), which mediates A3G polyubiquitination and subsequent cellular depletion. Previous studies have implied that A3G polyubiquitination is essential for Vif-induced degradation. However, the contribution of polyubiquitination to the rate of A3G degradation remains unclear. Here we show that A3G po...

  5. Increased chemokine signaling in a model of HIV1-associated peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan David J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Painful distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP is the most common neurological complication of HIV1 infection. Although infection with the virus itself is associated with an incidence of DSP, patients are more likely to become symptomatic following initiation of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI treatment. The chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1/CCL2 and stromal derived factor-1 (SDF1/CXCL12 and their respective receptors, CCR2 and CXCR4, have been implicated in HIV1 related neuropathic pain mechanisms including NRTI treatment in rodents. Utilizing a rodent model that incorporates the viral coat protein, gp120, and the NRTI, 2'3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC, we examined the degree to which chemokine receptor signaling via CCR2 and CXCR4 potentially influences the resultant chronic hypernociceptive behavior. We observed that following unilateral gp120 sciatic nerve administration, rats developed profound tactile hypernociception in the hindpaw ipsilateral to gp120 treatment. Behavioral changes were also present in the hindpaw contralateral to the injury, albeit delayed and less robust. Using immunohistochemical studies, we demonstrated that MCP1 and CCR2 were upregulated by primary sensory neurons in lumbar ganglia by post-operative day (POD 14. The functional nature of these observations was confirmed using calcium imaging in acutely dissociated lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG derived from gp120 injured rats at POD 14. Tactile hypernociception in gp120 treated animals was reversed following treatment with a CCR2 receptor antagonist at POD 14. Some groups of animals were subjected to gp120 sciatic nerve injury in combination with an injection of ddC at POD 14. This injury paradigm produced pronounced bilateral tactile hypernociception from POD 14–48. More importantly, functional MCP1/CCR2 and SDF1/CXCR4 signaling was present in sensory neurons. In contrast to gp120 treatment alone, the hypernociceptive behavior

  6. Crosstalk between HDAC6 and Nox2-based NADPH oxidase mediates HIV-1 Tat-induced pro-inflammatory responses in astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi Soo Youn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 likely is important in inflammatory diseases. However, how HDAC6 exerts its effect on inflammatory processes remains unclear. HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat activates NADPH oxidase resulting in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to extensive neuro-inflammation in the central nervous system. We investigated the correlation of HDAC6 and NADPH oxidase in HIV-1 Tat-stimulated astrocytes. HDAC6 knockdown attenuated HIV-1 Tat-induced ROS generation and NADPH oxidase activation. HDAC6 knockdown suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, such as Nox2, p47phox, and p22phox. Specific inhibition of HDAC6 using tubastatin A suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced ROS generation and activation of NADPH oxidase. N-acetyl cysteine, diphenyl iodonium, and apocynin suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of HDAC6 and the pro-inflammatory chemokines CCL2, CXCL8, and CXCL10. Nox2 knockdown attenuated HIV-1 Tat-induced HDAC6 expression and subsequent expression of chemokines. The collective results point to the potential crosstalk between HDAC6 and NADPH oxidase, which could be a combined therapeutic target for relief of HIV-1 Tat-mediated neuro-inflammation. Keywords: HIV-1 Tat, HDAC6, NADPH oxidase, ROS, Inflammation, Astrocytes

  7. CCL28 induces mucosal homing of HIV-1-specific IgA-secreting plasma cells in mice immunized with HIV-1 virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Rainone

    Full Text Available Mucosae-associated epithelial chemokine (MEC or CCL28 binds to CCR3 and CCR10 and recruits IgA-secreting plasma cells (IgA-ASCs in the mucosal lamina propria. The ability of this chemokine to enhance migration of IgA-ASCs to mucosal sites was assessed in a mouse immunization model using HIV-1(IIIB Virus-like particles (VLPs. Mice receiving either HIV-1(IIIB VLPs alone, CCL28 alone, or the irrelevant CCL19 chemokine were used as controls. Results showed a significantly increased CCR3 and CCR10 expression on CD19(+ splenocytes of HIV-1(IIIB VPL-CCL28-treated mice. HIV-1 Env-specific IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-5 production, total IgA, anti-Env IgA as well as gastro-intestinal mucosal IgA-secreting plasma cells were also significantly augmented in these mice. Notably, sera and vaginal secretions from HIV-1(IIIB VLP-CCL28-treated mice exhibited an enhanced neutralizing activity against both a HIV-1/B-subtype laboratory strain and a heterologous HIV-1/C-subtype primary isolate. These data suggest that CCL28 could be useful in enhancing the IgA immune response that will likely play a pivotal role in prophylactic HIV vaccines.

  8. [The humoral immune response in mice induced by recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing HIV-1 gag].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofei; Zhang, Cairong; Liu, Xiaojuan; Ma, Zhenghai

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the humoral immune response induced by recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing HIV-1 gag in mice immunized orally, intranasally, subcutaneously or in the combined way of above three. Fifty BALB/c mice were randomly divided into 5 groups, 10 mice per group. The mice were immunized consecutively three times at two week intervals with 10(9) CFU of recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing gag through oral, intranasal, subcutaneous administration or the mix of them. The mice that were immunized orally with Lactococcus lactis containing PMG36e served as a control group. The sera of mice were collected before primary immunization and 2 weeks after each immunization to detect the gag specific IgG by ELISA. Compared with the control group, the higher titer of serum gag specific IgG was detected in the four groups immunized with recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing gag, and it was the highest in the mixed immunization group (PLactococcus lactis expressing gag can induce humoral immune response in mice by oral, intranasal, subcutaneous injection or the mix of them, and the mixed immunization can enhance the immune effects of Lactococcus lactis vector vaccine.

  9. Minimal Contribution of APOBEC3-Induced G-to-A Hypermutation to HIV-1 Recombination and Genetic Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Burdick, Ryan C; Gorelick, Robert J; Keele, Brandon F; Hu, Wei-Shau; Pathak, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    Although the predominant effect of host restriction APOBEC3 proteins on HIV-1 infection is to block viral replication, they might inadvertently increase retroviral genetic variation by inducing G-to-A hypermutation. Numerous studies have disagreed on the contribution of hypermutation to viral genetic diversity and evolution. Confounding factors contributing to the debate include the extent of lethal (stop codon) and sublethal hypermutation induced by different APOBEC3 proteins, the inability to distinguish between G-to-A mutations induced by APOBEC3 proteins and error-prone viral replication, the potential impact of hypermutation on the frequency of retroviral recombination, and the extent to which viral recombination occurs in vivo, which can reassort mutations in hypermutated genomes. Here, we determined the effects of hypermutation on the HIV-1 recombination rate and its contribution to genetic variation through recombination to generate progeny genomes containing portions of hypermutated genomes without lethal mutations. We found that hypermutation did not significantly affect the rate of recombination, and recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes only increased the viral mutation rate by 3.9 × 10-5 mutations/bp/replication cycle in heterozygous virions, which is similar to the HIV-1 mutation rate. Since copackaging of hypermutated and wild-type genomes occurs very rarely in vivo, recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes does not significantly contribute to the genetic variation of replicating HIV-1. We also analyzed previously reported hypermutated sequences from infected patients and determined that the frequency of sublethal mutagenesis for A3G and A3F is negligible (4 × 10-21 and1 × 10-11, respectively) and its contribution to viral mutations is far below mutations generated during error-prone reverse transcription. Taken together, we conclude that the contribution of APOBEC3-induced hypermutation to HIV-1 genetic

  10. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily E I M Mouser

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62 from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs.

  11. Exploring the membrane fusion mechanism through force-induced disassembly of HIV-1 six-helix bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Kai [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yong [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Lou, Jizhong, E-mail: jlou@ibp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-05-13

    Enveloped virus, such as HIV-1, employs membrane fusion mechanism to invade into host cell. HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain uses six-helix bundle configuration to accomplish this process. Using molecular dynamic simulations, we confirmed the stability of this six-helix bundle by showing high occupancy of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Key residues and interactions important for the bundle integration were characterized by force-induced unfolding simulations of six-helix bundle, exhibiting the collapse order of these groups of interactions. Moreover, our results in some way concerted with a previous theory that the formation of coiled-coil choose a route which involved cooperative interactions between the N-terminal and C-terminal helix. -- Highlights: •Unfolding of HIV-1 gp41 six-helix bundle is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. •Specific interactions responsible for the stability of HIV-1 envelope post-fusion conformation were identified. •The gp41 six-helix bundle transition inducing membrane fusion might be a cooperative process of the three subunits.

  12. HIV-1 phylogenetic analysis shows HIV-1 transits through the meninges to brain and peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L; Gray, Rebecca R; Salemi, Marco; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; McGrath, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Brain infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been investigated in many reports with a variety of conclusions concerning the time of entry and degree of viral compartmentalization. To address these diverse findings, we sequenced HIV-1 gp120 clones from a wide range of brain, peripheral and meningeal tissues from five patients who died from several HIV-1 associated disease pathologies. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis confirmed previous studies that showed a significant degree of compartmentalization in brain and peripheral tissue subpopulations. Some intermixing between the HIV-1 subpopulations was evident, especially in patients that died from pathologies other than HIV-associated dementia. Interestingly, the major tissue harboring virus from both the brain and peripheral tissues was the meninges. These results show that (1) HIV-1 is clearly capable of migrating out of the brain, (2) the meninges are the most likely primary transport tissues, and (3) infected brain macrophages comprise an important HIV reservoir during highly active antiretroviral therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Ubc9 is involved in intracellular HIV-1 Env stability after trafficking out of the trans-Golgi network in a Gag dependent manner.

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    Christopher R Bohl

    Full Text Available The cellular E2 Sumo conjugase, Ubc9 interacts with HIV-1 Gag, and is important for the assembly of infectious HIV-1 virions. In the previous study we demonstrated that in the absence of Ubc9, a defect in virion assembly was associated with decreased levels of mature intracellular Envelope (Env that affected Env incorporation into virions and virion infectivity. We have further characterized the effect of Ubc9 knockdown on HIV Env processing and assembly. We found that gp160 stability in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and its trafficking to the trans-Golgi network (TGN were unaffected, indicating that the decreased intracellular mature Env levels in Ubc9-depleted cells were due to a selective degradation of mature Env gp120 after cleavage from gp160 and trafficked out of the TGN. Decreased levels of Gag and mature Env were found to be associated with the plasma membrane and lipid rafts, which suggest that these viral proteins were not trafficked correctly to the assembly site. Intracellular gp120 were partially rescued when treated with a combination of lysosome inhibitors. Taken together our results suggest that in the absence of Ubc9, gp120 is preferentially degraded in the lysosomes likely before trafficking to assembly sites leading to the production of defective virions. This study provides further insight in the processing and packaging of the HIV-1 gp120 into mature HIV-1 virions.

  14. Glycosylation in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein and its biological implications

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, Yung Shwen

    2013-08-01

    Glycosylation of HIV-1 envelope proteins (Env gp120/gp41) plays a vital role in viral evasion from the host immune response, which occurs through the masking of key neutralization epitopes and the presentation of the Env glycosylation as \\'self\\' to the host immune system. Env glycosylation is generally conserved, yet its continual evolution plays an important role in modulating viral infectivity and Env immunogenicity. Thus, it is believed that Env glycosylation, which is a vital part of the HIV-1 architecture, also controls intra- and inter-clade genetic variations. Discerning intra- and inter-clade glycosylation variations could therefore yield important information for understanding the molecular and biological differences between HIV clades and may assist in effectively designing Env-based immunogens and in clearly understanding HIV vaccines. This review provides an in-depth perspective of various aspects of Env glycosylation in the context of HIV-1 pathogenesis. © 2013 Future Medicine Ltd.

  15. Characterization of the virus-cell interactions by HIV-1 subtype C variants from an antiretroviral therapy-naïve subject with baseline resistance to the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Martin Roelsgaard

    The CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc (MVC) exerts its antiviral activity by binding to- and altering the conformation of the CCR5 extracellular loops such that HIV-1 gp120 no longer recognizes CCR5. Viruses that have become resistant to MVC through long-term in vitro culture, or from treatment failure...... in vivo, can use the MVCbound form of CCR5 for HIV-1 entry via adaptive alterations in gp120. Partial baseline resistance to another CCR5 inhibitor through this mechanism, AD101, has been noted recently in one subject (1). Here, we identified and characterized envelope (Env) clones with baseline...

  16. The HIV-1 Vpu protein induces apoptosis in Drosophila via activation of JNK signaling.

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    Christelle Marchal

    Full Text Available The genome of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes the canonical retroviral proteins, as well as additional accessory proteins that enhance the expression of viral genes, the infectivity of the virus and the production of virions. The accessory Viral Protein U (Vpu, in particular, enhances viral particle production, while also promoting apoptosis of HIV-infected human T lymphocytes. Some Vpu effects rely on its interaction with the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system, but the mechanisms responsible for its pro-apoptotic effects in vivo are complex and remain largely to be elucidated.We took advantage of the Drosophila model to study the effects of Vpu activity in vivo. Expression of Vpu in the developing Drosophila wing provoked tissue loss due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, Vpu induced expression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper, known to down-regulate Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs which are caspase-antagonizing E3 ubiquitin ligases. Indeed, Vpu also reduced accumulation of Drosophila IAP1 (DIAP1. Though our results demonstrate a physical interaction between Vpu and the proteasome-addressing SLIMB/β-TrCP protein, as in mammals, both SLIMB/βTrCP-dependent and -independent Vpu effects were observed in the Drosophila wing. Lastly, the pro-apoptotic effect of Vpu in this tissue was abrogated upon inactivation of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK pathway. Our results in the fly thus provide the first functional evidence linking Vpu pro-apoptotic effects to activation of the conserved JNK pathway.

  17. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo; El-Hage, Nazira; Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan; Kashanchi, Fatah; Ochem, Alex; Simon, Gary L.; Karn, Jonathan; Hauser, Kurt F.; Tyagi, Mudit

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR

  18. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); El-Hage, Nazira [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah [George Mason University, Manassas, VA (United States); Ochem, Alex [ICGEB, Wernher and Beit Building, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa); Simon, Gary L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Karn, Jonathan [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hauser, Kurt F. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Tyagi, Mudit, E-mail: tmudit@email.gwu.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR.

  19. Role of the carbohydrate-binding sites of griffithsin in the prevention of DC-SIGN-mediated capture and transmission of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Hoorelbeke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The glycan-targeting C-type DC-SIGN lectin receptor is implicated in the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV by binding the virus and transferring the captured HIV-1 to CD4(+ T lymphocytes. Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs have been reported to block HIV-1 infection. We have now investigated the potent mannose-specific anti-HIV CBA griffithsin (GRFT on its ability to inhibit the capture of HIV-1 to DC-SIGN, its DC-SIGN-directed transmission to CD4(+ T-lymphocytes and the role of the three carbohydrate-binding sites (CBS of GRFT in these processes. FINDINGS: GRFT inhibited HIV-1(IIIB infection of CEM and HIV-1(NL4.3 infection of C8166 CD4(+ T-lymphocytes at an EC50 of 0.059 and 0.444 nM, respectively. The single mutant CBS variants of GRFT (in which a key Asp in one of the CBS was mutated to Ala were about ∼20 to 60-fold less potent to prevent HIV-1 infection and ∼20 to 90-fold less potent to inhibit syncytia formation in co-cultures of persistently HIV-1 infected HuT-78 and uninfected C8166 CD4(+ T-lymphocytes. GRFT prevents DC-SIGN-mediated virus capture and HIV-1 transmission to CD4(+ T-lymphocytes at an EC50 of 1.5 nM and 0.012 nM, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR studies revealed that wild-type GRFT efficiently blocked the binding between DC-SIGN and immobilized gp120, whereas the point mutant CBS variants of GRFT were ∼10- to 15-fold less efficient. SPR-analysis also demonstrated that wild-type GRFT and its single mutant CBS variants have the capacity to expel bound gp120 from the gp120-DC-SIGN complex in a dose dependent manner, a property that was not observed for HHA, another mannose-specific potent anti-HIV-1 CBA. CONCLUSION: GRFT is inhibitory against HIV gp120 binding to DC-SIGN, efficiently prevents DC-SIGN-mediated transfer of HIV-1 to CD4(+ T-lymphocytes and is able to expel gp120 from the gp120-DC-SIGN complex. Functionally intact CBS of GRFT are important for the optimal action of

  20. Glycosaminoglycans are interactants of Langerin: comparison with gp120 highlights an unexpected calcium-independent binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrol, Eric; Nurisso, Alessandra; Daina, Antoine; Vassal-Stermann, Emilie; Thepaut, Michel; Girard, Eric; Vivès, Romain R; Fieschi, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Langerin is a C-type lectin specifically expressed in Langerhans cells. As recently shown for HIV, Langerin is thought to capture pathogens and mediate their internalisation into Birbeck Granules for elimination. However, the precise functions of Langerin remain elusive, mostly because of the lack of information on its binding properties and physiological ligands. Based on recent reports that Langerin binds to sulfated sugars, we conducted here a comparative analysis of Langerin interaction with mannose-rich HIV glycoprotein gp120 and glycosaminoglycan (GAGs), a family of sulfated polysaccharides expressed at the surface of most mammalian cells. Our results first revealed that Langerin bound to these different glycans through very distinct mechanisms and led to the identification of a novel, GAG-specific binding mode within Langerin. In contrast to the canonical lectin domain, this new binding site showed no Ca(2+)-dependency, and could only be detected in entire, trimeric extracellular domains of Langerin. Interestingly binding to GAGs, did not simply rely on a net charge effect, but rather on more discrete saccharide features, such as 6-O-sulfation, or iduronic acid content. Using molecular modelling simulations, we proposed a model of Langerin/heparin complex, which located the GAG binding site at the interface of two of the three Carbohydrate-recognition domains of the protein, at the edge of the a-helix coiled-coil. To our knowledge, the binding properties that we have highlighted here for Langerin, have never been reported for C-type lectins before. These findings provide new insights towards the understanding of Langerin biological functions.

  1. Glycosaminoglycans are interactants of Langerin: comparison with gp120 highlights an unexpected calcium-independent binding mode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Chabrol

    Full Text Available Langerin is a C-type lectin specifically expressed in Langerhans cells. As recently shown for HIV, Langerin is thought to capture pathogens and mediate their internalisation into Birbeck Granules for elimination. However, the precise functions of Langerin remain elusive, mostly because of the lack of information on its binding properties and physiological ligands. Based on recent reports that Langerin binds to sulfated sugars, we conducted here a comparative analysis of Langerin interaction with mannose-rich HIV glycoprotein gp120 and glycosaminoglycan (GAGs, a family of sulfated polysaccharides expressed at the surface of most mammalian cells. Our results first revealed that Langerin bound to these different glycans through very distinct mechanisms and led to the identification of a novel, GAG-specific binding mode within Langerin. In contrast to the canonical lectin domain, this new binding site showed no Ca(2+-dependency, and could only be detected in entire, trimeric extracellular domains of Langerin. Interestingly binding to GAGs, did not simply rely on a net charge effect, but rather on more discrete saccharide features, such as 6-O-sulfation, or iduronic acid content. Using molecular modelling simulations, we proposed a model of Langerin/heparin complex, which located the GAG binding site at the interface of two of the three Carbohydrate-recognition domains of the protein, at the edge of the a-helix coiled-coil. To our knowledge, the binding properties that we have highlighted here for Langerin, have never been reported for C-type lectins before. These findings provide new insights towards the understanding of Langerin biological functions.

  2. Programming of neurotoxic cofactor CXCL-10 in HIV-1-associated dementia: abrogation of CXCL-10-induced neuro-glial toxicity in vitro by PKC activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehla Rajeev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 50% of patients undergoing lifelong suppressive antiviral treatment for HIV-1 infection develop minor HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Neurological complications during HIV-1 infection are the result of direct neuronal damage by proinflammatory products released from HIV-1-infected or -uninfected activated lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, microglia and astrocytes. The specific pro-inflammatory products and their roles in neurotoxicity are far from clear. We investigated proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of HIV-demented (HIV-D and HIV-nondemented (HIV-ND patients and studied their affect on neuroglial toxicity. Methods and results Bioplex array showed elevated levels of signatory chemokines or cytokines (IL-6, IFN-γ, CXCL10, MCP-1 and PDGF in the CSF of HIV-D patients (n = 7 but not in that of HIV-ND patients (n = 7. Among the signatory cytokines and chemokines, CXCL10 was distinctly upregulated in-vitro in HIV-1 (NLENG1-activated human fetal astrocytes, HIV-1 (Ba-L-infected macrophages, and HIV-1 (NLENG1-infected lymphocytes. Virus-infected macrophages also had increased levels of TNF-α. Consistently, human fetal astrocytes treated with HIV-1 and TNF-α induced the signatory molecules. CXCL10 in combination with HIV-1 synergistically enhanced neuronal toxicity and showed chemotactic activity (~ 40 fold for activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, suggesting the intersection of signaling events imparted by HIV-1 and CXCL10 after binding to their respective surface receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR3, on neurons. Blocking CXCR3 and its downstream MAP kinase (MAPK signaling pathway suppressed combined CXCL10 and HIV-1-induced neurotoxicity. Bryostatin, a PKC modulator and suppressor of CXCR4, conferred neuroprotection against combined insult with HIV-1 and CXCL10. Bryostatin also suppressed HIV-1 and CXCL10-induced PBMC chemotaxis. Although, therapeutic targeting

  3. SP-D impedes transfer of HIV-1 from multi-layered vaginal epithelium with a distinct gene signature

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    Hrishikesh Pandit

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant Protein (SP D is a member of the collectin family of soluble pattern recognition receptors. We have previously shown that a recombinant fragment of SP-D (rhSP-D inhibits gp120-CD4 interaction and HIV-1 entry in target cells. To potentiate its prophylactic use as a vaginal microbicide, we determined ex vivo efficacy using organotypic human vaginal-ectocervical epithelia (VEC-100 that closely resemble the native tissues of origin. VEC-100, stratified human vaginal-ectocervical tissues grown on membrane inserts were treated with rhSP-D followed by a challenge with HIV-1 to assess the transfer of HIV-1 through the VEC-100 tissues to PBMCs in the basal submucosal compartment. Treated VEC tissues were subjected to mRNA Illumina microarray analysis. Levels of transcripts encoding for immune mediators, adhesion and tight junction proteins were also evaluated. Effect of rhSP-D on viability, NFκB activation, cytokine secretion and bacterial colonization of cervical vaginal epithelial cells was determined. rhSP-D significantly inhibited HIV-1 transfer from the multi-layered epithelial tissues to the basal PBMCs as compared to HIV-1 alone. Global gene expression profile of HIV-1 challenged VEC-100 tissues revealed differential regulation of genes and pathways majorly involved in inflammation, cell survival and transcription factors. Levels of Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs and interferon-inducible proteins were significantly upregulated suggesting an interferon host defense response. rhSP-D showed an inhibition in the levels of GBPs and rescued the cell adhesion molecules such as Claudin 2, 3, 4, 5 and Occludin, known to be down regulated by HIV-1 in primary vaginal cells. Importantly, rhSP-D conditioned VEC tissue supernatants did not enhance susceptibility of target cells to HIV-1. rhSP-D treated vaginal epithelial cells did not show any significant alteration in viability, NFκB activation and levels of immune mediators like IL-1RA, Elafin

  4. Morphogenesis of the infectious HIV-1 virion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ichi eSakuragi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The virion of HIV-1 is spherical and viral glycoprotein spikes (gp120, gp41 protrude from its envelope. The characteristic cone-shaped core exists within the virion, caging the ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex, which is comprised of viral RNA, nucleocapsid (NC and viral enzymes. The HIV-1 virion is budded and released from the infected cell as an immature donut-shaped particle. During or immediately after release, viral protease (PR is activated and subsequently processes the viral structural protein Gag. Through this maturation process, virions acquire infectivity, but its mechanism and transition of morphology largely remain unclear. Recent technological advances in experimental devices and techniques have made it possible to closely dissect the viral production site on the cell, the exterior – or even the interior – of an individual virion, and many new aspects on virion morphology and maturation. In this manuscript, I review the morphogenesis of HIV-1 virions. I focus on several studies, including some of our recent findings, which examined virion formation and/or maturation processes. The story of novel compound, which inhibits virion maturation, and the importance of maturation research are also discussed.

  5. Ritonavir and Topical Ocular Corticosteroid Induced Cushing's Syndrome in an Adolescent With HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsbury, Paul G; Sharp, Jessica; Tappin, Alison; Hussey, Martin; Lenko, Alexandra; Foster, Caroline

    2017-05-01

    Cushing's syndrome after topical ocular corticosteroid use is extremely rare. We describe a case of symptomatic Cushing's syndrome in an adolescent male with sight-threatening vernal keratoconjunctivitis on antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection that included ritonavir, a potent cytochrome p450 CYP3A4 inhibitor. CYP3A4 inhibition reduces the metabolism of exogenous corticosteroids leading to suppression of endogenous steroid production and Cushing's syndrome.

  6. Monocyte-lymphocyte fusion induced by the HIV-1 envelope generates functional heterokaryons with an activated monocyte-like phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Méndez, David; Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Ortega, Enrique; Licona-Limón, Ileana; Huerta, Leonor, E-mail: leonorhh@biomedicas.unam.mx

    2017-03-01

    Enveloped viruses induce cell-cell fusion when infected cells expressing viral envelope proteins interact with target cells, or through the contact of cell-free viral particles with adjoining target cells. CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes and cells from the monocyte-macrophage lineage express receptors for HIV envelope protein. We have previously reported that lymphoid Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) can fuse with THP-1 monocytic cells, forming heterokaryons with a predominantly myeloid phenotype. This study shows that the expression of monocytic markers in heterokaryons is stable, whereas the expression of lymphoid markers is mostly lost. Like THP-1 cells, heterokaryons exhibited FcγR-dependent phagocytic activity and showed an enhanced expression of the activation marker ICAM-1 upon stimulation with PMA. In addition, heterokaryons showed morphological changes compatible with maturation, and high expression of the differentiation marker CD11b in the absence of differentiation-inducing agents. No morphological change nor increase in CD11b expression were observed when an HIV-fusion inhibitor blocked fusion, or when THP-1 cells were cocultured with Jurkat cells expressing a non-fusogenic Env protein, showing that differentiation was not induced merely by cell-cell interaction but required cell-cell fusion. Inhibition of TLR2/TLR4 signaling by a TIRAP inhibitor greatly reduced the expression of CD11b in heterokaryons. Thus, lymphocyte-monocyte heterokaryons induced by HIV-1 Env are stable and functional, and fusion prompts a phenotype characteristic of activated monocytes via intracellular TLR2/TLR4 signaling. - Highlights: • Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope fuse with THP-1 monocytes. • Heterokaryons display a dominant myeloid phenotype and monocyte function. • Heterokaryons exhibit activation features in the absence of activation agents. • Activation is not due to cell-cell interaction but requires cell-cell fusion. • The

  7. Monocyte-lymphocyte fusion induced by the HIV-1 envelope generates functional heterokaryons with an activated monocyte-like phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Méndez, David; Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Ortega, Enrique; Licona-Limón, Ileana; Huerta, Leonor

    2017-01-01

    Enveloped viruses induce cell-cell fusion when infected cells expressing viral envelope proteins interact with target cells, or through the contact of cell-free viral particles with adjoining target cells. CD4"+ T lymphocytes and cells from the monocyte-macrophage lineage express receptors for HIV envelope protein. We have previously reported that lymphoid Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) can fuse with THP-1 monocytic cells, forming heterokaryons with a predominantly myeloid phenotype. This study shows that the expression of monocytic markers in heterokaryons is stable, whereas the expression of lymphoid markers is mostly lost. Like THP-1 cells, heterokaryons exhibited FcγR-dependent phagocytic activity and showed an enhanced expression of the activation marker ICAM-1 upon stimulation with PMA. In addition, heterokaryons showed morphological changes compatible with maturation, and high expression of the differentiation marker CD11b in the absence of differentiation-inducing agents. No morphological change nor increase in CD11b expression were observed when an HIV-fusion inhibitor blocked fusion, or when THP-1 cells were cocultured with Jurkat cells expressing a non-fusogenic Env protein, showing that differentiation was not induced merely by cell-cell interaction but required cell-cell fusion. Inhibition of TLR2/TLR4 signaling by a TIRAP inhibitor greatly reduced the expression of CD11b in heterokaryons. Thus, lymphocyte-monocyte heterokaryons induced by HIV-1 Env are stable and functional, and fusion prompts a phenotype characteristic of activated monocytes via intracellular TLR2/TLR4 signaling. - Highlights: • Jurkat T cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope fuse with THP-1 monocytes. • Heterokaryons display a dominant myeloid phenotype and monocyte function. • Heterokaryons exhibit activation features in the absence of activation agents. • Activation is not due to cell-cell interaction but requires cell-cell fusion. • The

  8. Neutralization of X4- and R5-tropic HIV-1 NL4-3 variants by HOCl-modified serum albumins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwalbe Birco

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myeloperoxidase (MPO, an important element of the microbicidal activity of neutrophils, generates hypochlorous acid (HOCl from H2O2 and chloride, which is released into body fluids. Besides its direct microbicidal activity, HOCl can react with amino acid residues and HOCl-modified proteins can be detected in vivo. Findings This report is based on binding studies of HOCl-modified serum albumins to HIV-1 gp120 and three different neutralization assays using infectious virus. The binding studies were carried out by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and by standard ELISA techniques. Virus neutralization assays were carried out using HIV-1 NL4-3 virus and recombinant strains with CXCR4 and CCR5 coreceptor usage. Viral infection was monitored by a standard p24 or X-gal staining assay. Our data demonstrate that HOCl-modified mouse-, bovine- and human serum albumins all bind to the HIV-1 NL4-3 gp120 (LAV glycoprotein in contrast to non-modified albumin. Binding of HOCl-modified albumin to gp120 correlated to the blockade of CD4 as well as that of V3 loop specific monoclonal antibody binding. In neutralization experiments, HOCl-modified serum albumins inhibited replication and syncytium formation of the X4- and R5-tropic NL4-3 isolates in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions Our data indicate that HOCl-modified serum albumin veils the binding site for CD4 and the V3 loop on gp120. Such masking of the viral gp120/gp41 envelope complex might be a simple but promising strategy to inactivate HIV-1 and therefore prevent infection when HOCl-modified serum albumin is applied, for example, as a topical microbicide.

  9. HIV-1 tat protein recruits CIS to the cytoplasmic tail of CD127 to induce receptor ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugden, Scott, E-mail: scott.sugden@ircm.qc.ca [The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5 (Canada); Ghazawi, Feras [The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5 (Canada); MacPherson, Paul, E-mail: pmacpherson@toh.on.ca [The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5 (Canada); Division of Infectious Diseases, The Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6 (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 Tat protein down regulates expression of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain (CD127) from the surface of CD8 T cells resulting in impaired T cell proliferation and cytolytic capacity. We have previously shown that soluble Tat protein is taken up by CD8 T cells and interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of CD127 to induce receptor degradation. The N-terminal domain of Tat interacts with CD127 while the basic domain directs CD127 to the proteasome. We have also shown that upon IL-7 binding to its receptor, CD127 is phosphorylated resulting in CIS-mediated proteasomal degradation. Here, we show that Tat mimics this process by recruiting CIS to CD127 in the absence of IL-7 and receptor phosphorylation, leading to CD127 ubiquitination and degradation. Tat therefore acts as an adapter to induce cellular responses under conditions where they may not otherwise occur. Thusly, Tat reduces IL-7 signaling and impairs CD8 T cell survival and function. -- Highlights: •Soluble HIV-1 Tat decreases CD127 expression on CD8 T cells, causing dysfunction. •Tat induces CD127 ubiquitination without activating IL-7 signaling. •Tat binds CD127 and recruits the E3 ubiquitin ligase CIS via its basic domain. •Tat hijacks a normal cellular mechanism to degrade CD127 without IL-7 signaling.

  10. HIV-1 tat protein recruits CIS to the cytoplasmic tail of CD127 to induce receptor ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugden, Scott; Ghazawi, Feras; MacPherson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat protein down regulates expression of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain (CD127) from the surface of CD8 T cells resulting in impaired T cell proliferation and cytolytic capacity. We have previously shown that soluble Tat protein is taken up by CD8 T cells and interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of CD127 to induce receptor degradation. The N-terminal domain of Tat interacts with CD127 while the basic domain directs CD127 to the proteasome. We have also shown that upon IL-7 binding to its receptor, CD127 is phosphorylated resulting in CIS-mediated proteasomal degradation. Here, we show that Tat mimics this process by recruiting CIS to CD127 in the absence of IL-7 and receptor phosphorylation, leading to CD127 ubiquitination and degradation. Tat therefore acts as an adapter to induce cellular responses under conditions where they may not otherwise occur. Thusly, Tat reduces IL-7 signaling and impairs CD8 T cell survival and function. -- Highlights: •Soluble HIV-1 Tat decreases CD127 expression on CD8 T cells, causing dysfunction. •Tat induces CD127 ubiquitination without activating IL-7 signaling. •Tat binds CD127 and recruits the E3 ubiquitin ligase CIS via its basic domain. •Tat hijacks a normal cellular mechanism to degrade CD127 without IL-7 signaling.

  11. cGAS-Mediated Innate Immunity Spreads Intercellularly through HIV-1 Env-Induced Membrane Fusion Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuting; Ducroux, Aurélie; Ponnurangam, Aparna; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Franz, Sergej; Müsken, Mathias; Zillinger, Thomas; Malassa, Angelina; Ewald, Ellen; Hornung, Veit; Barchet, Winfried; Häussler, Susanne; Pietschmann, Thomas; Goffinet, Christine

    2016-10-12

    Upon sensing cytoplasmic retroviral DNA in infected cells, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) produces the cyclic dinucleotide cGAMP, which activates STING to trigger a type I interferon (IFN) response. We find that membrane fusion-inducing contact between donor cells expressing the HIV envelope (Env) and primary macrophages endogenously expressing the HIV receptor CD4 and coreceptor enable intercellular transfer of cGAMP. This cGAMP exchange results in STING-dependent antiviral IFN responses in target macrophages and protection from HIV infection. Furthermore, under conditions allowing cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1, infected primary T cells, but not cell-free virions, deliver cGAMP to autologous macrophages through HIV-1 Env and CD4/coreceptor-mediated membrane fusion sites and induce a STING-dependent, but cGAS-independent, IFN response in target cells. Collectively, these findings identify an infection-specific mode of horizontal transfer of cGAMP between primary immune cells that may boost antiviral responses, particularly in infected tissues in which cell-to-cell transmission of virions exceeds cell-free infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Organization of cellular receptors into a nanoscale junction during HIV-1 adhesion.

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    Terrence M Dobrowsky

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 with its host cell is the target for new antiretroviral therapies. Viral particles interact with the flexible plasma membrane via viral surface protein gp120 which binds its primary cellular receptor CD4 and subsequently the coreceptor CCR5. However, whether and how these receptors become organized at the adhesive junction between cell and virion are unknown. Here, stochastic modeling predicts that, regarding binding to gp120, cellular receptors CD4 and CCR5 form an organized, ring-like, nanoscale structure beneath the virion, which locally deforms the plasma membrane. This organized adhesive junction between cell and virion, which we name the viral junction, is reminiscent of the well-characterized immunological synapse, albeit at much smaller length scales. The formation of an organized viral junction under multiple physiopathologically relevant conditions may represent a novel intermediate step in productive infection.

  13. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies: peripheral glycosylation of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 may be a target for virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    - and O-linked carbohydrate epitopes (LeY, A1, and sialyl-Tn) were able to block infection by cell-free virus as well as inhibit syncytium formation. Inhibition of virus infectivity was independent of virus strain (HTLVIIIB or patient isolate SSI-002), the cell line used for virus propagation (H9 or MT4......), and the cell type used as the infection target (MT4, PMC, or selected T4 lymphocytes). Inhibition was observed when viruses were preincubated with MAbs but not when cells were preincubated with MAbs before inoculation, and the MAbs were shown to precipitate 125I-labeled gp120. The MAbs therefore define...

  14. High-Mannose Specific Lectin and Its Recombinants from a Carrageenophyta Kappaphycus alvarezii Represent a Potent Anti-HIV Activity Through High-Affinity Binding to the Viral Envelope Glycoprotein gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Makoto; Shibata, Hiromi; Imamura, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Hori, Kanji

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported that a high-mannose binding lectin KAA-2 from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii, which is an economically important species and widely cultivated as a source of carrageenans, had a potent anti-influenza virus activity. In this study, the full-length sequences of two KAA isoforms, KAA-1 and KAA-2, were elucidated by a combination of peptide mapping and complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning. They consisted of four internal tandem-repeated domains, which are conserved in high-mannose specific lectins from lower organisms, including a cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii and a red alga Eucheuma serra. Using an Escherichia coli expression system, an active recombinant form of KAA-1 (His-tagged rKAA-1) was successfully generated in the yield of 115 mg per liter of culture. In a detailed oligosaccharide binding analysis by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method with 27 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, His-tagged rKAA-1 and rKAA-1 specifically bound to high-mannose N-glycans with an exposed α1-3 mannose in the D2 arm as the native lectin did. Predicted from oligosaccharide binding specificity, a surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the recombinants exhibit strong interaction with gp120, a heavily glycosylated envelope glycoprotein of HIV with high association constants (1.48 - 1.61 × 10(9) M(-1)). Native KAAs and the recombinants inhibited the HIV-1 entry at IC50s of low nanomolar levels (7.3-12.9 nM). Thus, the recombinant proteins would be useful as antiviral reagents targeting the viral surface glycoproteins with high-mannose N-glycans, and the cultivated alga K. alvarezii could also be a good source of not only carrageenans but also this functional lectin(s).

  15. HMBA Enhances Prostratin-Induced Activation of Latent HIV-1 via Suppressing the Expression of Negative Feedback Regulator A20/TNFAIP3 in NF-κB Signaling

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    Duchu Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, much emphasis has been put on the transcriptional activation of HIV-1, which is proposed as a promised strategy for eradicating latent HIV-1 provirus. Two drugs, prostratin and hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA, have shown potent effects as inducers for releasing HIV-1 latency when used alone or in combination, although their cellular target(s are currently not well understood, especially under drug combination. Here, we have shown that HMBA and prostratin synergistically release HIV-1 latency via different mechanisms. While prostratin strongly stimulates HMBA-induced HIV-1 transcription via improved P-TEFb activation, HMBA is capable of boosting NF-κB-dependent transcription initiation by suppressing prostratin-induced expression of the deubiquitinase A20, a negative feedback regulator in the NF-κB signaling pathway. In addition, HMBA was able to increase prostratin-induced phosphorylation and degradation of NF-κB inhibitor IκBα, thereby enhancing and prolonging prostratin-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, a prerequisite for stimulation of transcription initiation. Thus, by blocking the negative feedback circuit, HMBA functions as a signaling enhancer of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  16. HIV-1 Myristoylated Nef Treatment of Murine Microglial Cells Activates Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, NO2 Production and Neurotoxic Activity.

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    Giorgio Mangino

    Full Text Available The potential role of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 accessory protein Nef in the pathogenesis of neuroAIDS is still poorly understood. Nef is a molecular adapter that influences several cellular signal transduction events and membrane trafficking. In human macrophages, Nef expression induces the production of extracellular factors (e.g. pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines and the recruitment of T cells, thus favoring their infection and its own transfer to uninfected cells via exosomes, cellular protrusions or cell-to-cell contacts. Murine cells are normally not permissive for HIV-1 but, in transgenic mice, Nef is a major disease determinant. Both in human and murine macrophages, myristoylated Nef (myr+Nef treatment has been shown to activate NF-κB, MAP kinases and interferon responsive factor 3 (IRF-3, thereby inducing tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducers and activator of transcription (STAT-1, STAT-2 and STAT-3 through the production of proinflammatory factors.We report that treatment of BV-2 murine microglial cells with myr+Nef leads to STAT-1, -2 and -3 tyrosine phosphorylation and upregulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS with production of nitric oxide. We provide evidence that extracellular Nef regulates iNOS expression through NF-κB activation and, at least in part, interferon-β (IFNβ release that acts in concert with Nef. All of these effects require both myristoylation and a highly conserved acidic cluster in the viral protein. Finally, we report that Nef induces the release of neurotoxic factors in the supernatants of microglial cells.These results suggest a potential role of extracellular Nef in promoting neuronal injury in the murine model. They also indicate a possible interplay between Nef and host factors in the pathogenesis of neuroAIDS through the production of reactive nitrogen species in microglial cells.

  17. A sensitive HIV-1 envelope induced fusion assay identifies fusion enhancement of thrombin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, De-Chun; Zhong, Guo-Cai; Su, Ju-Xiang; Liu, Yan-Hong; Li, Yan; Wang, Jia-Ye; Hattori, Toshio; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Feng-Min

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the interaction between HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and target cell receptors, various cell-cell-fusion assays have been developed. In the present study, we established a novel fusion system. In this system, the expression of the sensitive reporter gene, firefly luciferase (FL) gene, in the target cells was used to evaluate cell fusion event. Simultaneously, constitutively expressed Renilla luciferase (RL) gene was used to monitor effector cell number and viability. FL gave a wider dynamic range than other known reporters and the introduction of RL made the assay accurate and reproducible. This system is especially beneficial for investigation of potential entry-influencing agents, for its power of ruling out the false inhibition or enhancement caused by the artificial cell-number variation. As a case study, we applied this fusion system to observe the effect of a serine protease, thrombin, on HIV Env-mediated cell-cell fusion and have found the fusion enhancement activity of thrombin over two R5-tropic HIV strains.

  18. Broader tropism and higher cytopathicity for CD4+ T cells of a syncytium-inducing compared to a non-syncytium-inducing HIV-1 isolate as a mechanism for accelerated CD4+ T cell decline in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fouchier, R. A.; Meyaard, L.; Brouwer, M.; Hovenkamp, E.; Schuitemaker, H.

    1996-01-01

    The emergence of syncytium-inducing (SI) HIV-1 isolates in infected individuals precedes an accelerated CD4+ T cell decline and is associated with high virus load and rapid disease progression. The exact mechanism by which SI HIV-1 variants may cause this enhanced clinical progression is unknown.

  19. Adjuvanted HLA-supertype restricted subdominant peptides induce new T-cell immunity during untreated HIV-1-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Brandt, Lea; Vinner, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    . T-cell immunogenicity was examined longitudinally by a flow cytometry (CD107a, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-2 and/or MIP1β expression) as well as IFNγ ELISPOT. Safety was evaluated by clinical follow up combined with monitoring of biochemistry, hematology, CD4 T-cell counts and viral load. New CD4 and CD8 T......-cell responses specific for one or more vaccine epitopes were induced in 10/10 vaccinees. The responses were dominated by CD107a and MIP1β expression. There were no significant changes in HIV-1 viral load or CD4 T-cell counts. Our study demonstrates that the peptide/CAF01 vaccine is safe and that it is possible...

  20. HIV-specific antibodies but not t-cell responses are associated with protection in seronegative partners of HIV-1-infected individuals in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Marie; Pean, Polidy; Lopalco, Lucia; Nouhin, Janin; Phoung, Viseth; Ly, Nary; Vermisse, Pierre; Henin, Yvette; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Burastero, Samuele E; Reynes, Jean-Marc; Carcelain, Guislaine; Pancino, Gianfranco

    2006-08-01

    To study biological factors related to protection against HIV-1 infection in Cambodia, we recruited 48 partners of HIV-1-infected patients who remained uninfected (exposed uninfected individuals, EUs) despite unprotected sexual intercourse for more than 1 year and 49 unexposed controls (UCs). HIV-1-specific antibodies (IgA anti-gp41 and IgG anti-CD4-gp120 complex), T-cell responses, and cellular factors that may be involved in protection (peripheral blood mononuclear cell [PBMC] resistance to HIV-1 infection and beta-chemokine production) were evaluated. Anti-HIV-1 antibodies were higher in EUs than those in UCs (P = 0.01 and P = 0.04 for anti-gp41 and anti-CD4-gp120, respectively). We observed a decreased susceptibility to a primary Cambodian isolate, HIV-1KH019, in EU PBMCs as compared with UC PBMCs (P = 0.03). A weak T-cell response to one pool of HIV-1 Gag peptides was found by ELISpot in 1 of 19 EUs. Whereas T-cell specific immunity was not associated to protection, our results suggest that HIV-specific humoral immunity and reduced cell susceptibility to infection may contribute to protection against HIV-1 infection in Cambodian EUs.

  1. HIV-1 infection and first line ART induced differential responses in mitochondria from blood lymphocytes and monocytes: the ANRS EP45 "Aging" study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Perrin

    Full Text Available The ANRS EP45 "Aging" study investigates the cellular mechanisms involved in the accelerated aging of HIV-1 infected and treated patients. The data reported focus on mitochondria, organelles known to be involved in cell senescence.49 HIV-1 infected patients untreated with antiretroviral therapy, together with 49 seronegative age- and sex-matched control subjects and 81 HIV-1 infected and treated patients, were recruited by 3 AIDS centres (Marseille, Montpellier, Nice; France; http://clinicaltrials.gov/, NCT01038999. In more than 88% of treated patients, the viral load was 500/mm(3. ROS (reactive oxygen species production and ΔΨm (inner membrane potential were measured by flow cytometry in blood lymphocytes and monocytes (functional parameters. Three mitochondrial network quantitative morphological parameters were computed using confocal microscopy and image analysis. Three PBMC mitochondrial proteins (porin and subunits 2 and 4 of cytochrome C oxidase encoded by mtDNA or nuclear DNA, respectively were analysed by western blotting.Quantitative changes in PBMC mitochondrial proteins were not induced by either HIV-1 infection or ART. Discriminant analysis integrating functional (ROS production and ΔΨm or morphological (network volume density, fragmentation and branching parameters revealed HIV-1 infection and ART differential effects according to cell type. First line ART tended to rescue lymphocyte mitochondrial parameters altered by viral infection, but induced slight changes in monocytes. No statistical difference was found between the effects of three ART regimens on mitochondrial parameters. Correlations between functional parameters and viral load confirmed the damaging effects of HIV-1 in lymphocyte mitochondria.In patients considered to be clinically stable, mitochondria exhibited functional and morphological modifications in PBMCs resulting from either direct or indirect effects of HIV-1 infection (lymphocytes, or from first line ART

  2. Immunization with Clinical HIV-1 Env Proteins Induces Broad Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in a Rabbit Vaccination Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov; Heyndrickx, Leo; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2017-11-17

    The induction of both neutralizing antibodies and non-neutralizing antibodies with effector functions, for example, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is desired in the search for effective vaccines against HIV-1. In the pursuit of novel immunogens capable of inducing an efficient antibody response, rabbits were immunized with selected antigens using different prime-boost strategies. We immunized 35 different groups of rabbits with Env antigens from clinical HIV-1 subtypes A and B, including immunization with DNA alone, protein alone, and DNA prime with protein boost. The rabbit sera were screened for ADCC activity using a GranToxiLux-based assay with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as effector cells and CEM.NKR CCR5 cells coated with HIV-1 envelope as target cells. The groups with the highest ADCC activity were further characterized for cross-reactivity between HIV-1 subtypes. The immunogen inducing the most potent and broadest ADCC response was a trimeric gp140. The ADCC activity was highest against the HIV-1 subtype corresponding to the immunogen. The ADCC activity did not necessarily reflect neutralizing activity in the pseudovirus-TZMbl assay, but there was an overall correlation between the two antiviral activities. We present a rabbit vaccination model and an assay suitable for screening HIV-1 vaccine candidates for the induction of ADCC-mediating antibodies in addition to neutralizing antibodies. The antigens and/or immunization strategies capable of inducing antibodies with ADCC activity did not necessarily induce neutralizing activity and vice versa. Nevertheless, we identified vaccine candidates that were able to concurrently induce both types of responses and that had ADCC activity that was cross-reactive between different subtypes. When searching for an effective vaccine candidate, it is important to evaluate the antibody response using a model and an assay measuring the desired function.

  3. Punica granatum (Pomegranate juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1 infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2 binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored.

  4. Immunization with Clinical HIV-1 Env Proteins Induces Broad Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in a Rabbit Vaccination Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov

    2018-01-01

    The induction of both neutralizing antibodies and non-neutralizing antibodies with effector functions, for example, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is desired in the search for effective vaccines against HIV-1. In the pursuit of novel immunogens capable of inducing an efficient a...

  5. HIV-1 transgene expression in rats causes oxidant stress and alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Barbara A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk for acute and chronic airway disease even though there is no evidence that the virus can infect the lung epithelium. Although HIV-related proteins including gp120 and Tat can directly cause oxidant stress and cellular dysfunction, their effects in the lung are unknown. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of HIV-1 transgene expression in rats on alveolar epithelial barrier function. Alveolar epithelial barrier function was assessed by determining lung liquid clearance in vivo and alveolar epithelial monolayer permeability in vitro. Oxidant stress in the alveolar space was determined by measuring the glutathione redox couple by high performance liquid chromatography, and the expression and membrane localization of key tight junction proteins were assessed. Finally, the direct effects of the HIV-related proteins gp120 and Tat on alveolar epithelial barrier formation and tight junction protein expression were determined. Results HIV-1 transgene expression caused oxidant stress within the alveolar space and impaired epithelial barrier function even though there was no evidence of overt inflammation within the airways. The expression and membrane localization of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and occludin were decreased in alveolar epithelial cells from HIV-1 transgenic rats. Further, treating alveolar epithelial monolayers from wild type rats in vitro with recombinant gp120 or Tat for 24 hours reproduced many of the effects on zonula occludens-1 and occludin expression and membrane localization. Conclusion Taken together, these data indicate that HIV-related proteins cause oxidant stress and alter the expression of critical tight junction proteins in the alveolar epithelium, resulting in barrier dysfunction.

  6. HIV-1 subtype C superinfected individuals mount low autologous neutralizing antibody responses prior to intrasubtype superinfection

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    Basu Debby

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential role of antibodies in protection against intra-subtype HIV-1 superinfection remains to be understood. We compared the early neutralizing antibody (NAb responses in three individuals, who were superinfected within one year of primary infection, to ten matched non-superinfected controls from a Zambian cohort of subtype C transmission cases. Sequence analysis of single genome amplified full-length envs from a previous study showed limited diversification in the individuals who became superinfected with the same HIV-1 subtype within year one post-seroconversion. We hypothesized that this reflected a blunted NAb response, which may have made these individuals more susceptible to superinfection. Results Neutralization assays showed that autologous plasma NAb responses to the earliest, and in some cases transmitted/founder, virus were delayed and had low to undetectable titers in all three superinfected individuals prior to superinfection. In contrast, NAbs with a median IC50 titer of 1896 were detected as early as three months post-seroconversion in non-superinfected controls. Early plasma NAbs in all subjects showed limited but variable levels of heterologous neutralization breadth. Superinfected individuals also exhibited a trend toward lower levels of gp120- and V1V2-specific IgG binding antibodies but higher gp120-specific plasma IgA binding antibodies. Conclusions These data suggest that the lack of development of IgG antibodies, as reflected in autologous NAbs as well as gp120 and V1V2 binding antibodies to the primary infection virus, combined with potentially competing, non-protective IgA antibodies, may increase susceptibility to superinfection in the context of settings where a single HIV-1 subtype predominates.

  7. Variable fitness impact of HIV-1 escape mutations to cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Troyer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Human lymphocyte antigen (HLA-restricted CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL target and kill HIV-infected cells expressing cognate viral epitopes. This response selects for escape mutations within CTL epitopes that can diminish viral replication fitness. Here, we assess the fitness impact of escape mutations emerging in seven CTL epitopes in the gp120 Env and p24 Gag coding regions of an individual followed longitudinally from the time of acute HIV-1 infection, as well as some of these same epitopes recognized in other HIV-1-infected individuals. Nine dominant mutations appeared in five gp120 epitopes within the first year of infection, whereas all four mutations found in two p24 epitopes emerged after nearly two years of infection. These mutations were introduced individually into the autologous gene found in acute infection and then placed into a full-length, infectious viral genome. When competed against virus expressing the parental protein, fitness loss was observed with only one of the nine gp120 mutations, whereas four had no effect and three conferred a slight increase in fitness. In contrast, mutations conferring CTL escape in the p24 epitopes significantly decreased viral fitness. One particular escape mutation within a p24 epitope was associated with reduced peptide recognition and high viral fitness costs but was replaced by a fitness-neutral mutation. This mutation appeared to alter epitope processing concomitant with a reduced CTL response. In conclusion, CTL escape mutations in HIV-1 Gag p24 were associated with significant fitness costs, whereas most escape mutations in the Env gene were fitness neutral, suggesting a balance between immunologic escape and replicative fitness costs.

  8. Maturation of the viral core enhances the fusion of HIV-1 particles with primary human T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jiyang; Aiken, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 infection requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes in a reaction catalyzed by the viral envelope proteins gp120 and gp41. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 particle fusion with target cells is linked to maturation of the viral core by an activity of the gp41 cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that maturation enhances the fusion of a variety of recombinant viruses bearing primary and laboratory-adapted Env proteins with primary human CD4 + T cells. Overall, HIV-1 fusion was more dependent on maturation for viruses bearing X4-tropic envelope proteins than for R5-tropic viruses. Fusion of HIV-1 with monocyte-derived macrophages was also dependent on particle maturation. We conclude that the ability to couple fusion to particle maturation is a common feature of HIV-1 Env proteins and may play an important role during HIV-1 replication in vivo

  9. NF-kappaB and p53 are the dominant apoptosis-inducing transcription factors elicited by the HIV-1 envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfettini, Jean-Luc; Roumier, Thomas; Castedo, Maria; Larochette, Nathanael; Boya, Patricia; Raynal, Brigitte; Lazar, Vladimir; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Nardacci, Roberta; Penninger, Josef; Piacentini, Mauro; Kroemer, Guido

    2004-03-01

    The coculture of cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) with cells expressing CD4 results into cell fusion, deregulated mitosis, and subsequent cell death. Here, we show that NF-kappaB, p53, and AP1 are activated in Env-elicited apoptosis. The nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) super repressor had an antimitotic and antiapoptotic effect and prevented the Env-elicited phosphorylation of p53 on serine 15 and 46, as well as the activation of AP1. Transfection with dominant-negative p53 abolished apoptosis and AP1 activation. Signs of NF-kappaB and p53 activation were also detected in lymph node biopsies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Microarrays revealed that most (85%) of the transcriptional effects of HIV-1 Env were blocked by the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-alpha. Macroarrays led to the identification of several Env-elicited, p53-dependent proapoptotic transcripts, in particular Puma, a proapoptotic "BH3-only" protein from the Bcl-2 family known to activate Bax/Bak. Down modulation of Puma by antisense oligonucleotides, as well as RNA interference of Bax and Bak, prevented Env-induced apoptosis. HIV-1-infected primary lymphoblasts up-regulated Puma in vitro. Moreover, circulating CD4+ lymphocytes from untreated, HIV-1-infected donors contained enhanced amounts of Puma protein, and these elevated Puma levels dropped upon antiretroviral therapy. Altogether, these data indicate that NF-kappaB and p53 cooperate as the dominant proapoptotic transcription factors participating in HIV-1 infection.

  10. A trypsin inhibitor from rambutan seeds with antitumor, anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and nitric oxide-inducing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-01

    Nephelium lappaceum L., commonly known as "rambutan," is a typical tropical tree and is well known for its juicy and sweet fruit which has an exotic flavor. Chemical studies on rambutan have led to the identification of various components such as monoterpene lactones and volatile compounds. Here, a 22.5-kDa trypsin inhibitor (N . lappaceum trypsin inhibitor (NLTI)) was isolated from fresh rambutan seeds using liquid chromatographical techniques. NLTI reduced the proteolytic activities of both trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. Dithiothreitol reduced the trypsin inhibitory activity of NLTI at a concentration of 1 mM, indicating that an intact disulfide bond is essential to the activity. NLTI inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 0.73 μM. In addition, NLTI manifested a time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on growth in many tumor cells. NLTI is one of the few trypsin inhibitors with nitric oxide-inducing activity and may find application in tumor therapy.

  11. Temporal expression of HIV-1 envelope proteins in baculovirus-infected insect cells: Implications for glycosylation and CD4 binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.I.; Lennick, M.; Lehar, S.M.; Beltz, G.A.; Young, E.

    1990-01-01

    Three different human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope derived recombinant proteins and the full length human CD4 polypeptide were expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. DNA constructs encoding CD4, gp120, gp160, and gp160 delta were cloned into the baculovirus expression vector pVL941 or a derivative and used to generate recombinant viruses in a cotransfection with DNA from Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV). Western blotting of cell extracts of the recombinant HIV-1 proteins showed that for each construct two major bands specifically reacted with anti-HIV-1 envelope antiserum. These bands corresponded to glycosylated and nonglycosylated versions of the HIV proteins as determined by 3H-mannose labeling and tunicamycin treatment of infected cells. A time course of HIV envelope expression revealed that at early times post-infection (24 hours) the proteins were fully glycosylated and soluble in nonionic detergents. However, at later times postinfection (48 hours), expression levels of recombinant protein reached a maximum but most of the increase was due to a rise in the level of the nonglycosylated species, which was largely insoluble in nonionic detergents. Thus, it appears that Sf9 cells cannot process large amounts of glycosylated recombinant proteins efficiently. As a measure of biological activity, the CD4 binding ability of both glycosylated and nonglycosylated recombinant HIV envelope proteins was tested in a coimmunoprecipitation assay. The results showed that CD4 and the glycosylated versions of recombinant gp120 or gp160 delta specifically associated with one another in this analysis. Nonglycosylated gp120 or gp160 delta proteins from tunicamycin-treated cultures did immunoprecipitate with anti-HIV-1 antiserum but did not interact with CD4

  12. Role of protein disulfide isomerase and other thiol-reactive proteins in HIV-1 envelope protein-mediated fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Wu; Silver, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Cell-surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been proposed to promote disulfide bond rearrangements in HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) that accompany Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated the role of PDI in ways that have not been previously tested by downregulating PDI with siRNA and by overexpressing wild-type or variant forms of PDI in transiently and stably transfected cells. These manipulations, as well as treatment with anti-PDI antibodies, had only small effects on infection or cell fusion mediated by NL4-3 or AD8 strains of HIV-1. However, the cell-surface thiol-reactive reagent 5, 5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) had a much stronger inhibitory effect in our system, suggesting that cell-surface thiol-containing molecules other than PDI, acting alone or in concert, have a greater effect than PDI on HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated one such candidate, thioredoxin, a PDI family member reported to reduce a labile disulfide bond in CD4. We found that the ability of thioredoxin to reduce the disulfide bond in CD4 is enhanced in the presence of HIV-1 Env gp120 and that thioredoxin also reduces disulfide bonds in gp120 directly in the absence of CD4. We discuss the implications of these observations for identification of molecules involved in disulfide rearrangements in Env during fusion

  13. Prediction of exposed domains of envelope glycoprotein in Indian HIV-1 isolates and experimental confirmation of their immunogenicity in humans

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    Mohabatkar H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the impact of subtype differences on the seroreactivity of linear antigenic epitopes in envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 isolates from different geographical locations. By computer analysis, we predicted potential antigenic sites of envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and gp4l of this virus. For this purpose, after fetching sequences of proteins of interest from data banks, values of hydrophilicity, flexibility, accessibility, inverted hydrophobicity, and secondary structure were considered. We identified several potential antigenic epitopes in a B subtype strain of envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 (IIIB. Solid- phase peptide synthesis methods of Merrifield and Fmoc chemistry were used for synthesizing peptides. These synthetic peptides corresponded mainly to the C2, V3 and CD4 binding sites of gp120 and some parts of the ectodomain of gp41. The reactivity of these peptides was tested by ELISA against different HIV-1-positive sera from different locations in India. For two of these predicted epitopes, the corresponding Indian consensus sequences (LAIERYLKQQLLGWG and DIIGDIRQAHCNISEDKWNET (subtype C were also synthesized and their reactivity was tested by ELISA. These peptides also distinguished HIV-1-positive sera of Indians with C subtype infections from sera from HIV-negative subjects.

  14. Frequent intra-subtype recombination among HIV-1 circulating in Tanzania.

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    Ireen E Kiwelu

    Full Text Available The study estimated the prevalence of HIV-1 intra-subtype recombinant variants among female bar and hotel workers in Tanzania. While intra-subtype recombination occurs in HIV-1, it is generally underestimated. HIV-1 env gp120 V1-C5 quasispecies from 45 subjects were generated by single-genome amplification and sequencing (median (IQR of 38 (28-50 sequences per subject. Recombination analysis was performed using seven methods implemented within the recombination detection program version 3, RDP3. HIV-1 sequences were considered recombinant if recombination signals were detected by at least three methods with p-values of ≤0.05 after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. HIV-1 in 38 (84% subjects showed evidence for intra-subtype recombination including 22 with HIV-1 subtype A1, 13 with HIV-1 subtype C, and 3 with HIV-1 subtype D. The distribution of intra-patient recombination breakpoints suggested ongoing recombination and showed selective enrichment of recombinant variants in 23 (60% subjects. The number of subjects with evidence of intra-subtype recombination increased from 29 (69% to 36 (82% over one year of follow-up, although the increase did not reach statistical significance. Adjustment for intra-subtype recombination is important for the analysis of multiplicity of HIV infection. This is the first report of high prevalence of intra-subtype recombination in the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Tanzania, a region where multiple HIV-1 subtypes co-circulate. HIV-1 intra-subtype recombination increases viral diversity and presents additional challenges for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  15. Short communication: Anti-HIV-1 envelope immunoglobulin Gs in blood and cervicovaginal samples of Beninese commercial sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batraville, Laurie-Anne; Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Alary, Michel; Guédou, Fernand; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Poudrier, Johanne; Finzi, Andrés; Roger, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of the immune correlates of protection against HIV infection is crucial for the development of preventive strategies. This study examined HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins, specifically immunoglobulin G (IgG), in systemic and mucosal compartments of female Beninese commercial sex workers (CSWs). Samples of 23 HIV-1-positive and 20 highly exposed HIV-1-seronegative (HESN) CSWs were studied. HIV-1 Env-specific IgG detection in sera and cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs) from the study population was done by cell-based ELISA. The HIV neutralizing activity was evaluated with a neutralization assay. The HIV-1-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) response of the cohort was measured with a FACS-based assay evaluating the ADCC-mediated elimination of gp120-coated target cells. No anti-HIV-1 Env-specific IgG neutralizing or ADCC activities were detected in samples from HESN CSWs. Samples from HIV-1-infected CSWs presented ADCC activity in both sera and CVLs. Anti-Env IgG from sera and CVLs from HIV-1-infected CSWs preferentially recognized Env in its CD4-bound conformation. HIV-1-infected CSWs have ADCC-mediating IgG that preferentially recognizes Env in its CD4-bound conformation at the mucosal site.

  16. Complement lysis activity in autologous plasma is associated with lower viral loads during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection.

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    Michael Huber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the possibility that antibody-mediated complement lysis contributes to viremia control in HIV-1 infection, we measured the activity of patient plasma in mediating complement lysis of autologous primary virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sera from two groups of patients-25 with acute HIV-1 infection and 31 with chronic infection-were used in this study. We developed a novel real-time PCR-based assay strategy that allows reliable and sensitive quantification of virus lysis by complement. Plasma derived at the time of virus isolation induced complement lysis of the autologous virus isolate in the majority of patients. Overall lysis activity against the autologous virus and the heterologous primary virus strain JR-FL was higher at chronic disease stages than during the acute phase. Most strikingly, we found that plasma virus load levels during the acute but not the chronic infection phase correlated inversely with the autologous complement lysis activity. Antibody reactivity to the envelope (Env proteins gp120 and gp41 were positively correlated with the lysis activity against JR-FL, indicating that anti-Env responses mediated complement lysis. Neutralization and complement lysis activity against autologous viruses were not associated, suggesting that complement lysis is predominantly caused by non-neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively our data provide evidence that antibody-mediated complement virion lysis develops rapidly and is effective early in the course of infection; thus it should be considered a parameter that, in concert with other immune functions, steers viremia control in vivo.

  17. Is HIV-2- induced AIDS different from HIV-1-associated AIDS? Data from a West African clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Steele, Euridice; Awasana, Akum Aveika; Corrah, Tumani; Sabally, Saihou; van der Sande, Marianne; Jaye, Assan; Togun, Toyin; Sarge-Njie, Ramu; McConkey, Samuel J.; Whittle, Hilton; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2007-01-01

    Although AIDS is less frequent following HIV-2 than HIV-1 infection, it is unclear whether the clinical picture and clinical course of AIDS are similar in the two infections. To compare the pattern of AIDS-defining events, CD4 cell count at the time of AIDS diagnosis, survival from time of AIDS, and

  18. Antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 infection in human term syncytiotrophoblast cells cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, F D; Mosborg-Petersen, P; Kiss, J; Aboagye-Mathiesen, G; Zdravkovic, M; Hager, H; Aranyosi, J; Lampé, L; Ebbesen, P

    1994-06-01

    We examined if Fc receptor-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (FcR-ADE) or complement-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (C'-ADE) of virus infection can contribute to increasing replication of HIV-1 in human syncytiotrophoblast (ST) cells. Here we report that both FcR-ADE and C'-ADE may result in enhanced virus release from HIV-1-infected ST cells. We show that FcR-ADE of HIV-1 infection in ST cells is mediated by FcRIII and other FcR(s) belonging to undetermined Fc classes and does not require CD4 receptors, whereas C'-ADE uses both CD4 and CR2-like receptors. FcR-ADE seems to be more efficient in enhancing HIV-1 replication than C'-ADE. While FcR-ADE leads to increased internalization of HIV-1, C'-ADE does not result in enhanced endocytosis of the virus. In addition, antibodies mediating FcR-ADE are reactive with the gp120 viral envelope antigen, whereas antibodies involved in C'-ADE react with the viral transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Data suggest that both FcR-ADE and C'-ADE may contribute to the spread of HIV-1 from mother to the fetus.

  19. Six Highly Conserved Targets of RNAi Revealed in HIV-1-Infected Patients from Russia Are Also Present in Many HIV-1 Strains Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretova, Olga V; Fedoseeva, Daria M; Gorbacheva, Maria A; Gashnikova, Natalya M; Gashnikova, Maria P; Melnikova, Nataliya V; Chechetkin, Vladimir R; Kravatsky, Yuri V; Tchurikov, Nickolai A

    2017-09-15

    RNAi has been suggested for use in gene therapy of HIV/AIDS, but the main problem is that HIV-1 is highly variable and could escape attack from the small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) due to even single nucleotide substitutions in the potential targets. To exhaustively check the variability in selected RNA targets of HIV-1, we used ultra-deep sequencing of six regions of HIV-1 from the plasma of two independent cohorts of patients from Russia. Six RNAi targets were found that are invariable in 82%-97% of viruses in both cohorts and are located inside the domains specifying reverse transcriptase (RT), integrase, vpu, gp120, and p17. The analysis of mutation frequencies and their characteristics inside the targets suggests a likely role for APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G, A3G) in G-to-A mutations and a predominant effect of RT biases in the detected variability of the virus. The lowest frequency of mutations was detected in the central part of all six targets. We also discovered that the identical RNAi targets are present in many HIV-1 strains from many countries and from all continents. The data are important for both the understanding of the patterns of HIV-1 mutability and properties of RT and for the development of gene therapy approaches using RNAi for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lignosulfonic acid exhibits broadly anti-HIV-1 activity--potential as a microbicide candidate for the prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Qiu

    Full Text Available Some secondary metabolites from plants show to have potent inhibitory activities against microbial pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus (HSV, Treponema pallidum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, etc. Here we report that lignosulfonic acid (LSA, a polymeric lignin derivative, exhibits potent and broad activity against HIV-1 isolates of diverse subtypes including two North America strains and a number of Chinese clinical isolates values ranging from 21.4 to 633 nM. Distinct from other polyanions, LSA functions as an entry inhibitor with multiple targets on viral gp120 as well as on host receptor CD4 and co-receptors CCR5/CXCR4. LSA blocks viral entry as determined by time-of-drug addiction and cell-cell fusion assays. Moreover, LSA inhibits CD4-gp120 interaction by blocking the binding of antibodies specific for CD4-binding sites (CD4bs and for the V3 loop of gp120. Similarly, LSA interacts with CCR5 and CXCR4 via its inhibition of specific anti-CCR5 and anti-CXCR4 antibodies, respectively. Interestingly, the combination of LSA with AZT and Nevirapine exhibits synergism in viral inhibition. For the purpose of microbicide development, LSA displays low in vitro cytotoxicity to human genital tract epithelial cells, does not stimulate NF-κB activation and has no significant up-regulation of IL-1α/β and IL-8 as compared with N-9. Lastly, LSA shows no adverse effect on the epithelial integrity and the junctional protein expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that LSA can be a potential candidate for tropical microbicide.

  1. HIV-1 specific antibody titers and neutralization among chronically infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART: a cross-sectional study.

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    Johannes S Gach

    Full Text Available The majority of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 have been isolated from untreated patients with acute or chronic infection. To assess the extent of HIV-1 specific antibody response and neutralization after many years of virologic suppression from potent combination ART, we examined antibody binding titers and neutralization of 51 patients with chronic HIV-1 infection on suppressive ART for at least three years. In this cross-sectional analysis, we found high antibody titers against gp120, gp41, and the membrane proximal external region (MPER in 59%, 43%, and 27% of patients, respectively. We observed significantly higher endpoint binding titers for gp120 and gp41 for patients with >10 compared to ≤ 10 years of detectable HIV RNA. Additionally, we observed higher median gp120 and gp41 antibody titers in patients with HIV RNA 10 years of detectable HIV RNA (8/20 [40.0%] versus 3/31 [9.7%] for ≤ 10 years, p = 0.02 and a trend toward greater neutralization in patients with ≤ 5 years of HIV RNA 5 years, p = 0.08. All patients with neutralizing activity mediated successful phagocytosis of VLPs by THP-1 cells after antibody opsonization. Our findings of highly specific antibodies to several structural epitopes of HIV-1 with antibody effector functions and neutralizing activity after long-term suppressive ART, suggest continuous antigenic stimulation and evolution of HIV-specific antibody response occurs before and after suppression with ART. These patients, particularly those with slower HIV progression and more time with detectable viremia prior to initiation of suppressive ART, are a promising population to identify and further study functional antibodies against HIV-1.

  2. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo; El-Hage, Nazira; Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan; Kashanchi, Fatah; Ochem, Alex; Simon, Gary L.; Karn, Jonathan; Hauser, Kurt F.; Tyagi, Mudit

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-κB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-κB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. PMID:25980739

  3. HIV-1 Resistant CDK2-Knockdown Macrophage-Like Cells Generated from 293T Cell-Derived Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Kuan-Teh Jeang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in studies of human diseases involving macrophages is low yield and heterogeneity of the primary cells and limited ability of these cells for transfections and genetic manipulations. To address this issue, we developed a simple and efficient three steps method for somatic 293T cells reprogramming into monocytes and macrophage-like cells. First, 293T cells were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs through a transfection-mediated expression of two factors, Oct-4 and Sox2, resulting in a high yield of iPSC. Second, the obtained iPSC were differentiated into monocytes using IL-3 and M-CSF treatment. And third, monocytes were differentiated into macrophage-like cells in the presence of M-CSF. As an example, we developed HIV-1-resistant macrophage-like cells from 293T cells with knockdown of CDK2, a factor critical for HIV-1 transcription. Our study provides a proof-of-principle approach that can be used to study the role of host cell factors in HIV-1 infection of human macrophages.

  4. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  5. Plasticity and Epitope Exposure of the HIV-1 Envelope Trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rebecca L R; Totrov, Maxim; Itri, Vincenza; Liu, Xiaomei; Fox, Alisa; Zolla-Pazner, Susan

    2017-09-01

    We recently showed that mutations in the HIV-1 envelope (Env) destabilize the V3 loop, rendering neutralization-resistant viruses sensitive to V3-directed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Here, we investigated the propagation of this effect on other Env epitopes, with special emphasis on V2 loop exposure. Wild-type JR-FL and 19 mutant JR-FL pseudoviruses were tested for neutralization sensitivity to 21 MAbs specific for epitopes in V2, the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), and the CD4-induced (CD4i) region. Certain glycan mutants, mutations in the gp120 hydrophobic core, and mutations in residues involved in intraprotomer interactions exposed epitopes in the V2i region (which overlies the α4β7 integrin binding site) and the V3 crown, suggesting general destabilization of the distal region of the trimer apex. In contrast, other glycan mutants, mutations affecting interprotomer interactions, and mutations affecting the CD4bs exposed V3 but not V2i epitopes. These data indicate for the first time that V3 can move independently of V2, with V3 pivoting out from its "tucked" position in the trimer while apparently leaving the V2 apex intact. Notably, none of the mutations exposed V2 epitopes without also exposing V3, suggesting that movement of V2 releases V3. Most mutations increased sensitivity to CD4bs-directed MAbs without exposure of the CD4i epitope, implying these mutations facilitate the trimers' maintenance of an intermediate energy state between open and closed conformations. Taken together, these data indicate that several transient Env epitopes can be rendered more accessible to antibodies (Abs) via specific mutations, and this may facilitate the design of V1V2-targeting immunogens. IMPORTANCE Many epitopes of the HIV envelope (Env) spike are relatively inaccessible to antibodies (Abs) compared to their exposure in the open Env conformation induced by receptor binding. However, the reduced infection rate that resulted from the vaccine used in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine

  6. Gag induces the coalescence of clustered lipid rafts and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains at HIV-1 assembly sites on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B; Grover, Jonathan R; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Ono, Akira

    2011-10-01

    The HIV-1 structural protein Gag associates with two types of plasma membrane microdomains, lipid rafts and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs), both of which have been proposed to be platforms for HIV-1 assembly. However, a variety of studies have demonstrated that lipid rafts and TEMs are distinct microdomains in the absence of HIV-1 infection. To measure the impact of Gag on microdomain behaviors, we took advantage of two assays: an antibody-mediated copatching assay and a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that measures the clustering of microdomain markers in live cells without antibody-mediated patching. We found that lipid rafts and TEMs copatched and clustered to a greater extent in the presence of membrane-bound Gag in both assays, suggesting that Gag induces the coalescence of lipid rafts and TEMs. Substitutions in membrane binding motifs of Gag revealed that, while Gag membrane binding is necessary to induce coalescence of lipid rafts and TEMs, either acylation of Gag or binding of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate is sufficient. Finally, a Gag derivative that is defective in inducing membrane curvature appeared less able to induce lipid raft and TEM coalescence. A higher-resolution analysis of assembly sites by correlative fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy showed that coalescence of clustered lipid rafts and TEMs occurs predominantly at completed cell surface virus-like particles, whereas a transmembrane raft marker protein appeared to associate with punctate Gag fluorescence even in the absence of cell surface particles. Together, these results suggest that different membrane microdomain components are recruited in a stepwise manner during assembly.

  7. Gag Induces the Coalescence of Clustered Lipid Rafts and Tetraspanin-Enriched Microdomains at HIV-1 Assembly Sites on the Plasma Membrane ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B.; Grover, Jonathan R.; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Ono, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 structural protein Gag associates with two types of plasma membrane microdomains, lipid rafts and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs), both of which have been proposed to be platforms for HIV-1 assembly. However, a variety of studies have demonstrated that lipid rafts and TEMs are distinct microdomains in the absence of HIV-1 infection. To measure the impact of Gag on microdomain behaviors, we took advantage of two assays: an antibody-mediated copatching assay and a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that measures the clustering of microdomain markers in live cells without antibody-mediated patching. We found that lipid rafts and TEMs copatched and clustered to a greater extent in the presence of membrane-bound Gag in both assays, suggesting that Gag induces the coalescence of lipid rafts and TEMs. Substitutions in membrane binding motifs of Gag revealed that, while Gag membrane binding is necessary to induce coalescence of lipid rafts and TEMs, either acylation of Gag or binding of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate is sufficient. Finally, a Gag derivative that is defective in inducing membrane curvature appeared less able to induce lipid raft and TEM coalescence. A higher-resolution analysis of assembly sites by correlative fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy showed that coalescence of clustered lipid rafts and TEMs occurs predominately at completed cell surface virus-like particles, whereas a transmembrane raft marker protein appeared to associate with punctate Gag fluorescence even in the absence of cell surface particles. Together, these results suggest that different membrane microdomain components are recruited in a stepwise manner during assembly. PMID:21813604

  8. Anti-HIV-1 activity of anionic polymers: a comparative study of candidate microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP in soluble form blocks coreceptor binding sites on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120 and elicits gp41 six-helix bundle formation, processes involved in virus inactivation. CAP is not soluble at pH Methods Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were used to (1 study HIV-1 IIIB and BaL binding to micronized CAP; (2 detect virus disintegration; and (3 measure gp41 six-helix bundle formation. Cells containing integrated HIV-1 LTR linked to the β-gal gene and expressing CD4 and coreceptors CXCR4 or CCR5 were used to measure virus infectivity. Results 1 HIV-1 IIIB and BaL, respectively, effectively bound to micronized CAP. 2 The interaction between HIV-1 and micronized CAP led to: (a gp41 six-helix bundle formation; (b virus disintegration and shedding of envelope glycoproteins; and (c rapid loss of infectivity. Polymers other than CAP, except Carbomer 974P, elicited gp41 six-helix bundle formation in HIV-1 IIIB but only poly(napthalene sulfonate, in addition to CAP, had this effect on HIV-1 BaL. These polymers differed with respect to their virucidal activities, the differences being more pronounced for HIV-1 BaL. Conclusions Micronized CAP is the only candidate topical microbicide with the capacity to remove rapidly by adsorption from physiological fluids HIV-1 of both the X4 and R5 biotypes and is likely to prevent virus contact with target cells. The interaction between micronized CAP and HIV-1 leads to rapid virus inactivation. Among other anionic polymers, cellulose sulfate, BufferGel and aryl sulfonates appear most effective in this respect.

  9. Immune defence against HIV-1 infection in HIV-1-exposed seronegative persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmechel, S C; Russell, N; Hladik, F; Lang, J; Wilson, A; Ha, R; Desbien, A; McElrath, M J

    2001-11-01

    Rare individuals who are repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 through unprotected sexual contact fail to acquire HIV-1 infection. These persons represent a unique study population to evaluate mechanisms by which HIV-1 replication is either prevented or controlled. We followed longitudinally a group of healthy HIV-1 seronegative persons each reporting repeated high-risk sexual activities with their HIV-1-infected partner at enrollment. The volunteers were primarily (90%) male homosexuals, maintaining high risk activities with their known infected partner (45%) or multiple other partners (61%). We evaluated the quantity and specificity of HIV-1-specific T cells in 31 exposed seronegatives (ES) using a IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay to enumerate T cells recognizing epitopes within HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef. PBMC from only three of the 31 volunteers demonstrated ex vivo HIV-1-specific IFN-gamma secretion, in contrast to nearly 30% exhibiting cytolytic responses in previous studies. These findings suggest that if T cell responses in ES are induced by HIV-1 exposure, the frequency is at low levels in most of them, and below the level of detection using the ELISPOT assay. Alternative approaches to improve the sensitivity of detection may include use of dendritic cells as antigen-presenting cells in the ex vivo assay and more careful definition of the risk behavior and extent of HIV-1 exposure in conjunction with the evaluation of T cell responses.

  10. Rhesus macaque and chimpanzee DC-SIGN act as HIV/SIV gp120 trans-receptors, similar to human DC-SIGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijtenbeek, T. B.; Koopman, G.; van Duijnhoven, G. C.; van Vliet, S. J.; van Schijndel, A. C.; Engering, A.; Heeney, J. L.; van Kooyk, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively). The DC-specific HIV-1 trans-receptor DC-SIGN is thought to be essential for viral dissemination by DC. Abundant expression in lymphoid tissues also implies a

  11. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by extracts derived from traditional Chinese medicinal herbal plants

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    Song Xinming

    2009-08-01

    HIV-1 interaction with target cells, i.e., the interaction between gp120 and CD4/CCR5 or gp120 and CD4/CXCR4 and point to the potential of developing these two extracts to be HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

  12. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

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    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  13. Co-evolution of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody and founder virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Lynch, Rebecca; Zhou, Tongqing; Gao, Feng; Alam, S. Munir; Boyd, Scott D.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Roskin, Krishna M.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhu, Jiang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mullikin, James C.; Gnanakaran, S.; Hraber, Peter; Wiehe, Kevin; Kelsoe, Garnett; Yang, Guang; Xia, Shi-Mao; Montefiori, David C.; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Scearce, Richard M.; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Cohen, Myron; Kaminga, Gift; Louder, Mark K.; Tran, Lillan M.; Chen, Yue; Cai, Fangping; Chen, Sheri; Moquin, Stephanie; Du, Xiulian; Joyce, Gordon M.; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Korber, Bette T.M.; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2013-01-01

    Current HIV-1 vaccines elicit strain-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies arise in ~20% of HIV-1-infected individuals, and details of their generation could provide a roadmap for effective vaccination. Here we report the isolation, evolution and structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody from an African donor followed from time of infection. The mature antibody, CH103, neutralized ~55% of HIV-1 isolates, and its co-crystal structure with gp120 revealed a novel loop-based mechanism of CD4-binding site recognition. Virus and antibody gene sequencing revealed concomitant virus evolution and antibody maturation. Notably, the CH103-lineage unmutated common ancestor avidly bound the transmitted/founder HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, and evolution of antibody neutralization breadth was preceded by extensive viral diversification in and near the CH103 epitope. These data elucidate the viral and antibody evolution leading to induction of a lineage of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies and provide insights into strategies to elicit similar antibodies via vaccination. PMID:23552890

  14. A small set of succinct signature patterns distinguishes Chinese and non-Chinese HIV-1 genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of HIV-1 in China has unique features that may have led to unique viral strains. We therefore tested the hypothesis that it is possible to find distinctive patterns in HIV-1 genomes sampled in China. Using a rule inference algorithm we could indeed extract from sequences of the third variable loop (V3 of HIV-1 gp120 a set of 14 signature patterns that with 89% accuracy distinguished Chinese from non-Chinese sequences. These patterns were found to be specific to HIV-1 subtype, i.e. sequences complying with pattern 1 were of subtype B, pattern 2 almost exclusively covered sequences of subtype 01_AE, etc. We then analyzed the first of these signature patterns in depth, namely that L and W at two V3 positions are specifically occurring in Chinese sequences of subtype B/B' (3% false positives. This pattern was found to be in agreement with the phylogeny of HIV-1 of subtype B inside and outside of China. We could neither reject nor convincingly confirm that the pattern is stabilized by immune escape. For further interpretation of the signature pattern we used the recently developed measure of Direct Information, and in this way discovered evidence for physical interactions between V2 and V3. We conclude by a discussion of limitations of signature patterns, and the applicability of the approach to other genomic regions and other countries.

  15. Six Highly Conserved Targets of RNAi Revealed in HIV-1-Infected Patients from Russia Are Also Present in Many HIV-1 Strains Worldwide

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    Olga V. Kretova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available RNAi has been suggested for use in gene therapy of HIV/AIDS, but the main problem is that HIV-1 is highly variable and could escape attack from the small interfering RNAs (siRNAs due to even single nucleotide substitutions in the potential targets. To exhaustively check the variability in selected RNA targets of HIV-1, we used ultra-deep sequencing of six regions of HIV-1 from the plasma of two independent cohorts of patients from Russia. Six RNAi targets were found that are invariable in 82%–97% of viruses in both cohorts and are located inside the domains specifying reverse transcriptase (RT, integrase, vpu, gp120, and p17. The analysis of mutation frequencies and their characteristics inside the targets suggests a likely role for APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G, A3G in G-to-A mutations and a predominant effect of RT biases in the detected variability of the virus. The lowest frequency of mutations was detected in the central part of all six targets. We also discovered that the identical RNAi targets are present in many HIV-1 strains from many countries and from all continents. The data are important for both the understanding of the patterns of HIV-1 mutability and properties of RT and for the development of gene therapy approaches using RNAi for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Keywords: HIV-1, RNAi targets, gene therapy, ultra-deep sequencing, conserved HIV-1 sequences

  16. Virucidal activity of the dendrimer microbicide SPL7013 against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telwatte, Sushama; Moore, Katie; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Aldunate, Muriel; Gorry, Paul R; Ramsland, Paul A; Lewis, Gareth R; Paull, Jeremy R A; Sonza, Secondo; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2011-06-01

    Topical microbicides for use by women to prevent the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections are urgently required. Dendrimers are highly branched nanoparticles being developed as microbicides. SPL7013 is a dendrimer with broad-spectrum activity against HIV type I (HIV-1) and -2 (HIV-2), herpes simplex viruses type-1 (HSV-1) and -2 (HSV-2) and human papillomavirus. SPL7013 [3% (w/w)] has been formulated in a mucoadhesive carbopol gel (VivaGel®) for use as a topical microbicide. Previous studies showed that SPL7013 has similar potency against CXCR4-(X4) and CCR5-using (R5) strains of HIV-1 and that it blocks viral entry. However, the ability of SPL7013 to directly inactivate HIV-1 is unknown. We examined whether SPL7013 demonstrates virucidal activity against X4 (NL4.3, MBC200, CMU02 clade EA and 92UG046 clade D), R5 (Ba-L, NB25 and 92RW016 clade A) and dual-tropic (R5X4; MACS1-spln) HIV-1 using a modified HLA-DR viral capture method and by polyethylene glycol precipitation. Evaluation of virion integrity was determined by ultracentrifugation through a sucrose cushion and detection of viral proteins by Western blot analysis. SPL7013 demonstrated potent virucidal activity against X4 and R5X4 strains, although virucidal activity was less potent for the 92UG046 X4 clade D isolate. Where potent virucidal activity was observed, the 50% virucidal concentrations were similar to the 50% effective concentrations previously reported in drug susceptibility assays, indicating that the main mode of action of SPL7013 is by direct viral inactivation for these strains. In contrast, SPL7013 lacked potent virucidal activity against R5 HIV-1 strains. Evaluation of the virucidal mechanism showed that SPL7013-treated NL4.3, 92UG046 and MACS1-spln virions were intact with no significant decrease in gp120 surface protein with respect to p24 capsid content compared to the corresponding untreated virus. These studies demonstrate that SPL

  17. Patterns and rates of viral evolution in HIV-1 subtype B infected females and males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Dapp

    Full Text Available Biological sex differences affect the course of HIV infection, with untreated women having lower viral loads compared to their male counterparts but, for a given viral load, women have a higher rate of progression to AIDS. However, the vast majority of data on viral evolution, a process that is clearly impacted by host immunity and could be impacted by sex differences, has been derived from men. We conducted an intensive analysis of HIV-1 gag and env-gp120 evolution taken over the first 6-11 years of infection from 8 Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS participants who had not received combination antiretroviral therapy (ART. This was compared to similar data previously collected from men, with both groups infected with HIV-1 subtype B. Early virus populations in men and women were generally homogenous with no differences in diversity between sexes. No differences in ensuing nucleotide substitution rates were found between the female and male cohorts studied herein. As previously reported for men, time to peak diversity in env-gp120 in women was positively associated with time to CD4+ cell count below 200 (P = 0.017, and the number of predicted N-linked glycosylation sites generally increased over time, followed by a plateau or decline, with the majority of changes localized to the V1-V2 region. These findings strongly suggest that the sex differences in HIV-1 disease progression attributed to immune system composition and sensitivities are not revealed by, nor do they impact, global patterns of viral evolution, the latter of which proceeds similarly in women and men.

  18. HIV-1 Vpr Induces Adipose Dysfunction in Vivo Through Reciprocal Effects on PPAR/GR Co-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Neeti; Iyer, Dinakar; Patel, Sanjeet G.; Sekhar, Rajagopal V.; Phillips, Terry M.; Schubert, Ulrich; Oplt, Toni; Buras, Eric D.; Samson, Susan L.; Couturier, Jacob; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Jahoor, Farook; Kino, Tomoshige; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections, such as HIV, have been linked to obesity, but mechanistic evidence that they cause adipose dysfunction in vivo is lacking. We investigated a pathogenic role for the HIV-1 accessory protein viral protein R (Vpr), which can coactivate the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and co-repress peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in vitro, in HIV-associated adipose dysfunction. Vpr circulated in the blood of most HIV-infected patients tested, including those on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with undetectable viral load. Vpr-mediated mechanisms were dissected in vivo using mouse models expressing the Vpr transgene in adipose tissues and liver (Vpr-Tg) or infused with synthetic Vpr. Both models demonstrated accelerated whole-body lipolysis, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia, and tissue-specific findings. Fat depots in these mice had diminished mass, macrophage infiltration, and blunted PPARγ target gene expression but increased GR target gene expression. In liver, we observed blunted PPARα target gene expression, steatosis with decreased adenosine monophosphate– activated protein kinase activity, and insulin resistance. Similar to human HIV-infected patients, Vpr circulated in the serum of Vpr-Tg mice. Vpr blocked differentiation in preadipocytes through cell cycle arrest, whereas in mature adipocytes, it increased lipolysis with reciprocally altered association of PPARγ and GR with their target promoters. These results delineate a distinct pathogenic sequence: Vpr, released from HIV-1 in tissue reservoirs after ART, can disrupt PPAR/GR co-regulation and cell cycle control to produce adipose dysfunction and hepatosteatosis. Confirmation of these mechanisms in HIV patients could lead to targeted treatment of the metabolic complications with Vpr inhibitors, GR antagonists, or PPARγ/PPARα agonists. PMID:24285483

  19. μ-opioid modulation of HIV-1 coreceptor expressionand HIV-1 replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, Amber D.; Henderson, Earl E.; Rogers, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    A substantial proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals are intravenous drug users (IVDUs) who abuse opiates. Opioids induce a number of immunomodulatory effects that may directly influence HIV-1 disease progression. In the present report, we have investigated the effect of opioids on the expression of the major HIV-1 coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5. For these studies we have focused on opiates which are ligands for the μ-opioid receptor. Our results show that DAMGO, a selective μ-opioid agonist, increases CXCR4 and CCR5 expression in both CD3 + lymphoblasts and CD14 + monocytes three- to fivefold. Furthermore, DAMGO-induced elevation of HIV-1 coreceptor expression translates into enhanced replication of both X4 and R5 viral strains of HIV-1. We have confirmed the role of the μ-opioid receptor based on the ability of a μ-opioid receptor-selective antagonist to block the effects of DAMGO. We have also found that morphine enhances CXCR4 and CCR5 expression and subsequently increases both X4 and R5 HIV-1 infection. We suggest that the capacity of μ-opioids to increase HIV-1 coreceptor expression and replication may promote viral binding, trafficking of HIV-1-infected cells, and enhanced disease progression

  20. UCLA1, a synthetic derivative of a gp120 RNA aptamer, inhibits entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available such as South Africa (47), where this study was conducted, we assessed the sensitivity of a large panel of subtype C isolates derived from adult and pediatric patients at different stages of HIV-1 infection against UCLA1. We examined its neutralization..., 34). These were derived from the CAPRISA 002 acute infection study cohort (18), subtype C reference panel (31), pediatric and AIDS patients? isolates (9, 17), and a subtype C consensus sequence clone (ConC) (26). The subtype C pseudoviruses were...

  1. A study of vaccine-induced immune pressure on breakthrough infections in the Phambili phase 2b HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, M.; Magaret, C.A.; Rademeyer, C.; Fiore-Gartland, A.; Edlefsen, P.T.; DeCamp, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ngandu, N.; Larsen, B.B.; Frahm, N.; Marais, J.; Thebus, R.; Geraghty, D.; Hural, J.; Corey, L.; Kublin, J.; Gray, G.; McElrath, M.J.; Mullins, J.I.; Gilbert, P.B.; Williamson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Merck Adenovirus-5 Gag/Pol/Nef HIV-1 subtype-B vaccine evaluated in predominately subtype B epidemic regions (Step Study), while not preventing infection, exerted vaccine-induced immune pressure on HIV-1 breakthrough infections. Here we investigated if the same vaccine exerted immune pressure when tested in the Phambili Phase 2b study in a subtype C epidemic. Materials and methods A sieve analysis, which compares breakthrough viruses from placebo and vaccine arms, was performed on 277 near full-length genomes generated from 23 vaccine and 20 placebo recipients. Vaccine coverage was estimated by computing the percentage of 9-mers that were exact matches to the vaccine insert. Results There was significantly greater protein distances from the vaccine immunogen sequence in Gag (p = 0.045) and Nef (p = 0.021) in viruses infecting vaccine recipients compared to placebo recipients. Twenty-seven putative sites of vaccine-induced pressure were identified (p sieve effect in Step was driven by HLA A*02:01; an allele which was found in low frequency in Phambili participants compared to Step participants. Furthermore, the coverage of the vaccine against subtype C Phambili viruses was 31%, 46% and 14% for Gag, Pol and Nef, respectively, compared to subtype B Step virus coverage of 56%, 61% and 26%, respectively. Discussion This study presents evidence of sieve effects in Gag and Nef; however could not confirm effects on specific amino acid sites. We propose that this weaker signal of vaccine immune pressure detected in the Phambili study compared to the Step study may have been influenced by differences in host genetics (HLA allele frequency) and reduced impact of vaccine-induced immune responses due to mismatch between the viral subtype in the vaccine and infecting subtypes. PMID:27756485

  2. The utility of protein structure as a predictor of site-wise dN/dS varies widely among HIV-1 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Austin G; Wilke, Claus O

    2015-10-06

    Protein structure acts as a general constraint on the evolution of viral proteins. One widely recognized structural constraint explaining evolutionary variation among sites is the relative solvent accessibility (RSA) of residues in the folded protein. In influenza virus, the distance from functional sites has been found to explain an additional portion of the evolutionary variation in the external antigenic proteins. However, to what extent RSA and distance from a reference site in the protein can be used more generally to explain protein adaptation in other viruses and in the different proteins of any given virus remains an open question. To address this question, we have carried out an analysis of the distribution and structural predictors of site-wise dN/dS in HIV-1. Our results indicate that the distribution of dN/dS in HIV follows a smooth gamma distribution, with no special enrichment or depletion of sites with dN/dS at or above one. The variation in dN/dS can be partially explained by RSA and distance from a reference site in the protein, but these structural constraints do not act uniformly among the different HIV-1 proteins. Structural constraints are highly predictive in just one of the three enzymes and one of three structural proteins in HIV-1. For these two proteins, the protease enzyme and the gp120 structural protein, structure explains between 30 and 40% of the variation in dN/dS. Finally, for the gp120 protein of the receptor-binding complex, we also find that glycosylation sites explain just 2% of the variation in dN/dS and do not explain gp120 evolution independently of either RSA or distance from the apical surface. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Characteristic Ligand-Induced Crystal Forms of HIV-1 Protease Complexes: A Novel Discovery of X-Ray Crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olajuyigbe, Folasade M.; Geremia, Silvano

    2009-10-01

    Mixtures of saquinavir (SQV) and ritonavir (RTV) were cocrystallized with HIV-1 protease (PR) in an attempt to compare their relative potencies using a crystallographic approach and factors responsible for the respective crystal forms obtained were examined. The mixture ratio of the SQV/RTV was in the range of 1:1 to 1:50 with increasing concentration of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) used. Two crystal forms of PR complexes were obtained. At concentrations of 0.8 and 1.2 % DMSO using 1:1 and 1:15 ratios of SQV/RTV, the crystal form was monoclinic while increasing the concentration of DMSO to 3.2 and 5.0% using 1:15 and 1:50 ratios of SQV/RTV, the orthorhombic crystal form was obtained. The high resolution X-ray crystal structures of the PR/ inhibitor complexes reveal that crystal forms with respective space groups are dependent on the occupancy of either SQV or RTV in the active site of the PR. The occupancy of either of the PR inhibitors in the active site of PR has interestingly demonstrated unique cooperativity effects in crystallization of protein-ligand complexes. The crystal forms obtained were also related to the concentration of DMSO and ammonium sulphate in crystallization, and storage conditions of purified PR. Surprisingly, the relative occupancies of these inhibitors in the active site suggested a competition between the two inhibitors which were not inhibition constants related. Analysis of the structures in both crystal forms show no difference in DMSO content but at higher concentration of DMSO (3.2 - 5.0%) in the orthorhombic crystal forms, there were protein-sulphate interactions which were absent in the monoclinic forms with lower concentration (0.8 - 1.2%) of DMSO. This work has clearly demonstrated that there is cooperativity in crystallization and the conditions of crystallization influence specific intermolecular contacts in crystal packing (crystal form). (author)

  4. Trans-dissemination of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells fosters both HIV-1 trans-infection in resting CD4+ T lymphocytes and reactivation of the HIV-1 reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiozzini, Chiara; Arenaccio, Claudia; Olivetta, Eleonora; Anticoli, Simona; Manfredi, Francesco; Ferrantelli, Flavia; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Schietroma, Ivan; Andreotti, Mauro; Federico, Maurizio

    2017-09-01

    Intact HIV-1 and exosomes can be internalized by dendritic cells (DCs) through a common pathway leading to their transmission to CD4 + T lymphocytes by means of mechanisms defined as trans-infection and trans-dissemination, respectively. We previously reported that exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells activate both uninfected quiescent CD4 + T lymphocytes, which become permissive to HIV-1, and latently infected cells, with release of HIV-1 particles. However, nothing is known about the effects of trans-dissemination of exosomes produced by HIV-1-infected cells on uninfected or latently HIV-1-infected CD4 + T lymphocytes. Here, we report that trans-dissemination of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells induces cell activation in resting CD4 + T lymphocytes, which appears stronger with mature than immature DCs. Using purified preparations of both HIV-1 and exosomes, we observed that mDC-mediated trans-dissemination of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells to resting CD4 + T lymphocytes induces efficient trans-infection and HIV-1 expression in target cells. Most relevant, when both mDCs and CD4 + T lymphocytes were isolated from combination anti-retroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-1-infected patients, trans-dissemination of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells led to HIV-1 reactivation from the viral reservoir. In sum, our data suggest a role of exosome trans-dissemination in both HIV-1 spread in the infected host and reactivation of the HIV-1 reservoir.

  5. Analysis of Select Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Proteins for Restriction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1): HSV-1 gM Protein Potently Restricts HIV-1 by Preventing Intracellular Transport and Processing of Env gp160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polpitiya Arachchige, Sachith; Henke, Wyatt; Pramanik, Ankita; Kalamvoki, Maria; Stephens, Edward B

    2018-01-15

    Virus-encoded proteins that impair or shut down specific host cell functions during replication can be used as probes to identify potential proteins/pathways used in the replication of viruses from other families. We screened nine proteins from herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for the ability to enhance or restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. We show that several HSV-1 proteins (glycoprotein M [gM], US3, and UL24) potently restricted the replication of HIV-1. Unlike UL24 and US3, which reduced viral protein synthesis, we observed that gM restriction of HIV-1 occurred through interference with the processing and transport of gp160, resulting in a significantly reduced level of mature gp120/gp41 released from cells. Finally, we show that an HSV-1 gM mutant lacking the majority of the C-terminal domain (HA-gM[Δ345-473]) restricted neither gp160 processing nor the release of infectious virus. These studies identify proteins from heterologous viruses that can restrict viruses through novel pathways. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 infection of humans results in AIDS, characterized by the loss of CD4 + T cells and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Both HIV-1 and HSV-1 can infect astrocytes and microglia of the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, the identification of HSV-1 proteins that directly restrict HIV-1 or interfere with pathways required for HIV-1 replication could lead to novel antiretroviral strategies. The results of this study show that select viral proteins from HSV-1 can potently restrict HIV-1. Further, our results indicate that the gM protein of HSV-1 restricts HIV-1 through a novel pathway by interfering with the processing of gp160 and its incorporation into virus maturing from the cell. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Biophysical characterization of V3-lipopeptide liposomes influencing HIV-1 infectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizos, Apostolos K.; Baritaki, Stavroula; Tsikalas, Ioannis; Doetschman, David C.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Krambovitis, Elias

    2007-01-01

    The V3-loop of the HIV-1 gp120 alters host cell immune function and modulates infectivity. We investigated biophysical parameters of liposome constructs with embedded lipopeptides from the principle neutralizing domain of the V3-loop and their influence on viral infectivity. Dynamic light scattering measurements showed liposome supramolecular structures with hydrodynamic radius of the order of 900 and 1300 nm for plain and V3-lipopeptide liposomes. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements showed almost identical local microenvironment. The difference in liposome hydrodynamic radius was attributed to the fluctuating ionic environment of the V3-lipopeptide liposomes. In vitro HIV-1 infectivity assays showed that plain liposomes reduced virus production in all cell cultures, probably due to the hydrophobic nature of the aggregates. Liposomes carrying V3-lipopeptides with different cationic potentials restored and even enhanced infectivity (p < 0.05). These results highlight the need for elucidation of the involvement of lipid bilayers as dynamic components in supramolecular structures and in HIV-1 fusion mechanisms

  7. HIV-1 gp41 Fusion Intermediate: A Target for HIV Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chungen Pan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection is initiated by the binding of gp120 envelope glyco-protein to its cell receptor (CD4 and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5, followed by a series of conformational changes in the gp41 transmembrane subunit. These changes include insertion of fusion peptide into the target cell membrane and association of C-heptad repeat (CHR peptide with the N-heptad repeat (NHR trimer, a pre-hairpin fusion intermediate. A stable six-helix bundle core is then formed, bringing the viral envelope and target cell membrane into close proximity for fusion. Peptides derived from the CHR region, such as T20 and C34, inhibit HIV-1 fusion by interacting with the gp41 fusion intermediate. A number of anti-HIV-1 peptides and small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 NHR-trimer have been identified. By combining HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting different sites in the gp41 fusion intermediate, a potent synergistic effect takes place, resulting in a potential new therapeutic strategy for the HIV infection/AIDS. Here, we present an overview of the current development of anti-HIV drugs, particularly those targeting the gp41 fusion intermediate.

  8. HIV-1 Nef induces proinflammatory state in macrophages through its acidic cluster domain: involvement of TNF alpha receptor associated factor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Mangino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 Nef is a virulence factor that plays multiple roles during HIV replication. Recently, it has been described that Nef intersects the CD40 signalling in macrophages, leading to modification in the pattern of secreted factors that appear able to recruit, activate and render T lymphocytes susceptible to HIV infection. The engagement of CD40 by CD40L induces the activation of different signalling cascades that require the recruitment of specific tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (i.e. TRAFs. We hypothesized that TRAFs might be involved in the rapid activation of NF-κB, MAPKs and IRF-3 that were previously described in Nef-treated macrophages to induce the synthesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and IFNβ to activate STAT1, -2 and -3. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Searching for possible TRAF binding sites on Nef, we found a TRAF2 consensus binding site in the AQEEEE sequence encompassing the conserved four-glutamate acidic cluster. Here we show that all the signalling effects we observed in Nef treated macrophages depend on the integrity of the acidic cluster. In addition, Nef was able to interact in vitro with TRAF2, but not TRAF6, and this interaction involved the acidic cluster. Finally silencing experiments in THP-1 monocytic cells indicate that both TRAF2 and, surprisingly, TRAF6 are required for the Nef-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. CONCLUSIONS: Results reported here revealed TRAF2 as a new possible cellular interactor of Nef and highlighted that in monocytes/macrophages this viral protein is able to manipulate both the TRAF/NF-κB and TRAF/IRF-3 signalling axes, thereby inducing the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines as well as IFNβ.

  9. N-terminal substitutions in HIV-1 gp41 reduce the expression of non-trimeric envelope glycoproteins on the virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Antu K.; David, Kathryn B.; Ray, Neelanjana; Ketas, Thomas J.; Klasse, Per J.; Doms, Robert W.; Moore, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The native, functional HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex is a trimer of two non-covalently associated subunits: the gp120 surface glycoprotein and the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein. However, various non-functional forms of Env are present on virus particles and HIV-1-infected cells, some of which probably arise as the native complex decays. The aberrant forms include gp120-gp41 monomers and oligomers, as well as gp41 subunits from which gp120 has dissociated. The presence of non-functional Env creates binding sites for antibodies that do not recognize native Env complexes and that are, therefore, non-neutralizing. Non-native Env forms (monomers, dimers, tetramers and aggregates) can also arise when soluble gp140 proteins, lacking the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of gp41, are expressed for vaccine studies. We recently identified five amino acids in the gp41 N-terminal region (I535, Q543, S553, K567 and R588) that promote gp140 trimerization. We have now studied their influence on the function and antigenic properties of JR-FL Env expressed on the surfaces of pseudoviruses and Env-transfected cells. The 5 substitutions in gp41 reduce the expression of non-trimeric gp160s, without affecting trimer levels. Pseudovirions bearing the mutant Env are fully infectious with similar kinetics of Env-mediated fusion. Various non-neutralizing antibodies bind less strongly to the Env mutant, but neutralizing antibody binding is unaffected. Hence the gp41 substitutions do not adversely affect Env structure, supporting their use for making new Env-based vaccines. The mutant Env might also help in studies intended to correlate antibody binding to virus neutralization. Of note is that the 5 residues are much more frequent, individually or collectively, in viruses from subtypes other than B

  10. Naringin Reverses Hepatocyte Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Associated with HIV-1 Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-Induced Metabolic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafeyisetan O. Adebiyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs have not only improved therapeutic outcomes in the treatment of HIV infection but have also led to an increase in associated metabolic complications of NRTIs. Naringin’s effects in mitigating NRTI-induced complications were investigated in this study. Wistar rats, randomly allotted into seven groups (n = 7 were orally treated daily for 56 days with 100 mg/kg zidovudine (AZT (groups I, II III, 50 mg/kg stavudine (d4T (groups IV, V, VI and 3 mL/kg of distilled water (group VII. Additionally, rats in groups II and V were similarly treated with 50 mg/kg naringin, while groups III and VI were treated with 45 mg/kg vitamin E. AZT or d4T treatment significantly reduced body weight and plasma high density lipoprotein concentrations but increased liver weights, plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol compared to controls, respectively. Furthermore, AZT or d4T treatment significantly increased oxidative stress, adiposity index and expression of Bax protein, but reduced Bcl-2 protein expression compared to controls, respectively. However, either naringin or vitamin E significantly mitigated AZT- or d4T-induced weight loss, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis compared to AZT- or d4T-only treated rats. Our results suggest that naringin reverses metabolic complications associated with NRTIs by ameliorating oxidative stress and apoptosis. This implies that naringin supplements could mitigate lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia associated with NRTI therapy.

  11. Fractalkine/CX3CL1 protects striatal neurons from synergistic morphine and HIV-1 Tat-induced dendritic losses and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Masami

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractalkine/CX3CL1 and its cognate receptor CX3CR1 are abundantly expressed in the CNS. Fractalkine is an unusual C-X3-C motif chemokine that is important in neuron-microglial communication, a co-receptor for HIV infection, and can be neuroprotective. To assess the effects of fractalkine on opiate-HIV interactive neurotoxicity, wild-type murine striatal neurons were co-cultured with mixed glia from the striata of wild-type or Cx3cr1 knockout mice ± HIV-1 Tat and/or morphine. Time-lapse digital images were continuously recorded at 20 min intervals for up to 72 h using computer-aided microscopy to track the same cells repeatedly. Results Co-exposure to Tat and morphine caused synergistic increases in neuron death, dendritic pruning, and microglial motility as previously reported. Exogenous fractalkine prevented synergistic Tat and morphine-induced dendritic losses and neuron death even though the inflammatory mediator TNF-α remained significantly elevated. Antibody blockade of CX3CR1 mimicked the toxic effects of morphine plus Tat, but did not add to their toxicity; while fractalkine failed to protect wild-type neurons co-cultured with Cx3cr1-/--null glia against morphine and Tat toxicity. Exogenous fractalkine also normalized microglial motility, which is elevated by Tat and morphine co-exposure, presumably limiting microglial surveillance that may lead to toxic effects on neurons. Fractalkine immunofluorescence was expressed in neurons and to a lesser extent by other cell types, whereas CX3CR1 immunoreactivity or GFP fluorescence in cells cultured from the striatum of Cx3cr1-/- (Cx3cr1GFP/GFP mice were associated with microglia. Immunoblotting shows that fractalkine levels were unchanged following Tat and/or morphine exposure and there was no increase in released fractalkine as determined by ELISA. By contrast, CX3CR1 protein levels were markedly downregulated. Conclusions The results suggest that deficits in fractalkine

  12. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  13. Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV-1 Individuals Infected by Subtypes B, F1, C or the B/Bbr Variant in Relation to the Genetics and Biochemical Characteristics of the env Gene.

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    Dalziza Victalina de Almeida

    Full Text Available Various HIV-1 env genetic and biochemical features impact the elicitation of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies in natural infections. Thus, we aimed to investigate cross-neutralizing antibodies in individuals infected with HIV-1 env subtypes B, F1, C or the B/Bbr variant as well as env characteristics. Therefore, plasma samples from Brazilian chronically HIV-1 infected individuals were submitted to the TZM-bl neutralization assay. We also analyzed putative N-glycosylation sites (PNGLs and the size of gp120 variable domains in the context of HIV-1 subtypes prevalent in Brazil. We observed a greater breadth and potency of the anti-Env neutralizing response in individuals infected with the F1 or B HIV-1 subtypes compared with the C subtype and the variant B/Bbr. We observed greater V1 B/Bbr and smaller V4 F1 than those of other subtypes (p<0.005, however neither was there a correlation verified between the variable region length and neutralization potency, nor between PNLG and HIV-1 subtypes. The enrichment of W at top of V3 loop in weak neutralizing response viruses and the P in viruses with higher neutralization susceptibility was statistically significant (p = 0.013. Some other signatures sites were associated to HIV-1 subtype-specific F1 and B/Bbr samples might influence in the distinct neutralizing response. These results indicate that a single amino acid substitution may lead to a distinct conformational exposure or load in the association domain of the trimer of gp120 and interfere with the induction power of the neutralizing response, which affects the sensitivity of the neutralizing antibody and has significant implications for vaccine design.

  14. P2Y12 receptor upregulation in satellite glial cells is involved in neuropathic pain induced by HIV glycoprotein 120 and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhihua; Xie, Lihui; Zhou, Congfa; Yuan, Huilong; Ouyang, Shuai; Fang, Zhi; Zhao, Shanhong; Jia, Tianyu; Zou, Lifang; Wang, Shouyu; Xue, Yun; Wu, Bing; Gao, Yun; Li, Guilin; Liu, Shuangmei; Xu, Hong; Xu, Changshui; Zhang, Chunping; Liang, Shangdong

    2018-03-01

    The direct neurotoxicity of HIV and neurotoxicity of combination antiretroviral therapy medications both contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) plays a crucial role in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. The P2Y 12 receptor expressed in SGCs of the DRG is involved in pain transmission. In this study, we explored the role of the P2Y 12 receptor in neuropathic pain induced by HIV envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) combined with ddC (2',3'-dideoxycytidine). A rat model of gp120+ddC-induced neuropathic pain was used. Peripheral nerve exposure to HIV-gp120+ddC increased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in gp120+ddC-treated model rats. The gp120+ddC treatment increased expression of P2Y 12 receptor mRNA and protein in DRG SGCs. In primary cultured DRG SGCs treated with gp120+ddC, the levels of [Ca 2+ ] i activated by the P2Y 12 receptor agonist 2-(Methylthio) adenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt (2-MeSADP) were significantly increased. P2Y 12 receptor shRNA treatment inhibited 2-MeSADP-induced [Ca 2+ ] i in primary cultured DRG SGCs treated with gp120+ddC. Intrathecal treatment with a shRNA against P2Y 12 receptor in DRG SGCs reduced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in the DRG of gp120+ddC-treated rats. Thus, downregulating the P2Y 12 receptor relieved mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in gp120+ddC-treated rats.

  15. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection in ex vivo cervical tissue model of human vagina by palmitic acid; implications for a microbicide development.

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    Xudong Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 80% of all new HIV-1 infections are acquired through sexual contact. Currently, there is no clinically approved microbicide, indicating a clear and urgent therapeutic need. We recently reported that palmitic acid (PA is a novel and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and entry. Mechanistically, PA inhibits HIV-1 infection by binding to a novel pocket on the CD4 receptor and blocks efficient gp120-to-CD4 attachment. Here, we wanted to assess the ability of PA to inhibit HIV-1 infection in cervical tissue ex vivo model of human vagina, and determine its effect on Lactobacillus (L species of probiotic vaginal flora. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results show that treatment with 100-200 µM PA inhibited HIV-1 infection in cervical tissue by up to 50%, and this treatment was not toxic to the tissue or to L. crispatus and jensenii species of vaginal flora. In vitro, in a cell free system that is independent of in vivo cell associated CD4 receptor; we determined inhibition constant (Ki to be ∼2.53 µM. SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate utility of PA as a model molecule for further preclinical development of a safe and potent HIV-1 entry microbicide inhibitor.

  16. HIV-1 subtypes among intravenous drug users from two neighboring cities in São Paulo State, Brazil

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    M.A.A. Rossini

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in two neighboring cities located near the epicenter of the HIV-1 epidemics in Brazil (Santos and São Paulo, we investigated 83 HIV-1 strains obtained from samples collected in 1995 from intravenous drug users. The V3 through V5 region of the envelope of gp 120 was analyzed by heteroduplex mobility analysis. Of the 95 samples, 12 (12.6% were PCR negative (6 samples from each group; low DNA concentration was the reason for non-amplification in half of these cases. Of the 42 typed cases from São Paulo, 34 (81%, 95% confidence limits 74.9 to 87.0% were B and 8 (19%, 95% confidence limits 12.9 to 25.0% were F, whereas of the 41 typed cases from Santos, 39 (95%, 95% confidence limits 91.6 to 98.4% were B and 2 (5%, 95% confidence limits 1.6 to 8.4% were C. We therefore confirm the relationship between clade F and intravenous drug use in São Paulo, and the presence of clade C in Santos. The fact that different genetic subtypes of HIV-1 are co-circulating indicates a need for continuous surveillance for these subtypes as well as for recombinant viruses in Brazil.

  17. Varied sensitivity to therapy of HIV-1 strains in CD4+ lymphocyte sub-populations upon ART initiation

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    Paxton William A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although antiretroviral therapy (ART has proven its success against HIV-1, the long lifespan of infected cells and viral latency prevent eradication. In this study we analyzed the sensitivity to ART of HIV-1 strains in naïve, central memory and effector memory CD4+ lymphocyte subsets. Methods From five patients cellular HIV-1 infection levels were quantified before and after initiation of therapy (2-5 weeks. Through sequencing the C2V3 region of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope, we studied the effect of short-term therapy on virus variants derived from naïve, central memory and effector memory CD4+ lymphocyte subsets. Results During short-term ART, HIV-1 infection levels declined in all lymphocyte subsets but not as much as RNA levels in serum. Virus diversity in the naïve and central memory lymphocyte populations remained unchanged, whilst diversity decreased in serum and the effector memory lymphocytes. ART differentially affected the virus populations co-circulating in one individual harboring a dual HIV-1 infection. Changes in V3 charge were found in all individuals after ART initiation with increases within the effector memory subset and decreases found in the naïve cell population. Conclusions During early ART virus diversity is affected mainly in the serum and effector memory cell compartments. Differential alterations in V3 charge were observed between effector memory and naïve populations. While certain cell populations can be targeted preferentially during early ART, some virus strains demonstrate varied sensitivity to therapy, as shown from studying two strains within a dual HIV-1 infected individual.

  18. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya; Richardson, Des R.; Ray, Patricio E.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Nekhai, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics

  19. CCR5 Disruption in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using CRISPR/Cas9 Provides Selective Resistance of Immune Cells to CCR5-tropic HIV-1 Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, HyunJun; Minder, Petra; Park, Mi Ae; Mesquitta, Walatta-Tseyon; Torbett, Bruce E; Slukvin, Igor I

    2015-12-15

    The chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) serves as an HIV-1 co-receptor and is essential for cell infection with CCR5-tropic viruses. Loss of functional receptor protects against HIV infection. Here, we report the successful targeting of CCR5 in GFP-marked human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using CRISPR/Cas9 with single and dual guide RNAs (gRNAs). Following CRISPER/Cas9-mediated gene editing using a single gRNA, 12.5% of cell colonies demonstrated CCR5 editing, of which 22.2% showed biallelic editing as determined by a Surveyor nuclease assay and direct sequencing. The use of dual gRNAs significantly increased the efficacy of CCR5 editing to 27% with a biallelic gene alteration frequency of 41%. To ensure the homogeneity of gene editing within cells, we used single cell sorting to establish clonal iPSC lines. Single cell-derived iPSC lines with homozygous CCR5 mutations displayed the typical characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and differentiated efficiently into hematopoietic cells, including macrophages. Although macrophages from both wild-type and CCR5-edited iPSCs supported CXCR4-tropic virus replication, macrophages from CCR5-edited iPSCs were uniquely resistant to CCR5-tropic virus challenge. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying iPSC technology for the study of the role of CCR5 in HIV infection in vitro, and generation of HIV-resistant cells for potential therapeutic applications.

  20. Covariance of charged amino acids at positions 322 and 440 of HIV-1 Env contributes to coreceptor specificity of subtype B viruses, and can be used to improve the performance of V3 sequence-based coreceptor usage prediction algorithms.

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    Kieran Cashin

    Full Text Available The ability to determine coreceptor usage of patient-derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains is clinically important, particularly for the administration of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc. The envelope glycoprotein (Env determinants of coreceptor specificity lie primarily within the gp120 V3 loop region, although other Env determinants have been shown to influence gp120-coreceptor interactions. Here, we determined whether conserved amino acid alterations outside the V3 loop that contribute to coreceptor usage exist, and whether these alterations improve the performance of V3 sequence-based coreceptor usage prediction algorithms. We demonstrate a significant covariant association between charged amino acids at position 322 in V3 and position 440 in the C4 Env region that contributes to the specificity of HIV-1 subtype B strains for CCR5 or CXCR4. Specifically, positively charged Lys/Arg at position 322 and negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 440 occurred more frequently in CXCR4-using viruses, whereas negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 322 and positively charged Arg at position 440 occurred more frequently in R5 strains. In the context of CD4-bound gp120, structural models suggest that covariation of amino acids at Env positions 322 and 440 has the potential to alter electrostatic interactions that are formed between gp120 and charged amino acids in the CCR5 N-terminus. We further demonstrate that inclusion of a "440 rule" can improve the sensitivity of several V3 sequence-based genotypic algorithms for predicting coreceptor usage of subtype B HIV-1 strains, without compromising specificity, and significantly improves the AUROC of the geno2pheno algorithm when set to its recommended false positive rate of 5.75%. Together, our results provide further mechanistic insights into the intra-molecular interactions within Env that contribute to coreceptor specificity of subtype B HIV-1 strains, and demonstrate that incorporation

  1. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals binding residues for the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, Michael J; Garry, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The surface glycoprotein (SU, gp120) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) must bind to a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4, to invade CD4+ cells. Plasmodium vivax uses the Duffy Binding Protein (DBP) to bind the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) and invade reticulocytes. Results Variable loop 3 (V3) of HIV-1 SU and domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax DBP share a sequence similarity. The site of amino acid sequence similarity was necessary, but not sufficient, ...

  2. Inter-laboratory assessment of a prototype multiplex kit for determination of recent HIV-1 infection.

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    Kelly A Curtis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate and reliable laboratory-based assays are needed for estimating HIV-1 incidence from cross-sectional samples. We recently described the development of a customized, HIV-1-specific Bio-Plex assay that allows for the measurement of HIV-specific antibody levels and avidity to multiple analytes for improved HIV-1 incidence estimates. METHODS: To assess intra- and inter-laboratory assay performance, prototype multiplex kits were developed and evaluated by three distinct laboratories. Longitudinal seroconversion specimens were tested in parallel by each laboratory and kit performance was compared to that of an in-house assay. Additionally, the ability of the kit to distinguish recent from long-term HIV-1 infection, as compared to the in-house assay, was determined by comparing the reactivity of known recent (infected 12 months drug naïve specimens. RESULTS: Although the range of reactivity for each analyte varied between the prototype kit and in-house assay, a measurable distinction in reactivity between recent and long-term specimens was observed with both assays in all three laboratories. Additionally, kit performance was consistent between all three laboratories. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV, between sample replicates for all laboratories, ranged from 0.5% to 6.1%. The inter-laboratory CVs ranged from 8.5% to 21.3% for gp160-avidity index (a and gp120-normalized mean fluorescent intensity (MFI value (n, respectively. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate the feasibility of producing a multiplex kit for measuring HIV antibody levels and avidity, with the potential for improved incidence estimates based on multi-analyte algorithms. The availability of a commercial kit will facilitate the transfer of technology among diverse laboratories for widespread assay use.

  3. Performance of V3-based HIV-1 sero subtyping in HIV endemic areas

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    Lara Tavoschi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 serosubtyping based on reactivity to peptides from the V3 region of gp120 is a low-cost and easy to perform procedure often used in geographical areas with high prevalence and incidence of HIV infection. We evaluated the performance of V3-based serotyping on 148 sera from 118 HIV-1-infected individuals living in Uganda, with estimated dates of seroconversion. Of the 148 tested samples, 68 (46.0% specifically reacted with only one of the V3 peptides included in the test (SP, 64 (43.2% did not react with any peptide (NR and 16 (10.8% reacted with two or more peptides (CR. According to the estimated seroconversion date, the large majority of samples collected early after infection belonged to the NR group. These samples had also a low Avidity Index. In contrast, samples collected later after infection belonged mainly to CR and SP groups and had also a higher avidity index. These results indicate that the performance of V3-based assays depends on maturation of HIV-specific immune response and can be significantly lowered when these tests are carried out on specimens collected from recently infected individuals.

  4. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

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    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  5. In vivo evolution of HIV-1 co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, G; Tresoldi, E; Björndal, A; Fredriksson, R; Colognesi, C; Deng, H K; Malnati, M S; Plebani, A; Siccardi, A G; Littman, D R; Fenyö, E M; Lusso, P

    1997-11-01

    Following the identification of the C-C chemokines RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta as major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-suppressive factors produced by CD8+ T cells, several chemokine receptors were found to serve as membrane co-receptors for primate immunodeficiency lentiretroviruses. The two most widely used co-receptors thus far recognized, CCR5 and CXCR4, are expressed by both activated T lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes. CCR5, a specific RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1 receptor, is used preferentially by non-MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains and by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), whereas CXCR4, a receptor for the C-X-C chemokine SDF-1, is used by MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2, but not by SIV. Other receptors with a more restricted cellular distribution, such as CCR2b, CCR3 and STRL33, can also function as co-receptors for selected viral isolates. The third variable region (V3) of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 has been fingered as a critical determinant of the co-receptor choice. Here, we document a consistent pattern of evolution of viral co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression in a longitudinal follow-up of children with progressive HIV-1 infection. Viral isolates obtained during the asymptomatic stages generally used only CCR5 as a co-receptor and were inhibited by RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, but not by SDF-1. By contrast, the majority of the isolates derived after the progression of the disease were resistant to C-C chemokines, having acquired the ability to use CXCR4 and, in some cases, CCR3, while gradually losing CCR5 usage. Surprisingly, most of these isolates were also insensitive to SDF-1, even when used in combination with RANTES. An early acquisition of CXCR4 usage predicted a poor prognosis. In children who progressed to AIDS without a shift to CXCR4 usage, all the sequential isolates were CCR5-dependent but showed a reduced sensitivity to C-C chemokines. Discrete changes in the V3 domain

  6. Analysis of memory B cell responses and isolation of novel monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing breadth from HIV-1-infected individuals.

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    Davide Corti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that neutralize a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates and the characterization of the human neutralizing antibody B cell response to HIV-1 infection are important goals that are central to the design of an effective antibody-based vaccine.We immortalized IgG(+ memory B cells from individuals infected with diverse clades of HIV-1 and selected on the basis of plasma neutralization profiles that were cross-clade and relatively potent. Culture supernatants were screened using various recombinant forms of the envelope glycoproteins (Env in multiple parallel assays. We isolated 58 mAbs that were mapped to different Env surfaces, most of which showed neutralizing activity. One mAb in particular (HJ16 specific for a novel epitope proximal to the CD4 binding site on gp120 selectively neutralized a multi-clade panel of Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses, and demonstrated reactivity that was comparable in breadth, but distinct in neutralization specificity, to that of the other CD4 binding site-specific neutralizing mAb b12. A second mAb (HGN194 bound a conserved epitope in the V3 crown and neutralized all Tier-1 and a proportion of Tier-2 pseudoviruses tested, irrespective of clade. A third mAb (HK20 with broad neutralizing activity, particularly as a Fab fragment, recognized a highly conserved epitope in the HR-1 region of gp41, but showed striking assay-dependent selectivity in its activity.This study reveals that by using appropriate screening methods, a large proportion of memory B cells can be isolated that produce mAbs with HIV-1 neutralizing activity. Three of these mAbs show unusual breadth of neutralization and therefore add to the current panel of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies with potential for passive protection and template-based vaccine design.

  7. The Depsipeptide Romidepsin Reverses HIV-1 Latency In Vivo.

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    Ole S Søgaard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacologically-induced activation of replication competent proviruses from latency in the presence of antiretroviral treatment (ART has been proposed as a step towards curing HIV-1 infection. However, until now, approaches to reverse HIV-1 latency in humans have yielded mixed results. Here, we report a proof-of-concept phase Ib/IIa trial where 6 aviremic HIV-1 infected adults received intravenous 5 mg/m2 romidepsin (Celgene once weekly for 3 weeks while maintaining ART. Lymphocyte histone H3 acetylation, a cellular measure of the pharmacodynamic response to romidepsin, increased rapidly (maximum fold range: 3.7–7.7 relative to baseline within the first hours following each romidepsin administration. Concurrently, HIV-1 transcription quantified as copies of cell-associated un-spliced HIV-1 RNA increased significantly from baseline during treatment (range of fold-increase: 2.4–5.0; p = 0.03. Plasma HIV-1 RNA increased from <20 copies/mL at baseline to readily quantifiable levels at multiple post-infusion time-points in 5 of 6 patients (range 46–103 copies/mL following the second infusion, p = 0.04. Importantly, romidepsin did not decrease the number of HIV-specific T cells or inhibit T cell cytokine production. Adverse events (all grade 1–2 were consistent with the known side effects of romidepsin. In conclusion, romidepsin safely induced HIV-1 transcription resulting in plasma HIV-1 RNA that was readily detected with standard commercial assays demonstrating that significant reversal of HIV-1 latency in vivo is possible without blunting T cell-mediated immune responses. These finding have major implications for future trials aiming to eradicate the HIV-1 reservoir.clinicaltrials.gov NTC02092116.

  8. The N-terminal domain of APJ, a CNS-based coreceptor for HIV-1, is essential for its receptor function and coreceptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Naiming; Zhang Xiaoling; Fan Xuejun; Argyris, Elias; Fang Jianhua; Acheampong, Edward; DuBois, Garrett C.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    2003-01-01

    The human APJ, a G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptor, has been found to be dramatically expressed in the human central nervous system (CNS) and also to serve as a coreceptor for the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Studies with animal models suggested that APJ and its natural ligand, apelin, play an important role in the central control of body fluid homeostasis, and in regulation of blood pressure and cardiac contractility. In this study, we characterize the structural and functional determinants of the N-terminal domain of APJ in interactions with its natural ligand and HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. We demonstrate that the second 10 residues of the N-terminal domain of APJ are critical for association with apelin, while the first 20 amino acids play an important role in supporting cell-cell fusion mediated by HIV-1 gp120. With site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified that the negatively charged amino acid residues Glu20 and Asp23 are involved in receptor and coreceptor functions, but residues Tyr10 and Tyr11 substantially contribute to coreceptor function for both T-tropic (CXCR4) and dual-tropic (CXCR4 and CCR5) HIV-1 isolates. Thus, this study provides potentially important information for further characterizing APJ-apelin functions in vitro and in vivo and designing small molecules for treatment of HIV-1 infection in the CNS

  9. Peptide-derivatized SB105-A10 dendrimer inhibits the infectivity of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains in primary PBMCs and cervicovaginal histocultures.

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    Isabella Bon

    Full Text Available Peptide dendrimers are a class of molecules that exhibit a large array of biological effects including antiviral activity. In this report, we analyzed the antiviral activity of the peptide-derivatized SB105-A10 dendrimer, which is a tetra-branched dendrimer synthetized on a lysine core, in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs that were challenged with reference and wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains. SB105-A10 inhibited infections by HIV-1 X4 and R5 strains, interfering with the early phases of the viral replication cycle. SB105-A10 targets heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs and, importantly, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR assay revealed that SB105-A10 strongly binds gp41 and gp120, most likely preventing HIV-1 attachment/entry through multiple mechanisms. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of SB105-A10 was also detectable in an organ-like structure of human cervicovaginal tissue, in which SB105-A10 inhibited the HIV-1ada R5 strain infection without altering the tissue viability. These results demonstrated the strong antiviral activity of SB105-A10 and suggest a potential microbicide use of this dendrimer to prevent the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1.

  10. Development of an epitope-based HIV-1 vaccine strategy from HIV-1 lipopeptide to dendritic-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surenaud, Mathieu; Lacabaratz, Christine; Zurawski, Gérard; Lévy, Yves; Lelièvre, Jean-Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Development of a safe, effective and globally affordable Human Immunodeficiency Virus strain 1 (HIV-1) vaccine offers the best hope for future control of the HIV-1 pandemic. However, with the exception of the recent RV144 trial, which elicited a modest level of protection against infection, no vaccine candidate has shown efficacy in preventing HIV-1 infection or in controlling virus replication in humans. There is also a great need for a successful immunotherapeutic vaccine since combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) does not eliminate the reservoir of HIV-infected cells. But to date, no vaccine candidate has proven to significantly alter the natural history of an individual with HIV-1 infection. Areas covered: For over 25 years, the ANRS (France Recherche Nord&Sud Sida-HIV hépatites) has been committed to an original program combining basic science and clinical research developing an epitope-based vaccine strategy to induce a multiepitopic cellular response against HIV-1. This review describes the evolution of concepts, based on strategies using HIV-1 lipopeptides towards the use of dendritic cell (DC) manipulation. Expert commentary: Understanding the crucial role of DCs in immune responses allowed moving from the non-specific administration of HIV-1 sequences with lipopeptides to DC-based vaccines. These DC-targeting strategies should improve HIV-1 vaccine efficacy.

  11. Variation in HIV-1 R5 macrophage-tropism correlates with sensitivity to reagents that block envelope: CD4 interactions but not with sensitivity to other entry inhibitors

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    Simmonds Peter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 R5 viruses cause most of the AIDS cases worldwide and are preferentially transmitted compared to CXCR4-using viruses. Furthermore, R5 viruses vary extensively in capacity to infect macrophages and highly macrophage-tropic variants are frequently identified in the brains of patients with dementia. Here, we investigated the sensitivity of R5 envelopes to a range of inhibitors and antibodies that block HIV entry. We studied a large panel of R5 envelopes, derived by PCR amplification without culture from brain, lymph node, blood and semen. These R5 envelopes conferred a wide range of macrophage tropism and included highly macrophage-tropic variants from brain and non-macrophage-tropic variants from lymph node. Results R5 macrophage-tropism correlated with sensitivity to inhibition by reagents that inhibited gp120:CD4 interactions. Thus, increasing macrophage-tropism was associated with increased sensitivity to soluble CD4 and to IgG-CD4 (PRO 542, but with increased resistance to the anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (mab, Q4120. These observations were highly significant and are consistent with an increased affinity of envelope for CD4 for macrophage-tropic envelopes. No overall correlations were noted between R5 macrophage-tropism and sensitivity to CCR5 antagonists or to gp41 specific reagents. Intriguingly, there was a relationship between increasing macrophage-tropism and increased sensitivity to the CD4 binding site mab, b12, but decreased sensitivity to 2G12, a mab that binds a glycan complex on gp120. Conclusion Variation in R5 macrophage-tropism is caused by envelope variation that predominantly influences sensitivity to reagents that block gp120:CD4 interactions. Such variation has important implications for therapy using viral entry inhibitors and for the design of envelope antigens for vaccines.

  12. McCoy cell line as a possible model containing CD4+ receptors for the study of HIV-1 replication

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    Nogueira Yeda L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have recently shown the use of recombinant rabies virus as potential vector-viral vaccine for HIV-1. The sequence homology between gp 120 and rabies virus glycoprotein has been reported. The McCoy cell line has therefore been used to show CD4+ or CD4+ like receptors. Samples of HIV-1 were isolated, when plasma of HIV-1 positive patients was inoculated in the McCoy cell line. The virus infection was then studied during successive virus passages. The proteins released in the extra cellular medium were checked for protein activity, by exposure to SDS Electrophoresis and blotting to nitro-cellulose filter, then reacting with sera of HIV positive and negative patients. Successive passages were performed, and showed viral replication, membrane permeabilization, the syncytium formation, and the cellular lysis (cytopathic effect. Flow cytometry analysis shows clear evidence that CD4+ receptors are present in this cell line, which enhances the likelihood of easy isolation and replication of HIV. The results observed allow the use of this cell line as a possible model for isolating HIV, as well as for carrying out studies of the dynamics of viral infection in several situations, including exposure to drugs in pharmacological studies, and possibly studies and analyses of the immune response in vaccine therapies.

  13. Entry inhibitor-based microbicides are active in vitro against HIV-1 isolates from multiple genetic subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketas, Thomas J.; Schader, Susan M.; Zurita, Juan; Teo, Esther; Polonis, Victoria; Lu Min; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Inhibitors of viral entry are under consideration as topical microbicides to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. Small molecules targeting HIV-1 gp120 (BMS-378806) or CCR5 (CMPD167), and a peptide fusion inhibitor (C52L), each blocks vaginal infection of macaques by a SHIV. A microbicide, however, must be active against multiple HIV-1 variants. We therefore tested BMS-C (a BMS-378806 derivative), CMPD167, C52L and the CXCR4 ligand AMD3465, alone and in combination, against 25 primary R5, 12 X4 and 7 R5X4 isolates from subtypes A-G. At high concentrations (0.1-1 μM), the replication of most R5 isolates in human donor lymphocytes was inhibited by > 90%. At lower concentrations, double and triple combinations were more effective than individual inhibitors. Similar results were obtained with X4 viruses when AMD3465 was substituted for CMPD167. The R5X4 viruses were inhibited by combining AMD3465 with CMPD167, or by the coreceptor-independent compounds. Thus, combining entry inhibitors may improve microbicide effectiveness

  14. Architectural Insight into Inovirus-Associated Vectors (IAVs and Development of IAV-Based Vaccines Inducing Humoral and Cellular Responses: Implications in HIV-1 Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos A. Hassapis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs are engineered, non-lytic, filamentous bacteriophages that are assembled primarily from thousands of copies of the major coat protein gp8 and just five copies of each of the four minor coat proteins gp3, gp6, gp7 and gp9. Inovirus display studies have shown that the architecture of inoviruses makes all coat proteins of the inoviral particle accessible to the outside. This particular feature of IAVs allows foreign antigenic peptides to be displayed on the outer surface of the virion fused to its coat proteins and for more than two decades has been exploited in many applications including antibody or peptide display libraries, drug design, and vaccine development against infectious and non-infectious diseases. As vaccine carriers, IAVs have been shown to elicit both a cellular and humoral response against various pathogens through the display of antibody epitopes on their coat proteins. Despite their high immunogenicity, the goal of developing an effective vaccine against HIV-1 has not yet materialized. One possible limitation of previous efforts was the use of broadly neutralizing antibodies, which exhibited autoreactivity properties. In the past five years, however, new, more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that do not exhibit autoreactivity properties have been isolated from HIV-1 infected individuals, suggesting that vaccination strategies aimed at producing such broadly neutralizing antibodies may confer protection against infection. The utilization of these new, broadly neutralizing antibodies in combination with the architectural traits of IAVs have driven the current developments in the design of an inovirus-based vaccine against HIV-1. This article reviews the applications of IAVs in vaccine development, with particular emphasis on the design of inoviral-based vaccines against HIV-1.

  15. Somatic populations of PGT135-137 HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies identified by 454 pyrosequencing and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang eZhu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Select HIV-1-infected individuals develop sera capable of neutralizing diverse viral strains. The molecular basis of this neutralization is currently being deciphered by the isolation of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies. In one infected donor, three neutralizing antibodies, PGT135-137, were identified by assessment of neutralization from individually sorted B cells and found to recognize an epitope containing an N-linked glycan at residue 332 on HIV-1 gp120. Here we use deep sequencing and bioinformatics methods to interrogate the B cell record of this donor to gain a more complete understanding of the humoral immune response. PGT135-137-gene family-specific primers were used to amplify heavy and light chain-variable domain sequences. 454 pyrosequencing produced 141,298 heavy-chain sequences of IGHV4-39 origin and 87,229 light-chain sequences of IGKV3-15 origin. A number of heavy and light chain sequences of ~90% identity to PGT137, several to PGT136, and none of high identity to PGT135 were identified. After expansion of these sequences to include close phylogenetic relatives, a total of 202 heavy-chain sequences and 72 light-chain sequences were identified. These sequences were clustered into populations of 95% identity comprising 15 for heavy chain and 10 for light chain, and a select sequence from each population was synthesized and reconstituted with a PGT137-partner chain. Reconstituted antibodies showed varied neutralization phenotypes for HIV-1 clade A and D isolates. Sequence diversity of the antibody population represented by these tested sequences was notably higher than observed with a 454 pyrosequencing-control analysis on 10 antibodies of defined sequence, suggesting that this diversity results primarily from somatic maturation. Our results thus provide an example of how pathogens like HIV-1 are opposed by a varied humoral immune response, derived from intrinsic mechanisms of antibody development, and embodied by somatic populations

  16. Characterization of broadly neutralizing antibody responses to HIV-1 in a cohort of long term non-progressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Nuria; McKee, Krisha; Lynch, Rebecca M; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Jimenez, Laura; Grau, Eulalia; Yuste, Eloísa; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Alcamí, José

    2018-01-01

    Only a small fraction of HIV-1-infected patients develop broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), a process generally associated to chronic antigen stimulation. It has been described that rare aviremic HIV-1-infected patients can generate bNAbs but this issue remains controversial. To address this matter we have assessed bNAb responses in a large cohort of long-term non-progressors (LTNPs) with low or undetectable viremia. Samples from the LTNP cohort of the Spanish AIDS Research Network (87 elite and 42 viremic controllers) and a control population of 176 viremic typical-progressors (TPs) were screened for bNAbs using Env-recombinant viruses. bNAb specificities were studied by ELISA using mutated gp120, neutralization assays with mutated viruses, and peptide competition. Epitope specificities were also elucidated from the serum pattern of neutralization against a panel of diverse HIV-1 isolates. Broadly neutralizing sera were found among 9.3% LTNPs, both elite (7%) and viremic controllers (14%). Within the broadly neutralizing sera, CD4 binding site antibodies were detected by ELISA in 4/12 LTNPs (33%), and 16/33 of TPs (48%). Anti-MPER antibodies were detected in 6/12 LTNPs (50%) and 14/33 TPs (42%) whereas glycan-dependent HIV-1 bNAbs were more frequent in LTNPs (11/12, 92%) as compared to TPs (12/33, 36%). A good concordance between standard serum mapping and neutralization-based mapping was observed. LTNPs, both viremic and elite controllers, showed broad humoral immune responses against HIV-1, including activity against many major epitopes involved in bNAbs-mediated protection.

  17. Cryoelectron Tomography of HIV-1 Envelope Spikes: Further Evidence for Tripod-Like Legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Winkler, Hanspeter; Chertova, Elena; Taylor, Kenneth A.; Roux, Kenneth H.

    2008-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the morphology of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) spike is key to understanding viral pathogenesis and for informed vaccine design. We have previously presented a cryoelectron microscopic tomogram (cryoET) of the Env spikes on SIV virions. Several structural features were noted in the gp120 head and gp41 stalk regions. Perhaps most notable was the presence of three splayed legs projecting obliquely from the base of the spike head toward the viral membrane. Subsequently, a second 3D image of SIV spikes, also obtained by cryoET, was published by another group which featured a compact vertical stalk. We now report the cryoET analysis of HIV-1 virion-associated Env spikes using enhanced analytical cryoET procedures. More than 2,000 Env spike volumes were initially selected, aligned, and sorted into structural classes using algorithms that compensate for the “missing wedge” and do not impose any symmetry. The results show varying morphologies between structural classes: some classes showed trimers in the head domains; nearly all showed two or three legs, though unambiguous three-fold symmetry was not observed either in the heads or the legs. Subsequently, clearer evidence of trimeric head domains and three splayed legs emerged when head and leg volumes were independently aligned and classified. These data show that HIV-1, like SIV, also displays the tripod-like leg configuration, and, unexpectedly, shows considerable gp41 leg flexibility/heteromorphology. The tripod-like model for gp41 is consistent with, and helps explain, many of the unique biophysical and immunological features of this region. PMID:19008954

  18. Phase I safety and immunogenicity evaluation of MVA-CMDR, a multigenic, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara-HIV-1 vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Jeffrey R; Ngauy, Viseth; de Souza, Mark S; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Cox, Josephine H; Polonis, Victoria R; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Peel, Sheila; Slike, Bonnie; Sriplienchan, Somchai; Thongcharoen, Prasert; Paris, Robert M; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome; Michael, Nelson L; Marovich, Mary A

    2010-11-15

    We conducted a Phase I randomized, dose-escalation, route-comparison trial of MVA-CMDR, a candidate HIV-1 vaccine based on a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara viral vector expressing HIV-1 genes env/gag/pol. The HIV sequences were derived from circulating recombinant form CRF01_AE, which predominates in Thailand. The objective was to evaluate safety and immunogenicity of MVA-CMDR in human volunteers in the US and Thailand. MVA-CMDR or placebo was administered intra-muscularly (IM; 10(7) or 10(8) pfu) or intradermally (ID; 10(6) or 10(7) pfu) at months 0, 1 and 3, to 48 healthy volunteers at low risk for HIV-1 infection. Twelve volunteers in each dosage group were randomized to receive MVA-CMDR or placebo (10∶2). Volunteers were actively monitored for local and systemic reactogenicity and adverse events post vaccination. Cellular immunogenicity was assessed by a validated IFNγ Elispot assay, an intracellular cytokine staining assay, lymphocyte proliferation and a (51)Cr-release assay. Humoral immunogenicity was assessed by ADCC for gp120 and binding antibody ELISAs for gp120 and p24. MVA-CMDR was safe and well tolerated with no vaccine related serious adverse events. Cell-mediated immune responses were: (i) moderate in magnitude (median IFNγ Elispot of 78 SFC/10(6) PBMC at 10(8) pfu IM), but high in response rate (70% (51)Cr-release positive; 90% Elispot positive; 100% ICS positive, at 10(8) pfu IM); (ii) predominantly HIV Env-specific CD4(+) T cells, with a high proliferative capacity and durable for at least 6 months (100% LPA response rate by the IM route); (iv) dose- and route-dependent with 10(8) pfu IM being the most immunogenic treatment. Binding antibodies against gp120 and p24 were detectable in all vaccination groups with ADCC capacity detectable at the highest dose (40% positive at 10(8) pfu IM). MVA-CMDR delivered both intramuscularly and intradermally was safe, well-tolerated and elicited durable cell-mediated and humoral immune responses

  19. Phase I safety and immunogenicity evaluation of MVA-CMDR, a multigenic, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara-HIV-1 vaccine candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Currier

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a Phase I randomized, dose-escalation, route-comparison trial of MVA-CMDR, a candidate HIV-1 vaccine based on a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara viral vector expressing HIV-1 genes env/gag/pol. The HIV sequences were derived from circulating recombinant form CRF01_AE, which predominates in Thailand. The objective was to evaluate safety and immunogenicity of MVA-CMDR in human volunteers in the US and Thailand.MVA-CMDR or placebo was administered intra-muscularly (IM; 10(7 or 10(8 pfu or intradermally (ID; 10(6 or 10(7 pfu at months 0, 1 and 3, to 48 healthy volunteers at low risk for HIV-1 infection. Twelve volunteers in each dosage group were randomized to receive MVA-CMDR or placebo (10∶2. Volunteers were actively monitored for local and systemic reactogenicity and adverse events post vaccination. Cellular immunogenicity was assessed by a validated IFNγ Elispot assay, an intracellular cytokine staining assay, lymphocyte proliferation and a (51Cr-release assay. Humoral immunogenicity was assessed by ADCC for gp120 and binding antibody ELISAs for gp120 and p24. MVA-CMDR was safe and well tolerated with no vaccine related serious adverse events. Cell-mediated immune responses were: (i moderate in magnitude (median IFNγ Elispot of 78 SFC/10(6 PBMC at 10(8 pfu IM, but high in response rate (70% (51Cr-release positive; 90% Elispot positive; 100% ICS positive, at 10(8 pfu IM; (ii predominantly HIV Env-specific CD4(+ T cells, with a high proliferative capacity and durable for at least 6 months (100% LPA response rate by the IM route; (iv dose- and route-dependent with 10(8 pfu IM being the most immunogenic treatment. Binding antibodies against gp120 and p24 were detectable in all vaccination groups with ADCC capacity detectable at the highest dose (40% positive at 10(8 pfu IM.MVA-CMDR delivered both intramuscularly and intradermally was safe, well-tolerated and elicited durable cell-mediated and humoral immune responses

  20. NF-κB and p53 Are the Dominant Apoptosis-inducing Transcription Factors Elicited by the HIV-1 Envelope

    OpenAIRE

    Perfettini, Jean-Luc; Roumier, Thomas; Castedo, Maria; Larochette, Nathanael; Boya, Patricia; Raynal, Brigitte; Lazar, Vladimir; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Nardacci, Roberta; Penninger, Josef; Piacentini, Mauro; Kroemer, Guido

    2004-01-01

    The coculture of cells expressing the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) with cells expressing CD4 results into cell fusion, deregulated mitosis, and subsequent cell death. Here, we show that NF-κB, p53, and AP1 are activated in Env-elicited apoptosis. The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) super repressor had an antimitotic and antiapoptotic effect and prevented the Env-elicited phosphorylation of p53 on serine 15 and 46, as well as the activation of AP1. Transfection with dominant-negative p5...

  1. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn (NHLS-South Africa); (NIH); (Witwatersrand); (KwaZulu-Natal)

    2016-08-31

    ABSTRACT

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage.

    IMPORTANCEThe conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of

  2. Blocking type I interferon signaling enhances T cell recovery and reduces HIV-1 reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Ma, Jianping; Li, Jingyun; Li, Dan; Li, Guangming; Li, Feng; Zhang, Qing; Yu, Haisheng; Yasui, Fumihiko; Ye, Chaobaihui; Tsao, Li-Chung; Hu, Zhiyuan; Su, Lishan; Zhang, Liguo

    2017-01-03

    Despite the efficient suppression of HIV-1 replication that can be achieved with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), low levels of type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling persist in some individuals. This sustained signaling may impede immune recovery and foster viral persistence. Here we report studies using a monoclonal antibody to block IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR) signaling in humanized mice (hu-mice) that were persistently infected with HIV-1. We discovered that effective cART restored the number of human immune cells in HIV-1-infected hu-mice but did not rescue their immune hyperactivation and dysfunction. IFNAR blockade fully reversed HIV-1-induced immune hyperactivation and rescued anti-HIV-1 immune responses in T cells from HIV-1-infected hu-mice. Finally, we found that IFNAR blockade in the presence of cART reduced the size of HIV-1 reservoirs in lymphoid tissues and delayed HIV-1 rebound after cART cessation in the HIV-1-infected hu-mice. We conclude that low levels of IFN-I signaling contribute to HIV-1-associated immune dysfunction and foster HIV-1 persistence in cART-treated hosts. Our results suggest that blocking IFNAR may provide a potential strategy to enhance immune recovery and reduce HIV-1 reservoirs in individuals with sustained elevations in IFN-I signaling during suppressive cART.

  3. eCD4-Ig variants that more potently neutralize HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, Ina; Gardner, Matthew R; Davis-Gardner, Meredith E; Prasad, Neha R; Alfant, Barnett; Weber, Jesse A; Farzan, Michael

    2018-03-28

    The HIV-1 entry inhibitor eCD4-Ig is a fusion of CD4-Ig and a coreceptor-mimetic peptide. eCD4-Ig is markedly more potent than CD4-Ig, with neutralization efficiencies approaching those of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). However, unlike bNAbs, eCD4-Ig neutralizes all HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV isolates that it has been tested against, suggesting that it may be useful in clinical settings where antibody escape is a concern. Here we characterize three new eCD4-Ig variants, each with different architectures and each utilizing D1.22, a stabilized form of CD4 domain 1. These variants were 10- to 20-fold more potent than our original eCD4-Ig variant, with a construct bearing four D1.22 domains (eD1.22-HL-Ig) exhibiting the greatest potency. However, this variant mediated less efficient antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity than eCD4-Ig itself or several other eCD4-Ig variants, including the smallest variant (eD1.22-Ig). A variant with the same architecture as original eCD4-Ig (eD1.22-D2-Ig) showed modestly higher thermal stability and best prevented promotion of infection of CCR5-positive, CD4-negative cells. All three variants, and eCD4-Ig itself, mediated more efficient shedding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 than did CD4-Ig. Finally, we show that only three D1.22 mutations contributed to the potency of eD1.22-D2-Ig, and that introduction of these changes into eCD4-Ig resulted in a variant 9-fold more potent than eCD4-Ig and 2-fold more potent than eD1.22-D2-Ig. These studies will assist in developing eCD4-Ig variants with properties optimized for prophylaxis, therapy, and cure applications. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 bNAbs have properties different from antiretroviral compounds. Specifically, antibodies can enlist immune effector cells to eliminate infected cells, whereas antiretroviral compounds simply interfere with various steps in the viral lifecycle. Unfortunately, HIV-1 is adept at evading antibody recognition, limiting the

  4. HIV-1 and the macrophage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Sebastiaan M.; Cobos-Jimenez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; van 't Wout, Angelique B.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages and CD4(+) T cells are natural target cells for HIV-1, and both cell types contribute to the establishment of the viral reservoir that is responsible for continuous residual virus replication during antiretroviral therapy and viral load rebound upon treatment interruption. Scientific

  5. Developing strategies for HIV-1 eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Christine M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, transforming the outlook for infected patients. However, reservoirs of replication-competent forms of the virus persist during HAART, and when treatment is stopped, high rates of HIV-1 replication return. Recent insights into HIV-1 latency, as well as a report that HIV-1 infection was eradicated in one individual, have renewed interest in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Strategies for HIV-1 eradication include gene therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stimulating host immunity to control HIV-1 replication, and targeting latent HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells. Future efforts should aim to provide better understanding of how to reconstitute the CD4+ T cell compartment with genetically engineered cells, exert immune control over HIV-1 replication, and identify and eliminate all viral reservoirs. PMID:22867874

  6. Identifying HIV-1 dual infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelissen Marion

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is no exception to the phenomenon that a second, productive infection with another strain of the same virus is feasible. Experiments with RNA viruses have suggested that both coinfections (simultaneous infection with two strains of a virus and superinfections (second infection after a specific immune response to the first infecting strain has developed can result in increased fitness of the viral population. Concerns about dual infections with HIV are increasing. First, the frequent detection of superinfections seems to indicate that it will be difficult to develop a prophylactic vaccine. Second, HIV-1 superinfections have been associated with accelerated disease progression, although this is not true for all persons. In fact, superinfections have even been detected in persons controlling their HIV infections without antiretroviral therapy. Third, dual infections can give rise to recombinant viruses, which are increasingly found in the HIV-1 epidemic. Recombinants could have increased fitness over the parental strains, as in vitro models suggest, and could exhibit increased pathogenicity. Multiple drug resistant (MDR strains could recombine to produce a pan-resistant, transmittable virus. We will describe in this review what is presently known about super- and re-infection among ambient viral infections, as well as the first cases of HIV-1 superinfection, including HIV-1 triple infections. The clinical implications, the impact of the immune system, and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy will be covered, as will as the timing of HIV superinfection. The methods used to detect HIV-1 dual infections will be discussed in detail. To increase the likelihood of detecting a dual HIV-1 infection, pre-selection of patients can be done by serotyping, heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA, counting the degenerate base codes in the HIV-1 genotyping sequence, or surveying unexpected increases in the

  7. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  8. Multimeric scaffolds displaying the HIV-1 envelope MPER induce MPER-specific antibodies and cross-neutralizing antibodies when co-immunized with gp160 DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly J Krebs

    Full Text Available Developing a vaccine that overcomes the diversity of HIV-1 is likely to require a strategy that directs antibody (Ab responses toward conserved regions of the viral Envelope (Env. However, the generation of neutralizing Abs (NAbs targeting these regions through vaccination has proven to be difficult. One conserved region of particular interest is the membrane proximal external region (MPER of Env located within the gp41 ectodomain. In order to direct the immune response to this region, the MPER and gp41 ectodomain were expressed separately as N-terminal fusions to the E2 protein of Geobacillus stearothermophilus. The E2 protein acts as a scaffold by self-assembling into 60-mer particles, displaying up to 60 copies of the fused target on the surface. Rabbits were immunized with E2 particles displaying MPER and/or the gp41 ectodomain in conjunction with DNA encoding full-length gp160. Only vaccines including E2 particles displaying MPER elicited MPER-specific Ab responses. NAbs were elicited after two immunizations that largely targeted the V3 loop. To overcome V3 immunodominance in the DNA component, E2 particles displaying MPER were used in conjunction with gp160 DNA lacking hypervariable regions V2, V3, or combined V1V2V3. All rabbits had HIV binding Ab responses and NAbs following the second vaccination. Using HIV-2/HIV-1 MPER chimeric viruses as targets, NAbs were detected in 12/16 rabbits after three immunizations. Low levels of NAbs specific for Tier 1 and 2 viruses were observed in all groups. This study provides evidence that co-immunizing E2 particles displaying MPER and gp160 DNA can focus Ab responses toward conserved regions of Env.

  9. Distinct patterns of HIV-1 evolution within metastatic tissues in patients with non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, AIDS related lymphoma (ARL occurs at a significantly higher rate in patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV than in the general population. HIV-infected macrophages are a known viral reservoir and have been shown to have lymphomagenic potential in SCID mice; therefore, there is an interest in determining if a viral component to lymphomagenesis also exists. We sequenced HIV-1 envelope gp120 clones obtained post mortem from several tumor and non-tumor tissues of two patients who died with AIDS-related Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (ARL-NH. Similar results were found in both patients: 1 high-resolution phylogenetic analysis showed a significant degree of compartmentalization between lymphoma and non-lymphoma viral sub-populations while viral sub-populations from lymph nodes appeared to be intermixed within sequences from tumor and non-tumor tissues, 2 a 100-fold increase in the effective HIV population size in tumor versus non-tumor tissues was associated with the emergence of lymphadenopathy and aggressive metastatic ARL, and 3 HIV gene flow among lymph nodes, normal and metastatic tissues was non-random. The different population dynamics between the viruses found in tumors versus the non-tumor associated viruses suggest that there is a significant relationship between HIV evolution and lymphoma pathogenesis. Moreover, the study indicates that HIV could be used as an effective marker to study the origin and dissemination of lymphomas in vivo.

  10. HIV-1 RNAs are Not Part of the Argonaute 2 Associated RNA Interference Pathway in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Vongrad

    Full Text Available MiRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs are key players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. HIV-1 derived small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs have been described in HIV-1 infected cells, but their biological functions still remain to be elucidated. Here, we approached the question whether viral sncRNAs may play a role in the RNA interference (RNAi pathway or whether viral mRNAs are targeted by cellular miRNAs in human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM.The incorporation of viral sncRNAs and/or their target RNAs into RNA-induced silencing complex was investigated using photoactivatable ribonucleoside-induced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP as well as high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP, which capture Argonaute2-bound miRNAs and their target RNAs. HIV-1 infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM were chosen as target cells, as they have previously been shown to express HIV-1 sncRNAs. In addition, we applied small RNA deep sequencing to study differential cellular miRNA expression in HIV-1 infected versus non-infected MDMs.PAR-CLIP and HITS-CLIP data demonstrated the absence of HIV-1 RNAs in Ago2-RISC, although the presence of a multitude of HIV-1 sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected MDMs was confirmed by small RNA sequencing. Small RNA sequencing revealed that 1.4% of all sncRNAs were of HIV-1 origin. However, neither HIV-1 derived sncRNAs nor putative HIV-1 target sequences incorporated into Ago2-RISC were identified suggesting that HIV-1 sncRNAs are not involved in the canonical RNAi pathway nor is HIV-1 targeted by this pathway in HIV-1 infected macrophages.

  11. HIV-1, Methamphetamine and Astrocytes at Neuroinflammatory crossroads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen eBorgmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As a popular psychostimulant, methamphetamine (METH use leads to long-lasting, strong euphoric effects. While METH abuse is common in the general population, between 10-15% of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 patients report having abused METH. METH exacerbates the severity and onset of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND through direct and indirect mechanisms. Repetitive METH use decreases adherence to antiretroviral drug regimens, increasing the likelihood of HIV-1 disease progression towards AIDS. METH exposure also directly affects both innate and adaptive immunity, altering lymphocyte number and activity, cytokine signaling, phagocytic function, and CNS infiltration through the blood brain barrier. Further, METH triggers the neuronal dopamine reward pathway and leads to altered neuronal activity and direct toxicity. Concurrently, METH and HIV-1 alter the neuroimmune balance and induce neuroinflammation. Neuroinflammation modulates a wide range of brain functions including neuronal signaling and activity, glial activation, viral infection, oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Pathologically, glial activation is a hallmark of both HIV-1 and METH-associated neuroinflammation. Significant commonality exists in the neurotoxic mechanisms for both METH and HAND; however, the pathways dysregulated in astroglia during METH exposure are less clear. Thus alterations in astrocyte intracellular signaling pathways, gene expression and function during METH and HIV-1 comorbidity, neuroinflammation and HAND are carefully reviewed. Interventions targeting astrocytes in HAND and METH are presented as potential novel therapeutic approaches.

  12. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Johan Klasse, Per; Moore, John P.

    2012-01-01

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  13. Synergistic activity profile of griffithsin in combination with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide against HIV-1 clade C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferir, Geoffrey; Palmer, Kenneth E.; Schols, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is possibly the most potent anti-HIV peptide found in natural sources. Due to its potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activity and unique safety profile it has great potential as topical microbicide component. Here, we evaluated various combinations of GRFT against HIV-1 clade B and clade C isolates in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in CD4 + MT-4 cells. In all combinations tested, GRFT showed synergistic activity profile with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide based on the median effect principle with combination indices (CI) varying between 0.34 and 0.79 at the calculated EC 95 level. Furthermore, the different glycosylation patterns on the viral envelope of clade B and clade C gp120 had no observable effect on the synergistic interactions. Overall, we can conclude that the evaluated two-drug combination increases their antiviral potency and supports further clinical investigations in pre-exposure prophylaxis for GRFT combinations in the context of HIV-1 clade C infection.

  14. Phase 1 safety and immunogenicity evaluation of ADMVA, a multigenic, modified vaccinia Ankara-HIV-1 B'/C candidate vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Vasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted a Phase I dose-escalation trial of ADMVA, a Clade-B'/C-based HIV-1 candidate vaccine expressing env, gag, pol, nef, and tat in a modified vaccinia Ankara viral vector. Sequences were derived from a prevalent circulating HIV-1 recombinant form in Yunnan, China, an area of high HIV incidence. The objective was to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of ADMVA in human volunteers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ADMVA or placebo was administered intramuscularly at months 0, 1 and 6 to 50 healthy adult volunteers not at high risk for HIV-1. In each dosage group [1x10(7 (low, 5x10(7 (mid, or 2.5x10(8 pfu (high] volunteers were randomized in a 3:1 ratio to receive ADMVA or placebo in a double-blinded design. Subjects were followed for local and systemic reactogenicity, adverse events including cardiac adverse events, and clinical laboratory parameters. Study follow up was 18 months. Humoral immunogenicity was evaluated by anti-gp120 binding ELISA, immunoflourescent staining, and HIV-1 neutralization. Cellular immunogenicity was assessed by a validated IFNgamma ELISpot assay and intracellular cytokine staining. Anti-vaccinia binding titers were measured by ELISA. ADMVA was generally well-tolerated, with no vaccine-related serious adverse events or cardiac adverse events. Local or systemic reactogenicity events were reported by 77% and 78% of volunteers, respectively. The majority of events were of mild intensity. The IFNgamma ELISpot response rate to any HIV antigen was 0/12 (0% in the placebo group, 3/12 (25% in the low dosage group, 6/12 (50% in the mid dosage group, and 8/13 (62% in the high dosage group. Responses were often multigenic and occasionally persisted up to one year post vaccination. Antibodies to gp120 were detected in 0/12 (0%, 8/13 (62%, 6/12 (50% and 10/13 (77% in the placebo, low, mid, and high dosage groups, respectively. Antibodies persisted up to 12 months after vaccination, with a trend toward agreement

  15. HIV1 V3 loop hypermutability is enhanced by the guanine usage bias in the part of env gene coding for it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich

    2009-01-01

    Guanine is the most mutable nucleotide in HIV genes because of frequently occurring G to A transitions, which are caused by cytosine deamination in viral DNA minus strands catalyzed by APOBEC enzymes. Distribution of guanine between three codon positions should influence the probability for G to A mutation to be nonsynonymous (to occur in first or second codon position). We discovered that nucleotide sequences of env genes coding for third variable regions (V3 loops) of gp120 from HIV1 and HIV2 have different kinds of guanine usage biases. In the HIV1 reference strain and 100 additionally analyzed HIV1 strains the guanine usage bias in V3 loop coding regions (2G>1G>3G) should lead to elevated nonsynonymous G to A transitions occurrence rates. In the HIV2 reference strain and 100 other HIV2 strains guanine usage bias in V3 loop coding regions (3G>2G>1G) should protect V3 loops from hypermutability. According to the HIV1 and HIV2 V3 alignment, insertion of the sequence enriched with 2G (21 codons in length) occurred during the evolution of HIV1 predecessor, while insertion of the different sequence enriched with 3G (19 codons in length) occurred during the evolution of HIV2 predecessor. The higher is the level of 3G in the V3 coding region, the lower should be the immune escaping mutation occurrence rates. This hypothesis was tested in this study by comparing the guanine usage in V3 loop coding regions from HIV1 fast and slow progressors. All calculations have been performed by our algorithms "VVK In length", "VVK Dinucleotides" and "VVK Consensus" (www.barkovsky.hotmail.ru).

  16. Variable epitope libraries: new vaccine immunogens capable of inducing broad human immunodeficiency virus type 1-neutralizing antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Niño, Claudia; Pedroza-Roldan, Cesar; Viveros, Monica; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2011-07-18

    The extreme antigenic variability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) leads to immune escape of the virus, representing a major challenge in the design of effective vaccine. We have developed a novel concept for immunogen construction based on introduction of massive mutations within the epitopes targeting antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. Previously, we showed that these immunogens carrying large combinatorial libraries of mutated epitope variants, termed as variable epitope libraries (VELs), induce potent, broad and long lasting CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cell response. Moreover, we demonstrated that these T cells recognize more than 50% of heavily mutated variants (5 out of 10 amino acid positions were mutated in each epitope variant) of HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop-derived cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope (RGPGRAFVTI) in mice. The constructed VELs had complexities of 10000 and 12500 individual members, generated as plasmid DNA or as M13 phage display combinatorial libraries, respectively, and with structural composition RGPGXAXXXX or XGXGXAXVXI, where X is any of 20 natural amino acids. Here, we demonstrated that sera from mice immunized with these VELs are capable of neutralizing 5 out of 10 viral isolates from Tier 2 reference panel of subtype B envelope clones, including HIV-1 isolates which are known to be resistant to neutralization by several potent monoclonal antibodies, described previously. These data indicate the feasibility of the application of immunogens based on VEL concept as an alternative approach for the development of molecular vaccines against antigenically variable pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  18. Macrophage Resistance to HIV-1 Infection Is Enhanced by the Neuropeptides VIP and PACAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temerozo, Jairo R.; Joaquim, Rafael; Regis, Eduardo G.; Savino, Wilson; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that host factors can modulate HIV-1 replication in macrophages, critical cells in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection due to their ability to continuously produce virus. The neuropeptides VIP and PACAP induce well-characterized effects on macrophages through binding to the G protein-coupled receptors VPAC1, VPAC2 and PAC1, but their influence on HIV-1 production by these cells has not been established. Here, we describe that VIP and PACAP reduce macrophage production of HIV-1, acting in a synergistic or additive manner to decrease viral growth. Using receptor antagonists, we detected that the HIV-1 inhibition promoted by VIP is dependent on its ligation to VPAC1/2, whereas PACAP decreases HIV-1 growth via activation of the VPAC1/2 and PAC1 receptors. Specific agonists of VPAC2 or PAC1 decrease macrophage production of HIV-1, whereas sole activation of VPAC1 enhances viral growth. However, the combination of specific agonists mimicking the receptor preference of the natural neuropeptides reproduces the ability of VIP and PACAP to increase macrophage resistance to HIV-1 replication. VIP and PACAP up-regulated macrophage secretion of the β-chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and the cytokine IL-10, whose neutralization reversed the neuropeptide-induced inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Our results suggest that VIP and PACAP and the receptors VPAC2 and PAC1 could be used as targets for developing alternative therapeutic strategies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:23818986

  19. Development of aptamer based HIV-1 entry inhibitor prophylactic drugs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    London, G

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available proliferation assay and mapped their epitopes on gp120 by site directed mutagenesis. UCLA1 and CSIR1.1 neutralized infectivity of 79 % and 84 % pseudotyped viruses, respectively. UCLA1, further inhibited > 60 % of clinical isolates. We noted that, aptamers...

  20. A heterologous prime-boosting strategy with replicating Vaccinia virus vectors and plant-produced HIV-1 Gag/dgp41 virus-like particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meador, Lydia R. [Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Kessans, Sarah A. [Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Kibler, Karen V. [Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Pantaleo, Giuseppe [Division of Immunology and Allergy, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Swiss Vaccine Research Institute, Lausanne (Switzerland); Roderiguez, Mariano Esteban [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia – CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Blattman, Joseph N. [Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Jacobs, Bertram L., E-mail: bjacobs@asu.edu [Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Mor, Tsafrir S., E-mail: tsafrir.mor@asu.edu [Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Showing modest efficacy, the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine clinical trial utilized a non-replicating canarypox viral vector and a soluble gp120 protein boost. Here we built upon the RV144 strategy by developing a novel combination of a replicating, but highly-attenuated Vaccinia virus vector, NYVAC-KC, and plant-produced HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs). Both components contained the full-length Gag and a membrane anchored truncated gp41 presenting the membrane proximal external region with its conserved broadly neutralizing epitopes in the pre-fusion conformation. We tested different prime/boost combinations of these components in mice and showed that the group primed with NYVAC-KC and boosted with both the viral vectors and plant-produced VLPs have the most robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses, at 12.7% of CD8 T cells expressing IFN-γ in response to stimulation with five Gag epitopes. The same immunization group elicited the best systemic and mucosal antibody responses to Gag and dgp41 with a bias towards IgG1. - Highlights: • We devised a prime/boost anti HIV-1 vaccination strategy modeled after RV144. • We used plant-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) consisting of Gag and dgp41. • We used attenuated, replicating vaccinia virus vectors expressing the same antigens. • The immunogens elicited strong cellular and humoral immune responses.

  1. A European multicientre study on the comparison of HIV-1 viral loads between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and Roche COBAS® TAQMAN® HIV-1 test, Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Hofmann, Jörg; Izopet, Jacques; Kühn, Sebastian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Mancon, Alessandro; Marcos, Mª Angeles; Mileto, Davide; Sauné, Karine; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Viral load monitoring is essential for patients under treatment for HIV. Beckman Coulter has developed the VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the novel, automated DxN VERIS Molecular Diagnostics System. ¥ OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the clinical performance of the new quantitative VERIS HIV-1 Assay at multiple EU laboratories. Method comparison with the VERIS HIV-1 Assay was performed with 415 specimens at 5 sites tested with COBAS ® AmpliPrep/COBAS ® TaqMan ® HIV-1 Test, v2.0, 169 specimens at 3 sites tested with RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and 202 specimens from 2 sites tested with VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Patient monitoring sample results from 4 sites were also compared. Bland-Altman analysis showed the average bias between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay to be 0.28, 0.39, and 0.61 log 10 cp/mL, respectively. Bias at low end levels below 1000cp/mL showed predicted bias to be <0.3 log 10 cp/mL for VERIS HIV-1 Assay versus COBAS HIV-1 Test and RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and <0.5 log 10 cp/mL versus VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Analysis on 174 specimens tested with the 0.175mL volume VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test showed average bias of 0.39 log 10 cp/mL. Patient monitoring results using VERIS HIV-1 Assay demonstrated similar viral load trends over time to all comparators. The VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the DxN VERIS System demonstrated comparable clinical performance to COBAS ® HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-01-01

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1 QH1549.13 blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  3. Necroptosis takes place in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Pan

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is characterized by progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and dysfunction of the immune system. The numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the human body are maintained constantly by homeostatic mechanisms that failed during HIV-1 infection, resulting in progressive loss of CD4+ T cells mainly via apoptosis. Recently, a non-apoptotic form of necrotic programmed cell death, named necroptosis, has been investigated in many biological and pathological processes. We then determine whether HIV-1-infected cells also undergo necroptosis. In this report, we demonstrate that HIV-1 not only induces apoptosis, but also mediates necroptosis in the infected primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD4+ T-cell lines. Necroptosis-dependent cytopathic effects are significantly increased in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells that is lack of Fas-associated protein-containing death domain (FADD, indicating that necroptosis occurs as an alternative cell death mechanism in the absence of apoptosis. Unlike apoptosis, necroptosis mainly occurs in HIV-infected cells and spares bystander damage. Treatment with necrostatin-1(Nec-1, a RIP1 inhibitor that specifically blocks the necroptosis pathway, potently restrains HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect and interestingly, inhibits the formation of HIV-induced syncytia in CD4+ T-cell lines. This suggests that syncytia formation is mediated, at least partially, by necroptosis-related processes. Furthermore, we also found that the HIV-1 infection-augmented tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α plays a key role in inducing necroptosis and HIV-1 Envelope and Tat proteins function as its co-factors. Taken together,necroptosis can function as an alternative cell death pathway in lieu of apoptosis during HIV-1 infection, thereby also contributing to HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects. Our results reveal that in addition to apoptosis, necroptosis also plays an important role in HIV-1-induced pathogenesis.

  4. Candidate Microbicides Block HIV-1 Infection of Human Immature Langerhans Cells within Epithelial Tissue Explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Cohen, Sandra S.; Borris, Debra L.; Aquilino, Elisabeth A.; Glushakova, Svetlana; Margolis, Leonid B.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Offord, Robin E.; Neurath, A. Robert; Blauvelt, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Initial biologic events that underlie sexual transmission of HIV-1 are poorly understood. To model these events, we exposed human immature Langerhans cells (LCs) within epithelial tissue explants to two primary and two laboratory-adapted HIV-1 isolates. We detected HIV-1Ba-L infection in single LCs that spontaneously emigrated from explants by flow cytometry (median of infected LCs = 0.52%, range = 0.08–4.77%). HIV-1–infected LCs downregulated surface CD4 and CD83, whereas MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 were unchanged. For all HIV-1 strains tested, emigrated LCs were critical in establishing high levels of infection (0.1–1 μg HIV-1 p24 per milliliter) in cocultured autologous or allogeneic T cells. HIV-1Ba-L (an R5 HIV-1 strain) more efficiently infected LC–T cell cocultures when compared with HIV-1IIIB (an X4 HIV-1 strain). Interestingly, pretreatment of explants with either aminooxypentane-RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) or cellulose acetate phthalate (potential microbicides) blocked HIV-1 infection of LCs and subsequent T cell infection in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, we document HIV-1 infection in single LCs after exposure to virus within epithelial tissue, demonstrate that relatively low numbers of these cells are capable of inducing high levels of infection in cocultured T cells, and provide a useful explant model for testing of agents designed to block sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:11085750

  5. Sieve analysis in HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlefsen, Paul T; Gilbert, Peter B; Rolland, Morgane

    2013-09-01

    The genetic characterization of HIV-1 breakthrough infections in vaccine and placebo recipients offers new ways to assess vaccine efficacy trials. Statistical and sequence analysis methods provide opportunities to mine the mechanisms behind the effect of an HIV vaccine. The release of results from two HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials, Step/HVTN-502 (HIV Vaccine Trials Network-502) and RV144, led to numerous studies in the last 5 years, including efforts to sequence HIV-1 breakthrough infections and compare viral characteristics between the vaccine and placebo groups. Novel genetic and statistical analysis methods uncovered features that distinguished founder viruses isolated from vaccinees from those isolated from placebo recipients, and identified HIV-1 genetic targets of vaccine-induced immune responses. Studies of HIV-1 breakthrough infections in vaccine efficacy trials can provide an independent confirmation to correlates of risk studies, as they take advantage of vaccine/placebo comparisons, whereas correlates of risk analyses are limited to vaccine recipients. Through the identification of viral determinants impacted by vaccine-mediated host immune responses, sieve analyses can shed light on potential mechanisms of vaccine protection.

  6. Back to the future: revisiting HIV-1 lethal mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapp, Michael J.; Patterson, Steven E.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of eliminating HIV-1 infectivity by elevating the viral mutation rate was first proposed over a decade ago, even though the general concept had been conceived earlier for RNA viruses. Lethal mutagenesis was originally viewed as a novel chemotherapeutic approach for treating HIV-1 infection in which use of a viral mutagen would over multiple rounds of replication lead to the lethal accumulation of mutations, rendering the virus population non infectious – known as the slow mutation accumulation model. There have been limitations in obtaining good efficacy data with drug leads, leaving some doubt into clinical translation. More recent studies of the APOBEC3 proteins as well as new progress in the use of nucleoside analogs for inducing lethal mutagenesis have helped to refocus attention on rapid induction of HIV-1 lethal mutagenesis in a single or limited number of replication cycles leading to a rapid mutation accumulation model. PMID:23195922

  7. Variations in the Biological Functions of HIV-1 Clade C Envelope in a SHIV-Infected Rhesus Macaque during Disease Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    For Yue Tso

    Full Text Available A better understanding of how the biological functions of the HIV-1 envelope (Env changes during disease progression may aid the design of an efficacious anti-HIV-1 vaccine. Although studies from patient had provided some insights on this issue, the differences in the study cohorts and methodology had make it difficult to reach a consensus of the variations in the HIV-1 Env functions during disease progression. To this end, an animal model that can be infected under controlled environment and reflect the disease course of HIV-1 infection in human will be beneficial. Such an animal model was previously demonstrated by the infection of macaque with SHIV, expressing HIV-1 clade C Env V1-V5 region. By using this model, we examined the changes in biological functions of Env in the infected animal over the entire disease course. Our data showed an increase in the neutralization resistance phenotype over time and coincided with the decrease in the net charges of the V1-V5 region. Infection of PBMC with provirus expressing various Env clones, isolated from the infected animal over time, showed a surprisingly better replicative fitness for viruses expressing the Env from early time point. Biotinylation and ELISA data also indicated a decrease of cell-surface-associated Env and virion-associated gp120 content with disease progression. This decrease did not affect the CD4-binding capability of Env, but were positively correlated with the decrease of Env fusion ability. Interestingly, some of these changes in biological functions reverted to the pre-AIDS level during advance AIDS. These data suggested a dynamic relationship between the Env V1-V5 region with the host immune pressure. The observed changes of biological functions in this setting might reflect and predict those occurring during natural disease progression in human.

  8. Synthesis of single- and double-chain fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon galactosyl amphiphiles and their anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroux-Corlay, B; Clary, L; Gadras, C; Hammache, D; Greiner, J; Santaella, C; Aubertin, A M; Vierling, P; Fantini, J

    2000-07-24

    Galactosylceramide (GalCer) is an alternative receptor allowing HIV-1 entry into CD4(-)/GalCer(+) cells. This glycosphingolipid recognizes the V3 loop of HIV gp120, which plays a key role in the fusion of the HIV envelope and cellular membrane. To inhibit HIV uptake and infection, we designed and synthesized analogs of GalCer. These amphiphiles and bolaamphiphiles consist of single and double hydrocarbon and/or fluorocarbon chain beta-linked to galactose and galactosamine. They derive from serine (GalSer), cysteine (GalCys), and ethanolamine (GalAE). The anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity of these galactolipids were evaluated in vitro on CEM-SS (a CD4(+) cell line), HT-29, a CD4(-) cell line expressing high levels of GalCer receptor, and/or HT29 genetically modified to express CD4. GalSer and GalAE derivatives, tested in aqueous medium or as part of liposome preparation, showed moderate anti-HIV-1 activities (IC50 in the 20-220 microM range), whereas none of the GalCys derivatives was found to be active. Moreover, only some of these anti-HIV active analogs inhibited the binding of [3H]suramin (a polysulfonyl compound which displays a high affinity for the V3 loop) to SPC3, a synthetic peptide which contains the conserved GPGRAF region of the V3 loop. Our results most likely indicate that the neutralization of the virion through masking of this conserved V3 loop region is not the only mechanism involved in the HIV-1 antiviral activity of our GalCer analogs.

  9. Strong association between failure of T cell homeostasis and the syncytium-inducing phenotype among HIV-1-infected men in the Amsterdam Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J. J.; Gange, S. J.; Schuitemaker, H.; Coutinho, R. A.; van Leeuwen, R.; Margolick, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between T cell homeostasis and its failure and 1.) the occurrence of AIDS and 2.) the switch from the non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) to the syncytium-inducing (SI) HIV virus phenotype. METHODS: For each of 325 homosexual men in the Amsterdam Cohort Study, the slope

  10. Polyclonal B cell differentiation and loss of gastrointestinal tract germinal centers in the earliest stages of HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc C Levesque

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The antibody response to HIV-1 does not appear in the plasma until approximately 2-5 weeks after transmission, and neutralizing antibodies to autologous HIV-1 generally do not become detectable until 12 weeks or more after transmission. Moreover, levels of HIV-1-specific antibodies decline on antiretroviral treatment. The mechanisms of this delay in the appearance of anti-HIV-1 antibodies and of their subsequent rapid decline are not known. While the effect of HIV-1 on depletion of gut CD4(+ T cells in acute HIV-1 infection is well described, we studied blood and tissue B cells soon after infection to determine the effect of early HIV-1 on these cells.In human participants, we analyzed B cells in blood as early as 17 days after HIV-1 infection, and in terminal ileum inductive and effector microenvironments beginning at 47 days after infection. We found that HIV-1 infection rapidly induced polyclonal activation and terminal differentiation of B cells in blood and in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT B cells. The specificities of antibodies produced by GALT memory B cells in acute HIV-1 infection (AHI included not only HIV-1-specific antibodies, but also influenza-specific and autoreactive antibodies, indicating very early onset of HIV-1-induced polyclonal B cell activation. Follicular damage or germinal center loss in terminal ileum Peyer's patches was seen with 88% of follicles exhibiting B or T cell apoptosis and follicular lysis.Early induction of polyclonal B cell differentiation, coupled with follicular damage and germinal center loss soon after HIV-1 infection, may explain both the high rate of decline in HIV-1-induced antibody responses and the delay in plasma antibody responses to HIV-1. Please see later in the article for Editors' Summary.

  11. APOBEC3G inhibits elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate N Bishop

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available APOBEC3G (A3G is a host cytidine deaminase that, in the absence of Vif, restricts HIV-1 replication and reduces the amount of viral DNA that accumulates in cells. Initial studies determined that A3G induces extensive mutation of nascent HIV-1 cDNA during reverse transcription. It has been proposed that this triggers the degradation of the viral DNA, but there is now mounting evidence that this mechanism may not be correct. Here, we use a natural endogenous reverse transcriptase assay to show that, in cell-free virus particles, A3G is able to inhibit HIV-1 cDNA accumulation not only in the absence of hypermutation but also without the apparent need for any target cell factors. We find that although reverse transcription initiates in the presence of A3G, elongation of the cDNA product is impeded. These data support the model that A3G reduces HIV-1 cDNA levels by inhibiting synthesis rather than by inducing degradation.

  12. Direct effects of HIV-1 Tat on excitability and survival of primary dorsal root ganglion neurons: possible contribution to HIV-1-associated pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianxun Chi

    Full Text Available The vast majority of people living with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 have pain syndrome, which has a significant impact on their quality of life. The underlying causes of HIV-1-associated pain are not likely attributable to direct viral infection of the nervous system due to the lack of evidence of neuronal infection by HIV-1. However, HIV-1 proteins are possibly involved as they have been implicated in neuronal damage and death. The current study assesses the direct effects of HIV-1 Tat, one of potent neurotoxic viral proteins released from HIV-1-infected cells, on the excitability and survival of rat primary dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. We demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat triggered rapid and sustained enhancement of the excitability of small-diameter rat primary DRG neurons, which was accompanied by marked reductions in the rheobase and resting membrane potential (RMP, and an increase in the resistance at threshold (R(Th. Such Tat-induced DRG hyperexcitability may be a consequence of the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 activity. Tat rapidly inhibited Cdk5 kinase activity and mRNA production, and roscovitine, a well-known Cdk5 inhibitor, induced a very similar pattern of DRG hyperexcitability. Indeed, pre-application of Tat prevented roscovitine from having additional effects on the RMP and action potentials (APs of DRGs. However, Tat-mediated actions on the rheobase and R(Th were accelerated by roscovitine. These results suggest that Tat-mediated changes in DRG excitability are partly facilitated by Cdk5 inhibition. In addition, Cdk5 is most abundant in DRG neurons and participates in the regulation of pain signaling. We also demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat markedly induced apoptosis of primary DRG neurons after exposure for longer than 48 h. Together, this work indicates that HIV-1 proteins are capable of producing pain signaling through direct actions on excitability and survival of sensory neurons.

  13. Point mutations associated with HIV-1 drug resistance, evasion of the immune response and AIDS pathogenesis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khati, M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA and Vpr, respectively pol Protease (PR) gag/pol cleavage pol Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Reverse transcription pol RNase H RNase H activity pol Integrase (IN) DNA provirus integration env Env (gp120 and gp41) gp120 binds CD4 receptor and CXCR4.../CCR5 co-receptors , gp41 mediates fusion tat Tat Viral transcription activator rev Rev RNA transport, stability and utilization factor (phosphoprotein) vif Vif Promotes virion maturation and infectivity vpr Vpr Promotes nuclear localization...

  14. Interactive HIV-1 Tat and morphine-induced synaptodendritic injury is triggered through focal disruptions in Na⁺ influx, mitochondrial instability, and Ca²⁺ overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Sylvia; Knapp, Pamela E; Zou, Shiping; Marks, William D; Bowers, M Scott; Akbarali, Hamid I; Hauser, Kurt F

    2014-09-17

    Synaptodendritic injury is thought to underlie HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and contributes to exaggerated inflammation and cognitive impairment seen in opioid abusers with HIV-1. To examine events triggering combined transactivator of transcription (Tat)- and morphine-induced synaptodendritic injury systematically, striatal neuron imaging studies were conducted in vitro. These studies demonstrated nearly identical pathologic increases in dendritic varicosities as seen in Tat transgenic mice in vivo. Tat caused significant focal increases in intracellular sodium ([Na(+)]i) and calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) in dendrites that were accompanied by the emergence of dendritic varicosities. These effects were largely, but not entirely, attenuated by the NMDA and AMPA receptor antagonists MK-801 and CNQX, respectively. Concurrent morphine treatment accelerated Tat-induced focal varicosities, which were accompanied by localized increases in [Ca(2+)]i and exaggerated instability in mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Importantly, morphine's effects were prevented by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP and were not observed in neurons cultured from μ-opioid receptor knock-out mice. Combined Tat- and morphine-induced initial losses in ion homeostasis and increases in [Ca(2+)]i were attenuated by the ryanodine receptor inhibitor ryanodine, as well as pyruvate. In summary, Tat induced increases in [Na(+)]i, mitochondrial instability, excessive Ca(2+) influx through glutamatergic receptors, and swelling along dendrites. Morphine, acting via μ-opioid receptors, exacerbates these excitotoxic Tat effects at the same subcellular locations by mobilizing additional [Ca(2+)]i and by further disrupting [Ca(2+)]i homeostasis. We hypothesize that the spatiotemporal relationship of μ-opioid and aberrant AMPA/NMDA glutamate receptor signaling is critical in defining the location and degree to which opiates exacerbate the synaptodendritic injury commonly observed in neuro

  15. Production and characterization of human anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies from the cells of HIV-1 infected Indian donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrabi Raiees

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs developed from HIV-1 infected donors have enormously contributed to the identification of neutralization sensitive epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The third variable region (V3 is a crucial target on gp120, primarily due to its involvement in co-receptor (CXCR4 or CCR5 binding and presence of epitopes recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Methods Thirty-three HIV-1 seropositive drug naive patients (18 males and 15 females within the age range of 20–57 years (median = 33 years were recruited in this study for mAb production. The mAbs were selected from EBV transformed cultures with conformationally constrained Cholera-toxin-B containing V3C (V3C-CTB fusion protein. We tested the mAbs for their binding with HIV-1 derived proteins and peptides by ELISA and for neutralization against HIV-1 viruses by TZM-bl assays. Results We isolated three anti-V3 mAbs, 277, 903 and 904 from the cells of different individuals. The ELISA binding revealed a subtype-C and subtype-A specific binding of antibody 277 and 903 while mAb 904 exhibited cross reactivity also with subtype-B V3. Epitope mapping of mAbs with overlapping V3 peptides showed exclusive binding to V3 crown. The antibodies displayed high and low neutralizing activity against 2/5 tier 1 and 1/6 tier 2 viruses respectively. Overall, we observed a resistance of the tier 2 viruses to neutralization by the anti-V3 mAbs, despite the exposure of the epitopes recognized by these antibodies on two representative native viruses (Du156.12 and JRFL, suggesting that the affinity of mAb might equally be crucial for neutralization, as the epitope recognition. Conclusions Our study suggests that the anti-V3 antibodies derived from subtype-C infected Indian patients display neutralization potential against tier 1 viruses while such activity may be limited against more resistant tier 2 viruses. Defining the fine epitope

  16. Nef decreases HIV-1 sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies that target the membrane-proximal external region of TMgp41.

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    Rachel P J Lai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Primate lentivirus nef is required for sustained virus replication in vivo and accelerated progression to AIDS. While exploring the mechanism by which Nef increases the infectivity of cell-free virions, we investigated a functional link between Nef and Env. Since we failed to detect an effect of Nef on the quantity of virion-associated Env, we searched for qualitative changes by examining whether Nef alters HIV-1 sensitivity to agents that target distinct features of Env. Nef conferred as much as 50-fold resistance to 2F5 and 4E10, two potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs that target the membrane proximal external region (MPER of TMgp41. In contrast, Nef had no effect on HIV-1 neutralization by MPER-specific nAb Z13e1, by the peptide inhibitor T20, nor by a panel of nAbs and other reagents targeting gp120. Resistance to neutralization by 2F5 and 4E10 was observed with Nef from a diverse range of HIV-1 and SIV isolates, as well as with HIV-1 virions bearing Env from CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic viruses, clade B and C viruses, or primary isolates. Functional analysis of a panel of Nef mutants revealed that this activity requires Nef myristoylation but that it is genetically separable from other Nef functions such as the ability to enhance virus infectivity and to downregulate CD4. Glycosylated-Gag from MoMLV substituted for Nef in conferring resistance to 2F5 and 4E10, indicating that this activity is conserved in a retrovirus that does not encode Nef. Given the reported membrane-dependence of MPER-recognition by 2F5 and 4E10, in contrast to the membrane-independence of Z13e1, the data here is consistent with a model in which Nef alters MPER recognition in the context of the virion membrane. Indeed, Nef and Glycosylated-Gag decreased the efficiency of virion capture by 2F5 and 4E10, but not by other nAbs. These studies demonstrate that Nef protects lentiviruses from one of the most broadly-acting classes of neutralizing antibodies. This newly

  17. First report of an HIV-1 triple recombinant of subtypes B, C and F in Buenos Aires, Argentina

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    Weissenbacher Mercedes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe the genetic diversity of currently transmitted strains of HIV-1 in men who have sex with men (MSM in Buenos Aires, Argentina between 2000 and 2004. Nearly full-length sequence analysis of 10 samples showed that 6 were subtype B, 3 were BF recombinant and 1 was a triple recombinant of subtypes B, C and F. The 3 BF recombinants were 3 different unique recombinant forms. Full genome analysis of one strain that was subtype F when sequenced in pol was found to be a triple recombinant. Gag and pol were predominantly subtype F, while gp120 was subtype B; there were regions of subtype C interspersed throughout. The young man infected with this strain reported multiple sexual partners and sero-converted between May and November of 2004. This study reported for the first time the full genome analysis of a triple recombinant between subtypes B, C and F, that combines in one virus the three most common subtypes in South America.

  18. Residues in the membrane-spanning domain core modulate conformation and fusogenicity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for its biological activity. Initial studies have defined an almost invariant 'core' structure in the MSD and demonstrated that it is crucial for anchoring Env in the membrane and virus entry. We show here that amino acid substitutions in the MSD 'core' do not influence specific virus-cell attachment, nor CD4 receptor and CXCR4 coreceptor recognition by Env. However, substitutions within the MSD 'core' delayed the kinetics and reduced the efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by Env. Although we observed no evidence that membrane fusion mediated by the MSD core mutants was arrested at a hemifusion stage, impaired Env fusogenicity was correlated with minor conformational changes in the V2, C1, and C5 regions in gp120 and the immunodominant loop in gp41. These changes could delay initiation of the conformational changes required in the fusion process.

  19. Complete dissociation of the HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain and membrane proximal regions upon phospholipid binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Aniana, Annie; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein gp41 mediates the process of membrane fusion that enables entry of the HIV-1 virus into the host cell. Strong lipid affinity of the ectodomain suggests that its heptad repeat regions play an active role in destabilizing membranes by directly binding to the lipid bilayers and thereby lowering the free-energy barrier for membrane fusion. In such a model, immediately following the shedding of gp120, the N-heptad and C-heptad helices dissociate and melt into the host cell and viral membranes, respectively, pulling the destabilized membranes into juxtaposition, ready for fusion. Post-fusion, reaching the final 6-helix bundle (6HB) conformation then involves competition between intermolecular interactions needed for formation of the symmetric 6HB trimer and the membrane affinity of gp41’s ectodomain, including its membrane-proximal regions. Our solution NMR study of the structural and dynamic properties of three constructs containing the ectodomain of gp41 with and without its membrane-proximal regions suggests that these segments do not form inter-helical interactions until the very late steps of the fusion process. Interactions between the polar termini of the heptad regions, which are not associating with the lipid surface, therefore may constitute the main driving force initiating formation of the final post-fusion states. The absence of significant intermolecular ectodomain interactions in the presence of dodecyl phosphocholine highlights the importance of trimerization of gp41’s transmembrane helix to prevent complete dissociation of the trimer during the course of fusion

  20. Complete dissociation of the HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain and membrane proximal regions upon phospholipid binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Aniana, Annie [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States); Ghirlando, Rodolfo [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The envelope glycoprotein gp41 mediates the process of membrane fusion that enables entry of the HIV-1 virus into the host cell. Strong lipid affinity of the ectodomain suggests that its heptad repeat regions play an active role in destabilizing membranes by directly binding to the lipid bilayers and thereby lowering the free-energy barrier for membrane fusion. In such a model, immediately following the shedding of gp120, the N-heptad and C-heptad helices dissociate and melt into the host cell and viral membranes, respectively, pulling the destabilized membranes into juxtaposition, ready for fusion. Post-fusion, reaching the final 6-helix bundle (6HB) conformation then involves competition between intermolecular interactions needed for formation of the symmetric 6HB trimer and the membrane affinity of gp41’s ectodomain, including its membrane-proximal regions. Our solution NMR study of the structural and dynamic properties of three constructs containing the ectodomain of gp41 with and without its membrane-proximal regions suggests that these segments do not form inter-helical interactions until the very late steps of the fusion process. Interactions between the polar termini of the heptad regions, which are not associating with the lipid surface, therefore may constitute the main driving force initiating formation of the final post-fusion states. The absence of significant intermolecular ectodomain interactions in the presence of dodecyl phosphocholine highlights the importance of trimerization of gp41’s transmembrane helix to prevent complete dissociation of the trimer during the course of fusion.

  1. Llama Antibody Fragments Recognizing Various Epitopes of the CD4bs Neutralize a Broad Range of HIV-1 Subtypes A, B and C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasa-Chapman, Marlèn; Gorlani, Andrea; Forsman Quigley, Anna; Hulsik, David Lutje; Chen, Lei; Weiss, Robin; de Haard, Hans; Verrips, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Many of the neutralising antibodies, isolated to date, display limited activities against the globally most prevalent HIV-1 subtypes A and C. Therefore, those subtypes are considered to be an important target for antibody-based therapy. Variable domains of llama heavy chain antibodies (VHH) have some superior properties compared with classical antibodies. Therefore we describe the application of trimeric forms of envelope proteins (Env), derived from HIV-1 of subtype A and B/C, for a prolonged immunization of two llamas. A panel of VHH, which interfere with CD4 binding to HIV-1 Env were selected with use of panning. The results of binding and competition assays to various Env, including a variant with a stabilized CD4-binding state (gp120Ds2), cross-competition experiments, maturation analysis and neutralisation assays, enabled us to classify the selected VHH into three groups. The VHH of group I were efficient mainly against viruses of subtype A, C and B′/C. The VHH of group II resemble the broadly neutralising antibody (bnmAb) b12, neutralizing mainly subtype B and C viruses, however some had a broader neutralisation profile. A representative of the third group, 2E7, had an even higher neutralization breadth, neutralizing 21 out of the 26 tested strains belonging to the A, A/G, B, B/C and C subtypes. To evaluate the contribution of certain amino acids to the potency of the VHH a small set of the mutants were constructed. Surprisingly this yielded one mutant with slightly improved neutralisation potency against 92UG37.A9 (subtype A) and 96ZM651.02 (subtype C). These findings and the well-known stability of VHH indicate the potential application of these VHH as anti-HIV-1 microbicides. PMID:22438910

  2. Optimization of a multi-gene HIV-1 recombinant subtype CRF02AG DNA vaccine for expression of multiple immunogenic forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellenberger, Dennis; Li Bin; Smith, James; Yi Hong; Folks, Thomas; Robinson, Harriet; Butera, Salvatore

    2004-01-01

    We developed an AIDS vaccine for Western and West-Central Africa based on a DNA plasmid vector expressing HIV-1 recombinant subtype CRF02 A G gag, pol, and env genes. To optimize the production of noninfectious HIV-like particles (VLPs) and potentially improve the effectiveness of the vaccine, we generated four potential vaccine constructs: the parental (IC2) and three modifications (IC25, IC48, and IC90) containing mutations within the HIV protease. While the parental construct IC2 expressed aggregates of Gag proteins, the IC25 construct resulted in the production of immature VLPs (the core comprises unprocessed Pr 55Gag ). The remaining two constructs (IC48 and IC90) produced mature VLPs (the core comprises processed capsid p24) in addition to immature VLPs and aggregates of Gag proteins. VLPs incorporated significant levels of mature gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Importantly, the mature VLPs were fusion competent and entered coreceptor-specific target cells. The production of multiple antigenic forms, including fusion-competent VLPs, by candidate DNA vaccine constructs may provide immunologic advantages for induction of protective cellular and humoral responses against HIV-1 proteins

  3. Accumulation of MxB/Mx2-resistant HIV-1 Capsid Variants During Expansion of the HIV-1 Epidemic in Human Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Guo, Haoran; Ma, Min; Markham, Richard; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have identified human myxovirus resistance protein 2 (MxB or Mx2) as an interferon induced inhibitor of HIV-1 replication. However, whether HIV-1 can overcome MxB restriction without compromise of viral fitness has been undefined. Here, we have discovered that naturally occurring capsid (CA) variants can render HIV-1 resistant to the activity of MxB without losing viral infectivity or the ability to escape from interferon induction. Moreover, these MxB resistant HIV-1 variants do not lose MxB recognition. Surprisingly, MxB resistant CA variants are most commonly found in the Clade C HIV-1 that is the most rapidly expanding Clade throughout the world. Accumulation of MxB resistant mutations is also observed during HIV-1 spreading in human populations. These findings support a potential role for MxB as a selective force during HIV-1 transmission and evolution. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Pawlica

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral capsid (CA cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus, and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating.

  5. Role of MRP transporters in regulating antimicrobial drug inefficacy and oxidative stress-induced pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Upal; Barber, Paul; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Batrakova, Elena V; Mondal, Debasis; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB) therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH) conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9) have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function, and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  6. Role of MRP Transporters in Regulating Antimicrobial Drug Inefficacy and Oxidative Stress-induced Pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upal eRoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9 have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  7. Exposure to apoptotic activated CD4+ T cells induces maturation and APOBEC3G-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatramanan Mohanram

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are activated by signaling via pathogen-specific receptors or exposure to inflammatory mediators. Here we show that co-culturing DCs with apoptotic HIV-infected activated CD4(+ T cells (ApoInf or apoptotic uninfected activated CD4(+ T cells (ApoAct induced expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine release. In addition, we measured a reduced HIV infection rate in DCs after co-culture with ApoAct. A prerequisite for reduced HIV infection in DCs was activation of CD4(+ T cells before apoptosis induction. DCs exposed to ApoAct or ApoInf secreted MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, and TNF-α; this effect was retained in the presence of exogenous HIV. The ApoAct-mediated induction of co-stimulatory CD86 molecules and reduction of HIV infection in DCs were partially abrogated after blocking TNF-α using monoclonal antibodies. APOBEC3G expression in DCs was increased in co-cultures of DCs and ApoAct but not by apoptotic resting CD4(+ T cells (ApoRest. Silencing of APOBEC3G in DC abrogated the HIV inhibitory effect mediated by ApoAct. Sequence analyses of an env region revealed significant induction of G-to-A hypermutations in the context of GG or GA dinucleotides in DNA isolated from DCs exposed to HIV and ApoAct. Thus, ApoAct-mediated DC maturation resulted in induction of APOBEC3G that was important for inhibition of HIV-infection in DCs. These findings underscore the complexity of differential DC responses evoked upon interaction with resting as compared with activated dying cells during HIV infection.

  8. IFITM Proteins Restrict HIV-1 Infection by Antagonizing the Envelope Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyou Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM proteins have been recently shown to restrict HIV-1 and other viruses. Here, we provide evidence that IFITM proteins, particularly IFITM2 and IFITM3, specifically antagonize the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env, thereby inhibiting viral infection. IFITM proteins interact with HIV-1 Env in viral producer cells, leading to impaired Env processing and virion incorporation. Notably, the level of IFITM incorporation into HIV-1 virions does not strictly correlate with the extent of inhibition. Prolonged passage of HIV-1 in IFITM-expressing T lymphocytes leads to emergence of Env mutants that overcome IFITM restriction. The ability of IFITMs to inhibit cell-to-cell infection can be extended to HIV-1 primary isolates, HIV-2 and SIVs; however, the extent of inhibition appears to be virus-strain dependent. Overall, our study uncovers a mechanism by which IFITM proteins specifically antagonize HIV-1 Env to restrict HIV-1 infection and provides insight into the specialized role of IFITMs in HIV infection.

  9. Electron tomography of the contact between T cells and SIV/HIV-1: implications for viral entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Sougrat

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The envelope glycoproteins of primate lentiviruses, including human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, are heterodimers of a transmembrane glycoprotein (usually gp41, and a surface glycoprotein (gp120, which binds CD4 on target cells to initiate viral entry. We have used electron tomography to determine the three-dimensional architectures of purified SIV virions in isolation and in contact with CD4+ target cells. The trimeric viral envelope glycoprotein surface spikes are heterogeneous in appearance and typically approximately 120 A long and approximately 120 A wide at the distal end. Docking of SIV or HIV-1 on the T cell surface occurs via a neck-shaped contact region that is approximately 400 A wide and consistently consists of a closely spaced cluster of five to seven rod-shaped features, each approximately 100 A long and approximately 100 A wide. This distinctive structure is not observed when viruses are incubated with T lymphocytes in the presence of anti-CD4 antibodies, the CCR5 antagonist TAK779, or the peptide entry inhibitor SIVmac251 C34. For virions bound to cells, few trimers were observed away from this cluster at the virion-cell interface, even in cases where virus preparations showing as many as 70 envelope glycoprotein trimers per virus particle were used. This contact zone, which we term the "entry claw", provides a spatial context to understand the molecular mechanisms of viral entry. Determination of the molecular composition and structure of the entry claw may facilitate the identification of improved drugs for the inhibition of HIV-1 entry.

  10. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rumlová, Michaela; Křížová, Ivana; Keprová, Alena; Hadravová, Romana; Doležal, Michal; Strohalmová, Karolína; Pichová, Iva; Hájek, Miroslav; Ruml, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, May 20 (2014), 37/1-37/15 ISSN 1742-4690 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1388 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV protease * BCA3 * AKIP-1 * apoptosis * mitochondria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.185, year: 2014 http://www.retrovirology.com/content/11/1/37

  11. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Campbell, Mary S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Mullins, James I [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Hughes, James P [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wong, Kim G [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Raugi, Dana N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Scrensen, Stefanie [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  12. Discovery of a small molecule agonist of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p110α that reactivates latent HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Doyon

    Full Text Available Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART can effectively suppress HIV-1 replication, but the latent viral reservoir in resting memory CD4(+ T cells is impervious to cART and represents a major barrier to curing HIV-1 infection. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 represents a possible strategy for elimination of this reservoir. In this study we describe the discovery of 1,2,9,10-tetramethoxy-7H-dibenzo[de,g]quinolin-7-one (57704 which reactivates latent HIV-1 in several cell-line models of latency (J89GFP, U1 and ACH-2. 57704 also increased HIV-1 expression in 3 of 4 CD8(+-depleted blood mononuclear cell preparations isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals on suppressive cART. In contrast, vorinostat increased HIV-1 expression in only 1 of the 4 donors tested. Importantly, 57704 does not induce global T cell activation. Mechanistic studies revealed that 57704 reactivates latent HIV-1 via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt signaling pathway. 57704 was found to be an agonist of PI3K with specificity to the p110α isoform, but not the p110β, δ or γ isoforms. Taken together, our work suggests that 57704 could serve as a scaffold for the development of more potent activators of latent HIV-1. Furthermore, it highlights the involvement of the PI3K/Akt pathway in the maintenance of HIV-1 latency.

  13. New approaches to design HIV-1 T-cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Hélène; Canderan, Glenda; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Trautmann, Lydie

    2010-09-01

    Following the evidence that T-cell responses are crucial in the control of HIV-1 infection, vaccines targeting T-cell responses were tested in recent clinical trials. However, these vaccines showed a lack of efficacy. This review attempts to define the qualitative and quantitative features that are desirable for T-cell-induced responses by vaccines. We also describe strategies that could lead to achievement of this goal. Using the yellow fever vaccine as a benchmark of an efficient vaccine, recent studies identified factors of immune protection and more importantly innate immune pathways needed for the establishment of long-term protective adaptive immunity. To prevent or control HIV-1 infection, a vaccine must induce efficient and persistent antigen-specific T cells endowed with mucosal homing capacity. Such cells should have the capability to counteract HIV-1 diversity and its rapid spread from the initial site of infection. To achieve this goal, the activation of a diversified innate immune response is critical. New systems biology approaches will provide more precise correlates of immune protection that will pave the way for new approaches in T-cell-based vaccines.

  14. HIV-1 transgenic rats develop T cell abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, William; Abdelwahab, Sayed; Sadowska, Mariola; Huso, David; Neal, Ashley; Ahearn, Aaron; Bryant, Joseph; Gallo, Robert C.; Lewis, George K.; Reitz, Marvin

    2004-01-01

    HIV-1 infection leads to impaired antigen-specific T cell proliferation, increased susceptibility of T cells to apoptosis, progressive impairment of T-helper 1 (Th1) responses, and altered maturation of HIV-1-specific memory cells. We have identified similar impairments in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Tg rats developed an absolute reduction in CD4 + and CD8 + T cells able to produce IFN-γ following activation and an increased susceptibility of T cells to activation-induced apoptosis. CD4 + and CD8 + effector/memory (CD45RC - CD62L - ) pools were significantly smaller in Tg rats compared to non-Tg controls, although the converse was true for the naieve (CD45RC + CD62L + ) T cell pool. Our interpretation is that the HIV transgene causes defects in the development of T cell effector function and generation of specific effector/memory T cell subsets, and that activation-induced apoptosis may be an essential factor in this process

  15. HIV-1 binding and neutralizing antibodies of injecting drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Ouverney

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a stronger seroreactivity against some synthetic peptides responsible for inducing neutralizing antibodies in injecting drug users (IDU compared to that of individuals sexually infected with HIV-1 (S, but the effectiveness in terms of the neutralizing ability of these antibodies has not been evaluated. Our objective was to study the humoral immune response of IDU by determining the specificity of their antibodies and the presence of neutralizing antibodies. The neutralization capacity against the HIV-1 isolate MN (genotype B, the primary HIV-1 isolate 95BRRJ021 (genotype F, and the seroreactivity with peptides known to induce neutralizing antibodies, from the V2 and V3 loops of different HIV-1 subtypes, were analyzed. Seroreactivity indicates that IDU plasma are more likely to recognize a broader range of peptides than S plasma, with significantly higher titers, especially of V3 peptides. Similar neutralization frequencies of the MN isolate were observed in plasma of the IDU (16/47 and S (20/60 groups in the 1:10 dilution. The neutralization of the 95BRRJ021 isolate was more frequently observed for plasma from the S group (15/23 than from the IDU group (15/47, P = 0.0108. No correlation between neutralization and seroreactivity with the peptides tested was observed. These results suggest that an important factor responsible for the extensive and broad humoral immune response observed in IDU is their infection route. There was very little difference in neutralizing antibody response between the IDU and S groups despite their differences in seroreactivity and health status.

  16. Semen Bacterial Concentrations and HIV-1 RNA Shedding Among HIV-1–Seropositive Kenyan Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Huang, Dandi; Ko, Daisy L.; Sanders, Eduard J.; Peshu, Norbert M.; Krieger, John N.; Muller, Charles H.; Coombs, Robert W.; Fredricks, David N.; Graham, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: HIV-1 is transmitted through semen from men to their sexual partners. Genital infections can increase HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen, but shedding also occurs in the absence of typical pathogens. We hypothesized that higher bacterial concentrations in semen would be associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods: We analyzed semen samples from 42 HIV-1–seropositive Kenyan men using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess bacterial concentrations and real-time PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA levels. Generalized estimation equations were used to evaluate associations between these 2 measures. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing was performed on a subset of 13 samples to assess bacterial community composition. Results: Bacteria were detected in 96.6% of 88 samples by quantitative PCR. Semen bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA levels were correlated 0.30 (P = 0.01). The association between bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA detection was not significant after adjustment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (adjusted odds ratio: 1.27, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.91). Factors associated with semen bacterial concentration included insertive anal sex (adjusted beta 0.92, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.73) and ART use (adjusted beta: −0.77, 95% CI: −1.50 to 0.04). Among 13 samples with pyrosequencing data, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. were most frequently detected. Conclusion: Most of these HIV-1–infected men had bacteria in their semen. ART use was associated with undetectable semen HIV-1 RNA and lower semen bacterial concentrations, whereas insertive anal sex was associated with higher bacterial concentrations. Additional studies evaluating the relationship between semen bacteria, inflammation, mucosal immunity, and HIV-1 shedding are needed to understand implications for HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27861240

  17. Semen Bacterial Concentrations and HIV-1 RNA Shedding Among HIV-1-Seropositive Kenyan Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Christine J; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Huang, Dandi; Ko, Daisy L; Sanders, Eduard J; Peshu, Norbert M; Krieger, John N; Muller, Charles H; Coombs, Robert W; Fredricks, David N; Graham, Susan M

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted through semen from men to their sexual partners. Genital infections can increase HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen, but shedding also occurs in the absence of typical pathogens. We hypothesized that higher bacterial concentrations in semen would be associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels. We analyzed semen samples from 42 HIV-1-seropositive Kenyan men using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess bacterial concentrations and real-time PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA levels. Generalized estimation equations were used to evaluate associations between these 2 measures. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing was performed on a subset of 13 samples to assess bacterial community composition. Bacteria were detected in 96.6% of 88 samples by quantitative PCR. Semen bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA levels were correlated 0.30 (P = 0.01). The association between bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA detection was not significant after adjustment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (adjusted odds ratio: 1.27, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.91). Factors associated with semen bacterial concentration included insertive anal sex (adjusted beta 0.92, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.73) and ART use (adjusted beta: -0.77, 95% CI: -1.50 to 0.04). Among 13 samples with pyrosequencing data, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. were most frequently detected. Most of these HIV-1-infected men had bacteria in their semen. ART use was associated with undetectable semen HIV-1 RNA and lower semen bacterial concentrations, whereas insertive anal sex was associated with higher bacterial concentrations. Additional studies evaluating the relationship between semen bacteria, inflammation, mucosal immunity, and HIV-1 shedding are needed to understand implications for HIV-1 transmission.

  18. Safety and immunogenicity of a live recombinant canarypox virus expressing HIV type 1 gp120 MN MN tm/gag/protease LAI (ALVAC-HIV, vCP205) followed by a p24E-V3 MN synthetic peptide (CLTB-36) administered in healthy volunteers at low risk for HIV infection. AGIS Group and L'Agence Nationale de Recherches sur Le Sida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon-Céron, D; Excler, J L; Finkielsztejn, L; Autran, B; Gluckman, J C; Sicard, D; Matthews, T J; Meignier, B; Valentin, C; El Habib, R; Blondeau, C; Raux, M; Moog, C; Tartaglia, J; Chong, P; Klein, M; Milcamps, B; Heshmati, F; Plotkin, S

    1999-05-01

    A live recombinant canarypox vector expressing HIV-1 gpl20 MN tm/gag/protease LAI (ALVAC-HIV, vCP205) alone or boosted by a p24E-V3 MN synthetic peptide (CLTB-36) was tested in healthy volunteers at low risk for HIV infection for their safety and immunogenicity. Both antigens were well tolerated. ALVAC-HIV (vCP205) induced low levels of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 MN in 33% of the volunteers. None of them had detectable neutralizing antibodies against a nonsyncytium-inducing HIV-1 clade B primary isolate (Bx08). After the fourth injection of vCP205, CTL activity was detected in 33% of the volunteers and was directed against Env, Gag, and Pol. This activity was mediated by both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. On the other hand, the CLTB-36 peptide was poorly immunogenic and induced no neutralizing antibodies or CTLs. Although the ALVAC-HIV (vCP205) and CLTB-36 prime-boost regimen was not optimal, further studies with ALVAC-HIV (vCP205) are warranted because of its clear induction of a cellular immune response and utility as a priming agent for other subunit antigens such as envelope glycoproteins, pseudoparticles, or new peptides.

  19. Effect of HIV-1 envelope cytoplasmic tail on adenovirus primed virus encoded virus-like particle immunizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne Marie C; Ragonnaud, Emeline; Seaton, Kelly E.

    2016-01-01

    were found between the different priming regimens as both induced high titered tier 1 neutralizing antibodies, but no tier 2 antibodies, possibly reflecting the similar presentation of trimer specific antibody epitopes. The described vaccine regimens provide insight into the effects of the HIV-1 Env......The low number of envelope (Env) spikes presented on native HIV-1 particles is a major impediment for HIV-1 prophylactic vaccine development. We designed virus-like particle encoding adenoviral vectors utilizing SIVmac239 Gag as an anchor for full length and truncated HIV-1 M consensus Env...

  20. Substrate-induced stable enzyme-inhibitor complex formation allows tight binding of novel 2-aminopyrimidin-4(3H)-ones to drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuele, Alberta; Facchini, Marcella; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Artico, Marino; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    We recently reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of 5-alkyl-2-(N,N-disubstituted)amino-6-(2,6-difluorophenylalkyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-4(3H)-ones (F(2)-N,N-DABOs). These compounds are highly active against both wild-type HIV-1 and the K103N, Y181C, and Y188L mutant strains. Herein we present novel 6-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenylalkyl)-N,N-DABO (2-Cl-6-F-N,N-DABO) derivatives and investigate the molecular basis for their high-affinity binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Our results show that the new compounds display higher association rates than the difluoro derivatives toward wild-type HIV-1 RT or drug-resistant RT mutant forms. We also show that they preferentially associate to either the free enzyme or the enzyme-nucleic acid binary complex, and that this binding is stabilized upon formation of the ternary complex between HIV-1 RT and both the nucleic acid and nucleotide substrates. Interestingly, one compound showed dissociation rates from the ternary complex with RT mutants K103N and Y181I 10-20-fold slower than from the corresponding complex with wild-type RT.

  1. Contrasting roles for TLR ligands in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beda Brichacek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The first line of a host's response to various pathogens is triggered by their engagement of cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. Binding of microbial ligands to these receptors leads to the induction of a variety of cellular factors that alter intracellular and extracellular environment and interfere directly or indirectly with the life cycle of the triggering pathogen. Such changes may also affect any coinfecting microbe. Using ligands to Toll-like receptors (TLRs 5 and 9, we examined their effect on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 replication in lymphoid tissue ex vivo. We found marked differences in the outcomes of such treatment. While flagellin (TLR5 agonist treatment enhanced replication of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR 5-tropic and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4-tropic HIV-1, treatment with oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN M362 (TLR9 agonist suppressed both viral variants. The differential effects of these TLR ligands on HIV-1 replication correlated with changes in production of CC chemokines CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, and of CXC chemokines CXCL10, and CXCL12 in the ligand-treated HIV-1-infected tissues. The nature and/or magnitude of these changes were dependent on the ligand as well as on the HIV-1 viral strain. Moreover, the tested ligands differed in their ability to induce cellular activation as evaluated by the expression of the cluster of differentiation markers (CD 25, CD38, CD39, CD69, CD154, and human leukocyte antigen D related (HLA-DR as well as of a cell proliferation marker, Ki67, and of CCR5. No significant effect of the ligand treatment was observed on apoptosis and cell death/loss in the treated lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Our results suggest that binding of microbial ligands to TLRs is one of the mechanisms that mediate interactions between coinfected microbes and HIV-1 in human tissues. Thus, the engagement of appropriate TLRs by microbial molecules or their mimetic might become a new strategy for HIV therapy or prevention.

  2. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine-induced

  3. Acceleration of Age-Associated Methylation Patterns in HIV-1-Infected Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehl, Mary; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Hultin, Patricia M.; Hultin, Lance E.; Quach, Austin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Horvath, Steve; Vilain, Eric; Jamieson, Beth D.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of young (20-35) and older (36-56) adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, pmodules; module 3 (ME3) was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70) and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31). Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015). In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage= 0.007088, p=2.08 x 10-9; βHIV= 0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage= 0.008762, p=1.27x 10-5; βHIV= 0.128649, p= 0.0001). Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10-6, odds ratio=1.91). These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that are similar to age-associated patterns and suggest that general aging and HIV-1 related aging work through some common cellular

  4. Pathogenesis and treatment of HIV-1 infection: recent developments (Y2K update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, S L; da Cruz, R L; Whetter, L

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the etiologic agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The pathogenesis of HIV-1-induced disease is complex and characterized by the interplay of both viral and host factors, which together determine the outcome of infection. An improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of AIDS, combined with recent insights into the dynamics of viral infection may provide powerful new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against this virus.

  5. Modulation of chromatin structure by the FACT histone chaperone complex regulates HIV-1 integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Julien; Lesbats, Paul; Mauro, Eric; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lopez, Angelica P; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Ruff, Marc; Llano, Manuel; Delelis, Olivier; Lavigne, Marc; Parissi, Vincent

    2017-07-28

    Insertion of retroviral genome DNA occurs in the chromatin of the host cell. This step is modulated by chromatin structure as nucleosomes compaction was shown to prevent HIV-1 integration and chromatin remodeling has been reported to affect integration efficiency. LEDGF/p75-mediated targeting of the integration complex toward RNA polymerase II (polII) transcribed regions ensures optimal access to dynamic regions that are suitable for integration. Consequently, we have investigated the involvement of polII-associated factors in the regulation of HIV-1 integration. Using a pull down approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we have selected the FACT (FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription) complex as a new potential cofactor of HIV-1 integration. FACT is a histone chaperone complex associated with the polII transcription machinery and recently shown to bind LEDGF/p75. We report here that a tripartite complex can be formed between HIV-1 integrase, LEDGF/p75 and FACT in vitro and in cells. Biochemical analyzes show that FACT-dependent nucleosome disassembly promotes HIV-1 integration into chromatinized templates, and generates highly favored nucleosomal structures in vitro. This effect was found to be amplified by LEDGF/p75. Promotion of this FACT-mediated chromatin remodeling in cells both increases chromatin accessibility and stimulates HIV-1 infectivity and integration. Altogether, our data indicate that FACT regulates HIV-1 integration by inducing local nucleosomes dissociation that modulates the functional association between the incoming intasome and the targeted nucleosome.

  6. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN76742797 and EudraCT2004-000446-20 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03821.001 PMID:25217531

  7. Influenza vaccination of HIV-1-positive and HIV-1-negative former intravenous drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, A; Boschini, A; Colzani, D; Anselmi, G; Oltolina, A; Zucconi, R; Begnini, M; Besana, S; Tanzi, E; Zanetti, A R

    2001-12-01

    The immunogenicity of an anti-influenza vaccine was assessed in 409 former intravenous drug user volunteers and its effect on the levels of HIV-1 RNA, proviral DNA and on CD4+ lymphocyte counts in a subset HIV-1-positive subjects was measured. HIV-1-positive individuals (n = 72) were divided into three groups on the basis of their CD4+ lymphocyte counts, while the 337 HIV-1-negative participants were allocated into group four. Haemagglutination inhibiting (HI) responses varied from 45.8 to 70% in the HIV-1-positive subjects and were significantly higher in group four (80.7% responses to the H1N1 strain, 81.6% to the H3N2 strain, and 83% to the B strain). The percentage of subjects with HI protective antibody titres (> or = 1:40) increased significantly after vaccination, especially in HIV-1 uninfected subjects. Immunization caused no significant changes in CD4+ counts and in neither plasma HIV-1 RNA nor proviral DNA levels. Therefore, vaccination against influenza may benefit persons infected by HIV-1. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Acyclovir and Transmission of HIV-1 from Persons Infected with HIV-1 and HSV-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celum, Connie; Wald, Anna; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Magaret, Amalia S.; Wang, Richard S.; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared M.; Mullins, James I.; Hughes, James P.; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; Stewart, Grace John; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Were, Edwin; Fife, Kenneth H.; de Bruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda E.; McIntyre, James A.; Manongi, Rachel; Kapiga, Saidi; Coetzee, David; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Kanweka, William; Delany, Sinead; Rees, Helen; Vwalika, Bellington; Stevens, Wendy; Campbell, Mary S.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Coombs, Robert W.; Morrow, Rhoda; Whittington, William L.H.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Barnes, Linda; Ridzon, Renee; Corey, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most persons who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are also infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which is frequently reactivated and is associated with increased plasma and genital levels of HIV-1. Therapy to suppress HSV-2 reduces the frequency of reactivation of HSV-2 as well as HIV-1 levels, suggesting that suppression of HSV-2 may reduce the risk of transmission of HIV-1. METHODS We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of suppressive therapy for HSV-2 (acyclovir at a dose of 400 mg orally twice daily) in couples in which only one of the partners was seropositive for HIV-1 (CD4 count, ≥250 cells per cubic millimeter) and that partner was also infected with HSV-2 and was not taking antiretroviral therapy at the time of enrollment. The primary end point was transmission of HIV-1 to the partner who was not initially infected with HIV-1; linkage of transmissions was assessed by means of genetic sequencing of viruses. RESULTS A total of 3408 couples were enrolled at 14 sites in Africa. Of the partners who were infected with HIV-1, 68% were women, and the baseline median CD4 count was 462 cells per cubic millimeter. Of 132 HIV-1 seroconversions that occurred after randomization (an incidence of 2.7 per 100 person-years), 84 were linked within couples by viral sequencing: 41 in the acyclovir group and 43 in the placebo group (hazard ratio with acyclovir, 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.41; P = 0.69). Suppression with acyclovir reduced the mean plasma concentration of HIV-1 by 0.25 log10 copies per milliliter (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.29; P<0.001) and the occurrence of HSV-2–positive genital ulcers by 73% (risk ratio, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.36; P<0.001). A total of 92% of the partners infected with HIV-1 and 84% of the partners not infected with HIV-1 remained in the study for 24 months. The level of adherence to the dispensed study drug was 96%. No serious adverse events related to acyclovir

  9. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env

  10. The C-terminal sequence of IFITM1 regulates its anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Jia

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins inhibit a wide range of viruses. We previously reported the inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strain BH10 by human IFITM1, 2 and 3. It is unknown whether other HIV-1 strains are similarly inhibited by IFITMs and whether there exists viral countermeasure to overcome IFITM inhibition. We report here that the HIV-1 NL4-3 strain (HIV-1NL4-3 is not restricted by IFITM1 and its viral envelope glycoprotein is partly responsible for this insensitivity. However, HIV-1NL4-3 is profoundly inhibited by an IFITM1 mutant, known as Δ(117-125, which is deleted of 9 amino acids at the C-terminus. In contrast to the wild type IFITM1, which does not affect HIV-1 entry, the Δ(117-125 mutant diminishes HIV-1NL4-3 entry by 3-fold. This inhibition correlates with the predominant localization of Δ(117-125 to the plasma membrane where HIV-1 entry occurs. In spite of strong conservation of IFITM1 among most species, mouse IFITM1 is 19 amino acids shorter at its C-terminus as compared to human IFITM1 and, like the human IFITM1 mutant Δ(117-125, mouse IFITM1 also inhibits HIV-1 entry. This is the first report illustrating the role of viral envelope protein in overcoming IFITM1 restriction. The results also demonstrate the importance of the C-terminal region of IFITM1 in modulating the antiviral function through controlling protein subcellular localization.

  11. HIV-1 Reservoir Association with Immune Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Vallejo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of EBioMedicine, Ruggiero and colleagues describe immune activation biomarkers associated with the size of the HIV reservoir in a carefully designed cross-sectional study. The cohort consists of a homogeneous sample of HIV-1-infected patients with long-term plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression under antiretroviral treatment (ART. It is crucial to explore the potential utility of biomarkers that are easier (less labor intensive, less expensive to measure than integrated HIV DNA load, in order to quickly and accurately quantify cellular reservoirs of HIV.

  12. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  13. Suppression of APOBEC3-mediated restriction of HIV-1 by Vif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing eFeng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The APOBEC3 restriction factors are a family of deoxycytidine deaminases that are able to suppress replication of viruses with a single-stranded DNA intermediate by inducing mutagenesis and functional inactivation of the virus. Of the seven human APOBEC3 enzymes, only APOBEC3-D, -F, -G, and -H appear relevant to restriction of HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and will be the focus of this review. The restriction of HIV-1 occurs most potently in the absence of HIV-1 Vif that induces polyubiquitination and degradation of APOBEC3 enzymes through the proteasome pathway. To restrict HIV-1, APOBEC3 enzymes must be encapsidated into budding virions. Upon infection of the target cell during reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA into (-DNA APOBEC3 enzymes deaminate cytosines to forms uracils in single-stranded (- DNA regions. Upon replication of the (-DNA to (+DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite the uracils thereby inducing C/G to T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. APOBEC3G is the most studied APOBEC3 enzyme and it is known that Vif attempts to thwart APOBEC3 function not only by inducing its proteasomal degradation but by several degradation-independent mechanisms such as inhibiting APOBEC3G virion encapsidation, mRNA translation, and for those APOBEC3G molecules that still become virion encapsidated, Vif can inhibit APOBEC3G mutagenic activity. Although most Vif variants can induce efficient degradation of APOBEC3-D, -F, and -G, there appears to be differential sensitivity to Vif-mediated degradation for APOBEC3H. This review examines APOBEC3-mediated HIV restriction mechanisms, how Vif acts as a substrate receptor for a Cullin5 ubiquitin ligase complex to induce degradation of APOBEC3s, and the determinants and functional consequences of the APOBEC3 and Vif interaction from a biological and biochemical perspective.

  14. Infection and depletion of CD4+ group-1 innate lymphoid cells by HIV-1 via type-I interferon pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are severely depleted during chronic HIV-1 infection by unclear mechanisms. We report here that human ILC1s comprising of CD4+ and CD4- subpopulations were present in various human lymphoid organs but with different transcription programs and functions. Importantly, CD4+ ILC1s expressed HIV-1 co-receptors and were productively infected by HIV-1 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, chronic HIV-1 infection activated and depleted both CD4+ and CD4- ILC1s, and impaired their cytokine production activity. Highly active antiretroviral (HAART therapy in HIV-1 patients efficiently rescued the ILC1 numbers and reduced their activation, but failed to restore their functionality. We also found that blocking type-I interferon (IFN-I signaling during HIV-1 infection in vivo in humanized mice prevented HIV-1 induced depletion or apoptosis of ILC1 cells. Therefore, we have identified the CD4+ ILC1 cells as a new target population for HIV-1 infection, and revealed that IFN-I contributes to the depletion of ILC1s during HIV-1 infection.

  15. Oxaliplatin antagonizes HIV-1 latency by activating NF-κB without causing global T cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Liu, Sijie; Wang, Pengfei; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Hanxian; Chen, Huabiao; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 in this cell line model of HIV-1 latency. • Reactivation is synergized when oxaliplatin is used in combination with valproic acid. • Oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 through activation of NF-kB and does not induce T cell activation. - Abstract: Reactivation of latent HIV-1 is a promising strategy for the clearance of the viral reservoirs. Because of the limitations of current agents, identification of new latency activators is urgently required. Using an established model of HIV-1 latency, we examined the effect of Oxaliplatin on latent HIV-1 reactivation. We showed that Oxaliplatin, alone or in combination with valproic acid (VPA), was able to reactivate HIV-1 without inducing global T cell activation. We also provided evidence that Oxaliplatin reactivated HIV-1 expression by inducing nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Our results indicated that Oxaliplatin could be a potential drug candidate for anti-latency therapies

  16. Oxaliplatin antagonizes HIV-1 latency by activating NF-κB without causing global T cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Liu, Sijie; Wang, Pengfei; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Xiaohui; Zeng, Hanxian [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, Huabiao [Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhu, Huanzhang, E-mail: hzzhu@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 in this cell line model of HIV-1 latency. • Reactivation is synergized when oxaliplatin is used in combination with valproic acid. • Oxaliplatin reactivates latent HIV-1 through activation of NF-kB and does not induce T cell activation. - Abstract: Reactivation of latent HIV-1 is a promising strategy for the clearance of the viral reservoirs. Because of the limitations of current agents, identification of new latency activators is urgently required. Using an established model of HIV-1 latency, we examined the effect of Oxaliplatin on latent HIV-1 reactivation. We showed that Oxaliplatin, alone or in combination with valproic acid (VPA), was able to reactivate HIV-1 without inducing global T cell activation. We also provided evidence that Oxaliplatin reactivated HIV-1 expression by inducing nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Our results indicated that Oxaliplatin could be a potential drug candidate for anti-latency therapies.

  17. Lack of mutational hot spots during decitabine-mediated HIV-1 mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Landman, Sean R; Reilly, Cavan S; Bonnac, Laurent; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2015-11-01

    Decitabine has previously been shown to induce lethal mutagenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, the factors that determine the susceptibilities of individual sequence positions in HIV-1 to decitabine have not yet been defined. To investigate this, we performed Illumina high-throughput sequencing of multiple amplicons prepared from proviral DNA that was recovered from decitabine-treated cells infected with HIV-1. We found that decitabine induced an ≈4.1-fold increase in the total mutation frequency of HIV-1, primarily due to a striking ≈155-fold increase in the G-to-C transversion frequency. Intriguingly, decitabine also led to an ≈29-fold increase in the C-to-G transversion frequency. G-to-C frequencies varied substantially (up to ≈80-fold) depending upon sequence position, but surprisingly, mutational hot spots (defined as upper outliers within the mutation frequency distribution) were not observed. We further found that every single guanine position examined was significantly susceptible to the mutagenic effects of decitabine. Taken together, these observations demonstrate for the first time that decitabine-mediated HIV-1 mutagenesis is promiscuous and occurs in the absence of a clear bias for mutational hot spots. These data imply that decitabine-mediated G-to-C mutagenesis is a highly effective antiviral mechanism for extinguishing HIV-1 infectivity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, Pedro; Gaj, Thomas; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Barbas, Carlos F; Goncalves, Joao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 -which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells--is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection.

  19. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Perdigão

    Full Text Available The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 -which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells--is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection.

  20. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chang; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Roh, Tae-Young; Park, Jihwan; Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil; Choi, Sang-Yun; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. → CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. → HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. → H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. → HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56 Lck , ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56 Lck , ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new antireservoir therapy.

  1. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Chang [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Guk [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Tae-Young [Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jihwan [Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang-Yun [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Soon [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byeong-Sun, E-mail: byeongsun@korea.kr [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. {yields} H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. {yields} HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new

  2. Viral linkage in HIV-1 seroconverters and their partners in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary S Campbell

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of viruses in HIV-1 transmission pairs will help identify biological determinants of infectiousness and evaluate candidate interventions to reduce transmission. Although HIV-1 sequencing is frequently used to substantiate linkage between newly HIV-1 infected individuals and their sexual partners in epidemiologic and forensic studies, viral sequencing is seldom applied in HIV-1 prevention trials. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00194519 was a prospective randomized placebo-controlled trial that enrolled serodiscordant heterosexual couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression in reducing HIV-1 transmission; as part of the study analysis, HIV-1 sequences were examined for genetic linkage between seroconverters and their enrolled partners.We obtained partial consensus HIV-1 env and gag sequences from blood plasma for 151 transmission pairs and performed deep sequencing of env in some cases. We analyzed sequences with phylogenetic techniques and developed a Bayesian algorithm to evaluate the probability of linkage. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between enrolled partners' sequences and a Bayesian posterior probability of ≥ 50%. Adjudicators classified each seroconversion, finding 108 (71.5% linked, 40 (26.5% unlinked, and 3 (2.0% indeterminate transmissions, with linkage determined by consensus env sequencing in 91 (84%. Male seroconverters had a higher frequency of unlinked transmissions than female seroconverters. The likelihood of transmission from the enrolled partner was related to time on study, with increasing numbers of unlinked transmissions occurring after longer observation periods. Finally, baseline viral load was found to be significantly higher among linked transmitters.In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner

  3. Molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since identification of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), numerous studies suggest a link between neurological impairments, in particular dementia, with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with alarming occurrence worldwide. Approximately, 60% of HIV-infected people show some form of neurological ...

  4. Epidemiology of HIV-1 and emerging problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukashov, V. V.; de Ronde, A.; de Jong, J. J.; Goudsmit, J.

    2000-01-01

    Broad use of antiretroviral drugs is becoming a factor that is important to consider for understanding the HIV-1 epidemiology. Since 1993, we observe that a proportion of new infections within major risk groups in Amsterdam is caused by azidothymidine (AZT)-resistant viruses. After the introduction

  5. The Oncolytic Virus MG1 Targets and Eliminates Cells Latently Infected With HIV-1: Implications for an HIV Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganath, Nischal; Sandstrom, Teslin S; Burke Schinkel, Stephanie C; Côté, Sandra C; Angel, Jonathan B

    2018-02-14

    Cells latently infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) evade immune- and drug-mediated clearance. These cells harbor intracellular signaling defects, including impairment of the antiviral type I interferon response. Such defects have also been observed in several cancers and have been exploited for the development of therapeutic oncolytic viruses, including the recombinant Maraba virus (MG1). We therefore hypothesized that MG1 would infect and eliminate cells latently infected with HIV-1, while sparing healthy uninfected cells. Preferential infection and elimination by MG1 was first demonstrated in cell lines latently infected with HIV-1. Following this, a reduction in HIV-1 DNA and inducible HIV-1 replication was observed following MG1 infection of latently infected, resting CD4+ T cells generated using an in vitro model of latency. Last, MG1 infection resulted in a reduction in HIV-1 DNA and inducible HIV-1 replication in memory CD4+ T cells isolated from effectively treated, HIV-1-infected individuals. Our results therefore highlight a novel approach to eliminate the latent HIV-1 reservoir. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of HIV-1 Tat toxoid in immunocompromised HIV-1-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gringeri, A; Santagostino, E; Muça-Perja, M; Mannucci, P M; Zagury, J F; Bizzini, B; Lachgar, A; Carcagno, M; Rappaport, J; Criscuolo, M; Blattner, W; Burny, A; Gallo, R C; Zagury, D

    1998-01-01

    To antagonize the deleterious effects of the HIV-1 toxin extracellular Tat on uninfected immune cells, we developed a new strategy of anti-HIV-1 vaccine using an inactivated but immunogenic Tat (Tat toxoid). Tat toxoid has been assayed for safety and immunogenicity in seropositive patients. The phase I vaccine clinical trial testing Tat toxoid preparation in Seppic Isa 51 oil adjuvant was performed on 14 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic although biologically immunocompromised individuals (500-200 CD4+ cells/mm3). Following as many as 8 injections, no clinical defects were observed. All patients exhibited an antibody (Ab) response to Tat, and some had cell-mediated immunity (CMI) as evaluated by skin test in vivo and T-cell proliferation in vitro. These results provide initial evidence of safety and potency of Tat toxoid vaccination in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  7. HIV-1 entry inhibition by small-molecule CCR5 antagonists: A combined molecular modeling and mutant study using a high-throughput assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labrecque, Jean; Metz, Markus; Lau, Gloria; Darkes, Marilyn C.; Wong, Rebecca S.Y.; Bogucki, David; Carpenter, Bryon; Chen Gang; Li Tongshuang; Nan, Susan; Schols, Dominique; Bridger, Gary J.; Fricker, Simon P.; Skerlj, Renato T.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the attrition rate of CCR5 small molecule antagonists in the clinic the discovery and development of next generation antagonists with an improved pharmacology and safety profile is necessary. Herein, we describe a combined molecular modeling, CCR5-mediated cell fusion, and receptor site-directed mutagenesis approach to study the molecular interactions of six structurally diverse compounds (aplaviroc, maraviroc, vicriviroc, TAK-779, SCH-C and a benzyloxycarbonyl-aminopiperidin-1-yl-butane derivative) with CCR5, a coreceptor for CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains. This is the first study using an antifusogenic assay, a model of the interaction of the gp120 envelope protein with CCR5. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and HIV infection assays, and can be used in a high throughput mode. The assay was validated by comparison with other established CCR5 assays. Given the hydrophobic nature of the binding pocket several binding models are suggested which could prove useful in the rational drug design of new lead compounds.

  8. Sensitivity of HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies against O-linked carbohydrate epitopes despite deletion of O-glycosylation signals in the V3 loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Jansson, B; Gram, G J

    1996-01-01

    It has been suggested that threonine or serine residues in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 are glycosylated with the short-chain O-linked oligosaccharides Tn or sialosyl-Tn that function as epitopes for broadly neutralizing carbohydrate specific antibodies. In this study we examined whether mutation....... Additionally, one of these T-A mutants (T308A) also abrogated the signal for N-glycosylation at N306 inside the V3-loop. The mutant clones were compared with the wild type virus as to sensitivity to neutralization with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific for the tip of the V3 loop of BRU or for the O......-linked oligosaccharides Tn or sialosyl-Tn. Deletion of the N-linked oligosaccharide at N306 increased the neutralization sensitivity to antibodies specific for the tip of the loop, which indicates that N-linked glycosylation modulates the accessibility to this immunodominant epitope. However, none of the mutants...

  9. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huang

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  10. A DEAD box protein facilitates HIV-1 replication as a cellular co-factor of Rev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Jianhua; Kubota, Satoshi; Yang Bin; Zhou Naiming; Zhang Hui; Godbout, Roseline; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    2004-01-01

    HIV-1 Rev escorts unspliced viral mRNAs out of the nucleus of infected cells, which allows formation of infectious HIV-1 virions. We have identified a putative DEAD box (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) RNA helicase, DDX1, as a cellular co-factor of Rev, through yeast and mammalian two-hybrid systems using the N-terminal motif of Rev as 'bait'. DDX1 is not a functional homolog of HIV-1 Rev, but down-regulation of DDX1 resulted in an alternative splicing pattern of Rev-responsive element (RRE)-containing mRNA, and attenuation of Gag p24 antigen production from HLfb rev(-) cells rescued by exogenous Rev. Co-transfection of a DDX1 expression vector with HIV-1 significantly increased viral production. DDX1 binding to Rev, as well as to the RRE, strongly suggest that DDX1 affects Rev function through the Rev-RRE axis. Moreover, down-regulation of DDX1 altered the steady state subcellular distribution of Rev, from nuclear/nucleolar to cytoplasmic dominance. These findings indicate that DDX1 is a critical cellular co-factor for Rev function, which maintains the proper subcellular distribution of this lentiviral regulatory protein. Therefore, alterations in DDX1-Rev interactions could induce HIV-1 persistence and targeting DDX1 may lead to rationally designed and novel anti-HIV-1 strategies and therapeutics

  11. Synthesis of a Vpr-Binding Derivative for Use as a Novel HIV-1 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ishii, Hideki; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Kodama, Eiichi N; Kawaji, Kumi; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Suzuki, Masaaki; Aida, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. We previously identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-importin α interaction and inhibits HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner by blocking nuclear import of the pre-integration complex. However, it was unstable. Here, we synthesized a stable derivative of hematoxylin that bound specifically and stably to Vpr and inhibited HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Furthermore, like hematoxylin, the derivative inhibited nuclear import of Vpr in an in vitro nuclear import assay, but had no effect on Vpr-induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest or caspase activity. Interestingly, this derivative bound strongly to amino acid residues 54-74 within the C-terminal α-helical domain (αH3) of Vpr. These residues are highly conserved among different HIV strains, indicating that this region is a potential target for drug-resistant HIV-1 infection. Thus, we succeeded in developing a stable hematoxylin derivative that bound directly to Vpr, suggesting that specific inhibitors of the interaction between cells and viral accessory proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  12. Synthesis of a Vpr-Binding Derivative for Use as a Novel HIV-1 Inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoji Hagiwara

    Full Text Available The emergence of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. We previously identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-importin α interaction and inhibits HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner by blocking nuclear import of the pre-integration complex. However, it was unstable. Here, we synthesized a stable derivative of hematoxylin that bound specifically and stably to Vpr and inhibited HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Furthermore, like hematoxylin, the derivative inhibited nuclear import of Vpr in an in vitro nuclear import assay, but had no effect on Vpr-induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest or caspase activity. Interestingly, this derivative bound strongly to amino acid residues 54-74 within the C-terminal α-helical domain (αH3 of Vpr. These residues are highly conserved among different HIV strains, indicating that this region is a potential target for drug-resistant HIV-1 infection. Thus, we succeeded in developing a stable hematoxylin derivative that bound directly to Vpr, suggesting that specific inhibitors of the interaction between cells and viral accessory proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  13. Role of seminal plasma in the anti-HIV-1 activity of candidate microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of microbicides for prevention of HIV-1 infection in macaque models for vaginal infection has indicated that the concentrations of active compounds needed for protection by far exceed levels sufficient for complete inhibition of infection in vitro. These experiments were done in the absence of seminal plasma (SP, a vehicle for sexual transmission of the virus. To gain insight into the possible effect of SP on the performance of selected microbicides, their anti-HIV-1 activity in the presence, and absence of SP, was determined. Methods The inhibitory activity of compounds against the X4 virus, HIV-1 IIIB, and the R5 virus, HIV-1 BaL was determined using TZM-bl indicator cells and quantitated by measuring β-galactosidase induced by infection. The virucidal properties of cellulose acetate 1,2-benzene-dicarboxylate (CAP, the only microbicide provided in water insoluble, micronized form, in the presence of SP was measured. Results The HIV-1 inhibitory activity of the polymeric microbicides, poly(naphthalene sulfonate, cellulose sulfate, carrageenan, CAP (in soluble form and polystyrene sulfonate, respectively, was considerably (range ≈ 4 to ≈ 73-fold diminished in the presence of SP (33.3%. Formulations of micronized CAP, providing an acidic buffering system even in the presence of an SP volume excess, effectively inactivated HIV-1 infectivity. Conclusion The data presented here suggest that the in vivo efficacy of polymeric microbicides, acting as HIV-1 entry inhibitors, might become at least partly compromised by the inevitable presence of SP. These possible disadvantages could be overcome by combining the respective polymers with acidic pH buffering systems (built-in for formulations of micronized CAP or with other anti-HIV-1 compounds, the activity of which is not affected by SP, e.g. reverse transcriptase and zinc finger inhibitors.

  14. Astrocytes sustain long-term productive HIV-1 infection without establishment of reactivable viral latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barat, Corinne; Proust, Alizé; Deshiere, Alexandre; Leboeuf, Mathieu; Drouin, Jean; Tremblay, Michel J

    2018-02-21

    The "shock and kill" HIV-1 cure strategy proposes eradication of stable cellular reservoirs by clinical treatment with latency-reversing agents (LRAs). Although resting CD4 + T cells latently infected with HIV-1 constitute the main reservoir that is targeted by these approaches, their consequences on other reservoirs such as the central nervous system are still unknown and should be taken into consideration. We performed experiments aimed at defining the possible role of astrocytes in HIV-1 persistence in the brain and the effect of LRA treatments on this viral sanctuary. We first demonstrate that the diminished HIV-1 production in a proliferating astrocyte culture is due to a reduced proliferative capacity of virus-infected cells compared with uninfected astrocytes. In contrast, infection of non-proliferating astrocytes led to a robust HIV-1 infection that was sustained for over 60 days. To identify astrocytes latently infected with HIV-1, we designed a new dual-color reporter virus called NL4.3 eGFP-IRES-Crimson that is fully infectious and encodes for all viral proteins. Although we detected a small fraction of astrocytes carrying silent HIV-1 proviruses, we did not observe any reactivation using various LRAs and even strong inducers such as tumor necrosis factor, thus suggesting that these proviruses were either not transcriptionally competent or in a state of deep latency. Our findings imply that astrocytes might not constitute a latent reservoir per se but that relentless virus production by this brain cell population could contribute to the neurological disorders seen in HIV-1-infected persons subjected to combination antiretroviral therapy. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Extracellular ATP reduces HIV-1 transfer from immature dendritic cells to CD4+ T lymphocytes

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    Barat Corinne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are considered as key mediators of the early events in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection at mucosal sites. Previous studies have shown that surface-bound virions and/or internalized viruses found in endocytic vacuoles of DCs are efficiently transferred to CD4+ T cells. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP either secreted or released from necrotic cells induces a distorted maturation of DCs, transiently increases their endocytic capacity and affects their migratory capacity. Knowing that high extracellular ATP concentrations are present in situations of tissue injury and inflammation, we investigated the effect of ATP on HIV-1 transmission from DCs to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Results In this study, we show that extracellular ATP reduces HIV-1 transfer from immature monocyte-derived DCs (iDCs to autologous CD4+ T cells. This observed decrease in viral replication was related to a lower proportion of infected CD4+ T cells following transfer, and was seen with both X4- and R5-tropic isolates of HIV-1. Extracellular ATP had no effect on direct CD4+ T cell infection as well as on productive HIV-1 infection of iDCs. These observations indicate that extracellular ATP affects HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells in trans with no effect on de novo virus production by iDCs. Additional experiments suggest that extracellular ATP might modulate the trafficking pathway of internalized virions within iDCs leading to an increased lysosomal degradation, which could be partly responsible for the decreased HIV-1 transmission. Conclusion These results suggest that extracellular ATP can act as a factor controlling HIV-1 propagation.

  16. Involvement of histone methyltransferase GLP in HIV-1 latency through catalysis of H3K9 dimethylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Donglin; Qu, Xiying; Li, Lin; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Sijie; Lin, Shiguan; Wang, Pengfei; Liu, Shaohui; Kong, Chuijin; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Lin; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 latency is crucial to eradication of the viral reservoir in HIV-1-infected individuals. However, the role of histone methyltransferase (HMT) G9a-like protein (GLP) in HIV-1 latency is still unclear. In the present work, we established four clonal cell lines containing HIV-1 vector. We found that the integration sites of most clonal cell lines favored active gene regions. However, we also observed hypomethylation of CpG of HIV 5′LTR in all four clonal cell lines. Additionally, 5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA), a broad-spectrum histone methyltransferase inhibitor, was used to examine the role of histone methylation in HIV-1 latency. MTA was found to decrease the level of H3K9 dimethylation, causing reactivation of latent HIV-1 in C11 cells. GLP knockdown by small interfering RNA clearly induced HIV-1 LTR expression. Results suggest that GLP may play a significant role in the maintenance of HIV-1 latency by catalyzing dimethylation of H3K9. - Highlights: ► We have established an in vitro model of HIV-1 latency. ► The integration sites of most clonal cell lines favor in active gene regions. ► Hypomethylation occurs in CpG islands of HIV 5′LTR in all four clonal cell lines. ► MTA can reactivate latent HIV-1 by decreasing the level of H3K9 me2 in C11 cells. ► HMT GLP may play a significant role in the maintenance of HIV-1 latency

  17. Hit-and-run stimulation: a novel concept to reactivate latent HIV-1 infection without cytokine gene induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Wagner, Frederic H; Huff, Jason; Benjamin, William H; Saag, Michael S; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2010-09-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently controls HIV-1 replication but fails to eradicate the virus. Even after years of successful ART, HIV-1 can conceal itself in a latent state in long-lived CD4(+) memory T cells. From this latent reservoir, HIV-1 rebounds during treatment interruptions. Attempts to therapeutically eradicate this viral reservoir have yielded disappointing results. A major problem with previously utilized activating agents is that at the concentrations required for efficient HIV-1 reactivation, these stimuli trigger high-level cytokine gene expression (hypercytokinemia). Therapeutically relevant HIV-1-reactivating agents will have to trigger HIV-1</