WorldWideScience

Sample records for hiv research network

  1. Recruitment of Underrepresented Minority Researchers into HIV Prevention Research: The HIV Prevention Trials Network Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Erica L.; Griffith, Sam B.; Jennings, Larissa; Dyer, Typhanye V.; Mayer, Kenneth; Wheeler, Darrell

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Most U.S. investigators in the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) have been of majority race/ethnicity and sexual orientation. Research participants, in contrast, have been disproportionately from racial/ethnic minorities and men who have sex with men (MSM), reflecting the U.S. epidemic. We initiated and subsequently evaluated the HPTN Scholars Program that mentors early career investigators from underrepresented minority groups. Scholars were affiliated with the HPTN for 12–18 months, mentored by a senior researcher to analyze HPTN study data. Participation in scientific committees, trainings, protocol teams, and advisory groups was facilitated, followed by evaluative exit surveys. Twenty-six trainees have produced 17 peer-reviewed articles to date. Research topics typically explored health disparities and HIV prevention among black and Hispanic MSM and at-risk black women. Most scholars (81% in the first five cohorts) continued HIV research after program completion. Alumni reported program-related career benefits and subsequent funding successes. Their feedback also suggested that we must improve the scholars' abilities to engage new research protocols that are developed within the network. Mentored engagement can nurture the professional development of young researchers from racial/ethnic and sexual minority communities. Minority scientists can benefit from training and mentoring within research consortia, whereas the network research benefits from perspectives of underrepresented minority scientists. PMID:29145745

  2. Creating an African HIV clinical research and prevention trials network: HIV prevalence, incidence and transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner.

  3. Creating an African HIV clinical research and prevention trials network: HIV prevalence, incidence and transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Kamali

    Full Text Available HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner.

  4. Creating an African HIV Clinical Research and Prevention Trials Network: HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A.; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J.; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K.; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner. PMID:25602351

  5. CIHR canadian HIV trials network HIV workshop: ethical research through community participation and strengthening scientific validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Slogrove, Amy; Sas, Jacqueline; Kunda, John; Morfaw, Frederick; Mukonzo, Jackson; Thabane, Lehana

    2014-01-01

    The CIHR canadian HIV trials network mandate includes strengthening capacity to conduct and apply clinical research through training and mentoring initiatives of HIV researchers by building strong networks and partnerships on the African continent. At the17th International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa (ICASA), the CTN facilitated a two-day workshop to address ethical issues in the conduct of HIV research, and career enhancing strategies for young African HIV researchers. Conference attendees were allowed to attend whichever session was of interest to them. We report on the topics covered, readings shared and participants' evaluation of the workshop. The scientific aspects of ethical research in HIV and career enhancement strategies are relevant issues to conference attendees.

  6. Structures of Care in the Clinics of the HIV Research Network

    OpenAIRE

    Yehia, Baligh R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Hicks, Perrin B.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Moore, Richard D.; Ridore, Michelande; Mathews, William Christopher

    2008-01-01

    As the HIV epidemic has evolved to become a chronic, treatable condition the focus of HIV care has shifted from the inpatient to the outpatient arena. The optimal structure of HIV care in the outpatient setting is unknown. Using the HIV Research Network (HIVRN), a federally sponsored consortium of 21 sites that provide care to HIV-infected individuals, this study attempted to: (1) document key features of the organization of care in HIVRN adult clinics and (2) estimate variability among clini...

  7. Structures of care in the clinics of the HIV Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Baligh R; Gebo, Kelly A; Hicks, Perrin B; Korthuis, P Todd; Moore, Richard D; Ridore, Michelande; Mathews, William Christopher

    2008-12-01

    As the HIV epidemic has evolved to become a chronic, treatable condition the focus of HIV care has shifted from the inpatient to the outpatient arena. The optimal structure of HIV care in the outpatient setting is unknown. Using the HIV Research Network (HIVRN), a federally sponsored consortium of 21 sites that provide care to HIV-infected individuals, this study attempted to: (1) document key features of the organization of care in HIVRN adult clinics and (2) estimate variability among clinics in these parameters. A cross-sectional survey of adult clinic directors regarding patient volume, follow-up care, provider characteristics, acute patient care issues, wait times, patient safety procedures, and prophylaxis practices was conducted from July to December 2007. All 15 adult HIVRN clinic sites responded: 9 academic and 6 community-based. The results demonstrate variability in key practice parameters. Median (range) of selected practice characteristics were: (1) annual patient panel size, 1300 (355-5600); (2) appointment no-show rate, 28% (8%-40%); (3) annual loss to follow-up, 15% (5%-25%); (4) wait time for new appointments, 5 days (0.5-22.5), and follow-up appointment, 8 days (0-30). The majority of clinics had an internal mechanism to handle acute patient care issues and provide a number of onsite consultative services. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants were highly utilized. These data will facilitate improvements in chronic care management of persons living with HIV.

  8. Evaluating research and impact: a bibliometric analysis of research by the NIH/NIAID HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Rosas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluative bibliometrics uses advanced techniques to assess the impact of scholarly work in the context of other scientific work and usually compares the relative scientific contributions of research groups or institutions. Using publications from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID HIV/AIDS extramural clinical trials networks, we assessed the presence, performance, and impact of papers published in 2006-2008. Through this approach, we sought to expand traditional bibliometric analyses beyond citation counts to include normative comparisons across journals and fields, visualization of co-authorship across the networks, and assess the inclusion of publications in reviews and syntheses. Specifically, we examined the research output of the networks in terms of the a presence of papers in the scientific journal hierarchy ranked on the basis of journal influence measures, b performance of publications on traditional bibliometric measures, and c impact of publications in comparisons with similar publications worldwide, adjusted for journals and fields. We also examined collaboration and interdisciplinarity across the initiative, through network analysis and modeling of co-authorship patterns. Finally, we explored the uptake of network produced publications in research reviews and syntheses. Overall, the results suggest the networks are producing highly recognized work, engaging in extensive interdisciplinary collaborations, and having an impact across several areas of HIV-related science. The strengths and limitations of the approach for evaluation and monitoring research initiatives are discussed.

  9. Evaluating Research and Impact: A Bibliometric Analysis of Research by the NIH/NIAID HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Scott R.; Kagan, Jonathan M.; Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Slack, Perry A.; Trochim, William M. K.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluative bibliometrics uses advanced techniques to assess the impact of scholarly work in the context of other scientific work and usually compares the relative scientific contributions of research groups or institutions. Using publications from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) HIV/AIDS extramural clinical trials networks, we assessed the presence, performance, and impact of papers published in 2006–2008. Through this approach, we sought to expand traditional bibliometric analyses beyond citation counts to include normative comparisons across journals and fields, visualization of co-authorship across the networks, and assess the inclusion of publications in reviews and syntheses. Specifically, we examined the research output of the networks in terms of the a) presence of papers in the scientific journal hierarchy ranked on the basis of journal influence measures, b) performance of publications on traditional bibliometric measures, and c) impact of publications in comparisons with similar publications worldwide, adjusted for journals and fields. We also examined collaboration and interdisciplinarity across the initiative, through network analysis and modeling of co-authorship patterns. Finally, we explored the uptake of network produced publications in research reviews and syntheses. Overall, the results suggest the networks are producing highly recognized work, engaging in extensive interdisciplinary collaborations, and having an impact across several areas of HIV-related science. The strengths and limitations of the approach for evaluation and monitoring research initiatives are discussed. PMID:21394198

  10. TanZamBo Capacity Building for HIV Prevention Research Network ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will support the development of HIV/AIDS prevention trial expertise in Botswana, Tanzania and Zambia using existing collaborations between Africa, Canada and the United States. The Botswana-Tanzania-Zambia Capacity Building Network (TanZamBo) is composed of two African institutions with fairly well ...

  11. CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network Coinfection and Concurrent Diseases Core Research Group: 2016 Updated Canadian HIV/Hepatitis C Adult Guidelines for Management and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Mark; Wong, Alex; Tseng, Alice; Giguère, Pierre; Barrett, Lisa; Haider, Shariq; Conway, Brian; Klein, Marina; Cooper, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection occurs in 20–30% of Canadians living with HIV and is responsible for a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. Purpose. To update national standards for management of HCV-HIV coinfected adults in the Canadian context with evolving evidence for and accessibility of effective and tolerable DAA therapies. The document addresses patient workup and treatment preparation, antiviral recommendations overall and in specific populations, and drug-drug interactions. Methods. A standing working group with HIV-HCV expertise was convened by The Canadian Institute of Health Research HIV Trials Network to review recently published HCV antiviral data and update Canadian HIV-HCV Coinfection Guidelines. Results. The gap in sustained virologic response between HCV monoinfection and HIV-HCV coinfection has been eliminated with newer HCV antiviral regimens. All coinfected individuals should be assessed for interferon-free, Direct Acting Antiviral HCV therapy. Regimens vary in content, duration, and success based largely on genotype. Reimbursement restrictions forcing the use of pegylated interferon is not acceptable if optimal patient care is to be provided. Discussion. Recommendations may not supersede individual clinical judgement. Treatment advances published since December 2015 are not considered in this document. PMID:27471521

  12. CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network Coinfection and Concurrent Diseases Core Research Group: 2016 Updated Canadian HIV/Hepatitis C Adult Guidelines for Management and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV coinfection occurs in 20–30% of Canadians living with HIV and is responsible for a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. Purpose. To update national standards for management of HCV-HIV coinfected adults in the Canadian context with evolving evidence for and accessibility of effective and tolerable DAA therapies. The document addresses patient workup and treatment preparation, antiviral recommendations overall and in specific populations, and drug-drug interactions. Methods. A standing working group with HIV-HCV expertise was convened by The Canadian Institute of Health Research HIV Trials Network to review recently published HCV antiviral data and update Canadian HIV-HCV Coinfection Guidelines. Results. The gap in sustained virologic response between HCV monoinfection and HIV-HCV coinfection has been eliminated with newer HCV antiviral regimens. All coinfected individuals should be assessed for interferon-free, Direct Acting Antiviral HCV therapy. Regimens vary in content, duration, and success based largely on genotype. Reimbursement restrictions forcing the use of pegylated interferon is not acceptable if optimal patient care is to be provided. Discussion. Recommendations may not supersede individual clinical judgement. Treatment advances published since December 2015 are not considered in this document.

  13. The network researchers' network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C.; Jiang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987). In thi......The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987......). In this paper, based upon the papers presented at the 22 conferences held to date, we undertake a Social Network Analysis in order to examine the degree of co-publishing that has taken place between this group of researchers. We identify the different components in this database, and examine the large main...

  14. The family's role as a support network for people living with HIV/AIDS: a review of Brazilian research into the theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Leonara Maria Souza; Tavares, Jeane Saskya Campos

    2015-04-01

    The study of HIV transmission and the implementation of AIDS prevention actions recognize the importance of social networks in the transmission of the disease, the adherence to treatment and the quality of life of those infected. For this relevance there was a review of articles on social support networks to people living with HIV /AIDS available in the Virtual Health Library (VHL) were published in Brazil between 2002 and 2012. In this study 31 articles were used from journals covering the following áreas: Nursing (n = 15), Psychology (n = 6) and Science Health / Biomedica (n = 6), were included, which some principal authors were affiliated to higher education public institutions (n = 17). In relation to the methodology used, priority wasgiven to conducting: qualitative research (n = 18), cross-sectional studies (n = 19) and studies that involved talking to people living with HIV/AIDS (n = 13). Particular importance was placed on analytic categories related to: adherence to treatment (n = 6), the family (n = 4), vulnerability (n = 3) and support from social networks (n = 5). Within this paper we argue for more investments into studies that focus on the family, carers and their households, as well as deepening the theoretical study of the themes discussed and the use of developed theories for the analysis of Social Networks.

  15. Southern African Treatment Resistance Network (SATuRN) RegaDB HIV drug resistance and clinical management database: supporting patient management, surveillance and research in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasa, Justen; Lessells, Richard; Rossouw, Theresa; Naidu, Kevindra; Van Vuuren, Cloete; Goedhals, Dominique; van Zyl, Gert; Bester, Armand; Skingsley, Andrew; Stott, Katharine; Danaviah, Siva; Chetty, Terusha; Singh, Lavanya; Moodley, Pravi; Iwuji, Collins; McGrath, Nuala; Seebregts, Christopher J; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2014-01-01

    Substantial amounts of data have been generated from patient management and academic exercises designed to better understand the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and design interventions to control it. A number of specialized databases have been designed to manage huge data sets from HIV cohort, vaccine, host genomic and drug resistance studies. Besides databases from cohort studies, most of the online databases contain limited curated data and are thus sequence repositories. HIV drug resistance has been shown to have a great potential to derail the progress made thus far through antiretroviral therapy. Thus, a lot of resources have been invested in generating drug resistance data for patient management and surveillance purposes. Unfortunately, most of the data currently available relate to subtype B even though >60% of the epidemic is caused by HIV-1 subtype C. A consortium of clinicians, scientists, public health experts and policy markers working in southern Africa came together and formed a network, the Southern African Treatment and Resistance Network (SATuRN), with the aim of increasing curated HIV-1 subtype C and tuberculosis drug resistance data. This article describes the HIV-1 data curation process using the SATuRN Rega database. The data curation is a manual and time-consuming process done by clinical, laboratory and data curation specialists. Access to the highly curated data sets is through applications that are reviewed by the SATuRN executive committee. Examples of research outputs from the analysis of the curated data include trends in the level of transmitted drug resistance in South Africa, analysis of the levels of acquired resistance among patients failing therapy and factors associated with the absence of genotypic evidence of drug resistance among patients failing therapy. All these studies have been important for informing first- and second-line therapy. This database is a free password-protected open source database available on

  16. HIV behavioral research online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Mary Ann; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Tesoriero, James M; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Hirshfield, Sabina; Remien, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Internet access has caused a global revolution in the way people of all ages and genders interact. Many have turned to the Internet to seek love, companionship, and sex, prompting researchers to move behavioral studies online. The sexual behavior of men who have sex with men (MSM) has been more closely studied than that of any other group online given the abundance of gay-oriented websites and concerns about increasing transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Not only does the Internet provide a new medium for the conduct of behavioral research and for participant recruitment into an array of research studies, it has the as yet unrealized potential to reach huge numbers of MSM with innovative harm reduction and prevention messages tailored to individualized needs, interests, and risk behavior. Internet-based research on sexual behavior has many advantages in rapidity of recruitment of diverse samples which include individuals unreachable through conventional methods (i.e., non-gay identified and geographically and socially isolated MSM, etc.). Internet-based research also presents some new methodologic challenges in study design, participant recruitment, survey implementation, and interpretation of results. In addition, there are ethical issues unique to online research including difficulties in verifying informed consent, obstacles to surveying minors, and the ability to assure anonymity. This paper presents a review of Internet-based research on sexual behavior in MSM, a general discussion of the methodologic and ethical challenges of Internet-based research, and recommendations for future interdisciplinary research.

  17. Host Proteome Research in HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Honghao

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has been widely used in the last few years to look for new biomarkers and decipher the mechanism of HIV?host interaction. Herein, we review the recent developments of HIV/AIDS proteomic research, including the samples used in HIV/AIDS related research, the technologies used for proteomic study, the diagnosis biomarkers of HIV-associated disease especially HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment, the mechanisms of HIV?host interaction, HIV-associated dementia, substance abuse, and ...

  18. The Spanish HIV BioBank: a model of cooperative HIV research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto Cristina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The collection of samples from HIV-infected patients is the beginning of the chain of translational research. To carry out quality research that could eventually end in a personalized treatment for HIV, it is essential to guarantee the availability, quality and traceability of samples, under a strict system of quality management. Methods The Spanish HIV BioBank was created with the objectives of processing, storing and providing distinct samples from HIV/AIDS patients, categorized according to strictly defined characteristics, free of charge to research projects. Strict compliance to ethical norms is always guaranteed. Results At the moment, the HIV BioBank possesses nearly 50,000 vials containing different prospective longitudinal study sample types. More than 1,700 of these samples are now used in 19 national and international research projects. Conclusion The HIV BioBank represents a novel approach to HIV research that might be of general interest not only for basic and clinical research teams working on HIV, but also for those groups trying to establish large networks focused on research on specific clinical problems. It also represents a model to stimulate cooperative research among large numbers of research groups working as a network on specific clinical problems. The main objective of this article is to show the structure and function of the HIV BioBank that allow it to very efficiently release samples to different research project not only in Spain but also in other countries.

  19. Social networks, drug injectors' lives, and HIV/AIDS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedman, Samuel R

    1999-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Individualistic Views of Risk Behaviors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Social and Risk Networks Influence HIV Risk Behaviors and Infection...

  20. Clinical, epidemiological and treatment failure data among HIV-1 non-B-infected patients in the Spanish AIDS Research Network Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrecilla García, Esther; Yebra Sanz, Gonzalo; Llácer-Delicado, Teresa; Rubio García, Rafael; González-García, Juan; García García, Federico; López-Aldeguer, José; Asensi Álvarez, Víctor; Holguín Fernández, África

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV-1 non-B variants is increasing in Spain, showing a higher number of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDR) since 2002. This study presents the features of non-B-infected patients enrolled in the cohort of antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV-infected patients included in the Research Network on HIV/AIDS (CoRIS). The study includes a selected group of HIV-1 non-B-infected subjects from 670 subjects with pol sequences collected from 2004 to 2008 in the CoRIS cohort. Epidemiological-clinical-virological data were analyzed since cohort entry until October 2011, considering the presence or absence of treatment failure (TF). Eighty two non-B infected subjects with known HIV-1 variants were selected from 2004 to 2008 in the CoRIS cohort, being mainly female, immigrants, infected by recombinant viruses, and by heterosexual route. They had an intermediate TDR rate (9.4%), a high rate of TF (25.6%), of losses to follow-up (35%), of coinfections (32.9%), and baseline CD4+ counts ≥350cells/mm(3) (61.8%). Non-B subjects with TF showed higher rates of heterosexual infection (85.7% vs. 69.5%, p<0.05), tuberculosis (30.8% vs. 9.1%, p=0.10) and hepatitis C (23.8% vs. 13.9%, p=0.34) coinfections and lower rates of syphilis (0% vs. 21.9%, p<0.05), and had more frequently received first-line ART including protease inhibitors (PIs) than patients without TF (70% vs. 30%, p<0.05). Interestingly, infection with non-B variants reduced the risk of TDR to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and increased the risk to PIs. HIV-1 non-B-infected patients in Spain had a particular epidemiological and clinical profile that should be considered during their clinical management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute Care Management of the HIV-Infected Patient: A Report from the HIV Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Spencer H; Badowski, Melissa E; Liedtke, Michelle D; Rathbun, R Chris; Pecora Fulco, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) admitted to the hospital have complex antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens with an increased medication error rate upon admission. This report provides a resource for clinicians managing HIV-infected patients and ART in the inpatient setting. A survey of the authors was conducted to evaluate common issues that arise during an acute hospitalization for HIV-infected patients. After a group consensus, a review of the medical literature was performed to determine the supporting evidence for the following HIV-associated hospital queries: admission/discharge orders, antiretroviral hospital formularies, laboratory monitoring, altered hepatic/renal function, drug-drug interactions (DDIs), enteral administration, and therapeutic drug monitoring. With any hospital admission for an HIV-infected patient, a specific set of procedures should be followed including a thorough admission medication history and communication with the ambulatory HIV provider to avoid omissions or substitutions in the ART regimen. DDIs are common and should be reviewed at all transitions of care during the hospital admission. ART may be continued if enteral nutrition with a feeding tube is deemed necessary, but the entire regimen should be discontinued if no oral access is available for a prolonged period. Therapeutic drug monitoring is not generally recommended but, if available, should be considered in unique clinical scenarios where antiretroviral pharmacokinetics are difficult to predict. ART may need adjustment if hepatic or renal insufficiency ensues. Treatment of hospitalized patients with HIV is highly complex. HIV-infected patients are at high risk for medication errors during various transitions of care. Baseline knowledge of the principles of antiretroviral pharmacotherapy is necessary for clinicians managing acutely ill HIV-infected patients to avoid medication errors, identify DDIs, and correctly dose medications if organ

  2. Operations research in HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anant

    2013-01-01

    Operations research is mainly applied to decision making in industries and corporations using quantitative methods to optimize production. The applications of operations research in social sciences research or health research in HIV, service delivery, and program performance improvement are minimal. Considering the complexity of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, it is imperative to learn from operations research in scaling up HIV treatment, prevention, and intervention in resource-poor settings. In this article the author discusses the methodological issues in operations research within the context of HIV/AIDS research. The author also suggests a framework for using operations research in the field of HIV/AIDS research and program intervention.

  3. HIV Clients as Agents for Prevention: A Social Network Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Ssali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV prevention efforts to date have not explored the potential for persons living with HIV to act as change agents for prevention behaviour in their social networks. Using egocentric social network analysis, this study examined the prevalence and social network correlates of prevention advocacy behaviours (discussing HIV in general; encouraging abstinence or condom use, HIV testing, and seeking HIV care enacted by 39 HIV clients in Uganda. Participants engaged in each prevention advocacy behaviour with roughly 50–70% of the members in their network. The strongest determinant of engaging in prevention advocacy with more of one’s network members was having a greater proportion of network members who knew one’s HIV seropositive status, as this was associated with three of the four advocacy behaviours. These findings highlight the potential for PLHA to be key change agents for HIV prevention within their networks and the importance of HIV disclosure in facilitating prevention advocacy.

  4. Lymphatic Education & Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymphatic Education & Research Network Donate Now Become a Supporting Member X Living with LYMPHEDEMA AND Lymphatic Disease FAQs About ... December 8, 2017 11.08.2017 The Lymphatic Education & Research Network… Read More > ASRM LE&RN Combined ...

  5. Host proteome research in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Honghao

    2010-03-01

    Proteomics has been widely used in the last few years to look for new biomarkers and decipher the mechanism of HIV-host interaction. Herein, we review the recent developments of HIV/AIDS proteomic research, including the samples used in HIV/AIDS related research, the technologies used for proteomic study, the diagnosis biomarkers of HIV-associated disease especially HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment, the mechanisms of HIV-host interaction, HIV-associated dementia, substance abuse, and so on. In the end of this review, we also give some prospects about the limitation and future improvement of HIV/AIDS proteomic research. 2010 Beijing Genomics Institute. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. HIV cure research: a formidable challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ultimate goal of HIV cure research is to allow HIV-infected individuals to be free of disease in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. We discuss current directions and future opportunities aimed at achieving sustained virological remission, and possibly eradication. A multidisciplinary approach to HIV cure research will be important, and ethical, social and behavioural research should be conducted in parallel with basic and clinical research.

  7. Research Report: HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental Health Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, Evzio) Pain Prevention Recovery Substance ... or alcohol are more likely to have unsafe sex that might expose them to HIV and other ...

  8. Utility of urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in diagnosing tuberculosis and predicting mortality with and without HIV: prospective TB cohort from the Thailand Big City TB Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanpimolkul, Gompol; Kawkitinarong, Kamon; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Sophonphan, Jiratchaya; Gatechompol, Sivaporn; Ohata, Pirapon June; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Iampornsin, Thatri; Katerattanakul, Pairaj; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the applicability and accuracy of the urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) test in tuberculosis (TB)/HIV co-infected patients and HIV-negative patients with disseminated TB. Frozen urine samples obtained at baseline from patients in the TB research cohort with proven culture-positive TB were selected for blinded urine LAM testing. One hundred and nine patients were categorized into four groups: (1) HIV-positive patients with TB; (2) HIV-negative patients with disseminated TB; (3) HIV-negative immunocompromised patients with TB; and (4) patients with diseases other than TB. The sensitivity of urine LAM testing for culture-positive TB, specificity of urine LAM testing for patients without TB, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed. The sensitivity of the urine LAM test in group 1 patients with a CD4 T-cell count of >100, ≤100, and ≤50 cells/mm3 was 38.5%, 40.6%, and 45%, respectively. The specificity and PPV of the urine LAM test were >80%. The sensitivity of the test was 20% in group 2 and 12.5% in group 3, and the specificity and PPV were 100% for both groups. A positive urine LAM test result was significantly associated with death. This promising diagnostic tool could increase the yield of TB diagnosis and may predict the mortality rate of TB infection, particularly in TB/HIV co-infected patients. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Stochastic simulation of HIV population dynamics through complex network modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, P. M. A.; Ivanov, S. V.; Boukhanovsky, A. V.; van de Vijver, D. A. M. C.; Boucher, C. A. B.

    We propose a new way to model HIV infection spreading through the use of dynamic complex networks. The heterogeneous population of HIV exposure groups is described through a unique network degree probability distribution. The time evolution of the network nodes is modelled by a Markov process and

  10. Stochastic simulation of HIV population dynamics through complex network modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, P.M.A.; Ivanov, S.V.; Boukhanovsky, A.V.; van de Vijver, D.A.M.C.; Boucher, C.A.B.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new way to model HIV infection spreading through the use of dynamic complex networks. The heterogeneous population of HIV exposure groups is described through a unique network degree probability distribution. The time evolution of the network nodes is modelled by a Markov process and

  11. Implementation and Operational Research: Pulling the Network Together: Quasiexperimental Trial of a Patient-Defined Support Network Intervention for Promoting Engagement in HIV Care and Medication Adherence on Mfangano Island, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Matthew D; Salmen, Charles R; Omollo, Dan; Mattah, Brian; Fiorella, Kathryn J; Geng, Elvin H; Bacchetti, Peter; Blat, Cinthia; Ouma, Gor B; Zoughbie, Daniel; Tessler, Robert A; Salmen, Marcus R; Campbell, Harold; Gandhi, Monica; Shade, Starley; Njoroge, Betty; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R

    2015-08-01

    Despite progress in the global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy, sustained engagement in HIV care remains challenging. Social capital is an important factor for sustained engagement, but interventions designed to harness this powerful social force are uncommon. We conducted a quasiexperimental study evaluating the impact of the Microclinic Social Network intervention on engagement in HIV care and medication adherence on Mfangano Island, Kenya. The intervention was introduced into 1 of 4 similar communities served by this clinic; comparisons were made between communities using an intention-to-treat analysis. Microclinics, composed of patient-defined support networks, participated in 10 biweekly discussion sessions covering topics ranging from HIV biology to group support and group HIV status disclosure. Nevirapine concentrations in hair were measured before and after study. One hundred thirteen (74%) intervention community participants joined a microclinic group, 86% of whom participated in group HIV status disclosure. Over 22-month follow-up, intervention community participants experienced one-half the rate of ≥ 90-day clinic absence as those in control communities (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.48; 95% confidence interval: 0.25 to 0.92). Nevirapine hair levels declined in both study arms; in adjusted linear regression analysis, the decline was 6.7 ng/mg less severe in the intervention arm than control arm (95% confidence interval: -2.7 to 16.1). The microclinic intervention is a promising and feasible community-based strategy to improve long-term engagement in HIV care and possibly medication adherence. Reducing treatment interruptions using a social network approach has important implications for individual patient virologic suppression, morbidity, and mortality and for broader community empowerment and engagement in healthcare.

  12. Predictors of the International HIV-AIDS INGO Network over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumate, Michelle; Fulk, Janet; Monge, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The HIV-AIDS epidemic is one of the most challenging and significant health crises facing the world today. In order to cope with its complexities, the United Nations and World Health Organization have increasingly relied upon the resources offered by networks of HIV-AIDS nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The research reported here uses…

  13. Humanized mice for HIV and AIDS research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor Garcia, J

    2016-08-01

    HIV has a very limited species tropism that prevents the use of most conventional small animal models for AIDS research. The in vivo analysis of HIV/AIDS has benefited extensively from novel chimeric animal models that accurately recapitulate key aspects of the human condition. Specifically, immunodeficient mice that are systemically repopulated with human hematolymphoid cells offer a viable alternative for the study of a multitude of highly relevant aspects of HIV replication, pathogenesis, therapy, transmission, prevention, and eradication. This article summarizes some of the multiple contributions that humanized mouse models of HIV infection have made to the field of AIDS research. These models have proven to be highly informative and hold great potential for accelerating multiple aspects of HIV research in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Standards and Guidelines for HIV Prevention Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Standards and Guidelines for HIV Prevention Research: Considerations for Local Context in the Interpretation of Global .... African women19,20. But then there is the question of which guidelines should be used to structure ..... sponsors prior to initiating HIV prevention studies. The lessons from this case study show that in.

  15. HIV, sex, and social change: applying ESID principles to HIV prevention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M Isabel; Bowen, G Stephen; Gay, Caryl L; Mattson, Tiffany R; Bital, Evelyne; Kelly, Jeffrey A

    2003-12-01

    The HIV epidemic has been the most significant public health crisis of the last 2 decades. Although Experimental Social Innovation and Dissemination (ESID) principles have been used by many HIV prevention researchers, the clearest application is the series of model-building and replication experiments conducted by Kelly and colleagues. The model mobilized, trained, and engaged key opinion leaders to serve as behavior change and safe-sex endorsers in their social networks. This paper illustrates how ESID principles were used to develop, test, and disseminate an innovative social model and discusses the challenges of applying ESID methodology in the midst of a public health emergency.

  16. Combining epidemiological and genetic networks signifies the importance of early treatment in HIV-1 transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Zarrabi

    Full Text Available Inferring disease transmission networks is important in epidemiology in order to understand and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Reconstruction of the infection transmission networks requires insight into viral genome data as well as social interactions. For the HIV-1 epidemic, current research either uses genetic information of patients' virus to infer the past infection events or uses statistics of sexual interactions to model the network structure of viral spreading. Methods for a reliable reconstruction of HIV-1 transmission dynamics, taking into account both molecular and societal data are still lacking. The aim of this study is to combine information from both genetic and epidemiological scales to characterize and analyse a transmission network of the HIV-1 epidemic in central Italy.We introduce a novel filter-reduction method to build a network of HIV infected patients based on their social and treatment information. The network is then combined with a genetic network, to infer a hypothetical infection transmission network. We apply this method to a cohort study of HIV-1 infected patients in central Italy and find that patients who are highly connected in the network have longer untreated infection periods. We also find that the network structures for homosexual males and heterosexual populations are heterogeneous, consisting of a majority of 'peripheral nodes' that have only a few sexual interactions and a minority of 'hub nodes' that have many sexual interactions. Inferring HIV-1 transmission networks using this novel combined approach reveals remarkable correlations between high out-degree individuals and longer untreated infection periods. These findings signify the importance of early treatment and support the potential benefit of wide population screening, management of early diagnoses and anticipated antiretroviral treatment to prevent viral transmission and spread. The approach presented here for reconstructing HIV-1

  17. chronicles of medical history the era of hiv cure research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HAART) has significantly transformed the natural history of the ... mentioned in the history HIV cure research. Similar cases of .... strategies that synergize with HIV prevention efforts. This workshop .... Lower HIV provirus levels are associated with.

  18. Dynamics of HIV infection in lymphoid tissue network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Shinji; Iwami, Shingo; Sato, Kei

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a fast replicating ribonucleic acid virus, which can easily mutate in order to escape the effects of drug administration. Hence, understanding the basic mechanisms underlying HIV persistence in the body is essential in the development of new therapies that could eradicate HIV infection. Lymphoid tissues are the primary sites of HIV infection. Despite the recent progress in real-time monitoring technology, HIV infection dynamics in a whole body is unknown. Mathematical modeling and simulations provide speculations on global behavior of HIV infection in the lymphatic system. We propose a new mathematical model that describes the spread of HIV infection throughout the lymphoid tissue network. In order to represent the volume difference between lymphoid tissues, we propose the proportionality of several kinetic parameters to the lymphoid tissues' volume distribution. Under this assumption, we perform extensive numerical computations in order to simulate the spread of HIV infection in the lymphoid tissue network. Numerical computations simulate single drug treatments of an HIV infection. One of the important biological speculations derived from this study is a drug saturation effect generated by lymphoid network connection. This implies that a portion of reservoir lymphoid tissues to which drug is not sufficiently delivered would inhibit HIV eradication despite of extensive drug injection.

  19. Gender differences in HIV risk behaviors among young injectors and their social network members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Susanne B; Hyde, Justeen; De Rosa, Christine Johnson; Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Ennett, Susan; Harvey, S Marie; Clatts, Michael; Iverson, Ellen; Kipke, Michele D

    2002-01-01

    Using epidemiological and social network research methods, this study examines gender differences in HIV risk and protective behaviors and social network characteristics among 193 young injection drug users (IDUs) and 127 referred members of their social networks. Respondents reported on their drug use, sexual behavior, and relationships within three types of social networks: hang out (i.e., friendship); drug use; and sexual networks. Most respondents were homeless and had experienced numerous life stressors. Females' social networks consisted more predominantly of drug injectors, and members more frequently appeared multiple networks. Females reported needle sharing more frequently than males, but also reported more protective behaviors such as needle exchange use and carrying clean syringes. Young female IDUs may compound their risk by having sex and injecting with higher risk partners. However, their propensity to practice protective behaviors may provide an opening for interventions to reduce their HIV risk and that of their social network members.

  20. Social networks of older adults living with HIV in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Nuno Ribeiro; Kylmä, Jari; Kirsi, Tapio; Pereira, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the social networks of older adults living with HIV. Interviews were conducted with nine individuals aged 50 or older living with HIV in Helsinki, Finland. Analysis of transcripts was analysed by inductive qualitative content analysis. Results indicated that these participants' networks tended to be large, including those both aware and unaware of the participants' health status. Analysis identified three main themes: large multifaceted social networks, importance of a support group, and downsizing of social networks. Support received appeared to be of great importance in coping with their health condition, especially since the time of diagnosis. Friends and family were the primary source of informal support. The majority of participants relied mostly on friends, some of whom were HIV-positive. Formal support came primarily from the HIV organisation's support group. In this study group, non-disclosure did not impact participants' well-being. In years to come, social networks of older adults living with HIV may shrink due to personal reasons other than HIV-disclosure. What is of primary importance is that healthcare professionals become knowledgeable about psychosocial issues of older adults living with HIV, identifying latent problems and developing adequate interventions in the early stages of the disease; this would help prevent social isolation and foster successful ageing with HIV.

  1. Regional Network on HIV/AIDS, Rural Livelihoods and Food ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Launched in 2001, the Regional Network on HIV/AIDS, Rural Livelihoods and Food Security (RENEWAL) is a growing network of networks made up of national food and nutrition organizations (public, private and nongovernmental) and partners in AIDS and public health. RENEWAL aims to understand and facilitate a ...

  2. Complex networks and agent-based models of HIV epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we explore the limits of multi-scale models by looking into the HIV data present at different scales (from molecular and cellular to epidemiological scales). We build data-driven models and perform network analysis in order to understand the dynamics of HIV epidemic at different

  3. Pilot Integration of HIV Screening and Healthcare Settings with Multi- Component Social Network and Partner Testing for HIV Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentz, Michael F; Ruffner, Andrew H; Ancona, Rachel M; Hart, Kimberly W; Kues, John R; Barczak, Christopher M; Lindsell, Christopher J; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Lyons, Michael S

    2017-11-23

    Healthcare settings screen broadly for HIV. Public health settings use social network and partner testing ("Transmission Network Targeting (TNT)") to select high-risk individuals based on their contacts. HIV screening and TNT systems are not integrated, and healthcare settings have not implemented TNT. The study aimed to evaluate pilot implementation of multi-component, multi-venue TNT in conjunction with HIV screening by a healthcare setting. Our urban, academic health center implemented a TNT program in collaboration with the local health department for five months during 2011. High-risk or HIV positive patients of the infectious diseases clinic and emergency department HIV screening program were recruited to access social and partner networks via compensated peer-referral, testing of companions present with them, and partner notification services. Contacts became the next-generation index cases in a snowball recruitment strategy. The pilot TNT program yielded 485 HIV tests for 482 individuals through eight generations of recruitment with five (1.0%; 95% CI = 0.4%, 2.3%) new diagnoses. Of these, 246 (51.0%; 95% CI = 46.6%, 55.5%) reported that they had not been tested for HIV within the last 12 months and 383 (79.5%; 95% CI = 75.7%, 82.9%) had not been tested by the existing ED screening program within the last five years. TNT complements population screening by more directly targeting high-risk individuals and by expanding the population receiving testing. Information from existing healthcare services could be used to seed TNT programs, or TNT could be implemented within healthcare settings. Research evaluating multi-component, multi-venue HIV detection is necessary to maximize complementary approaches while minimizing redundancy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. International research networks in pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, Uwe; Rake, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge production and scientific research have become increasingly more collaborative and international, particularly in pharmaceuticals. We analyze this tendency in general and tie formation in international research networks on the country level in particular. Based on a unique dataset...... of scientific publications related to pharmaceutical research and applying social network analysis, we find that both the number of countries and their connectivity increase in almost all disease group specific networks. The cores of the networks consist of high income OECD countries and remain rather stable...

  5. The emergence and evolution of the research fronts in HIV/AIDS research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Ortiz, David; Lopez-Cervantes, Malaquias; Duran, Luis; Dumontier, Michel; Lara, Miguel; Ochoa, Hector; Castano, Victor M

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have identified and analyzed the emergence, structure and dynamics of the paradigmatic research fronts that established the fundamentals of the biomedical knowledge on HIV/AIDS. A search of papers with the identifiers "HIV/AIDS", "Human Immunodeficiency Virus", "HIV-1" and "Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome" in the Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), was carried out. A citation network of those papers was constructed. Then, a sub-network of the papers with the highest number of inter-citations (with a minimal in-degree of 28) was selected to perform a combination of network clustering and text mining to identify the paradigmatic research fronts and analyze their dynamics. Thirteen research fronts were identified in this sub-network. The biggest and oldest front is related to the clinical knowledge on the disease in the patient. Nine of the fronts are related to the study of specific molecular structures and mechanisms and two of these fronts are related to the development of drugs. The rest of the fronts are related to the study of the disease at the cellular level. Interestingly, the emergence of these fronts occurred in successive "waves" over the time which suggest a transition in the paradigmatic focus. The emergence and evolution of the biomedical fronts in HIV/AIDS research is explained not just by the partition of the problem in elements and interactions leading to increasingly specialized communities, but also by changes in the technological context of this health problem and the dramatic changes in the epidemiological reality of HIV/AIDS that occurred between 1993 and 1995.

  6. Size matters: concurrency and the epidemic potential of HIV in small networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bohme Carnegie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Generalized heterosexual epidemics are responsible for the largest share of the global burden of HIV. These occur in populations that do not have high rates of partner acquisition, and research suggests that a pattern of fewer, but concurrent, partnerships may be the mechanism that provides the connectivity necessary for sustained transmission. We examine how network size affects the impact of concurrency on network connectivity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use a stochastic network model to generate a sample of networks, varying the size of the network and the level of concurrency, and compare the largest components for each scenario to the asymptotic expected values. While the threshold for the growth of a giant component does not change, the transition is more gradual in the smaller networks. As a result, low levels of concurrency generate more connectivity in small networks. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Generalized HIV epidemics are by definition those that spread to a larger fraction of the population, but the mechanism may rely in part on the dynamics of transmission in a set of linked small networks. Examples include rural populations in sub-Saharan Africa and segregated minority populations in the US, where the effective size of the sexual network may well be in the hundreds, rather than thousands. Connectivity emerges at lower levels of concurrency in smaller networks, but these networks can still be disconnected with small changes in behavior. Concurrency remains a strategic target for HIV combination prevention programs in this context.

  7. What is a Therapeutic HIV Vaccine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find HIV Treatment Services HIV and Mental Health HIV and Nutrition and Food Safety Print This Fact Sheet Entire Series Related Content AIDSource | Vaccine Research HIV Vaccine Trials Network Need Help? Call 1-800- ...

  8. HIV/AIDS, social capital, and online social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drushel, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    The prospects for online social networks as sites of information-gathering and affiliation for persons with AIDS and others concerned about HIV/AIDS not only represent the latest development in a trend toward circumventing traditional media and official information sources, but also may offer hope for a revitalization of HIV/AIDS discourse in the public sphere. This article provides an overview of three decades of information-seeking on the pandemic and its social and personal implications, as well as case studies of three examples of social networking surrounding HIV/AIDS. It finds preliminary evidence of the formation of strong and weak ties as described in Social Network Theory and suggests that the online accumulation of social capital by opinion leaders could facilitate dissemination of messages on HIV/AIDS awareness and testing.

  9. Action Research as a Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    and the different roles I occupied. To better understand the complex nature of collaboration found within action research projects, I propose conceptualizing action research as a network. The network framework directs our attention to the collective production and the conditions through which roles......This paper explores roles and interventions in IS action research. I draw upon a four-year research project about electronic medical records, conducted in close collaboration with a community partner. Following a self-reflexive stance, I trace the trajectory of the research engagement...... and interventions come to exist. Thus, interventions and roles can be seen as network effects—they are enacted and supported by the network. Accordingly, roles and interventions are neither simply static and fixed nor fluid and flexible; rather, these are products of past and present attachments. I demonstrate how...

  10. Research Award: Informaon and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC's Informaon and Networks (I&N) program is seeking a Research Awardee for 2014. The growth of networked technologies has created new opportunies for advancing human development in developing countries. Greater access to the Internet and mobile phones has led to a series of unique and ...

  11. Network Firewall Dynamics and the Subsaturation Stabilization of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Khan

    2013-01-01

    individuals engaging in risk acts over a period of 15 years. The model’s parameters are based on analyses of data collected in prior studies of the real-world risk networks of people who inject drugs (PWID in New York City. Analysis of system trajectories reveals the structural mechanisms by which individuals with mature HIV infections tend to partition the network into homogeneous clusters (with respect to infection status and how uninfected clusters remain relatively stable (with respect to infection status over long stretches of time. We confirm the spontaneous emergence of network firewalls in the system and reveal their structural role in the nonspreading of HIV.

  12. Action Research as a Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores roles and interventions in IS action research. I draw upon a four-year research project about electronic medical records, conducted in close collaboration with a community partner. Following a self-reflexive stance, I trace the trajectory of the research engagement...... and the different roles I occupied. To better understand the complex nature of collaboration found within action research projects, I propose conceptualizing action research as a network. The network framework directs our attention to the collective production and the conditions through which roles...... this influences the researcher’s agency....

  13. Will HIV vaccination reshape HIV risk behavior networks? A social network analysis of drug users' anticipated risk compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, April M; Halgin, Daniel S; DiClemente, Ralph J; Sterk, Claire E; Havens, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    An HIV vaccine could substantially impact the epidemic. However, risk compensation (RC), or post-vaccination increase in risk behavior, could present a major challenge. The methodology used in previous studies of risk compensation has been almost exclusively individual-level in focus, and has not explored how increased risk behavior could affect the connectivity of risk networks. This study examined the impact of anticipated HIV vaccine-related RC on the structure of high-risk drug users' sexual and injection risk network. A sample of 433 rural drug users in the US provided data on their risk relationships (i.e., those involving recent unprotected sex and/or injection equipment sharing). Dyad-specific data were collected on likelihood of increasing/initiating risk behavior if they, their partner, or they and their partner received an HIV vaccine. Using these data and social network analysis, a "post-vaccination network" was constructed and compared to the current network on measures relevant to HIV transmission, including network size, cohesiveness (e.g., diameter, component structure, density), and centrality. Participants reported 488 risk relationships. Few reported an intention to decrease condom use or increase equipment sharing (4% and 1%, respectively). RC intent was reported in 30 existing risk relationships and vaccination was anticipated to elicit the formation of five new relationships. RC resulted in a 5% increase in risk network size (n = 142 to n = 149) and a significant increase in network density. The initiation of risk relationships resulted in the connection of otherwise disconnected network components, with the largest doubling in size from five to ten. This study demonstrates a new methodological approach to studying RC and reveals that behavior change following HIV vaccination could potentially impact risk network connectivity. These data will be valuable in parameterizing future network models that can determine if network-level change

  14. Gigabit Network Communications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-31

    DARTnet of multi-part music synchronized using the protocol. ISI served as an endpoint for a distributed music demonstration; we performed one of the...34Portable DUAs", USC/ISI, October 1992. RFC 1374: Renwick, J., and A. Nicholson, "IP and ARP on HIPPI ", Cray Research Inc., October 1992. RFC 1375

  15. Research nodes and networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Schwarz, Annette Winkel; Find, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the spatial distribution and connectivity of scientific research, using linkages between academic units (institutions and business)to assess the relative weight of the worlds metropolitan regions. The findings support Richard Floridas assertion that the world is "spiky" rather than flat...

  16. Open Research Networking Gadgets (ORNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Eric; Turner, Brian; Chatterjee, Anirvan; Yuan, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, UCSF embarked on a journey to utilize industry-backed application standards to extend our research networking tool of choice, Profiles, into a software platform. The goal of this work was to bring extended data and functionality to our researchers' online environment and make it easier to share independently-developed software innovations with others. We used the OpenSocial standard to achieve these ends. In 2012 we extended the OpenSocial standard to support RDF and the VIVO Ontology in an effort titled "Open Research Network Gadgets" or ORNG. Our work has been adopted by two major academic open source research networking tools - Harvard Catalyst Profiles and VIVO, and the ORNG standard is now available for use by the 50+ institutions that use recent versions of the two software products.

  17. Clinical research in HIV-1 infected children

    OpenAIRE

    Fraaij, Pieter

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAcquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was described for the first time in 1981. Two years later the previously unknown human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified as the causative agent. HIV has been included in the genus Lent/viruses of the Retroviridae family. Two types are recognized: HIV-1 and HIV-2. Of these, HIV-1 is the primary etiologic agent of the current pandemic. HIV probably originates from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) which is endemic in African mon...

  18. Research, Boundaries, and Policy in Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book presents cutting-edge, peer reviewed research on networked learning organized by three themes: policy in networked learning, researching networked learning, and boundaries in networked learning. The "policy in networked learning" section explores networked learning in relation to policy...

  19. Research nodes and networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Schwarz, Annette Winkel; Find, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the spatial distribution and connectivity of scientific research, using linkages between academic units (institutions and business)to assess the relative weight of the worlds metropolitan regions. The findings support Richard Floridas assertion that the world is "spiky" rather than flat......, and that the scientific world is even spikier that other spatial configurations. It is shown that there is a great deal of path dependence in the spatial structure of science, with northwestern Europe and north America hosting most of the leading creative metropolitan regions. But there is also a disimination tendency...

  20. Stakeholder Engagement in HIV Cure Research: Lessons Learned from Other HIV Interventions and the Way Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Carissa; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Excler, Jean-Louis; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clinical and basic science advances have raised considerable hope for achieving an HIV cure by accelerating research. This research is dominated primarily by issues about the nature and design of current and future clinical trials. Stakeholder engagement for HIV cure remains in its early stages. Our analysis examines timing and mechanisms of historical stakeholder engagement in other HIV research areas for HIV-uninfected individuals [vaccine development and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)], and HIV-infected individuals (treatment as prevention, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and treatment of acute HIV infection) and articulate a plan for HIV cure stakeholder engagement. The experience from HIV vaccine development shows that early engagement of stakeholders helped manage expectations, mitigating the failure of several vaccine trials, while paving the way for subsequent trials. The relatively late engagement of HIV stakeholders in PrEP research may partly explain some of the implementation challenges. The treatment-related stakeholder engagement was strong and community-led from the onset and helped translation from research to implementation. We outline five steps to initiate and sustain stakeholder engagement in HIV cure research and conclude that stakeholder engagement represents a key investment in which stakeholders mutually agree to share knowledge, benefits, and risk of failure. Effective stakeholder engagement prevents misconceptions. As HIV cure research advances from early trials involving subjects with generally favorable prognosis to studies involving greater risk and uncertainty, success may depend on early and deliberate engagement of stakeholders. PMID:26061668

  1. Research Program of Adolescent HIV Prevention Strategies | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In Africa, HIV is having a devastating impact on young people. Globally, youth aged 15 to 24 account for almost one third of all new infections. There are unique challenges to implementing adolescent-friendly policies and HIV prevention programs. More research is needed to inform HIV prevention strategies focusing on ...

  2. Research Program of Adolescent HIV Prevention Strategies | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In Africa, HIV is having a devastating impact on young people. Globally, youth aged 15 to 24 account for almost one third of all new infections. There are unique challenges to implementing adolescent-friendly policies and HIV prevention programs. More research is needed to inform HIV prevention strategies focusing on ...

  3. Exploring Social Networking Technologies as Tools for HIV Prevention for Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramallo, Jorge; Kidder, Thomas; Albritton, Tashuna; Blick, Gary; Pachankis, John; Grandelski, Valen; Grandeleski, Valen; Kershaw, Trace

    2015-08-01

    Social networking technologies are influential among men who have sex with men (MSM) and may be an important strategy for HIV prevention. We conducted focus groups with HIV positive and negative participants. Almost all participants used social networking sites to meet new friends and sexual partners. The main obstacle to effective HIV prevention campaigns in social networking platforms was stigmatization based on homosexuality as well as HIV status. Persistent stigma associated with HIV status and disclosure was cited as a top reason for avoiding HIV-related conversations while meeting new partners using social technologies. Further, social networking sites have different social etiquettes and rules that may increase HIV risk by discouraging HIV status disclosure. Overall, successful interventions for MSM using social networking technologies must consider aspects of privacy, stigma, and social norms in order to enact HIV reduction among MSM.

  4. Advancing research and practice in HIV and rehabilitation: a framework of research priorities in HIV, disability and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Ibáñez-Carrasco, Francisco; Solomon, Patricia; Harding, Richard; Cattaneo, Jessica; Chegwidden, William; Gahagan, Jacqueline; Baxter, Larry; Worthington, Catherine; Gayle, Patriic; Merritt, Brenda; Baltzer-Turje, Rosalind; Iku, Nkem; Zack, Elisse

    2014-12-31

    HIV increasingly is experienced as a complex chronic illness where individuals are living longer with a range of physical, cognitive, mental and social health-related challenges associated with HIV, comorbidities and aging, a concept that may be termed 'disability'. Rehabilitation such as physical therapy and occupational therapy can help address disability and has the potential to improve quality of life in people living with HIV. Hence, the role for rehabilitation in the context of HIV, aging and comorbidities is emerging. Our aim was to establish a framework of research priorities in HIV, disability and rehabilitation. We convened people living with HIV, clinicians, researchers, service providers, representatives from community-based organizations and policy and funding stakeholders to participate in the first International Forum on HIV and Rehabilitation Research. We conducted a multi-stakeholder consultation to identify current and emerging issues in HIV, disability and rehabilitation. Data were collated and analyzed using content analytical techniques. Ninety-two participants attended the Forum from Canada, United Kingdom (UK), Ireland and the United States. Situated within three overarching themes (episodic health and disability across the life course; rehabilitation; and methodological advances), the Framework of Research Priorities in HIV, Disability and Rehabilitation includes six research priorities: 1) episodic health and disability; 2) aging with HIV across the life course; 3) concurrent health conditions; 4) access to rehabilitation and models of rehabilitation service provision; 5) effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions; and 6) enhancing outcome measurement in HIV and rehabilitation research. The Framework includes methodological considerations and environmental and personal contextual factors (or lenses) through which to approach research in the field. Knowledge translation should be implemented throughout the development and application of

  5. Migration, sexual networks, and HIV in Agbogbloshie, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassels, Susan; Jenness, Samuel M.; Biney, Adriana A. E.; Ampofo, William Kwabena; Dodoo, F. Nii-Amoo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND HIV is spread through structured sexual networks, which are influenced by migration patterns, but network-oriented studies of mobility and HIV risk behavior have been limited. OBJECTIVE We present a comprehensive description and initial results from our Migration & HIV in Ghana (MHG) study in Agbogbloshie, an urban slum area within Accra, Ghana. METHODS The MHG study was a population-based cross-sectional study of adults aged 18–49 in Agbogbloshie in 2012. We used a one-year retrospective relationship history calendar to collect egocentric network data on sexual partners as well as migration and short-term mobility, and tested for prevalent HIV-1/2 infection. RESULTS HIV prevalence was 5.5%, with prevalence among women (7.2%) over twice that of men (2.8%). Three-quarters of residents were born outside the Greater Accra region, but had lived in Agbogbloshie an average of 10.7 years. Only 7% had moved housing structures within the past year. However, short-term mobility was common. Residents had an average of 7.3 overnight trips in the last year, with women reporting more travel than men. Thirty-seven percent of men and 9% of women reported more than one sexual partner in the last year. CONCLUSIONS Population-based surveys of migration and sexual risk behavior using relationship history calendars in low-resource settings can produce high quality data. Residents in Agbogbloshie are disproportionately affected by HIV, and have high levels of short-term mobility. HIV prevention interventions targeted to highly mobile populations in high prevalence settings may have far-reaching and long-term implications. PMID:25364298

  6. Research into Queueing Network Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    recomposition , and stretching) that have been considered in queueing networks map arrival processes that are Markov renewal processes into other...research under this contract are marked by a double asterik(**). Other references are to work cited in the body of the report and are not ideas

  7. HIV and health systems: research to bridge the divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Margaret E

    2011-08-01

    Concern that HIV programs in low-income countries may strain weak health systems and undermine achievement of other priority health goals has resulted in a research agenda focused on measuring the effects of past HIV investments on non-HIV services and outcomes. However, this research has limited value for informing future health policies and programs, which increasingly view health systems as the common platform for delivery of HIV and other health services. These policies reflect a shift in the framing of HIV care and treatment from emergency response to routine health service. In this paradigm, relevant areas for research are strengthening, scaling, and sustaining health systems in low-income countries to reduce all-cause mortality and morbidity, including deaths from HIV. To build an evidence base to support current and future health systems and policy, researchers need to move from retrospective studies to prospective research and adopt innovative study designs and analytic methods.

  8. The Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzemer, William L; Méndez, Marta Rivero; Portillo, Carmen; Padilla, Geraldine; Cuca, Yvette; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the partnership between the schools of nursing at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Puerto Rico to address the need for nursing research on HIV/AIDS health disparities. The partnership led to the creation of the Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities with funding from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research. We provide background information on the disproportionate impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on racial and ethnic minorities, describe the major predictors of health disparities in persons at risk for or diagnosed with HIV/AIDS using the Outcomes Model for Health Care Research, and outline the major components of the Nursing Research Center. The center's goal is to improve health outcomes for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS by enhancing the knowledge base for HIV/AIDS care.

  9. Network Penetration Testing and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brandon F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will focus the on research and testing done on penetrating a network for security purposes. This research will provide the IT security office new methods of attacks across and against a company's network as well as introduce them to new platforms and software that can be used to better assist with protecting against such attacks. Throughout this paper testing and research has been done on two different Linux based operating systems, for attacking and compromising a Windows based host computer. Backtrack 5 and BlackBuntu (Linux based penetration testing operating systems) are two different "attacker'' computers that will attempt to plant viruses and or NASA USRP - Internship Final Report exploits on a host Windows 7 operating system, as well as try to retrieve information from the host. On each Linux OS (Backtrack 5 and BlackBuntu) there is penetration testing software which provides the necessary tools to create exploits that can compromise a windows system as well as other operating systems. This paper will focus on two main methods of deploying exploits 1 onto a host computer in order to retrieve information from a compromised system. One method of deployment for an exploit that was tested is known as a "social engineering" exploit. This type of method requires interaction from unsuspecting user. With this user interaction, a deployed exploit may allow a malicious user to gain access to the unsuspecting user's computer as well as the network that such computer is connected to. Due to more advance security setting and antivirus protection and detection, this method is easily identified and defended against. The second method of exploit deployment is the method mainly focused upon within this paper. This method required extensive research on the best way to compromise a security enabled protected network. Once a network has been compromised, then any and all devices connected to such network has the potential to be compromised as well. With a compromised

  10. HIV-1 Induced CNS Dysfunction: Current Overview and Research Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jeymohan; Colosi, Deborah A; Rao, Vasudev R

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the clinical presentation of HIV infection of the Central Nervous System (CNS) has evolved. Prior to wide spread use of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), more than a third of infected individuals exhibited a range of neurocognitive and motor deficits that frequently progressed to severe dementia and paralysis. However, the use of ART has significantly decreased the prevalence of severe forms of HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Studies of neurocognitive dysfunction have reported variable prevalence, ranging from 21% to 77.6%, defined primarily by mild to moderate neurocognitive impairment. HIV-associated chronic inflammation and associated neurotoxicity of long term ART, as well as the aging of the HIV-infected population, likely influence the pathogenesis of HAND. Despite significant research efforts directed towards a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying HIV neuropathogenesis, definitive causal pathophysiology of HAND and thus effective prevention or treatment remain elusive. Furthermore, HIV therapeutic research now includes efforts to effect a cure, by eliminating or silencing HIV within infected cells, which must include efforts to target the latently infected cells within the CNS. Prevention and treatment of the neurological complications of HIV, and eradication of persistent virus from the CNS compartment are major priorities for the HIV-CNS research. Here we give an overview of the progress of research on HIV-CNS disease, define new challenges and research areas, and highlight domestic and global priorities.

  11. The California HIV/AIDS Research Program: History, Impact, and HIV Cure Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb Stanga, Lisa; Mujeeb, Anwer; Packel, Laura; Martz, Tyler; Lemp, George

    2017-08-29

    This Special Issue of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses features results from the HIV Cure Initiative, funded by the California HIV/AIDS Research Program (CHRP). As a publicly-funded grant maker, CHRP has served for more than three decades as a unique resource for innovative researchers in California whose work seeks to address all aspects of the HIV epidemic and the communities affected by it. Early initiatives at CHRP pioneered what would become enduring cornerstones of HIV science: isolation of the virus; efficacy and toxicities of the first HIV treatments; the emergence of drug resistance; the first biospecimen banks for HIV-related research; the first community-based laboratory service for HIV diagnostic serology; and the first population-based longitudinal cohort study of persons living with HIV - The Gay Men's Health Study. More recently, CHRP-funded conceptual studies of zinc finger nuclease-mediated disruption of CCR5 genomic sequences and the safety of solid organ transplantation for HIV-positive patients have progressed from brilliant ideas to clinical realities, and CHRP is currently funding the first multisite trial of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis for transgender persons in the U.S. The present article outlines the founding of CHRP, our current grantmaking process, and our impact on HIV research over time. In 2013, CHRP launched a new initiative aimed at moving the then nascent area of HIV cure science forward: the CHRP HIV Cure Initiative provided over $1.4 million to multiple basic biomedical research projects, and their results are presented in this Special Issue.

  12. Evidence of social network influence on multiple HIV risk behaviors and normative beliefs among young Tanzanian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulawa, Marta; Yamanis, Thespina J; Hill, Lauren M; Balvanz, Peter; Kajula, Lusajo J; Maman, Suzanne

    2016-03-01

    Research on network-level influences on HIV risk behaviors among young men in sub-Saharan Africa is severely lacking. One significant gap in the literature that may provide direction for future research with this population is understanding the degree to which various HIV risk behaviors and normative beliefs cluster within men's social networks. Such research may help us understand which HIV-related norms and behaviors have the greatest potential to be changed through social influence. Additionally, few network-based studies have described the structure of social networks of young men in sub-Saharan Africa. Understanding the structure of men's peer networks may motivate future research examining the ways in which network structures shape the spread of information, adoption of norms, and diffusion of behaviors. We contribute to filling these gaps by using social network analysis and multilevel modeling to describe a unique dataset of mostly young men (n = 1249 men and 242 women) nested within 59 urban social networks in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We examine the means, ranges, and clustering of men's HIV-related normative beliefs and behaviors. Networks in this urban setting varied substantially in both composition and structure and a large proportion of men engaged in risky behaviors including inconsistent condom use, sexual partner concurrency, and intimate partner violence perpetration. We found significant clustering of normative beliefs and risk behaviors within these men's social networks. Specifically, network membership explained between 5.78 and 7.17% of variance in men's normative beliefs and between 1.93 and 15.79% of variance in risk behaviors. Our results suggest that social networks are important socialization sites for young men and may influence the adoption of norms and behaviors. We conclude by calling for more research on men's social networks in Sub-Saharan Africa and map out several areas of future inquiry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  13. Evidence of social network influence on multiple HIV risk behaviors and normative beliefs among young Tanzanian men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulawa, Marta; Yamanis, Thespina J.; Hill, Lauren; Balvanz, Peter; Kajula, Lusajo J.; Maman, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Research on network-level influences on HIV risk behaviors among young men in sub-Saharan Africa is severely lacking. One significant gap in the literature that may provide direction for future research with this population is understanding the degree to which various HIV risk behaviors and normative beliefs cluster within men’s social networks. Such research may help us understand which HIV-related norms and behaviors have the greatest potential to be changed through social influence. Additionally, few network-based studies have described the structure of social networks of young men in sub-Saharan Africa. Understanding the structure of men’s peer networks may motivate future research examining the ways in which network structures shape the spread of information, adoption of norms, and diffusion of behaviors. We contribute to filling these gaps by using social network analysis and multilevel modeling to describe a unique dataset of mostly young men (n= 1,249 men and 242 women) nested within 59 urban social networks in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We examine the means, ranges, and clustering of men’s HIV-related normative beliefs and behaviors. Networks in this urban setting varied substantially in both composition and structure and a large proportion of men engaged in risky behaviors including inconsistent condom use, sexual partner concurrency, and intimate partner violence perpetration. We found significant clustering of normative beliefs and risk behaviors within these men’s social networks. Specifically, network membership explained between 5.78 and 7.17% of variance in men’s normative beliefs and between 1.93 and 15.79% of variance in risk behaviors. Our results suggest that social networks are important socialization sites for young men and may influence the adoption of norms and behaviors. We conclude by calling for more research on men’s social networks in Sub-Saharan Africa and map out several areas of future inquiry. PMID:26874081

  14. Combining social and genetic networks to study HIV transmission in mixing risk groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Prosperi, M.C.F.; Belleman, R.G.; Di Giambenedetto, S.; Fabbiani, M.; De Luca, A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of HIV transmission networks is important for understanding and preventing the spread of the virus and drug resistant variants. Mixing risk groups is important in network analysis of HIV in order to assess the role of transmission between risk groups in the HIV epidemic. Most of the

  15. How Parental HIV Affects Children. Research Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAND Corporation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The shadow cast by HIV reaches beyond individuals diagnosed with the condition. It touches the lives of family members, friends, coworkers, and many others. One group in particular that feels these effects keenly is the children of HIV-positive parents. With improved treatments that have extended the life expectancies of HIV-infected people and…

  16. Social networks and mental health among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odek, Willis Omondi

    2014-01-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) in developing countries can live longer due to improved treatment access, and a deeper understanding of determinants of their quality of life is critical. This study assessed the link between social capital, operationally defined in terms of social networks (group-based and personal social networks) and access to network resources (access to material and non-material resources and social support) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among 554 (55% female) adults on HIV treatment through South Africa's public health system. Female study participants were involved with more group-based social networks but had fewer personal social networks in comparison to males. Access to network resources was higher among females and those from larger households but lower among older study participants. Experience of social support significantly increased with household economic status and duration at current residence. Social capital indicators were unrelated to HIV disease status indicators, including duration since diagnosis, CD4 count and viral load. Only a minority (13%) of study participants took part in groups formed by and for predominantly PLHIV (HIV support groups), and participation in such groups was unrelated to their mental or physical health. Personal rather than group-linked social networks and access to network resources were significantly associated with mental but not physical health, after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. The findings of limited participation in HIV support groups and that the participation in such groups was not significantly associated with physical or mental health may suggest efforts among PLHIV in South Africa to normalise HIV as a chronic illness through broad-based rather than HIV-status bounded social participation, as a strategy for deflecting stigma. Further research is required to examine the effects of HIV treatment on social networking and participation

  17. Research findings are catalyst to nationwide rollout of HIV ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-27

    Apr 27, 2016 ... Research findings are catalyst to nationwide rollout of HIV prevention program in Botswana. April 27 ... The research found that gender violence, regressive views of gender hierarchy, economic dependence, and substance or alcohol abuse all lead to choice disability when it comes to HIV/AIDS prevention.

  18. Bridging the social and the biomedical: engaging the social and political sciences in HIV research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippax, Susan C; Holt, Martin; Friedman, Samuel R

    2011-09-27

    This supplement to the Journal of the International AIDS Society focuses on the engagement of the social and political sciences within HIV research and, in particular, maintaining a productive relationship between social and biomedical perspectives on HIV. It responds to a number of concerns raised primarily by social scientists, but also recognized as important by biomedical and public health researchers. These concerns include how best to understand the impact of medical technologies (such as HIV treatments, HIV testing, viral load testing, male circumcision, microbicides, and pre-and post-exposure prophylaxis) on sexual cultures, drug practices, relationships and social networks in different cultural, economic and political contexts. The supplement is also concerned with how we might examine the relationship between HIV prevention and treatment, understand the social and political mobilization required to tackle HIV, and sustain the range of disciplinary approaches needed to inform and guide responses to the global pandemic. The six articles included in the supplement demonstrate the value of fostering high quality social and political research to inform, guide and challenge our collaborative responses to HIV/AIDS.

  19. Limited overlap between phylogenetic HIV and hepatitis C virus clusters illustrates the dynamic sexual network structure of Dutch HIV-infected MSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhommerig, Joost W.; Bezemer, Daniela; Molenkamp, Richard; van Sighem, Ard I.; Smit, Colette; Arends, Joop E.; Lauw, Fanny N.; Brinkman, Kees; Rijnders, Bart J.; Newsum, Astrid M.; Bruisten, Sylvia M.; Prins, Maria; van der Meer, Jan T.; van de Laar, Thijs J.; Schinkel, Janke

    2017-01-01

    Objective: MSM are at increased risk for infection with HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Is HIV/HCV coinfection confined to specific HIV transmission networks? Design and methods: A HIV phylogenetic tree was constructed for 5038 HIV-1 subtype B polymerase (pol) sequences obtained from MSM in the

  20. Adolescent sexual networking and HIV transmission in rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konde-Lule, J K; Sewankambo, N; Morris, M

    1997-01-01

    Information on 861 adolescents shows that in 1991 36 per cent reported having been sexually active in the previous 12 months, but only 6.2 per cent had ever used a condom (11% males, 2.4% females). The HIV infection rate was 5.9 per cent overall, 0.8 per cent in males and 9.9 per cent in females. The proportion sexually active and the rate of HIV infection rise with age. The annual incidence of HIV infection was 2.0 per 100 person-years of follow-up among all adolescents, 0.8 in males and 3.0 in females. The annual mortality rate among HIV-negative adolescents was 0.37 per cent versus 3.92 per cent among the HIV-positive adolescents, a rate ratio of 10.6. Sexual network data were collected on 389 adolescents aged 15-19 years of whom 55 per cent were sexually active. The median age of first sexual intercourse was 15 years in either sex. The 214 adolescents reported 339 sexual relationships of which 38.5 per cent were with spouses, 36 per cent with boy or girl friends and 21 per cent with 'friends'. There were 52 concurrent sexual relationships reported by 35 adolescents. Males report higher rates of concurrent sexual relationships than females. The sexual partners of boys were mainly younger students and housemaids while the girls' partners were mainly older traders and salaried workers. Adolescents in this community report high rates of sexual activity and have complex sexual networks. They probably are important in the dynamics of HIV infection.

  1. Biomedical HIV Prevention Research and Development in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    . Chairman, Board of Trustees, New HIV Vaccine and Microbicide Advocacy Society (NHVMAS). The research and development process for new ... research, clinical trials and programmatic interventions, to ensure that the most infected and.

  2. A journey to HIV prevention research: From social psychology to social health via multidisciplinarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippax, Susan

    2017-05-01

    This article is a personal account of my research in HIV prevention and how and why I navigated my way from social psychology to 'social health' via multidisciplinarity. My work in HIV prevention - from 1984 to the present day - developed my understandings of epistemology, building on and expanding the ways in which I undertook research. This article describes those whose writings and research influenced me and the input of colleagues and students. It also demonstrates my disquiet with the individualism of psychology as a way of thinking about what was needed to prevent HIV transmission. HIV prevention requires social transformation and such change is produced via changes in the social practices and social norms of communities and networks rather than by changes in the behaviours of individuals. While the input of social and biomedical scientists was and continues to be of central importance to the success of HIV prevention, so also is the input of the expertise of the members of the communities and networks most affected by HIV - collectivities of gay men, people who inject drugs and sex workers. It was the members of these communities and networks who collectively transformed their practices and made them safer. The article outlines the ways in which the research participants in research studies made me re-examine notions of knowledge and evidence. Over time, my colleagues and I developed a 'social health': a model of social transformation that involves enabling communities and their members to modify their social practices by building on emergent community responses, responses that were identified by the use of a reflexive research methodology.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Research (AIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-15

    Dermatology Microflora"(comploted) Smith RV22 Retrospective Review Gtter RV44 HIV/ Syphilis Johnson RV44 Propylthiouracil 1aCivito XV40 Chatges-Blood...follows: 1) To identify all HIV positive or HIV exposed pregnant women as early in gestation as possible and obtain blood samples in each trimester...of HZV Infection on the Clinical manifestations and Response to Treatment of Syphilis ’- This protocol had the purpose of defining the risk factors

  4. Nursing research and HIV infection: state-of-the-science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldrick, B A; Baigis, J A; Larsen, J; Lemert, J L

    2000-01-01

    To provide an update of the nursing research literature on HIV infection and to develop an HIV/AIDS database using arcs computer software. Nursing research literature from 1986 through 1997 on human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) was reviewed. With an emphasis on client-focused research, 246 studies were entered into the arcs HIV/AIDS database. Analysis of over 1,000 citations in the HIV/AIDS nursing research literature over the past decade indicated that 22% (n = 219) of the nursing studies were client- or patient-focused; 29% (n = 292) were risk-group focused; and 49% (n = 492) were provider-focused. Of the 246 studies entered into the arcs HIV/AIDS database, 88 (35.7%) were classified in the psychologic domain, 65 (26.4%) in the physiologic domain, 24 (9.7%) in the behavioral domain, and 25 (10%) in the social domain. In addition, 17 (6.9%) of the studies were classified in the quality of life domain, and 27 (10.9%) in the stage of HIV disease domain. The majority (53%) of the 246 studies (n = 131) were correlational, 86 (35%) were descriptive, and 29 (12%) had experimental or quasi-experimental designs. Although nursing studies have described some of the problems that affect HIV-infected people, further research is needed, particularly related to clinical interventions.

  5. History, current issues and future of the brazilian network for attending and studying Trypanosoma cruzi/HIV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Júnior, Alberto Novaes; Correia, Dalmo; Almeida, Eros Antônio; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida

    2010-11-24

    In countries with endemic Chagas disease, coinfection involving Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV is expected to become more frequent. There is a clear need to structure a comprehensive care network aimed at dealing with this situation, with mobilization going from primary care to care at the highest level of technological complexity. The objective of this study was to describe the Brazilian response to the challenges of Chagas disease: the history, current issues, and future of the Brazilian Network for attending and studying T. cruzi/HIV coinfection. This descriptive study reviewed technical documents relating to the basis and structuring process of the Brazilian network for attending and studying T. cruzi/HIV coinfection. The process of setting up the network was marked by technical and political debates in technical-scientific meetings going back to the 1990s. This process made it possible to expand and focus on different aspects of comprehensive care for Chagas disease in Brazil, regardless of the associated immunosuppressive conditions. These meetings produced a structure of national technical guidelines and standards, health care and research protocols and research priorities, along with mobilization and awareness-raising among HIV/AIDS reference centers regarding occurrences of coinfection. The creation of the Brazilian network was a milestone for the country in terms of integration of control programs, with the reference point of quality of care and comprehensiveness. The possibility of extending this network to form a Latin American network is seen as a strategy for dealing more effectively with this condition.

  6. National research and education network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor, Tony

    1991-01-01

    Some goals of this network are as follows: Extend U.S. technological leadership in high performance computing and computer communications; Provide wide dissemination and application of the technologies both to the speed and the pace of innovation and to serve the national economy, national security, education, and the global environment; and Spur gains in the U.S. productivity and industrial competitiveness by making high performance computing and networking technologies an integral part of the design and production process. Strategies for achieving these goals are as follows: Support solutions to important scientific and technical challenges through a vigorous R and D effort; Reduce the uncertainties to industry for R and D and use of this technology through increased cooperation between government, industry, and universities and by the continued use of government and government funded facilities as a prototype user for early commercial HPCC products; and Support underlying research, network, and computational infrastructures on which U.S. high performance computing technology is based.

  7. Southern African Development Research Network | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will build on lessons learned from an earlier IDRC-supported effort, the Southern African Trade Research Network (SATRN), funded under project 100816. The grant will support a broad-based research network, the Southern Africa Development Research Network (SADRN) with a view to filling some of the gaps ...

  8. How does investment in research training affect the development of research networks and collaborations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paina, Ligia; Ssengooba, Freddie; Waswa, Douglas; M'imunya, James M; Bennett, Sara

    2013-05-20

    Whether and how research training programs contribute to research network development is underexplored. The Fogarty International Center (FIC) has supported overseas research training programs for over two decades. FIC programs could provide an entry point in the development of research networks and collaborations. We examine whether FIC's investment in research training contributed to the development of networks and collaborations in two countries with longstanding FIC investments - Uganda and Kenya - and the factors which facilitated this process. As part of two case studies at Uganda's Makerere University and Kenya's University of Nairobi, we conducted 53 semi-structured in-depth interviews and nine focus group discussions. To expand on our case study findings, we conducted a focused bibliometric analysis on two purposively selected topic areas to examine scientific productivity and used online network illustration tools to examine the resulting network structures. FIC support made important contributions to network development. Respondents from both Uganda and Kenya confirmed that FIC programs consistently provided trainees with networking skills and exposure to research collaborations, primarily within the institutions implementing FIC programs. In both countries, networks struggled with inclusiveness, particularly in HIV/AIDS research. Ugandan respondents perceived their networks to be more cohesive than Kenyan respondents did. Network cohesiveness was positively correlated with the magnitude and longevity of FIC's programs. Support from FIC grants to local and regional research network development and networking opportunities, such as conferences, was rare. Synergies between FIC programs and research grants helped to solidify and maintain research collaborations. Networks developed where FIC's programs focused on a particular institution, there was a critical mass of trainees with similar interests, and investments for network development were available from

  9. Biomedical HIV Prevention Research and Development in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Chairman, Board of Trustees, New HIV Vaccine and Microbicide Advocacy Society (NHVMAS). The research and development process for new. HIV prevention technologies is a global enterprise and most parts of Africa, have been actively involved in the identification and development of effective methods. The new tools ...

  10. Using participatory action research to develop an HIV and Aids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using participatory action research to develop an HIV and Aids school plan. ... they were of the view that the transfer of knowledge and skills was needed to support infected and affected children more effectively in the classroom; and they experienced the need to document knowledge and skills in the form of an HIV and ...

  11. Cancer therapies in HIV cure research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Thomas A; Anderson, Jenny L; Wightman, Fiona; Lewin, Sharon R

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an overview of anticancer therapies in various stages of clinical development as potential interventions to target HIV persistence. Epigenetic drugs developed for cancer have been investigated in vitro, ex vivo and in clinical trials as interventions aimed at reversing HIV latency and depleting the amount of virus that persists on antiretroviral therapy. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors induced HIV expression in patients on antiretroviral therapy but did not reduce the frequency of infected cells. Other interventions that may accelerate the decay of latently infected cells, in the presence or absence of latency-reversing therapy, are now being explored. These include apoptosis-promoting agents, nonhistone deacetylase inhibitor compounds to reverse HIV latency and immunotherapy interventions to enhance antiviral immunity such as immune checkpoint inhibitors and Toll-like receptor agonists. A curative strategy in HIV will likely need to both reduce the amount of virus that persists on antiretroviral therapy and improve anti-HIV immune surveillance. Although we continue to explore advances in the field of oncology including cancer immunotherapy, there are major differences in the risk-benefit assessment between HIV-infected individuals and patients with malignancies. Drug development specifically targeting HIV persistence will be the key to developing effective interventions with an appropriate safety profile.

  12. Clinical research in HIV-1 infected children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.L.A. Fraaij (Pieter)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAcquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was described for the first time in 1981. Two years later the previously unknown human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified as the causative agent. HIV has been included in the genus Lent/viruses of the Retroviridae family. Two types are

  13. Using Social Network Research in HRM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaše, Robert; King, Zella; Minbaeva, Dana

    2013-01-01

    ; the impact of social networking sites on perceptions of relationships; and ethical issues in organizational network analysis, we propose specific suggestions to bring social network perspectives closer to HRM researchers and practitioners and rebalance our attention to people and to their relationships.......The article features a conversation between Rob Cross and Martin Kilduff about organizational network analysis in research and practice. It demonstrates the value of using social network perspectives in HRM. Drawing on the discussion about managing personal networks; managing the networks of others...

  14. Chain and network science: A research framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omta, S.W.F.; Trienekens, J.H.; Beers, G.

    2001-01-01

    In this first article of the Journal on Chain and Network Science the base-line is set for a discussion on contents and scope of chain and network theory. Chain and network research is clustered into four main ‘streams’: Network theory, social capital theory, supply chain management and business

  15. Modeling management of research and education networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    Computer networks and their services have become an essential part of research and education. Nowadays every modern R&E institution must have a computer network and provide network services to its students and staff. In addition to its internal computer network, every R&E institution must have a

  16. Breaking Down the Siloes: Developing Effective Multidisciplinary HIV Research Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Manya; Castel, Amanda

    2016-09-01

    As the HIV epidemic passes its 35 years mark, the role of multidisciplinary approaches to HIV research has become increasingly important. Development of diverse, cross-cutting research teams has been found to be key to engaging and retaining participants in population-based studies; it is also a crucial component of designing studies capable of examining the sensitive and nuanced issues that surround HIV related risk and adherence behavior. Expanding our understanding of these issues is central to being able to overcome them and ultimately to the development of best practices for translation of research discovery into improvements in prevention and care. The objectives of this paper are to characterize the importance of multidisciplinary teams in HIV research where they are critical to gaining information that can have a positive impact on the epidemic and to propose specific methods for creating teams to conduct research with optimal public health impact.

  17. Progress in HIV-1 antibody research using humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruell, Henning; Klein, Florian

    2017-05-01

    Recent discoveries of highly potent broadly HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies provide new opportunities to successfully prevent, treat, and potentially cure HIV-1 infection. To test their activity in vivo, humanized mice have been shown to be a powerful model and were used to investigate antibody-mediated prevention and therapy approaches. In this review, we will summarize recent findings in humanized mice that have informed on the potential use of broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting HIV-1 in humans. Humanized mouse models have been used to demonstrate the antiviral efficacy of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies in vivo. It has been shown that a combination of antibodies can suppress viremia below the limit of detection and targets the HIV-1 reservoir. Moreover, passively administered antibodies and vector-mediated antibody production protect humanized mice from HIV-1 infection. Finally, immunization studies in knock-in/transgenic mice carrying human antibody gene segments have informed on potential vaccination strategies to induce broad and potent HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Humanized mouse models are of great value for HIV-1 research. They represent a highly versatile in vivo system to investigate novel approaches for HIV-1 prevention and therapy and expedite the critical translation from basic findings to clinical application.

  18. Social norms, social networks, and HIV risk behavior among injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkin, C A; Kuramoto, S J; Davey-Rothwell, M A; Tobin, K E

    2010-10-01

    Social network structure and norms are linked to HIV risk behavior. However little is known about the gradient of norm of HIV risk that exists among social networks. We examined the association between injection risk network structure and HIV risk norms among 818 injection drug users (IDUs). IDUs were categorized into four distinct groups based on their risk behaviors with their drug networks: no network members with whom they shared cookers or needles, only cooker-sharing member, one needle-sharing member, and multiple needle-sharing members. The riskiest group, networks of multiple needle sharers, was more likely to endorse both risky needle-sharing and sex norms. Networks of only cooker sharers were less likely to endorse high-risk norms, as compared to the networks with no sharing. There were also differences based on gender. Future HIV prevention interventions for IDUs should target both injection and sex risk norms, particularly among IDUs in the multiple needle-sharing networks.

  19. Towards Multidisciplinary HIV-Cure Research: Integrating Social Science with Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Cynthia I; Ross, Anna Laura; Auerbach, Judith D; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Dubé, Karine; Tucker, Joseph D; Noseda, Veronica; Possas, Cristina; Rausch, Dianne M

    2016-01-01

    The quest for a cure for HIV remains a timely and key challenge for the HIV research community. Despite significant scientific advances, current HIV therapy regimens do not completely eliminate the negative impact of HIV on the immune system; and the economic impact of treating all people infected with HIV globally, for the duration of their lifetimes, presents significant challenges. This article discusses, from a multidisciplinary approach, critical social, behavioral, ethical, and economic issues permeating the HIV-cure research agenda. As part of a search for an HIV cure, both the perspective of patients/participants and clinical researchers should be taken into account. In addition, continued efforts should be made to involve and educate the broader community. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Towards multi-disciplinary HIV cure research: integrating social science with biomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Cynthia I; Ross, Anna Laura; Auerbach, Judith D.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Dubé, Karine; Tucker, Joseph D.; Noseda, Veronica; Possas, Cristina; Rausch, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    The quest for a cure for HIV remains a timely and key challenge for the HIV research community. Despite significant scientific advances, current HIV therapy regimens do not completely eliminate the negative impact of HIV on the immune system; and the economic impact of treating all people infected with HIV globally, for the duration of their lifetimes, presents significant challenges. This article discusses, from a multi-disciplinary approach, critical social, behavioral, ethical, and economic issues permeating the HIV cure research agenda. As part of a search for an HIV cure, both the perspective of patients/participants and clinical researchers should be taken into account. In addition, continued efforts should be made to involve and educate the broader community. PMID:26642901

  1. Rescuing policy in tourism network research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    Networks provide a powerful lens to understand complex relational entanglements that are transforming social, economic and political life. Through a discussion of the various streams of network research in tourism, this paper argues that policy matters run across and throughout these strands....... Rather than arguing for increased interest in tourism policy network research as a separate subfield, the paper argues for deeper theoretical engagement with the policy dimension in tourism network research. Researchers adopting a network ontology could gain considerable insights and open up new lines...... of inquiry into what is really going on if they engage with, unpack and critique policy and political science theories, tools, frameworks and concepts....

  2. The smart grid research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troi, Anders; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard; Larsen, Emil Mahler

    2013-01-01

    This road map is a result of part-recommendation no. 25 in ‘MAIN REPORT – The Smart Grid Network’s recommendations’, written by the Smart Grid Network for the Danish Ministry of Climate, Energy and Building in October 2011. This part-recommendation states: “Part-recommendation 25 – A road map...... for Smart Grid research, development and demonstration It is recommended that the electricity sector invite the Ministry to participate in the creation of a road map to ensure that solutions are implemented and coordinated with related policy areas. The sector should also establish a fast-acting working...... group with representatives from universities, distribution companies and the electric industry, in order to produce a mutual, binding schedule for the RDD of the Smart Grid in Denmark. Time prioritisation of part-recommendation: 2011-2012 Responsibility for implementation of part...

  3. HIV lipodystrophy case definition using artificial neural network modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidis, John P A; Trikalinos, Thomas A; Law, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A case definition of HIV lipodystrophy has recently been developed from a combination of clinical, metabolic and imaging/body composition variables using logistic regression methods. We aimed to evaluate whether artificial neural networks could improve the diagnostic accuracy. METHODS......: The database of the case-control Lipodystrophy Case Definition Study was split into 504 subjects (265 with and 239 without lipodystrophy) used for training and 284 independent subjects (152 with and 132 without lipodystrophy) used for validation. Back-propagation neural networks with one or two middle layers...... were trained and validated. Results were compared against logistic regression models using the same information. RESULTS: Neural networks using clinical variables only (41 items) achieved consistently superior performance than logistic regression in terms of specificity, overall accuracy and area under...

  4. Methodological Issues in HIV-Related Social Research in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodological Issues in HIV-Related Social Research in Nigeria. ... like sexual mores and sexuality requires much more than a straightjacket social science method, such as simply doing a cross-section study and/or using interview schedule.

  5. TB and HIV Therapeutics: Pharmacology Research Priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E. Dooley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented number of investigational drugs are in the development pipeline for the treatment of tuberculosis. Among patients with tuberculosis, co-infection with HIV is common, and concurrent treatment of tuberculosis and HIV is now the standard of care. To ensure that combinations of anti-tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals are safe and are tested at doses most likely to be effective, selected pharmacokinetic studies based on knowledge of their metabolic pathways and their capacity to induce or inhibit metabolizing enzymes of companion drugs must be conducted. Drug interaction studies should be followed up by evaluations in larger populations to evaluate safety and pharmacodynamics more fully. Involving patients with HIV in trials of TB drugs early in development enhances the knowledge gained from the trials and will ensure that promising new tuberculosis treatments are available to patients with HIV as early as possible. In this review, we summarize current and planned pharmacokinetic and drug interaction studies involving investigational and licensed tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals and suggest priorities for tuberculosis-HIV pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and drug-drug interaction studies for the future. Priority studies for children and pregnant women with HIV and tuberculosis co-infection are briefly discussed.

  6. Overcoming HIV Stigma? A Qualitative Analysis of HIV Cure Research and Stigma Among Men Who Have Sex with Men Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng; Zhang, Alice; Babbitt, Andrew; Ma, Qingyan; Eyal, Nir; Pan, Xin; Cai, Weiping; Hu, Fengyu; Cheng, Yu; Tucker, Joseph D

    2017-11-17

    Despite global progress in HIV stigma reduction, persistent HIV stigma thwarts effective HIV service delivery. Advances in HIV biomedical research toward a cure may shift perceptions of people living with HIV and HIV stigma. The purpose of this study was to examine how men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV in Guangzhou, China perceive HIV cure research and its potential impact on MSM and HIV stigma. We conducted in-depth interviews with 26 MSM living with HIV about their perceptions of HIV cure research and the potential impact of an HIV cure on their lives. Thematic coding was used to identify themes and structure the analysis. Two overarching themes emerged. First, participants stated that an HIV cure may have a limited impact on MSM-related stigma. Men noted that most stigma toward MSM was linked to stereotypes of promiscuity and high rates of sexual transmitted diseases in the MSM community and might persist even after a cure. Second, participants believed that an HIV cure could substantially reduce enacted, anticipated, and internalized stigma associated with HIV. These findings suggest that a biomedical cure alone would not remove the layered stigma facing MSM living with HIV. Comprehensive measures to reduce stigma are needed.

  7. Sexual network structure and the spread of HIV in Africa: evidence from Likoma Island, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helleringer, Stéphane; Kohler, Hans-Peter

    2007-11-12

    Whereas sexual relationships among low-risk individuals account for the majority of HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa, limited knowledge exists about the structure and characteristics of sexual networks among the general population in sub-Saharan Africa. To investigate the population-level structure of sexual networks connecting the young adult population of several villages on Likoma Island (Malawi), and analyse the structural position of HIV-positive individuals within the sexual network. A cross-sectional sociocentric survey of sexual partnerships and biomarkers of prevalent HIV infections. The study documents the existence of a large and robust sexual network linking a substantial fraction of the island's young adult population: half of all sexually active respondents were connected in a giant network component, and more than a quarter were linked through multiple independent chains of sexual relationships. This high network connectivity emerges within short time frames. The prevalence of HIV also varied significantly across the network, with sparser regions having a higher HIV prevalence than densely connected components. Several risk factors related to sexual mixing patterns help explain differentials in HIV prevalence across network locations. Contrary to claims that sexual networks in rural sub-Saharan Africa are too sparse to sustain generalized HIV epidemics, the structure of the networks observed in Likoma appears compatible with a broad diffusion of HIV among lower-risk groups. The non-homogeneous distribution of HIV infection within the network suggests that network characteristics are an important determinant of the dynamics of HIV spread within a population.

  8. Rational design of HIV vaccines and microbicides: report of the EUROPRISE network annual conference 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchtenhagen Hannes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Novel, exciting intervention strategies to prevent infection with HIV have been tested in the past year, and the field is rapidly evolving. EUROPRISE is a network of excellence sponsored by the European Commission and concerned with a wide range of activities including integrated developmental research on HIV vaccines and microbicides from discovery to early clinical trials. A central and timely theme of the network is the development of the unique concept of co-usage of vaccines and microbicides. This review, prepared by the PhD students of the network captures much of the research ongoing between the partners. The network is in its 5th year and involves over 50 institutions from 13 European countries together with 3 industrial partners; GSK, Novartis and Sanofi-Pasteur. EUROPRISE is involved in 31 separate world-wide trials of Vaccines and Microbicides including 6 in African countries (Tanzania, Mozambique, South Africa, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, and is directly supporting clinical trials including MABGEL, a gp140-hsp70 conjugate trial and HIVIS, vaccine trials in Europe and Africa.

  9. AIDS vaccine for Asia Network (AVAN: expanding the regional role in developing HIV vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Kent

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to spread and an AIDS vaccine is urgently needed. Regional alliances and international collaborations can foster the development and evaluation of the next generation of AIDS vaccine candidates. The importance of coordinating and harmonizing efforts across regional alliances has become abundantly clear. We recently formed the AIDS Vaccine for Asia Network (AVAN to help facilitate the development of a regional AIDS vaccine strategy that accelerates research and development of an AIDS vaccine through government advocacy, improved coordination, and harmonization of research; develops clinical trial and manufacturing capacity; supports ethical and regulatory frameworks; and ensures community participation.

  10. Academic social networking and research impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2015-01-01

    Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications and datasets, get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work, and to stay current with news and events in your field of interest. It gives you another place to establish your name and research and perhaps even collaborate with others. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are Research...

  11. Group Sex Events and HIV/STI Risk in an Urban Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Samuel R.; Bolyard, Melissa; Khan, Maria; Maslow, Carey; Sandoval, Milagros; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Krauss, Beatrice; Aral, Sevgi O.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe: a. the prevalence and individual and network characteristics of group sex events (GSE) and GSE attendees; and b. HIV/STI discordance among respondents who said they went to a GSE together. Methods and Design In a sociometric network study of risk partners (defined as sexual partners, persons with whom respondents attended a GSE, or drug-injection partners) in Brooklyn, NY, we recruited a high-risk sample of 465 adults. Respondents reported on GSE attendance, the characteristics of GSEs, and their own and others’ behaviors at GSEs. Sera and urines were collected and STI prevalence was assayed. Results Of the 465 participants, 36% had attended a GSE in the last year, 26% had sex during the most recent of these GSEs, and 13% had unprotected sex there. Certain subgroups (hard drug users, men who have sex with men, women who have sex with women, and sex workers) were more likely to attend and more likely to engage in risk behaviors at these events. Among 90 GSE dyads in which at least one partner named the other as someone with whom they attended a GSE in the previous three months, STI/HIV discordance was common (HSV-2: 45% of dyads, HIV: 12% of dyads, Chlamydia: 21% of dyads). Many GSEs had 10 or more participants, and multiple partnerships at GSEs were common. High attendance rates at GSEs among members of large networks may increase community vulnerability to STI/HIV, particularly since network data show that almost all members of a large sociometric risk network either had sex with a GSE attendee or had sex with someone who had sex with a GSE attended. Conclusions Self-reported GSE attendance and participation was common among this high-risk sample. STI/HIV discordance among GSE attendees was high, highlighting the potential transmission risk associated with GSEs. Research on sexual behaviors should incorporate measures of GSE behaviors as standard research protocol. Interventions should be developed to reduce transmission at GSEs. PMID

  12. Shifting the HIV Training and Research Paradigm to Address Disparities in HIV Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Julie H; Alegría, Margarita

    2016-09-01

    Tailored programs to diversify the pool of HIV/AIDS investigators and provide sufficient training and support for minority investigators to compete successfully are uncommon in the US and abroad. This paper encourages a shift in the HIV/AIDS training and research paradigm to effectively train and mentor Latino researchers in the US, Latin America and the Caribbean. We suggest three strategies to accomplish this: (1) coaching senior administrative and academic staff of HIV/AIDS training programs on the needs, values, and experiences unique to Latino investigators; (2) encouraging mentors to be receptive to a different set of research questions and approaches that Latino researchers offer due to their life experiences and perspectives; and (3) creating a virtual infrastructure to share resources and tackle challenges faced by minority researchers. Shifts in the research paradigm to include, retain, and promote Latino HIV/AIDS researchers will benefit the scientific process and the patients and communities who await the promise of HIV/AIDS research.

  13. Actor and partner effects of perceived HIV stigma on social network components among people living with HIV/AIDS and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chun; Liu, Hongjie

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have investigated the relationship between HIV stigma and social network components at the dyadic level. The objective of this study was to examine the actor and partner effects of perceived HIV stigma by people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) and their caregivers on social network variables at the dyadic level. An egocentric social network study was conducted among 147 dyads consisting of one PLWHA and one caregiver (294 participants) in Nanning, China. The actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) was used to analyze the relationships between perceived HIV stigma and social network components (network relations, network structures, and network functions) at the dyadic level. We found in this dyadic analysis that: (1) social network components were similar between PLWHAs and their caregivers; (2) HIV stigma perceived by PLWHAs influenced their own social network components, whereas this influence did not exist between caregivers' perceived HIV stigma and their own social network components; (3) a few significant partner effects were observed between HIV stigma and social network components among both PLWHAs and caregivers. The interrelationships between HIV stigma and social network components were complex at the dyadic level. Future interventions programs targeting HIV stigma should focus on the interpersonal relationship at the dyadic level, beyond the intrapersonal factors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Pharmacists’ Research Contributions in the Fight against HIV/AIDs

    OpenAIRE

    Horace, Alexis E.

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacists have made many contributions to HIV/AIDs research and are still showing their significance as members of the healthcare team through innovative clinical trials. Pharmacists are showing advances in several healthcare settings including inpatient, outpatient, and community pharmacies. Because of the complex regimens of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the increased life span of patients living with HIV, and other concomitant medications taken for comorbid disease states...

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Research (AIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-28

    pathophysiology measured during follow-up. I. Compare neuropsychiatric and psychosocial findings in HIV-infected military personnel with non-infected military...venipuncture, and possible rare side effects of PTU therapy - hypothyroidism , skin rash, myalgias, arthralgias, hepatitis, edema. *23 RV47 A Randomized

  16. Marginalization and Power in Living with and Researching HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bodil Maria

    2005-01-01

    of the obtained knowledge. But situated historical and societal processes are involved in the effectuation of the HIV project, like they are in any other project. Researching the project heightens the awareness of the necessity of reflecting on situated and historical issues of power and marginalization......This article takes its point of departure in a research project studying the psychosocial problems of living with HIV. The project was intended to participate in changing practices dealing with these problems. It became a project including many differently situated and intersecting personal...... and generalized perspectives. The article researches the development of the HIV project as a contribution to discussions related to Participatory Action Research and Practice Research. In mainstream approaches methodological indications are often presented as rules to follow in order to ensure the quality...

  17. Collaborative community research consortium: a model for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanstad, K H; Stall, R; Goldstein, E; Everett, W; Brousseau, R

    1999-04-01

    In 1991, the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS) at the University of California, San Francisco, set out to develop a model of community collaborative research that would bring the skills of science to the service of HIV prevention and the knowledge of service providers into the domain of research. Essential elements of the model were training for community-based organizations (CBOs) in research protocol writing, partnership between CBOs and CAPS researchers, program research funding, support to implement studies and analyze results, and a program manager to oversee the effort and foster the relationships between CBOs and researchers. In this article, the authors describe the CAPS model of consortium-based community collaborative research. They also introduce a set of papers, written by researchers and service providers, that describes collaborative research projects conducted by research institutions and CBOs and illustrates how collaboration can change both HIV prevention research and service.

  18. HIV prevention research ethics: an introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B

    2014-02-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics represents a sampling of projects fostered through the NIDA-funded Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Institute. The first three articles employ processes of co-learning to give voice to the experiences of individuals recovering from substance abuse and engaged in sex work who have participated in HIV prevention studies in the United States, India, and the Philippines. The fourth article describes a unique community-based approach to the development of research ethics training modules designed to increase participation of American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) tribal members as partners in research on health disparities. The last two articles focus a critical scholarly lens on two underexamined areas confronting IRB review of HIV research: The emerging and continuously changing ethical challenges of using social media sites for recruitment into HIV prevention research, and the handling of research-related complaints from participants involving perceived research harms or research experiences that do not accord with their initial expectations. Together, the articles in this special issue identify key ethical crossroads and provide suggestions for best practices that respect the values and merit the trust of research participants.

  19. Current ethical issues in HIV/AIDS research and HIV/AIDS care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlongwa, P

    2016-04-01

    HIV/AIDS is a global public health concern with more than 30 million deaths having been reported. Over 70% of the 35 million people with HIV/AIDS live in sub-Saharan Africa. The current available antiretroviral treatments are limited because they do not cure but slow the progression of disease. Therefore, care and treatment for HIV/AIDS and its related research, especially in HIV-preventive vaccine trials, require stringent ethical guidelines because of the vulnerability of the affected individuals as it with all clinical trials. These guidelines should incorporate the basic principles in ethics which include autonomy of individuals, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice in the care and participation of individuals in research. With at least one in five African adults infected with the disease living in sub-Saharan Africa, this review will discuss the current ethical issues in HIV care and HIV research based on the South African context as well as exploring some of the issues globally. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Drug treatment as HIV prevention: a research update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, David S; Woody, George E; O'Brien, Charles P

    2010-12-01

    Drug use continues to be a major factor fueling the global epidemic of HIV infection. This article reviews the current literature on the ability of drug treatment programs to reduce HIV transmission among injection and noninjection drug users. Most data come from research on the treatment of opiate dependence and provide strong evidence on the effectiveness of medication-assisted treatment for reducing the frequency of drug use, risk behaviors, and HIV infections. This has been a consistent finding since the epidemic began among diverse populations and cultural settings. Use of medications other than methadone (such as buprenorphine/naloxone and naltrexone) has increased in recent years with promising data on their effectiveness as HIV prevention and as new treatment options for communities heavily affected by opiate use and HIV infection. However, few treatment interventions for stimulant abuse and dependence have shown efficacy in reducing HIV risk. The cumulative literature provides strong support of drug treatment programs for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral treatment. Drug users in substance abuse treatment are significantly more likely to achieve sustained viral suppression, making viral transmission less likely. Although there are challenges to implementing drug treatment programs for maximum impact, the scientific literature leaves no doubt about the effectiveness of drug treatment as an HIV prevention strategy.

  1. AIDS Exceptionalism: On the Social Psychology of HIV Prevention Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A; Kohut, Taylor; Fisher, Jeffrey D

    2009-12-01

    The current analysis considers the HIV prevention research record in the social sciences. We do so with special reference to what has been termed "AIDS Exceptionalism"- departures from standard public health practice and prevention research priorities in favor of alternative approaches to prevention that, it has been argued, emphasize individual rights at the expense of public health protection. In considering this issue, we review the historical context of the HIV epidemic; empirically demonstrate a pattern of prevention research characterized by systematic neglect of prevention interventions for HIV-infected persons; and articulate a rationale for "Prevention for Positives," supportive prevention efforts tailored to the needs of HIV+ individuals. We then propose a social psychological conceptualization of processes that appear to have influenced developments in HIV prevention research and directed its focus to particular target populations. Our concluding section considers whether there are social and research policy lessons to be learned from the record of HIV prevention research that might improve our ability to addresses effectively, equitably, and in timely fashion future epidemics that play out, as HIV does, at the junction of biology and behavior. At the first quarter century of the AIDS epidemic, it is important to weigh our accomplishments against our failures in the fight against AIDS…Future historians will conclude that we cannot escape responsibility for our failure to use effective, scientifically proven strategies to control the AIDS epidemic…They will also likely regard as tragic those instances when we allowed scarce resources to be used to support ideologically driven "prevention" that only served a particular political agenda.Editorial: A Quarter Century of AIDS . American Journal of Public Health. (Stall & Mills, 2006, p. 961).

  2. Using Network Science to Support Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parraguez Ruiz, Pedro; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    A network-based perspective on designing permits research on the complexity of product, process, and people interactions. Strengthened by the latest advances in information technologies and accessibility of data, a network-based perspective and use of appropriate network analysis metrics, theories......, and tools allow us to explore new data-driven research approaches in design. These approaches allow us to move from counting to connecting, meaning to explicitly link disconnected pieces of data, information, and knowledge, and thus to answer far-reaching research questions with strong industrial...... and societal impact. This chapter contributes to the use of network science in empirical studies of design organisations. It focuses on introducing a network-based perspective on the design process and in particular on making use of network science to support design research and practice. The main contribution...

  3. Research of ad hoc network based on SINCGARS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hao; Cai, Xiaoxia; Chen, Hong; Chen, Jian; Weng, Pengfei

    2016-03-01

    In today's world, science and technology make a spurt of progress, so society has entered the era of information technology, network. Only the comprehensive use of electronic warfare and network warfare means can we maximize their access to information and maintain the information superiority. Combined with the specific combat mission and operational requirements, the research design and construction in accordance with the actual military which are Suitable for the future of information technology needs of the tactical Adhoc network, tactical internet, will greatly improve the operational efficiency of the command of the army. Through the study of the network of the U.S. military SINCGARS network, it can explore the routing protocol and mobile model, to provide a reference for the research of our army network.

  4. Female sex worker social networks and STI/HIV prevention in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joseph D; Peng, Hua; Wang, Kaidi; Chang, Helena; Zhang, Sen-Miao; Yang, Li-Gang; Yang, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Reducing harm associated with selling and purchasing sex is an important public health priority in China, yet there are few examples of sustainable, successful programs to promote sexual health among female sex workers. The limited civil society and scope of nongovernmental organizations circumscribe the local capacity of female sex workers to collectively organize, advocate for their rights, and implement STI/HIV prevention programs. The purpose of this study was to examine social networks among low-income female sex workers in South China to determine their potential for sexual health promotion. Semi-structured interviews with 34 low-income female sex workers and 28 health outreach members were used to examine how social relationships affected condom use and negotiation, STI/HIV testing and health-seeking behaviors, and dealing with violent clients. These data suggested that sex worker's laoxiang (hometown social connections) were more powerful than relationships between women selling sex at the same venue in establishing the terms and risk of commercial sex. Female sex workers from the same hometown often migrated to the city with their laoxiang and these social connections fulfilled many of the functions of nongovernmental organizations, including collective mobilization, condom promotion, violence mitigation, and promotion of health-seeking behaviors. Outreach members observed that sex workers accompanied by their laoxiang were often more willing to accept STI/HIV testing and trust local sexual health services. Organizing STI/HIV prevention services around an explicitly defined laoxiang social network may provide a strong foundation for sex worker health programs. Further research on dyadic interpersonal relationships between female sex workers, group dynamics and norm establishment, and the social network characteristics are needed.

  5. Social Network Clustering and the Spread of HIV/AIDS Among Persons Who Inject Drugs in 2 Cities in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdery, Ashton M; Siripong, Nalyn; Pence, Brian W

    2017-09-01

    The Philippines has seen rapid increases in HIV prevalence among people who inject drugs. We study 2 neighboring cities where a linked HIV epidemic differed in timing of onset and levels of prevalence. In Cebu, prevalence rose rapidly from below 1% to 54% between 2009 and 2011 and remained high through 2013. In nearby Mandaue, HIV remained below 4% through 2011 then rose rapidly to 38% by 2013. We hypothesize that infection prevalence differences in these cities may owe to aspects of social network structure, specifically levels of network clustering. Building on previous research, we hypothesize that higher levels of network clustering are associated with greater epidemic potential. Data were collected with respondent-driven sampling among men who inject drugs in Cebu and Mandaue in 2013. We first examine sample composition using estimators for population means. We then apply new estimators of network clustering in respondent-driven sampling data to examine associations with HIV prevalence. Samples in both cities were comparable in composition by age, education, and injection locations. Dyadic needle-sharing levels were also similar between the 2 cities, but network clustering in the needle-sharing network differed dramatically. We found higher clustering in Cebu than Mandaue, consistent with expectations that higher clustering is associated with faster epidemic spread. This article is the first to apply estimators of network clustering to empirical respondent-driven samples, and it offers suggestive evidence that researchers should pay greater attention to network structure's role in HIV transmission dynamics.

  6. Transmission of HIV in sexual networks in sub-Saharan Africa and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Prosperi, Mattia C. F.; Ramasco, José J.

    2013-09-01

    We are reviewing the literature regarding sexual networks and HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa and Europe. On Likoma Island in Malawi, a sexual network was reconstructed using a sociometric survey in which individuals named their sexual partners. The sexual network identified one giant component including half of all sexually active individuals. More than 25% of respondents were linked through independent chains of sexual relations. HIV was more common in the sparser regions of the network due to over-representation of groups with higher HIV prevalence. A study from KwaZulu-Natal in South-Africa collected egocentric data about sexual partners and found that new infections in women in a particular area was associated with the number of life-time partners in men. Data about sexual networks and HIV transmission are not reported in Europe. It is, however, found that the annual number of sexual partners follows a scale-free network. Phylogenetic studies that determine genetic relatedness between HIV isolates obtained from infected individuals, found that patients in the early stages of infections explain a high number of new infections. In conclusion, the limited information that is available suggest that sexual networks play a role in spread of HIV. Obtaining more information about sexual networks can be of benefit for modeling studies on HIV transmission and prevention.

  7. Interactive Data Visualization for HIV Cohorts: Leveraging Data Exchange Standards to Share and Reuse Research Tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meridith Blevins

    Full Text Available To develop and disseminate tools for interactive visualization of HIV cohort data.If a picture is worth a thousand words, then an interactive video, composed of a long string of pictures, can produce an even richer presentation of HIV population dynamics. We developed an HIV cohort data visualization tool using open-source software (R statistical language. The tool requires that the data structure conform to the HIV Cohort Data Exchange Protocol (HICDEP, and our implementation utilized Caribbean, Central and South America network (CCASAnet data.This tool currently presents patient-level data in three classes of plots: (1 Longitudinal plots showing changes in measurements viewed alongside event probability curves allowing for simultaneous inspection of outcomes by relevant patient classes. (2 Bubble plots showing changes in indicators over time allowing for observation of group level dynamics. (3 Heat maps of levels of indicators changing over time allowing for observation of spatial-temporal dynamics. Examples of each class of plot are given using CCASAnet data investigating trends in CD4 count and AIDS at antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation, CD4 trajectories after ART initiation, and mortality.We invite researchers interested in this data visualization effort to use these tools and to suggest new classes of data visualization. We aim to contribute additional shareable tools in the spirit of open scientific collaboration and hope that these tools further the participation in open data standards like HICDEP by the HIV research community.

  8. Social Networking Technology Use and Engagement in HIV Related Risk and Protective Behaviors among Homeless Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric; Bender, Kimberly; Lengnick-Hall, Rebecca; Yoshioka-Maxwell, Amanda; Rhoades, Harmony

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary studies with homeless youth find surprisingly pervasive social media use and suggest youths’ online interactions may be associated with their HIV-related risk and protective behaviors. As homeless youth are transient and difficult to engage in place-based services, social media may represent a novel venue for intervention. A critical first step in intervention development is gaining greater understanding of how homeless youth use social media especially as it relates to whom they connect to and around what topics. Given the salience of Social Networking Sites in the lives of these otherwise difficult to reach adolescents, and their potential to disseminate prevention interventions, this study assessed associations between online social networking technology use and HIV risk behaviors among homeless youth in Los Angeles, California. Homeless youth ages 13 through 24 (N=1046) were recruited through three drop-in centers and surveyed about their social media use and self-reported HIV-related risk behaviors. Results suggest that social media use is widely prevalent among this population, and the content of these online interactions is associated with whether or not they engage in risk or protective behaviors. Implications for interventions and further research are discussed. PMID:27337044

  9. Creating a Common Platform for HIV Vaccine Research and HIV ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This will involve capacity building in clinical practice, research ethics, regulation, community mobilization, risk cohort development and clinical research, plus strengthening clinical laboratory facilities to the level of international certification. The idea is to achieve a fully functional clinical trials unit within a well engaged ...

  10. HIV testing among patients infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae: STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Heather; Asbel, Lenore; Bernstein, Kyle; Mattson, Melanie; Pathela, Preeti; Mohamed, Mukhtar; Samuel, Michael C; Schwebke, Jane; Stenger, Mark; Tabidze, Irina; Zenilman, Jonathan; Dowell, Deborah; Weinstock, Hillard

    2013-03-01

    We used data from the STD Surveillance Network to estimate HIV testing among patients being tested or treated for gonorrhea. Of 1,845 gonorrhea-infected patients identified through nationally notifiable disease data, only 51% were tested for HIV when they were tested or treated for gonorrhea. Among the 10 geographic sites in this analysis, the percentage of patients tested for HIV ranged from 22-63% for men and 20-79% for women. Nearly 33% of the un-tested patients had never been previously HIV-tested. STD clinic patients were more likely to be HIV-tested than those in other practice settings.

  11. Culture, community networks, and HIV/AIDS outreach opportunities in a south Indian Siddha organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baban, Kaylan; Ikeda, Scott; Pooran, Deeangelee; Hennig, Nils; Indyk, Debbie; Sacks, Henry; Carter, George

    2006-01-01

    Gandeepam is an NGO in rural south India, with an HIV prevalence rate estimated at 2-7 times the national average. Aside from several outreach programs, Gandeepam practices Siddha medicine. Evaluate Gandeepam's strengths and opportunities to promote HIV education. Three weeks of observing clinic practice, meeting patients, and discussing organizational structure. A survey of attitudes toward HIV was completed. Gandeepam reaches a broad cross-section of its community, and effectively disseminates information. No primary HIV prevention efforts were observed. Current strengths include an established network for information dissemination, and a strong community reputation. Tremendous social obstacles for disseminating effective HIV prevention messages remain.

  12. Animal models for HIV/AIDS research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Evans, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic continues to present us with unique scientific and public health challenges. Although the development of effective antiretroviral therapy has been a major triumph, the emergence of drug resistance requires active management of treatment regimens and the continued development of new antiretroviral drugs. Moreover, despite nearly 30 years of intensive investigation, we still lack the basic scientific knowledge necessary to produce a safe and effective vaccine against HIV-1. Animal models offer obvious advantages in the study of HIV/AIDS, allowing for a more invasive investigation of the disease and for preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines. Advances in humanized mouse models, non-human primate immunogenetics and recombinant challenge viruses have greatly increased the number and sophistication of available mouse and simian models. Understanding the advantages and limitations of each of these models is essential for the design of animal studies to guide the development of vaccines and antiretroviral therapies for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:23154262

  13. Network science and oral health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, Gerardo; McCranie, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The present overview of research methods describes a scientific enquiry paradigm that is well established in other disciplines, including health research, but that is fairly new to oral health research. Social networks analysis (SNA) or network science research is a set of relational methods purporting to identify and characterize the connections between members of a system or network, as well as the structure of the network. Persons and communities making up the members of networks have commonly been the focus of SNA studies but corporations or living organisms might just as well be organized in networks. SNA is grounded in both graphic imagery and computational models. SNA is based on the assumptions that features and structure of networks are amenable to characterization, that such information sheds light on the ways members of the network relate to each other (sharing information, diseases, norms, and so on), and that through these connections between members the overall network structure and characteristics are shaped. The overview resorts to examples specific to oral health themes and proposes a few general avenues for population-based research. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  14. Development of Guidelines for the Conduct of HIV Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Guidelines for HIV Research Monitoring by Ethics Committees ... Public Health, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria; 3Centre for Values, ... and (ii) comprehensive planning of research monitoring as part of the ethics committee protocol review process. .... Administration and Control (NAFDAC) is the.

  15. Performing Drug Safety Research During Pregnancy and Lactation: Biomedical HIV Prevention Research as a Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Richard H; Noguchi, Lisa; Brown, Gina; Piper, Jeanna; Watts, D Heather

    2016-07-01

    Evidence-based guidance regarding use of nearly all pharmaceuticals by pregnant and lactating women is limited. Models for performing research may assist in filling these knowledge gaps. Internationally, reproductive age women are at high risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Susceptibility to HIV infection may be increased during pregnancy, and risk of maternal-child transmission is increased with incident HIV infection during pregnancy and lactation. A multidisciplinary meeting of experts was convened at the United States National Institutes of Health to consider paradigms for drug research in pregnancy and lactation applicable to HIV prevention. This report summarizes the meeting proceedings and describes a framework for research on candidate HIV prevention agent use during pregnancy and lactation that may also have broader applications to other pharmaceutical products.

  16. Deep sequencing of HIV: clinical and research applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabria, Shiven B; Gupta, Shaili; Kozal, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exhibits remarkable diversity in its genomic makeup and exists in any given individual as a complex distribution of closely related but nonidentical genomes called a viral quasispecies, which is subject to genetic variation, competition, and selection. This viral diversity clinically manifests as a selection of mutant variants based on viral fitness in treatment-naive individuals and based on drug-selective pressure in those on antiretroviral therapy (ART). The current standard-of-care ART consists of a combination of antiretroviral agents, which ensures maximal viral suppression while preventing the emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. Unfortunately, transmission of drug-resistant HIV does occur, affecting 5% to >20% of newly infected individuals. To optimize therapy, clinicians rely on viral genotypic information obtained from conventional population sequencing-based assays, which cannot reliably detect viral variants that constitute HIV transmission, and detection of these variants is helping to inform strategies for vaccine development. Here, we discuss the molecular virology of HIV, viral heterogeneity, drug-resistance mutations, and the application of deep sequencing technologies in research and the clinical care of HIV-infected individuals.

  17. Heroin assisted treatment and research networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houborg, Esben; Munksgaard, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    . In total, 11 research communities were constructed with different scientific content. HAT research communities are closely connected to medical, psychiatric, and epidemiological research and very loosely connected to social research. Originality/value – The first mapping of the collaborative network HAT...

  18. Targeting molecular networks for drug research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of molecular networks has recently moved into the limelight of biomedical research. While it has certainly provided us with plenty of new insights into cellular mechanisms, the challenge now is how to modify or even restructure these networks. This is especially true for human diseases, which can be regarded as manifestations of distorted states of molecular networks. Of the possible interventions for altering networks, the use of drugs is presently the most feasible. In this mini-review, we present and discuss some exemplary approaches of how analysis of molecular interaction networks can contribute to pharmacology (e.g., by identifying new drug targets or prediction of drug side effects, as well as listing pointers to relevant resources and software to guide future research. We also outline recent progress in the use of drugs for in vitro reprogramming of cells, which constitutes an example par excellence for altering molecular interaction networks with drugs.

  19. Research and Development Trends of Car Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Zhixiong; Xie, Guotao

    With the rapid development of the world economy, road transport has become increasingly busy. An unexpected incident would cause serious traffic disaster due to traffic accidents. To solve this problem, the intelligent transportation system (ITS), which is important for the health developments of the city transportation, has become a hot topic. The car networking provides a new way for intelligent transportation system. It can ensure intelligent control and monitoring of urban road with high performance. This paper described the concept of car networking and related technology both in oversea and domestic. The importance of car networking to achieve vehicle and details of the car networking related technologies were illustrated firstly. Then, attentions focus on the research nodus of the car networking. Lastly, the development trend of car networking research was discussed.

  20. The analysis of HIV/AIDS drug-resistant on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maoxing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) drug-resistant model using an ordinary differential equation (ODE) model on scale-free networks. We derive the threshold for the epidemic to be zero in infinite scale-free network. We also prove the stability of disease-free equilibrium (DFE) and persistence of HIV/AIDS infection. The effects of two immunization schemes, including proportional scheme and targeted vaccination, are studied and compared. We find that targeted strategy compare favorably to a proportional condom using has prominent effect to control HIV/AIDS spread on scale-free networks.

  1. HIV/AIDS research in correctional settings: perspectives on training needs from researchers and IRB members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Karli K; Johnson, Mark E; Ironside, Erica F; Brems, Christiane; Eldridge, Gloria D

    2014-12-01

    Being disproportionately represented by individuals living with HIV/AIDS, correctional facilities are an important venue for potentially invaluable HIV/AIDS epidemiological and intervention research. However, unique ethical, regulatory, and environmental challenges exist in these settings that have limited the amount and scope of research. We surveyed 760 HIV/AIDS researchers, and IRB chairs, members, and prisoner representatives to identify areas in which additional training might ameliorate these challenges. Most commonly identified training needs related to federal regulations, ethics (confidentiality, protection for participants/researchers, coercion, privacy, informed consent, and general ethics), and issues specific to the environment (culture of the correctional setting; general knowledge of correctional systems; and correctional environments, policies, and procedures). Bolstering availability of training on the challenges of conducting HIV/AIDS research in correctional settings is a crucial step toward increasing research that will yield significant benefits to incarcerated individuals and society as a whole.

  2. Research Challenges for Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melodia, Tommaso; Akyildiz, Ian F.

    This chapter discusses the state of the art and the major research challenges in architectures, algorithms, and protocols, for wireless multimedia sensor networks (WMSNs). These are networks of wirelessly interconnected smart devices designed and deployed to retrieve video and audio streams, still images, and scalar sensor data. First, applications and key factors influencing the design of WMSNs are discussed. Then, the existing solutions at the application, transport, network, link, and physical layers of the communication protocol stack are investigated. Finally, fundamental open research issues are discussed and future research trends in this area are outlined.

  3. The Future of HIV Vaccine Research and the Role of the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Yegor; Manrique, Amapola; Bernstein, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review This review covers the role of the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise (the Enterprise), an alliance of independent organizations committed to development of a safe and effective HIV vaccine. It discussesthe history, impact on the field and future directions and initiatives of the alliance, in the context of recent progress in HIV vaccine research and development. Recent Findings Significant progress has been made in the field since the release of the 2005 Scientific Strategic Plan (The Plan) of the Enterprise. Over the last year, the Enterprise embarked on an impact assessment of the 2005 Planand the development of the 2010 Plan. Enterprise Working Groups identified key priorities in the field, several of which are discussed in this review, including: changing the nature, purpose and process of clinical trials; increasing and facilitating data sharing; and optimizing existing and attracting new resources. Summary This isan important moment in HIV vaccine research. New clinical trial and laboratory results have created new opportunities to advance the search for an HIV vaccineand reinvigorated the field. The Enterprise will publish its 2010 Scientific Strategic Planthis year, providinga framework for setting new priorities and directions, and encouraging new and existing partners to embark on a shared scientific agenda. PMID:20978383

  4. NC truck network model development research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    This research develops a validated prototype truck traffic network model for North Carolina. The model : includes all counties and metropolitan areas of North Carolina and major economic areas throughout the : U.S. Geographic boundaries, population a...

  5. Global Development Network: Supporting Global Research Capacity

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Global Development Network (GDN) is an international organization focused on building research capacity in development. Founded in 1999, GDN is ... The Centre for Research and Technology Development (RESTECH) is a two-year-old science and technology research centre at Maseno University in western Kenya.

  6. African Transitional Justice Research Network | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... the creation and sustainable expansion of an electronically-based research network on options and lessons learned pertaining to transitional justice. A second objective is to build the capacity of 75 African human rights researchers to produce locally based research and carry out evidence-based human rights advocacy.

  7. Attracting, equipping and retaining young medical doctors in HIV vaccine science in South Africa : original research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, Melissa; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Flood, Danna; Kublin, James; Bloch, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    ...), a programme to identify, train and retain clinician scientists in HIV vaccine research in SA.Objectives : The present study sought to identify factors influencing the attraction and retention of South African medical doctors in HIV vaccine research...

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLES HIV vaccine research – South Africa's ethical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    strodea@ukzn.ac.za). HIV vaccine research – South Africa's ethical-legal framework and its ability to promote the welfare of trial participants. Ann Strode, Catherine Slack, Muriel Mushariwa. An effective ethical-legal framework for the conduct of ...

  9. Building Capacity for HIV/AIDS Prevention Trials Research and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A relatively small number of African sites have the clinical and laboratory capacity to design, manage and carry out HIV/AIDS prevention trials. This project is based on the premise that many of the ... Journal supplement features 10 years of West African health systems research. In the wake of the devastating Ebola virus ...

  10. Research Award: Information and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship ...

  11. Eclecticism Beyond Orthodoxies: African Social Science Research in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Ambe-Uva T. Nom

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the importance of social science research on HIV/AIDS in Africa. There is a dearth of social science research on HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa as available literature focus essentially on biomedical and epidemiological aspect of HIV/AIDS research and behavioral changes. In Africa however, efforts at preventing and mitigating the impact of HIV/AIDS epidemic will have to consider the social dimension of the epidemic. This study argues for a distinct social science research on ...

  12. Male circumcision for HIV prevention: current research and programmatic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Helen A; Dickson, Kim E; Agot, Kawango; Hankins, Catherine A

    2010-10-01

    Randomized controlled trials in sub-Saharan Africa have shown that adult male circumcision reduces the risk of HIV acquisition in men by about 60%. In this article, we review recent data on the association of male circumcision and HIV/sexually transmitted infection in men and women. This includes a summary of data showing some evidence of an effect of male circumcision against genital ulcer disease, HSV-2 infection, human papillomavirus and Trichomonas vaginalis, but not Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoea in men. Longitudinal studies among HIV discordant couples suggest that male circumcision may provide some direct long-term benefit to women, which may start after complete wound healing. Circumcision may also protect against HIV acquisition in men who have sex with men (MSM) and those who practice unprotected anal intercourse (either exclusively or predominantly), although these data are not consistent. To date, there is little evidence from the few studies available of either unsafe practices or reported increases in risky behaviour, or adverse changes in sexual satisfaction and function. As countries in southern and eastern Africa scale up services, operational research will likely be useful to iteratively improve programme delivery and impact while identifying the best methods of integrating safe male circumcision services into HIV prevention strategies and strengthening health systems.

  13. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boucher Charles AB

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and dynamically, we have constructed an HIV-1 human protein interaction network. This network was analyzed for important proteins and processes that are specific for the HIV life-cycle. In order to expose viral strategies, network motif analysis was carried out showing reoccurring patterns in virus-host dynamics. Results Our analyses show that human proteins interacting with HIV form a densely connected and central sub-network within the total human protein interaction network. The evaluation of this sub-network for connectivity and centrality resulted in a set of proteins essential for the HIV life-cycle. Remarkably, we were able to associate proteins involved in RNA polymerase II transcription with hubs and proteasome formation with bottlenecks. Inferred network motifs show significant over-representation of positive and negative feedback patterns between virus and host. Strikingly, such patterns have never been reported in combined virus-host systems. Conclusions HIV infection results in a reprioritization of cellular processes reflected by an increase in the relative importance of transcriptional machinery and proteasome formation. We conclude that during the evolution of HIV, some patterns of interaction have been selected for resulting in a system where virus proteins preferably interact with central human proteins for direct control and with proteasomal proteins for indirect control over the cellular processes. Finally, the patterns described by network motifs illustrate how virus and host interact with one another.

  14. A new model for catalyzing translational science: the early stage investigator mentored research scholar program in HIV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Blythe J S; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Sopher, Carrie J; Flood, Danna M; Johnson, R Paul; Haynes, Barton F; Kublin, James G

    2015-04-01

    Engagement of early stage investigators (ESIs) in the search for a safe and effective vaccine is critical to the success of this highly challenging endeavor. In the wake of disappointing results from a large-scale efficacy trial, the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) and Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI) developed a novel mentored research program focused on the translation of findings from nonhuman primate studies to human trials of experimental vaccines. From 2008 to 2011, 14 ESI Scholars were selected from 42 complete applications. Post program surveys and tracked outcomes suggest that the combination of flexible funding, transdisciplinary mentorship, and structured training and networking promoted the scientific contributions and career development of promising ESIs. Embedding a multicomponent research program within collaborative clinical trial networks and research consortia is a promising strategy to attract and retain early career investigators and catalyze important translational science. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Interventionist Research as a Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus, Nina

    2010-01-01

    , fostering such close collaboration comes at the cost of greater dependency on the community partner and it brings about various methodological complexities related to the research practice. This includes, for instance, dealing with conflicting agendas and interest, juggling multiple roles, managing high......In the past three decades, we have been witnessing a development in social studies which has been described by STS scholars as the ‘participatory turn.’ This refers to a move toward various types of interventionist and action-oriented research. This turn to participation and action emerged...... as a response to growing concerns with making STS ‘useful’ and politically relevant. The fundamental characteristic of interventionist and action-oriented research, is that the researcher is deliberately and explicitly engaged in a process of change through collaboration with a community partner. However...

  16. A proposed international watershed research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Gray, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    An “International Watershed Research Network” is to be an initial project of the Sino-U. S. Centers for Soil and Water Conservation and Environmental Protection. The Network will provide a fundamental database for research personnel of the Centers, as well as of the global research community, and is viewed as an important resource for their successful operation. Efforts are under way to (a) identify and select candidate watersheds, (b) develop standards and protocols for data collection and dissemination, and (c) specify other data sources on erosion, sediment transport, hydrology, and ancillary information of probable interest and use to participants of the Centers. The initial focus of the Network will be on water-deficient areas. Candidate watersheds for the Network are yet to be determined although likely selections include the Ansai Research Station, northern China, and the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, Arizona, USA. The Network is to be patterned after the Vigil Network, an open-ended group of global sites and small drainage basins for which Internet-accessible geomorphic, hydrologic, and biological data are periodically collected or updated. Some types of data, using similar instruments and observation methods, will be collected at all watersheds selected for the Network. Other data from the watersheds that may reflect individual watershed characteristics and research objectives will be collected as well.

  17. Venue-based recruitment of women at elevated risk for HIV: an HIV Prevention Trials Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Danielle F; Golin, Carol; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Hughes, James P; Wang, Jing; Roman Isler, Malika; Mannheimer, Sharon; Kuo, Irene; Lucas, Jonathan; DiNenno, Elizabeth; Justman, Jessica; Frew, Paula M; Emel, Lynda; Rompalo, Anne; Polk, Sarah; Adimora, Adaora A; Rodriquez, Lorenna; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Hodder, Sally

    2014-06-01

    The challenge of identifying and recruiting U.S. women at elevated risk for HIV acquisition impedes prevention studies and services. HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 064 was a U.S. multisite, longitudinal cohort study designed to estimate HIV incidence among women living in communities with prevalent HIV and poverty. Venue-based sampling (VBS) methodologies and participant and venue characteristics are described. Eligible women were recruited from 10 U.S. communities with prevalent HIV and poverty using VBS. Participant eligibility criteria included age 18-44 years, residing in a designated census tract/zip code, and self-report of at least one high-risk personal and/or male sexual partner characteristic associated with HIV acquisition (e.g., incarceration history). Ethnography was conducted to finalize recruitment areas and venues. Eight thousand twenty-nine women were screened and 2,099 women were enrolled (88% black, median age 29 years) over 14 months. The majority of participants were recruited from outdoor venues (58%), retail spaces (18%), and social service organizations (13%). The proportion of women recruited per venue category varied by site. Most participants (73%) had both individual and partner characteristics that qualified them for the study; 14% were eligible based on partner risk only. VBS is a feasible and effective approach to rapidly recruit a population of women at enhanced risk for HIV in the United States. Such a recruitment approach is needed in order to engage women most at risk and requires strong community engagement.

  18. Growing the Pipeline of Diverse HIV Investigators: The Impact of Mentored Research Experiences to Engage Underrepresented Minority Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jonathan; Kouyate, Aminta; Kroboth, Liz; McFarland, Willi

    2016-09-01

    Structured, mentored research programs for high school and undergraduate students from underrepresented minority (URM) backgrounds are needed to increase the diversity of our nation's biomedical research workforce. In particular, a robust pipeline of investigators from the communities disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic is needed not only for fairness and equity but for insights and innovations to address persistent racial and ethnic disparities in new infections. We created the Summer HIV/AIDS Research Program (SHARP) at the San Francisco Department of Public Health for URM undergraduates as a 12-week program of hands-on research experience, one-on-one mentoring by a senior HIV investigator, didactic seminars for content and research methods, and networking opportunities. The first four cohorts (2012-2015) of SHARP gained research skills, built confidence in their abilities and self-identified as scientists. In addition, the majority of program alumni is employed in research positions and has been admitted to or is pursuing graduate degree programs in fields related to HIV prevention. While we await empirical studies of specific mentoring strategies at early educational stages, programs that engage faculty who are sensitive to the unique challenges facing diverse students and who draw lessons from established mentoring frameworks can help build an inclusive generation of HIV researchers.

  19. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Earth Science Grid Federation (ESGF); Boden, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cowley, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Dattoria, Vince [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Desai, Narayan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foster, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Goldstone, Robin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gregurick, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological Systems Science Division; Houghton, John [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program; Izaurralde, Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Joseph, Renu [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Pritchard, Matt [British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), Oxon (United Kingdom); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Strand, Gary [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Stuart, Cory [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tatusova, Tatiana [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Thomas, Brian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zurawski, Jason [Internet2, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  20. Creatiing a Collaborative Research Network for Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, W.

    2012-12-01

    This abstract proposes a discussion of how professional science communication and scientific cooperation can become more efficient through the use of modern social network technology, using the example of Mendeley. Mendeley is a research workflow and collaboration tool which crowdsources real-time research trend information and semantic annotations of research papers in a central data store, thereby creating a "social research network" that is emergent from the research data added to the platform. We describe how Mendeley's model can overcome barriers for collaboration by turning research papers into social objects, making academic data publicly available via an open API, and promoting more efficient collaboration. Central to the success of Mendeley has been the creation of a tool that works for the researcher without the requirement of being part of an explicit social network. Mendeley automatically extracts metadata from research papers, and allows a researcher to annotate, tag and organize their research collection. The tool integrates with the paper writing workflow and provides advanced collaboration options, thus significantly improving researchers' productivity. By anonymously aggregating usage data, Mendeley enables the emergence of social metrics and real-time usage stats on top of the articles' abstract metadata. In this way a social network of collaborators, and people genuinely interested in content, emerges. By building this research network around the article as the social object, a social layer of direct relevance to academia emerges. As science, particularly Earth sciences with their large shared resources, become more and more global, the management and coordination of research is more and more dependent on technology to support these distributed collaborations.

  1. Equivalence of ELISpot assays demonstrated between major HIV network laboratories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbinder K Gill

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Comprehensive T Cell Vaccine Immune Monitoring Consortium (CTC-VIMC was created to provide standardized immunogenicity monitoring services for HIV vaccine trials. The ex vivo interferon-gamma (IFN-γ ELISpot is used extensively as a primary immunogenicity assay to assess T cell-based vaccine candidates in trials for infectious diseases and cancer. Two independent, GCLP-accredited central laboratories of CTC-VIMC routinely use their own standard operating procedures (SOPs for ELISpot within two major networks of HIV vaccine trials. Studies are imperatively needed to assess the comparability of ELISpot measurements across laboratories to benefit optimal advancement of vaccine candidates.We describe an equivalence study of the two independently qualified IFN-g ELISpot SOPs. The study design, data collection and subsequent analysis were managed by independent statisticians to avoid subjectivity. The equivalence of both response rates and positivity calls to a given stimulus was assessed based on pre-specified acceptance criteria derived from a separate pilot study.Detection of positive responses was found to be equivalent between both laboratories. The 95% C.I. on the difference in response rates, for CMV (-1.5%, 1.5% and CEF (-0.4%, 7.8% responses, were both contained in the pre-specified equivalence margin of interval [-15%, 15%]. The lower bound of the 95% C.I. on the proportion of concordant positivity calls for CMV (97.2% and CEF (89.5% were both greater than the pre-specified margin of 70%. A third CTC-VIMC central laboratory already using one of the two SOPs also showed comparability when tested in a smaller sub-study.The described study procedure provides a prototypical example for the comparison of bioanalytical methods in HIV vaccine and other disease fields. This study also provides valuable and unprecedented information for future vaccine candidate evaluations on the comparison and pooling of ELISpot results generated by the CTC

  2. Protecting the Rights of Young Children Affected and Infected by HIV/AIDS in Africa: Updating Strategies and Reinforcing Existing Networks. Action Research in Family and Early Childhood Monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Early Childhood and Family Education Unit.

    This monograph summarizes the issues discussed at an international workshop convened to identify strategies, lines of action, and innovative approaches to respond to the needs of young children faced by the African HIV/AIDS pandemic. The monograph provides background information on the HIV/AIDS pandemic; describes current initiatives and results…

  3. Sampling dynamic networks with application to investigation of HIV epidemic drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ravi; De Gruttola, Victor

    2015-09-01

    We propose a method for randomly sampling dynamic networks that permits isolation of the impact of different network features on processes that propagate on networks. The new methods permit uniform sampling of dynamic networks in ways that ensure that they are consistent with both a given cumulative network and with specified values for constraints on the dynamic network properties. Development of such methods is challenging because modifying one network property will generally tend to modify others as well. Methods to sample constrained dynamic networks are particularly useful in the investigation of network-based interventions that target and modify specific dynamic network properties, especially in settings where the whole network is unobservable and therefore many network properties are unmeasurable. We illustrate this method by investigating the incremental impact of changes in networks properties that are relevant for the spread of infectious diseases, such as concurrency in sexual relationships. Development of the method is motivated by the challenges that arise in investigating the role of HIV epidemic drivers due to the often limited information available about contact networks. The proposed methods for randomly sampling dynamic networks facilitate investigation of the type of network data that can best contribute to an understanding of the HIV epidemic dynamics as well as of the limitations of conclusions drawn in the absence of such information. Hence, the methods are intended to aid in the design and interpretation of studies of network-based interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Action research in inter-organisational networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Rasmussen, Erik Stavnsager; Jørgensen, Jacob Høj

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, the literature on action research has been aimed at intra-organisational issues. These studies have distinguished between two researcher roles: The problem-solver and the observer. This article addresses the distinct challenges of action research in inter-organisational projects....... In addition to the problem-solver and observer roles, the researcher in an inter-organisational setting can serve as a legitimiser of the project and manage to involve partners that in an ordinary business-to-business setting would not have participated. Based on an action research project in a Danish inter......-organisational network, this article discusses potential pitfalls in the legitimiser role. Lack of clarity in defining the researcher role and project ownership in relation to the funding organisation and the rest of the network can jeopardise the project and potentially the credibility of the researchers. The article...

  5. The future of network governance research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The popularity and scope of network governance research and practice continues to expand from its divergent foundations, assumptions and ethodological positions. This paper introduces a symposium of papers on this substantial sub-field by first summarizing the sprawling research endeavour...

  6. Tobacco Control Research, Dissemination and Networking in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tobacco Control Research, Dissemination and Networking in Lebanon. The Tobacco Control Research Group (TCRG), University of Beirut (AUB), is a multidisciplinary team of professionals from the health sciences, medicine, chemistry and engineering departments. The Group was established in 1999 with IDRC support ...

  7. "Wan Kanyakla" (We are together): Community transformations in Kenya following a social network intervention for HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmen, Charles R; Hickey, Matthew D; Fiorella, Kathryn J; Omollo, Dan; Ouma, Gor; Zoughbie, Daniel; Salmen, Marcus R; Magerenge, Richard; Tessler, Robert; Campbell, Harold; Geng, Elvin; Gandhi, Monica; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R

    2015-12-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, failure to initiate and sustain HIV treatment contributes to significant health, psychosocial, and economic impacts that burden not only infected individuals but diverse members of their social networks. Yet, due to intense stigma, the responsibility for managing lifelong HIV treatment rests solely, and often secretly, with infected individuals. We introduce the concept of "HIV risk induction" to suggest that social networks of infected individuals share a vested interest in improving long-term engagement with HIV care, and may represent an underutilized resource for improving HIV/AIDS outcomes within high prevalence populations. In 2012, we implemented a 'microclinic' intervention to promote social network engagement in HIV/AIDS care and treatment. A microclinic is a therapy management collective comprised of a small group of neighbors, relatives, and friends who are trained as a team to provide psychosocial and adherence support for HIV-infected members. Our study population included 369 patients on ART and members of their social networks on Mfangano Island, Kenya, where HIV prevalence approaches 30%. Here we report qualitative data from 18 focus group discussions conducted with microclinic participants (n = 82), community health workers (n = 40), and local program staff (n = 39). Participants reported widespread acceptability and enthusiasm for the microclinic intervention. Responses highlight four overlapping community transformations regarding HIV care and treatment, namely (1) enhanced HIV treatment literacy (2) reduction in HIV stigma, (3) improved atmosphere for HIV status disclosure and (4) improved material and psychosocial support for HIV-infected patients. Despite challenges, participants describe an emerging sense of "collective responsibility" for treatment among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected members of social networks. The lived experiences and community transformations highlighted by participants enrolled in this social

  8. Social networks of HIV-positive women and their association with social support and depression symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederbaum, Julie A; Rice, Eric; Craddock, Jaih; Pimentel, Veronica; Beaver, Patty

    2017-02-01

    Social support is important to the mental health and well-being of HIV-positive women. Limited information exists about the specific structure and composition of HIV-positive women's support networks or associations of these network properties with mental health outcomes. In this pilot study, the authors examine whether support network characteristics were associated with depressive symptoms. Survey and network data were collected from HIV-positive women (N = 46) via a web-based survey and an iPad application in August 2012. Data were analyzed using multivariate linear regression models in SAS. Depressive symptoms were positively associated with a greater number of doctors in a woman's network; having more HIV-positive network members was associated with less symptom reporting. Women who reported more individuals who could care for them had more family support. Those who reported feeling loved were less likely to report disclosure stigma. This work highlighted that detailed social network data can increase our understanding of social support so as to identify interventions to support the mental health of HIV-positive women. Most significant is the ongoing need for support from peers.

  9. Sustaining Research Networks: the Twenty-Year Experience of the HMO Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, John F; Paolino, Andrea R; Thompson, Ella E; Larson, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    As multi-institutional research networks assume a central role in clinical research, they must address the challenge of sustainability. Despite its importance, the concept of network sustainability has received little attention in the literature, and the sustainability strategies of durable scientific networks have not been described. The Health Maintenance Organization Research Network (HMORN) is a consortium of 18 research departments in integrated health care delivery systems with over 15 million members in the United States and Israel. The HMORN has coordinated federally funded scientific networks and studies since 1994. This case study describes the HMORN approach to sustainability, proposes an operational definition of network sustainability, and identifies 10 essential elements that can enhance sustainability. The sustainability framework proposed here is drawn from prior publications on organizational issues by HMORN investigators and from the experience of recent HMORN leaders and senior staff. Network sustainability can be defined as (1) the development and enhancement of shared research assets to facilitate a sequence of research studies in a specific content area or multiple areas, and (2) a community of researchers and other stakeholders who reuse and develop those assets. Essential elements needed to develop the shared assets of a network include: network governance; trustworthy data and processes for sharing data; shared knowledge about research tools; administrative efficiency; physical infrastructure; and infrastructure funding. The community of researchers within a network is enhanced by: a clearly defined mission, vision and values; protection of human subjects; a culture of collaboration; and strong relationships with host organizations. While the importance of these elements varies based on the membership and goals of a network, this framework for sustainability can enhance strategic planning within the network and can guide relationships with

  10. Using animal models to overcome temporal, spatial and combinatorial challenges in HIV persistence research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denton, Paul W.; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Research challenges associated with understanding HIV persistence during antiretroviral therapy can be categorized as temporal, spatial and combinatorial. Temporal research challenges relate to the timing of events during establishment and maintenance of HIV persistence. Spatial research challeng...... for directly addressing these research challenges. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive review of these recent translational advances made in animal models of HIV persistence.......Research challenges associated with understanding HIV persistence during antiretroviral therapy can be categorized as temporal, spatial and combinatorial. Temporal research challenges relate to the timing of events during establishment and maintenance of HIV persistence. Spatial research challenges...... regard the anatomical locations and cell subsets that harbor persistent HIV. Combinatorial research challenges pertain to the order of administration, timing of administration and specific combinations of compounds to be administered during HIV eradication therapy. Overcoming these challenges...

  11. HIV research in Australia: linking basic research findings with clinical and public health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldor John M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite a population of only 20 million and sustained low prevalence of HIV infection in Australia, Australian researchers have provided many substantial original findings to the fields of HIV pathogenesis, treatment and prevention. More recently, Australian clinicians and scientists have turned their attention to assisting other countries in developing effective responses, particularly within the Asia-Pacific region. It is therefore fitting that the 4th International AIDS Society (IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention will be held in Sydney in July 2007. The meeting is expected to attract over 5000 participants and will have a dynamic and innovative programme within the three major themes of HIV basic science, clinical research and biomedical prevention.

  12. Vulnerable Youth as Prosumers in HIV Prevention: Studies Using Participatory Action Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Cath; Nayar, Shoba; Lubis, Dinar; Maibvisira, Carol; Modderman, Kristel

    2017-08-14

    Stigma, voicelessness, and legislative and rights barriers, coupled with top-down decision making, are the common experiences of vulnerable youth populations that limit their opportunities to participate in vital health promotion efforts such as HIV prevention. To consider new opportunities arising from a digital society for youth to creatively shape HIV prevention. Drawing on research with vulnerable youth in Busoga, Uganda; Bulawayo, Zimbabwe; Bangkok, Thailand; and Bali, Indonesia, we explore current youth participation, in theory and practice, while considering new opportunities arising from a digital society for youth to creatively shape HIV prevention. Collaborative commons and prosumer models are defined as people employing new technology to codesign toward a common goal. Within the context of a diminishing role of the traditional institution and the rise of digitized networks, such models offer exciting new directions for youth as electronic health promotion prosumers to participate in difficult challenges such as HIV prevention in the 21st century. It is time for institutions to embrace such opportunities, especially in areas where access to technology is widening, while continuing to champion youth and advocate for supportive social environments.

  13. HIV/AIDS and Employment Research: A Need for an Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyers, Liza Marie

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a reflection on the three articles that compose the Major Contribution on HIV/AIDS and employment research. It highlights the merits of the contribution in the broader context of HIV/AIDS employment research and recommends future directions for this area of inquiry, including theory integration, an investigation of HIV health…

  14. The Nation's Top HIV/AIDS Researcher Discusses This Continuing Health Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS The Nation's Top HIV/AIDS Researcher Discusses This Continuing Health Threat Past Issues / ... on. For more than 30 years, the NIH's HIV/AIDS research program has been led by Dr. Anthony S. ...

  15. The network structure of sex partner meeting places reported by HIV-infected MSM: Opportunities for HIV targeted control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Meredith; Schumacher, Christina; Fields, Errol L; Perin, Jamie; Safi, Amelia Greiner; Ellen, Jonathan M; Muvva, Ravikiran; Chaulk, Patrick; Jennings, Jacky M

    2017-06-01

    Baltimore, Maryland ranks among U.S. cities with the highest incidence of HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM). HIV screening at sex partner meeting places or venues frequented by MSM with new diagnoses and/or high HIV viral load may reduce transmission by identifying and linking infected individuals to care. We investigated venue-based clustering of newly diagnosed MSM to identify high HIV transmission venues. HIV surveillance data from MSM diagnosed between October 2012-June 2014 and reporting ≥1 sex partner meeting place were examined. Venue viral load was defined according to the geometric mean viral load of the cluster of cases that reported the venue and classified as high (>50,000 copies/mL), moderate (1500-50,000 copies/mL), and low (place, accounting for 132 unique venues. Twenty-six venues were reported by > 1 MSM; of these, a tightly connected cluster of six moderate viral load sex partner meeting places emerged, representing 66% of reports. Small, dense networks of moderate to high viral load venues may be important for targeted HIV control among MSM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel Network Services for Supporting Big Data Science Research

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Joaquin; Donovan, Sean; Bezerra, Jeronimo; Morgan, Heidi; Ibarra, Julio; Clark, Russ; Owen, Henry

    2017-01-01

    To interconnect research facilities across wide geographic areas, network operators deploy science networks, also referred to as Research and Education (R&E) networks. These networks allow experimenters to establish dedicated network connections between research facilities for transferring large amounts of data. Recently, R&E networks have started using Software-Defined Networking (SDN) and Software-Defined Exchanges (SDX) for deploying these connections. AtlanticWave/SDX is a response to the...

  17. Combining epidemiological and genetic networks signifies the importance of early treatment in HIV-1 transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Prosperi, M.; Belleman, R.G.; Colafigli, M.; De Luca, A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Inferring disease transmission networks is important in epidemiology in order to understand and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Reconstruction of the infection transmission networks requires insight into viral genome data as well as social interactions. For the HIV-1 epidemic, current

  18. The association between social networks and self-rated risk of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth J. Lyimo

    2014-03-18

    Mar 18, 2014 ... Participation in bridging networks was greater among females (25%) than males (12%, p , .005). Of ... association between bonding and bridging social networks on self-rated risk of HIV among study participants. However, sexually .... the social ecological model (SEM) described by Bronfenbrenner (1994).

  19. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes.

  20. Culture, social networks and HIV vulnerability among men who have sex with men in Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelsensius Klau Fauk

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to explore cultural and social network influence on HIV vulnerability among Men who have Sex with Men (MSM population in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. A qualitative inquiry employing in-depth one-on-one interviews was carried out with 24 MSM participants in July 2015. Data were analysed using a framework analysis and guided by the Social Networks Theory (SNT as a conceptual framework. Findings indicated that prohibitive cultural perspectives and norms against same-sex marriage made them to conceal their sexual orientation and thus secretively engaging in unprotected sex that increased their predisposition to HIV transmission. The prohibitive cultures were also instrumental in the formation of MSM sexual networks that provided supportive environment for HIV-risky sexual practices among network partners. These findings provide information that can be used to improve HIV/AIDS service practices and policies. However, further studies with large numbers of MSM would be needed to improve the understanding of other HIV vulnerability determinants, the unique needs of MSM, and what and how programs could be conducted to reduce HIV vulnerability among MSM population.

  1. Culture, social networks and HIV vulnerability among men who have sex with men in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauk, Nelsensius Klau; Merry, Maria Silvia; Sigilipoe, Mitra Andhini; Putra, Sukma; Mwanri, Lillian

    2017-01-01

    The current study aimed to explore cultural and social network influence on HIV vulnerability among Men who have Sex with Men (MSM) population in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. A qualitative inquiry employing in-depth one-on-one interviews was carried out with 24 MSM participants in July 2015. Data were analysed using a framework analysis and guided by the Social Networks Theory (SNT) as a conceptual framework. Findings indicated that prohibitive cultural perspectives and norms against same-sex marriage made them to conceal their sexual orientation and thus secretively engaging in unprotected sex that increased their predisposition to HIV transmission. The prohibitive cultures were also instrumental in the formation of MSM sexual networks that provided supportive environment for HIV-risky sexual practices among network partners. These findings provide information that can be used to improve HIV/AIDS service practices and policies. However, further studies with large numbers of MSM would be needed to improve the understanding of other HIV vulnerability determinants, the unique needs of MSM, and what and how programs could be conducted to reduce HIV vulnerability among MSM population.

  2. Examining Family Networks of HIV+ Women in Drug Recovery: Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    MITRANI, VICTORIA B.; Weiss-Laxer, Nomi S.; Ow, Christina E.; Burns, Myron J.; Ross, Samantha; Feaster, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is recognized as affecting and being affected by the family. HIV+ women in drug recovery and their families are particularly at risk due to family disruption and stigma. Yet family research with HIV+ adults is hampered by the challenges of defining the family, engaging family members into research, and tracking changes in family composition. In this paper we describe the family context of 144 HIV+ women in drug abuse recovery who are enrolled in a randomized trial of a family interve...

  3. Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention: a social network analysis of the acceptability of a face-to-face and online social networking intervention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Barman Adhikari, Anamika; Milburn, Norweeta G

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth.Seven peer leaders (PLs...

  4. The complex interplay of social networks, geography and HIV risk among Malaysian Drug Injectors: Results from respondent-driven sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenev, Alexei; Long, Elisa; Bazazi, Alexander R; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-11-01

    HIV is primarily concentrated among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Malaysia, where currently HIV prevention and treatment coverage is inadequate. To improve the targeting of interventions, we examined HIV clustering and the role that social networks and geographical distance play in influencing HIV transmission among PWID. Data were derived from a respondent-driven survey sample (RDS) collected during 2010 of 460 PWID in greater Kuala Lumpur. Analysis focused on socio-demographic, clinical, behavioural, and network information. Spatial probit models were developed based on a distinction between the influence of peers (individuals nominated through a recruitment network) and neighbours (residing a close distance to the individual). The models were expanded to account for the potential influence of the network formation. Recruitment patterns of HIV-infected PWID clustered both spatially and across the recruitment networks. In addition, HIV-infected PWID were more likely to have peers and neighbours who inject with clean needles were HIV-infected and lived nearby (network formation and sero-sorting. The relationship between HIV status across networks and space in Kuala Lumpur underscores the importance of these factors for surveillance and prevention strategies, and this needs to be more closely integrated. RDS can be applied to identify injection network structures, and this provides an important mechanism for improving public health surveillance, accessing high-risk populations, and implementing risk-reduction interventions to slow HIV transmission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Network support, technology use, depression, and ART adherence among HIV-positive MSM of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, I W; Tan, D; Dunlap, S L; Palmer, L; Beougher, S; Cederbaum, J A

    2017-09-01

    Depression is associated with poor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS. This relationship may be moderated by an individual's social network characteristics. Our study sought to examine social network correlates of treatment adherence among HIV-positive men recruited from social service agencies throughout Los Angeles County (N = 150) to inform technology-driven social support interventions for this population. We administered egocentric social network and computer-assisted survey interviews focused on demographic characteristics, health history, depressive symptoms, and ART adherence, where adherence was assessed by the number of reasons participants missed taking their medication, if ever. Significant univariate correlates of adherence were included in a multivariable regression analysis, where the moderating effect of having a network member who reminds participants to take their HIV medication on the relationship between depression and adherence was tested. Over 60% of participants reported clinically significant depressive symptoms; this was significantly associated with lower adherence among those without someone in their social network to remind them about taking their HIV medication, even after adjusting for covariates in an ordinary least squares regression (adjusted mean difference b = -1.61, SE = 0.42, p = 0.0003). Having a network member who reminds participants to take their ART medication significantly ameliorated the negative association between depression and treatment adherence, especially for those reporting greater depressive symptoms (p = 0.0394). Additionally, participants demonstrated high rates of technology use to communicate with social network members. In order to achieve the aims of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, innovative interventions addressing mental health to improve ART adherence are needed. Network strategies that leverage technology may be helpful for improving ART

  6. Exploring the potential of expatriate social networks to reduce HIV and STI transmission: a protocol for a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Gemma; Bowser, Nicole Jasmine; Brown, Graham Ernest; Maycock, Bruce Richard

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HIV diagnoses acquired among Australian men working or travelling overseas including  Southeast Asia are increasing. This change within transmission dynamics means traditional approaches to prevention need to be considered in new contexts. The significance and role of social networks in mediating sexual risk behaviours may be influential. Greater understanding of expatriate and traveller behaviour is required to understand how local relationships are formed, how individuals enter and are socialised into networks, and how these networks may affect sexual intentions and behaviours. This paper describes the development of a qualitative protocol to investigate how social networks of Australian expatriates and long-term travellers might support interventions to reduce transmission of HIV and sexually transmitted infections. Methods and analysis To explore the interactions of male expatriates and long-term travellers within and between their environments, symbolic interactionism will be the theoretical framework used. Grounded theory methods provide the ability to explain social processes through the development of explanatory theory. The primary data source will be interviews conducted in several rounds in both Australia and Southeast Asia. Purposive and theoretical sampling will be used to access participants whose data can provide depth and individual meaning. Ethics and dissemination The role of expatriate and long-term traveller networks and their potential to impact health are uncertain. This study seeks to gain a deeper understanding of the Australian expatriate culture, behavioural contexts and experiences within social networks in  Southeast Asia. This research will provide tangible recommendations for policy and practice as the findings will be disseminated to health professionals and other stakeholders, academics and the community via local research and evaluation networks, conference presentations and online forums. The Curtin University Human

  7. Networks (2005) | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... From its launch in 1970, IDRC adopted a new approach to providing international development assistance. IDRC's philosophy was to work with the people who hoped to benefit from the aid, and to set research agendas in collaboration with local partners. Networks have been at the core of this cooperative ...

  8. [Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network (RECAVA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Dorado, David; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso; Díez, Javier; Gabriel, Rafael; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R; Ortiz de Landázuri, Manuel; Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Today, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of death and hospitalization in Spain, and accounts for an annual healthcare budget of more than 4000 million euros. Consequently, early diagnosis, effective prevention, and the optimum treatment of cardiovascular disease present a significant social and healthcare challenge for the country. In this context, combining all available resources to increase the efficacy and healthcare benefits of scientific research is a priority. This rationale prompted the establishment of the Spanish Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network, or RECAVA (Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Enfermedades Cardiovasculares), 5 years ago. Since its foundation, RECAVA's activities have focused on achieving four objectives: a) to facilitate contacts between basic, clinical and epidemiological researchers; b) to promote the shared use of advanced technological facilities; c) to apply research results to clinical practice, and d) to train a new generation of translational cardiovascular researchers in Spain. At present, RECAVA consists of 41 research groups and seven shared technological facilities. RECAVA's research strategy is based on a scientific design matrix centered on the most important cardiovascular processes. The level of RECAVA's research activity is reflected in the fact that 28 co-authored articles were published in international journals during the first six months of 2007, with each involving contributions from at least two groups in the network. Finally, RECAVA also participates in the work of the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research, or CNIC (Centro Nacional de Investigación Cardiovascular), and some established Biomedical Research Network Centers, or CIBER (Centros de Investigación Biomédica en RED), with the aim of consolidating the development of a dynamic multidisciplinary research framework that is capable of meeting the growing challenge that cardiovascular disease will present

  9. Modelling the HIV persistence through the network of lymphocyte recirculation in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is able to persist in cellular and/or anatomical viral reservoirs, despite the effective inhibition of virus replication by the antiretroviral therapy (ART. Here we develop a mathematical model to gain some insights of HIV persistence relevant to the lymphocyte recirculation network of immune system and the central nervous system (CNS. Our simulations and analyses illustrate the role of the CNS as a virus reservoir to prevent antiretroviral drugs from penetrating the blood-brain (or blood-testis barrier, and we examine the long-term impact of this reservoir on the transmissibility of an infected individual. We observe numerically that level of HIV in peripheral blood may not accurately reflect the true mechanisms occurring within other organs. Keywords: HIV reservoirs, Blood-brain barrier, Dynamical model, Lymphocyte recirculation network, 2010 MSC: 39A11, 92D30

  10. Poland-AOD aerosol research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Jacek W.; Struzewska, Joanna; Markowicz, Krzysztof

    2017-04-01

    Poland-AOD research network (www.polandaod.pl) was formed in 2011. It is a consortium of Polish institutions that are involved in studies of the atmospheric aerosol impact on the climate system. In 2016 the Poland-AOD network comprised of five stations: Radiative Transfer Laboratory, University of Warsaw (urban station), the research station of the Institute of Oceanology, in Sopot (coastal station), Radiative Transfer Station SolarAOT in Strzyzow (background station in the Carpathian mountains), Meteorology and Climatology Observatory at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun (urban station), and the Research station in Rzecin at Poznan University of Life Sciences (rural station). The primary goal of the network is to carry out measurements of aerosol single scattering properties, radiation budget, simulate radiative transfer and aerosol transport, validate aerosol transport and transformation models such as NAAPS and GEM-AQ, as well as carry out instrument calibration and intercomparison. We will present observations of aerosol properties collected by the network as well as results from the GEM-AQ model simulations for selected episodes of biomass burning and urban aerosol.

  11. Adequacy of Mental Health Services for HIV-Positive Patients with Depression: Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Stephanie K Y; Boyle, Eleanor; Cairney, John; Gardner, Sandra; Collins, Evan J; Bacon, Jean; Rourke, Sean B

    2016-01-01

    Major depression can profoundly impact clinical and quality-of-life outcomes of people living with HIV, and this disease is underdiagnosed and undertreated in many HIV-positive individuals. Here, we describe the prevalence of publicly funded primary and secondary mental health service use and antidepressant use, as well as mental health care for depression in accordance with existing Canadian guidelines for HIV-positive patients with depression in Ontario, Canada. We conducted a prospective cohort study linking data from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study with administrative health databases in the province of Ontario, Canada. Current depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale or the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Multivariable regressions were used to characterize prevalence outcomes. Of 990 HIV-positive patients with depression, 493 (50%) patients used mental health services; 182 (18%) used primary services (general practitioners); 176 (18%) used secondary services (psychiatrists); and 135 (14%) used both. Antidepressants were used by 407 (39%) patients. Patients who identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual, as having low income or educational attainment, or as non-native English speakers or immigrants to Canada were less likely to obtain care. Of 493 patients using mental health services, 250 (51%) received mental health care for depression in accordance with existing Canadian guidelines. Our results showed gaps in delivering publicly funded mental health services to depressed HIV-positive patients and identified unequal access to these services, particularly among vulnerable groups. More effective mental health policies and better access to mental health services are required to address HIV-positive patient needs and reduce depression's impact on their lives.

  12. Lessons from the failure of the adenovector HIV vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Blais, Marie-Eve; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    The much-publicised halting of the joint Merck/HIV Vaccine Trials Network phase IIB candidate HIV-1 vaccine trial in 2007 has led to an unprecedented degree of discussion and introspection amongst the HIV research community. In this commentary, we will summarise the lessons learned from the trial and examine the current state of HIV vaccine research.

  13. HIV criminal prosecutions and public health: an examination of the empirical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Patrick; Bryan, Alyssa; Roy, Marie

    2013-12-01

    To review the extant literature on HIV criminal laws, and to determine the impact of these laws on public health practice. The available research on this topic was obtained and reviewed. The extant literature addressed three main topics: people's awareness of HIV criminal laws; people's perceptions of HIV criminal laws; and the potential effects of HIV criminal laws on people's sexual, HIV-status disclosure and healthcare-seeking practices. Within these categories, the literature demonstrated a high level of awareness of HIV criminal laws, but a poor comprehension of these laws. For perceptions, on the whole, the quantitative research identified support for, while the qualitative literature indicated opposition to, these laws. Lastly, the behavioural effects of HIV criminal laws appear to be complex and non-linear. A review of the extant literature from a public health perspective leads to the conclusion that HIV criminal laws undermine public health.

  14. Conceptualizing and Advancing Research Networking Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Titus; Butler, Brian S; Song, Mei; Spallek, Heiko

    2012-03-01

    Science in general, and biomedical research in particular, is becoming more collaborative. As a result, collaboration with the right individuals, teams, and institutions is increasingly crucial for scientific progress. We propose Research Networking Systems (RNS) as a new type of system designed to help scientists identify and choose collaborators, and suggest a corresponding research agenda. The research agenda covers four areas: foundations, presentation, architecture, and evaluation. Foundations includes project-, institution- and discipline-specific motivational factors; the role of social networks; and impression formation based on information beyond expertise and interests. Presentation addresses representing expertise in a comprehensive and up-to-date manner; the role of controlled vocabularies and folksonomies; the tension between seekers' need for comprehensive information and potential collaborators' desire to control how they are seen by others; and the need to support serendipitous discovery of collaborative opportunities. Architecture considers aggregation and synthesis of information from multiple sources, social system interoperability, and integration with the user's primary work context. Lastly, evaluation focuses on assessment of collaboration decisions, measurement of user-specific costs and benefits, and how the large-scale impact of RNS could be evaluated with longitudinal and naturalistic methods. We hope that this article stimulates the human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, and related communities to pursue a broad and comprehensive agenda for developing research networking systems.

  15. Conceptualizing and Advancing Research Networking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHLEYER, TITUS; BUTLER, BRIAN S.; SONG, MEI; SPALLEK, HEIKO

    2013-01-01

    Science in general, and biomedical research in particular, is becoming more collaborative. As a result, collaboration with the right individuals, teams, and institutions is increasingly crucial for scientific progress. We propose Research Networking Systems (RNS) as a new type of system designed to help scientists identify and choose collaborators, and suggest a corresponding research agenda. The research agenda covers four areas: foundations, presentation, architecture, and evaluation. Foundations includes project-, institution- and discipline-specific motivational factors; the role of social networks; and impression formation based on information beyond expertise and interests. Presentation addresses representing expertise in a comprehensive and up-to-date manner; the role of controlled vocabularies and folksonomies; the tension between seekers’ need for comprehensive information and potential collaborators’ desire to control how they are seen by others; and the need to support serendipitous discovery of collaborative opportunities. Architecture considers aggregation and synthesis of information from multiple sources, social system interoperability, and integration with the user’s primary work context. Lastly, evaluation focuses on assessment of collaboration decisions, measurement of user-specific costs and benefits, and how the large-scale impact of RNS could be evaluated with longitudinal and naturalistic methods. We hope that this article stimulates the human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, and related communities to pursue a broad and comprehensive agenda for developing research networking systems. PMID:24376309

  16. Participants' safety versus confidentiality: A case study of HIV research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Moral, Juan Manuel; Feijoo-Cid, Maria

    2017-05-01

    Background When conducting qualitative research, participants usually share lots of personal and private information with the researcher. As researchers, we must preserve participants' identity and confidentiality of the data. Objective To critically analyze an ethical conflict encountered regarding confidentiality when doing qualitative research. Research design Case study. Findings and discussion one of the participants in a study aiming to explain the meaning of living with HIV verbalized his imminent intention to commit suicide because of stigma of other social problems arising from living with HIV. Given the life-threatening situation, the commitment related to not disclosing the participant's identity and/or the content of the interview had to be broken. To avoid or prevent suicide, the therapist in charge of the case was properly informed about the participant's intentions. One important question arises from this case: was it ethically appropriate to break the confidentiality commitment? Conclusion confidentiality could be broken if a life-threatening event is identified during data collection and participants must know that. This has to be clearly stated in the informed consent form.

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-03-13

    Mar 13, 2014 ... Published in partnership with the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET). (www.afenet.net). Research ..... Artisan. 361(15.1). Civil servant. 348(14.6). Professional/Business Executive. 138(5.8). Mode of acquisition of HIV. Heterosexual Contact. 1876(78.5). Blood and Blood product. 129(5.4). MTCT.

  18. Parallel NGO networks for HIV control: risks and opportunities for NGO contracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Shehla; Gul, Xaher; Nishtar, Noureen Aleem

    2012-12-27

    Policy measures for preventive and promotive services are increasingly reliant on contracting of NGOs. Contracting is a neo-liberal response relying on open market competition for service delivery tenders. In contracting of health services a common assumption is a monolithic NGO market. A case study of HIV control in Pakistan shows that in reality the NGO market comprises of parallel NGO networks having widely different service packages, approaches and agendas. These parallel networks had evolved over time due to vertical policy agendas. Contracting of NGOs for provision of HIV services was faced with uneven capacities and turf rivalries across both NGO networks. At the same time contracting helped NGO providers belonging to different clusters to move towards standardized service delivery for HIV prevention. Market based measures such as contracting need to be accompanied with wider policy measures that facilitate in bringing NGOs groups to a shared understanding of health issues and responses.

  19. What Makes or Breaks Provider--Researcher Collaborations in HIV Research? A Mixed Method Analysis of Providers' Willingness to Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rogerio M.

    2013-01-01

    Research is lacking about what makes or breaks collaboration between researchers and HIV services providers. This study identified factors that influence providers' levels of willingness to collaborate in HIV prevention scientific research. Survey measures were grounded in in-depth interview data and included providers' "willingness to…

  20. Getting Past the Gatekeeper: Safeguarding and Access Issues in Researching HIV+ Children in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul; Kelly, Kemesha; Spawls, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This article is derived from a recently completed research study on the "Schooling Experiences of HIV+ Children in Jamaica". It is written against the background of researching children generally, and also in the context of researching vulnerable children, specifically those who are HIV+. Research carries with it various notions of power…

  1. The dynamics of injection drug users' personal networks and HIV risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costenbader, Elizabeth C; Astone, Nan M; Latkin, Carl A

    2006-07-01

    While studies of the social networks of injection drug users (IDUs) have provided insight into how the structures of interpersonal relationships among IDUs affect HIV risk behaviors, the majority of these studies have been cross-sectional. The present study examined the dynamics of IDUs' social networks and HIV risk behaviors over time. Using data from a longitudinal HIV-intervention study conducted in Baltimore, MD, this study assessed changes in the composition of the personal networks of 409 IDUs. We used a multi-nomial logistic regression analysis to assess the association between changes in network composition and simultaneous changes in levels of injection HIV risk behaviors. Using the regression parameters generated by the multi-nomial model, we estimated the predicted probability of being in each of four HIV risk behavior change groups. Compared to the base case, individuals who reported an entirely new set of drug-using network contacts at follow-up were more than three times as likely to be in the increasing risk group. In contrast, reporting all new non-drug-using contacts at follow-up increased the likelihood of being in the stable low-risk group by almost 50% and decreased the probability of being in the consistently high-risk group by more than 70%. The findings from this study show that, over and above IDUs' baseline characteristics, changes in their personal networks are associated with changes in individuals' risky injection behaviors. They also suggest that interventions aimed at reducing HIV risk among IDUs might benefit from increasing IDUs' social contacts with individuals who are not drug users.

  2. Eliciting community perspectives on research with older adults living with HIV through focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Annie L; Brown, Brandon; Taylor, Jeff; Estevez, Marlene; Loftus, Rick

    2017-12-01

    Approximately half of all people living with HIV in the US are age 50 and older. Existing research highlights the health challenges of these individuals, but little work has focused on gathering input about concerns in participating in HIV and aging research. Prior to designing a prospective cohort study on HIV and aging, we elicited feedback from potential participants on general attitudes toward participation in a prospective HIV cohort study, and perspectives on important research topics relevant to older adults living with HIV.Three qualitative focus groups were formed.Three focus groups (5-7 participants each; N = 18) were held with older adults living with HIV. All discussions were audiorecorded and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using content analysis.Participants emphasized the importance of data confidentiality, shared concerns about study biases arising from sponsored research, and suggested that conflicts of interest should be independently assessed by "representative" boards made of community members. They urged researchers to be mindful of research "burnout," because many people with HIV participate in multiple research studies. A number of priority research areas emerged, including the gap in provision of end-of-life services.Many older adults with HIV are knowledgeable about the research process and offer valuable insights to researchers. Addressing participant concerns can facilitate inclusion and enhance HIV research success.

  3. Social networking technologies as an emerging tool for HIV prevention: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sean D; Cumberland, William G; Lee, Sung-Jae; Jaganath, Devan; Szekeres, Greg; Coates, Thomas

    2013-09-03

    Social networking technologies are an emerging tool for HIV prevention. To determine whether social networking communities can increase HIV testing among African American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). Randomized, controlled trial with concealed allocation. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01701206). Online. 112 MSM based in Los Angeles, more than 85% of whom were African American or Latino. Sixteen peer leaders were randomly assigned to deliver information about HIV or general health to participants via Facebook groups over 12 weeks. After participants accepted a request to join the group, participation was voluntary. Group participation and engagement were monitored. Participants could request a free, home-based HIV testing kit and completed questionnaires at baseline and 12-week follow-up. Participant acceptance of and engagement in the intervention and social network participation, rates of home-based HIV testing, and sexual risk behaviors. Almost 95% of intervention participants and 73% of control participants voluntarily communicated using the social platform. Twenty-five of 57 intervention participants (44%) requested home-based HIV testing kits compared with 11 of 55 control participants (20%) (difference, 24 percentage points [95% CI, 8 to 41 percentage points]). Nine of the 25 intervention participants (36%) who requested the test took it and mailed it back compared with 2 of the 11 control participants (18%) who requested the test. Retention at study follow-up was more than 93%. Only 2 Facebook communities were included for each group. Social networking communities are acceptable and effective tools to increase home-based HIV testing among at-risk populations. National Institute of Mental Health.

  4. ResearchGate & Academia: Networks for Researchers to Improve Research Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    Researchers needs to remove many traditional obstacles to reach the general public. Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications, and get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work. It gives you another place to establish your name and research and perhaps even collaborate with others. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are R...

  5. Characteristics of HIV infected individuals traveling abroad. Results from the +REDIVI Collaborative Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Molina, Jose A; Martinez-Perez, Angela; Serre, Nuria; Treviño, Begoña; Ruiz-Giardín, José Manuel; Torrús, Diego; Goikoetxea, Josune; Echevarría, Esteban Martín; Malmierca, Eduardo; Rojo, Gerardo; Calabuig, Eva; Gutierrez, Belén; Norman, Francesca; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio

    2016-02-01

    The improvement in the prognosis of HIV infection, coupled with the increase in international travel and migration, has led to a rising number of HIV infected travelers. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological and clinical features of returning travelers, according to their HIV status. An observational prospective study was conducted including travelers and immigrants who traveled to visit friends and relatives (VFRs) registered in the +REDIVI collaborative network (January-2009; October-2014). +REDIVI is a national network that registers information regarding infections imported by travelers and immigrants at 21 different centers using a standardized protocol. A total of 3464 travellers were identified: 72 were HIV+ (2.1%) and 3.392 HIV- (98%). HIV+ vs. HIV- travelers were often older (40.5y vs. 34.2y P=.001), VFRs (79.1% vs. 44.4%; P<.001), and consulted less for pre-travel advice (27% vs. 37%; P=.078). The main destinations for both groups were sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. The most frequent reasons for consultation after travel were fever, request for a health examination, gastrointestinal complaints, and abnormal laboratory tests (mainly eosinophilia and anemia), which differed between groups. The most frequent diagnoses in HIV+ travelers were malaria (38.8%), newly diagnosed HIV infection (25%), and intestinal parasites (19.4%), while for HIV- travelers the main diagnoses were "healthy" (17.9%), malaria (14%), and intestinal parasites (17.3%). The typical profile of an HIV+ traveler in +REDIVI was that of a VFR traveler who did not seek pre-travel advice and made high-risk trips. This may increase the chance of acquiring travel-related infections which may pose a special risk for HIV-infected travelers. The post-travel visit was a good opportunity for HIV infection screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Networking to Improve Nutrition Policy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanck, Heidi M.; Cradock, Angie; Gortmaker, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Effective nutrition and obesity policies that improve the food environments in which Americans live, work, and play can have positive effects on the quality of human diets. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network (NOPREN) conducts transdisciplinary practice-based policy research and evaluation to foster understanding of the effectiveness of nutrition policies. The articles in this special collection bring to light a set of policies that are being used across the United States. They add to the larger picture of policies that can work together over time to improve diet and health. PMID:26355829

  7. Conducting HIV research in racial and ethnic minority communities: building a successful interdisciplinary research team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Frinny R; Dominguez, Dinora C; Grady, Christine; Stoll, Pamela; Ramos, Catalina; Mican, Joann M; Miranda-Acevedo, Robert; Morgan, Marcela; Aizvera, Jeasmine; Purdie, Lori; Koziol, Deloris; Rivera-Goba, Migdalia V

    2011-01-01

    HIV infection occurs in disproportionately high rates among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States, making it imperative that individuals from these groups be included in research studies. However, it is often difficult to recruit HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans in clinical trials, but a skilled interdisciplinary team that includes researchers with racial and ethnic diversity can help. This article describes a successful approach for building an interdisciplinary team that values the participation of racial and ethnic minorities in clinical trials and has the skills to work with these groups. The success of the Adelante (a Spanish word meaning forward) Team can be attributed to team members who actively participate in decision-making, are empowered, and function in a cohesive manner. Successful research teams build relationships with research participants to increase the probability that racial and ethnic minorities will enroll and participate fully in research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. A research on the application of software defined networking in satellite network architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huan; Chen, Jinqiang; Cao, Suzhi; Cui, Dandan; Li, Tong; Su, Yuxing

    2017-10-01

    Software defined network is a new type of network architecture, which decouples control plane and data plane of traditional network, has the feature of flexible configurations and is a direction of the next generation terrestrial Internet development. Satellite network is an important part of the space-ground integrated information network, while the traditional satellite network has the disadvantages of difficult network topology maintenance and slow configuration. The application of SDN technology in satellite network can solve these problems that traditional satellite network faces. At present, the research on the application of SDN technology in satellite network is still in the stage of preliminary study. In this paper, we start with introducing the SDN technology and satellite network architecture. Then we mainly introduce software defined satellite network architecture, as well as the comparison of different software defined satellite network architecture and satellite network virtualization. Finally, the present research status and development trend of SDN technology in satellite network are analyzed.

  9. Information literacy: perceptions of Brazilian HIV/AIDS researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Maria do Carmo Avamilano; França, Ivan; Cuenca, Angela Maria Belloni; Bastos, Francisco I; Ueno, Helene Mariko; Barros, Cláudia Renata; Guimarães, Maria Cristina Soares

    2014-03-01

    Information literacy has evolved with changes in lifelong learning. Can Brazilian health researchers search for and use updated scientific information? To describe researchers' information literacy based on their perceptions of their abilities to search for and use scientific information and on their interactions with libraries. Semi-structured interviews and focus group conducted with six Brazilian HIV/AIDS researchers. Analyses comprised the assessment of researchers as disseminators, their interactions with librarians, their use of information and communication technology and language. Interviewees believed they were partially qualified to use databases. They used words and phrases that indicated their knowledge of technology and terminology. They acted as disseminators for students during information searches. Researchers' abilities to interact with librarians are key skills, especially in a renewed context where libraries have, to a large extent, changed from physical spaces to digital environments. Great amounts of information have been made available, and researchers' participation in courses does not automatically translate into adequate information literacy. Librarians must help research groups, and as such, librarians' information literacy-related responsibilities in Brazil should be redefined and expanded. Students must develop the ability to learn quickly, and librarians should help them in their efforts. Librarians and researchers can act as gatekeepers for research groups and as information coaches to improve others' search abilities. © 2013 Health Libraries Group of CILIP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The Evolution of the Personal Networks of Novice Librarian Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Marie R.; Kennedy, David P.; Brancolini, Kristine R.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes for the first time the composition and structure of the personal networks of novice librarian researchers. We used social network analysis to observe if participating in the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) affected the development of the librarians' personal networks and how the networks changed over…

  11. Collectivism culture, HIV stigma and social network support in Anhui, China: a path analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Chunpeng; Guida, Jennifer; Sun, Yehuan; Liu, Hongjie

    2014-08-01

    HIV stigma is rooted in culture and, therefore, it is essential to investigate it within the context of culture. The objective of this study was to examine the interrelationships among individualism-collectivism, HIV stigma, and social network support. A social network study was conducted among 118 people living with HIVAIDS in China, who were infected by commercial plasma donation, a nonstigmatized behavior. The Individualism-Collectivism Interpersonal Assessment Inventory (ICIAI) was used to measure cultural norms and values in the context of three social groups, family members, friends, and neighbors. Path analyses revealed (1) a higher level of family ICIAI was significantly associated with a higher level of HIV self-stigma (β=0.32); (2) a higher level of friend ICIAI was associated with a lower level of self-stigma (β=-035); (3) neighbor ICIAI was associated with public stigma (β=-0.61); (4) self-stigman was associated with social support from neighbors (β=-0.27); and (5) public stigma was associated with social support from neighbors (β=-0.24). This study documents that HIV stigma may mediate the relationship between collectivist culture and social network support, providing an empirical basis for interventions to include aspects of culture into HIV intervention strategies.

  12. Computational Analysis of Molecular Interaction Networks Underlying Change of HIV-1 Resistance to Selected Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierczak, Marcin; Dramiński, Michał; Koronacki, Jacek; Komorowski, Jan

    2010-12-12

    Despite more than two decades of research, HIV resistance to drugs remains a serious obstacle in developing efficient AIDS treatments. Several computational methods have been developed to predict resistance level from the sequence of viral proteins such as reverse transcriptase (RT) or protease. These methods, while powerful and accurate, give very little insight into the molecular interactions that underly acquisition of drug resistance/hypersusceptibility. Here, we attempt at filling this gap by using our Monte Carlo feature selection and interdependency discovery method (MCFS-ID) to elucidate molecular interaction networks that characterize viral strains with altered drug resistance levels. We analyzed a number of HIV-1 RT sequences annotated with drug resistance level using the MCFS-ID method. This let us expound interdependency networks that characterize change of drug resistance to six selected RT inhibitors: Abacavir, Lamivudine, Stavudine, Zidovudine, Tenofovir and Nevirapine. The networks consider interdependencies at the level of physicochemical properties of mutating amino acids, eg,: polarity. We mapped each network on the 3D structure of RT in attempt to understand the molecular meaning of interacting pairs. The discovered interactions describe several known drug resistance mechanisms and, importantly, some previously unidentified ones. Our approach can be easily applied to a whole range of problems from the domain of protein engineering. A portable Java implementation of our MCFS-ID method is freely available for academic users and can be obtained at: http://www.ipipan.eu/staff/m.draminski/software.htm.

  13. Social Justice and HIV Vaccine Research in the Age of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and Treatment as Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Theodore C.; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The advent of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment as prevention (TasP) as means of HIV prevention raises issues of justice concerning how most fairly and equitably to apportion resources in support of the burgeoning variety of established HIV treatment and prevention measures and further HIV research, including HIV vaccine research. We apply contemporary approaches to social justice to assess the ethical justification for allocating resources in support of HIV vaccine research given...

  14. Social Networking Technology Use and Engagement in HIV-Related Risk and Protective Behaviors Among Homeless Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric; Bender, Kimberly; Lengnick-Hall, Rebecca; Yoshioka-Maxwell, Amanda; Rhoades, Harmony

    2016-07-01

    Preliminary studies with homeless youth have found surprisingly pervasive social media use and suggest that youth's online interactions may be associated with their HIV-related risk and protective behaviors. As homeless youth are transient and difficult to engage in place-based services, social media may represent a novel venue for intervention. A critical 1st step in intervention development is gaining greater understanding of how homeless youth use social media, especially as it relates to who they connect to and around what topics. Given the salience of social networking sites in the lives of these otherwise difficult-to-reach adolescents, and their potential to disseminate prevention interventions, this study assessed associations between online social networking technology use and HIV risk behaviors among homeless youth in Los Angeles, California. Homeless youth ages 13 through 24 (N = 1,046) were recruited through 3 drop-in centers and surveyed about their social media use and self-reported HIV-related risk behaviors. Results suggest that social media use is widely prevalent among this population, and the content of these online interactions is associated with whether youth engage in risk or protective behaviors. Implications for interventions and further research are discussed.

  15. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cohort of HIV-Uninfected Women in the United States: HIV Prevention Trials Network 064.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Chen

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral (ARV drug use was analyzed in HIV-uninfected women in an observational cohort study conducted in 10 urban and periurban communities in the United States with high rates of poverty and HIV infection. Plasma samples collected in 2009-2010 were tested for the presence of 16 ARV drugs. ARV drugs were detected in samples from 39 (2% of 1,806 participants: 27/181 (15% in Baltimore, MD and 12/179 (7% in Bronx, NY. The ARV drugs detected included different combinations of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (1-4 drugs/sample. These data were analyzed in the context of self-reported data on ARV drug use. None of the 39 women who had ARV drugs detected reported ARV drug use at any study visit. Further research is needed to evaluate ARV drug use by HIV-uninfected individuals.

  16. ESnet and Internet2 to launch next gen research network

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and Internet2 will deploy a high capacity nationwide network that will greatly enhance the capabilities of researchers across the country who participate in the DOE's scientific research efforts." (1 page)

  17. Research on Evolutionary Mechanism of Agile Supply Chain Network via Complex Network Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Ru Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper establishes the evolutionary mechanism model of agile supply chain network by means of complex network theory which can be used to describe the growth process of the agile supply chain network and analyze the complexity of the agile supply chain network. After introducing the process and the suitability of taking complex network theory into supply chain network research, the paper applies complex network theory into the agile supply chain network research, analyzes the complexity of agile supply chain network, presents the evolutionary mechanism of agile supply chain network based on complex network theory, and uses Matlab to simulate degree distribution, average path length, clustering coefficient, and node betweenness. Simulation results show that the evolution result displays the scale-free property. It lays the foundations of further research on agile supply chain network based on complex network theory.

  18. Research on 6R Military Logistics Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Wan; Wen, Wang

    The building of military logistics network is an important issue for the construction of new forces. This paper has thrown out a concept model of 6R military logistics network model based on JIT. Then we conceive of axis spoke y logistics centers network, flexible 6R organizational network, lean 6R military information network based grid. And then the strategy and proposal for the construction of the three sub networks of 6Rmilitary logistics network are given.

  19. Rational design of HIV vaccines and microbicides: report of the EUROPRISE network annual conference 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinckmann, Sarah; Da Costa, Kelly; van Gils, Marit J.; Hallengärd, David; Klein, Katja; Madeira, Luisa; Mainetti, Lara; Palma, Paolo; Raue, Katharina; Reinhart, David; Reudelsterz, Marc; Ruffin, Nicolas; Seifried, Janna; Schäfer, Katrein; Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Sköld, Annette; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Vabret, Nicolas; Ziglio, Serena; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Shattock, Robin; Wahren, Britta; Gotch, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Novel, exciting intervention strategies to prevent infection with HIV have been tested in the past year, and the field is rapidly evolving. EUROPRISE is a network of excellence sponsored by the European Commission and concerned with a wide range of activities including integrated developmental

  20. The association between social networks and self-rated risk of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes the social networks of secondary school students in Moshi Municipality, and their association with self-rated risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted among 300 students aged 15–24 years in 5 secondary schools in Moshi, Tanzania.

  1. Computational analysis of HIV-1 resistance based on gene expression profiles and the virus-host interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    Full Text Available A very small proportion of people remain negative for HIV infection after repeated HIV-1 viral exposure, which is called HIV-1 resistance. Understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 resistance is important for the development of HIV-1 vaccines and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS therapies. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of CD4+ T cells from HIV-1-resistant individuals and HIV-susceptible individuals. One hundred eighty-five discriminative HIV-1 resistance genes were identified using the Minimum Redundancy-Maximum Relevance (mRMR and Incremental Feature Selection (IFS methods. The virus protein target enrichment analysis of the 185 HIV-1 resistance genes suggested that the HIV-1 protein nef might play an important role in HIV-1 infection. Moreover, we identified 29 infection information exchanger genes from the 185 HIV-1 resistance genes based on a virus-host interaction network analysis. The infection information exchanger genes are located on the shortest paths between virus-targeted proteins and are important for the coordination of virus infection. These proteins may be useful targets for AIDS prevention or therapy, as intervention in these pathways could disrupt communication with virus-targeted proteins and HIV-1 infection.

  2. Integration opportunities for HIV and family planning services in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: an organizational network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, James C; Reynolds, Heidi; Bevc, Christine; Tsegaye, Ademe

    2014-01-18

    Public health resources are often deployed in developing countries by foreign governments, national governments, civil society and the private health clinics, but seldom in ways that are coordinated within a particular community or population. The lack of coordination results in inefficiencies and suboptimal results. Organizational network analysis can reveal how organizations interact with each other and provide insights into means of realizing better public health results from the resources already deployed. Our objective in this study was to identify the missed opportunities for the integration of HIV care and family planning services and to inform future network strengthening. In two sub-cities of Addis Ababa, we identified each organization providing either HIV care or family planning services. We interviewed representatives of each of them about exchanges of clients with each of the others. With network analysis, we identified network characteristics in each sub-city network, such as referral density and centrality; and gaps in the referral patterns. The results were shared with representatives from the organizations. The two networks were of similar size (25 and 26 organizations) and had referral densities of 0.115 and 0.155 out of a possible range from 0 (none) to 1.0 (all possible connections). Two organizations in one sub-city did not refer HIV clients to a family planning organization. One organization in one sub-city and seven in the other offered few HIV services and did not refer clients to any other HIV service provider. Representatives from the networks confirmed the results reflected their experience and expressed an interest in establishing more links between organizations. Because of organizations not working together, women in the two sub-cities were at risk of not receiving needed family planning or HIV care services. Facilitating referrals among a few organizations that are most often working in isolation could remediate the problem, but the

  3. Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL) Telemetry Warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Collection, Storage, and Retrieval 3 3.2 Comparative Analysis 4 3.3 Data Processing 4 4. Architecture 4 4.1 NTW Database 6 4.2 NTW Server 6 4.4...efforts between ARL and the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The primary emulation tools used by ARL are the Extendable Mobile Ad -Hoc Network...procedure call (gRPC) system. The gRPC system uses the Google protocol buffers compiler to generate the code for the server . gRPC handles many of the basic

  4. Research On Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) In Malawi: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The incidence of gonorrhoea, trichomoniasis, genital ulcers and genital warts among the cohort ofr644 HIV-I seropositive and 677 HIV-l seronegative women is shown in Table 3. The cumulative incidence of these diseases was significantly higher in HIV-l seropositive than in.

  5. Contemporary HIV/AIDS research: Insights from knowledge management theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Chris William

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge management as a field is concerned with the management of knowledge, including the management of knowledge in research processes. Knowledge management theory has the potential to support research into problems such as HIV, antibiotic resistance and others, particularly in terms of aspects of scientific research related to the contribution of social science. To date, however, these challenges remain with us, and theoretical contributions that can complement natural science efforts to eradicate these problems are needed. This paper seeks to offer a theoretical contribution grounded in Kuhn's paradigm theory of innovation, and in the argument by Lakatos that scientific research can be fundamentally non-innovative, which suggests that social science aspects of knowledge creation may hold the key to more effective biomedical innovation. Given the consequences of ongoing and emerging global crises, and the failure of knowledge systems of scientific research to solve such problems outright, this paper provides a review of theory and literature arguing for a new paradigm in scientific research, based on the development of global systems to maximise research collaborations. A global systems approach effectively includes social science theory development as an important complement to the natural sciences research process. Arguably, information technology and social media technology have developed to the point at which solutions to knowledge aggregation challenges can enable solutions to knowledge problems on a scale hitherto unimaginable. Expert and non-expert crowdsourced inputs can enable problem-solving through exponentially increasing problem-solving inputs, using the 'crowd,' thereby increasing collaborations dramatically. It is argued that these developments herald a new era of participatory research, or a democratisation of research, which offers new hope for solving global social problems. This paper seeks to contribute to this end, and to the recognition

  6. A new HIV prevention network approach: sociometric peer change agent selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, John A; Zhou, A Ning; Laumann, Edward O

    2015-01-01

    Internationally, the Peer Change Agent (PCA) model is the most frequently used conceptual framework for HIV prevention. Change agents themselves can be more important than the messages they convey. PCA selection is operationalized via heterogeneous methods based upon individual-level attributes. A sociometric position selection strategy, however, could increase peer influence potency and halt transmission at key network locations. In this study, we selected candidate PCAs based upon relative sociometric bridging and centrality scores and assessed their attributes in comparison to one another and to existing peer educators. We focused upon an emerging HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men in Southern India in 2011. PCAs selected based on their bridging score were more likely to be innovators when compared to other centrally-located PCAs, to PCAs located on the periphery, and to existing peer educators. We also found that sociodemographic attributes and risk behaviors were similar across all candidate PCAs, but risk behaviors of existing peer educators differed. Existing peer educators were more likely to engage in higher risk behavior such as receiving money for sex when compared to sociometrically selected peer changes agents. These existing peer educators were also more likely to exhibit leadership qualities within the overall network; they were, however, just as likely as other non-trained candidate peer change agents to report important HIV intravention behavior (encouraging condoms within their network). The importance of identifying bridges who may be able to diffuse innovation more effectively within high risk HIV networks is especially critical given recent efficacy data from novel HIV prevention interventions such as pre-exposure prophylaxis. Moreover, while existing peer educators were more likely to be leaders in our analysis, using peer educators with high risk behavior may have limited utility in enacting behavior change among sex worker peers or

  7. A New HIV Prevention Network Approach: Sociometric Peer Change Agent Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, John A.; Zhou, A. Ning; Laumann, Edward O.

    2014-01-01

    Internationally, the Peer Change Agent (PCA) model is the most frequently used conceptual framework for HIV prevention. Change agents themselves can be more important than the messages they convey. PCA selection is operationalized via heterogeneous methods based upon individual-level attributes. A sociometric position selection strategy, however, could increase peer influence potency and halt transmission at key network locations. In this study, we selected candidate PCAs based upon relative sociometric bridging and centrality scores and assessed their attributes in comparison to one another and to existing peer educators. We focused upon an emerging HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men in Southern India in 2011. PCAs selected based on their bridging score were more likely to be innovators when compared to other centrally-located PCAs, to PCAs located on the periphery, and to existing peer educators. We also found that sociodemographic attributes and risk behaviors were similar across all candidate PCAs, but risk behaviors of existing peer educators differed. Existing peer educators were more likely to engage in higher risk behavior such as receiving money for sex when compared to sociometrically selected peer changes agents. These existing peer educators were also more likely to exhibit leadership qualities within the overall network; they were, however, just as likely as other non-trained candidate peer change agents to report important HIV intravention behavior (encouraging condoms within their network). The importance of identifying bridges who may be able to diffuse innovation more effectively within high risk HIV networks is especially critical given recent efficacy data from novel HIV prevention interventions such as pre-exposure prophylaxis. Moreover, while existing peer educators were more likely to be leaders in our analysis, using peer educators with high risk behavior may have limited utility in enacting behavior change among sex worker peers or

  8. Breaking the Culture of Silence in Checkmating HIV/AIDS as a Teacher-Researcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, O.

    2010-01-01

    In my investigation I set out to break the HIV/AIDS culture of silence and emphasize the role of the teacher as a researcher and critical change agent in an HIV/AIDS challenged society. My work demonstrates how teachers could play such a role by encouraging learners' participation in sport. The sport, I focussed on in my action research project…

  9. Using Participatory Action Research to Develop an HIV and AIDS School Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ronél; Ebersöhn, Liesel; Botha, Karien

    2013-01-01

    In this article we report on the manner in which participatory action research (PAR) was utilised by teachers in developing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) school plan, in collaboration with university researchers. The need for a structured HIV and Aids school plan emerged during the course of a…

  10. Weighted brain networks in disease: centrality and entropy in HIV and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jewell B.; Brier, Matthew R.; Ortega, Mario; Benzinger, Tammie L.; Ances, Beau M.

    2014-01-01

    Graph theory models can produce simple, biologically informative metrics of the topology of resting-state functional connectivity (FC) networks. However, typical graph theory approaches model FC relationships between regions (nodes) as unweighted edges, complicating their interpretability in studies of disease or aging. We extended existing techniques and constructed fully-connected weighted graphs for groups of age-matched HIV positive (n=67) and HIV negative (n=77) individuals. We compared test-retest reliability of weighted vs. unweighted metrics in an independent study of healthy individuals (n=22) and found weighted measures to be more stable. We quantified two measures of node centrality (closeness centrality and eigenvector centrality) to capture the relative importance of individual nodes. We also quantified one measure of graph entropy (diversity) to measure the variability in connection strength (edge weights) at each node. HIV was primarily associated with differences in measures of centrality, and age was primarily associated with differences in diversity. HIV and age were associated with divergent measures when evaluated at the whole-graph level, within individual functional networks, and at the level of individual nodes. Graph models may allow us to distinguish previously indistinguishable effects related to HIV and age on FC. PMID:25034343

  11. Potentialities and weaknesses in the care network of people with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnera, Liliam Cristiana Júlio; Meirelles, Betina Hörner Schlindwein

    2015-01-01

    to understand the strengths and weaknesses in the care network of people with HIV/AIDS in a referral center in the state of Santa Catarina-SC. participants were eight subjects and their care network, totaling 18 participants. Data were collected through interviews and examined by content analysis, theoretically supported by symbolic interaction. the analysis resulted in the following categories: The network offering care to people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and Facing Barriers in care, which reflect the strengths and weaknesses in the care network. The fi rst depicts the provision of emotional and humanized care, and the second a restricted network formed by health professionals and a family member. the professional care network is important, despite the increased number of assistances in a physical structure and amount of professionals who no longer meet the growing demand.

  12. HIV Transmission Networks in the San Diego-Tijuana Border Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sanjay R; Wertheim, Joel O; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Wagner, Karla D; Chaillon, Antoine; Strathdee, Steffanie; Patterson, Thomas L; Rangel, Maria G; Vargas, Mlenka; Murrell, Ben; Garfein, Richard; Little, Susan J; Smith, Davey M

    2015-10-01

    HIV sequence data can be used to reconstruct local transmission networks. Along international borders, like the San Diego-Tijuana region, understanding the dynamics of HIV transmission across reported risks, racial/ethnic groups, and geography can help direct effective prevention efforts on both sides of the border. We gathered sociodemographic, geographic, clinical, and viral sequence data from HIV infected individuals participating in ten studies in the San Diego-Tijuana border region. Phylogenetic and network analysis was performed to infer putative relationships between HIV sequences. Correlates of identified clusters were evaluated and spatiotemporal relationships were explored using Bayesian phylogeographic analysis. After quality filtering, 843 HIV sequences with associated demographic data and 263 background sequences from the region were analyzed, and 138 clusters were inferred (2-23 individuals). Overall, the rate of clustering did not differ by ethnicity, residence, or sex, but bisexuals were less likely to cluster than heterosexuals or men who have sex with men (p = 0.043), and individuals identifying as white (p ≤ 0.01) were more likely to cluster than other races. Clustering individuals were also 3.5 years younger than non-clustering individuals (p < 0.001). Although the sampled San Diego and Tijuana epidemics were phylogenetically compartmentalized, five clusters contained individuals residing on both sides of the border. This study sampled ~ 7% of HIV infected individuals in the border region, and although the sampled networks on each side of the border were largely separate, there was evidence of persistent bidirectional cross-border transmissions that linked risk groups, thus highlighting the importance of the border region as a "melting pot" of risk groups. NIH, VA, and Pendleton Foundation.

  13. A network intervention that locates and intervenes with recently HIV-infected persons: The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K.; Pavlitina, Eirini; Muth, Stephen Q.; Schneider, John; Psichogiou, Mina; Williams, Leslie D.; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Sypsa, Vana; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Smyrnov, Pavlo; Korobchuk, Anya; Vasylyeva, Tetyana I.; Skaathun, Britt; Malliori, Melpomeni; Kafetzopoulos, Evangelos; Hatzakis, Angelos; Friedman, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    Early treatment, soon after infection, reduces HIV transmissions and benefits patients. The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP) evaluated a network intervention to detect individuals recently infected (in the past 6 months). TRIP was conducted in Greece (2013–2015) and focused on drug injector networks. Based on HIV status, testing history, and the results of an assay to detect recent infections, TRIP classified drug injector “Seeds” into groups: Recent Seeds (RS), and Control Seeds with Long-term HIV infection (LCS). The network members of RS and LCS were traced for two steps. The analysis included 23 RS, 171 network members of the RS, 19 LCS, and 65 network members of the LCS. The per-seed number of recents detected in the network of RS was 5 times the number in the network of LCS (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 5.23; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.54–27.61). The proportion of recents among HIV positives in the network of RS (27%) was approximately 3 times (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 3.30; 95% CI: 1.04–10.43) that in the network of LCS (8%). Strategic network tracing that starts with recently infected persons could support public health efforts to find and treat people early in their HIV infection. PMID:27917890

  14. A network-level explanation for the differences in HIV prevalence in South Africa's racial groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chris; Dlamini, Sipho; Boulle, Andrew; White, Richard G; Badri, Motasim

    2009-09-01

    Analyses of individual-level risk factors have not been able to adequately explain why HIV has spread so extensively in southern Africa and why this has occurred especially within certain racial or ethnic groups. Using data from a longitudinal study of a representative sample of adolescents aged 14-22 living in Cape Town, South Africa, this article presents evidence of how differences in individual-level risk factors as well as sexual network structures between different racial or ethnic groups may help explain the differential spread of HIV in South Africa. Particular emphasis is placed on how levels of partner concurrency, respondent concurrency, mutual concurrency, serial concurrency and numbers of sexual partners and an average early age of sexual debut combine in different ways in the different racial or ethnic groups to create networks of sexual partnerships that differ in the density of their interconnections and hence potential for HIV spread. These network-level differences offer a potential explanation for the observed generalised HIV epidemic seen among the population of black South Africans.

  15. Qualitative Research Methods to Advance Research on Health Inequities among Previously Incarcerated Women Living with HIV in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Courtenay; Scanlon, Michael L.; Pantalone, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Justice-involved HIV-positive women have poor health outcomes that constitute health inequities. Researchers have yet to embrace the range of qualitative methods to elucidate how psychosocial histories are connected to pathways of vulnerability to HIV and incarceration for this key population. We used life course narratives and…

  16. Risk factors and outcomes for late presentation for HIV-positive persons in Europe: results from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe Study (COHERE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D.; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Casabona, Jordi; Castagna, Antonella; Costagliola, Dominique; Dabis, Francois; de Wit, Stéphane; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Furrer, Hansjakob; Johnson, Anne M.; Lazanas, Marios K.; Leport, Catherine; Moreno, Santiago; Obel, Niels; Post, Frank A.; Reekie, Joanne; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Skaletz-Rorowski, Adriane; Suarez-Lozano, Ignacio; Torti, Carlo; Warszawski, Josiane; Zangerle, Robert; Fabre-Colin, Céline; Kjaer, Jesper; Chene, Genevieve; Grarup, Jesper; Kirk, Ole; Lundgren, Jens; Sabin, Miriam; Johnson, Anne; Lazanas, Mario; Post, Frank; Suarez-Loano, Ignacio; Johnson, Hansjakob Furrer Anne; Touloumi, Giota; Meyer, Laurence; Dabis, François; Krause, Murielle Mary; Ghosn, Jade; de Wolf, Frank; Prins, Maria; Bucher, Heiner; Gibb, Diana; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara; del Amo, Julia; Thorne, Claire; Stephan, Christoph; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Antinori, Andrea; Monforte, Antonella d' Arminio; Ramos, José; Battegay, Manuel; Rauch, Andri; Mussini, Cristina; Tookey, Pat; Miro, Jose M.; de Wit, Stephane; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Teira, Ramon; Garrido, Myriam; Judd, Ali; Haerry, David; Weller, Ian; Schwimmer, Christine; Termote, Monique; Touzeau, Guillaume; Campbell, Maria; Friis-Møller, Nina; Bohlius, Julia; Bouteloup, Vincent; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Dorrucci, Maria; Egger, Matthias; Engsig, Frederik; Lambotte, Olivier; Lewden, Charlotte; Lodwick, Rebecca; Matheron, Sophie; Miro, Jose; Paredes, Roger; Phillips, Andrew; Puoti, Massimo; Scherrer, Alexandra; Smit, Colette; Sterne, Jonathan; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; von Wyl, Viktor; Wittkop, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have monitored late presentation (LP) of HIV infection over the European continent, including Eastern Europe. Study objectives were to explore the impact of LP on AIDS and mortality. LP was defined in Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE) as HIV

  17. Social networks of old people in India: research and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Willigen, John; Chadha, N K

    2003-01-01

    This article presents a comparative analysis of the available research on the social networks of older persons in India. Most of this research has been done in North Indian cities. The research foci of the available studies include network size, core networks and beyond, life course changes in networks, impacts of residency in old-age homes, gender differences, and joint and nuclear family residence. This research is discussed in terms of its policy implications. Because the research demonstrates that social networks are important for the welfare of older Indians, one can conclude that social policy that encourages the maintenance of robust networks throughout the life course may be worth pursuing. One aspect of policy is discussed. The analysis of the relationship between social network and gender suggests that current policies that can be seen as supporting gender inequality in terms of property may have a negative impact on the networks of older women.

  18. Modern International Research Groups: Networks and Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katehi, Linda

    2009-05-01

    In a globalized economy, education and research are becoming increasing international in content and context. Academic and research institutions worldwide try to internationalize their programs by setting formal or informal collaborations. An education that is enhanced by international experiences leads to mobility of the science and technology workforce. Existing academic cultures and research structures are at odds with efforts to internationalize education. For the past 20-30 years, the US has recognized the need to improve the abroad experience of our scientists and technologists: however progress has been slow. Despite a number of both federally and privately supported programs, efforts to scale up the numbers of participants have not been satisfactory. The exchange is imbalanced as more foreign scientists and researchers move to the US than the other way around. There are a number of issues that contribute to this imbalance but we could consider the US academic career system, as defined by its policies and practices, as a barrier to internationalizing the early career faculty experience. Strict curricula, pre-tenure policies and financial commitments discourage students, post doctoral fellows and pre-tenure faculty from taking international leaves to participate in research abroad experiences. Specifically, achieving an international experience requires funding that is not provided by the universities. Furthermore, intellectual property requirements and constraints in pre-tenure probationary periods may discourage students and faculty from collaborations with peers across the Atlantic or Pacific or across the American continent. Environments that support early career networking are not available. This presentation will discuss the increasing need for international collaborations and will explore the need for additional programs, more integration, better conditions and improved infrastructures that can encourage and support mobility of scientists. In addition

  19. Structural bridging network position is associated with HIV status in a younger Black men who have sex with men epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirav S.; Iveniuk, James; Muth, Stephen Q.; Michaels, Stuart; Jose, Jo-Anne; Laumann, Edward O.; Schneider, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Younger Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) ages 16–29 have the highest rates of HIV in the United States. Despite increased attention to social and sexual networks as a framework for biomedical intervention, the role of measured network positions, such as bridging and their relationship to HIV risk has received limited attention. A network sample (N=620) of BMSM respondents (n=154) and their MSM and transgendered person network members (n=466) was generated through respondent driven sampling of BMSM and elicitation of their personal networks. Bridging status of each network member was determined by a constraint measure and was used to assess the relationship between this bridging and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), sex-drug use (SDU), group sex (GS) and HIV status within the network in South Chicago. Low, moderate and high bridging was observed in 411 (66.8%), 81 (13.2%) and 123 (20.0%) of the network. In addition to age and having sex with men only, moderate and high levels of bridging were associated with HIV status (AOR 3.19; 95% CI 1.58–6.45 and AOR 3.83; 95% CI 1.23–11.95, respectively). Risk behaviors observed including UAS, GS, and SDU were not associated with HIV status, however, they clustered together in their associations with one another. Bridging network position but not risk behavior was associated with HIV status in this network sample of younger BMSM. Socio-structural features such as position within the network may be important when implementing effective HIV prevention interventions in younger BMSM populations. PMID:24337699

  20. Evolution of the research collaboration network in a productive department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerndahl, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding collaboration networks can facilitate the research growth of new or developing departments. The purpose of this study was to use social network analysis to understand how the research collaboration network evolved within a productive department. Over a 13-year period, a departmental faculty completed an annual survey describing their research collaborations. Data were analyzed using social network analysis. Network measures focused on connectedness, distance, groupings and heterogeneity of distribution, while measures for the research director and external collaboration focused on centrality and roles within the network. Longitudinal patterns of network collaboration were assessed using Simulation Investigation for Empirical Network Analysis software (University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands). Based upon the number of active research projects, research development can be divided into three phases. The initial development phase was characterized by increasing centralization and collaboration focused within a single subject area. During the maintenance phase, measures went through cycles, possibly because of changes in faculty composition. While the research director was not a 'key player' within the network during the first several years, external collaboration played a central role during all phases. Longitudinal analysis found that forming ties was more likely when the opportunity for network closure existed and when those around you are principal investigators (PIs). Initial development of research relied heavily upon a centralized network involving external collaboration; a central position of the research director during research development was not important. Changes in collaboration depended upon faculty gender and tenure track as well as transitivity and the 'popularity of PIs'. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Recent Themes in Social Networking Service Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S Liu

    Full Text Available The body of literature addressing the phenomenon related to social networking services (SNSs has grown rather fast recently. Through a systematic and quantitative approach, this study identifies the recent SNS research themes, which are the issues discussed by a coherent and growing subset of this literature. A set of academic articles retrieved from the Web of Science database is used as the basis for uncovering the recent themes. We begin the analysis by constructing a citation network which is further separated into groups after applying a widely used clustering method. The resulting clusters all consist of articles coherent in citation relationships. This study suggests eight fast growing recent themes. They span widely encompassing politics, romantic relationships, public relations, journalism, and health. Among them, four focus their issues largely on Twitter, three on Facebook, and one generally on both. While discussions on traditional issues in SNSs such as personality, motivations, self-disclosure, narcissism, etc. continue to lead the pack, the proliferation of the highlighted recent themes in the near future is very likely to happen.

  2. Privacy Issues of a National Research and Education Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, James E.; Graveman, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the right to privacy of communications focuses on privacy expectations within a National Research and Education Network (NREN). Highlights include privacy needs in scientific and education communications; academic and research networks; network security and privacy concerns; protection strategies; and consequences of privacy…

  3. Social networks, migration, and HIV testing among Latinos in a new immigrant destination: Insights from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Clare; Gandhi, Anisha; Gill, Adrienne; Villa Torres, Laura; Brietzke, Maria Priscila; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa

    2017-12-03

    Latinos in the U.S. are disproportionately affected by HIV and are more likely than non-Latinos to present with a late diagnosis, which delays engagement in HIV care and treatment. Social networks may provide normative influence and social support for HIV testing, but a contextualised understanding of networks is needed in order to maximise these social resources. We conducted qualitative interviews with foreign-born Latino men and transgender women (n = 17) in a new immigrant destination to explore their social networks. Most participants described having smaller social networks after migrating. Networks included both local and transnational ties, but most participants had few close ties. Contextual factors including stigma and geographic dispersion limited the re-construction of networks with close ties after migration. HIV testing was not a common topic of discussion with social network ties. Efforts to improve early uptake of HIV testing among Latino immigrants may benefit from engaging with social networks, but such efforts need to address how the context in which networks operate enables access to testing.

  4. Networking: a catalyst in science and technological research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research focuses on the network of networks access, usage, and productivity by the research scientists of Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi Lagos. Data was gathered through the use of questionnaire randomly administered to 100 research scientists in two phases. The phases were before and after the ...

  5. Asia-Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNET ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Asia-Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNET) was established in 2004 to enhance the capacity of researchers and research institutions to deliver timely, demand-driven, trade-related research to policymakers in the region. During the first phase of support (102568), the Network produced a number of ...

  6. Research of Innovation Diffusion on Industrial Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongtai Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The real value of innovation consists in its diffusion on industrial network. The factors which affect the diffusion of innovation on industrial network are the topology of industrial network and rules of diffusion. Industrial network is a complex network which has scale-free and small-world characters; its structure has some affection on threshold, length of path, enterprise’s status, and information share of innovation diffusion. Based on the cost and attitude to risk of technical innovation, we present the “avalanche” diffusing model of technical innovation on industrial network.

  7. Characterising the progress in HIV/AIDS research in the Middle East and North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Hanan F; Kouyoumjian, Silva P; Mumtaz, Ghina R; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2013-11-01

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is perceived to have limited HIV data. The objective of this study was to quantitatively characterise the progress in HIV research in this region since the discovery of the epidemic. Four indices were defined and implemented to measure the progress of HIV research using the PubMed, Embase, MENA HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Synthesis Project and US Census Bureau HIV/AIDS Surveillance databases. The four indices provide complementary measures to characterise different aspects of the progress of HIV research. A total of 2118, 2352, 683 and 4889 records were identified through the PubMed, the Embase, the Synthesis Project and the HIV Prevalence indices, respectively. The proportion of the total global HIV records that relate to MENA is 1.2%. Overall, the indices show steady progress in the number of new records every year, with an accelerated pace in the last few years. The rate of progress in MENA was also higher than the rate of progress in HIV records globally. There is no evidence so far of stabilisation or a peak in the number of new records year by year. About half of the records were produced after the year 2005. The number of records shows large heterogeneity across countries. MENA has witnessed a rapid growth in HIV research over the last decade. However, there are still large gaps in HIV scientific evidence in the region, and the progress is far from being uniform across countries. Ongoing and future research needs to be geared towards academic standard and production of scientific publications.

  8. Improving Research Visibility Part 6: Academic Social Networking

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    Researchers needs to remove many traditional obstacles to disseminate and outreach their research outputs. Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications, and get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are ResearchGate and Academia.edu. These sites offer an instant technique to monitor wh...

  9. Academic Social Networking Sites: Improves Research Visibility and Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    Researchers needs to remove many traditional obstacles to disseminate and outreach their research outputs. Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications, and get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are ResearchGate and Academia.edu. These sites offer an instant technique to monitor wh...

  10. A network model for the propagation of Hepatitis C with HIV co-infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucit, Arnaud; Randon-Furling, Julien

    2017-05-01

    We define and examine a model of epidemic propagation for a virus such as Hepatitis C (with HIV co-infection) on a network of networks, namely the network of French urban areas. One network level is that of the individual interactions inside each urban area. The second level is that of the areas themselves, linked by individuals travelling between these areas and potentially helping the epidemic spread from one city to another. We choose to encode the second level of the network as extra, special nodes in the first level. We observe that such an encoding leads to sensible results in terms of the extent and speed of propagation of an epidemic, depending on its source point.

  11. HIV and cancer in Africa: mutual collaboration between HIV and cancer programs may provide timely research and public health data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbulaiteye Sam M

    2011-10-01

    merits for integrating cancer research in established HIV programs to obtain timely data about the incidence and burden of cancer in HIV-infected persons in Africa.

  12. HIV and cancer in Africa: mutual collaboration between HIV and cancer programs may provide timely research and public health data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Bhatia, Kishor; Adebamowo, Clement; Sasco, Annie J

    2011-10-17

    integrating cancer research in established HIV programs to obtain timely data about the incidence and burden of cancer in HIV-infected persons in Africa.

  13. HIV and cancer in Africa: mutual collaboration between HIV and cancer programs may provide timely research and public health data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    integrating cancer research in established HIV programs to obtain timely data about the incidence and burden of cancer in HIV-infected persons in Africa. PMID:22004990

  14. Clinic Network Collaboration and Patient Tracing to Maximize Retention in HIV Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H McMahon

    Full Text Available Understanding retention and loss to follow up in HIV care, in particular the number of people with unknown outcomes, is critical to maximise the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. Individual-level data are not available for these outcomes in Australia, which has an HIV epidemic predominantly focused amongst men who have sex with men.A network of the 6 main HIV clinical care sites was established in the state of Victoria, Australia. Individuals who had accessed care at these sites between February 2011 and June 2013 as assessed by HIV viral load testing but not accessed care between June 2013 and February 2014 were considered individuals with potentially unknown outcomes. For this group an intervention combining cross-referencing of clinical data between sites and phone tracing individuals with unknown outcomes was performed. 4966 people were in care in the network and before the intervention estimates of retention ranged from 85.9%-95.8% and the proportion with unknown outcomes ranged from 1.3-5.5%. After the intervention retention increased to 91.4-98.8% and unknown outcomes decreased to 0.1-2.4% (p<.01 for all sites for both outcomes. Most common reasons for disengagement from care were being too busy to attend or feeling well. For those with unknown outcomes prior to the intervention documented active psychiatric illness at last visit was associated with not re-entering care (p = 0.04.The network demonstrated low numbers of people with unknown outcomes and high levels of retention in care. Increased levels of retention in care and reductions in unknown outcomes identified after the intervention largely reflected confirmation of clinic transfers while a smaller number were successfully re-engaged in care. Factors associated with disengagement from care were identified. Systems to monitor patient retention, care transfer and minimize disengagement will maximise individual and population-level outcomes for populations with HIV.

  15. HIV/AIDS and mental health research in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Erica; Myer, Landon; Struthers, Helen; Joska, John A

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between mental illness and HIV/AIDS is complex and bidirectional. A significant amount of research has been performed in high-income countries but less is known about HIV and mental health in sub-Saharan Africa. The objectives of the review were to search the literature for quantitative studies conducted in sub-Saharan Africa on mental health and HIV and to critically evaluate and collate the studies in order to identify research needs and priorities. The databases Ovid, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) were searched for variations of search terms related to HIV/AIDS and mental health and studies limited to the populations of African countries. In addition, we hand-searched indexes of key journals and the databases of academic theses. We included 104 papers or research publications. The majority of these were published after 2005. The major topics covered were: mental-health-related HIV-risk behaviour, HIV in psychiatric populations, and mental illness in HIV-positive populations. The reported prevalence levels of mental illness among people living with HIV or AIDS (PLHIV) was high, with all but one study noting a prevalence of 19% or higher. Neurocognitive changes in adults with HIV were also prevalent, with reported deficits of up to 99% in symptomatic PLHIV and 33% in non-symptomatic PLHIV. Research on HIV in relation to mental health is increasing; however, there is a need for good-quality prospective studies to investigate the bidirectional effects of mental illness and HIV on each other.

  16. Community-centred Networks and Networking among Companies, Educational and Cultural Institutions and Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Ulla; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2010-01-01

    This article presents visions for community-centred networks and networking among companies, educational and cultural institutions and research based on blended on- and off-line collaboration and communication. Our point of departure is the general vision of networking between government, industry...... and research as formulated in the Triple Helix Model (Etzkowitz 2008). The article draws on a case study of NoEL, a network on e-learning among business, educational and cultural institutions and research, all in all 21 partners from all around Denmark. Focus is how networks and networking change character......’ in Networked Learning, Wenger et al. 2009; The analysis concerns the participation structure and how the network activities connect local work practices and research, and how technology and online communication contribute to a change from participation in offline and physical network activities into online...

  17. A framework for HIV/AIDS vaccine research in Zimbabwe | Gomo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A framework for HIV/AIDS vaccine research in Zimbabwe. ... In recognition of this need, African scientists convened a consultative meeting in Kenya under the auspices of the Joint United Nations Programme on AIDS (UNAIDS) to discuss strategies to accelerate the development of HIV vaccines in Africa. This paper ...

  18. HIV testing in community based research: a case study of female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV testing is a major issue of concern in developing countries. This paper aims at documenting field experiences in regard to testing for HIV in a community- based research. Detailed protocol was followed and participation in the study was on voluntary basis. Focus group discussions were held in study community.

  19. HIV/AIDS and mental health research in sub-Saharan Africa: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A significant amount of research has been performed in high-income countries but less is known about HIV and mental health in sub-Saharan Africa. ... The reported prevalence levels of mental illness among people living with HIV or AIDS (PLHIV) was high, with all but one study noting a prevalence of 19% or higher.

  20. Pharmacogenomics study on cadherin 2 network with regard to HIV infection and methadone treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hsiang-Wei; Shih, Chia-Lung; Tsung, Jieh-Hen; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Chu, Shih-Kai; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Tsou, Hsiao-Hui; Wang, Zih-Hsiang; Chen, Andrew C H; Liu, Yu-Li

    2017-01-01

    Heroin dependent patients have a high incidence of HIV infection. In contrast to the gene expression method, we developed a systemic correlation analysis method built upon the results of pharmacogenomics study in a methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) cohort consisting of 344 Taiwanese heroin dependent patients. We identified genetic variants and their encoding proteins that may be involved with HIV infection and MMT treatment outcome. Cadherin 2 (CDH2) genetic determinants were identified through the genome-wide pharmacogenomic study. We found significant correlations among HIV infection status, plasma levels of CDH2, cytokine IL-7, ADAM10, and the treatment responses to methadone. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms located within CDH2 gene showed associations with blood pressure and plasma CDH2 concentration. Plasma concentration of CDH2 showed correlations with the level of cytokine IL-7, status of HIV infection, and urine morphine test result. Plasma level of IL-7 was correlated with corrected QT interval (QTc) and gooseflesh skin withdrawal symptom score, while level of ADAM10 was correlated with plasma concentrations of vitamin D metabolite, nicotine metabolite, and R-methadone. The results suggest a novel network involving HIV infection and methadone treatment outcome.

  1. Pharmacogenomics study on cadherin 2 network with regard to HIV infection and methadone treatment outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Wei Kuo

    Full Text Available Heroin dependent patients have a high incidence of HIV infection. In contrast to the gene expression method, we developed a systemic correlation analysis method built upon the results of pharmacogenomics study in a methadone maintenance treatment (MMT cohort consisting of 344 Taiwanese heroin dependent patients. We identified genetic variants and their encoding proteins that may be involved with HIV infection and MMT treatment outcome. Cadherin 2 (CDH2 genetic determinants were identified through the genome-wide pharmacogenomic study. We found significant correlations among HIV infection status, plasma levels of CDH2, cytokine IL-7, ADAM10, and the treatment responses to methadone. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms located within CDH2 gene showed associations with blood pressure and plasma CDH2 concentration. Plasma concentration of CDH2 showed correlations with the level of cytokine IL-7, status of HIV infection, and urine morphine test result. Plasma level of IL-7 was correlated with corrected QT interval (QTc and gooseflesh skin withdrawal symptom score, while level of ADAM10 was correlated with plasma concentrations of vitamin D metabolite, nicotine metabolite, and R-methadone. The results suggest a novel network involving HIV infection and methadone treatment outcome.

  2. Feature Selection Combined with Neural Network Structure Optimization for HIV-1 Protease Cleavage Site Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is crucial to understand the specificity of HIV-1 protease for designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors. In this paper, a new feature selection method combined with neural network structure optimization is proposed to analyze the specificity of HIV-1 protease and find the important positions in an octapeptide that determined its cleavability. Two kinds of newly proposed features based on Amino Acid Index database plus traditional orthogonal encoding features are used in this paper, taking both physiochemical and sequence information into consideration. Results of feature selection prove that p2, p1, p1′, and p2′ are the most important positions. Two feature fusion methods are used in this paper: combination fusion and decision fusion aiming to get comprehensive feature representation and improve prediction performance. Decision fusion of subsets that getting after feature selection obtains excellent prediction performance, which proves feature selection combined with decision fusion is an effective and useful method for the task of HIV-1 protease cleavage site prediction. The results and analysis in this paper can provide useful instruction and help designing HIV-1 protease inhibitor in the future.

  3. Feature Selection Combined with Neural Network Structure Optimization for HIV-1 Protease Cleavage Site Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Shi, Xiaomiao; Guo, Dongmei; Zhao, Zuowei; Yimin

    2015-01-01

    It is crucial to understand the specificity of HIV-1 protease for designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors. In this paper, a new feature selection method combined with neural network structure optimization is proposed to analyze the specificity of HIV-1 protease and find the important positions in an octapeptide that determined its cleavability. Two kinds of newly proposed features based on Amino Acid Index database plus traditional orthogonal encoding features are used in this paper, taking both physiochemical and sequence information into consideration. Results of feature selection prove that p2, p1, p1', and p2' are the most important positions. Two feature fusion methods are used in this paper: combination fusion and decision fusion aiming to get comprehensive feature representation and improve prediction performance. Decision fusion of subsets that getting after feature selection obtains excellent prediction performance, which proves feature selection combined with decision fusion is an effective and useful method for the task of HIV-1 protease cleavage site prediction. The results and analysis in this paper can provide useful instruction and help designing HIV-1 protease inhibitor in the future.

  4. Collaboration networks and research productivity at IPEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Carlos Anisio; Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira, E-mail: monteiro@ipen.br, E-mail: barroso@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we investigate the IPEN's scientific collaboration network. Based on publications registered in IPEN's technical and scientific database was extracted a set of authors that developed technical and scientific work on the 2001 to 2010 period, using coauthorship to define the relationship between authors. From the data collected, we used degree centrality indicator in conjunction with two approaches to assess the relationship between collaboration and productivity: normal count, where for each publication that the author appears is added one for the author’s productivity indicator, and fractional count which is added a fractional value according to the total number of publication's authors. We concluded that collaboration for the development of a technical and scientific work has a positive correlation with the researchers productivity, that is, the greater the collaboration greater the productivity. We presented, also, a statistical summary to reveal the total number of publications and the number of IPEN's authors by publication, the average number of IPEN's authors per publication and the average number of publications by IPEN's author, the number of IPEN's authors that not published with no other author of the IPEN and, finally, the number of active and inactive (ex. retirees) researchers of the IPEN, as well as, the number of authors who do not have employment contract with the IPEN. (author)

  5. When to start paediatric testing of the adult HIV cure research agenda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Seema K

    2017-02-01

    Ethical guidelines recommend that experimental interventions should be tested in adults first before they are tested and approved in children. Some challenge this paradigm, however, and recommend initiating paediatric testing after preliminary safety testing in adults in certain cases. For instance, commentators have argued for accelerated testing of HIV vaccines in children. Additionally, HIV cure research on the use of very early therapy (VET) in infants, prompted in part by the Mississippi baby case, is one example of a strategy that is currently being tested in infants before it has been well tested in adults. Because infants' immune systems are still developing, the timing of HIV transmission is easier to identify in infants than in adults, and infants who receive VET might never develop the viral reservoirs that make HIV so difficult to eradicate, infants may be uniquely situated to achieve HIV cure or sustained viral remission. Several commentators have now argued for earlier initiation of HIV cure interventions other than (or in addition to) VET in children. HIV cure research is therefore a good case for re-examining the important question of when to initiate paediatric research. I will argue that, despite the potential for HIV cure research to benefit children and the scientific value of involving children in this research, the HIV cure agenda should not accelerate the involvement of children for the following reasons: HIV cure research is highly speculative, risky, aimed at combination approaches and does not compare favourably with the available alternatives. I conclude by drawing general implications for the initiation of paediatric testing, including that interventions that have to be used in combination with others and cures for chronic diseases may not be valuable enough to justify early paediatric testing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Research Gaps in Neonatal HIV-Related Care | Davies | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, both in South Africa and across sub-Saharan African, lack of boosted peri-partum prophylaxis for high-risk vertical transmission, loss to followup, and failure to initiate HIV-infected infants on antiretroviral therapy (ART) before disease progression are key remaining gaps in neonatal HIV-related care. In this issue of ...

  7. 13 Research Article ABSTRACT Liver diseases in HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-10

    Nov 10, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. Liver diseases in HIV infected persons can occur due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus. (HCV) co-infections, chronic alcoholism, and hepatic tuberculosis as well as antiretroviral drugs. Co- infection by HIV and HBV is frequently encountered with negative impact on HIV ...

  8. Academic research and HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995 were a window of opportunity during which time the control and management of HIV could have greatly reduced the future spread of the disease. This opportunity has been lost and prevalences in many groups have reached the expected levels. The most important factors leading to severe HIV epidemics are well ...

  9. Expanding the role of community mobilization to accelerate progress towards ending vertical transmission of HIV in Uganda: the Networks model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mburu, Gitau; Iorpenda, Kate; Muwanga, Fred

    2012-07-11

    Efforts to prevent vertical transmission of HIV have gained momentum globally since the launch of the "Global plan towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children by 2015 and keeping their mothers alive", reflecting the growing consensus that we now have low-cost, efficacious interventions that promise to end vertical transmission of HIV. Uganda is one of the 22 focus countries in the global plan and one of the 10 countries with the highest need for prevention of vertical transmission globally. In the context of current shortfalls in the prevention of vertical HIV transmission, this paper presents the results of the Networks project, a community mobilisation model implemented by the International HIV/AIDS Alliance in Uganda, and draws out the theoretical foundations and promising community mobilization practices relevant to prevention of vertical transmission. A retrospective review of the Network project's activities, documentation and evaluation was performed. The Networks project, through community mobilisation and greater involvement of people living with HIV, reached an estimated 1.3 million people with at least one health service. By clustering 750 groups of people living with HIV into larger coalitions, the project supported existing groups to amalgamate their collective strengths and skills in outreach, referral and literacy activities; and improved reach and coverage of HIV services through strengthened linkages with healthcare facilities. Our analysis of the Networks model shows that it could contribute to the prevention of vertical transmission of HIV as a replicable and sustainable community mobilisation approach. In particular, the Networks model increased the uptake of decentralized interventions for preventing vertical transmission through community referrals; promoted male involvement through peer sensitisation; and linked communities to advocacy channels for advancing maternal health and prevention of vertical HIV transmission. BY

  10. Conducting Internet-based HIV/STD prevention survey research: considerations in design and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pequegnat, Willo; Rosser, B R Simon; Bowen, Anne M; Bull, Sheana S; DiClemente, Ralph J; Bockting, Walter O; Elford, Jonathan; Fishbein, Martin; Gurak, Laura; Horvath, Keith; Konstan, Joseph; Noar, Seth M; Ross, Michael W; Sherr, Lorraine; Spiegel, David; Zimmerman, Rick

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to advance rigorous Internet-based HIV/STD Prevention quantitative research by providing guidance to fellow researchers, faculty supervising graduates, human subjects' committees, and review groups about some of the most common and challenging questions about Internet-based HIV prevention quantitative research. The authors represent several research groups who have gained experience conducting some of the first Internet-based HIV/STD prevention quantitative surveys in the US and elsewhere. Sixteen questions specific to Internet-based HIV prevention survey research are identified. To aid rigorous development and review of applications, these questions are organized around six common criteria used in federal review groups in the US: significance, innovation, approach (broken down further by research design, formative development, procedures, sampling considerations, and data collection); investigator, environment and human subjects' issues. Strategies promoting minority participant recruitment, minimizing attrition, validating participants, and compensating participants are discussed. Throughout, the implications on budget and realistic timetabling are identified.

  11. Are students kidding with health research ethics? The case of HIV/AIDS research in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Universities in Cameroon are playing an active part in HIV/AIDS research and much of this research is carried out by students, usually for the purpose of a dissertation/thesis. Student theses/dissertations present research findings in a much more comprehensive manner and have been described as the stepping-stone of a budding scientist’s potential in becoming an independent researcher. It is therefore important to verify how students handle issues of research ethics. Method Theses/dissertations on HIV/AIDS that described research studies involving the use of human research participants were screened to verify if research ethics approval and informed consent were obtained and documented. The contents of the consent forms were also qualitatively analyzed. Results Of 174 theses/dissertations on HIV, ethics approval was documented in 17 (9.77%) and informed consent in 77 (47.83%). Research ethics approval was first mentioned at all in 2002 and highly reported in the year 2007. Evidence of ethics approval was found for the first time in 2005 and informed consent first observed and evidenced in 1997. Ethics approval was mostly reported by students studying for an MD (14.01%) and was not reported in any Bachelors’ degree dissertation. Informed consent was also highly reported in MD theses (64.58%) followed by undergraduate theses (31.58%). Voluntary participation and potential benefits of the study were some of the common aspects dealt with in most of the consent forms. The right to discontinue participation in the study and management of residual samples were scarcely ever mentioned. Conclusions Overall, and given the current state of the art of research ethics around the world, student-scientists in Cameroon would seem to be merely kidding with research ethics. It is thus essential that training in health research ethics (HRE) be incorporated in the curriculum of universities in Cameroon in order that the next generation of scientists may be better

  12. Are students kidding with health research ethics? The case of HIV/AIDS research in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munung, Nchangwi Syntia; Tangwa, Godfrey B; Che, Chi Primus; Vidal, Laurent; Ouwe-Missi-Oukem-Boyer, Odile

    2012-06-11

    Universities in Cameroon are playing an active part in HIV/AIDS research and much of this research is carried out by students, usually for the purpose of a dissertation/thesis. Student theses/dissertations present research findings in a much more comprehensive manner and have been described as the stepping-stone of a budding scientist's potential in becoming an independent researcher. It is therefore important to verify how students handle issues of research ethics. Theses/dissertations on HIV/AIDS that described research studies involving the use of human research participants were screened to verify if research ethics approval and informed consent were obtained and documented. The contents of the consent forms were also qualitatively analyzed. Of 174 theses/dissertations on HIV, ethics approval was documented in 17 (9.77%) and informed consent in 77 (47.83%). Research ethics approval was first mentioned at all in 2002 and highly reported in the year 2007. Evidence of ethics approval was found for the first time in 2005 and informed consent first observed and evidenced in 1997. Ethics approval was mostly reported by students studying for an MD (14.01%) and was not reported in any Bachelors' degree dissertation. Informed consent was also highly reported in MD theses (64.58%) followed by undergraduate theses (31.58%). Voluntary participation and potential benefits of the study were some of the common aspects dealt with in most of the consent forms. The right to discontinue participation in the study and management of residual samples were scarcely ever mentioned. Overall, and given the current state of the art of research ethics around the world, student-scientists in Cameroon would seem to be merely kidding with research ethics. It is thus essential that training in health research ethics (HRE) be incorporated in the curriculum of universities in Cameroon in order that the next generation of scientists may be better equipped with thorough knowledge and practice of

  13. Are students kidding with health research ethics? The case of HIV/AIDS research in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munung Nchangwi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Universities in Cameroon are playing an active part in HIV/AIDS research and much of this research is carried out by students, usually for the purpose of a dissertation/thesis. Student theses/dissertations present research findings in a much more comprehensive manner and have been described as the stepping-stone of a budding scientist’s potential in becoming an independent researcher. It is therefore important to verify how students handle issues of research ethics. Method Theses/dissertations on HIV/AIDS that described research studies involving the use of human research participants were screened to verify if research ethics approval and informed consent were obtained and documented. The contents of the consent forms were also qualitatively analyzed. Results Of 174 theses/dissertations on HIV, ethics approval was documented in 17 (9.77% and informed consent in 77 (47.83%. Research ethics approval was first mentioned at all in 2002 and highly reported in the year 2007. Evidence of ethics approval was found for the first time in 2005 and informed consent first observed and evidenced in 1997. Ethics approval was mostly reported by students studying for an MD (14.01% and was not reported in any Bachelors’ degree dissertation. Informed consent was also highly reported in MD theses (64.58% followed by undergraduate theses (31.58%. Voluntary participation and potential benefits of the study were some of the common aspects dealt with in most of the consent forms. The right to discontinue participation in the study and management of residual samples were scarcely ever mentioned. Conclusions Overall, and given the current state of the art of research ethics around the world, student-scientists in Cameroon would seem to be merely kidding with research ethics. It is thus essential that training in health research ethics (HRE be incorporated in the curriculum of universities in Cameroon in order that the next generation of

  14. Local and Global HIV Aging Demographics and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Courtenay; Brown, Shelley M

    This introduction serves to foreground current patterns associated with HIV and aging, globally. We highlight key trends by World Health Organization sub-region, and identify gaps in existing knowledge. HIV and aging is insufficiently documented, as prevalence data for those over age 49 have not generally been captured by many countries, or by UNAIDS. Despite limited data and data systems, several dominant trends among adults aged 50 and older are discernible, including: growing HIV risk and prevalence is increasingly evident among maturing adults, worldwide; older individuals at risk of or living with HIV, and their health providers, fail to recognize risk and symptoms, leading to disease progression and delayed treatment. Cross-sectoral strategies will be needed to mount responses; public health campaigns will be essential in educating and informing individuals about HIV risk, prevention and care; and special efforts to tailor interventions to key populations most vulnerable or stigmatized in countries will be critical. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Research gaps in neonatal HIV-related care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Davies

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The South African prevention of mother to child transmission programme has made excellentprogress in reducing vertical HIV transmission, and paediatric antiretroviral therapyprogrammes have demonstrated good outcomes with increasing treatment initiation inyounger children and infants. However, both in South Africa and across sub-Saharan African,lack of boosted peri-partum prophylaxis for high-risk vertical transmission, loss to followup,and failure to initiate HIV-infected infants on antiretroviral therapy (ART before diseaseprogression are key remaining gaps in neonatal HIV-related care. In this issue of the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine, experts provide valuable recommendations for addressingthese gaps. The present article highlights a number of areas where evidence is lacking toinform guidelines and programme development for optimal neonatal HIV-related care.

  16. Research gaps in neonatal HIV-related care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Davies

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The South African prevention of mother to child transmission programme has made excellentprogress in reducing vertical HIV transmission, and paediatric antiretroviral therapyprogrammes have demonstrated good outcomes with increasing treatment initiation inyounger children and infants. However, both in South Africa and across sub-Saharan African,lack of boosted peri-partum prophylaxis for high-risk vertical transmission, loss to followup,and failure to initiate HIV-infected infants on antiretroviral therapy (ART before diseaseprogression are key remaining gaps in neonatal HIV-related care. In this issue of the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine, experts provide valuable recommendations for addressingthese gaps. The present article highlights a number of areas where evidence is lacking toinform guidelines and programme development for optimal neonatal HIV-related care.

  17. Understanding men's networks and perceptions of leadership to promote HIV testing and treatment in Agincourt, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Lauren M; Gottert, Ann; MacPhail, Catherine; Rebombo, Dumisani; Twine, Rhian; Kahn, Kathleen; Pettifor, Audrey; Lippman, Sheri A; Maman, Suzanne

    2017-12-22

    Understanding informal leadership in high HIV prevalence settings is important for the success of popular opinion leader (POL) and other HIV testing and treatment promotion strategies which aim to leverage the influence of these leaders. We conducted a study in Mpumalanga province, South Africa, in which we aimed to: (1) describe men's personal networks and key social relationships; and (2) describe the types of individuals men identify as leaders. We administered a structured questionnaire with 45 men (15 HIV-positive and 30 HIV-negative) in which men enumerated and described characteristics of individuals they share personal matters with, and people they considered as leaders. We further conducted in-depth interviews with 25 of these men to better understand men's conceptualisation of leadership in their community. Family members were prominent in men's personal networks and among the leaders they nominated. Men living with HIV were much more likely to know others living with HIV, and described friendships on the basis of the shared experience of HIV treatment. Future POL interventions aiming to promote HIV testing and care among men in rural South Africa should consider the importance of family in community leadership, and seek to leverage the influence of connections between men living with HIV.

  18. How funding structures for HIV/AIDS research shape outputs and utilization: a Swiss case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Kathrin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research policy in the field of HIV has changed substantially in recent decades in Switzerland. Until 2004, social science research on HIV/AIDS was funded by specialized funding agencies. After 2004, funding of such research was “normalized” and integrated into the Swiss National Science Foundation as the main funding agency for scientific research in Switzerland. This paper offers a longitudinal analysis of the relationship between the changing nature of funding structures on the one hand and the production and communication of policy-relevant scientific knowledge in the field of HIV on the other hand. Methods The analysis relies on an inventory of all social sciences research projects on HIV in Switzerland that were funded between 1987 and 2010, including topics covered and disciplines involved, as well as financial data. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 stakeholders. Results The analysis highlights that the pre-2004 funding policy ensured good coverage of important social science research themes. Specific incentives and explicit promotion of social science research related to HIV gave rise to a multidisciplinary, integrative and health-oriented approach. The abolition of a specific funding policy in 2004 was paralleled by a drastic reduction in the number of social science research projects submitted for funding, and a decline of public money dedicated to such research. Although the public administration in charge of HIV policy still acknowledges the relevance of findings from social sciences for the development of prevention, treatment and care, HIV-related social science research does not flourish under current funding conditions. Conclusions The Swiss experience sheds light on the difficulties of sustaining social science research and multidisciplinary approaches related to HIV without specialized funding agencies. Future funding policy might not necessarily require specialized agencies, but

  19. How funding structures for HIV/AIDS research shape outputs and utilization: a Swiss case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Research policy in the field of HIV has changed substantially in recent decades in Switzerland. Until 2004, social science research on HIV/AIDS was funded by specialized funding agencies. After 2004, funding of such research was “normalized” and integrated into the Swiss National Science Foundation as the main funding agency for scientific research in Switzerland. This paper offers a longitudinal analysis of the relationship between the changing nature of funding structures on the one hand and the production and communication of policy-relevant scientific knowledge in the field of HIV on the other hand. Methods The analysis relies on an inventory of all social sciences research projects on HIV in Switzerland that were funded between 1987 and 2010, including topics covered and disciplines involved, as well as financial data. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 stakeholders. Results The analysis highlights that the pre-2004 funding policy ensured good coverage of important social science research themes. Specific incentives and explicit promotion of social science research related to HIV gave rise to a multidisciplinary, integrative and health-oriented approach. The abolition of a specific funding policy in 2004 was paralleled by a drastic reduction in the number of social science research projects submitted for funding, and a decline of public money dedicated to such research. Although the public administration in charge of HIV policy still acknowledges the relevance of findings from social sciences for the development of prevention, treatment and care, HIV-related social science research does not flourish under current funding conditions. Conclusions The Swiss experience sheds light on the difficulties of sustaining social science research and multidisciplinary approaches related to HIV without specialized funding agencies. Future funding policy might not necessarily require specialized agencies, but should better take into

  20. $200,000 Grants Awarded to CCR Researchers for HIV/AIDS Studies | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Earlier this year, the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) awarded two, two-year grants of $200,000 each to Anu Puri, Ph.D., and Robert Blumenthal, Ph.D., both of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Nanobiology Program, and to Eric Freed, Ph.D., of the HIV Drug Resistance Program, for their research on potential new treatments for HIV.

  1. A New HIV Prevention Network Approach: Sociometric Peer Change Agent Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, John A; Zhou, A. Ning; Laumann, Edward O.

    2014-01-01

    Internationally, the Peer Change Agent (PCA) model is the most frequently used conceptual framework for HIV prevention. Change agents themselves can be more important than the messages they convey. PCA selection is operationalized via heterogeneous methods based upon individual-level attributes. A sociometric position selection strategy, however, could increase peer influence potency and halt transmission at key network locations. In this study, we selected candidate PCAs based upon relative ...

  2. Venue-Based Networks May Underpin HCV Transmissions amongst HIV-Infected Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bradshaw

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the potential influence of venue-based networks on HCV transmission in HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (GBM.This was a prospectively recruited cohort of HIV-infected GBM with recently-acquired HCV infection resident in Melbourne and Sydney. Clinical and demographic data were collected together with blood samples for HCV sequencing. Phylogenies were inferred and clusters of individuals infected with HCV with genetic sequence homology were identified. Venues used for sourcing sexual partners were identified; sourcing partners from the same venue was considered a potential social link. Using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, associations were identified between the network of sites where men sourced sex partners and transmission relationships as defined by phylogenetic clustering.Forty individuals were recruited, of whom 62.5% were considered to have sexually- and 37.5% IDU-acquired HCV. Venue use was consistent with men being members of a more sexually adventurous gay community subculture. Six phylogenetically-determined pairs or clusters were identified, comprising fifteen (15/28, 53.6% individuals. Participants belonging to phylogenetic clusters were observed within the same networks. There was a significant correlation between the network and phylogenetic clustering when both cities were considered simultaneously (p = 0.005, raising the possibility that social connections may be important for HCV transmissions.Venue-based network elicitation is a promising approach for elucidating HCV transmissions amongst HIV-infected GBM. Public health approaches targeting individuals and venues prominent within networks may reduce onward HCV transmission.

  3. Social science research of HIV in Vietnam: A critical review and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Amy; Hirsch, Jennifer; Giang, Le Minh; Parker, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Social science research, with theoretical and methodological tools that are well suited to capture the complexities of Vietnam’s rapidly changing social and political context, could contribute important insights that would enhance the response to Vietnam’s growing HIV epidemic. The present paper reviews the published, peer-reviewed English-language social science literature on HIV in Vietnam in order to identify critical theoretical and substantive gaps and lay the groundwork for future research. We found four broad foci for work on the social context of HIV and AIDS in Vietnam: the cultural meanings and social relationships that shape Vietnam’s HIV epidemic; stigma and discrimination; social inequality and structural violence as contributors to HIV risk; and, finally, how broader global and social systems shape Vietnam’s HIV epidemic. We signal the particular need for additional research on the effects of the media on attitudes toward HIV and AIDS, on social movements, and on health systems, as well as on a number of other key areas. Work along these lines, in addition to more effective communication of policy-relevant findings to those responsible for the development and implementation of policies and programmes, will strengthen Vietnam’s response to HIV and AIDS. PMID:23906241

  4. Social science research on HIV in Vietnam: a critical review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Amy; Hirsch, Jennifer S; Giang, Le Minh; Parker, Richard G

    2013-01-01

    Social science research can enhance the response to Vietnam's growing HIV epidemic by capturing the country's rapidly changing social and political context. The present paper reviews the published, peer-reviewed and English-language social science literature on HIV in Vietnam in order to identify critical theoretical and substantive gaps, while laying the groundwork for future research. We found four broad foci for work on the social context of HIV and AIDS in Vietnam: the cultural meanings and social relationships that shape Vietnam's HIV epidemic; stigma and discrimination; social inequality and structural violence as contributors to HIV risk; and, finally, how broader global and social systems shape Vietnam's HIV epidemic. We signal the particular need for additional research on the effects of the media on attitudes towards HIV and AIDS, on social movements, and on health systems, as well as on a number of other key areas. Work along these lines, in addition to more effective communication of policy-relevant findings to those responsible for the development and implementation of policies and programmes, will strengthen Vietnam's response to HIV and AIDS.

  5. Federal Plan for Advanced Networking Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — In the four decades since Federal research first enabled computers to send and receive data over networks, U.S. government research and development R and D in...

  6. Local Governance and ICT Research Network for Africa | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Local Governance and ICT Research Network for Africa (LOG-IN Africa) is an emergent pan-African network of researchers and research institutions from nine countries. LOG-IN Africa will assess the current state and outcome of electronic local governance initiatives in Africa, focusing on how information and ...

  7. Incursions from the epicentre: Southern theory, social science, and the global HIV research domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodes, Rebecca; Morrell, Robert

    2018-03-01

    Research about HIV constitutes a global domain of academic knowledge. The patterns that structure this domain reflect inequalities in the production and dissemination of knowledge, as well as broader inequalities in geopolitics. Conventional metrics for assessing the value and impact of academic research reveal that "Northern" research remains dominant, while "Southern" research remains peripheral. Southern theory provides a framework for greater critical engagement with knowledge produced by researchers within the global South. With a focus on HIV social science, we show that investigators working in and from Africa have produced and disseminated knowledge fundamental to the global domain of HIV research, and argue that their epistemological contribution may be understood within the framework of Southern theory. Through repurposing a bibliometrical measure of citation count, we constitute a new archive of highly cited social science research. With a focus on South Africa, we situate this archive within changing historical contexts, connecting research findings to developments in medicine, health sciences and politics. We focus on two key themes in the evolution of HIV knowledge: (1) the significance of context and locality - the "setting" of HIV research; and (2) sex, race and risk - changing ideas about the social determinants of HIV transmission.

  8. Changes in gay men's participation in gay community life: implications for HIV surveillance and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotska, Iryna B; Holt, Martin; Prestage, Garrett

    2012-04-01

    Successful antiretroviral treatments, achievements in gay acceptance and human rights, and internet use have prompted changes in gay socialising which create potential challenges for engaging with gay men for HIV surveillance and research. We used data from the Australian behavioural surveillance and explored (i) the relationship between community engagement and HIV related practices, and (ii) time trends in gay men's engagement with the gay community. Analyses were conducted using log-binomial regression and chi-square test for trend. The proportion of men who socialized mainly with gay men declined and the Internet use to connect with sex partners increased over time. Gay social engagement was associated with HIV positive serostatus, unprotected anal intercourse with regular partners and a high frequency of HIV/STI testing. Our findings indicate a shift in how gay men socialise and find partners. We discuss the challenges for ongoing engagement with gay men for behavioural surveillance and HIV research.

  9. The Security Research of Digital Library Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Song, Ding-Li; Yan, Shu

    Digital library is a self-development needs for the modern library to meet the development requirements of the times, changing the way services and so on. digital library from the hardware, technology, management and other aspects to objective analysis of the factors of threats to digital library network security. We should face up the problems of digital library network security: digital library network hardware are "not hard", the technology of digital library is relatively lag, digital library management system is imperfect and other problems; the government should take active measures to ensure that the library funding, to enhance the level of network hardware, to upgrade LAN and prevention technology, to improve network control technology, network monitoring technology; to strengthen safety management concepts, to prefect the safety management system; and to improve the level of security management modernization for digital library.

  10. Refining Current Scientific Priorities and Identifying New Scientific Gaps in HIV-Related Heart, Lung, Blood, and Sleep Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Homer L; Crystal, Ronald; Currier, Judith; Ridker, Paul; Berliner, Nancy; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Rutherford, George; Zou, Shimian; Glynn, Simone; Wong, Renee; Peprah, Emmanuel; Engelgau, Michael; Creazzo, Tony; Colombini-Hatch, Sandra; Caler, Elisabet

    2017-09-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) AIDS Program's goal is to provide direction and support for research and training programs in areas of HIV-related heart, lung, blood, and sleep (HLBS) diseases. To better define NHLBI current HIV-related scientific priorities and with the goal of identifying new scientific priorities and gaps in HIV-related HLBS research, a wide group of investigators gathered for a scientific NHLBI HIV Working Group on December 14-15, 2015, in Bethesda, MD. The core objectives of the Working Group included discussions on: (1) HIV-related HLBS comorbidities in the antiretroviral era; (2) HIV cure; (3) HIV prevention; and (4) mechanisms to implement new scientific discoveries in an efficient and timely manner so as to have the most impact on people living with HIV. The 2015 Working Group represented an opportunity for the NHLBI to obtain expert advice on HIV/AIDS scientific priorities and approaches over the next decade.

  11. Research of The Deeper Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao You Rong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural networks (NNs have powerful computational abilities and could be used in a variety of applications; however, training these networks is still a difficult problem. With different network structures, many neural models have been constructed. In this report, a deeper neural networks (DNNs architecture is proposed. The training algorithm of deeper neural network insides searching the global optimal point in the actual error surface. Before the training algorithm is designed, the error surface of the deeper neural network is analyzed from simple to complicated, and the features of the error surface is obtained. Based on these characters, the initialization method and training algorithm of DNNs is designed. For the initialization, a block-uniform design method is proposed which separates the error surface into some blocks and finds the optimal block using the uniform design method. For the training algorithm, the improved gradient-descent method is proposed which adds a penalty term into the cost function of the old gradient descent method. This algorithm makes the network have a great approximating ability and keeps the network state stable. All of these improve the practicality of the neural network.

  12. Research of multimedia streaming transmission in multiservice networks

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchuk, Vasyl; Chervenets, Vladymyr; Polishuk, Artur

    2012-01-01

    In order to forecast the quality of media streaming in multiservice networks under conditions of high load of network resources the research of the influence of network circulating traffic on streaming video and the efficiency analysis of existing protocols for transmission of multimedia data is held.

  13. Capacity building among african american faith leaders to promote HIV prevention and vaccine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alio, Amina P; Lewis, Cindi A; Bunce, Catherine A; Wakefield, Steven; Thomas, Weldon G; Sanders, Edwin; Keefer, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    In light of the increasing rates of HIV infection in African Americans, it is essential that black faith leaders become more proactive in the fight against the epidemic. The study aim was to engage faith leaders in a sustainable partnership to increase community participation in preventive HIV vaccine clinical research while improving their access to and utilization of HIV/AIDS prevention services. Leadership Development Seminars were adapted for faith leaders in Rochester, NY, with topics ranging from the importance of preventive HIV vaccine research to social issues surrounding HIV/AIDs within a theological framework. Seminars were taught by field-specific experts from the black community and included the development of action plans to institute HIV preventive ministries. To assess the outcome of the Seminars, baseline and post-training surveys were administered and analyzed through paired sample t Tests and informal interviews. 19 faith leaders completed the intervention. In general, the majority of clergy felt that their understanding of HIV vaccine research and its goals had increased postintervention. A critical outcome was the subsequent formation of the Rochester Faith Collaborative by participating clergy seeking to sustain the collaborative and address the implementation of community action plans. Providing scientific HIV/AIDS knowledge within the context of clergy members' belief structure was an effective method for engaging black Church leaders in Rochester, NY. Collaborative efforts with various local institutions and community-based organizations were essential in building trust with the faith leaders, thereby building bridges for better understanding of HIV/AIDS prevention efforts, including HIV vaccine research.

  14. Cancer Virology and HIV Think Tank | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Virology and HIV Think Tank Friday, December 15, 2017 9:30 AM - 3:30 PM Abstract submission deadline: November 29, 2017 Porter Neuroscience Center (Building 35A) Room 620/630 Atrium Space Please mark your calendars for the Cancer Virology and HIV Think Tank Meeting on December 15! This is an annual meeting hosted by the CCR Center of Excellence in HIV/AIDS and Cancer Virology that focuses on the exchange of information about the biology of cancer-associated viruses.

  15. Relationships between social norms, social network characteristics, and HIV risk behaviors in Thailand and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkin, Carl; Donnell, Deborah; Celentano, David D; Aramrattna, Apinun; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Vongchak, Tasanai; Wiboonnatakul, Kanokporn; Davis-Vogel, Annet; Metzger, David

    2009-05-01

    Social norms have been associated with a wide range of health behaviors. In this study, the authors examined whether the social norms of HIV risk behaviors are clustered within social networks and whether the norms of network members are linked to the risk behaviors of their social network members. Data were collected from the baseline assessment of 354 networks with 933 participants in a network-oriented HIV prevention intervention targeting injection drug users in Philadelphia, United States, and Chiang Mai, Thailand. Four descriptive HIV risk norms of sharing needles, cookers, and cotton and front- or back-loading among friends who inject were assessed. Three of 4 injection risk norms (sharing needle, cookers, and cotton) were found to be significantly clustered. In Philadelphia, 1 network member's (the index participant) norms of sharing needles and front- or back-loading were found to be significantly associated with the network members' risk behaviors, and the norm of sharing cotton was marginally associated. The results of this study suggest that among injection drug users, social norms are clustered within networks; social networks are a meaningful level of analyses for understanding how social norms lead to risk behaviors, providing important data for intervening to reduce injection-related HIV risks.

  16. Child privacy rights: A ‘Cinderella’ issue in HIV-prevention research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Elaine Strode

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Legal debates regarding child participation in HIV research have tended to focus on issues of informed consent. However, much less attention has been given to privacy; accordingly, we classify this as a ‘Cinderella issue’ that has been excluded from ‘the ball’ (academic debate. Here we argue that privacy issues are as important as consent issues in HIV-prevention research. We describe a child’s right to privacy regarding certain health interventions in South African law, and identify four key norms that flow from the law and that could be applied to HIV-prevention research: (i children cannot have an expectation of privacy regarding research participation if they have not given independent consent to the study; (ii children may have an expectation of privacy regarding certain components of the study, such as HIV testing, if they consent independently to such services; (iii children’s rights to privacy in health research are limited by mandatory reporting obligations; (iv children’s rights to privacy in HIV-prevention research may be justifiably limited by the concept of the best interests of the child. We conclude with guidelines for researchers on how to implement these principles in HIV-related research studies.

  17. Research collaboration in groups and networks: differences across academic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein; Reymert, Ingvild

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give a macro-picture of collaboration in research groups and networks across all academic fields in Norwegian research universities, and to examine the relative importance of membership in groups and networks for individual publication output. To our knowledge, this is a new approach, which may provide valuable information on collaborative patterns in a particular national system, but of clear relevance to other national university systems. At the system level, conducting research in groups and networks are equally important, but there are large differences between academic fields. The research group is clearly most important in the field of medicine and health, while undertaking research in an international network is most important in the natural sciences. Membership in a research group and active participation in international networks are likely to enhance publication productivity and the quality of research.

  18. The Relationships Between Policy, Boundaries and Research in Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Sinclair, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The biennial Networked Learning Conference is an established locus for work on practice, research and epistemology in the field of networked learning. That work continues between the conferences through the researchers’ own networks, ‘hot seat’ debates, and through publications, especially...... conferences, such as the inclusion of sociomaterial perspectives and recognition of informal networked learning. The chapters here each bring a particular perspective to the themes of Policy, Boundaries and Research in Networked Learning which we have chosen as the focus of the book. The selection...

  19. Future paths for HIV vaccine research: Exploiting results from recent clinical trials and current scientific advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Geetha P; Malaspina, Angela; Flores, Jorge

    2010-02-01

    More than 60 million individuals have been infected with HIV and approximately half of these individuals have died since the epidemic started. The quest for an effective vaccine to prevent HIV transmission, which is likely to be the most effective approach to halt the epidemic, has been and continues to be an insurmountable challenge. Traditional vaccine strategies that have been effective for other vaccines have proven unsuccessful or impractical for HIV because of safety concerns. Nonetheless, substantial efforts have been directed at the development and clinical testing of HIV vaccines during the past two decades. Four major HIV vaccine efficacy trials conducted by VaxGen Inc (AIDSVAX 003 and AIDSVAX 004) and the NIH-supported HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN 502 and HVTN 503) failed to demonstrate efficacy; however, a recent trial conducted in Thailand (RV144 trial) demonstrated a low level of efficacy, resulting in some renewed optimism. Dissecting the causes for vaccine failure and, more importantly, for the partial level of efficacy observed in the RV144 trial should provide important guidance to the field. This review discusses the ongoing HIV vaccine trials and also highlights recent scientific advances that have provided the field with new leads to invigorate the search for effective vaccines.

  20. Building capability through networking with investors and researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Schøtt, Thomas

    -creation is embedded in the network around the starting entrepreneur, we expect. Co-creation benefits from networking with potential investors and with researchers and inventors, we hypothesize, and especially by networking with both investors and researchers concurrently. Co-creation is analyzed in a sample...... of startups at inception, by 9,161 entrepreneurs, surveyed in Global Entrepreneurship Monitor in 49 countries. Co-creation is found to be reduced by the entrepreneur’s networking in the private sphere of family and friends, but to be benefiting from networking in the public sphere, especially by networking...... with investors and researchers simultaneously. The findings contribute to understanding capability building as embedded in networks around the startup....

  1. Environmental sensor networks in ecological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundel, Philip W; Graham, Eric A; Allen, Michael F; Fisher, Jason C; Harmon, Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    Environmental sensor networks offer a powerful combination of distributed sensing capacity, real-time data visualization and analysis, and integration with adjacent networks and remote sensing data streams. These advances have become a reality as a combined result of the continuing miniaturization of electronics, the availability of large data storage and computational capacity, and the pervasive connectivity of the Internet. Environmental sensor networks have been established and large new networks are planned for monitoring multiple habitats at many different scales. Projects range in spatial scale from continental systems designed to measure global change and environmental stability to those involved with the monitoring of only a few meters of forest edge in fragmented landscapes. Temporal measurements have ranged from the evaluation of sunfleck dynamics at scales of seconds, to daily CO2 fluxes, to decadal shifts in temperatures. Above-ground sensor systems are partnered with subsurface soil measurement networks for physical and biological activity, together with aquatic and riparian sensor networks to measure groundwater fluxes and nutrient dynamics. More recently, complex sensors, such as networked digital cameras and microphones, as well as newly emerging sensors, are being integrated into sensor networks for hierarchical methods of sensing that promise a further understanding of our ecological systems by revealing previously unobservable phenomena.

  2. Virtual Network Computing Testbed for Cybersecurity Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 212-346-1012 W911NF-12-1-0393 61504-CS-RIP.2 Final Report a. REPORT 14. ABSTRACT 16...Technology, 2007. [8] Pullen, J. M., 2000. The network workbench : network simulation software for academic investigation of Internet concepts. Comput

  3. The ethics of HIV research with people who inject drugs in Africa: a desk review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamotte, Nicole

    2012-03-01

    Injecting drug use is a growing problem in Africa and a growing risk factor for contracting HIV in the region. It is imperative that HIV research includes injecting drug users so that they too are able to benefit from safe and effective behavioural interventions and biomedical HIV prevention and treatment products. This article relates a critical review of the findings of a desk review of previously published literature. The article examines injecting drug use in relation to HIV-related risk and research in Kenya, Mauritius, Nigeria, South Africa and Tanzania. The ethical challenges of including people who inject drugs in HIV research in Africa are also presented. The review found injecting drug use to be on the increase in all the countries reviewed. HIV-risk behaviour among people who inject drugs, such as needle-sharing and higher-risk sexual behaviour, was also found to be widespread. Furthermore, criminalisation of drug use and strict anti-drug laws are common in the countries reviewed, while harm-reduction programmes for people who inject drugs were found to be limited. The review identified a number of ethical challenges to the involvement of people who inject drugs in HIV research in Africa. This includes the illegal status and stigma surrounding injecting drug use, which may complicate participant recruitment, enrolment and retention. In addition, a lack of funding for supportive programmes to help injecting drug users may hinder the provision of appropriate standards of prevention and care and treatment for those who seroconvert.

  4. Using participatory action research to develop an HIV and Aids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PAR) was utilised by ... general classroom? Current HIV and Aids policy in South African schools. In August 1999, the former Minister of Education, Kadar Asmal, after consultations with the then ... Method. We employed the following methodology.

  5. Exposing the Secrets of HIV's Success | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An estimated 40 million people were living with HIV and approximately 3 million people died of AIDS worldwide in 2005, making HIV the deadliest infectious agent of the modern era. HIV owes much of its pathogenic success to two factors —its rapid and imprecise replication, which can lead to drug resistance, and its ability to survive at low levels in the presence of antiviral drugs, a phenomenon called persistence. Multipronged treatment—usually a combination of three antiviral therapies—has helped reduce the number of AIDS-related deaths in developed countries, but does not provide a cure. Drug resistance sometimes occurs with long-term combination therapy, and is even more common when suboptimal treatment strategies are employed. Furthermore, if treatment is interrupted, HIV makes a rapid return.

  6. HIV and Alcohol Research Priorities of City, State, and Federal Policymakers: Results of a Delphi Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uyei, Jennifer; Li, Lingfeng; Braithwaite, Ronald Scott

    2015-01-01

    .... From June to July 2014, we conducted a 3-round Delphi study to elicit from experts a list of alcohol- and HIV-related clinical trial research questions that were important to fund and rank order...

  7. Behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research: Workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Swann, Edith M; Singh, Sagri

    2011-03-21

    In May 2009, a workshop was held in Washington DC to identify ways in which HIV vaccine clinical research could benefit from and better incorporate behavioral and social science (BSS) considerations. Seventy-one people from government, non-government, and private organizations participated, including HIV vaccine researchers, clinical trial scientists, BSS researchers, community representatives, and sponsors. This workshop elucidated the opportunities and challenges for integrating BSS in HIV vaccine research by highlighting insights gained from previous BSS research on HIV prevention and highlighting new BSS approaches and methodologies. Meeting participants identified priority areas where BSS methodologies could significantly impact HIV research and developed concrete recommendations for addressing current challenges encountered in HIV vaccine research relating to social impact, risk assessment, community engagement, informed consent, risk reduction, and special populations. These recommendations address the need for improving the accuracy of participant data; standardizing data collection to enable comparisons across studies; engaging the community at all levels; using evidenced-based counseling techniques; understanding the needs and concerns of target populations; and considering the impacts of macro-level forces and influences. The importance of establishing collaborations that can carry out these recommendations and facilitate necessary changes in thinking and practice was emphasized throughout the meeting. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Graduate students navigating social-ecological research: insights from the Long-Term Ecological Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydne Record

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary, collaborative research capable of capturing the feedbacks between biophysical and social systems can improve the capacity for sustainable environmental decision making. Networks of researchers provide unique opportunities to foster social-ecological inquiry. Although insights into interdisciplinary research have been discussed elsewhere, they rarely address the role of networks and often come from the perspectives of more senior scientists. We have provided graduate student perspectives on interdisciplinary degree paths from within the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER Network. Focusing on data from a survey of graduate students in the LTER Network and four self-identified successful graduate student research experiences, we examined the importance of funding, pedagogy, research design and development, communication, networking, and culture and attitude to students pursuing social-ecological research. Through sharing insights from successful graduate student approaches to social-ecological research within the LTER Network, we hope to facilitate dialogue between students, faculty, and networks to improve training for interdisciplinary scientists.

  9. HIV transmission through breastmilk: the science behind the understanding of current trends and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prameela, K K

    2012-12-01

    Breastmilk protects the infant from many diseases and many short- term and long- term benefits accrue. At the same time it is also known that breastfeeding acts as a vehicle for some infective agents. It is now accepted that breastmilk transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus- 1 (HIV-1) is an important mode of paediatric infection . Despite this fact, many researchers have observed that corresponding to the volume of milk consumed by the infant, maternal transmission via breastmilk is still comparatively low. Some have noted the long latency period of breastmilk HIV transmission with evidence of numerous anti-HIV factors in breastmilk. Although there are accepted standard guidelines on infant feeding in mothers who are HIV positive in many countries, it maybe equally important to realize gaps in our knowledge of mother- to -child HIV transmission. From an evolutionary perspective, the role of the mammary epithelial cell (MEC) and of breastmilk , in contributing to and possibly in influencing HIV-1 transmission is intriguing. The presence of HIV-1 or of other viruses in maternal milk seem to be a requisite to spur immunological defenses to optimize necessary protection to the infant. This article reviews some aspects of the science of HIV transmission through breastmilk and reflects the concept -based understanding of current policies on HIV and breastfeeding. At the same time, it highlights uncertainties in this field and the urgency for future research in this direction. Accepting current notions of breastmilk HIV transmission, greater deliberation by research may throw more light on why breastfeeding with its abundant advantages is fraught with the hazards of transmission of a deadly disease.

  10. Social Justice and HIV Vaccine Research in the Age of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and Treatment as Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Theodore C.; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The advent of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment as prevention (TasP) as means of HIV prevention raises issues of justice concerning how most fairly and equitably to apportion resources in support of the burgeoning variety of established HIV treatment and prevention measures and further HIV research, including HIV vaccine research. We apply contemporary approaches to social justice to assess the ethical justification for allocating resources in support of HIV vaccine research given competing priorities to support broad implementation of HIV treatment and prevention measures, including TasP and PrEP. We argue that there is prima facie reason to believe that a safe and effective preventive HIV vaccine would offer a distinct set of ethically significant benefits not provided by current HIV treatment or prevention methods. It is thereby possible to justify continued support for HIV vaccine research despite tension with priorities for treatment, prevention, and other research. We then consider a counter-argument to such a justification based on the uncertainty of successfully developing a safe and effective preventive HIV vaccine. Finally, we discuss how HIV vaccine research might now be ethically designed and conducted given the new preventive options of TasP and PrEP, focusing on the ethically appropriate standard of prevention for HIV vaccine trials. PMID:24033297

  11. Team research methods for studying intranasal heroin use and its HIV risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, L J; Wiebel, W W; Jimenez, A D

    1995-01-01

    Nineteen years ago Douglas (1976), a sociologist, vigorously recommended team field research. As Douglas noted, most ethnography is carried out using the "Lone Ranger" approach, which--while producing a number of excellent studies--generally limits the researcher to small groups or parts of large groups. In the few cases where field research teams were assembled (e.g., Becker et al. 1961), they tended to be homogeneous and to simply divide the group being studied between them and then essentially perform identical investigations (Douglas 1976). Douglas had a different vision. He saw the optimal field research group as heterogeneous, able to take on large projects, and able to take multiple perspectives. Such a team would have a variety of talents, experiences, and inclinations to call upon and would be more able to connect with the people being studied (e.g., by including indigenous members noted for their sociability). Douglas argued for giving greater consideration in designing research to society's conflictory nature and the desire and need for people to misinform, evade, construct false fronts, lie, and deceive themselves. According to Douglas, field research teams were an excellent means of coping with these problems. With various members using their array of talents to study a problem from multiple perspectives and through numerous webs of social cliques and networks, research teams would be particularly able to get behind people's facades and produce valid data. Though Douglas presented a compelling argument, there is little evidence of an increase in team field research, with one exception: research groups studying HIV/AIDS. The NADR program, funded by NIDA, created a number of field research teams across the United States that combined ethnographers with indigenous staff who, whatever their principal duties, could be used to assist in the research. These field research teams were also part of a survey research effort, and, in this fashion, quantitative and

  12. Europe agrees to boost Internet networks used by researchers

    CERN Multimedia

    Butler, D

    2000-01-01

    The member states of the EU have approved an 80 million Euro upgrade of Europe's research Internet networks. The move will ensure the necessary infrastructure for work to begin on the concept of an advanced research computing 'grid' (1 page).

  13. Contrast research of CDMA and GSM network optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanwen; Liu, Zehong; Zhou, Guangyue

    2004-03-01

    With the development of mobile telecommunication network, users of CDMA advanced their request of network service quality. While the operators also change their network management object from signal coverage to performance improvement. In that case, reasonably layout & optimization of mobile telecommunication network, reasonably configuration of network resource, improvement of the service quality, and increase the enterprise's core competition ability, all those have been concerned by the operator companies. This paper firstly looked into the flow of CDMA network optimization. Then it dissertated to some keystones in the CDMA network optimization, like PN code assignment, calculation of soft handover, etc. As GSM is also the similar cellular mobile telecommunication system like CDMA, so this paper also made a contrast research of CDMA and GSM network optimization in details, including the similarity and the different. In conclusion, network optimization is a long time job; it will run through the whole process of network construct. By the adjustment of network hardware (like BTS equipments, RF systems, etc.) and network software (like parameter optimized, configuration optimized, capacity optimized, etc.), network optimization work can improve the performance and service quality of the network.

  14. The Homogeneity Research of Urban Rail Transit Network Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fu-jian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban Rail Transit is an important part of the public transit, it is necessary to carry out the corresponding network function analysis. Previous studies mainly about network performance analysis of a single city rail transit, lacking of horizontal comparison between the multi-city, it is difficult to find inner unity of different Urban Rail Transit network functions. Taking into account the Urban Rail Transit network is a typical complex networks, so this paper proposes the application of complex network theory to research the homogeneity of Urban Rail Transit network performance. This paper selects rail networks of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou as calculation case, gave them a complex network mapping through the L, P Space method and had a static topological analysis using complex network theory, Network characteristics in three cities were calculated and analyzed form node degree distribution and node connection preference. Finally, this paper studied the network efficiency changes of Urban Rail Transit system under different attack mode. The results showed that, although rail transport network size, model construction and construction planning of the three cities are different, but their network performance in many aspects showed high homogeneity.

  15. The role of neuropsychology in UK pediatric HIV care: Relevance to clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Anita

    2017-11-01

    There has been a dramatic improvement in the survival of children with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) following the introduction of effective treatment in 1990s. The care for children living with PHIV is now focused on more accurately understanding the effects of both HIV and HIV treatment on the developing body and brain. An evaluation of current HIV neuroimaging, and neurocognitive research, when combined with clinical experience in the area of HIV, could help to inform United Kingdom (UK) PHIV service provision. This paper argues that an understanding from a neuropsychological perspective will help these young people to optimize their health, quality of life, and future functioning. The aim of the paper is to bring together research and clinical understanding of HIV and its treatment effects on the developing brain, together with an understanding of other potential neurological risk factors. It is argued here that there is a need for targeted neuropsychology assessment and preventative interventions, supported by clinical and preliminary research on the neurocognitive effects of HIV and its treatments.

  16. Speaking of sex workers: How suppression of research has distorted the United States' domestic HIV response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Sex workers remain a vulnerable population at risk for HIV acquisition and transmission. Research suggests that interventions at the individual level, such as condom distribution, are less effective in preventing HIV among sex workers than structural changes such as allowing safer work settings and reducing the harassment and abuse of sex workers by clients and police. In the US, HIV incidence has not declined in the last decade. This may be due in part to its policy of wilful ignorance about sex work, but the data to resolve the question simply do not exist. Political actions such as PEPFAR's prostitution pledge and a congressional campaign against "waste, fraud and abuse" in research are products of an ideological environment that suppresses research on HIV prevention and treatment needs of sex workers. Even basic prevalence data are missing because there is no "sex worker" category in the US National HIV Behavior Surveillance System. However, international efforts are taking a public health approach and are calling for decriminalization of sex work, as the most effective public health strategy for reducing HIV incidence among sex workers. Although such an approach is not yet politically feasible in the US, some urgent practical policy changes can be implemented to improve data collection and generation of evidence to support HIV prevention and treatment programs targeting sex workers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. New Visions for Large Scale Networks: Research and Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This paper documents the findings of the March 12-14, 2001 Workshop on New Visions for Large-Scale Networks: Research and Applications. The workshops objectives were...

  18. A Research and Management Agenda for Chain and Network Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omta, S.W.F.; Trienekens, J.H.; Beers, G.

    2002-01-01

    In the present editorial we address key issues and research questions in the field of chain and network science. Theoretical approaches discussed in this editorial include Network Theory, Supply Chain Management and Industrial Organisation Theory. Major research themes derived from these approaches

  19. How Might Better Network Theories Support School Leadership Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Mark; Jopling, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how recent research in education has applied different aspects of "network" theory to the study of school leadership. Constructs from different network theories are often used because of their perceived potential to clarify two perennial issues in leadership research. The first is the relative importance of formal and…

  20. Computer Network Equipment for Intrusion Detection Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ye, Nong

    2000-01-01

    .... To test the process model, the system-level intrusion detection techniques and the working prototype of the intrusion detection system, a set of computer and network equipment has been purchased...

  1. A computer-assisted motivational social network intervention to reduce alcohol, drug and HIV risk behaviors among Housing First residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David P; Hunter, Sarah B; Chan Osilla, Karen; Maksabedian, Ervant; Golinelli, Daniela; Tucker, Joan S

    2016-03-15

    Individuals transitioning from homelessness to housing face challenges to reducing alcohol, drug and HIV risk behaviors. To aid in this transition, this study developed and will test a computer-assisted intervention that delivers personalized social network feedback by an intervention facilitator trained in motivational interviewing (MI). The intervention goal is to enhance motivation to reduce high risk alcohol and other drug (AOD) use and reduce HIV risk behaviors. In this Stage 1b pilot trial, 60 individuals that are transitioning from homelessness to housing will be randomly assigned to the intervention or control condition. The intervention condition consists of four biweekly social network sessions conducted using MI. AOD use and HIV risk behaviors will be monitored prior to and immediately following the intervention and compared to control participants' behaviors to explore whether the intervention was associated with any systematic changes in AOD use or HIV risk behaviors. Social network health interventions are an innovative approach for reducing future AOD use and HIV risk problems, but little is known about their feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy. The current study develops and pilot-tests a computer-assisted intervention that incorporates social network visualizations and MI techniques to reduce high risk AOD use and HIV behaviors among the formerly homeless. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT02140359.

  2. Acceptability and feasibility of using established geosocial and sexual networking mobile applications to promote HIV and STD testing among men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christina J; Stowers, Jason; Miller, Cindy; Bachmann, Laura H; Rhodes, Scott D

    2015-03-01

    This study is the first published multi-app study, of which we are aware, to evaluate both the acceptability and feasibility of providing sexual health information and HIV/STD testing referrals via established geosocial and sexual networking apps for MSM. Data were collected using an online survey and through four apps (A4A Radar, Grindr, Jack'd, and Scruff). Two-thirds (64 %) found apps to be an acceptable source for sexual health information. MSM who found apps as acceptable were more likely non-white, not sure of their current HIV status, and have low HIV testing self-efficacy. One-quarter (26 %) of informational chats with the health educator resulted in users requesting and being referred to local HIV/STD testing sites. There were significant differences in the number and types of interactions across apps. Established apps designed for MSM may be both an acceptable and feasible platform to promote HIV/STD testing. Future research should evaluate interventions that leverage this technology.

  3. Supporting Scientific Research with the Energy Sciences Network

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Monga, Inder

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a high-performance, unclassified national network built to support scientific research. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science (SC) and managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, ESnet provides services to more than 40 DOE research sites, including the entire National Laboratory system, its supercomputing facilities, and its major scientific instruments. ESnet also connects to 140 research and commercial networks, permitting DOE-funded scientists to productively collaborate with partners around the world. ESnet Division Director (Interim) Inder Monga and ESnet Networking Engineer David Mitchell will present current ESnet projects and research activities which help support the HEP community. ESnet  helps support the CERN community by providing 100Gbps trans-Atlantic network transport for the LHCONE and LHCOPN services. ESnet is also actively engaged in researching connectivity to cloud computing resources for HEP workflows a...

  4. A 30-year bibliometric analysis of research coverage on HIV and AIDS in Lesotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugomeri, Eltony; Bekele, Bisrat S; Mafaesa, Mamajoin; Maibvise, Charles; Tarirai, Clemence; Aiyuk, Sunny E

    2017-03-21

    Given the well documented undesired impacts of HIV/AIDS globally, there is a need to create a statistical inventory of research output on HIV/AIDS. This need is particularly important for a country such as Lesotho, whose HIV/AIDS prevalence is one of the highest globally. Research on HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa continues to trail behind that of other regions, especially those of the developed countries. Lesotho, a sub-Saharan country, is a developing country with lower research output in this area when longitudinally compared to other countries. This study reviewed the volume and scope of the general research output on HIV/AIDS in Lesotho and assessed the coverage of the national research agenda on HIV/AIDS, making recourse to statistical principles. A bibliometric review of studies on HIV/AIDS retrieved from the SCOPUS and PubMed databases, published within the 30-year period between 1985 and 2016, was conducted. The focus of each of the studies was analysed and the studies were cross-matched with the national research agenda in accordance with bibliometric methodologies. In total, 1280 studies comprising 1181 (92.3%) journal articles, 91 (7.1%) books and 8 (0.6%) conference proceedings were retrieved. By proportion, estimation of burden of infection (40.7%) had the highest research volume, while basic (5.5%) and preventive measures (24.4%) and national planning (29.4%) had the lowest. Out of the total studies retrieved, only 516 (40.3%) matched the national research agenda. Research on maternal and child health quality of care, viral load point-of-care devices, and infant point-of-care diagnosis had hardly any publications in the high priority research category of the agenda. Notwithstanding a considerable research output on HIV/AIDS for Lesotho, there is insufficient coverage of the national research agenda in this research area. The major research gaps on general research output are in basic and preventive measures as well as national planning. There is also

  5. Functional Connectivity Alterations between Networks and Associations with Infant Immune Health within Networks in HIV Infected Children on Early Treatment: A Study at 7 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadrana T. F. Toich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although HIV has been shown to impact brain connectivity in adults and youth, it is not yet known to what extent long-term early antiretroviral therapy (ART may alter these effects, especially during rapid brain development in early childhood. Using both independent component analysis (ICA and seed-based correlation analysis (SCA, we examine the effects of HIV infection in conjunction with early ART on resting state functional connectivity (FC in 7 year old children. HIV infected (HIV+ children were from the Children with HIV Early Antiretroviral Therapy (CHER trial and all initiated ART before 18 months; uninfected children were recruited from an interlinking vaccine trial. To better understand the effects of current and early immune health on the developing brain, we also investigated among HIV+ children the association of FC at 7 years with CD4 count and CD4%, both in infancy (6–8 weeks and at scan. Although we found no differences within any ICA-generated resting state networks (RSNs between HIV+ and uninfected children (27 HIV+, 18 uninfected, whole brain connectivity to seeds located at RSN connectivity peaks revealed several loci of FC differences, predominantly from seeds in midline regions (posterior cingulate cortex, paracentral lobule, cuneus, and anterior cingulate. Reduced long-range connectivity and increased short-range connectivity suggest developmental delay. Within the HIV+ children, clinical measures at age 7 years were not associated with FC values in any of the RSNs; however, poor immune health during infancy was associated with localized FC increases in the somatosensory, salience and basal ganglia networks. Together these findings suggest that HIV may affect brain development from its earliest stages and persist into childhood, despite early ART.

  6. Cognitive radio wireless sensor networks: applications, challenges and research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gyanendra Prasad; Nam, Seung Yeob; Kim, Sung Won

    2013-08-22

    A cognitive radio wireless sensor network is one of the candidate areas where cognitive techniques can be used for opportunistic spectrum access. Research in this area is still in its infancy, but it is progressing rapidly. The aim of this study is to classify the existing literature of this fast emerging application area of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, highlight the key research that has already been undertaken, and indicate open problems. This paper describes the advantages of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, the difference between ad hoc cognitive radio networks, wireless sensor networks, and cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, potential application areas of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, challenges and research trend in cognitive radio wireless sensor networks. The sensing schemes suited for cognitive radio wireless sensor networks scenarios are discussed with an emphasis on cooperation and spectrum access methods that ensure the availability of the required QoS. Finally, this paper lists several open research challenges aimed at drawing the attention of the readers toward the important issues that need to be addressed before the vision of completely autonomous cognitive radio wireless sensor networks can be realized.

  7. Cognitive Radio Wireless Sensor Networks: Applications, Challenges and Research Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gyanendra Prasad; Nam, Seung Yeob; Kim, Sung Won

    2013-01-01

    A cognitive radio wireless sensor network is one of the candidate areas where cognitive techniques can be used for opportunistic spectrum access. Research in this area is still in its infancy, but it is progressing rapidly. The aim of this study is to classify the existing literature of this fast emerging application area of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, highlight the key research that has already been undertaken, and indicate open problems. This paper describes the advantages of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, the difference between ad hoc cognitive radio networks, wireless sensor networks, and cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, potential application areas of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, challenges and research trend in cognitive radio wireless sensor networks. The sensing schemes suited for cognitive radio wireless sensor networks scenarios are discussed with an emphasis on cooperation and spectrum access methods that ensure the availability of the required QoS. Finally, this paper lists several open research challenges aimed at drawing the attention of the readers toward the important issues that need to be addressed before the vision of completely autonomous cognitive radio wireless sensor networks can be realized. PMID:23974152

  8. ALEPH: Israel's Research Library Network: Background, Evolution, and Implications for Networking in a Small Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazinger, Susan S.

    1991-01-01

    Describes ALEPH, the research library network in Israel, and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of its decentralized structure. Highlights include comparisons between RLIN and ALEPH; centralized versus decentralized networks; the format of ALEPH; authority control in ALEPH; and non-Roman scripts in both networks. (16 references) (LRW)

  9. Ocean Research - Perspectives from an international Ocean Research Coordination Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Jay; Williams, Albert, III

    2013-04-01

    The need for improved coordination in ocean observations is more urgent now given the issues of climate change, sustainable food sources and increased need for energy. Ocean researchers must work across disciplines to provide policy makers with clear and understandable assessments of the state of the ocean. With advances in technology, not only in observation, but also communication and computer science, we are in a new era where we can answer questions asked over the last 100 years at the time and space scales that are relevant. Programs like GLOBEC moved us forward but we are still challenged by the disciplinary divide. Interdisciplinary problem solving must be addressed not only by the exchange of data between the many sides, but through levels where questions require day-to-day collaboration. A National Science Foundation-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is addressing approaches for improving interdisciplinary research capabilities in the ocean sciences. During the last year, the RCN had a working group for Open Data led by John Orcutt, Peter Pissierssens and Albert Williams III. The teams has focused on three areas: 1. Data and Information formats and standards; 2. Data access models (including IPR, business models for open data, data policies,...); 3. Data publishing, data citation. There has been a significant trend toward free and open access to data in the last few years. In 2007, the US announced that Landsat data would be available at no charge. Float data from the US (NDBC), JCOMM and OceanSites offer web-based access. The IODE is developing its Ocean Data Portal giving immediate and free access to ocean data. However, from the aspect of long-term collaborations across communities, this global trend is less robust than might appear at the surface. While there are many standard data formats for data exchange, there is not yet widespread uniformity in their adoption. Use of standard data formats can be encouraged in several ways: sponsors of

  10. Social networks and future direction for obesity research: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soohyun; Redeker, Nancy; Whittemore, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant efforts to decrease obesity rates, the prevalence of obesity continues to increase in the United States. Obesity risk behaviors including physical inactivity, unhealthy eating, and sleep deprivation are intertwined during daily life and are difficult to improve in the current social environment. Studies show that social networks-the thick webs of social relations and interactions-influence various health outcomes, such as HIV risk behaviors, alcohol consumption, smoking, depression, and cardiovascular mortality; however, there is limited information on the influences of social networks on obesity and obesity risk behaviors. Given the complexities of the biobehavioral pathology of obesity and the lack of clear evidence of effectiveness and sustainability of existing interventions that are usually focused on an individual approach, targeting change in an individual's health behaviors or attitude may not take sociocontextual factors into account; there is a pressing need for a new perspective on this problem. In this review, we evaluate the literature on social networks as a potential approach for obesity prevention and treatment (i.e., how social networks affect various health outcomes), present two major social network data analyses (i.e., egocentric and sociometric analysis), and discuss implications and the future direction for obesity research using social networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. HIV competition dynamics over sexual networks: first comer advantage conserves founder effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandy, Bence; Mones, Enys; Vicsek, Tamás; Müller, Viktor

    2015-02-01

    Outside Africa, the global phylogeography of HIV is characterized by compartmentalized local epidemics that are typically dominated by a single subtype, which indicates strong founder effects. We hypothesized that the competition of viral strains at the epidemic level may involve an advantage of the resident strain that was the first to colonize a population. Such an effect would slow down the invasion of new strains, and thus also the diversification of the epidemic. We developed a stochastic modelling framework to simulate HIV epidemics over dynamic contact networks. We simulated epidemics in which the second strain was introduced into a population where the first strain had established a steady-state epidemic, and assessed whether, and on what time scale, the second strain was able to spread in the population. Simulations were parameterized based on empirical data; we tested scenarios with varying levels of overall prevalence. The spread of the second strain occurred on a much slower time scale compared with the initial expansion of the first strain. With strains of equal transmission efficiency, the second strain was unable to invade on a time scale relevant for the history of the HIV pandemic. To become dominant over a time scale of decades, the second strain needed considerable (>25%) advantage in transmission efficiency over the resident strain. The inhibition effect was weaker if the second strain was introduced while the first strain was still in its growth phase. We also tested how possible mechanisms of interference (inhibition of superinfection, depletion of highly connected hubs in the network, one-time acute peak of infectiousness) contribute to the inhibition effect. Our simulations confirmed a strong first comer advantage in the competition dynamics of HIV at the population level, which may explain the global phylogeography of the virus and may influence the future evolution of the pandemic.

  12. HIV competition dynamics over sexual networks: first comer advantage conserves founder effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bence Ferdinandy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Outside Africa, the global phylogeography of HIV is characterized by compartmentalized local epidemics that are typically dominated by a single subtype, which indicates strong founder effects. We hypothesized that the competition of viral strains at the epidemic level may involve an advantage of the resident strain that was the first to colonize a population. Such an effect would slow down the invasion of new strains, and thus also the diversification of the epidemic. We developed a stochastic modelling framework to simulate HIV epidemics over dynamic contact networks. We simulated epidemics in which the second strain was introduced into a population where the first strain had established a steady-state epidemic, and assessed whether, and on what time scale, the second strain was able to spread in the population. Simulations were parameterized based on empirical data; we tested scenarios with varying levels of overall prevalence. The spread of the second strain occurred on a much slower time scale compared with the initial expansion of the first strain. With strains of equal transmission efficiency, the second strain was unable to invade on a time scale relevant for the history of the HIV pandemic. To become dominant over a time scale of decades, the second strain needed considerable (>25% advantage in transmission efficiency over the resident strain. The inhibition effect was weaker if the second strain was introduced while the first strain was still in its growth phase. We also tested how possible mechanisms of interference (inhibition of superinfection, depletion of highly connected hubs in the network, one-time acute peak of infectiousness contribute to the inhibition effect. Our simulations confirmed a strong first comer advantage in the competition dynamics of HIV at the population level, which may explain the global phylogeography of the virus and may influence the future evolution of the pandemic.

  13. Challenges in HIV vaccine research for treatment and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eEnsoli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many attempts have been made or are ongoing for HIV prevention and HIV cure. Many successes are in the list, particularly for HIV drugs, recently proposed also for prevention. However, no eradication of infection has been achieved so far with any drug.Further, a residual immune dysregulation associated to chronic immune activation and incomplete restoration of B and T cell subsets, together with HIV DNA persistence in reservoirs, are still unmet needs of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, causing novel non-AIDS related diseases that account for a higher risk of death even in virologically suppressed patients. These ART unmet needs represent a problem, which is expected to increase by ART roll out. Further, in countries such as South Africa, where 6 millions of individuals are infected, ART appears unable to contain the epidemics. Regretfully, all the attempts at developing a preventative vaccine have been largely disappointing. However, recent therapeutic immunization strategies have opened new avenues for HIV treatment, which might be exploitable also for preventative vaccine approaches. For example, immunization strategies aimed at targeting key viral products responsible of virus transmission, activation and maintenance of virus reservoirs may intensify drug efficacy and lead to a functional cure providing new perspectives also for prevention and future virus eradication strategies. However, this approach imposes new challenges to the scientific community, vaccine developers and regulatory bodies, such as the identification of novel immunological and virological biomarkers to assess efficacy endpoints, taking advantage from the natural history of infection and exploiting lessons from former trials.This review will focus first on recent advancement of therapeutic strategies, then on the progresses made in preventative approaches, discussing concepts and problems for the way ahead for the development of vaccines for HIV treatment

  14. Researching Design, Experience and Practice of Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodgson, Vivien; de Laat, Maarten; McConnell, David

    2014-01-01

    and final section draws attention to a growing topic of interest within networked learning: that of networked learning in informal practices. In addition, we provide a reflection on the theories, methods and settings featured in the networked learning research of the chapters. We conclude the introduction......In the introductory chapter, we explore how networked learning has developed in recent years by summarising and discussing the research presented in the chapters of the book. The chapters are structured in three sections, each highlighting a particular aspect of practice. The first section focuses...

  15. Informed recruitment in partner studies of HIV transmission: an ethical issue in couples research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Louise-Anne; Gordon, Elisa J; Uusküla, Anneli

    2009-08-27

    Much attention has been devoted to ethical issues related to randomized controlled trials for HIV treatment and prevention. However, there has been less discussion of ethical issues surrounding families involved in observational studies of HIV transmission. This paper describes the process of ethical deliberation about how best to obtain informed consent from sex partners of injection drug users (IDUs) tested for HIV, within a recent HIV study in Eastern Europe. The study aimed to assess the amount of HIV serodiscordance among IDUs and their sexual partners, identify barriers to harm reduction, and explore ways to optimize intervention programs. Including IDUs, either HIV-positive or at high risk for HIV, and their sexual partners would help to gain a more complete understanding of barriers to and opportunities for intervention. This paper focuses on the ethical dilemma regarding informed recruitment: whether researchers should disclose to sexual partners of IDUs that they were recruited because their partner injects drugs (i.e., their heightened risk for HIV). Disclosing risks to partners upholds the ethical value of respect for persons through informed consent. However, disclosure compromises the IDU's confidentiality, and potentially, the scientific validity of the research. Following a brief literature review, we summarize the researchers' systematic evaluation of this issue from ethical, scientific, and logistical perspectives. While the cultural context may be somewhat unique to Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the issues raised and solutions proposed here inform epidemiological research designs and their underlying ethical tensions. We present ethical arguments in favor of disclosure, discuss how cultural context shapes the ethical issues, and recommend refinement of guidance for couples research of communicable diseases to assist investigators encountering these ethical issues in the future.

  16. Chemokine receptors and their crucial role in human immunodeficiency virus infection: major breakthroughs in HIV research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, T B; Knudsen, T B; Eugen-Olsen, J

    1998-01-01

    Within the last three years, major progress in the understanding of acquired immune deficiency syndrome pathogenesis has been achieved. The discovery that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in addition to the CD4 receptor, requires the presence of a coreceptor in order to infect cells has led...... to a series of breakthroughs in HIV research and knowledge. These include an increased understanding of viral entry, a connection of viral phenotype to specific coreceptor use, and an unequivocal linkage of a single human gene to host susceptibility. All in all these achievements provide a number of promising...... new strategies for combating HIV....

  17. Chemokine receptors and their crucial role in human immunodeficiency virus infection: major breakthroughs in HIV research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, T B; Knudsen, T B; Eugen-Olsen, J

    1998-01-01

    to a series of breakthroughs in HIV research and knowledge. These include an increased understanding of viral entry, a connection of viral phenotype to specific coreceptor use, and an unequivocal linkage of a single human gene to host susceptibility. All in all these achievements provide a number of promising......Within the last three years, major progress in the understanding of acquired immune deficiency syndrome pathogenesis has been achieved. The discovery that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in addition to the CD4 receptor, requires the presence of a coreceptor in order to infect cells has led...... new strategies for combating HIV....

  18. Use of the location-based social networking application GRINDR as a recruitment tool in rectal microbicide development research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Earl R; Pines, Heather A; Robbie, Edward; Coleman, Leonardo; Murphy, Ryan D; Hess, Kristen L; Anton, Peter; Gorbach, Pamina M

    2012-10-01

    Mobile phone social networking applications such as GRINDR are potential tools for recruitment of men who have sex with men (MSM) for HIV prevention research. Demographics and sexual risk behaviors of men recruited through GRINDR and through traditional media were compared. GRINDR participants were younger (mean age 31 vs. 42, p vs. 30 %, p vs. 1.10, p vs. 50 %). This approach resulted in successful recruitment of younger and more educated, White identified MSM.

  19. Increasing Scalability of Researcher Network Extraction from the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Yohei; Matsuo, Yutaka; Ishizuka, Mitsuru

    Social networks, which describe relations among people or organizations as a network, have recently attracted attention. With the help of a social network, we can analyze the structure of a community and thereby promote efficient communications within it. We investigate the problem of extracting a network of researchers from the Web, to assist efficient cooperation among researchers. Our method uses a search engine to get the cooccurences of names of two researchers and calculates the streangth of the relation between them. Then we label the relation by analyzing the Web pages in which these two names cooccur. Research on social network extraction using search engines as ours, is attracting attention in Japan as well as abroad. However, the former approaches issue too many queries to search engines to extract a large-scale network. In this paper, we propose a method to filter superfluous queries and facilitates the extraction of large-scale networks. By this method we are able to extract a network of around 3000-nodes. Our experimental results show that the proposed method reduces the number of queries significantly while preserving the quality of the network as compared to former methods.

  20. HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The·human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be transmiHed from one person to onother through the use of non-sterile nee- dles, syringes, and other skin-piercing and invasive instruments. Proper .sterilization of all such instruments is therefore important to prevent its transmission. HIV is very sensitive to ...

  1. hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-31

    Mar 31, 2016 ... Indexed By: African Journal Online (AJOL); Texila American University; Genamics; Scholarsteer; EIJASR; CAS-American Chemical. Society; and IRMS Informatics India (J-Gate). ABSTRACT. This study evaluated the effect of HIV infection on CD4 T-lymphocyte depletion in people living with HIV/AIDS.

  2. The network researchers' network: A social network analysis of the IMP Group 1985-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C. M.; Ziang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    ). In this paper, based upon the papers presented at the 22 conferences held to date, we undertake a Social Network Analysis in order to examine the degree of co-publishing that has taken place between this group of researchers. We identify the different components in this database, and examine the large main...... components in some detail. The egonets of three of the original 'founding fathers' are examined in detail, and we draw comparisons as to how their publishing strategies vary. Finally, the paper draws some more general conclusions as to the insights that SNA can bring to those working within business...

  3. Interest in a national research network in surgery in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Businger, Adrian; Kaderli, Reto; Sommer, Christoph; Furrer, Markus; Villiger, Peter

    2011-11-08

    Networks are known to improve performance and create synergies. A research network can provide a significant advantage for all parties involved in research in surgery by systematically tracking the outcome of a huge number of patients over a long period of time. The aim of the present study was to investigate the experiences of surgeons with respect to research activities, to evaluate the opinions of surgeons with regard to the development of a national network for research in the field of surgery in Switzerland and to obtain data on how such a network should be designed. An anonymous postal survey of board-certified surgeons practising in Switzerland was conducted during summer 2007. The questionnaire included questions related to research activities, the desire to develop a national research network and the design and potential advantages of such a network. Qualitative analyses were performed using Mayring's content analysis. A total of 337 out of 749 (45%) questionnaires were returned. In all, 156/337 (46.3%) surgeons were engaged in research activities. During the past five years, 212/337 (62.9%) of the participants had participated at least in one multi-centre study. Out of 337, 88 (26.1%) surgeons were members of an established research association in Switzerland. Interest in a national surgical research network was reported by 266 (78.9%) participants. The reported advantages were "power" (53.1%), "teamwork effects" (23.7%), "efficiency" (12.2%) and "quality aspects" (8.0%). The most frequently named design proposal was based on a clinic for coordinating research, while the younger participants also suggested a web-based platform. Due to the significant interest of participants, the establishment of a national research network should be considered. An established clinic for coordinating research alongside an additional web-based platform to target young surgeons could function as an umbrella organisation.

  4. Challenges and research issues from the Italian Hearing Voices Network.

    OpenAIRE

    Cardano, Mario; Fornace, Gino; Macario, Marcello; Pezzano, Roberto; Piona, Glenda; Poobello, Raffaella; Santoni, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The Association "Rete Italiana Noi e le Voci" (Italian Hearing Voices Network, IHVN) is characterized by the active collaboration between voice hearers, mental health professionals and researchers. Goal of this presentation is to share two network challenges and research issues: (1) Psychiatric drugs: Based on the insights gained from Robert Whitaker's meta-analysis on the development of psychiatric drugs use and its effects, the study on this issue has become a priority in our research agend...

  5. Incarceration, Sex With an STI- or HIV-Infected Partner, and Infection With an STI or HIV in Bushwick, Brooklyn, NY: A Social Network Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, Matthew W.; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Bolyard, Melissa; Sandoval, Milagros; Friedman, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the link between incarceration and sexually transmitted infection (STI), including HIV, from a social network perspective. Methods. We used data collected during a social network study conducted in Brooklyn, NY (n = 343), to measure associations between incarceration and infection with herpes simplex virus-2, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis or HIV and sex with an infected partner, adjusting for characteristics of respondents and their sex partners. Results. Infection with an STI or HIV was associated with incarceration of less than 1 year (adjusted prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01, 1.76) and 1 year or longer (adjusted PR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.08, 1.74). Sex in the past 3 months with an infected partner was associated with sex in the past 3 months with 1 partner (adjusted PR = 1.42; 95% CI = 1.12, 1.79) and with 2 or more partners (adjusted PR = 1.85; 95% CI = 1.43, 2.38) who had ever been incarcerated. Conclusions. The results highlight the need for STI and HIV treatment and prevention for current and former prisoners and provide preliminary evidence to suggest that incarceration may influence STI and HIV, possibly because incarceration increases the risk of sex with infected partners. PMID:21233443

  6. Community capacity to acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence: a survey of Ontario's HIV/AIDS sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rourke Sean B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based organizations (CBOs are important stakeholders in health systems and are increasingly called upon to use research evidence to inform their advocacy, program planning, and service delivery. To better support CBOs to find and use research evidence, we sought to assess the capacity of CBOs in the HIV/AIDS sector to acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence in their work. Methods We invited executive directors of HIV/AIDS CBOs in Ontario, Canada (n = 51 to complete the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation's "Is Research Working for You?" survey. Findings Based on responses from 25 organizations that collectively provide services to approximately 32,000 clients per year with 290 full-time equivalent staff, we found organizational capacity to acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence to be low. CBO strengths include supporting a culture that rewards flexibility and quality improvement, exchanging information within their organization, and ensuring that their decision-making processes have a place for research. However, CBO Executive Directors indicated that they lacked the skills, time, resources, incentives, and links with experts to acquire research, assess its quality and reliability, and summarize it in a user-friendly way. Conclusion Given the limited capacity to find and use research evidence, we recommend a capacity-building strategy for HIV/AIDS CBOs that focuses on providing the tools, resources, and skills needed to more consistently acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence. Such a strategy may be appropriate in other sectors and jurisdictions as well given that CBO Executive Directors in the HIV/AIDS sector in Ontario report low capacity despite being in the enviable position of having stable government infrastructure in place to support them, benefiting from long-standing investment in capacity building, and being part of an active provincial network. CBOs in other

  7. Consolidating African Research and Education Networking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Free and Open Source Software in North African Universities. The project, Free and Open Source Software in North African Universities (POLLES), aims to establish a network of experts in open source software to develop information tools for use in North... View moreFree and Open Source Software in North African ...

  8. Research Award: Networked Economies | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... For example, open data has great potential for driving innovation. Similarly, big data analytics can offer solutions to a number of health and social problems. Networked Economies also works to build leaders and institutions in developing countries that are capable of advancing policy discussions in the ...

  9. Advanced Medical Technology and Network Systems Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    acceptance and operations of comprehensive radiology networks. Is the PACS cup half full or half empty? SPIE Proc. 1093:194-201 23. Deleted in proof...repeat examination in one to two menstrual cysts approximately 1-2 weeks after menstrual period." Similar recommendations are given for women over

  10. Enabling Research Network Connectivity to Clouds with Virtual Router Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuster, R.; Casteels, K.; Leavett-Brown, CR; Paterson, M.; Sobie, RJ

    2017-10-01

    The use of opportunistic cloud resources by HEP experiments has significantly increased over the past few years. Clouds that are owned or managed by the HEP community are connected to the LHCONE network or the research network with global access to HEP computing resources. Private clouds, such as those supported by non-HEP research funds are generally connected to the international research network; however, commercial clouds are either not connected to the research network or only connect to research sites within their national boundaries. Since research network connectivity is a requirement for HEP applications, we need to find a solution that provides a high-speed connection. We are studying a solution with a virtual router that will address the use case when a commercial cloud has research network connectivity in a limited region. In this situation, we host a virtual router in our HEP site and require that all traffic from the commercial site transit through the virtual router. Although this may increase the network path and also the load on the HEP site, it is a workable solution that would enable the use of the remote cloud for low I/O applications. We are exploring some simple open-source solutions. In this paper, we present the results of our studies and how it will benefit our use of private and public clouds for HEP computing.

  11. Recruitment and retention of women in fishing communities in HIV prevention research

    OpenAIRE

    Ssetaala, Ali; Nakiyingi-Miiro, Jessica; Asiimwe, Stephen; Nanvubya, Annet; Mpendo, Juliet; Asiki, Gershim; Nielsen, Leslie; Kiwanuka, Noah; Seeley, Janet; Kamali, Anatoli; Kaleebu, Pontiano

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women in fishing communities in Uganda are more at risk and have higher rates of HIV infection. Socio-cultural gender norms, limited access to health information and services, economic disempowerment, sexual abuse and their biological susceptibility make women more at risk of infection. There is need to design interventions that cater for women's vulnerability. We explore factors affecting recruitment and retention of women from fishing communities in HIV prevention research. Met...

  12. Oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS in Asia: Systematic review and future research guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Gaurav; Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Vohra, Puneeta; Nagpal, Archna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The authors have conducted a systematic review of oral manifestations of HIV from studies conducted in Asia to establish the characteristics and prevalence of individual oral manifestations in Asia, and to assess the direction of future research studies on oral manifestations of HIV in Asia. Material and Methods The electronic retrieval systems and databases searched for relevant articles were PubMed [MEDLINE], EBSCO, and EMBASE. The search was for limited articles published in Eng...

  13. Network analysis of unstructured EHR data for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Lependu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan V; Harpaz, Rave; Leeper, Nicholas J; Shah, Nigam H

    2013-01-01

    In biomedical research, network analysis provides a conceptual framework for interpreting data from high-throughput experiments. For example, protein-protein interaction networks have been successfully used to identify candidate disease genes. Recently, advances in clinical text processing and the increasing availability of clinical data have enabled analogous analyses on data from electronic medical records. We constructed networks of diseases, drugs, medical devices and procedures using concepts recognized in clinical notes from the Stanford clinical data warehouse. We demonstrate the use of the resulting networks for clinical research informatics in two ways-cohort construction and outcomes analysis-by examining the safety of cilostazol in peripheral artery disease patients as a use case. We show that the network-based approaches can be used for constructing patient cohorts as well as for analyzing differences in outcomes by comparing with standard methods, and discuss the advantages offered by network-based approaches.

  14. A sequential mixed methods research approach to investigating HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Semi-structured interviews then yielded richer qualitative data before quantitative datasets were revisited to exploit their potential for more complex analysis and modelling. Findings to date show that corporate knowledge about HIV/AIDS is inconsistent, that intervention management may miss the population most affected, ...

  15. RESEARCH Cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia in HIV-positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, in patients treated for cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN), the risk of developing cancer is still 2.8 times greater than in the general population, and may be more in women with recurrent disease.5 Studies show that the recurrence of CIN after treatment was between 20% and 65% in HIV-infected women.6,7.

  16. Ethical challenges in conducting HIV/AIDS research in correctional settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Gloria D; Robinson, Rebecca Volino; Corey, Staci; Brems, Christiane; Johnson, Mark E

    2012-10-01

    To explore ethical challenges in the conduct and oversight of HIV/AIDS research in correctional settings, 92 researchers; IRB chairs, members, and prisoner representatives; research ethicists; and prison administrators were asked the question, "If you had to pick the single most important ethical challenge to HIV/AIDS research with incarcerated people, what would it be?" Data were analyzed with NVivo 8.0 software and revealed that key concerns were confidentiality and privacy; autonomy and informed consent; and justice and access. Characteristics of people who are incarcerated, the nature of correctional institutions, and state and federal regulatory issues contributed to these challenges. These findings provide insights into ethical challenges that affect the conduct of HIV/AIDS research in correctional settings.

  17. Beyond Risk Compensation: Clusters of Antiretroviral Treatment (ART Users in Sexual Networks Can Modify the Impact of ART on HIV Incidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Delva

    Full Text Available Concerns about risk compensation-increased risk behaviours in response to a perception of reduced HIV transmission risk-after the initiation of ART have largely been dispelled in empirical studies, but other changes in sexual networking patterns may still modify the effects of ART on HIV incidence.We developed an exploratory mathematical model of HIV transmission that incorporates the possibility of ART clusters, i.e. subsets of the sexual network in which the density of ART patients is much higher than in the rest of the network. Such clusters may emerge as a result of ART homophily-a tendency for ART patients to preferentially form and maintain relationships with other ART patients. We assessed whether ART clusters may affect the impact of ART on HIV incidence, and how the influence of this effect-modifying variable depends on contextual variables such as HIV prevalence, HIV serosorting, coverage of HIV testing and ART, and adherence to ART.ART homophily can modify the impact of ART on HIV incidence in both directions. In concentrated epidemics and generalized epidemics with moderate HIV prevalence (≈ 10%, ART clusters can enhance the impact of ART on HIV incidence, especially when adherence to ART is poor. In hyperendemic settings (≈ 35% HIV prevalence, ART clusters can reduce the impact of ART on HIV incidence when adherence to ART is high but few people living with HIV (PLWH have been diagnosed. In all contexts, the effects of ART clusters on HIV epidemic dynamics are distinct from those of HIV serosorting.Depending on the programmatic and epidemiological context, ART clusters may enhance or reduce the impact of ART on HIV incidence, in contrast to serosorting, which always leads to a lower impact of ART on HIV incidence. ART homophily and the emergence of ART clusters should be measured empirically and incorporated into more refined models used to plan and evaluate ART programmes.

  18. The Healthy Aging Research Network: Modeling Collaboration for Community Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belza, Basia; Altpeter, Mary; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-03-01

    As the first Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Prevention Research Centers Program thematic network, the Healthy Aging Research Network was established to better understand the determinants of healthy aging within older adult populations, identify interventions that promote healthy aging, and assist in translating research into sustainable community-based programs throughout the nation. To achieve these goals requires concerted efforts of a collaborative network of academic, community, and public health organizational partnerships. For the 2001-2014 Prevention Research Center funding cycles, the Healthy Aging Research Network conducted prevention research and promoted the wide use of practices known to foster optimal health. Organized around components necessary for successful collaborations (i.e., governance and infrastructure, shaping focus, community involvement, and evaluation and improvement), this commentary highlights exemplars that demonstrate the Healthy Aging Research Network's unique contributions to the field. The Healthy Aging Research Network's collaboration provided a means to collectively build capacity for practice and policy, reduce fragmentation and duplication in health promotion and aging research efforts, maximize the efficient use of existing resources and generate additional resources, and ultimately, create synergies for advancing the healthy aging agenda. This collaborative model was built upon a backbone organization (coordinating center); setting of common agendas and mutually reinforcing activities; and continuous communications. Given its successes, the Healthy Aging Research Network model could be used to create new and evaluate existing thematic networks to guide the translation of research into policy and practice. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Basic Research in HIV vaccinology is hampered by reductionist thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc H V Van Regenmortel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the structure-based reverse vaccinology approach aimed at developing vaccine immunogens capable of inducing antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1. Some basic principles of protein immunochemistry are reviewed and the implications of the extensive polyspecificity of antibodies for vaccine development are underlined. Although it is natural for investigators to want to know the cause of an effective immunological intervention, the classic notion of causality is shown to have little explanatory value for a system as complex as the immune system, where any observed effect always results from many interactions between a large number of components. Causal explanations are reductive because a single factor is singled out for attention and given undue explanatory weight on its own. Other examples of the negative impact of reductionist thinking on HIV vaccine development are discussed. These include 1 the failure to distinguish between the chemical nature of antigenicity and the biological nature of immunogenicity, 2 the belief that when an HIV-1 epitope is reconstructed by rational design to better fit a neutralizing Mab, this will produce an immunogen able to elicit Abs with the same neutralizing capacity as the Ab used as template for designing the antigen 3 the belief that protection against infection can be analysed at the level of individual molecular interactions although it has meaning only at the level of an entire organism.The numerous unsuccessful strategies that have been used to design HIV-1 vaccine immunogens are described and it is suggested that the convergence of so many negative experimental results, justifies the conclusion that reverse vaccinology is unlikely to lead to the development of a preventive HIV-1 vaccine. Immune correlates of protection in vaccinees have not yet been identified because this will become feasible only retrospectively once an effective vaccine exists.

  20. Evaluating emergency care research networks: what are the right metrics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baren, Jill M; Middleton, Melissa K; Kaji, Amy H; O'Connor, Robert E; O'Conner, Robert E; Lindsell, Christopher; Weik, Tasmeen Singh; Lewis, Roger J

    2009-10-01

    Research networks can enable the inclusion of large, diverse patient populations in different settings. However, the optimal measures of a research network's failure or success are not well defined or standardized. To define a framework for metrics used to measure the performance and effectiveness of emergency care research networks (ECRN), a conference for emergency care investigators, funding agencies, patient advocacy groups, and other stakeholders was held and yielded the following major recommendations: 1) ECRN metrics should be measurable, explicitly defined, and customizable for the multiple stakeholders involved and 2) continuing to develop and institute metrics to evaluate ECRNs will be critical for their accountability and sustainability.

  1. The association between social networks and self-rated risk of HIV infection among secondary school students in Moshi Municipality, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyimo, Elizabeth J; Todd, Jim; Richey, Lisa Ann; Njau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the social networks of secondary school students in Moshi Municipality, and their association with self-rated risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted among 300 students aged 15-24 years in 5 secondary schools in Moshi, Tanzania. Bonding networks were defined as social groupings of students participating in activities within the school, while bridging networks were groups that included students participating in social groupings from outside of the school environs. A structured questionnaire was used to ask about participation in bonding and bridging social networks and self-rated HIV risk behavior. More participants participated in bonding networks (72%) than in bridging networks (29%). Participation in bridging networks was greater among females (25%) than males (12%, psexually experienced, and of these 62 (70%) considered themselves to be at low risk of HIV infection. Factors associated with self-rated risk of HIV included: type of school (psexually experienced (psex in the past three months (psexual partner (psexual intercourse (passociation between bonding and bridging social networks on self-rated risk of HIV among study participants. However, sexually experienced participants rated themselves at low risk of HIV infection despite practicing unsafe sex. Efforts to raise adolescents' self-awareness of risk of HIV infection through life skills education and HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome risk reduction strategies may be beneficial to students in this at-risk group.

  2. Multipath Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks: Survey and Research Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marjan; Dezfouli, Behnam; Bakar, Kamalrulnizam Abu; Lee, Malrey

    2012-01-01

    A wireless sensor network is a large collection of sensor nodes with limited power supply and constrained computational capability. Due to the restricted communication range and high density of sensor nodes, packet forwarding in sensor networks is usually performed through multi-hop data transmission. Therefore, routing in wireless sensor networks has been considered an important field of research over the past decade. Nowadays, multipath routing approach is widely used in wireless sensor networks to improve network performance through efficient utilization of available network resources. Accordingly, the main aim of this survey is to present the concept of the multipath routing approach and its fundamental challenges, as well as the basic motivations for utilizing this technique in wireless sensor networks. In addition, we present a comprehensive taxonomy on the existing multipath routing protocols, which are especially designed for wireless sensor networks. We highlight the primary motivation behind the development of each protocol category and explain the operation of different protocols in detail, with emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this paper compares and summarizes the state-of-the-art multipath routing techniques from the network application point of view. Finally, we identify open issues for further research in the development of multipath routing protocols for wireless sensor networks. PMID:22368490

  3. Multipath routing in wireless sensor networks: survey and research challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marjan; Dezfouli, Behnam; Abu Bakar, Kamalrulnizam; Lee, Malrey

    2012-01-01

    A wireless sensor network is a large collection of sensor nodes with limited power supply and constrained computational capability. Due to the restricted communication range and high density of sensor nodes, packet forwarding in sensor networks is usually performed through multi-hop data transmission. Therefore, routing in wireless sensor networks has been considered an important field of research over the past decade. Nowadays, multipath routing approach is widely used in wireless sensor networks to improve network performance through efficient utilization of available network resources. Accordingly, the main aim of this survey is to present the concept of the multipath routing approach and its fundamental challenges, as well as the basic motivations for utilizing this technique in wireless sensor networks. In addition, we present a comprehensive taxonomy on the existing multipath routing protocols, which are especially designed for wireless sensor networks. We highlight the primary motivation behind the development of each protocol category and explain the operation of different protocols in detail, with emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this paper compares and summarizes the state-of-the-art multipath routing techniques from the network application point of view. Finally, we identify open issues for further research in the development of multipath routing protocols for wireless sensor networks.

  4. PCs and networking for oceanographic research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Desa, E.; Vithayathil, G.

    This paper, first describes briefly the evolution of data acquisition techniques and different system implementation, on board research vessels. A data acquisition system being developed for a coastal research vessel is then described which is based...

  5. Understanding social and sexual networks of sexual minority men and transgender women in Guatemala city to improve HIV prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, C; Arandi, C Galindo; Bolaños, J Herbert; Paz-Bailey, G; Barrington, C

    2014-11-01

    Sexual minority men and transgender women are disproportionately affected by HIV in Guatemala. Innovative prevention strategies are urgently needed to address these disparities. While social network approaches are frequently used to reach sexual minorities, little is known about the unique network characteristics among sub-groups. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 13 gay-identifying men, eight non-gay-identifying men who have sex with men (MSM) and eight transgender women in Guatemala City. Using narrative and thematic coding procedures, we identified distinct patterns in the size, composition, and overlap between social and sexual networks across groups. Gay-identifying men had the largest, most supportive social networks, predominantly comprising family. For both non-gay-identifying MSM and transgender women, friends and sex clients provided more support. Transgender women reported the smallest social networks, least social support, and the most discrimination. HIV prevention efforts should be tailored to the specific sexual minority population and engage with strong ties.

  6. Stimulating high impact HIV-related cardiovascular research: recommendations from a multidisciplinary NHLBI Working Group on HIV-related heart, lung, and blood disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Monica R; Cook, Nakela; Wong, Renee; Hsue, Priscilla; Ridker, Paul; Currier, Judith; Shurin, Susan

    2015-02-24

    The clinical challenges confronting patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have shifted from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related illnesses to chronic diseases, such as coronary artery disease, chronic lung disease, and chronic anemia. With the growing burden of HIV-related heart, lung, and blood (HLB) disease, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recognizes it must stimulate and support HIV-related HLB research. Because HIV offers a natural, accelerated model of common pathological processes, such as inflammation, HIV-related HLB research may yield important breakthroughs for all patients with HLB disease. This paper summarizes the cardiovascular recommendations of an NHLBI Working Group, Advancing HIV/AIDS Research in Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases, charged with identifying scientific priorities in HIV-related HLB disease and developing recommendations to promote multidisciplinary collaboration among HIV and HLB investigators. The working group included multidisciplinary sessions, as well as HLB breakout sessions for discussion of disease-specific issues, with common themes about scientific priorities and strategies to stimulate HLB research emerging in all 3 groups. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Online communities: Challenges and opportunities for social network research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.; Moser, C.; Brass, D.; Labianca, G.; Mehra, A.; Halgin, D; Borgatti, S

    2014-01-01

    Online communities form a challenging and still-evolving field for social network research. We highlight two themes that are at the core of social network literature: formative processes and structures, and discuss how these might be relevant in the context of online communities. Processes of tie

  8. Viet Nam Economic Research Network (VERN) - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    VERN I (101273) constituted the first network for young economic researchers in Viet Nam, where previously there had been no modality for cooperation or peer review. Guided by the philosophy of "understanding and managing globalization" that underpinned the earlier project, VERN II proposes to expand the network, ...

  9. Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will assist the Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa (ERNWACA) by providing funding for succession planning, recruiting a regional coordinator (to be based in Mali) and strengthening the Network's ... IDRC partner the World Economic Forum is building a hub for inclusive growth solutions.

  10. Viet Nam Economic Research Network (VERN) - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    VERN I (101273) constituted the first network for young economic researchers in Viet Nam, where previously there had been no modality for cooperation or peer review. Guided by the philosophy of "understanding and managing globalization" that underpinned the earlier project, VERN II proposes to expand the network, ...

  11. Learning Networks--Enabling Change through Community Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleach, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Learning networks are a critical element of ethos of the community action research approach taken by the Early Learning Initiative at the National College of Ireland, a community-based educational initiative in the Dublin Docklands. Key criteria for networking, whether at local, national or international level, are the individual's and…

  12. Academic social networking (ResearchGate & Academia) and the research impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2016-01-01

    Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications and datasets, get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work, and to stay current with news and events in your field of interest. It gives you another place to establish your name and research and perhaps even collaborate with others. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are Research...

  13. Conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Swann, Edith M.; Singh, Sagri; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Meissner, Helen I.; Stansbury, James P.

    2011-01-01

    HIV vaccine clinical research occurs within a context where biomedical science and social issues are interlinked. Previous HIV vaccine research has considered behavioral and social issues, but often treated them as independent of clinical research processes. Systematic attention to the intersection of behavioral and social issues within a defined clinical research framework is needed to address gaps, such as those related to participation in trials, completion of trials, and the overall research experience. Rigorous attention to these issues at project inception can inform trial design and conduct by matching research approaches to the context in which trials are to be conducted. Conducting behavioral and social sciences research concurrent with vaccine clinical research is important because it can help identify potential barriers to trial implementation, as well as ultimate acceptance and dissemination of trial results. We therefore propose a conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research and use examples from the behavioral and social science literature to demonstrate how the model can facilitate identification of significant areas meriting additional exploration. Standardized use of the conceptual framework could improve HIV vaccine clinical research efficiency and relevance. PMID:21821083

  14. Conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Swann, Edith M; Singh, Sagri; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Meissner, Helen I; Stansbury, James P

    2011-10-13

    HIV vaccine clinical research occurs within a context where biomedical science and social issues are interlinked. Previous HIV vaccine research has considered behavioral and social issues, but often treated them as independent of clinical research processes. Systematic attention to the intersection of behavioral and social issues within a defined clinical research framework is needed to address gaps, such as those related to participation in trials, completion of trials, and the overall research experience. Rigorous attention to these issues at project inception can inform trial design and conduct by matching research approaches to the context in which trials are to be conducted. Conducting behavioral and social sciences research concurrent with vaccine clinical research is important because it can help identify potential barriers to trial implementation, as well as ultimate acceptance and dissemination of trial results. We therefore propose a conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research and use examples from the behavioral and social science literature to demonstrate how the model can facilitate identification of significant areas meriting additional exploration. Standardized use of the conceptual framework could improve HIV vaccine clinical research efficiency and relevance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Psychiatric aspec ts of HIV/AIDS in adolescents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-05-09

    May 9, 2008 ... Adherence Networking Group. Children's. ART Adherence Resource Pack. Johannesburg: Perinatal HIV Research Unit, 2006: 14. 4. Kellerman SE, Drake A, Lansky A, Klevens. RM. Use of and exposure to HIV prevention programs and services by persons at high risk for HIV. AIDS Patient Care STDS 2006 ...

  16. Sexual seroadaptation: lessons for prevention and sex research from a cohort of HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jeff McConnell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surveillance data on sexually transmitted infections (STIs and behavioral characteristics identified in studies of the risk of seroconversion are often used as to track sexual behaviors that spread HIV. However, such analyses can be confounded by "seroadaptation"--the restriction of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI, especially unprotected insertive UAI, to seroconcordant partnerships. METHODS: We utilized sexual network methodology and repeated-measures statistics to test the hypothesis that seroadaptive strategies reduce the risk of HIV transmission despite numerous partnerships and frequent UAI. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a prospective cohort study of HIV superinfection including 168 HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM, we found extensive seroadaptation. UAI was 15.5 times more likely to occur with a positive partner than a negative one (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.1-26.4. Receptive UAI was 4.3 times more likely in seroconcordant partnerships than with negative partners (95% CI, 2.8-6.6, but insertive UAI was 13.6 times more likely with positives (95% CI, 7.2-25.6. Our estimates suggest that seroadaptation reduced HIV transmissions by 98%. CONCLUSION: Potentially effective HIV prevention strategies, such as seroadaptation, have evolved in communities of MSM before they have been recognized in research or discussed in the public health forum. Thus, to be informative, studies of HIV risk must be designed to assess seroadaptive behaviors rather than be limited to individual characteristics, unprotected intercourse, and numbers of partners. STI surveillance is not an effective indicator of trends in HIV incidence where there are strong patterns of seroadaptation.

  17. A picture is worth a thousand words: maps of HIV indicators to inform research, programs, and policy from NA-ACCORD and CCASAnet clinical cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Keri N; Rebeiro, Peter F; Hanna, David B; Padgett, Denis; Horberg, Michael A; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Abraham, Alison G; Hogg, Robert; Gill, M John; Wolff, Marcelo J; Mayor, Angel; Rachlis, Anita; Williams, Carolyn; Sterling, Timothy R; Kitahata, Mari M; Buchacz, Kate; Thorne, Jennifer E; Cesar, Carina; Cordero, Fernando M; Rourke, Sean B; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Pape, Jean W; Cahn, Pedro; McGowan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Maps are powerful tools for visualization of differences in health indicators by geographical region, but multi-country maps of HIV indicators do not exist, perhaps due to lack of consistent data across countries. Our objective was to create maps of four HIV indicators in North, Central, and South American countries. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) and the Caribbean, Central, and South America network for HIV epidemiology (CCASAnet), we mapped median CD4 at presentation for HIV clinical care, proportion retained in HIV primary care, proportion prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the proportion with suppressed plasma HIV viral load (VL) from 2010 to 2012 for North, Central, and South America. The 15 Canadian and US clinical cohorts and 7 clinical cohorts in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru represented approximately 2-7% of persons known to be living with HIV in these countries. Study populations were selected for each indicator: median CD4 at presentation for care was estimated among 14,811 adults; retention was estimated among 87,979 adults; ART use was estimated among 84,757 adults; and suppressed VL was estimated among 51,118 adults. Only three US states and the District of Columbia had a median CD4 at presentation >350 cells/mm(3). Haiti, Mexico, and several states had >85% retention in care; lower (50-74%) retention in care was observed in the US West, South, and Mid-Atlantic, and in Argentina, Brazil, and Peru. ART use was highest (90%) in Mexico. The percentages of patients with suppressed VL in the US South and Northeast were lower than in most of Central and South America. These maps provide visualization of gaps in the quality of HIV care and allow for comparison between and within countries as well as monitoring policy and programme goals within geographical boundaries.

  18. A picture is worth a thousand words: maps of HIV indicators to inform research, programs, and policy from NA-ACCORD and CCASAnet clinical cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri N Althoff

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maps are powerful tools for visualization of differences in health indicators by geographical region, but multi-country maps of HIV indicators do not exist, perhaps due to lack of consistent data across countries. Our objective was to create maps of four HIV indicators in North, Central, and South American countries. Methods: Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD and the Caribbean, Central, and South America network for HIV epidemiology (CCASAnet, we mapped median CD4 at presentation for HIV clinical care, proportion retained in HIV primary care, proportion prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART, and the proportion with suppressed plasma HIV viral load (VL from 2010 to 2012 for North, Central, and South America. The 15 Canadian and US clinical cohorts and 7 clinical cohorts in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru represented approximately 2–7% of persons known to be living with HIV in these countries. Results: Study populations were selected for each indicator: median CD4 at presentation for care was estimated among 14,811 adults; retention was estimated among 87,979 adults; ART use was estimated among 84,757 adults; and suppressed VL was estimated among 51,118 adults. Only three US states and the District of Columbia had a median CD4 at presentation >350 cells/mm3. Haiti, Mexico, and several states had >85% retention in care; lower (50–74% retention in care was observed in the US West, South, and Mid-Atlantic, and in Argentina, Brazil, and Peru. ART use was highest (90% in Mexico. The percentages of patients with suppressed VL in the US South and Northeast were lower than in most of Central and South America. Conclusions: These maps provide visualization of gaps in the quality of HIV care and allow for comparison between and within countries as well as monitoring policy and programme goals within geographical boundaries.

  19. A picture is worth a thousand words: maps of HIV indicators to inform research, programs, and policy from NA-ACCORD and CCASAnet clinical cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Keri N; Rebeiro, Peter F; Hanna, David B; Padgett, Denis; Horberg, Michael A; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Abraham, Alison G; Hogg, Robert; Gill, M John; Wolff, Marcelo J; Mayor, Angel; Rachlis, Anita; Williams, Carolyn; Sterling, Timothy R; Kitahata, Mari M; Buchacz, Kate; Thorne, Jennifer E; Cesar, Carina; Cordero, Fernando M; Rourke, Sean B; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Pape, Jean W; Cahn, Pedro; McGowan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Maps are powerful tools for visualization of differences in health indicators by geographical region, but multi-country maps of HIV indicators do not exist, perhaps due to lack of consistent data across countries. Our objective was to create maps of four HIV indicators in North, Central, and South American countries. Methods Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) and the Caribbean, Central, and South America network for HIV epidemiology (CCASAnet), we mapped median CD4 at presentation for HIV clinical care, proportion retained in HIV primary care, proportion prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the proportion with suppressed plasma HIV viral load (VL) from 2010 to 2012 for North, Central, and South America. The 15 Canadian and US clinical cohorts and 7 clinical cohorts in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru represented approximately 2–7% of persons known to be living with HIV in these countries. Results Study populations were selected for each indicator: median CD4 at presentation for care was estimated among 14,811 adults; retention was estimated among 87,979 adults; ART use was estimated among 84,757 adults; and suppressed VL was estimated among 51,118 adults. Only three US states and the District of Columbia had a median CD4 at presentation >350 cells/mm3. Haiti, Mexico, and several states had >85% retention in care; lower (50–74%) retention in care was observed in the US West, South, and Mid-Atlantic, and in Argentina, Brazil, and Peru. ART use was highest (90%) in Mexico. The percentages of patients with suppressed VL in the US South and Northeast were lower than in most of Central and South America. Conclusions These maps provide visualization of gaps in the quality of HIV care and allow for comparison between and within countries as well as monitoring policy and programme goals within geographical boundaries. PMID:27049052

  20. The association between social networks and self-rated risk of HIV infection among secondary school students in Moshi Municipality, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyimo, Elizabeth; Todd, Jim; Richey, Lisa Ann

    2013-01-01

    participants rated themselves at low risk of HIV infection despite practicing unsafe sex. Efforts to raise adolescents' self-awareness of risk of HIV infection through life skills education and HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome risk reduction strategies may be beneficial to students in this at-risk group.......This study describes the social networks of secondary school students in Moshi Municipality, and their association with self-rated risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted among 300 students aged 15–24 years in 5 secondary schools...... participation in bonding and bridging social networks and self-rated HIV risk behavior. More participants participated in bonding networks (72%) than in bridging networks (29%). Participation in bridging networks was greater among females (25%) than males (12%, p 

  1. Disclosure of HIV-positive status to Latino gay men's social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea, María Cecilia; Reisen, Carol A; Poppen, Paul J; Echeverry, John J; Bianchi, Fernanda T

    2004-03-01

    This study explored disclosure of serostatus in a sample of 155 HIV-positive Latino gay men from New York City and Washington, DC. We examined rates of disclosure to different members of the social network: mothers, fathers, close friends, and primary sexual partners. There were high rates of disclosure of HIV-positive serostatus to main partners and closest friends and lower rates to fathers and mothers. We examined the role of 3 contextual target-dependent factors (emotional closeness to target, anticipated reactions from target, and target's knowledge of sexual orientation), as well as acculturation and time since diagnosis. Three separate logistic regression models were performed to predict disclosure of HIV-positive status to 3 targets: mothers, fathers, and closest friends. We found that disclosure was not a generalized tendency, but rather different factors were influential depending on the target. Whether the target was aware of participant's sexual orientation was associated with disclosure in all 3 models. Greater emotional closeness also predicted disclosure to mother and father; greater U.S. acculturation was associated with disclosure to father and marginally to mother. A longer time since diagnosis was associated with disclosure to the closest friend. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account roles and relationships, and their effect on disclosure.

  2. Innovative research of AD HOC network mobility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin

    2017-08-01

    It is difficult for researchers of AD HOC network to conduct actual deployment during experimental stage as the network topology is changeable and location of nodes is unfixed. Thus simulation still remains the main research method of the network. Mobility model is an important component of AD HOC network simulation. It is used to describe the movement pattern of nodes in AD HOC network (including location and velocity, etc.) and decides the movement trail of nodes, playing as the abstraction of the movement modes of nodes. Therefore, mobility model which simulates node movement is an important foundation for simulation research. In AD HOC network research, mobility model shall reflect the movement law of nodes as truly as possible. In this paper, node generally refers to the wireless equipment people carry. The main research contents include how nodes avoid obstacles during movement process and the impacts of obstacles on the mutual relation among nodes, based on which a Node Self Avoiding Obstacle, i.e. NASO model is established in AD HOC network.

  3. Research participants want to feel they are better off than they were before research was introduced to them”: engaging cameroonian rural plantation populations in HIV research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiawi Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During a period of evolving international consensus on how to engage communities in research, facilitators and barriers to participation in HIV prevention research were explored in a rural plantation community in the coastal region of Cameroon. Methods A formative rapid assessment using structured observations, focus group discussions (FGD, and key informant interviews (KIIs was conducted with a purposive non-probabilistic sample of plantation workers and their household members. Eligibility criteria included living or working >1 year within the plantation community and age >18 years. Both rapid and in-depth techniques were used to complete thematic analysis. Results Sixty-five persons participated in the study (6 FGDs and 12 KIIs. Participants viewed malaria and gastrointestinal conditions as more common health concerns than HIV. They identified three factors as contributing to HIV risk: concurrent sexual relationships, sex work, and infrequent condom use. Interviewees perceived that the community would participate in HIV research if it is designed to: (1 improve community welfare, (2 provide comprehensive health services and treatment for illnesses, (3 protect the personal information of participants, especially those who test positive for HIV, (4 provide participant incentives, (5 incorporate community input, and (6 minimize disruptions to “everyday life”. Barriers to participation included: (1 fear of HIV testing, (2 mistrust of researchers given possible disrespect or intolerance of plantation community life and lack of concern for communication, (3 time commitment demands, (3 medical care and treatment that would be difficult or costly to access, and (4 life disruptions along with potential requirements for changes in behaviour (i.e., engage in or abstain from alcohol use and sex activities. Conclusions Consistent with UNAIDS guidelines for good participatory practice in HIV prevention research, study

  4. Scottish Stroke Research Network: the first three years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, K; Langhorne, P; Graham, F E J; McFarlane, C

    2010-08-01

    Research networks were introduced in the UK to facilitate and improve clinical research and stroke was seen as a priority topic for local research network development. The Scottish Stroke Research Network (SSRN) is one of 11 stroke research networks in the UK. In this article we review the progress of the Scottish Stroke Research Network in the three years since inception. Between 2006-2009 the number of active hospital research sites has increased from 10 to 22 expanding to involve 20 stroke research nurses. There was a corresponding 58% increase in recruitment of participants into stroke studies, from 376 in 2006/07 to 594 in 2008/09. The majority (17/20) of our current studies are interventional. Data from one of these, the CLOTs trial (Clots in Legs Or sTocking after Stroke), demonstrates that the annual recruitment in Scotland increased from a median of 94 (range 6-122) patients per year in the six years before the SSRN, to 140 (135-158) patients per year after SSRN involvement. We currently screen about 50% of Scottish stroke patients and approximately 5% of Scottish stroke patients are participating in research studies that we support. The SSRN has made good progress in the first three years. Increasing the recruitment of screened patients remains a challenge.

  5. Network-based analysis of comorbidities risk during an infection: SARS and HIV case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Mohammad Ali; Liò, Pietro

    2014-10-24

    Infections are often associated to comorbidity that increases the risk of medical conditions which can lead to further morbidity and mortality. SARS is a threat which is similar to MERS virus, but the comorbidity is the key aspect to underline their different impacts. One UK doctor says "I'd rather have HIV than diabetes" as life expectancy among diabetes patients is lower than that of HIV. However, HIV has a comorbidity impact on the diabetes. We present a quantitative framework to compare and explore comorbidity between diseases. By using neighbourhood based benchmark and topological methods, we have built comorbidity relationships network based on the OMIM and our identified significant genes. Then based on the gene expression, PPI and signalling pathways data, we investigate the comorbidity association of these 2 infective pathologies with other 7 diseases (heart failure, kidney disorder, breast cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, bone diseases, Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes). Phenotypic association is measured by calculating both the Relative Risk as the quantified measures of comorbidity tendency of two disease pairs and the ϕ-correlation to measure the robustness of the comorbidity associations. The differential gene expression profiling strongly suggests that the response of SARS affected patients seems to be mainly an innate inflammatory response and statistically dysregulates a large number of genes, pathways and PPIs subnetworks in different pathologies such as chronic heart failure (21 genes), breast cancer (16 genes) and bone diseases (11 genes). HIV-1 induces comorbidities relationship with many other diseases, particularly strong correlation with the neurological, cancer, metabolic and immunological diseases. Similar comorbidities risk is observed from the clinical information. Moreover, SARS and HIV infections dysregulate 4 genes (ANXA3, GNS, HIST1H1C, RASA3) and 3 genes (HBA1, TFRC, GHITM) respectively that affect the ageing process. It is notable

  6. West and Central African Research and Education Networking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    West and Central African Research and Education Networking (WACREN). For universities and research centres around the world, the Internet has become an important resource for teaching, learning and research. But, African universities have always faced important challenges to accessing cheap and reliable bandwidth ...

  7. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  8. West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network (WIoDER) aims to support research, training, and pilot interventions in up to four Western Indian Ocean river deltas under pressure from human activity. Research will examine in particular the links between population mobility, agriculture, climate change, ...

  9. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  10. Research on key technology of space laser communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chengwu; Huang, Huiming; Liu, Hongyang; Gao, Shenghua; Cheng, Liyu

    2016-10-01

    Since the 21st century, Spatial laser communication has made a breakthrough development. Europe, the United States, Japan and other space powers have carried out the test of spatial laser communication technology on-orbit, and put forward a series of plans. In 2011, China made the first technology demonstration of satellite-ground laser communication carried by HY-2 satellite. Nowadays, in order to improve the transmission rate of spatial network, the topic of spatial laser communication network is becoming a research hotspot at home and abroad. This thesis, from the basic problem of spatial laser communication network to solve, analyzes the main difference between spatial network and ground network, which draws forth the key technology of spatial laser communication backbone network, and systematically introduces our research on aggregation, addressing, architecture of spatial network. From the perspective of technology development status and trends, the thesis proposes the development route of spatial laser communication network in stages. So as to provide reference about the development of spatial laser communication network in China.

  11. When to Monitor CD4 Cell Count and HIV RNA to Reduce Mortality and AIDS-Defining Illness in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Positive Persons on Antiretroviral Therapy in High-Income Countries: A Prospective Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caniglia, Ellen C.; Sabin, Caroline; Robins, James M.; Logan, Roger; Cain, Lauren E.; Abgrall, Sophie; Mugavero, Michael J.; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Remonie; Drozd, Daniel R.; Seage, George R.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Dabis, Francois; Moore, Richard R.; Reiss, Peter; van Sighem, Ard; Mathews, William C.; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G.; Muga, Roberto; Boswell, Stephen L.; Ferrer, Elena; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Jose, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Olson, Ashley; Justice, Amy C.; Tate, Janet P.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Egger, Matthias; Touloumi, Giota; Sterne, Jonathan A.; Costagliola, Dominique; Saag, Michael; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    To illustrate an approach to compare CD4 cell count and HIV-RNA monitoring strategies in HIV-positive individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Prospective studies of HIV-positive individuals in Europe and the USA in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration and The Center for AIDS Research Network of

  12. Mentoring the next generation of HIV prevention researchers: a model mentoring program at the University of California San Francisco and Gladstone Institute of Immunology and Virology Center for AIDS research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, James; Des Jarlais, Christine D; Dobkin, Loren; Barrs, Sarah French; Greenblatt, Ruth M

    2008-03-01

    Mentoring is critical to develop and nurture early career investigators, helping them to succeed in building networks of colleagues, and is especially important for investigators focused on HIV research. We piloted a multidiscipline mentoring program targeting postdoctoral scholars and early career faculty concentrating on HIV/AIDS research. The pilot mentoring program was conducted at the Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) at the University of California San Francisco and the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology. Mentees were self-referred postdoctoral scholars and early career faculty. Mentors were drawn from the senior faculty. Early career mentees were matched with senior investigators for individual meetings, a monthly workshop on topics directed by the mentees, and single-day mentoring seminars. More than 30 mentees and 20 mentors have participated in the pilot project. Most mentees reported that the 1-on-1 mentoring was a satisfying experience. The most highly valued activities were those that facilitated networking among mentees, networking between mentors and mentees, and workshops that focused on grant applications and first academic appointments and promotions. A multidisciplinary mentoring program for postdoctoral scholars and early career faculty focused on HIV/AIDS research is valuable. Umbrella organizations, such as the CFAR, are well suited to create and provide highly valued mentoring experiences.

  13. Networks as integrated in research methodologies in PER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of researchers within the PER community have started using network analysis as a new methodology to extend our understanding of teaching and learning physics by viewing these as complex systems. In this paper, I give examples of social, cognitive, and action mapping...... networks and how they can be analyzed. In so doing I show how a network can be methodologically described as a set of relations between a set of entities, and how a network can be characterized and analyzed as a mathematical object. Then, as an illustrative example, I discuss a relatively new example...... of using networks to create insightful maps of learning discussions. To conclude, I argue that conceptual blending is a powerful framework for constructing "mixed methods" methodologies that may integrate diverse theories and other methodologies with network methodologies....

  14. Content-centric networks an overview, applications and research challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Syed Hassan; Kim, Dongkyun

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces Content-Centric Networking (CCN), a networking paradigm that provides a simple and effective solution to the challenging demands of future wired and wireless communications. It provides an overview of the recent developments in the area of future internet technologies, bringing together the advancements that have been made in Information-Centric Networking (ICN) in general, with a focus on CCN. It begins with an introduction to the basics of CCN is followed by an overview of the current internet paradigm and its challenges. Next, an application perspective has been included, where the authors encompass the selected applications for CCN with recent refereed research and developments. These applications include Internet of Things (IoT), Smart Grid, Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANETs), and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). The book is a useful reference source for practising researchers, and can be used as supporting material for undergraduate and graduate level courses in computer science and...

  15. Data Transfer Throughput Research Over Mobile Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolis Žvinys

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses communication channel settings of UMTS technology, which are related with a data transfer throughput. The paper describes the measurement equipment that is suitable for measuring parameters of a mobile network channel. Besides, it analyses the suitability of this equipment and issue of parameter values that are associated with data throughput. Further, the study includes the selection of the most specific parameters, which are crucial for data speed. Using these parameters, models were developed for prediction of data transfer throughput. To build the model, the linear and nonlinear forecasting methods were used. The linear prediction was made by using linear regression, nonlinear — neural networks. Using the linear prediction model, 77.83% forecast accuracy was achieved, while the accuracy of forecasted nonlinear transmission rate amounted to 76.19%. The accuracy of prediction models was obtained using eight parameters of the communication channel. Finally, the paper presents the data throughput prediction models that allow predicting data speed with the help of channel parameters presented by a standard terminal. The list of these channel parameters is derived from five UE‘s of different manufacturers. The expected most accurate data transfer rate can be predicted using a set of parameters issued by Nokia device.Article in Lithuanian

  16. Tools and Methods to Create Scenarios for Experimental Research in the Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    among the nodes, you can choose to create more wireless networks by adding more clouds, or you can create a wired connection between 2 nodes. To make...traditional wireless networking challenges as well as more general network science research issues. NSRL is capable of doing this by providing a...the .eel file through EMANE. Click on the square blue Ethernet hub on the left panel. Select the cloud (which is a wireless local area network [LAN

  17. Bridging the Divide: HIV Prevention Research and Black Men Who Have Sex With Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Christian; Powell, Borris; Humes, Damon; Wakefield, Steven; Kripke, Katharine; Eckstein, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We obtained contextual information regarding documented barriers to HIV clinical trial participation among Black men who have sex with men (MSM), and explored current preventive HIV clinical trial attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions among Black MSM leaders in the United States. Methods. We conducted 2 focus groups with Black MSM leaders attending an annual African American MSM Leadership Conference on HIV/AIDS. Focus group questions explored biomedical research perceptions and attitudes, barriers to participation in biomedical prevention research, and steps that need to be taken to address these barriers. A feedback and member checking (participants presented with final themes to provide feedback and guidance) session was also held at the 2012 conference. Results. Three distinct themes emerged regarding Black MSM engagement and participation in HIV vaccine research: (1) community-based organizations as true partners, (2) investment in the Black gay community, and (3) true efforts to inform and educate the community. Conclusions. A key focus for improving efforts to engage the Black MSM community in preventive HIV clinical trials is building and maintaining equitable and reciprocal partnerships among research institutions, Black-led AIDS service organizations and community-based organizations, and community members. PMID:24524520

  18. Oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS in Asia: Systematic review and future research guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Oberoi, Sukhvinder-Singh; Vohra, Puneeta; Nagpal, Archna

    2015-07-01

    The authors have conducted a systematic review of oral manifestations of HIV from studies conducted in Asia to establish the characteristics and prevalence of individual oral manifestations in Asia, and to assess the direction of future research studies on oral manifestations of HIV in Asia. The electronic retrieval systems and databases searched for relevant articles were PubMed [MEDLINE], EBSCO, and EMBASE. The search was for limited articles published in English or with an English abstract and articles published during the period January 1995 to August 2014. The authors reached a final overall sample of 39 studies that were conducted in Asia. The median population size among all studies was 312.7 patients. Oral candidiasis [OC] was the most common oral manifestation [37.7%] in studies conducted in Asia. The overall prevalence of oral hairy leukoplakia and melanotic hyperpigmentation was computed to be 10.1% and 22.8% respectively. Thailand and India are primarily countries with maximum research on oral manifestations. The research on oral manifestations of HIV in Asia has to upgrade to more interventional and therapeutic studies rather than the contemporary cross- sectional epidemiological descriptive studies. The authors have given suggestions and future directions for the implementation of clinical research of oral manifestations in HIV patients. Key words:Oral manifestations, HIV/AIDS, Asia, Systematic review.

  19. Academic research and HIV/AIDS in South Africa | Campbell | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic research and HIV/AIDS in South Africa. C.M. Campbell, B.G. Williams. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  20. Languaging for Life: African Youth Talk Back to HIV/AIDS Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Bonny; Mutonyi, Harriet

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present a case study, undertaken in Uganda, in which 12 young people debated and critiqued four research articles on HIV/AIDS relevant to Ugandan youth. The rationale for the study was to provide students with the opportunity to respond to health research that had a direct bearing on their lives. It also complements applied…

  1. A Plan for the Next Generation of HIV Prevention Research: Seven Key Policy Investigative Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Thomas J.; Szekeres,Gregory

    2004-01-01

    Although HIV prevention research has accomplished much over the last 2 decades, significant challenges remain. The accomplishments have included rapid progression through various stages of research--from descriptive to clinical trials--and the fielding of several Phase 3 trials with biological endpoints. The challenges include developing…

  2. Research award: Networked Economies | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... Deadline: September 6, 2017 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh ...

  3. SOCIAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION NETWORKS FOR INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ace vedo Zapata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to describe the social management of knowledge through research and innovation networks to promote social inclusion. The reflection of the exploratory stage is presented within the doctoral thesis analyzing the challenges of the universities in the achievement of social inclusion with networks of research and innovation. A descriptive work was done, with documentary tracking, systematization and analysis. The findings show that it is necessary to articulate efforts in interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary networks with different actors: state, company, education, scientists, technologists and vulnerable, excluded populations, to build policies and strategies for social inclusion.

  4. The HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute: Training Early-Career Scientists to Conduct Research on Research Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B; Yuko, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    The responsible conduct of HIV/drug abuse prevention research requires investigators with both the knowledge of and ability to generate empirical data that can enhance global ethical practices and policies. This article describes a multidisciplinary program offering early-career professionals a 2-year intensive summer curriculum along with funding to conduct a mentored research study on a wide variety of HIV/drug abuse research ethics topics. Now in its fifth year, the program has admitted 29 trainees who have to date demonstrated increased knowledge of research ethics, produced 17 peer-reviewed publications, 46 professional presentations, and submitted or been awarded five related federal grants. The institute also hosts a global information platform providing general and HIV/drug abuse relevant research ethics educational and research resources that have had more than 38,800 unique visitors from more than 150 countries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. 'Every teacher is a researcher!': Creating indigenous epistemologies and practices for HIV prevention through values-based action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lesley

    2012-12-01

    Since gender is an undisputed driver of HIV infection, teachers concerned with HIV prevention education should ideally encourage critical awareness of and culturally sensitive practices around gender inequalities. Many interventions and programmes have been developed for teachers to enable them to do this, however most have met with limited success. This article proceeds from the viewpoint that for HIV-prevention interventions to be sustainable and effective, teachers should be actively engaged in their design, implementation and evaluation. It outlines how teachers in an HIV prevention programme utilised an action research design to explore their own gender constructs as a necessary first step to the creation of more gender-sensitive school climates and teaching practices. This values-based self-enquiry moved the teachers to action on two levels: first, to adopt a more gender-sensitive approach in their own personal and professional lives and second, to take action to challenge gender inequalities within their particular educational contexts. Evidence is presented to justify the claim that action research of this genre helps teachers to generate indigenous epistemologies and practices that not only are effective in creating sustainable and empowering learning environments for HIV prevention education, but also for teaching and learning in general.

  6. The current state of play of research on the social, political and legal dimensions of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Vera; Ferguson, Laura; Aggleton, Peter; Mane, Purnima; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Giang, Le Minh; Barbosa, Regina M; Caceres, Carlos F; Parker, Richard

    2015-03-01

    This paper offers a critical overview of social science research presented at the 2014 International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia. In an era of major biomedical advance, the political nature of HIV remains of fundamental importance. No new development can be rolled out successfully without taking into account its social and political context, and consequences. Four main themes ran throughout the conference track on social and political research, law, policy and human rights: first, the importance of work with socially vulnerable groups, now increasingly referred to as "key populations"; second, continued recognition that actions and programs need to be tailored locally and contextually; third, the need for an urgent response to a rapidly growing epidemic of HIV among young people; and fourth, the negative effects of the growing criminalization of minority sexualities and people living with HIV. Lack of stress on human rights and community participation is resulting in poorer policy globally. A new research agenda is needed to respond to these challenges.

  7. Implementation science perspectives and opportunities for HIV/AIDS research: integrating science, practice, and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Russell E; Eckstein, Erin T; Elzarrad, M Khair

    2013-06-01

    Disparities in the incidence and mortality of HIV/AIDS persist, challenging researchers, practitioners, and communities to develop improved strategies to reach vulnerable and marginalized populations. The emerging field of Implementation Science, with its focus on context, external validity, and innovative design approaches, is well suited to respond to this challenge. We provide an overview of Implementation Science, including its frameworks, tools, and strategies, and how they can inform the response to HIV/AIDS. We summarize pioneering Implementation Science frameworks, and then present examples using newer models, including RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness/Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) and the Evidence Integration Triangle, a framework for combining research and practice using participatory and adaptive processes in a multilevel context. Although still developing, the international field of Implementation Science can offer helpful perspectives for facilitating the more rapid integration of HIV/AIDS research, practice, and policy.

  8. HIV/AIDS Research in Correctional Settings: A Difficult Task Made Even Harder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark E; Kondo, Karli K; Brems, Christiane; Eldridge, Gloria D

    2015-04-01

    Housing a large number of individuals living with or at risk for HIV/AIDS, correctional settings have considerable potential for epidemiological, prevention, and treatment research. However, federal regulations and institutional challenges have limited the extent and types of such research with prisoners. This study examines the degree to which HIV/AIDS correctional researchers report greater challenges than do their noncorrectional counterparts. Results indicate that correctional researchers reported significantly more frequent challenges than those in noncorrectional settings, even after controlling for experience, with the dominant difference related to challenges due to the research setting. These findings add empirical data and support previous research in the field; however, additional research should include correctional staff and incarcerated individuals, and explore whether these differences extend to other research topics. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. No longer simply a Practice-based Research Network (PBRN) health improvement networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L; Rhyne, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    While primary care Practice-based Research Networks are best known for their original, research purpose, evidence accumulating over the last several years is demonstrating broader values of these collaborations. Studies have demonstrated their role in quality improvement and practice change, in continuing professional education, in clinician retention in medically underserved areas, and in facilitating transition of primary care organization. A role in informing and facilitating health policy development is also suggested. Taking into account this more robust potential, we propose a new title, the Health Improvement Network, and a new vision for Practice-based Research Networks.

  10. Analyzing hidden populations online: topic, emotion, and social network of HIV-related users in the largest Chinese online community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuchu; Lu, Xin

    2018-01-05

    Traditional survey methods are limited in the study of hidden populations due to the hard to access properties, including lack of a sampling frame, sensitivity issue, reporting error, small sample size, etc. The rapid increase of online communities, of which members interact with others via the Internet, have generated large amounts of data, offering new opportunities for understanding hidden populations with unprecedented sample sizes and richness of information. In this study, we try to understand the multidimensional characteristics of a hidden population by analyzing the massive data generated in the online community. By elaborately designing crawlers, we retrieved a complete dataset from the "HIV bar," the largest bar related to HIV on the Baidu Tieba platform, for all records from January 2005 to August 2016. Through natural language processing and social network analysis, we explored the psychology, behavior and demand of online HIV population and examined the network community structure. In HIV communities, the average topic similarity among members is positively correlated to network efficiency (r = 0.70, p online services for HIV/AIDS consultation and diagnosis be improved to avoid privacy concerns and social discrimination in China.

  11. Predictors of willingness to use a smartphone for research in underserved persons living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Rebecca; Cho, Hwayoung; Webel, Allison

    2017-03-01

    The burden of HIV/AIDS is borne disproportionally by a growing number of racial and ethnic minorities and socioeconomically disadvantaged individuals. Developing mHealth interventions for the everyday self-management needs of persons living with HIV (PLWH) can be challenging given the current constraints of the U.S. healthcare system, especially for those from underserved communities. In order to develop effective, evidence-based mHealth self-management interventions, we need a better understanding of the factors associated with mHealth research. The purpose of this study was to assess factors associated with PLWH's for participation in research using smartphones. We conducted a prospective cohort study (parent study) to examine the relationships among HIV self-management, age, gender and mental wellness. Relevant to this study, we analyzed the relationship between self-reported use of smartphones, willingness to use a smartphone for research, and other predictor variables including: HIV stigma, social isolation, social integration functions, and depression. We selected these variables because previous work indicated they may influence smartphone or mHealth use and because they also tend to be elevated in PLWH. We found increased age, HIV stigma and social isolation were negatively associated with smartphone use, which supports the use of smartphones for conducting research with PLWH but also suggests that age, stigma, social integration functions and social isolation need to be considered in research involving PLWH. Findings here support smartphone use in research involving PLWH. However, future mHealth interventions targeting PLWH should take into account the inverse relationship between smartphone use and age, HIV stigma, and social isolation, and other predictor variables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network Coinfection and Concurrent Diseases Core: Canadian guidelines for management and treatment of HIV/hepatitis C coinfection in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Mark; Klein, Marina; Shafran, Stephen; Tseng, Alice; Giguère, Pierre; Côté, Pierre; Poliquin, Marc; Cooper, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection occurs in 20% to 30% of Canadians living with HIV, and is responsible for a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. HIV-HCV management is more complex due to the accelerated progression of liver disease, the timing and nature of antiretroviral and HCV therapy, mental health and addictions management, socioeconomic obstacles and drug-drug interactions between new HCV direct-acting antiviral therapies and antiretroviral regimens. OBJECTIVE: To develop national standards for the management of HCV-HIV coinfected adults in the Canadian context. METHODS: A panel with specific clinical expertise in HIV-HCV co-infection was convened by The CIHR HIV Trials Network to review current literature, existing guidelines and protocols. Following broad solicitation for input, consensus recommendations were approved by the working group, and were characterized using a Class (benefit verses harm) and Level (strength of certainty) quality-of-evidence scale. RESULTS: All HIV-HCV coinfected individuals should be assessed for HCV therapy. Individuals unable to initiate HCV therapy should initiate antiretroviral therapy to slow liver disease progression. Standard of care for genotype 1 is pegylated interferon and weight-based ribavirin dosing plus an HCV protease inhibitor; traditional dual therapy for 24 weeks (for genotype 2/3 with virological clearance at week 4); or 48 weeks (for genotypes 2–6). Therapy deferral for individuals with mild liver disease may be considered. HIV should not be considered a barrier to liver transplantation in coinfected patients. DISCUSSION: Recommendations may not supersede individual clinical judgement. PMID:24489565

  13. Direct2Experts: a pilot national network to demonstrate interoperability among research-networking platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, William; Conlon, Mike; Eichmann, David; Kibbe, Warren; Falk-Krzesinski, Holly; Halaas, Michael; Johnson, Layne; Meeks, Eric; Mitchell, Donald; Schleyer, Titus; Stallings, Sarah; Warden, Michael; Kahlon, Maninder

    2011-01-01

    Research-networking tools use data-mining and social networking to enable expertise discovery, matchmaking and collaboration, which are important facets of team science and translational research. Several commercial and academic platforms have been built, and many institutions have deployed these products to help their investigators find local collaborators. Recent studies, though, have shown the growing importance of multiuniversity teams in science. Unfortunately, the lack of a standard data-exchange model and resistance of universities to share information about their faculty have presented barriers to forming an institutionally supported national network. This case report describes an initiative, which, in only 6 months, achieved interoperability among seven major research-networking products at 28 universities by taking an approach that focused on addressing institutional concerns and encouraging their participation. With this necessary groundwork in place, the second phase of this effort can begin, which will expand the network's functionality and focus on the end users. PMID:22037890

  14. CD4-gp120 interaction interface - a gateway for HIV-1 infection in human: molecular network, modeling and docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Deeksha; Podder, Avijit; Pandit, Mansi; Latha, Narayanan

    2017-09-01

    The major causative agent for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1). HIV-1 is a predominant subtype of HIV which counts on human cellular mechanism virtually in every aspect of its life cycle. Binding of viral envelope glycoprotein-gp120 with human cell surface CD4 receptor triggers the early infection stage of HIV-1. This study focuses on the interaction interface between these two proteins that play a crucial role for viral infectivity. The CD4-gp120 interaction interface has been studied through a comprehensive protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analysis and highlighted as a useful step towards identifying potential therapeutic drug targets against HIV-1 infection. We prioritized gp41, Nef and Tat proteins of HIV-1 as valuable drug targets at early stage of viral infection. Lack of crystal structure has made it difficult to understand the biological implication of these proteins during disease progression. Here, computational protein modeling techniques and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to generate three-dimensional models of these targets. Besides, molecular docking was initiated to determine the desirability of these target proteins for already available HIV-1 specific drugs which indicates the usefulness of these protein structures to identify an effective drug combination therapy against AIDS.

  15. Detecting and analyzing research communities in longitudinal scientific networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone Sciabolazza, Valerio; Vacca, Raffaele; Kennelly Okraku, Therese; McCarty, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that collaborative teams and communities tend to produce the highest-impact scientific work. This paper proposes a new method to (1) Identify collaborative communities in longitudinal scientific networks, and (2) Evaluate the impact of specific research institutes, services or policies on the interdisciplinary collaboration between these communities. First, we apply community-detection algorithms to cross-sectional scientific collaboration networks and analyze different types of co-membership in the resulting subgroups over time. This analysis summarizes large amounts of longitudinal network data to extract sets of research communities whose members have consistently collaborated or shared collaborators over time. Second, we construct networks of cross-community interactions and estimate Exponential Random Graph Models to predict the formation of interdisciplinary collaborations between different communities. The method is applied to longitudinal data on publication and grant collaborations at the University of Florida. Results show that similar institutional affiliation, spatial proximity, transitivity effects, and use of the same research services predict higher degree of interdisciplinary collaboration between research communities. Our application also illustrates how the identification of research communities in longitudinal data and the analysis of cross-community network formation can be used to measure the growth of interdisciplinary team science at a research university, and to evaluate its association with research policies, services or institutes.

  16. Detecting and analyzing research communities in longitudinal scientific networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Leone Sciabolazza

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence shows that collaborative teams and communities tend to produce the highest-impact scientific work. This paper proposes a new method to (1 Identify collaborative communities in longitudinal scientific networks, and (2 Evaluate the impact of specific research institutes, services or policies on the interdisciplinary collaboration between these communities. First, we apply community-detection algorithms to cross-sectional scientific collaboration networks and analyze different types of co-membership in the resulting subgroups over time. This analysis summarizes large amounts of longitudinal network data to extract sets of research communities whose members have consistently collaborated or shared collaborators over time. Second, we construct networks of cross-community interactions and estimate Exponential Random Graph Models to predict the formation of interdisciplinary collaborations between different communities. The method is applied to longitudinal data on publication and grant collaborations at the University of Florida. Results show that similar institutional affiliation, spatial proximity, transitivity effects, and use of the same research services predict higher degree of interdisciplinary collaboration between research communities. Our application also illustrates how the identification of research communities in longitudinal data and the analysis of cross-community network formation can be used to measure the growth of interdisciplinary team science at a research university, and to evaluate its association with research policies, services or institutes.

  17. 75 FR 80853 - Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and Information... ``Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and Information... report entitled ``Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

  18. Strengthening the network of mentored, underrepresented minority scientists and leaders to reduce HIV-related health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Madeline Y; Lanier, Yzette A; Willis, Leigh A; Castellanos, Ted; Dominguez, Ken; Fitzpatrick, Lisa; Miller, Kim S

    2013-12-01

    We reviewed data for the Minority HIV/AIDS Research Initiative (MARI), which was established in 2003 to support underrepresented minority scientists performing HIV prevention research in highly affected communities. MARI was established at the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control as a program of competitively awarded, mentored grants for early career researchers conducting HIV prevention research in highly affected racial/ethnic and sexual minority communities. We have described progress from 2003 to 2013. To date, MARI has mentored 27 scientist leaders using low-cost strategies to enhance the development of effective HIV prevention interventions. These scientists have (1) developed research programs in disproportionately affected communities of color, (2) produced first-authored peer-reviewed scientific and programmatic products (including articles and community-level interventions), and (3) obtained larger, subsequent funding awards for research and programmatic work related to HIV prevention and health disparities work. The MARI program demonstrates how to effectively engage minority scientists to conduct HIV prevention research and reduce racial/ethnic investigator disparities and serves as a model for programs to reduce disparities in other public health areas in which communities of color are disproportionately affected.

  19. Measuring Networking as an Outcome Variable in Undergraduate Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I.; Hatfull, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose, present, and validate a simple survey instrument to measure student conversational networking. The tool consists of five items that cover personal and professional social networks, and its basic principle is the self-reporting of degrees of conversation, with a range of specific discussion partners. The networking instrument was validated in three studies. The basic psychometric characteristics of the scales were established by conducting a factor analysis and evaluating internal consistency using Cronbach’s alpha. The second study used a known-groups comparison and involved comparing outcomes for networking scales between two different undergraduate laboratory courses (one involving a specific effort to enhance networking). The final study looked at potential relationships between specific networking items and the established psychosocial variable of project ownership through a series of binary logistic regressions. Overall, the data from the three studies indicate that the networking scales have high internal consistency (α = 0.88), consist of a unitary dimension, can significantly differentiate between research experiences with low and high networking designs, and are related to project ownership scales. The ramifications of the networking instrument for student retention, the enhancement of public scientific literacy, and the differentiation of laboratory courses are discussed. PMID:26538387

  20. [Training of institutional research networks as a strategy of improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Plata, María Eugenia; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio Abdel

    2017-01-01

    The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) through the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud (Health Research Council) has promoted a strong link between the generation of scientific knowledge and the clinical care through the program Redes Institucionales de Investigación (Institutional Research Network Program), whose main aim is to promote and generate collaborative research between clinical, basic, epidemiologic, educational, economic and health services researchers, seeking direct benefits for patients, as well as to generate a positive impact on institutional processes. All of these research lines have focused on high-priority health issues in Mexico. The IMSS internal structure, as well as the sufficient health services coverage, allows the integration of researchers at the three levels of health care into these networks. A few years after their creation, these networks have already generated significant results, and these are currently applied in the institutional regulations in diseases that represent a high burden to health care. Two examples are the National Health Care Program for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction "Código Infarto", and the Early Detection Program on Chronic Kidney Disease; another result is the generation of multiple scientific publications, and the promotion of training of human resources in research from the same members of our Research Networks. There is no doubt that the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud advances steadily implementing the translational research, which will keep being fruitful to the benefit of our patients, and of our own institution.

  1. Mapping the network | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... of the 12 scholars who joined in subsequent years are affiliated with universities in cities other than Beijing and Shanghai. In fact, the researchers' roots extend more widely than that. Few of them actually come from Beijing or Shanghai. Most were born in smaller cities and moved to the major centres for graduate school.

  2. The network evolves | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... Canada, China collaborate to encourage “brain flow” between the two countries. The "brain flow" between Canada and China involves the movement of Chinese students, researchers, and faculty to Canadian educational institutions,. View moreCanada, China collaborate to encourage “brain flow” between ...

  3. Tobacco Control Research, Dissemination and Networking in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  4. Building a fisheries research network | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-02-01

    Feb 1, 2011 ... At the same time, much of the scientific research being carried out on these issues was primarily biological in nature, even while people were starting to recognize that the real solutions were social, economic, political, and institutional in nature. Too much of the focus went toward studying the fish, and not ...

  5. Southern African Development Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Members of the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) are struggling to craft policies for fruitful integration into the global economy and inclusive growth. While some donor initiatives have been successful in meeting short-term policy needs, they are not sustainable solutions to a weak research and policy ...

  6. Expanding delivery system research in public health settings: lessons from practice-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Glen P; Hogg, Rachel A

    2012-11-01

    Delivery system research to identify how best to organize, finance, and implement health improvement strategies has focused heavily on clinical practice settings, with relatively little attention paid to public health settings-where research is made more difficult by wide heterogeneity in settings and limited sources of existing data and measures. This study examines the approaches used by public health practice-based research networks (PBRNs) to expand delivery system research and evidence-based practice in public health settings. Practice-based research networks employ quasi-experimental research designs, natural experiments, and mixed-method analytic techniques to evaluate how community partnerships, economic shocks, and policy changes impact delivery processes in public health settings. In addition, network analysis methods are used to assess patterns of interaction between practitioners and researchers within PBRNs to produce and apply research findings. Findings from individual PBRN studies elucidate the roles of information exchange, community resources, and leadership and decision-making structures in shaping implementation outcomes in public health delivery. Network analysis of PBRNs reveals broad engagement of both practitioners and researchers in scientific inquiry, with practitioners in the periphery of these networks reporting particularly large benefits from research participation. Public health PBRNs provide effective mechanisms for implementing delivery system research and engaging practitioners in the process. These networks also hold promise for accelerating the translation and application of research findings into public health settings.

  7. Primary care research conducted in networks: getting down to business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, James W

    2012-01-01

    This seventh annual practice-based research theme issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine highlights primary care research conducted in practice-based research networks (PBRNs). The issue includes discussion of (1) theoretical and methodological research, (2) health care research (studies addressing primary care processes), (3) clinical research (studies addressing the impact of primary care on patients), and (4) health systems research (studies of health system issues impacting primary care including the quality improvement process). We had a noticeable increase in submissions from PBRN collaborations, that is, studies that involved multiple networks. As PBRNs cooperate to recruit larger and more diverse patient samples, greater generalizability and applicability of findings lead to improved primary care processes.

  8. The Mind Research Network - Mental Illness Neuroscience Discovery Grant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. [The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Calhoun, V. [The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-17

    The scientific and technological programs of the Mind Research Network (MRN), reflect DOE missions in basic science and associated instrumentation, computational modeling, and experimental techniques. MRN's technical goals over the course of this project have been to develop and apply integrated, multi-modality functional imaging techniques derived from a decade of DOE-support research and technology development.

  9. Networks of Practice in Science Education Research: A Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sonya N.; Siry, Christina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we employ cultural sociology and Braj Kachru's model of World Englishes as theoretical and analytical tools for considering English as a form of capital necessary for widely disseminating research findings from local networks of practice to the greater science education research community. We present a brief analysis of recent…

  10. Asia-Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNET ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) Adjustments to Information Technology (IT) in Trade Facilitation: The South Korean Experience. Documents. Asia - Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNeT) newsletter, volume 6, issue 1 / October 2009 - January 2010. Documents. Asia - Pacific Research and ...

  11. Ethical challenges and opportunities for nurses in HIV and AIDS community-based participatory research in Jamaica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, C.M.; Kahwa, E.; Atkinson, U.; Hepburn-Brown, C.; Aiken, J.; Dawkins, P.; Rae, T.; Edwards, N.; Roelofs, S.; MacFarlane, D.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a multinational program of research, we undertook a community-based participatory research project in Jamaica to strengthen nurses' engagement in HIV and AIDS policy. Three leadership hubs were purposefully convened and included small groups of people (6-10) from diverse HIV and AIDS

  12. Advancing the strategic use of HIV operations research to strengthen local policies and programmes: the Research to Prevention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Deanna; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Cheng, Alison Surdo; Sandison, Sarah J; Fonner, Virginia A; Holtgrave, David R; Brahmbhatt, Heena

    2015-01-01

    In the field of HIV prevention, there is renewed interest in operations research (OR) within an implementation science framework. The ultimate goal of such studies is to generate new knowledge that can inform local programmes and policies, thus improving access, quality, efficiency and effectiveness. Using four case studies from the USAID-funded Research to Prevention (R2P) project, we highlight the strategic use of OR and the impact it can have on shaping the focus and content of HIV prevention programming across geographic and epidemic settings and populations. These case studies, which include experiences from several sub-Saharan African countries and the Caribbean, emphasize four unique ways that R2P projects utilized OR to stimulate change in a given context, including: (1) translating findings from clinical trials to real-world settings; (2) adapting promising structural interventions to a new context; (3) tailoring effective interventions to underserved populations; and (4) prioritizing key populations within a national response to HIV. Carefully crafted OR can bridge the common gap that exists between research-generated knowledge and field-based practice, lead to substantial, real-world changes in national policies and programmes, and strengthen local organizations and the use of data to be more responsive to a given topic or population, ultimately supporting a locally tailored HIV response.

  13. Investigating communication networks contextually: Qualitative network analysis as cross-media research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hepp

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the approach of contextualised communication network analysis as a qualitative procedure for researching communicative relationships realised through the media. It combines qualitative interviews on media appropriation, egocentric network maps, and media diaries. Through the triangulation of these methods of data collection, it is possible to gain a differentiated insight into the specific meanings, structures and processes of communication networks across a variety of media. The approach is illustrated using a recent study dealing with the mediatisation of community building among young people. In this context, the qualitative communication network analysis has been applied to distinguish “localists” from “centrists”, “multilocalists”, and “pluralists”. These different “horizons of mediatised communitisation” are connected to distinct communication networks. Since this involves today a variety of different media, the contextual analysis of communication networks necessarily has to imply a cross-media perspective.

  14. High Prevalence of HIV Infection and Bisexual Networks among a Sample of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Eastern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiang Lin

    Full Text Available To examine homosexual and heterosexual behaviors, behavioral networks and HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM in Eastern China.A cross-sectional survey was conducted among MSM in 2013 in a rural prefecture of Zhejiang province. Participants were interviewed for their sexual behaviors and sexual networks and were tested for HIV infection.A total of 620 MSM from gay bath houses and bars participated in the survey. Of them, 58.2% aged 18 to 39 years and 49.5% were currently married with a female. The age of first homosexual contact was 26.7 years on average, ranging from 12 to 66 years. 91.0% had multiple male sex partners and 86.1% also had female sex partners in lifetime. 70 (11.3% of the participants were tested HIV-positive. A total of 620 independent egocentric sexual networks involving 620 study participants and 1,971 reported sexual partners in the past 12 months were constructed, including 70 networks for the 70 HIV-positive participants with their 221 sexual partners and 550 networks for the 550 HIV-negative participants with their 1,750 sexual partners. The median network degree was 3 (IQR 2-4 overall and was not different between HIV-positive participants (Median: 3; IQR: 2-4 and HIV-negative participants (Median: 3; IQR: 2-4 (Mann-Whitney test, Z=-0.015, P=0.998. The proportion of networks with a multiple male sexual partnership was 63.7% overall, 62.8% for HIV-positive participants and 63.8% for HIV-negative participants (χ2=0.025, P=0.875. The proportion of networks with both male and female sexual partners was 44.8% overall, 47.1% for HIV-positive participants and 44.5% for HIV-negative participants (χ2=0.169, P=0.681. Consistent condom use and knowledge of HIV infection status were rare within the network partners.The currently high HIV prevalence and complicated bisexual networks among MSM in the study area provides enhanced evidence for developing tailored prevention strategies for HIV transmission among and

  15. Efficacy of Mobile Serious Games in Increasing HIV Risk Perception in Swaziland: A Randomized Control Trial (SGprev Trial) Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhele, Bhekumusa Wellington; Musumari, Patou; El-Saaidi, Christina; Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Suguimoto, S Pilar; Ono Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2016-11-22

    -list control group at 4-weeks post-intervention. We will use standardized regression coefficients to calculate the effect of the intervention on our primary outcome with P values. We will conduct both intention to treat and as treated analysis. This study is funded by Hayao Nakayama Foundation for Science & Technology and Culture; Grant number H26-A2-41. The research and development approval has been obtained from Kyoto University Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee, Japan, and Swaziland's Ministry of Health Ethics and Scientific committee. Results are expected in February 2017. This study will provide evidence on the efficiency of a mobile phone interactive game in increasing HIV risk perception in Swaziland. Our findings may also be generalizable to similar settings in SSA. University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registry ID number (UMIN-CTR):UMIN000021781; URL:https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr_e/ctr_view.cgi?recptno=R000025103 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6hOphB11a).

  16. Efficacy of Mobile Serious Games in Increasing HIV Risk Perception in Swaziland: A Randomized Control Trial (SGprev Trial) Research Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumari, Patou; El-Saaidi, Christina; Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Suguimoto, S. Pilar; Ono Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    the mean change in the wait-list control group at 4-weeks post-intervention. We will use standardized regression coefficients to calculate the effect of the intervention on our primary outcome with P values. We will conduct both intention to treat and as treated analysis. Results This study is funded by Hayao Nakayama Foundation for Science & Technology and Culture; Grant number H26-A2-41. The research and development approval has been obtained from Kyoto University Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee, Japan, and Swaziland’s Ministry of Health Ethics and Scientific committee. Results are expected in February 2017. Conclusions This study will provide evidence on the efficiency of a mobile phone interactive game in increasing HIV risk perception in Swaziland. Our findings may also be generalizable to similar settings in SSA. Trial Registration University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registry ID number (UMIN-CTR):UMIN000021781; URL:https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr_e/ctr_view.cgi?recptno=R000025103 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6hOphB11a). PMID:27876685

  17. Why female sex workers participate in HIV research: the illusion of voluntariness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Elizabeth; Fisher, Celia B; Blankenship, Kim M; West, Brooke S; Khoshnood, Kaveh

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors influencing the motivation for and perceived voluntariness of participation in non-intervention HIV research among female sex workers (FSW) in India. FSW (n = 30) who participated in non-intervention HIV studies in the previous three years were recruited from a local community-based organization. Semi-structured qualitative interviews focused on women's personal and economic motivations for participation and their perceptions of the informed consent process. Interviews were audio-recorded, translated, transcribed, and reviewed for common themes. Content analysis indicated that while many women reported willing participation, reports of obligatory participation were also a common theme. Obligations included money-related pressures and coercion by other FSW, social pressures, not wanting to disappoint the researchers, and perceiving that they had a contractual agreement to complete participation as a result of signing the consent form. Findings suggest a need for additional efforts during and following informed consent to prevent obligatory participation in HIV research studies among FSW. Findings emphasize the importance of integrating ongoing participant feedback into research ethics practices to identify issues not well addressed via standard ethics protocols when conducting HIV research among vulnerable populations.

  18. EEG-based research on brain functional networks in cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Niannian; Zhang, Li; Liu, Guozhong

    2015-01-01

    Recently, exploring the cognitive functions of the brain by establishing a network model to understand the working mechanism of the brain has become a popular research topic in the field of neuroscience. In this study, electroencephalography (EEG) was used to collect data from subjects given four different mathematical cognitive tasks: recite numbers clockwise and counter-clockwise, and letters clockwise and counter-clockwise to build a complex brain function network (BFN). By studying the connectivity features and parameters of those brain functional networks, it was found that the average clustering coefficient is much larger than its corresponding random network and the average shortest path length is similar to the corresponding random networks, which clearly shows the characteristics of the small-world network. The brain regions stimulated during the experiment are consistent with traditional cognitive science regarding learning, memory, comprehension, and other rational judgment results. The new method of complex networking involves studying the mathematical cognitive process of reciting, providing an effective research foundation for exploring the relationship between brain cognition and human learning skills and memory. This could help detect memory deficits early in young and mentally handicapped children, and help scientists understand the causes of cognitive brain disorders.

  19. Roles of Clinical Research Networks in Pediatric Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mark A; Attar, Sabah; de Wildt, Saskia N; Vassal, Gilles; Mangiarini, Laura; Giaquinto, Carlo

    2017-10-01

    The evaluation of drugs that are used in children has been neglected historically but is now well established as an essential part of clinical drug development. The increase in pediatric activity among industry, and other sectors, has highlighted the importance of joint working. All participants in pediatric drug development need to be aware of the "big picture." An increasingly important part of this big picture in pediatrics, as in other populations, is the design and conduct of clinical trials in networks. This narrative review provides an overview of the roles of clinical research networks in pediatric drug development. Networks take many forms as specialty networks and geographic networks but work toward common principles, including sharing resources between trials, and using experience with trial conduct to improve trial design. Networks develop standardized processes for trial conduct (including performance management) that increase the speed and predictability of trial conduct while reducing burdens on sites, sponsors, and intermediaries. Networks can provide validated, real-world information about natural history, participant distribution, and standards of care to inform planning of development programs, including extrapolation and clinical trial simulation. Networks can work across geographic and jurisdictional barriers to promote global interoperability of drug development. Networks support participant centrality. Networks offer an opportunity to develop relationships with investigators, sites, and methodological experts that span pre-competitive foundations for drug development and specific products. Sustainable networks benefit all stakeholders by providing a multifunctional platform that promotes the quality and timeliness of clinical drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Linguistic and Cultural Challenges in Communication and Translation in US-Sponsored HIV Prevention Research in Emerging Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Linguistic and cultural differences can impede comprehension among potential research participants during the informed consent process, but how researchers and IRBs respond to these challenges in practice is unclear. We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 researchers, research ethics committee (REC) chairs and members from 8 different countries with emerging economies, involved in HIV-related research sponsored by HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN), regarding the ethical and regulatory challenges they face in this regard. In the interviews, problems with translating study materials often arose as major concerns. Four sets of challenges were identified concerning linguistic and cultural translations of informed consent documents and other study materials, related to the: (1) context, (2) process, (3) content and (4) translation of these documents. Host country contextual issues included low literacy rates, education (e.g., documents may need to be written below 5th grade reading level), and experiences with research, and different views of written documentation. Certain terms and concepts may not exist in other languages, or have additional connotations that back translations do not always reveal. Challenges arise because of not only the content of word-for-word, literal translation, but the linguistic form of the language, such as tone (e.g., appropriate forms of politeness vs. legalese, seen as harsh), syntax, manner of questions posed, and the concept of the consent); and the contexts of use affect meaning. Problems also emerged in bilateral communications – US IRBs may misunderstand local practices, or communicate insufficiently the reasons for their decisions to foreign RECs. In sum, these data highlight several challenges that have received little, if any, attention in past literature on translation of informed consent and study materials, and have crucial implications for improving practice, education, research and policy, suggesting several strategies

  1. Linguistic and Cultural Challenges in Communication and Translation in US-Sponsored HIV Prevention Research in Emerging Economies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Hanrahan

    Full Text Available Linguistic and cultural differences can impede comprehension among potential research participants during the informed consent process, but how researchers and IRBs respond to these challenges in practice is unclear. We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 researchers, research ethics committee (REC chairs and members from 8 different countries with emerging economies, involved in HIV-related research sponsored by HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN, regarding the ethical and regulatory challenges they face in this regard. In the interviews, problems with translating study materials often arose as major concerns. Four sets of challenges were identified concerning linguistic and cultural translations of informed consent documents and other study materials, related to the: (1 context, (2 process, (3 content and (4 translation of these documents. Host country contextual issues included low literacy rates, education (e.g., documents may need to be written below 5th grade reading level, and experiences with research, and different views of written documentation. Certain terms and concepts may not exist in other languages, or have additional connotations that back translations do not always reveal. Challenges arise because of not only the content of word-for-word, literal translation, but the linguistic form of the language, such as tone (e.g., appropriate forms of politeness vs. legalese, seen as harsh, syntax, manner of questions posed, and the concept of the consent; and the contexts of use affect meaning. Problems also emerged in bilateral communications--US IRBs may misunderstand local practices, or communicate insufficiently the reasons for their decisions to foreign RECs. In sum, these data highlight several challenges that have received little, if any, attention in past literature on translation of informed consent and study materials, and have crucial implications for improving practice, education, research and policy, suggesting several

  2. Linguistic and Cultural Challenges in Communication and Translation in US-Sponsored HIV Prevention Research in Emerging Economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Donna; Sexton, Patrina; Hui, Katrina; Teitcher, Jennifer; Sugarman, Jeremy; London, Alex John; Barnes, Mark; Purpura, James; Klitzman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Linguistic and cultural differences can impede comprehension among potential research participants during the informed consent process, but how researchers and IRBs respond to these challenges in practice is unclear. We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 researchers, research ethics committee (REC) chairs and members from 8 different countries with emerging economies, involved in HIV-related research sponsored by HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN), regarding the ethical and regulatory challenges they face in this regard. In the interviews, problems with translating study materials often arose as major concerns. Four sets of challenges were identified concerning linguistic and cultural translations of informed consent documents and other study materials, related to the: (1) context, (2) process, (3) content and (4) translation of these documents. Host country contextual issues included low literacy rates, education (e.g., documents may need to be written below 5th grade reading level), and experiences with research, and different views of written documentation. Certain terms and concepts may not exist in other languages, or have additional connotations that back translations do not always reveal. Challenges arise because of not only the content of word-for-word, literal translation, but the linguistic form of the language, such as tone (e.g., appropriate forms of politeness vs. legalese, seen as harsh), syntax, manner of questions posed, and the concept of the consent); and the contexts of use affect meaning. Problems also emerged in bilateral communications--US IRBs may misunderstand local practices, or communicate insufficiently the reasons for their decisions to foreign RECs. In sum, these data highlight several challenges that have received little, if any, attention in past literature on translation of informed consent and study materials, and have crucial implications for improving practice, education, research and policy, suggesting several strategies

  3. Defining and measuring successful emergency care networks: a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Seth W; Kit Delgado, M; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Hollander, Judd E; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Jacobs, Alice K; Kilaru, Austin S; Lorch, Scott A; Mutter, Ryan L; Myers, Sage R; Owens, Pamela L; Phelan, Michael P; Pines, Jesse M; Seymour, Christopher W; Ewen Wang, N; Branas, Charles C

    2010-12-01

    The demands on emergency services have grown relentlessly, and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has asserted the need for "regionalized, coordinated, and accountable emergency care systems throughout the country." There are large gaps in the evidence base needed to fix the problem of how emergency care is organized and delivered, and science is urgently needed to define and measure success in the emerging network of emergency care. In 2010, Academic Emergency Medicine convened a consensus conference entitled "Beyond Regionalization: Integrated Networks of Emergency Care." This article is a product of the conference breakout session on "Defining and Measuring Successful Networks"; it explores the concept of integrated emergency care delivery and prioritizes a research agenda for how to best define and measure successful networks of emergency care. The authors discuss five key areas: 1) the fundamental metrics that are needed to measure networks across time-sensitive and non-time-sensitive conditions; 2) how networks can be scalable and nimble and can be creative in terms of best practices; 3) the potential unintended consequences of networks of emergency care; 4) the development of large-scale, yet feasible, network data systems; and 5) the linkage of data systems across the disease course. These knowledge gaps must be filled to improve the quality and efficiency of emergency care and to fulfill the IOM's vision of regionalized, coordinated, and accountable emergency care systems. 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. A scoping review and thematic analysis of social and behavioural research among HIV-serodiscordant couples in high-income settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Joshua B; Calzavara, Liviana; Daftary, Amrita; Mitra, Sanjana; Pidutti, Joel; Allman, Dan; Bourne, Adam; Loutfy, Mona; Myers, Ted

    2015-03-13

    While HIV incidence has stabilized in many settings, increases in health and wellbeing among many people living with HIV/AIDS suggest that the number of HIV-serodiscordant relationships is growing. Given the deficit of reviews addressing social and behavioural characteristics of HIV-serodiscordant couples within high-income settings, our objective was to understand the scope of the published literature, identify evidence gaps, and suggest future research needs. Ten electronic databases were searched. Studies were included if they were reported in English, used primary data, were from the combination antiretroviral (cART) era (>1996), reported on social or behavioural aspects, included any fraction of primary (i.e., stable) relationships, and were conducted in high-income settings. Studies that identified their unit of analysis as either the dyad or individual member of the couple were included. Studies were coded according to a thematic framework. Included studies (n = 154) clustered into eight themes: risk behaviours (29%), risk management (26%), reproductive issues (12%), relationship quality (9%), serostatus disclosure (7%), adherence to antiretroviral therapy (7%), vulnerability (5%), and social support (3%). The proportion of studies conducted among heterosexual couples, same-sex male couples, and mixed cohorts were 42%, 34%, and 24%, respectively. Most studies (70%) were conducted in the United States, 70% of all studies were quantitative (including interventions), but only one-third were focused on couples (dyads) where both partners are recruited to a study. Over 25% of studies focused on sexual risk among same-sex male couples. Future research efforts should focus on the interrelationship of risk management strategies and relationship quality, social determinants of health and wellbeing, HIV testing, vulnerable populations, reproductive issues among same-sex couples, disclosure of serodiscordant status to social networks, dyadic studies, population

  5. Progress in HIV vaccine research: an outsider's view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuritzkes D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP and treatment as prevention (TasP to have a significant impact on HIV transmission, there is broad agreement that a safe and effective preventive vaccine remains an essential tool for ending the AIDS epidemic. To date, progress towards a vaccine has been painstaking. Nevertheless, recent progress has opened up promising new leads. Results of the STEP and RV-144 trials provide novel insights that may lead to improved design of candidate vaccines. In addition, the identification of highly potent, broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies from some infected patients suggests novel approaches to generating protective immunity. Refinements in our understanding of the gp120 structure and its interaction with CD4 also provide opportunities for improving immunogen design. Although the challenges remain daunting, these advances have instilled a renewed sense of optimism into the field.

  6. Latinos and HIV/AIDS: Examining Factors Related to Disparity and Identifying Opportunities for Psychosocial Intervention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Ellen Setsuko; Collins, Erin Marie; Durán, Ron E.; Safren, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Latinos maintain an AIDS case rate more than 3 times higher than whites, a greater rate of progression to AIDS, and a higher rate of HIV/AIDS-related deaths. Three broad areas are reviewed related to these disparities: (1) relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and socio-cultural factors among Latinos; (2) drug abuse and mental health problems in Latinos relevant to HIV/AIDS outcomes; and (3) opportunities for psychosocial intervention. Latinos living with HIV are a rapidly growing group, are more severely impacted by HIV than whites, and confront unique challenges in coping with HIV/AIDS. A body of research suggests that depression, substance abuse, treatment adherence, health literacy, and access to healthcare may be fruitful targets for intervention research in this population. Though limited, the current literature suggests that psychosocial interventions that target these factors could help reduce HIV/AIDS disparities between Latinos and whites and could have important public health value. PMID:18498050

  7. The role of law in the regulation of HIV-vaccine research in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The challenges for law as a regulatory mechanism in this regard are twofold: the complexity of issues related to HIV-vaccine research, and the apparent disconnection between the legal and ethical frameworks that are applied in the regulation of these issues. This article analyses the extent to which these challenges have ...

  8. Ethical issues in HIV/AIDS research, counselling and testing in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, A J

    2006-12-01

    HIV/AIDS is a major pubic health problem in Nigeria. This paper identifies the ethical issues involved in HIV/AIDS biomedical and behavioural research, counselling and testing in the country. These concerns are discussed in the context of the three universal ethical principles of respect for persons, beneficence, and justice. Written informed consent, which is a component of respect for persons, is a challenge in Nigeria because of skepticism to documentation, sensitivity of sexual practices often explored in behavioural research, and a tradition that discourages patients from questioning medical authority. Although monetary inducement of research participants is ethically acceptable, the high levels of poverty in Nigeria raise concerns that payment of money may unduly induce indigent participants to enroll in research. The disclosure of results in situations when married HIV positive persons insist that their status should not be revealed to their spouse illustrate the dilemma that health workers face in adhering to the ethical norm of keeping confidentiality and the public health obligation of preventing HIV transmission in a third party. Some recommendations are offered to address these concerns.

  9. Antiretroviral therapy in prevention of HIV and TB: update on current research efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granich, Reuben; Gupta, Somya; Suthar, Amitabh B; Smyth, Caoimhe; Hoos, David; Vitoria, Marco; Simao, Mariangela; Hankins, Catherine; Schwartlander, Bernard; Ridzon, Renee; Bazin, Brigitte; Williams, Brian; Lo, Ying-Ru; McClure, Craig; Montaner, Julio; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2011-09-01

    There is considerable scientific evidence supporting the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) infections. The complex nature of the HIV and TB prevention responses, resource constraints, remaining questions about cost and feasibility, and the need to use a solid evidence base to make policy decisions, and the implementation challenges to translating trial data to operational settings require a well-organised and coordinated response to research in this area. To this end, we aimed to catalogue the ongoing and planned research activities that evaluate the impact of ART plus other interventions on HIV- and/or TB-related morbidity, mortality, risk behaviour, HIV incidence and transmission. Using a limited search methodology, 50 projects were identified examining ART as prevention, representing 5 regions and 52 countries with a global distribution. There are 24 randomised controlled clinical trials with at least 12 large randomised individual or community cluster trials in resource-constrained settings that are in the planning or early implementation stages. There is considerable heterogeneity between studies in terms of methodology, interventions and geographical location. While the identified studies will undoubtedly advance our understanding of the efficacy and effectiveness of ART for prevention, some key questions may remain unanswered or only partially answered. The large number and wide variety of research projects emphasise the importance of this research issue and clearly demonstrate the potential for synergies, partnerships and coordination across funding agencies.

  10. Characterizing the Structure and Functions of Social Networks of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Ghana, West Africa: Implications for Peer-Based HIV Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Geoffrey; Strudwick, Gillian; Lalani, Yasmin; Boakye, Francis; Wilton, Leo; Nelson, LaRon E

    2017-07-20

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) in Ghana are at an increased risk of contracting HIV. Understanding the social networks of MSM may support the development of HIV prevention strategies for this unique population. This article explores the structure and function of the social networks of MSM from 22 focus groups drawn from two urban and one rural setting in Ghana. Gaining insights into the characteristics of these networks will allow health care providers to design HIV prevention efforts and increase access to these programs. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. All rights reserved.

  11. Research priorities in the field of HIV and AIDS in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AliAkbar Haghdoost

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV is a multidimensional problem. Therefore, prioritization of research topics in this field is a serious challenge. We decided to prioritize the major areas of research on HIV/AIDS in Iran. Materials ans Methods : In a brain-storming session with the main national and provincial stakeholders and experts from different relevant fields, the direct and indirect dimensions of HIV/AIDS and its related research issues were explored. Afterward, using the Delphi method, we sent questionnaires to 20 experts (13 respondents from different sectors. In this electronic based questioner, we requested experts to evaluate main topics and their subtopics. The ranges of scores were between 0 and 100. Results: The score of priorities of main themes were preventive activities (43.2, large scale planning (25.4, the estimation of the HIV/AIDS burden (20.9, and basic scientific research (10.5. The most important priority in each main theme was education particularly in high risk groups (52.5, developing the national strategy to address the epidemic (31.8, estimation of the incidence and prevalence among high-risk groups (59.5 and developing new preventive methods (66.7, respectively. Conclusions: The most important priorities of researches on HIV/AIDS were preventive activities and developing national strategy. As high risk groups are the most involved people in the epidemic, and they are also the most hard-to-reach sub-populations, a national well designated comprehensive strategy is essential. However, we believe with a very specific and directed scheme, special attention to research in basic sciences is necessary, at least in limited number of institutes.

  12. The menopause transition in women living with HIV: current evidence and future avenues of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Shema; Anderson, Jane; Burns, Fiona; Delpech, Valerie; Gilson, Richard; Sabin, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    As the life expectancy of people living with HIV improves as a result of antiretroviral therapy, increasing numbers of women living with HIV (WLHIV) are now reaching menopausal age. The menopause transition in WLHIV remains a relatively overlooked area in clinical HIV research. Whilst there is some evidence to suggest that WLHIV experience menopause at an earlier age and that they have more menopausal symptoms, there is no clear consensus in the literature around an impact of HIV infection on either timing or symptomatology of the menopause. Data are also conflicting on whether HIV-related factors such as HIV viral load and CD4 cell count have an impact on the menopause. Furthermore, menopausal symptoms in WLHIV are known to go under-recognised by both healthcare providers and women themselves. There is likely to be a burden of unmet health needs among WLHIV transitioning through the menopause, with significant gaps in the evidence base for their care. With this in mind, we have developed the PRIME study (Positive Transitions Through the Menopause). This mixed-methods observational study will explore, for the first time in the UK, the impact of the menopause on the health and wellbeing of 1500 ethnically diverse WLHIV. In establishing a cohort of women in their midlife and following them up longitudinally, we hope to develop a nuanced understanding of the gendered aspects of ageing and HIV, informing the provision of appropriate services for WLHIV to ensure that they are supported in maintaining optimal health and wellbeing as they get older.

  13. Effects of Actor-Network Theory in Accounting Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise Nederland; Mouritsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    of a critical literature review and discussion. Findings – Since the early 1990s, actor-network theory, particularly the work of Bruno Latour, has inspired accounting researchers and led to a number of innovative studies of accounting phenomena. In particular, Latour's book, Science in Action, has been...... number of accounting papers that apply actor-network theory. A different sample might have given a somewhat different picture. Furthermore, it focuses on the influence of Latour's work and refrains from discussing how the writings of Michel Callon, John Law or other thinkers within the actor......Purpose – This paper aims to discuss how Bruno Latour's version of actor-network theory has influenced accounting research. It also seeks to show that Latour's writings contain unexplored potential that may inspire future accounting research. Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes the form...

  14. Inhibitions and implications associated with celebrity participation in social marketing programs focusing on HIV prevention: an exploratory research

    OpenAIRE

    Beatriz Casais; João F. Proença

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses celebrity participation in social marketing programs focusing on public health, especially on HIV programs. The research identifies the inhibitions of celebrity people and implications that this involvement may have upon their lives. The paper analysis data from in-depth interviews made to twenty-seven Portuguese celebrities from arts, show business and sports. The results show absence of prejudice against HIV. Famous people feel motivated to join public health and HIV ca...

  15. Focus on CSIR research in pollution waste: Added water related diarrhoeal burden due to HIV/AIDS

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, M

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available related diarrhoeal burden due to HIV/AIDS Lack of access to proper water, improved sanitation and hygiene, is the main risk factor attributable to diarrhoeal-related disease in the country. Of the 48 million people in South Africa, approximately... each day. In addition, HIV/AIDS exacerbates the diarrhoeal disease problem. Research shows that 90% of HIV/AIDS patients in Africa suffer from chronic diarrhoea. The added diarrhoeal disease in people with suppressed immune systems...

  16. Development of Guidelines for the Conduct of HIV Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian research ethics committees are charged with the responsibility to monitor ongoing research to ensure compliance with ethical standards. Recent evidence from qualitative studies on research conduct however, indicate that many research studies fail to implement their protocols as written, and that this is not ...

  17. A Review of Risk Behaviors for HIV Infection by Men Who Have Sex With Men Through Geosocial Networking Phone Apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco Luz Nunes Queiroz, Artur Acelino; Lopes de Sousa, Álvaro Francisco; Evangelista de Araújo, Telma Maria; Milanez de Oliveira, Francisco Braz; Batista Moura, Maria Eliete; Reis, Renata Karina

    The purpose of our review was to analyze the relationship between the use of geosocial networking phone apps and risk behaviors for HIV infection in men who have sex with men (MSM). The review was guided by the question: Does the use of geosocial networking apps to find sex partners increase risk behaviors for HIV infection by MSM? We searched the databases PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, and LILACS, considering primary studies published up to December 2015, without any time restraint. All 14 studies that met our search criteria analyzed sexual behaviors in relation to sociocultural and economic characteristics, number of partners, unprotected anal sex, drug use, HIV testing, risk management measures, and the presence of other sexually transmitted diseases. The results indicated that use of geosocial networking apps to find sex partners may lead to new patterns of behavior and relationships that place MSM at risk for HIV. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  19. Research on complex networks' repairing characteristics due to cascading failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoqi, Fu; Ying, Wang; Xiaoyang, Wang

    2017-09-01

    In reality, most of the topological structures of complex networks are not ideal. Considering the restrictions from all aspects, we cannot timely adjust and improve network defects. Once complex networks collapse under cascading failure, an appropriate repair strategy must be implemented. This repair process is divided into 3 kinds of situations. Based on different types of opening times, we presented 2 repair modes, and researched 4 kinds of repair strategies. Results showed that network efficiency recovered faster when the repair strategies were arranged in descending order by parameters under the immediate opening condition. However, the risk of secondary failure and additional expansion capacity were large. On the contrary, when repair strategies were in ascending order, the demand for additional capacity caused by secondary failure was greatly saved, but the recovery of network efficiency was relatively slow. Compared to immediate opening, delayed opening alleviated the contradiction between network efficiency and additional expansion capacity, particularly to reduce the risk of secondary failure. Therefore, different repair methods have different repair characteristics. This paper investigates the impact of cascading effects on the network repair process, and by presenting a detailed description of the status of each repaired node, helps us understand the advantages and disadvantages of different repair strategies.

  20. Network pharmacology: a new approach for chinese herbal medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-Biao; Li, Qing-Ya; Chen, Qi-Long; Su, Shi-Bing

    2013-01-01

    The dominant paradigm of "one gene, one target, one disease" has influenced many aspects of drug discovery strategy. However, in recent years, it has been appreciated that many effective drugs act on multiple targets rather than a single one. As an integrated multidisciplinary concept, network pharmacology, which is based on system biology and polypharmacology, affords a novel network mode of "multiple targets, multiple effects, complex diseases" and replaces the "magic bullets" by "magic shotguns." Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been recognized as one of the most important strategies in complementary and alternative medicine. Though CHM has been practiced for a very long time, its effectiveness and beneficial contribution to public health has not been fully recognized. Also, the knowledge on the mechanisms of CHM formulas is scarce. In the present review, the concept and significance of network pharmacology is briefly introduced. The application and potential role of network pharmacology in the CHM fields is also discussed, such as data collection, target prediction, network visualization, multicomponent interaction, and network toxicology. Furthermore, the developing tendency of network pharmacology is also summarized, and its role in CHM research is discussed.

  1. Network Pharmacology: A New Approach for Chinese Herbal Medicine Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-biao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dominant paradigm of “one gene, one target, one disease” has influenced many aspects of drug discovery strategy. However, in recent years, it has been appreciated that many effective drugs act on multiple targets rather than a single one. As an integrated multidisciplinary concept, network pharmacology, which is based on system biology and polypharmacology, affords a novel network mode of “multiple targets, multiple effects, complex diseases” and replaces the “magic bullets” by “magic shotguns.” Chinese herbal medicine (CHM has been recognized as one of the most important strategies in complementary and alternative medicine. Though CHM has been practiced for a very long time, its effectiveness and beneficial contribution to public health has not been fully recognized. Also, the knowledge on the mechanisms of CHM formulas is scarce. In the present review, the concept and significance of network pharmacology is briefly introduced. The application and potential role of network pharmacology in the CHM fields is also discussed, such as data collection, target prediction, network visualization, multicomponent interaction, and network toxicology. Furthermore, the developing tendency of network pharmacology is also summarized, and its role in CHM research is discussed.

  2. NIHR Clinical Research Networks: what they do and how they help paediatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lythgoe, Hanna; Price, Victoria; Poustie, Vanessa; Attar, Sabah; Hawcutt, Daniel; Preston, Jennifer; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-08-01

    This review provides paediatricians with an update on the new structure of the National Institute for Health Research's (NIHR) Clinical Research Network (CRN): Children and its role within the wider NIHR infrastructure. The network supports delivery of high-quality research within the NHS in England and supports researchers, through provision of staff and resources, with feasibility, site set-up, patient recruitment and study management. Since 2013, over 80% of commercial contract studies running within the UK sat within the UKCRN Portfolio. Of the diverse, increasing portfolio of studies supported by the network, many studies are interventional, with 33% being randomised controlled studies. Recruitment to studies supported by the network through the Children's Portfolio has consistently improved. Over 200 000 participants have been recruited to the Children's Portfolio studies to date, and there are currently approximately 500 studies open to recruitment. The CRN: Children has successfully involved patients and the public in all aspects of study design and delivery, including through the work of Generation R. Challenges remain in conducting paediatric research and the network is committed to supporting Children's research and further building on its achievements to date. Education and engagement of paediatricians within the network and research is important to further improving quality and delivery of paediatric research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Building up a collaborative network for the surveillance of HIV genetic diversity in Italy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzia Sanarico

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of infection with HIV-1 non-B subtypes in Italy has been reported to raise, due to increased migration flows and travels. HIV-1 variants show different biological and immunological properties that impact on disease progression rate, response to antiretroviral therapy (ART and sensitivity of diagnostic tests with important implications for public health. Therefore, a constant surveillance of the dynamics of HIV variants in Italy should be a high public health priority. Organization of surveillance studies requires building up a platform constituted of a network of clinical centers, laboratories and institutional agencies, able to properly collect samples for the investigation of HIV subtypes heterogeneity and to provide a database with reliable demographic, clinical, immunological and virological data. AIM: We here report our experience in building up such a platform, co-ordinated by the National AIDS Center of the Istituto Superiore di Sanita, taking advantage of a pilot study aimed at evaluating HIV subtypes diversity in populations of HIV-infected migrant people in Italy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four hundred and thirty four HIV-infected migrants were enrolled in 9 Italian clinical centers located throughout the Italian territory. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs for sample collection were provided by the National AIDS Center to each clinical center. In addition, clinical centers were required to fill up a case report form (crf for each patient, which included demographic, clinical, immunological and virological information. RESULTS: All centers properly collected and stored samples from each enrolled individual. Overall, the required information was correctly provided for more than 90% of the patients. However, some fields of the crf, particularly those including information on the last HIV-negative antibody test and presence of co-infections, were properly filled up in less than 80% of the enrolled migrants. Centers

  4. Building up a collaborative network for the surveillance of HIV genetic diversity in Italy. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanarico, Nunzia; D'Amato, Stefania; Picconi, Orietta; Ensoli, Barbara; Buttò, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of infection with HIV-1 non-B subtypes in Italy has been reported to raise, due to increased migration flows and travels. HIV-1 variants show different biological and immunological properties that impact on disease progression rate, response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and sensitivity of diagnostic tests with important implications for public health. Therefore, a constant surveillance of the dynamics of HIV variants in Italy should be a high public health priority. Organization of surveillance studies requires building up a platform constituted of a network of clinical centers, laboratories and institutional agencies, able to properly collect samples for the investigation of HIV subtypes heterogeneity and to provide a database with reliable demographic, clinical, immunological and virological data. We here report our experience in building up such a platform, co-ordinated by the National AIDS Center of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, taking advantage of a pilot study aimed at evaluating HIV subtypes diversity in populations of HIV-infected migrant people in Italy. Four hundred and thirty four HIV-infected migrants were enrolled in 9 Italian clinical centers located throughout the Italian territory. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for sample collection were provided by the National AIDS Center to each clinical center. In addition, clinical centers were required to fill up a case report form (crf) for each patient, which included demographic, clinical, immunological and virological information. All centers properly collected and stored samples from each enrolled individual. Overall, the required information was correctly provided for more than 90% of the patients. However, some fields of the crf, particularly those including information on the last HIV-negative antibody test and presence of co-infections, were properly filled up in less than 80% of the enrolled migrants. Centers from Northern and Central Italy showed a better tendency to report

  5. 75 FR 57521 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... FOUNDATION Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010 Strategic Plan--URL Correction AGENCY: The National Coordination Office (NCO) for Networking and Information... Coordination Office for Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) requests...

  6. Research on the complex network of the UNSPSC ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingying; Zou, Shengrong; Gu, Aihua; Wei, Li; Zhou, Ta

    The UNSPSC ontology mainly applies to the classification system of the e-business and governments buying the worldwide products and services, and supports the logic structure of classification of the products and services. In this paper, the related technologies of the complex network were applied to analyzing the structure of the ontology. The concept of the ontology was corresponding to the node of the complex network, and the relationship of the ontology concept was corresponding to the edge of the complex network. With existing methods of analysis and performance indicators in the complex network, analyzing the degree distribution and community of the ontology, and the research will help evaluate the concept of the ontology, classify the concept of the ontology and improve the efficiency of semantic matching.

  7. Building capability through networking with investors and researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Schøtt, Thomas

    A startup requires financing, typically, and the startup is based on innovation, often. Capabilities for innovation and financing may be built simultaneously and created jointly at inception. Co-creation of capabilities for financing and innovation is accounted for in this study. Co...... of startups at inception, by 9,161 entrepreneurs, surveyed in Global Entrepreneurship Monitor in 49 countries. Co-creation is found to be reduced by the entrepreneur’s networking in the private sphere of family and friends, but to be benefiting from networking in the public sphere, especially by networking...... with investors and researchers simultaneously. The findings contribute to understanding capability building as embedded in networks around the startup....

  8. Recruitment and retention of women in fishing communities in HIV prevention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssetaala, Ali; Nakiyingi-Miiro, Jessica; Asiimwe, Stephen; Nanvubya, Annet; Mpendo, Juliet; Asiki, Gershim; Nielsen, Leslie; Kiwanuka, Noah; Seeley, Janet; Kamali, Anatoli; Kaleebu, Pontiano

    2015-01-01

    Women in fishing communities in Uganda are more at risk and have higher rates of HIV infection. Socio-cultural gender norms, limited access to health information and services, economic disempowerment, sexual abuse and their biological susceptibility make women more at risk of infection. There is need to design interventions that cater for women's vulnerability. We explore factors affecting recruitment and retention of women from fishing communities in HIV prevention research. An HIV incidence cohort screened 2074 volunteers (1057 men and 1017 women) aged 13-49 years from 5 fishing communities along Lake Victoria using demographic, medical history, risk behaviour assessment questionnaires.1000 HIV negative high risk volunteers were enrolled and followed every 6 months for 18 months. Factors associated with completion of study visits among women were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Women constituted 1,017(49%) of those screened, and 449(45%) of those enrolled with a median (IQR) age of 27 (22-33) years. Main reasons for non-enrolment were HIV infection (33.9%) and reported low risk behaviour (37.5%). A total of 382 (74%) women and 332 (69%) men completed all follow up visits. Older women (>24 yrs) and those unemployed, who had lived in the community for 5 years or more, were more likely to complete all study visits. Women had better retention rates than men at 18 months. Strategies for recruiting and retaining younger women and those who have stayed for less than 5 years need to be developed for improved retention of women in fishing communities in HIV prevention and research Programs.

  9. Needle Exchange and the HIV Epidemic in Vancouver: Lessons Learned from 15 years of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyshka, Elaine; Strathdee, Steffanie; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    During the mid-1990s, Vancouver experienced a well characterized HIV outbreak among injection drug users (IDU) and many questioned how this could occur in the presence of a high volume needle exchange program (NEP). Specific concerns were fuelled by early research demonstrating that frequent needle exchange program attendees were more likely to be HIV positive than those who attended the NEP less frequently. Since then, some have misinterpreted this finding as evidence that NEPs are ineffective or potentially harmful. In light of continuing questions about the Vancouver HIV epidemic, we review 15 years of peer-reviewed research on Vancouver’s NEP to describe what has been learned through this work. Our review demonstrates that: 1) NEP attendance is not causally associated with HIV infection, 2) frequent attendees of Vancouver’s NEP have higher risk profiles which explain their increased risk of HIV seroconversion, and 3) a number of policy concerns, as well as the high prevalence of cocaine injecting contributed to the failure of the NEP to prevent the outbreak. Additionally, we highlight several improvements to Vancouver’s NEP that contributed to declines in syringe sharing and HIV incidence. Vancouver’s experience provides a number of important lessons regarding NEP. Keys to success include refocusing the NEP away from an emphasis on public order objectives by separating distribution and collection functions, removing syringe distribution limits and decentralizing and diversifying NEP services. Additionally, our review highlights the importance of context when implementing NEPs, as well as ongoing evaluation to identify factors that constrain or improve access to sterile syringes. PMID:22579215

  10. Clinical Trial Design for HIV Prevention Research: Determining Standards of Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Liza; Zwerski, Sheryl

    2015-06-01

    This article seeks to advance ethical dialogue on choosing standards of prevention in clinical trials testing improved biomedical prevention methods for HIV. The stakes in this area of research are high, given the continued high rates of infection in many countries and the budget limitations that have constrained efforts to expand treatment for all who are currently HIV-infected. New prevention methods are still needed; at the same time, some existing prevention and treatment interventions have been proven effective but are not yet widely available in the countries where they most urgently needed. The ethical tensions in this field of clinical research are well known and have been the subject of extensive debate. There is no single clinical trial design that can optimize all the ethically important goals and commitments involved in research. Several recent articles have described the current ethical difficulties in designing HIV prevention trials, especially in resource limited settings; however, there is no consensus on how to handle clinical trial design decisions, and existing international ethical guidelines offer conflicting advice. This article acknowledges these deep ethical dilemmas and moves beyond a simple descriptive approach to advance an organized method for considering what clinical trial designs will be ethically acceptable for HIV prevention trials, balancing the relevant criteria and providing justification for specific design decisions. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Ethical Issues in mHealth Research Involving Persons Living with HIV/AIDS and Substance Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Labrique, Alain B.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Westergaard, Ryan P.; Merritt, Maria W.

    2013-01-01

    We aim to raise awareness and stimulate dialogue among investigators and research ethics committees regarding ethical issues that arise specifically in the design and conduct of mHealth research involving persons living with HIV/AIDS and substance abuse. Following a brief background discussion of mHealth research in general, we offer a case example to illustrate the characteristics of mHealth research involving people living with HIV/AIDS and substance abuse. With reference to a well-establis...

  12. The use and significance of a research networking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Maninder; Yuan, Leslie; Daigre, John; Meeks, Eric; Nelson, Katie; Piontkowski, Cynthia; Reuter, Katja; Sak, Rachael; Turner, Brian; Weber, Griffin M; Chatterjee, Anirvan

    2014-02-07

    Universities have begun deploying public Internet systems that allow for easy search of their experts, expertise, and intellectual networks. Deployed first in biomedical schools but now being implemented more broadly, the initial motivator of these research networking systems was to enable easier identification of collaborators and enable the development of teams for research. The intent of the study was to provide the first description of the usage of an institutional research "social networking" system or research networking system (RNS). Number of visits, visitor location and type, referral source, depth of visit, search terms, and click paths were derived from 2.5 years of Web analytics data. Feedback from a pop-up survey presented to users over 15 months was summarized. RNSs automatically generate and display profiles and networks of researchers. Within 2.5 years, the RNS at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) achieved one-seventh of the monthly visit rate of the main longstanding university website, with an increasing trend. Visitors came from diverse locations beyond the institution. Close to 75% (74.78%, 208,304/278,570) came via a public search engine and 84.0% (210 out of a sample of 250) of these queried an individual's name that took them directly to the relevant profile page. In addition, 20.90% (214 of 1024) visits went beyond the page related to a person of interest to explore related researchers and topics through the novel and networked information provided by the tool. At the end of the period analyzed, more than 2000 visits per month traversed 5 or more links into related people and topics. One-third of visits came from returning visitors who were significantly more likely to continue to explore networked people and topics (P<.001). Responses to an online survey suggest a broad range of benefits of using the RNS in supporting the research and clinical mission. Returning visitors in an ever-increasing pool of visitors to an RNS are

  13. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements: ASCR Network Requirements Review Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Charles [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, Greg [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Canon, Shane [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dart, Eli [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dattoria, Vince [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Goodwin, Dave [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Lee, Jason [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hicks, Susan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holohan, Ed [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Klasky, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lauzon, Carolyn [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Rogers, Jim [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shipman, Galen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  14. Linking behavior in the physics education research coauthorship network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine A. Anderson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable long-term interest in understanding the dynamics of collaboration networks, and how these networks form and evolve over time. Most of the work done on the dynamics of social networks focuses on well-established communities. Work examining emerging social networks is rarer, simply because data are difficult to obtain in real time. In this paper, we use thirty years of data from an emerging scientific community to look at that crucial early stage in the development of a social network. We show that when the field was very young, islands of individual researchers labored in relative isolation, and the coauthorship network was disconnected. Thirty years later, rather than a cluster of individuals, we find a true collaborative community, bound together by a robust collaboration network. However, this change did not take place gradually—the network remained a loose assortment of isolated individuals until the mid 2000s, when those smaller parts suddenly knit themselves together into a single whole. In the rest of this paper, we consider the role of three factors in these observed structural changes: growth, changes in social norms, and the introduction of institutions such as field-specific conferences and journals. We have data from the very earliest years of the field, a period which includes the introduction of two different institutions: the first field-specific conference, and the first field-specific journals. We also identify two relevant behavioral shifts: a discrete increase in coauthorship coincident with the first conference, and a shift among established authors away from collaborating with outsiders, towards collaborating with each other. The interaction of these factors gives us insight into the formation of collaboration networks more broadly.

  15. Linking behavior in the physics education research coauthorship network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Katharine A.; Crespi, Matthew; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2017-06-01

    There is considerable long-term interest in understanding the dynamics of collaboration networks, and how these networks form and evolve over time. Most of the work done on the dynamics of social networks focuses on well-established communities. Work examining emerging social networks is rarer, simply because data are difficult to obtain in real time. In this paper, we use thirty years of data from an emerging scientific community to look at that crucial early stage in the development of a social network. We show that when the field was very young, islands of individual researchers labored in relative isolation, and the coauthorship network was disconnected. Thirty years later, rather than a cluster of individuals, we find a true collaborative community, bound together by a robust collaboration network. However, this change did not take place gradually—the network remained a loose assortment of isolated individuals until the mid 2000s, when those smaller parts suddenly knit themselves together into a single whole. In the rest of this paper, we consider the role of three factors in these observed structural changes: growth, changes in social norms, and the introduction of institutions such as field-specific conferences and journals. We have data from the very earliest years of the field, a period which includes the introduction of two different institutions: the first field-specific conference, and the first field-specific journals. We also identify two relevant behavioral shifts: a discrete increase in coauthorship coincident with the first conference, and a shift among established authors away from collaborating with outsiders, towards collaborating with each other. The interaction of these factors gives us insight into the formation of collaboration networks more broadly.

  16. Measuring Networking as an Outcome Variable in Undergraduate Research Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I; Hatfull, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose, present, and validate a simple survey instrument to measure student conversational networking. The tool consists of five items that cover personal and professional social networks, and its basic principle is the self-reporting of degrees of conversation, with a range of specific discussion partners. The networking instrument was validated in three studies. The basic psychometric characteristics of the scales were established by conducting a factor analysis and evaluating internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha. The second study used a known-groups comparison and involved comparing outcomes for networking scales between two different undergraduate laboratory courses (one involving a specific effort to enhance networking). The final study looked at potential relationships between specific networking items and the established psychosocial variable of project ownership through a series of binary logistic regressions. Overall, the data from the three studies indicate that the networking scales have high internal consistency (α = 0.88), consist of a unitary dimension, can significantly differentiate between research experiences with low and high networking designs, and are related to project ownership scales. The ramifications of the networking instrument for student retention, the enhancement of public scientific literacy, and the differentiation of laboratory courses are discussed. © 2015 D. I. Hanauer and G. Hatfull. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Commercial Licensing of HIV-1 Protease: Applications of the NIH Research Tools Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, George H; Ferguson, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Licensing of the HIV-1 protease gene by the NIH Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) provides an example of the effective use of the principles of the NIH Research Tools Policy, which was designed to provide broad access to important biomedical technologies. The OTT licensing experience is presented in detail as it was applied to research reagents, diagnostics and drug development to thus enhance the overall development process for a wide variety of medical products.

  18. Networking of theories as a research practice in mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Bikner-Ahsbahs, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    How can we deal with the diversity of theories in mathematics education This was the main question that led the authors of this book to found the Networking Theories Group. Starting from the shared assumption that the existence of different theories is a resource for mathematics education research, the authors have explored the possibilities of interactions between theories, such as contrasting, coordinating, and locally integrating them. The book explains and illustrates what it means to network theories; it presents networking as a challenging but fruitful research practice and shows how the Group dealt with this challenge considering five theoretical approaches, namely the approach of Action, Production, and Communication (APC), the Theory of Didactical Situations (TDS), the Anthropological Theory of the Didactic (ATD), the approach of Abstraction in Context (AiC), and the Theory of Interest-Dense Situations (IDS). A synthetic presentation of each theory and their connections shows how the activity of netw...

  19. Stories in Networks and Networks in Stories: A Tri-Modal Model for Mixed-Methods Social Network Research on Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Doyle, Kira J.

    2015-01-01

    Social network research on teachers and schools has risen exponentially in recent years as an innovative method to reveal the role of social networks in education. However, scholars are still exploring ways to incorporate traditional quantitative methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) with qualitative approaches to social network research. This…

  20. Digital networks to aid research and education in Africa

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Around 120 participants were assembled over two days at CERN to discuss ways to bridge the digital divide with Africa. As part of efforts to implement the outcome of the first World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in Geneva in 2003, CERN held the international workshop on Research and Education Networks in Africa, from 25 to 27 September. Organized by the United Nations University (UNU) in collaboration with the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and CERN, this meeting was designed to promote scientific cooperation with and within Africa, through the development of networking infrastructure. Faster, reliable and more affordable Internet access is widely recognized as one of the key factors for enhancing research and education efforts in African academic and research institutions. For the first time, this workshop brought together representatives of all the key stakeholders: African academic and research institutions, international coordinators, funding agencies, grass-roots imple...

  1. Graduate students navigating social-ecological research: insights from the Long-Term Ecological Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydne Record; Paige F. B. Ferguson; Elise Benveniste; Rose A. Graves; Vera W. Pfeiffer; Michele Romolini; Christie E. Yorke; Ben Beardmore

    2016-01-01

    Interdisciplinary, collaborative research capable of capturing the feedbacks between biophysical and social systems can improve the capacity for sustainable environmental decision making. Networks of researchers provide unique opportunities to foster social-ecological inquiry. Although insights into interdisciplinary research have been discussed elsewhere,...

  2. The Roles of Behavioral and Social Science Research in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS: A Functional Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaist, Paul; Stirratt, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Landmark advances have been made in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. These include proof-of-concept and public health implementation of preexposure prophylaxis and "treatment as prevention" to reduce HIV transmission as well as definitive evidence of the clinical gain from early antiretroviral treatment initiation. Significant progress has been made in understanding and addressing the social contexts and behavioral factors that impact HIV prevention, care, and treatment interventions. These include facilitating uptake of testing and counseling, developing technology-based interventions that increase viral suppression, reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma, and addressing other sociobehavioral and structural barriers to care and treatment. This evolving landscape provides an important juncture to assess current and future directions for HIV/AIDS behavioral and social science research (BSSR). We propose a functional framework for HIV/AIDS-related BSSR, highlighting 4 primary BSSR domains: (1) understanding vulnerable populations and contexts of risk ("Basic BSSR"); (2) improving behavioral and social factor approaches to risk reduction, prevention, and care ("Elemental BSSR"); (3) strengthening the design and outcomes of biomedically focused research in HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention ("Supportive BSSR"); and (4) contributing building blocks to integrated HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment approaches ("Integrative BSSR"). These domains and their resulting confluence at the highest level underscore how fundamental and essential BSSR is to current and future efforts to prevent, treat, and cure HIV/AIDS.

  3. Higher Education Change and Social Networks: A Review of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews literature on the potential for understanding higher education change processes through social network analysis (SNA). In this article, the main tenets of SNA are reviewed and, in conjunction with organizational theory, are applied to higher education change to develop a set of hypotheses that can be tested in future research.

  4. Artificial Neural Networks in Policy Research: A Current Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelfel, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Suggests that artificial neural networks (ANNs) exhibit properties that promise usefulness for policy researchers. Notes that ANNs have found extensive use in areas once reserved for multivariate statistical programs such as regression and multiple classification analysis and are developing an extensive community of advocates for processing text…

  5. Understanding the meaning of awareness in Research Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Mletzko, Christian; Sloep, Peter; Drachsler, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Reinhardt, W., Mletzko, C., Sloep, P. B., & Drachsler, H. (2012). Understanding the meaning of awareness in Research Networks. In A. Moore, V. Pammer, L. Pannese, M. Prilla, K. Rajagopal, W. Reinhardt, Th. D. Ullman, & Ch. Voigt (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in

  6. Exploration of Heterogeneity in Distributed Research Network Drug Safety Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Richard A.; Zeng, Peng; Ryan, Patrick; Gao, Juan; Sonawane, Kalyani; Teeter, Benjamin; Westrich, Kimberly; Dubois, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Distributed data networks representing large diverse populations are an expanding focus of drug safety research. However, interpreting results is difficult when treatment effect estimates vary across datasets (i.e., heterogeneity). In a previous study, risk estimates were generated for selected drugs and potential adverse outcomes. Analyses were…

  7. Research Note: Networking Among Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Hans Jørgen; Grøn, Sisse; Flensborg Jensen, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Researchers and regulatory bodies lack an in-depth understanding of how small and mediumsized enterprises (SMEs) make decisions about workplace health and safety improvements and the role played by business networks in these decisions. To improve regulation and support there is a need to understa...

  8. Faculty Use of Author Identifiers and Researcher Networking Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Clara Y.; Lyon, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional survey focused on faculty use and knowledge of author identifiers and researcher networking systems, and professional use of social media, at a large state university. Results from 296 completed faculty surveys representing all disciplines (9.3% response rate) show low levels of awareness and variable resource preferences. The…

  9. Mekong Economic Research Network (MERN) | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Mekong Economic Research Network (MERN). The Greater Mekong countries of Cambodia, Laos and Viet Nam are among the lowest income countries in Asia. Although recent market-oriented reforms have greatly accelerated economic development in all three countries, they face numerous challenges to achieving ...

  10. Leadership in Network Learning: Business Action Research at Monash University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Tim; Barton, John; Stephens, John; Schell, Liz; Olsen, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergent nature of leadership in a university-based learning network of mature-aged practitioner-scholars. Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on previously published work, interviews, and current research. Findings: The paper finds that once initial structures have been established,…

  11. A community of practice: librarians in a biomedical research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager-Loftus, Danielle P; Midyette, J David; Harvey, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Providing library and reference services within a biomedical research community presents special challenges for librarians, especially those in historically lower-funded states. These challenges can include understanding needs, defining and communicating the library's role, building relationships, and developing and maintaining general and subject specific knowledge. This article describes a biomedical research network and the work of health sciences librarians at the lead intensive research institution with librarians from primarily undergraduate institutions and tribal colleges. Applying the concept of a community of practice to a collaborative effort suggests how librarians can work together to provide effective reference services to researchers in biomedicine.

  12. Annual Research Review: Mental Health and Resilience in HIV/AIDS-Affected Children--A Review of the Literature and Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; Meyers-Ohki, Sarah E.; Charrow, Alexandra; Hansen, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Background: To date, research on mental health in HIV-affected children (children who have an HIV-positive caregiver or live with the virus themselves) has focused on risk factors associated with the disease. However, simultaneous identification of factors that contribute to resilience in the face of risks is also needed. A greater understanding…

  13. OAFP starts practice-based resource/research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, J W; Barton, E D

    1996-12-01

    The Oklahoma Academy of Family Physicians, in collaboration with the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, has established a primary care practice-based research network with thirteen family practice offices currently participating. The practices are connected to each other and to the Health Sciences Center campuses in Oklahoma City and Tulsa by electronic mail and have begun their first research project involving the diagnosis and treatment of brown recluse spider bites in the primary care setting.

  14. Interdependent networks - Topological percolation research and application in finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Di

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my Ph.D. research: i) developing a theoretical framework of complex networks and applying simulation and numerical methods to study the robustness of the network system, and ii) applying statistical physics concepts and methods to quantitatively analyze complex systems and applying the theoretical framework to study real-world systems. In part I, we focus on developing theories of interdependent networks as well as building computer simulation models, which includes three parts: 1) We report on the effects of topology on failure propagation for a model system consisting of two interdependent networks. We find that the internal node correlations in each of the networks significantly changes the critical density of failures, which can trigger the total disruption of the two-network system. Specifically, we find that the assortativity within a single network decreases the robustness of the entire system. 2) We study the percolation behavior of two interdependent scale-free (SF) networks under random failure of 1-p fraction of nodes. We find that as the coupling strength q between the two networks reduces from 1 (fully coupled) to 0 (no coupling), there exist two critical coupling strengths q1 and q2 , which separate the behaviors of the giant component as a function of p into three different regions, and for q2 numerically. We study a starlike network of n Erdos-Renyi (ER), SF networks and a looplike network of n ER networks, and we find for starlike networks, their phase transition regions change with n, but for looplike networks the phase regions change with average degree k . In part II, we apply concepts and methods developed in statistical physics to study economic systems. We analyze stock market indices and foreign exchange daily returns for 60 countries over the period of 1999-2012. We build a multi-layer network model based on different correlation measures, and introduce a dynamic network model to simulate and

  15. Social networks and social support among ball-attending African American men who have sex with men and transgender women are associated with HIV-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Emily A; Sterrett-Hong, Emma; Jonas, Adam; Pollack, Lance M

    2018-02-01

    The House Ball Community (HBC) is an understudied network of African American men who have sex with men and transgender women, who join family-like houses that compete in elaborate balls in cities across the United States. From 2011 to 2012, we surveyed 274 recent attendees of balls in the San Francisco Bay Area, focusing on social networks, social support, and HIV-related behaviours. Participants with a high percentage of alters who were supportive of HIV testing were significantly more likely to have tested in the past six months (p = .02), and less likely to have engaged in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in the past three months (p = .003). Multivariate regression analyses of social network characteristics, and social support, revealed that testing in the past six months was significantly associated with social support for safer sex, instrumental social support, and age. Similarly, UAI in the past three months was significantly associated with social support for safer sex, homophily based on sexual identity and HIV status. HIV-related social support provided through the HBC networks was correlated with recent HIV testing and reduced UAI. Approaches utilising networks within alternative kinship systems, may increase HIV-related social support and improve HIV-related outcomes.

  16. The Use and Significance of a Research Networking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Leslie; Daigre, John; Meeks, Eric; Nelson, Katie; Piontkowski, Cynthia; Reuter, Katja; Sak, Rachael; Turner, Brian; Weber, Griffin M; Chatterjee, Anirvan

    2014-01-01

    Background Universities have begun deploying public Internet systems that allow for easy search of their experts, expertise, and intellectual networks. Deployed first in biomedical schools but now being implemented more broadly, the initial motivator of these research networking systems was to enable easier identification of collaborators and enable the development of teams for research. Objective The intent of the study was to provide the first description of the usage of an institutional research “social networking” system or research networking system (RNS). Methods Number of visits, visitor location and type, referral source, depth of visit, search terms, and click paths were derived from 2.5 years of Web analytics data. Feedback from a pop-up survey presented to users over 15 months was summarized. Results RNSs automatically generate and display profiles and networks of researchers. Within 2.5 years, the RNS at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) achieved one-seventh of the monthly visit rate of the main longstanding university website, with an increasing trend. Visitors came from diverse locations beyond the institution. Close to 75% (74.78%, 208,304/278,570) came via a public search engine and 84.0% (210 out of a sample of 250) of these queried an individual’s name that took them directly to the relevant profile page. In addition, 20.90% (214 of 1024) visits went beyond the page related to a person of interest to explore related researchers and topics through the novel and networked information provided by the tool. At the end of the period analyzed, more than 2000 visits per month traversed 5 or more links into related people and topics. One-third of visits came from returning visitors who were significantly more likely to continue to explore networked people and topics (P<.001). Responses to an online survey suggest a broad range of benefits of using the RNS in supporting the research and clinical mission. Conclusions Returning

  17. Less research on tuberculosis than HIV and malaria when research agendas are poorly coordinated: a systematic review of research outputs from Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mishal; James, Richard; Sundaram, Neisha; Wu, Shishi; Eang, Mao Tang; Vonthanak, Saphonn; Coker, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Coordination of health interventions and research is often weak during periods of political transition and unprecedented aid inflows, which Cambodia has recently experienced. Although HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and malaria have been a focus of international funding, TB has received much less. This study compares the numbers and methodologies of studies conducted on TB, malaria, and HIV in Cambodia, identifying evidence gaps and future research needs. Three electronic databases and the grey literature were searched for studies on HIV, TB, and malaria published between January 2000 and October 2015. Information about the disease focus and methodology was extracted from the studies included. A total of 2581 unique studies were screened and 712 were included in the analysis. The results of this review demonstrated that despite increasing numbers of publications, there have been fewer studies on TB (16%) than HIV (43%) and malaria (41%). Observational epidemiological studies outnumbered other methodologies (44%) for all three diseases. Despite substantial investments, important research areas appear to have been neglected in Cambodia; specifically, studies on TB and studies involving economic, qualitative, interventional, and genomics methods. The inter-disease disparity in published research in Cambodia identified, considered alongside disease burden, suggests that an increase in TB research may be needed to inform control strategies. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Research trends in wireless visual sensor networks when exploiting prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel G; Guedes, Luiz Affonso; Vasques, Francisco; Portugal, Paulo

    2015-01-15

    The development of wireless sensor networks for control and monitoring functions has created a vibrant investigation scenario, where many critical topics, such as communication efficiency and energy consumption, have been investigated in the past few years. However, when sensors are endowed with low-power cameras for visual monitoring, a new scope of challenges is raised, demanding new research efforts. In this context, the resource-constrained nature of sensor nodes has demanded the use of prioritization approaches as a practical mechanism to lower the transmission burden of visual data over wireless sensor networks. Many works in recent years have considered local-level prioritization parameters to enhance the overall performance of those networks, but global-level policies can potentially achieve better results in terms of visual monitoring efficiency. In this paper, we make a broad review of some recent works on priority-based optimizations in wireless visual sensor networks. Moreover, we envisage some research trends when exploiting prioritization, potentially fostering the development of promising optimizations for wireless sensor networks composed of visual sensors.

  19. Research Trends in Wireless Visual Sensor Networks When Exploiting Prioritization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Costa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of wireless sensor networks for control and monitoring functions has created a vibrant investigation scenario, where many critical topics, such as communication efficiency and energy consumption, have been investigated in the past few years. However, when sensors are endowed with low-power cameras for visual monitoring, a new scope of challenges is raised, demanding new research efforts. In this context, the resource-constrained nature of sensor nodes has demanded the use of prioritization approaches as a practical mechanism to lower the transmission burden of visual data over wireless sensor networks. Many works in recent years have considered local-level prioritization parameters to enhance the overall performance of those networks, but global-level policies can potentially achieve better results in terms of visual monitoring efficiency. In this paper, we make a broad review of some recent works on priority-based optimizations in wireless visual sensor networks. Moreover, we envisage some research trends when exploiting prioritization, potentially fostering the development of promising optimizations for wireless sensor networks composed of visual sensors.

  20. Assessing citation networks for dissemination and implementation research frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Lehmann, Todd; Tabak, Rachel G; Harris, Jenine; Lecy, Jesse; Sales, Anne E

    2017-07-28

    A recent review of frameworks used in dissemination and implementation (D&I) science described 61 judged to be related either to dissemination, implementation, or both. The current use of these frameworks and their contributions to D&I science more broadly has yet to be reviewed. For these reasons, our objective was to determine the role of these frameworks in the development of D&I science. We used the Web of Science™ Core Collection and Google Scholar™ to conduct a citation network analysis for the key frameworks described in a recent systematic review of D&I frameworks (Am J Prev Med 43(3):337-350, 2012). From January to August 2016, we collected framework data including title, reference, publication year, and citations per year and conducted descriptive and main path network analyses to identify those most important in holding the current citation network for D&I frameworks together. The source article contained 119 cited references, with 50 published articles and 11 documents identified as a primary framework reference. The average citations per year for the 61 frameworks reviewed ranged from 0.7 to 103.3 among articles published from 1985 to 2012. Citation rates from all frameworks are reported with citation network analyses for the framework review article and ten highly cited framework seed articles. The main path for the D&I framework citation network is presented. We examined citation rates and the main paths through the citation network to delineate the current landscape of D&I framework research, and opportunities for advancing framework development and use. Dissemination and implementation researchers and practitioners may consider frequency of framework citation and our network findings when planning implementation efforts to build upon this foundation and promote systematic advances in D&I science.