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Sample records for hiv outpatient training

  1. Outpatient HIV care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, E.A.N.

    2017-01-01

    HIV is now, as a result of cART, a treatable condition. Sadly, as reflected by the large number of annual HIV-related deaths and new infections, managing HIV infection and curbing the epidemic has proven extremely challenging. To achieve world without HIV and AIDS, we need to ensure that all

  2. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410...-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management training... Part B covers outpatient diabetes self-management training for a beneficiary who has been diagnosed...

  3. Effect of outpatient exercise training programmes in patients with chronic heart failure: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Suzan; Zwerink, Marlies; van Brussel, M.; van der Valk, P.D.; Wajon, E.M.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria

    2012-01-01

    Advantages of outpatient exercise training are reduced waiting lists, better compliance, reduced time investment by the patient with reduced travel expenses, and less dependence on other people to participate. Therefore, this systematic review studies the effects of outpatient exercise training

  4. Trends of HIV-1, HIV-2 and dual infection in women attending outpatient clinics in Senegal, 1990–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzinger, K; Sow, P S; Badiane, N M Dia; Gottlieb, G S; N’Doye, I; Toure, M; Kiviat, N B; Hawes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Summary We assessed trends in the relative prevalences of HIV-1, HIV-2 and dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infection in 10,321 women attending outpatient clinics in Senegal between 1990 and 2009. The relative prevalence of HIV-1 (defined as the proportion of seropositive subjects having HIV-1) rose sharply from 38% in 1990 until 1993 (P Senegal. From 1993 to 2009, the relative prevalence of HIV-1 increased at a slower rate, while the relative prevalences of HIV-2 and dual infection decreased. These results confirm trends in HIV prevalence observed in other West African populations and provide a critical update on HIV transmission risk among women in Senegal. PMID:23104745

  5. Prevalence of and risk factors for MRSA colonization in HIV-positive outpatients in Singapore

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    Kyaw Win

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst there have been studies on the risks and outcomes of MRSA colonization and infections in HIV-positive patients, local data is limited on the risk factors for MRSA colonization among these patients. We undertook this study in a tertiary HIV care centre to document the risk factors for colonization and to determine the prevalence of MRSA colonization among HIV-positive outpatients in Singapore. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which factors associated with MRSA positivity among patients with HIV infection were evaluated. A set of standardized questionnaire and data collection forms were available to interview all recruited patients. Following the interview, trained nurses collected swabs from the anterior nares/axilla/groin (NAG, throat and peri-anal regions. Information on demographics, clinical history, laboratory results and hospitalization history were retrieved from medical records. Results MRSA was detected in swab cultures from at least 1 site in 15 patients (5.1%. Inclusion of throat and/or peri-anal swabs increased the sensitivity of NAG screening by 20%. Predictors for MRSA colonization among HIV-positive patients were age, history of pneumonia, lymphoma, presence of a percutaneous device within the past 12 months, history of household members hospitalized more than two times within the past 12 months, and a most recent CD4 count less than 200. Conclusions This study highlights that a proportion of MRSA carriers would have been undetected without multiple-site screening cultures. This study could shed insight into identifying patients at risk of MRSA colonization upon hospital visit and this may suggest that a risk factor-based approach for MRSA surveillance focusing on high risk populations could be considered.

  6. Structure and quality of outpatient care for people living with an HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, Esther A. N.; Smit, Colette; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Reiss, Peter; Kroon, Frank P.; Brinkman, Kees; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Policy-makers and clinicians are faced with a gap of evidence to guide policy on standards for HIV outpatient care. Ongoing debates include which settings of care improve health outcomes, and how many HIV-infected patients a health-care provider should treat to gain and maintain expertise. In this

  7. Systematic cultural adaptation of cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Sidle, John E; Martino, Steve; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Songole, Rogers; Omolo, Otieno E; Gakinya, Benson N; Mwaniki, Michael M; Adina, Japheth O; Nafula, Tobista; Owino-Ong'or, Willis D; Bryant, Kendall J; Carroll, Kathleen M; Goulet, Joseph L; Justice, Amy C; Maisto, Stephen A

    2010-06-01

    Two-thirds of those with HIV worldwide live in sub-Saharan Africa. Alcohol use is associated with the HIV epidemic through risky sex and suboptimal ARV adherence. In western Kenya, hazardous drinking was reported by HIV (53%) and general medicine (68%) outpatients. Cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) has demonstrated strong efficacy to reduce alcohol use. This article reports on a systematic cultural adaptation and pilot feasibility study of group paraprofessional-delivered CBT to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in Eldoret, Kenya. Following adaptation and counselor training, five pilot groups were run (n = 27). Overall attendance was 77%. Percent days abstinent from alcohol (PDA) before session 1 was 52-100% (women) and 21-36% (men), and by session 6 was 96-100% (women) and 89-100% (men). PDA effect sizes (Cohen's d) between first and last CBT session were 2.32 (women) and 2.64 (men). Participants reported treatment satisfaction. Results indicate feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy for CBT in Kenya.

  8. Practices in security and confidentiality of HIV/AIDS patients' information: A national survey among staff at HIV outpatient clinics in Vietnam.

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    Nguyen Khac Hai

    Full Text Available Breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy from the collection and use of medical records, particularly those of patients with HIV/AIDS or other diseases sensitive to stigmatization, should be prevented by all related stakeholders in healthcare settings. The main focus of this study was to assess practices regarding security and confidentiality of HIV-related information among staff at HIV outpatient clinics (HIV-OPCs in Vietnam.A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at all 312 HIV-OPCs across the country using an online survey technique.In general, the staff practices for securing and protecting patient information were at acceptable levels. Most staff had proper measures and practices for maintaining data security; however, the protection of patient confidentiality, particularly for data access, sharing, and transfer still required improvement. Most HIV-OPC staff had good or moderate knowledge and positive perceptions towards security and confidentiality issues. Staff who were not trained in the practice of security measures differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 3.74; 95%CI: 1.44-9.67; staff needing improved knowledge levels differed significantly from those with good (OR: 5.20; 95%CI: 2.39-11.32 and moderate knowledge levels (OR: 5.10; 95%CI: 2.36-11.00; and staff needing improved perception levels differed significantly from those with good (i.e., with 100% proper practices and moderate perception levels (OR: 5.67; 95%CI: 2.93-10.95. Staff who were not trained in the protection of data confidentiality differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.29-3.65.Training is an important factor to help raise the levels of proper practices regarding confidentiality and security, to improve knowledge and raise awareness about change among staff. The operation and management of HIV treatment and care in Vietnam are currently transitioning from separate healthcare clinics (HIV-OPC into units

  9. Practices in security and confidentiality of HIV/AIDS patients' information: A national survey among staff at HIV outpatient clinics in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khac Hai, Nguyen; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Jittamala, Podjanee; Thi Thu Huong, Phan; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2017-01-01

    Breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy from the collection and use of medical records, particularly those of patients with HIV/AIDS or other diseases sensitive to stigmatization, should be prevented by all related stakeholders in healthcare settings. The main focus of this study was to assess practices regarding security and confidentiality of HIV-related information among staff at HIV outpatient clinics (HIV-OPCs) in Vietnam. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at all 312 HIV-OPCs across the country using an online survey technique. In general, the staff practices for securing and protecting patient information were at acceptable levels. Most staff had proper measures and practices for maintaining data security; however, the protection of patient confidentiality, particularly for data access, sharing, and transfer still required improvement. Most HIV-OPC staff had good or moderate knowledge and positive perceptions towards security and confidentiality issues. Staff who were not trained in the practice of security measures differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 3.74; 95%CI: 1.44-9.67); staff needing improved knowledge levels differed significantly from those with good (OR: 5.20; 95%CI: 2.39-11.32) and moderate knowledge levels (OR: 5.10; 95%CI: 2.36-11.00); and staff needing improved perception levels differed significantly from those with good (i.e., with 100% proper practices) and moderate perception levels (OR: 5.67; 95%CI: 2.93-10.95). Staff who were not trained in the protection of data confidentiality differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.29-3.65). Training is an important factor to help raise the levels of proper practices regarding confidentiality and security, to improve knowledge and raise awareness about change among staff. The operation and management of HIV treatment and care in Vietnam are currently transitioning from separate healthcare clinics (HIV-OPC) into units integrated

  10. Practices in security and confidentiality of HIV/AIDS patients’ information: A national survey among staff at HIV outpatient clinics in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khac Hai, Nguyen; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Jittamala, Podjanee; Thi Thu Huong, Phan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy from the collection and use of medical records, particularly those of patients with HIV/AIDS or other diseases sensitive to stigmatization, should be prevented by all related stakeholders in healthcare settings. The main focus of this study was to assess practices regarding security and confidentiality of HIV-related information among staff at HIV outpatient clinics (HIV-OPCs) in Vietnam. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at all 312 HIV-OPCs across the country using an online survey technique. Results In general, the staff practices for securing and protecting patient information were at acceptable levels. Most staff had proper measures and practices for maintaining data security; however, the protection of patient confidentiality, particularly for data access, sharing, and transfer still required improvement. Most HIV-OPC staff had good or moderate knowledge and positive perceptions towards security and confidentiality issues. Staff who were not trained in the practice of security measures differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 3.74; 95%CI: 1.44–9.67); staff needing improved knowledge levels differed significantly from those with good (OR: 5.20; 95%CI: 2.39–11.32) and moderate knowledge levels (OR: 5.10; 95%CI: 2.36–11.00); and staff needing improved perception levels differed significantly from those with good (i.e., with 100% proper practices) and moderate perception levels (OR: 5.67; 95%CI: 2.93–10.95). Staff who were not trained in the protection of data confidentiality differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.29–3.65). Conclusions Training is an important factor to help raise the levels of proper practices regarding confidentiality and security, to improve knowledge and raise awareness about change among staff. The operation and management of HIV treatment and care in Vietnam are currently transitioning from separate

  11. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule in...

  12. Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training across in- and outpatient clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Sommer, Johanna; Hudelson, Patricia; Demaurex, Florence; Luthy, Christophe; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Nendaz, Mathieu; De Grave, Willem; Dolmans, Diana; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-05-01

    Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training are important to identify before designing context-specific training programmes, since learrners' perceived needs can influence the effectiveness of training. To explore residents' perceptions of their training needs and training experiences around communication skills, and whether these differ between residents training in inpatient and outpatient clinical settings. Four focus groups (FG) and a self-administered questionnaire were conducted with residents working in in- and outpatient medical service settings at a Swiss University Hospital. Focus groups explored residents' perceptions of their communication needs, their past training experiences and suggestions for future training programmes in communication skills. Transcripts were analysed in a thematic way using qualitative analytic approaches. All residents from both settings were asked to complete a questionnaire that queried their sociodemographics and amount of prior training in communication skills. In focus groups, outpatient residents felt that communication skills were especially useful in addressing chronic diseases and social issues. In contrast, inpatient residents emphasized the importance of good communication skills for dealing with family conflicts and end-of-life issues. Felt needs reflected residents' differing service priorities: outpatient residents saw the need for skills to structure the consultation and explore patients' perspectives in order to build therapeutic alliances, whereas inpatient residents wanted techniques to help them break bad news, provide information and increase their own well-being. The survey's overall response rate was 56%. Its data showed that outpatient residents received more training in communication skills and more of them than inpatient residents considered communication skills training to be useful (100% vs 74%). Outpatient residents' perceived needs in communication skills were more patient

  13. CD4 Cell Counts at HIV Diagnosis among HIV Outpatient Study Participants, 2000–2009

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    Kate Buchacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unclear if CD4 cell counts at HIV diagnosis have improved over a 10-year period of expanded HIV testing in the USA. Methods. We studied HOPS participants diagnosed with HIV infection ≤6 months prior to entry into care during 2000–2009. We assessed the correlates of CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 at HIV diagnosis (late HIV diagnosis by logistic regression. Results. Of 1,203 eligible patients, 936 (78% had a CD4 count within 3 months after HIV diagnosis. Median CD4 count at HIV diagnosis was 299 cells/mm3 and did not significantly improve over time (P=0.13. Comparing periods 2000-2001 versus 2008-2009, respectively, 39% and 35% of patients had a late HIV diagnosis (P=0.34. Independent correlates of late HIV diagnosis were having an HIV risk other than being MSM, age ≥35 years at diagnosis, and being of nonwhite race/ethnicity. Conclusions. There is need for routine universal HIV testing to reduce the frequency of late HIV diagnosis and increase opportunity for patient- and potentially population-level benefits associated with early antiretroviral treatment.

  14. Factors affecting acceptance of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling services among outpatient clients in selected health facilities in Harar Town, Eastern Ethiopia

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    Abdurahman S

    2015-05-01

    partners, a fear of the results, a shortage of staff, a busy work environment, a lack of private rooms, and a lack of refresher training, which were identified as the main barriers for PITC. Conclusion: There is evidence of the relatively increased acceptability of PITC services by outpatient department clients. A program needs to be strengthened to enhance the use of PITC; the Ministry of Health, Regional Health Bureau, and other responsible bodies – including health facilities – should design and strengthen information education and communication/behavioral change and communication interventions and promote activities related to PITC and HIV counseling and testing in both health facilities and the community at large. Keywords: PITC, outpatient clients, Harar town, Eastern Ethiopia

  15. Training Manual for HIV/AIDS Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Patricia H.; Vallenari, Allison

    This manual includes all necessary information for implementing the Champs program, which trains older elementary school students or middle/high school students to operate puppets to deliver an HIV/AIDS message to kindergarten through sixth graders. Relying on a peer approach, the Program provides scripted, prerecorded lessons intended to reach…

  16. An Analysis of the Last Clinical Encounter before Outpatient Mortality among Children with HIV Infection and Exposure in Lilongwe, Malawi.

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    Chris A Rees

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV contributes to nearly 20% of all deaths in children under five years of age in Malawi. Expanded coverage of antiretroviral therapy has allowed children to access treatment on an outpatient basis. Little is known about characteristics of the final outpatient encounter prior to mortality in the outpatient setting.This retrospective cohort study assessed clinical factors associated with mortality among HIV-exposed infants and HIV-infected children less than 18 years of age at the Baylor College of Medicine Abbott Fund Children's Center of Excellence in Lilongwe, Malawi. We compared clinical indicators documented from the final outpatient encounter for patients who died in the outpatient setting versus those who were alive after their penultimate clinical encounter.Of the 8,546 patients who were attended to over a 10-year period at the Baylor Center of Excellence, 851 had died (10%. Of children who died, 392 (46% were directly admitted to the hospital after their last clinical encounter and died as inpatients. Of the remaining 459 who died as outpatients after their last visit, 53.5% had a World Health Organization (WHO stage IV condition at their last visit, and 25% had a WHO stage III condition. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that poor nutritional status, female gender, shorter time as a patient, more clinical encounters in the prior month, if last visit was an unscheduled sick visit, and if the patient had lost weight since their prior visit independently predicted increased mortality in the outpatient setting after the final clinical encounter.Clinical indicators may assist in identifying children with HIV who have increased risk of mortality in the outpatient setting. Recognizing these indicators may aid in identifying HIV-infected children who require a higher level of care or closer follow-up.

  17. Depressive Symptoms, Disclosure, HIV-Related Stigma, and Coping Following HIV Testing Among Outpatients in Uganda: A Daily Process Analysis.

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    Kiene, Susan M; Dove, Meredith; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2018-05-01

    As efforts to end the HIV epidemic accelerate there is emphasis on reaching those living with undiagnosed HIV infection. Newly diagnosed individuals face a number of psychosocial challenges, yet we know little about depressive symptoms in the weeks immediately following diagnosis and how disclosure, coping, and other factors may affect short and longer-term depressive symptoms. Purposively sampled Ugandan outpatients completed structured interviews immediately prior to testing for HIV, daily for 28 days after receiving their test results, and at 3 and 6 months post-test. The sample included a total of 244 participants: 20 who tested HIV positive at baseline and who provided 342 daily data points, and 224 who tested HIV negative at baseline and who provided 4388 daily data points. We used linear mixed effects modeling to examine changes in depressive symptom scores over the 28 day daily interview period and predictors of depressive symptom scores and changes over time. Results from the mixed modeling revealed that while those diagnosed with HIV showed initially high depressive symptoms following diagnosis, their symptoms decreased significantly and on average fell below the cutoff for possible depression approximately 15 days after diagnosis. Among those who tested HIV-negative, on average their depressive symptoms were below the cutoff for possible depression and did not change over time. Among those diagnosed with HIV, disclosure, especially to a partner, on a particular day was associated with higher depressive symptoms that day. However, those who disclosed to their partner during the 28 days after diagnosis had significantly lower depression scores by the end of the 28 days as well as lower depression scores 3 and 6 months after diagnosis than did those who did not disclose to their partner during the 28 days after diagnosis. Scoring higher on HIV-related stigma on a particular day was associated with higher depressive symptoms that day and engaging

  18. Aggression Replacement Training for Violent Young Men in a Forensic Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic

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    Hornsveld, R.H.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Muris, P.; Zwets, A.J.; Kanters, T.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Aggression Replacement Training (ART) were explored in a group of Dutch violent young men aged 16 to 21 years, who were obliged by the court to follow a treatment program in a forensic psychiatric outpatient clinic. To evaluate the training, patients completed a set of self-report

  19. Provider training and experience for people living with HIV/AIDS.

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    Rackal, Julia M; Tynan, Anne-Marie; Handford, Curtis D; Rzeznikiewiz, Damian; Agha, Ayda; Glazier, Richard

    2011-06-15

    The complexity of HIV/AIDS raises challenges for the effective delivery of care. It is important to ensure that the expertise and experience of care providers is of high quality. Training and experience of HIV/AIDS providers may impact not only individual patient outcomes but increasingly on health care costs as well. The objective of this review is to assess the effects of provider training and experience on people living with HIV/AIDS on the following outcomes: immunological (ie. viral load, CD4 count), medical (ie. mortality, proportion on antiretrovirals), psychosocial (ie. quality of life measures) and economic outcomes (ie health care costs). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International (DAI), CINAHL, HealthStar, PsycInfo, PsycLit, Social Sciences Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts from January 1, 1980 through May 29, 2009.  Electronic searches were performed for abstracts from major international AIDS conferences. Reference lists from pertinent articles, books and review articles were retrieved and reviewed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials, cohort, case control, cross-sectional studies and controlled before and after designs that examined the qualifications/training and patient volume of HIV/AIDS care of providers caring for persons known to be infected with HIV/AIDS were included. At least two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for further information as required. Assessment of confounding factors was undertaken independently by two reviewers. A total of four studies (one randomized controlled trial, three non- randomized studies) involving 8488 people living with HIV/AIDS were included. The main findings of this review demonstrated a trend to improved outcomes when treated by a provider with more training/expertise in HIV/AIDS care in the outpatient (clinic) setting. Due to the heterogeneity of the included studies, we could not perform a

  20. evolution of hiv training for enhanced care provision in kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in pre-service and in-service HIV training to ensure sustainability. INTRODUCTION. Over the .... workers to ensure provision of quality service delivery. (1). HIV service delivery ... (internal migration) as well as 'brain drain' to wealthier countries ...

  1. Suicide risk and alcohol and drug abuse in outpatients with HIV infection and Chagas disease.

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    Guimarães, Patrícia M; Passos, Sonia R; Calvet, Guilherme A; Hökerberg, Yara H; Lessa, José L; Andrade, Carlos A de

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate psychiatric comorbidities in outpatients receiving care for HIV and Chagas disease at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas (IPEC), Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 125 patients referred to an outpatient psychiatric clinic from February to December 2010. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used. Factors associated with more frequent mental disorders were estimated by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) by multiple logistic regression. Seventy-six (60.8%) patients with HIV, 40 (32%) patients with Chagas disease, and nine (7.2%) patients with human T-lymphotropic virus were interviewed. The majority were women (64%), with up to 8 years of formal education (56%), and unemployed (81.6%). The median age was 49 years. Suicide risk (n=71) (56%), agoraphobia (n=65) (52%), major depressive episode (n=56) (44.8%), and alcohol/drug abuse (n=43) (34.4%) predominated, the latter being directly associated with lower family income (OR = 2.64; 95%CI 1.03-6.75) and HIV infection (OR = 5.24; 95%CI 1.56-17.61). Suicide risk was associated with non-white skin color (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.03-4.75), unemployment (OR = 2.72; 95%CI 1.01-7.34), and diagnosis of major depression (OR = 3.34; 95%CI 1.54-7.44). Measures targeting adverse socioeconomic conditions and psychiatric and psychological monitoring and care should be encouraged in this population, considering the association with abuse of alcohol/other psychoactive drugs and suicide risk.

  2. Suicide risk and alcohol and drug abuse in outpatients with HIV infection and Chagas disease

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    Patrícia M. Guimarães

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate psychiatric comorbidities in outpatients receiving care for HIV and Chagas disease at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas (IPEC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 125 patients referred to an outpatient psychiatric clinic from February to December 2010. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI was used. Factors associated with more frequent mental disorders were estimated by odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI by multiple logistic regression. Results: Seventy-six (60.8% patients with HIV, 40 (32% patients with Chagas disease, and nine (7.2% patients with human T-lymphotropic virus were interviewed. The majority were women (64%, with up to 8 years of formal education (56%, and unemployed (81.6%. The median age was 49 years. Suicide risk (n=71 (56%, agoraphobia (n=65 (52%, major depressive episode (n=56 (44.8%, and alcohol/drug abuse (n=43 (34.4% predominated, the latter being directly associated with lower family income (OR = 2.64; 95%CI 1.03-6.75 and HIV infection (OR = 5.24; 95%CI 1.56-17.61. Suicide risk was associated with non-white skin color (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.03-4.75, unemployment (OR = 2.72; 95%CI 1.01-7.34, and diagnosis of major depression (OR = 3.34; 95%CI 1.54-7.44. Conclusion: Measures targeting adverse socioeconomic conditions and psychiatric and psychological monitoring and care should be encouraged in this population, considering the association with abuse of alcohol/other psychoactive drugs and suicide risk.

  3. Enhancing patient safety with an electronic results checking system in a large HIV outpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, D B; Uthayakumar, N; Ferrand, R A; Edwards, S G; Miller, R; Benn, P

    2013-08-01

    To establish whether an automated electronic tracker system for reporting blood results would expedite clinician review of abnormal results in HIV-positive outpatients and to pilot the use of this system in routine clinical practice. An outpatient service in central London providing specialist HIV-related care to 3900 HIV positive patients. A comparison of the time taken from sampling to identification and clinician review of abnormal blood results for biochemical tests between the original paper-based checking system and an automated electronic system during a 3-week pilot. Of 513 patients undergoing one or more blood tests, 296 (57%) had one or more biochemical abnormalities identified by electronic checking system. Out of 371 biochemical abnormalities, 307 (82.7%) were identified simultaneously by the paper-based system. Of the 307, 33 (10.7%) were classified as urgent, 130 (42.3%) as non-urgent and 144 (46.9%) as not clinically significant. The median interval between sampling and receipt of results was 1 (interquartile range 1-2) vs 4 days ( interquartile range 3-5), P interquartile range 1-4) vs 3 days (interquartile range 3-6), Pinterquartile range 1-4) vs 10 days ( interquartile range 9-12), P=0.136, for electronic and paper-based systems respectively. Seven (11%) of the missing paper-based system results were classified as urgent. The electronic system missed three abnormalities as a result of a software processing error which was subsequently corrected. The electronic tracker system allows faster identification of biochemical abnormalities and allowed faster review of these results by clinicians. The pilot study allowed for a software error to be identified and corrected before full implementation. The system has since integrated successfully into routine clinical practice.

  4. Quality of life of elderly people living with HIV/AIDS in outpatient follow-up

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    Juliano de Souza Caliari

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze factors related to the quality of life of elderly people living with HIV/AIDS. Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out with people aged 50 years or more in a specialized outpatient clinic. The data collection was by means of an interview. For the analysis of data and characterization of the sample, descriptive statistics and comparison tests were used. The project met the ethical requirements. Results: Participants were 81 users aged 50 to 75 years, mean age was 57.8 (± 6.1 years, 71.6% of whom were men. There was a statistically significant relationship with the quality of life, the following variables: gender, children, occupation, religion, diagnosis time, HIV exposure, adverse effects, treatment interruption, viral load counts, hospitalization, dependence for daily activities and use of drugs. Conclusion: The results suggest that the quality of life deficit is related not only to physical changes, but to the anguish and stigma related to HIV/AIDS.

  5. Health and mood among HIV-positive outpatients attending an ART Clinic of a University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dilar; Mendes, Aida; Abreu, Wilson

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate how individuals at different stages of infection with HIV perceive their health status and its association with mood states. With the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in 1996, the quality of life of people living with HIV has improved. However, the literature emphasises the negative effects of the disease on the mental health of individuals suffering from this condition and the high incidence of depression among infected individuals. Although people diagnosed and living with HIV are overwhelmed by emotions, we found that various emotional manifestations are understudied within this group of patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in an outpatient unit of a University Hospital (antiretroviral therapy clinic), with a consecutive sample composed of 152 patients. Data were collected through a questionnaire used to assess the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, the Short Form (36) Health Survey, and the Profile of Mood States scale. The health status negatively affects the role at the emotional and mental health dimensions. The participants showing a worse health condition than in the previous year had higher levels of tension/anxiety, depression/dejection, fatigue/inertia and confusion/bewilderment. The stage of disease and the profile of mood state emerged as independent phenomena. The results of this study indicate that nurses worldwide should be aware of the emotional aspects (negative emotions strongly impact health) related to the subjective perception of a worsening health status, regardless of the stage of the disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  7. Integration of outpatient infectious diseases clinic pharmacy services and specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Elise M; Gerzenshtein, Lana

    2016-06-01

    The integration of specialty pharmacy services and existing outpatient clinical pharmacy services within an infectious diseases (ID) clinic to optimize the care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is described. The management of HIV-infected patients is a highly specialized area of practice, often requiring use of complex medication regimens for reduction of HIV-associated morbidity and mortality prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections, and prevention of HIV transmission. To maximize the effectiveness and safety of treatment with antiretroviral agents and associated pharmacotherapies, an interdisciplinary team is often involved in patient care. At Chicago-based Northwestern Medicine (NM), the outpatient ID clinic has long worked with an interdisciplinary care team including physicians, clinical pharmacists, nurses, and social workers to care for patients with HIV infection. In April 2014, specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection were added to the NM ID clinic's care model to help maintain continuity of care and enhance patient follow-up. The care model includes well-defined roles for clinical pharmacists, pharmacy residents and students on rotation, and licensed pharmacy technicians. Specialty pharmacy services, including medication education, prescription fulfillment, assistance with medication access (e.g., navigation of financial assistance programs, completion of prior-authorization requests), and treatment monitoring, allow for closed-loop medication management of the HIV-infected patient population. Integration of specialty pharmacy services with the interdisciplinary care provided in the outpatient NM ID clinic has enhanced continuity of care for patients with HIV infection in terms of prescription filling, medication counseling, and adherence monitoring. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A nurse- and pharmacist-led treatment advice clinic for patients attending an HIV outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, C; Miles, K; Aldam, D; Cornforth, D; Minton, J; Edwards, S; Williams, I

    2007-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study to map care pathways, examine the approach of different treatment advisors and explore the acceptability of a nurse- and pharmacist-led treatment advice clinic in order to aid decision-making for the future development and evaluation of the clinic. High levels of adherence to antiretroviral drugs are a prerequisite for a successful and durable virological and immunological response to HIV. Treatment guidelines acknowledge that adherence is a process, not a single event, and that adherence support must be integrated into clinical follow-up for all patients receiving these drugs. Data were collected between September 2004 and January 2005 through 17 consultation observations and 10 patient interviews in a specialist treatment advice clinic located within a central London HIV outpatient clinic providing care for over 2200 patients, of whom more than 1300 are taking highly active antiretroviral therapy. The nurses and pharmacist had similar consultation approaches, although follow-up care varied in extent. Benefits of the clinic approach included permitting patients to observe real tablets, tailoring regimens to lifestyles and telephone follow-up. These factors, particularly telephone support, were perceived by patients to assist with adherence. The role of telephone support, perceived to assist with initial adherence, requires further investigation. Future work is also needed to explore the health economics of this approach and to determine the actual impact of the clinic on clinical and adherence outcomes.

  9. Behavioral and clinical characteristics of people receiving medical care for HIV infection in an outpatient facility in Sicily, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Carlo P

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Paola Di Carlo,1 Giuliana Guadagnino,1 Palmira Immordino,1 Giovanni Mazzola,2 Pietro Colletti,2 Ilenia Alongi,1 Lucia Adamoli,1 Francesco Vitale,1 Alessandra Casuccio1 1Department of Sciences for Health Promotion and Mother-Child Care “G D’Alessandro”, University of Palermo, 2Department of Medicinal Clinics and Emerging Diseases, “Paolo Giaccone” Polyclinic University Hospital, Palermo, Italy Aim: The authors examined a cohort of HIV-positive outpatients at the AIDS Center of Palermo University in Italy in order to identify factors related to the frequency of their visits to the outpatient facility for health care services.Methods: Two hundred and twenty-four HIV-infected subjects were enrolled in the study. Demographic and HIV disease characteristics were recorded and assessed with the number of days accessed to our outpatients unit in univariate and multivariate analyses. The potential relationship with immunological status was also analyzed stratifying the patients into groups according to their CD4+ T-cell counts (≥500 vs <500/mm3, and ≥200 vs <200/mm3.Results: Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that duration of antiretroviral therapy <5 years and hypertension were significantly associated with a CD4+ T-cell count of <500/mm3, whereas geographic origin (Africa was associated with a CD4+ T-cell count of <200/mm3. Mean number of days the patients sought access to day-care services for laboratory tests was negatively associated with CD4+ T-cell count.Conclusion: Patients with low CD4+ T-cell counts showed higher use of health care services, demonstrating how early HIV diagnosis can help to reduce health care costs. The CD4+ T-cell cut-off of 200 cells emphasizes the importance of identifying and managing HIV infection among hard-to-reach groups like vulnerable migrants. In our sample, the illegal status of immigrants does not influence the management of their HIV/AIDS condition, but the lack of European health card

  10. Validation of the International HIV Dementia Scale as a Screening Tool for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders in a German-Speaking HIV Outpatient Clinic.

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    Victor Marin-Webb

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND are widely present among people living with HIV. Especially its milder forms, asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI and mild neurocognitive disorder (MND, remain highly prevalent worldwide. Diagnosing these conditions is subject to a time and resource consuming neuropsychological assessment. Selecting patients at a higher risk of cognitive impairment by using a simple but effective screening tool helps to organise access to further neuropsychological diagnosis. The International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS has until now been a well-established screening tool in African and American countries, however these populations' demographics defer significantly from ours, so using the same parameters could be ineffective.To calculate the prevalence of this condition among people attending an HIV outpatient clinic in Berlin and to validate the use of the IHDS as a screening tool for HAND in a German-speaking population.We screened 480 HIV-infected patients using the IHDS, 89% of them were on a stable antiretroviral treatment. Ninety of them completed a standardised neuropsychological battery of tests and a specific cognitive complaints questionnaire. The same procedure was applied to a control group of 30 HIV-negative participants. HAND diagnosis was established according to the Frascati criteria.The overall prevalence of HAND in our cohort was 43% (20% ANI, 17% MND and 6% HIV-associated dementia. The optimal cut-off on the IHDS for detecting HAND cases was set at 11 and achieved both a sensitivity and a specificity of 80%. When specifically screening for the more severe form of HAND, HIV-associated dementia, a cut-off value of 10 offered an increase in both sensitivity (94% and specificity (86%. The Youden Index for diagnostic accuracy was 0.6 and 0.8, respectively.The prevalence of HAND was comparable to the reported by recent studies performed in countries with a similar economic development. The study

  11. Validation of the International HIV Dementia Scale as a Screening Tool for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders in a German-Speaking HIV Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Webb, Victor; Jessen, Heiko; Kopp, Ute; Jessen, Arne B; Hahn, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are widely present among people living with HIV. Especially its milder forms, asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) and mild neurocognitive disorder (MND), remain highly prevalent worldwide. Diagnosing these conditions is subject to a time and resource consuming neuropsychological assessment. Selecting patients at a higher risk of cognitive impairment by using a simple but effective screening tool helps to organise access to further neuropsychological diagnosis. The International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) has until now been a well-established screening tool in African and American countries, however these populations' demographics defer significantly from ours, so using the same parameters could be ineffective. To calculate the prevalence of this condition among people attending an HIV outpatient clinic in Berlin and to validate the use of the IHDS as a screening tool for HAND in a German-speaking population. We screened 480 HIV-infected patients using the IHDS, 89% of them were on a stable antiretroviral treatment. Ninety of them completed a standardised neuropsychological battery of tests and a specific cognitive complaints questionnaire. The same procedure was applied to a control group of 30 HIV-negative participants. HAND diagnosis was established according to the Frascati criteria. The overall prevalence of HAND in our cohort was 43% (20% ANI, 17% MND and 6% HIV-associated dementia). The optimal cut-off on the IHDS for detecting HAND cases was set at 11 and achieved both a sensitivity and a specificity of 80%. When specifically screening for the more severe form of HAND, HIV-associated dementia, a cut-off value of 10 offered an increase in both sensitivity (94%) and specificity (86%). The Youden Index for diagnostic accuracy was 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. The prevalence of HAND was comparable to the reported by recent studies performed in countries with a similar economic development. The study confirms

  12. Psychoactive substances, alcohol and tobacco consumption in HIV-infected outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Jean-Marc; Peyriere, Hélène; Makinson, Alain; Peries, Marianne; Nagot, Nicolas; Donnadieu-Rigole, Hélène; Reynes, Jacques

    2018-06-01

    To assess the alcohol consumption, tobacco addiction and psychoactive substance use (PSU) of people living with HIV (PLHIV). Cross-sectional study in an HIV outpatient unit. Autoquestionnaire systematically proposed to all patients during their usual clinical care visit during a 6-months period, for alcohol (AUDIT test), tobacco (Short Fagerstrom Test) and PSU (ASSIST V3.0 test). Of 1334 distributed questionnaires, 1018 PLHIV responded: 76.8% were men [528 patients were MSM), and the median age was 49 years (interquartile range: 42-46). A prevalence of excessive alcohol drinking was found in 22% [95% confidence interval (CI) 19.5-24.7%] and 44.6% (CI 41.5-47.7%) were current smokers, with high dependence in 29.1% (CI 24.9-33.7%). The prevalence of PSU was 37.8% (CI 34.8-41%) in the past 3 months: cannabis 27.7%, poppers 16.4%, cocaine 8.9%, psychotropic medications 7.1%, gamma-hydroxybutyrate/gamma-butyrolactone (GHB/GBL) 4.7%, stimulants 3.1%, synthetic cathinones 2.7%, hallucinogens 1.5%. In the past 3 months, PSU was more prevalent in MSM than in non-MSM patients (46 versus 30%, P poppers) 31.0 versus 1.1%, GHB/GBL 7.8 versus 0.8%, stimulants 5.0 versus 1.1%, synthetic cathinones 4.9 versus 0.3%, and hallucinogens 2.3 versus 0.5%. Given the high prevalence of PSU and other addictions (alcohol and smoking) among PLHIV, and particularly among MSM, a systematic screening of PSU and other addictions should be part of routine clinical care.

  13. Trends in Decline of Antiretroviral Resistance among ARV-Experienced Patients in the HIV Outpatient Study: 1999–2008

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    Kate Buchacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about temporal trends in frequencies of clinically relevant ARV resistance mutations in HIV strains from U.S. patients undergoing genotypic testing (GT in routine HIV care. Methods. We analyzed cumulative frequency of HIV resistance among patients in the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS who, during 1999–2008 and while prescribed antiretrovirals, underwent GT with plasma HIV RNA >1,000 copies/mL. Exposure ≥4 months to each of three major antiretroviral classes (NRTI, NNRTI and PI was defined as triple-class exposure (TCE. Results. 906 patients contributed 1,570 GT results. The annual frequency of any major resistance mutations decreased during 1999–2008 (88% to 79%, P=0.05. Resistance to PIs decreased among PI-exposed patients (71% to 46%, P=0.010 as exposure to ritonavir-boosted PIs increased (6% to 81%, P<0.001. Non-significant declines were observed in resistance to NRTIs among NRTI-exposed (82% to 67%, and triple-class-resistance among TCE patients (66% to 41%, but not to NNRTIs among NNRTI-exposed. Conclusions. HIV resistance was common but declined in HIV isolates from subgroups of ARV-experienced HOPS patients during 1999–2008. Resistance to PIs among PI-exposed patients decreased, possibly due to increased representation of patients whose only PI exposures were to boosted PIs.

  14. Assessment of satisfaction with pharmaceutical services in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in outpatient HIV treatment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oqua, Dorothy; Agada, Peter; Ohiaeri, Samuel I; Adesina, Afusat; Abdulkareem, Mohammed Habeeb; King, Rosalyn C; Wutoh, Anthony K

    2014-06-01

    The patient's perception and satisfaction are increasingly considered as a useful factor in the assessment of competency of health care providers and quality of care. However, these patient focused assessments are largely ignored when assessing health care outcomes. The study assessed the perception and satisfaction of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) with pharmaceutical services received in outpatient HIV treatment settings. Seventeen HIV treatment centres in Nigeria. This cross-sectional survey included 2,700 patients randomly selected from 26,319 HIV patients on ART, who received pharmaceutical services in the study setting. A study-specific Likert-type instrument was administered to the participants at point of exit from the pharmacy. Midpoint of the 5-point scale was computed and scores above it were regarded as positive while below as negative. Chi-square was used for inferential statistics. All reported p values were 2-sided at 95 % confidence interval (CI). Patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical services. Of 2,700 patients sampled, data from 1,617 (59.9 %) were valid for analysis; 62.3 % were aged 26-40 years and 65.4 % were females. The participants had received pharmaceutical services for a mean duration of 25.2 (95 % CI 24.3-26.1) months. Perception of participants regarding the appearance of pharmacy was positive while that regarding the pharmacists' efforts to solve patients' medication related problems was negative. The participants' rating of satisfaction with the waiting time to access pharmaceutical services was negative; the satisfaction decreases with increasing waiting time. However, the satisfaction with the overall quality of pharmaceutical services received was rated as positive; 90.0 % reported that they got the kind of pharmaceutical services they wanted; 98.2 % would come back to the pharmacy if they were to seek help again and would recommend services to others. The level of satisfaction was found to be associated with

  15. Evaluation of outpatients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in a high HIV prevalence setting in Ethiopia: clinical, diagnostic and epidemiological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchfeld, Judith; Aderaye, Getachew; Palme, Ingela Berggren; Bjorvatn, Bjarne; Britton, Sven; Feleke, Yewenhareg; Källenius, Gunilla; Lindquist, Lars

    2002-01-01

    In a setting with a high prevalence of HIV we studied (i) the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and HIV; (ii) clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PTB; and (iii) the usefulness of standard procedures for diagnosing PTB. Of 509 consecutive outpatients evaluated on clinical suspicion of PTB in Addis Ababa, 33.0% were culture-verified as having PTB. PTB patients, non-TB patients and controls were HIV-1-positive in 57.1%, 38.5% and 8.3% of cases, respectively. Predictors for culture-verified PTB were age infection. Diagnosis of PTB based on clinical symptoms, sputum microscopy for acid-fast bacilli and chest radiography was sensitive (86.7%) but unspecific (64.1%). In HIV-positive patients both sensitivity and specificity were significantly lower (p infections are often misinterpreted as smear-negative PTB. HIV screening is therefore warranted not only in cases of verified TB but also as part of the diagnostic work-up in patients with respiratory symptoms suggestive of PTB. Also, increased awareness of, and improved diagnostic tools for, HIV-related pulmonary infections other than PTB are required, together with algorithms for patients with suspected PTB.

  16. Rates and Covariates of Recent Sexual and Physical Violence Against HIV-Infected Outpatient Drinkers in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Gakinya, Benson N; Mwaniki, Michael M; Lee, Hana; Kiarie, Stella W; Martino, Steve; Loxley, Michelle P; Keter, Alfred K; Klein, Debra A; Sidle, John E; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Maisto, Stephen A

    2017-08-01

    Victimization from physical and sexual violence presents global health challenges. Partner violence is higher in Kenya than Africa. Violence against drinkers and HIV-infected individuals is typically elevated, so dual vulnerabilities may further augment risk. Understanding violence risks can improve interventions. Participants were 614 HIV-infected outpatient drinkers in western Kenya enrolled in a randomized trial to reduce alcohol use. At baseline, past 90-day partner physical and sexual violence were examined descriptively and in gender-stratified regression models. We hypothesized higher reported violence against women than men, and positive violence association with HIV stigma and alcohol use across gender. Women reported significantly more current sexual (26.3 vs. 5.7%) and physical (38.9 vs. 24.8%) victimization than men. Rates were generally higher than Kenyan lifetime national averages. In both regression models, HIV stigma and alcohol-related sexual expectations were significantly associated with violence while alcohol use was not. For women, higher violence risk was also conferred by childhood violence, past-year transactional sex, and younger age. HIV-infected Kenyan drinkers, particularly women, endorse high current violence due to multiple risk factors. Findings have implications for HIV interventions. Longitudinal research is needed to understand development of risk.

  17. Behavioral and Other Characteristics Associated with HIV Viral Load in an Outpatient Clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul L Sacamano

    Full Text Available Persons living with HIV (PLWH who are engaged in care, yet not virally suppressed, represent a risk for transmission and opportunity for risk reduction interventions. This study describes characteristics of an outpatient clinic cohort of PLWH by laboratory confirmed viral suppression status and examines associations with demographics and sexual and drug use behaviors gathered through questionnaire. From a sample of 500 clinic patients, 438 were prescribed antiretroviral treatment (ART and 62 were not. Among the 438 on ART, 72 (16.4% were not virally suppressed at the most recent lab draw. Compared to individuals with a suppressed viral load, those that were unsuppressed were more likely to: be black (79.2% vs. 64.2%; p = 0.014; earn below $25,000/year (88.9% vs. 65.0%; p < 0.001; be of a younger age (47.8 vs. 50.0 mean years; p = 0.009; be on opiate substitution (14.1% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.023; and acknowledge poly-substance (38.9% vs. 24.4%; p = 0.012 and excessive alcohol use (13.9% vs. 6.0%; p = 0.019. Conversely, a smaller proportion of those with an unsuppressed viral load had multiple sex partners in the previous 30 days (39.8% vs. 58.5%; p = 0.003. In multivariable regression of those on ART, the prevalence of an unsuppressed viral load was 3% lower with each increasing year of age (aPR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95, 0.99 and 47% lower with income over $25,000/year (aPR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.70. In a separate analysis of all 500 subjects, ART was less frequently prescribed to blacks compared to whites, heterosexuals, those with lower education and income, and persons with active substance use. Findings confirm that a large proportion of PLWH and engaged in care were not virally suppressed and continued behaviors that risk transmission, indicating the need for screening, prevention counseling and access to ancillary services to lower the incidence of HIV infections.

  18. A Mindfulness-Based Compassionate Living Training in a Heterogeneous Sample of Psychiatric Outpatients : a Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels-Velthuis, Agna A.; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Ploeg, Karen; Koster, Frits; Fleer, Joke; van den Brink, Erik

    We developed a novel compassion-focused training (mindfulness-based compassionate living; MBCL) and examined its effects in a heterogeneous psychiatric outpatient population with regard to feasibility and changes in levels of depression, anxiety, mindfulness and compassion. The training consisted of

  19. Implementing HIV/AIDS education: impact of teachers' training on HIV/AIDS education in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Haribondhu; Oliveras, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    School-based HIV/AIDS education is a common and well-proven intervention strategy for providing information on HIV/AIDS to young people. However, lack of skills among teachers for imparting sensitive information to students can lead to programme failure in terms of achieving goals. A cross-sectional study was conducted among teachers to identify the factors that support or hinder their role in HIV/AIDS education. A self-administered questionnaire was used for interviewing teachers from randomly-selected schools in two adjacent districts in Bangladesh. Based on exposure to teachers' training, the districts were divided into control and intervention areas and the teachers' ability, skill, and their participation in HIV/AIDS education were compared between the districts. Trained teachers in the intervention schools were more likely to participate, less likely to face difficulties, and more likely to use interactive teaching methods in HIV/ AIDS classes compared to the controls who did not receive any training. Inadequate allocation of time for conducting the HIV/AIDS class was found to be barriers to HIV/AIDS education that suggest the need to provide teachers with more support in terms of training and logistics.

  20. The cost of antiretroviral treatment service for patients with HIV/AIDS in a central outpatient clinic in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen LT

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Long Thanh Nguyen,1 Bach Xuan Tran,2 Cuong Tuan Tran,1 Huong Thi Le,1 Son Van Tran1 1Authority of HIV/AIDS Control, Ministry of Health, Hanoi, Vietnam; 2Institute for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam Introduction: Antiretroviral treatment (ART services are estimated to account for 30% of the total resources needed for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS control and prevention in Vietnam during the 2011–2020 timeframe. With international funding decreasing, determining the total cost of HIV/AIDS treatment is necessary in order to develop a master plan for the transition of ART services delivery and management. We analyzed the costs of HIV/AIDS treatment paid by both HIV programs and patients in a central outpatient clinic, and we explored factors associated with the capacity of patients to pay for this service. Methods: Patients (n=315 receiving ART in the Department of Infectious Diseases at Bach Mai Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam, were interviewed. Patient records and expenses were reviewed. Results: The total cost of ART per patient was US$611 (75% from health care providers, 25% from patients or their families. The cost of a second-line regimen was found to be 2.7 times higher than the first-line regimen cost. Most outpatients (73.3% were able to completely pay for all of their ART expenses. Capacity to pay for ART was influenced by five factors, including marital status, distance from house to clinic, patient's monthly income, household economic condition, and health insurance status. Most of the patients (84.8% would have been willing to pay for health insurance if a copayment scheme for ART were to be introduced. Conclusion: This study provides evidence on payment capacity of HIV/AIDS patients in Vietnam and supplies information on ART costs from both provider and patient perspectives. In particular, results from this study suggest that earlier access to ART

  1. Sociodemographic profile and predictors of outpatient clinic attendance among HIV-positive patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in Selangor, Malaysia

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    Abdulrahman SA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surajudeen Abiola Abdulrahman,1,2 Lekhraj Rampal,1 Norlijah Othman,3 Faisal Ibrahim,1 Kadir Shahar Hayati,1 Anuradha P Radhakrishnan4 1Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 2Department of Public Health Medicine, Penang Medical College, George Town, Penang, 3Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 4Infectious Disease Clinic, Hospital Sungai Buloh, Sungai Buloh, Selangor, MalaysiaBackground: Inconsistent literature evidence suggests that sociodemographic, economic, and system- and patient-related factors are associated with clinic attendance among the HIV-positive population receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART around the world. We examined the factors that predict outpatient clinic attendance among a cohort of HIV-positive patients initiating ART in Selangor, Malaysia.Patients and methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed secondary data on outpatient clinic attendance and sociodemographic, economic, psychosocial, and patient-related factors among 242 adult Malaysian patients initiating ART in Selangor, Malaysia. Study cohort was enrolled in a parent randomized controlled trial (RCT in Hospital Sungai Buloh Malaysia between January and December 2014, during which peer counseling, medication, and clinic appointment reminders were provided to the intervention group through short message service (SMS and telephone calls for 24 consecutive weeks. Data on outpatient clinic attendance were extracted from the hospital electronic medical records system, while other patient-level data were extracted from pre-validated Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG adherence questionnaires in which primary data were collected. Outpatient clinic attendance was categorized into binary outcome – regular attendee and defaulter categories – based on the number of missed scheduled outpatient clinic appointments within a 6-month

  2. Detecting suicidality among adolescent outpatients: evaluation of trained clinicians' suicidality assessment against a structured diagnostic assessment made by trained raters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holi, Matti Mikael; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Karlsson, Linnea; Tuisku, Virpi; Kiviruusu, Olli; Ruuttu, Titta; Marttunen, Mauri

    2008-12-31

    Accurate assessment of suicidality is of major importance. We aimed to evaluate trained clinicians' ability to assess suicidality against a structured assessment made by trained raters. Treating clinicians classified 218 adolescent psychiatric outpatients suffering from a depressive mood disorder into three classes: 1-no suicidal ideation, 2-suicidal ideation, no suicidal acts, 3-suicidal or self-harming acts. This classification was compared with a classification with identical content derived from the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS-PL) made by trained raters. The convergence was assessed by kappa- and weighted kappa tests. The clinicians' classification to class 1 (no suicidal ideation) was 85%, class 2 (suicidal ideation) 50%, and class 3 (suicidal acts) 10% concurrent with the K-SADS evaluation (gamma2 = 37.1, df 4, p = 0.000). Weighted kappa for the agreement of the measures was 0.335 (CI = 0.198-0.471, p < 0.0001). The clinicians under-detected suicidal and self-harm acts, but over-detected suicidal ideation. There was only a modest agreement between the trained clinicians' suicidality evaluation and the K-SADS evaluation, especially concerning suicidal or self-harming acts. We suggest a wider use of structured scales in clinical and research settings to improve reliable detection of adolescents with suicidality.

  3. Detecting suicidality among adolescent outpatients: evaluation of trained clinicians' suicidality assessment against a structured diagnostic assessment made by trained raters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuisku Virpi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate assessment of suicidality is of major importance. We aimed to evaluate trained clinicians' ability to assess suicidality against a structured assessment made by trained raters. Method Treating clinicians classified 218 adolescent psychiatric outpatients suffering from a depressive mood disorder into three classes: 1-no suicidal ideation, 2-suicidal ideation, no suicidal acts, 3-suicidal or self-harming acts. This classification was compared with a classification with identical content derived from the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS-PL made by trained raters. The convergence was assessed by kappa- and weighted kappa tests. Results The clinicians' classification to class 1 (no suicidal ideation was 85%, class 2 (suicidal ideation 50%, and class 3 (suicidal acts 10% concurrent with the K-SADS evaluation (γ2 = 37.1, df 4, p = 0.000. Weighted kappa for the agreement of the measures was 0.335 (CI = 0.198–0.471, p Conclusion There was only a modest agreement between the trained clinicians' suicidality evaluation and the K-SADS evaluation, especially concerning suicidal or self-harming acts. We suggest a wider use of structured scales in clinical and research settings to improve reliable detection of adolescents with suicidality.

  4. HIV prevention for migrants in transit: developing and testing TRAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahromov, Mahbat; Weine, Stevan

    2011-06-01

    This study was a pilot investigation of the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of TRAIN (Transit to Russia AIDS Intervention with Newcomers) a three-session HIV preventive intervention for Tajik male labor migrants performed in transit. Sixty adult Tajik male labor migrants on the 5-day train ride from Dushanbe to Moscow were randomly assigned to either the intervention or a control condition. Each initially completed an in-person survey then another 3 days later (immediately postintervention), and participated in a cell phone survey three months later. All participants came to all intervention sessions, were satisfied with the program, and completed all postassessments. In comparison with the controls, the TRAIN group reported significant increases in condom use with sex workers and non-sex workers, condom knowledge, worry about HIV/AIDS, talking with persons about HIV/AIDS, talking with wife about HIV/AIDS, community activities, and religious activities. HIV/AIDS prevention performed in transit is feasible, accceptable, and potentially efficacious in diminishing HIV risk behaviors in labor migrants.

  5. Interactive "Video Doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings.

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    Paul Gilbert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide "prevention with positives" in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based assessment and counseling for risky behaviors.We conducted a parallel groups randomized controlled trial (December 2003-September 2006 at 5 San Francisco area outpatient HIV clinics. Eligible patients (HIV-positive English-speaking adults completed an in-depth computerized risk assessment. Participants reporting substance use or sexual risks (n = 476 were randomized in stratified blocks. The intervention group received tailored risk-reduction counseling from a "Video Doctor" via laptop computer and a printed Educational Worksheet; providers received a Cueing Sheet on reported risks. Compared with control, fewer intervention participants reported continuing illicit drug use (RR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.689, 0.957, p = 0.014 at 3 months; and RR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.540, 0.785, p<0.001 at 6 months and unprotected sex (RR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.773, 0.993, p = 0.039 at 3 months; and RR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.686, 0.941, p = 0.007 at 6 months. Intervention participants reported fewer mean days of ongoing illicit drug use (-4.0 days vs. -1.3 days, p = 0.346, at 3 months; and -4.7 days vs. -0.7 days, p = 0.130, at 6 months than did controls, and had fewer casual sex partners at (-2.3 vs. -1.4, p = 0.461, at 3 months; and -2.7 vs. -0.6, p = 0.042, at 6 months.The Positive Choice intervention achieved significant cessation of illicit drug use and unprotected sex at the group-level, and modest individual-level reductions in days of ongoing drug use and number of casual sex partners compared with the

  6. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART.

  7. Nosocomial HIV-transmission in an outpatient clinic detected by epidemiologicaland phylogenetic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, T.L.; Jørgensen, L.B.; H, Permin

    1999-01-01

    .9% respectively. In addition, GP harboured HIV RNA with a foscarnet resistance mutation further lendingsupport to virus from the foscarnet-treated FDL being the source of the infection. Interestingly, GP experienced increases inimmunoglobulin production after contracting the HIV-infection, and decreases after...... antiretroviral-induced viral suppression. Aclinical procedure which, under stressful conditions, could lead to breaches in infection control measures was identified. The source ofthe infection was most likely a contaminated multidose vial. CONCLUSION: Through epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses acase...

  8. The language divide. The importance of training in the use of interpreters for outpatient practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Gildengorin, Ginny

    2004-02-01

    Provision of interpreter services for non-English-speaking patients is a federal requirement. We surveyed clinicians to describe their experience using interpreters. In this cross-sectional study we surveyed clinicians in three academic outpatient settings in San Francisco (N = 194) regarding their most recent patient encounter which involved an interpreter. Questions about the visit included type of interpreter, satisfaction with content of clinical encounter, potential problems, and frequency of need. Previous training in interpreter use, languages spoken, and demographics were also asked. Questionnaires were self-administered in approximately 10 minutes. Of 194 questionnaires mailed, 158 were completed (81% response rate) and 67% were from resident physicians. Most respondents (78%) were very satisfied or satisfied with the medical care they provided, 85% felt satisfied with their ability to diagnose a disease and treat a disease, but only 45% were satisfied with their ability to empower the patient with knowledge about their disease, treatment, or medication. Even though 71% felt they were able to make a personal connection with their patient, only 33% felt they had learned about another culture as a result of the encounter. Clinicians reported difficulties eliciting exact symptoms (70%), explaining treatments (44%), and eliciting treatment preferences (51%). Clinicians perceived that lack of knowledge of a patient's culture hindered their ability to provide quality medical care and only 18% felt they were unable to establish trust or rapport. Previous training in interpreter use was associated with increased use of professional interpreters (odds ratio [OR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 7.5) and increased satisfaction with medical care provided (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 6.6). Clinicians reported communication difficulties affecting their ability to understand symptoms and treat disease, as well as their ability to empower patients regarding their

  9. Effects of an explicit problem-solving skills training program using a metacomponential approach for outpatients with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Kenneth N K; Howie, Dorothy R

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of an explicit problem-solving skills training program using a metacomponential approach with 33 outpatients with moderate acquired brain injury, in the Hong Kong context. We compared an experimental training intervention with this explicit problem-solving approach, which taught metacomponential strategies, with a conventional cognitive training approach that did not have this explicit metacognitive training. We found significant advantages for the experimental group on the Metacomponential Interview measure in association with the explicit metacomponential training, but transfer to the real-life problem-solving measures was not evidenced in statistically significant findings. Small sample size, limited time of intervention, and some limitations with these tools may have been contributing factors to these results. The training program was demonstrated to have a significantly greater effect than the conventional training approach on metacomponential functioning and the component of problem representation. However, these benefits were not transferable to real-life situations.

  10. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Elsa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings.

  11. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia J; Cotrina, Armando; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Elsa; Buffardi, Anne L

    2010-09-28

    There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings.

  12. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings. PMID:20875140

  13. Treatment outcomes of a Stage 1 cognitive-behavioral trial to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K.; Sidle, John E.; Gakinya, Benson N.; Baliddawa, Joyce B.; Martino, Steve; Mwaniki, Michael M.; Songole, Rogers; Omolo, Otieno E.; Kamanda, Allan M.; Ayuku, David O.; Ojwang, Claris; Owino-Ong’or, Willis D.; Harrington, Magdalena; Bryant, Kendall J.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Justice, Amy C.; Hogan, Joseph W.; Maisto, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Dual epidemics of HIV and alcohol use disorders, and a dearth of professional resources for behavioral treatment in sub-Saharan Africa, suggest the need for development of culturally relevant and feasible interventions. The purpose of this study was to test the preliminary efficacy of a culturally adapted 6-session gender-stratified group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention delivered by paraprofessionals to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in Eldoret, Kenya. Design Randomized clinical trial comparing CBT against a usual care assessment only control Setting A large HIV outpatient clinic in Eldoret, Kenya, part of the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare collaboration Participants 75 HIV-infected outpatients who were antiretroviral (ARV)-initiated or ARV-eligible and who reported hazardous or binge drinking Measurements Percent drinking days (PDD) and mean drinks per drinking days (DDD) measured continuously using the Timeline Followback Findings There were 299 ineligible and 102 eligible outpatients with 12 refusals. Effect sizes of the change in alcohol use since baseline between the two conditions at the 30-day follow-up were large (d=.95, p=.0002, mean difference=24.93 (95% CI: 12.43, 37.43) PDD; d=.76, p=.002, mean difference=2.88 (95% CI: 1.05, 4.70) DDD). Randomized participants attended 93% of the 6 CBT sessions offered. Reported alcohol abstinence at the 90-day follow-up was 69.4% (CBT) and 37.5% (usual care). Paraprofessional counselors achieved independent ratings of adherence and competence equivalent to college-educated therapists in the U.S. Treatment effect sizes were comparable to alcohol intervention studies conducted in the U.S. Conclusions Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be successfully adapted to group paraprofessional delivery in Kenya and may be effective in reducing alcohol use among HIV-infected Kenyan outpatients. PMID:21631622

  14. Depression, alcohol use, and intimate partner violence among outpatients in rural Uganda: vulnerabilities for HIV, STIs and high risk sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiene, Susan M; Lule, Haruna; Sileo, Katelyn M; Silmi, Kazi Priyanka; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2017-01-19

    Intimate partner violence (IPV), alcohol use, and depression are key vulnerabilities for HIV in Uganda, and taken together may have a synergistic effect on risk. Our objective was to investigate the associations between depression, IPV, and alcohol use and HIV-risk indicators among a sample of outpatients in rural Uganda, and the effect of co-occurrence of these factors on HIV-risk indicators. In a structured interview we collected data on high-risk sexual behavior, depression symptoms, emotional and physical IPV, and alcohol use, as well as a blood sample for HIV and syphilis tests and a urine sample for chlamydia and gonorrhea tests from 325 male and female outpatients receiving provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC) at a public hospital outpatient clinic in rural Uganda. We used logistic regression and generalized linear modeling to test independent associations between depression, IPV, and alcohol use and HIV-risk indicators, as well as the effect of co-occurrence on HIV-risk indicators. Twelve percent of men and 15% of women had two or more of the following conditions: depression, IPV, and alcohol use; another 29% of men and 33% of women had 1 condition. Each condition was independently associated with HIV risk behavior for men and women, and for women, depression was associated with testing positive for HIV or a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Men with one condition (AOR 2.32, 95% CI 1.95-2.77) and two or more conditions (AOR 12.77, 95% CI 7.97-20.47) reported more high risk sex acts compared to those with no potential co-occurring conditions. For men, experiencing two or more conditions increased risky sex more than one alone (χ 2 24.68, p risk for risky sex (AOR 2.18, 95% CI 1.64-2.91). We also found preliminary evidence suggesting synergistic effects between depression and emotional IPV and between alcohol use and depression. This study demonstrates the co-occurrence of depression, IPV, and alcohol use in men and women in an

  15. Factors associated with HIV-1 virological failure in an outpatient clinic for HIV-infected people in Haiphong, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huong, D T M; Bannister, W; Phong, P T

    2011-01-01

    starting ART, 23% had detectable HIV-1 viral load (= 400 copies/mL). Patients who had developed a World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage 4 condition at the time of initiation of ART were more likely to experience virological failure than those in stages 1-3, odds ratio (OR): 5.20 (95% confidence...

  16. Vaccination status of people living with HIV/AIDS in outpatient care in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmara Holanda da Cunha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy has increased the survival of patients with HIV/AIDS, thus necessitating health promotion practice with immunization. Vaccines are critical components for protecting people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA. The purpose of study was to analyze the vaccination status of PLWHA in outpatient care in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Cross-sectional study performed from June 2014 to June 2015. The screening was done with patients in antiretroviral therapy, 420 patients underwent screening, but only 99 met the inclusion criteria. Data were collected for interviews using forms to characterize sociodemographic, clinical and vaccination situations. Only 14 patients had complete vaccination schedules. The most used vaccines were hepatitis B, influenza vaccine and 23-valent pneumococcal. There was no difference between men and women regarding the proportion of PLWHA with full vaccination schedule or between sex, skin color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion or occupational status. There was no difference between having or not having a complete vaccination schedule and age, years of education, family income or number of hospitalizations. CD4+ T-cells count of patients with incomplete immunization was lower than patients with complete immunization. Health education strategies can be done individually or in groups to explain the importance of vaccination and to remind about doses to be administered. Most patients did not have proper adherence to vaccination schedules, especially due to lack of guidance. Results implied that education in health is important for vaccination adhesion, knowledge of adverse events and continuation of schemes.

  17. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in HIV-Infected Patients: Female Sex and Smoking as Risk Factors in an Outpatient Cohort in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelisa Silva E Alves de Carvalho Santos

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS and associated factors in an outpatient cohort of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA followed between October 2009 and July 2011. We evaluated nausea and/or vomiting, dyspepsia, heartburn, diarrhea, constipation, and flatulence. The outcome variable was the presence of three or more GIS. Sociodemographic (sex, skin color, age, income, years of schooling, lifestyle (smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity level, clinical (antiretroviral therapy, time of HIV infection, CD4 lymphocyte count, viral load, and anthropometric (nutritional status and waist circumference variables were investigated. Data on sociodemographic and lifestyle variables were collected through a pre-tested and standardized questionnaire. CD4 count was determined by flow cytometry and viral load by branched DNA (bDNA assays for HIV-1. All variables were analyzed at a p<0.05 significance level. Among 290 patients, the incidence of three or more GIS was 28.8% (95% CI 23.17 to 33.84 and 74.48% presented at least one symptom. Female gender (IR 2.29, 95% CI 1.63 to 3.22 and smoking status (IR 1.93, 95% CI 1.30 to 2.88 were risk factors for the presence of three or more GIS after multivariate Poisson regression. A high incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms was found among PLWHA, and it was significantly associated with female sex and tobacco use. Those results reinforce the relevance of investigating the presence of GIS in PLWHA as it may affect treatment adherence.

  18. The Perilous Road from HIV Diagnosis in the Hospital to Viral Suppression in the Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasanti, Jonathan; Goswami, Neela D; Khoubian, Jonathan J; Pennisi, Eugene; Root, Christin; Ziemer, Dorothy; Armstrong, Wendy S; Del Rio, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The HIV care continuum has received considerable attention in recent years, however, few care continua focus on the population of patients who are diagnosed during an inpatient hospital admission. We aimed to describe the HIV care continuum for patients newly diagnosed during hospitalization through 24-month follow-up. A retrospective chart review of HIV patients diagnosed at Grady Memorial Hospital from 2011 to 2012 was performed and records were matched to Georgia Department of Public Health HIV/AIDS surveillance data. Descriptive statistics and statistical tests of independence were utilized. Ninety-four new diagnoses were confirmed during the 2-year study period. Median age was 43 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30-51), 77% were male, 72% were non-Hispanic Black, 31% were men who have sex with men (MSM), and 77% were uninsured. Median CD4 count at diagnosis was 134 cells/μL (IQR 30-307). Eighty-four percent received their diagnosis before hospital discharge, 68% linked to care by 90 days, 73% were retained for 12 months, 48% were virologically suppressed by 12 months, 58% were retained for 24 continuous months, and 38% achieved continuous viral suppression (VS) during the initial 24 months after diagnosis. Late diagnosis is a persistent problem in hospitalized patients. Despite relative success with linkage to care and 12-month retention in care, a minority of patients maintained retention and VS for 24 continuous months.

  19. [General conditions concerning the implementation of an outpatient education programme--characteristics and distinctions from an inpatient training programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, I; Wunderlich, B; Niehues, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the EVA study was to develop an outpatient education programme for women with endometriosis with a view to permanent transfer into routine care. Implementation of the programme generated several problems and obstacles that are not, or not to this extent, present in the inpatient setting of a rehabilitation clinic. The patient education programme was developed in line with an existing inpatient programme, taking into account the criteria for evaluating such training programmes. Several adjustments to process, structure and content level had to be made to achieve the conditions of the outpatient setting. Since May 2008, 17 training courses took place in various outpatient and acute inpatient settings, and a total of 156 women with diagnosed endometriosis participated. The problems and obstacles that emerged affected similarly the process, structure and content of the training programme. On the structural level, especially problems with availability of rooms, technical equipment and trainers occurred, leading to significant time pressures. The main problem on the procedural level was the recruitment of participants, since--in contrast to the inpatient setting and to disease management programmes--no assignment by physicians or insurers takes place. Furthermore, gainful activity of the participants and the resulting shift of the training beyond the usual working and opening hours are important barriers for implementation. The unavailability of trainers in these settings requires creative solutions. Regarding the contents of the training it has to be taken into consideration that--unlike the inpatient setting--no aftercare intervention and no individual psychological consultation are possible. The training programme has to be designed in such a way that all problems that have occurred could be dealt with appropriately. In summary, the permanent implementation of an outpatient training programme is possible but is more time-consuming than inpatient trainings

  20. HIV RNA Suppression during and after Pregnancy among Women in the HIV Outpatient Study, 1996 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Monita; Tedaldi, Ellen; Armon, Carl; Nesheim, Steven; Lampe, Margaret; Palella, Frank; Novak, Richard; Sutton, Madeline; Buchacz, Kate

    2018-01-01

    To examine HIV viral suppression during/after pregnancy. Prospective observational cohort. We identified pregnancies from 1996 to 2015. We examined HIV RNA viral load (VL), VL suppression (≤500 copies/mL), and antiretroviral therapy (ART) status at pregnancy start, end, and 6 months postpartum. We estimated risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for VL nonsuppression. Among 253 pregnancies analyzed, 34.8% of women exhibited VL suppression at pregnancy start, 60.1% at pregnancy end, and 42.7% at 6 months postpartum. Median VL (log 10 copies/mL) was 2.80 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.40-3.85) at pregnancy start, 1.70 (IQR: 1.40-2.82) at pregnancy end, and 2.30 (IQR: 1.40-3.86) at postpartum. Risk of postpartum VL nonsuppression was also lower among women on ART and with VL suppression at pregnancy end (versus those not; adjusted RR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.17-0.53). Maintaining VL suppression among US women remains a challenge, particularly during postpartum. Achieving VL suppression earlier during pregnancy benefits women subsequently.

  1. Vaccination coverage in a cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving care at an AIDS outpatient clinic in Espírito Santo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Ferreira da Silva Pinto Neto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study assessed the immunization status of human immune deficiency virus (HIV-infected patients receiving care at an outpatient clinic in Brazil. The sociodemographic characteristics, CD4 count and HIV viral load of 281 out of 612 adult outpatients were analyzed. A total of 331 patients were excluded because of no availability of vaccination cards. Chi-square or Fisher's exact test were used. Immunization coverage was higher for diphtheria/tetanus (59.79% and hepatitis B (56.7%, and lowest for hepatitis A (6.8% and for meningococcal group C (6%. Only 11.74% of the patients had received the influenza virus vaccine yearly since their HIV-infection diagnosis. No vaccination against influenza (p < 0.034 or hepatitis B (p < 0.029 were associated with CD4 counts <500 cells/mL; no vaccination against flu or pneumococcus were associated with detectable HIV viral load (p < 0.049 and p < 0.002, respectively. Immunization coverage is still very low among HIV-infected adults in this setting despite recommendations and high infection-related mortality.

  2. Ethical issues in a stage 1 cognitive-behavioral therapy feasibility study and trial to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Gakinya, Benson N; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Martino, Steve; Bryant, Kendall J; Meslin, Eric M; Sidle, John E

    2012-07-01

    Epidemics of both HIV/AIDS and alcohol abuse in sub-Saharan Africa have spurred the conduct of local behavioral therapy trials for these problems, but the ethical issues involved in these trials have not been fully examined. In this paper, we discuss ethical issues that emerged during the conduct of a behavioral intervention adaptation and trial using cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in Eldoret, Kenya. The study was performed within our multinational collaboration, the USAID-Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare Partnership. We discuss relevant ethical considerations and how we addressed them.

  3. Financial impact of surgical training on hospital economics: an income analysis of 1184 out-patient clinic consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J E F; Ravindra, P; Lepore, M; Armstrong, A; Bhangu, A; Maxwell-Armstrong, C A

    2013-01-01

    In many countries healthcare commissioning bodies (state or insurance-based) reimburse hospitals for their activity. The costs associated with post-graduate clinical training as part of this are poorly understood. This study quantified the financial revenue generated by surgical trainees in the out-patient clinic setting. A retrospective analysis of surgical out-patient ambulatory care appointments under 6 full-time equivalent Consultants (Attendings) in one hospital over 2 months. Clinic attendance lists were generated from the Patient Access System. Appointments were categorised as: 'new', 'review' or 'procedure' as per the Department of Health Payment by Results (PbR) Outpatient Tariff (Outpatient Treatment Function Code 104; Outpatient Procedure Code OPRSI1). During the study period 78 clinics offered 1184 appointments; 133 of these were not attended (11.2%). Of those attended 1029 had sufficient detail for analysis (98%). 261 (25.4%) patients were seen by a trainee. Applying PbR reimbursement criteria to these gave a projected annual income of £GBP 218,712 (€EU 266,527; $USD 353,657) generated by 6 surgical trainees (Residents). This is equivalent to approximately £GBP 36,452 (€EU 44,415; $USD 58,943) per trainee annually compared to £GBP 48,732 (€EU 59,378; $USD 78,800) per Consultant. This projected yearly income off-set 95% of the trainee's basic salary. Surgical trainees generated a quarter of the out-patient clinic activity related income in this study, with each trainee producing three-quarters of that generated by a Consultant. This offers considerable commercial value to hospitals. Although this must offset productivity differences and overall running costs, training bodies should ensure hospitals offer an appropriate return. In a competitive market hospitals could be invited to compete for trainees, with preference given to those providing excellence in training. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  4. The association between symptoms of mental disorders and health risk behaviours in Vietnamese HIV positive outpatients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Truc T; Jones, Mairwen K; Harris, Lynne M; Heard, Robert C

    2017-03-14

    A high prevalence of symptoms of mental disorders (SOMD) has been found among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV). Additionally, SOMD may impact on the prevalence of high-risk health behaviours (HRB). This study investigates the relationship between SOMD and HRB in a large sample of Vietnamese HIV positive outpatients. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 400 outpatients at two HIV/AIDS clinics in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, selected using a systematic sampling technique. Validated scales were used to measure SOMD, specifically symptoms of depression, anxiety, alcohol use disorder (AUD), substance use disorder (SUD) and HIV associated dementia (HAD). Participants completed a self-report questionnaire assessing HRB during the preceding 12 months including unsafe sexual practices and illicit drug use. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between SOMD and HRB. The majority of participants (63.5%) were male and the median age was 34.0 years. Unsafe sexual practices and illicit drug use were reported by 13.8 and 5.5% of participants. The prevalences of HAD, depression, AUD, anxiety and SUD symptoms were 39.8, 36.5, 13.3 10.5, 3.3% respectively. There was no association between SOMD and HRB either with or without adjusting for correlates of HRB, except between symptoms of SUD and illicit drug use. PLHIV who had symptoms of SUD were more likely to use illicit drugs (adjusted Odds Ratio 81.14, 95% CI 12.55-524.47). While the prevalence of SOMD among HIV positive outpatients was high, most SOMD were not associated with increased HRB. Only illicit drug use was predicted by symptoms of SUD. Screening PLHIV for symptoms of SUD may be useful for detecting people likely to be engaging in illicit drug use to reduce the risk of secondary disease transmission.

  5. The association between symptoms of mental disorders and health risk behaviours in Vietnamese HIV positive outpatients: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truc T. Thai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high prevalence of symptoms of mental disorders (SOMD has been found among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV. Additionally, SOMD may impact on the prevalence of high-risk health behaviours (HRB. This study investigates the relationship between SOMD and HRB in a large sample of Vietnamese HIV positive outpatients. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 400 outpatients at two HIV/AIDS clinics in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, selected using a systematic sampling technique. Validated scales were used to measure SOMD, specifically symptoms of depression, anxiety, alcohol use disorder (AUD, substance use disorder (SUD and HIV associated dementia (HAD. Participants completed a self-report questionnaire assessing HRB during the preceding 12 months including unsafe sexual practices and illicit drug use. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between SOMD and HRB. Results The majority of participants (63.5% were male and the median age was 34.0 years. Unsafe sexual practices and illicit drug use were reported by 13.8 and 5.5% of participants. The prevalences of HAD, depression, AUD, anxiety and SUD symptoms were 39.8, 36.5, 13.3 10.5, 3.3% respectively. There was no association between SOMD and HRB either with or without adjusting for correlates of HRB, except between symptoms of SUD and illicit drug use. PLHIV who had symptoms of SUD were more likely to use illicit drugs (adjusted Odds Ratio 81.14, 95% CI 12.55–524.47. Conclusions While the prevalence of SOMD among HIV positive outpatients was high, most SOMD were not associated with increased HRB. Only illicit drug use was predicted by symptoms of SUD. Screening PLHIV for symptoms of SUD may be useful for detecting people likely to be engaging in illicit drug use to reduce the risk of secondary disease transmission.

  6. Operating Characteristics of a Tuberculosis Screening Tool for People Living with HIV in Out-Patient HIV Care and Treatment Services, Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Turinawe

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO 2010 guidelines for intensified tuberculosis (TB case finding (ICF among people living with HIV (PLHIV includes a recommendation that PLHIV receive routine TB screening. Since 2005, the Rwandan Ministry of Health has been using a five-question screening tool. Our study objective was to assess the operating characteristics of the tool designed to identify PLHIV with presumptive TB as measured against a composite reference standard, including bacteriologically confirmed TB.In a cross-sectional study, the TB screening tool was routinely administered at enrolment in outpatient HIV care and treatment services at seven public health facilities. From March to September 2011, study enrollees were examined for TB disease irrespective of TB screening outcome. The examination consisted of a chest radiograph (CXR, three sputum smears (SS, sputum culture (SC and polymerase chain reaction line-probe assay (Hain test. PLHIV were classified as having "laboratory-confirmed TB" with positive results on SS for acid-fast bacilli, SC on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, or a Hain test.Overall, 1,767 patients were enrolled and screened of which; 1,017 (57.6% were female, median age was 33 (IQR, 27-41, and median CD4+ cell count was 385 (IQR, 229-563 cells/mm3. Of the patients screened, 138 (7.8% were diagnosed with TB of which; 125 (90.5% were laboratory-confirmed pulmonary TB. Of 404 (22.9% patients who screened positive and 1,363 (77.1% who screened negative, 79 (19.5% and 59 (4.3%, respectively, were diagnosed with TB. For laboratory-confirmed TB, the tool had a sensitivity of 54.4% (95% CI 45.3-63.3, specificity of 79.5% (95% CI 77.5-81.5, PPV of 16.8% and NPV of 95.8%.TB prevalence among PLHIV newly enrolling into HIV care and treatment was 65 times greater than the overall population prevalence. However, the performance of the tool was poorer than the predicted performance of the WHO recommended TB screening questions.

  7. Life skills training as HIV/AIDS preventive strategy in secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A life skills and HIV/AIDS education programme was implemented in secondary schools as a strategy to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS among school-going young people in South Africa. As part of a joint effort of the Departments of Health and Education, two teachers per school were trained to implement life skills training ...

  8. Validity of impedance-based predictions of total body water as measured by 2H dilution in African HIV/AIDS outpatients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diouf, Adama; Idohou Dossou, Nicole; Wade, Salimata; Gartner, Agnes; Sanon, Dominique Alexis; Bluck, Les; Wright, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of body composition are crucial in identifying HIV-infected patients at risk of malnutrition. No information is available on the validity of indirect body composition methods in African HIV-infected outpatients. Our aim was to test the validity of fifteen published equations, developed in whites, African-Americans and/or Africans who were or not HIV-infected, for predicting total body water (TBW) from bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in HIV-infected patients. The second aim was to develop specific predictive equations. Thirty-four HIV-infected patients without antiretroviral treatment and oedema at the beginning of the study (age 39 (SD 7) years, BMI 18.7 (SD 3.7) kg/m2, TBW 30.4 (SD 7.2 kg) were measured at inclusion then 3 and 6 months later. In the resulting eighty-eight measurements, we compared TBW values predicted from BIA to those measured by 2H dilution. Range of bias values was 0.1-4.3, and errors showed acceptable values (2.2-3.4 kg) for fourteen equations and a high value (10.4) for one equation. Two equations developed in non-HIV-infected subjects showed non-significant bias and could be used in African HIV-infected patients. In the other cases, poor agreement indicated a lack of validity. Specific equations developed from our sample showed a higher precision of TBW prediction when using resistance at 1000kHz (1.7kg) than at 50kHz (2.3kg), this latter precision being similar to that of the valid published equations (2.3 and 2.8kg). The valid published or developed predictive equations should be cross-validated in large independent samples of African HIV-infected patients. (Authors)

  9. Malignancies in HIV/AIDS patients attending an outpatient clinic in Vitória, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Ferreira da Silva Pinto Neto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study investigated cancer prevalence and associated factors among HIV-infected individuals attending an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitória, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. METHODS: A sectional study was conducted among HIV infected adults attending an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitória, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Demographic, epidemiological and clinical data were abstracted from medical records, including cancer diagnoses; nadir and current CD4 cell count, HIV viral load, time on antiretroviral treatment (ART, type of ART and smoking status. RESULTS: A total of 730 (91.3% patients were included in the study. Median age was 44.0 [interquartile range (IQR: 35-50.3] years; median time since HIV diagnosis was 5.5 years (IQR: 2-10; 60% were male; and 59% were white. Thirty (4.1% cases of cancer were identified of which 16 (53% were AIDS defining cancers and 14 (47% were non-AIDS defining malignancies. Patients diagnosed with cancer presented higher chance of being tobacco users [OR 2.2 (95% CI: 1.04-6.24]; having nadir CD4 ≤200 cells/mm³ [OR 3.0 (95% CI: 1.19-7.81] and higher lethality [OR 13,3 (95% CI: 4,57-38,72]. CONCLUSIONS: These results corroborate the importance of screening for and prevention of non-AIDS defining cancers focus in HIV-infected population, as these cancers presented with similar frequency as AIDS defining cancers.

  10. Augmenting Outpatient Alcohol Treatment as Usual With Online Alcohol Avoidance Training: Protocol for a Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratti-van der Werf, Marleen Kj; Laurens, Melissa C; Postel, Marloes G; Pieterse, Marcel E; Ben Allouch, Somaya; Wiers, Reinout W; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Salemink, Elske

    2018-03-01

    Recent theoretical models emphasize the role of impulsive processes in alcohol addiction, which can be retrained with computerized Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) training. In this study, the focus is on action tendencies that are activated relatively automatically. The aim of the study is to examine the effectiveness of online CBM Alcohol Avoidance Training using an adapted Approach-Avoidance Task as a supplement to treatment as usual (TAU) in an outpatient treatment setting. The effectiveness of 8 online sessions of CBM Alcohol Avoidance Training added to TAU is tested in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial with pre- and postassessments, plus follow-up assessments after 3 and 6 months. Participants are adult patients (age 18 years or over) currently following Web-based or face-to-face TAU to reduce or stop drinking. These patients are randomly assigned to a CBM Alcohol Avoidance or a placebo training. The primary outcome measure is a reduction in alcohol consumption. We hypothesize that TAU + CBM will result in up to a 13-percentage point incremental effect in the number of patients reaching the safe drinking guidelines compared to TAU + placebo CBM. Secondary outcome measures include an improvement in health status and a decrease in depression, anxiety, stress, and possible mediation by the change in approach bias. Finally, patients' adherence, acceptability, and credibility will be examined. The trial was funded in 2014 and is currently in the active participant recruitment phase (since May 2015). Enrolment will be completed in 2019. First results are expected to be submitted for publication in 2020. The main purpose of this study is to increase our knowledge about the added value of online Alcohol Avoidance Training as a supplement to TAU in an outpatient treatment setting. If the added effectiveness of the training is proven, the next step could be to incorporate the intervention into current treatment. Netherlands Trial Register NTR5087; http

  11. Modeling the impact of integrating HIV and outpatient health services on patient waiting times in an urban health clinic in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarang Deo

    Full Text Available Rapid scale up of HIV treatment programs in sub-Saharan Africa has refueled the long-standing health policy debate regarding the merits and drawbacks of vertical and integrated system. Recent pilots of integrating outpatient and HIV services have shown an improvement in some patient outcomes but deterioration in waiting times, which can lead to worse health outcomes in the long run.A pilot intervention involving integration of outpatient and HIV services in an urban primary care facility in Lusaka, Zambia was studied. Data on waiting time of patients during two seven-day periods before and six months after the integration were collected using a time and motion study. Statistical tests were conducted to investigate whether the two observation periods differed in operational details such as staffing, patient arrival rates, mix of patients etc. A discrete event simulation model was constructed to facilitate a fair comparison of waiting times before and after integration. The simulation model was also used to develop alternative configurations of integration and to estimate the resulting waiting times.Comparison of raw data showed that waiting times increased by 32% and 36% after integration for OPD and ART patients respectively (p<0.01. Using simulation modeling, we found that a large portion of this increase could be explained by changes in operational conditions before and after integration such as reduced staff availability (p<0.01 and longer breaks between consecutive patients (p<0.05. Controlling for these differences, integration of services, per se, would have resulted in a significant decrease in waiting times for OPD and a moderate decrease for HIV services.Integrating health services has the potential of reducing waiting times due to more efficient use of resources. However, one needs to ensure that other operational factors such as staff availability are not adversely affected due to integration.

  12. A Comparative Evaluation of Two Interventions for Educator Training in HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li-Wei; Gow, Jeff; Akintola, Olagoke; Pauly, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two different methods to teach educators about HIV/AIDS. Sixty educators were selected from eight schools in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, to undergo HIV/AIDS training using an interactive CD-ROM intervention. Another sixty educators from other schools were selected to undergo a two-day Life Skills…

  13. Interactive "Video doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, P; Ciccarone, D; Gansky, SA; Bangsberg, DR; Clanon, K; McPhee, SJ; Calderón, SH; Bogetz, A; Gerbert, B

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide “prevention with positives” in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based...

  14. The feasibility of cognitive adaptation training for outpatients with schizophrenia in integrated treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Peter; Østergaard, Birte; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive adaptation training (CAT) has been tested as a psychosocial treatment, showing promising results. To date there are no reported tests of CAT treatment outside the United States. Thus, we decided to adjust CAT treatment and apply it to an Integrated Treatment setting in Denmark. In this ...

  15. Integrating teaching into routine outpatient care: The design and evaluation of an ambulatory training concept (HeiSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundertmark, Jan; Apondo, Sandra Karina; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    Background: Direct patient contact is crucial in learning important interactional and examination skills. However, medical students have limited opportunity to self-responsibly practise these skills in authentic clinical settings and typically receive insufficient feedback on their performance. We developed a novel single-session ambulatory teaching concept (Heidelberg Student Ambulatory training, "HeiSA") to prepare students more adequately for clinical-practical responsibilities. Methods: To identify challenges and target group needs, we reviewed current literature and consulted an expert group of faculty lecturers and training researchers. The resulting course concept was put into practice at the University Hospital's general-internistic outpatient department and evaluated in a pilot phase (winter term 2010, ten participants) and a main project phase (summer and winter terms 2011, 14 and 21 participants, respectively). Third and fourth-year students autonomously take a new patient's medical history and conduct a complete physical examination in one hour under supervision, followed by extensive preceptor feedback. To assess learning achievements, participants and a control group self-rated their communication and examination skills before and (participants only) after the session on six-point Likert scales (1=completely able, 6=completely unable). The preceptor also evaluated the participants' performance. Finally, all stakeholders re-evaluated the course concept. Results: HeiSA is a feasible training concept and accepted by staff members and students. It provides opportunities to practise clinical skills in a relevant, authentic learning environment with extensive feedback. Participants report improved anamnesis (0.27±0.51, p =.003) and physical examination (0.25±0.41, p =.008) skills. The preceptor evaluated students' performance to be generally high, with ratings ranging from 1.40±0.55 (item: the student does not interrupt the patient) to 2.51±0.89 (item

  16. Training health care workers to promote HIV services for patients with tuberculosis in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behets Frieda

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV counseling and testing, HIV prevention and provision of HIV care and support are essential activities to reduce the burden of HIV among patients with TB, and should be integrated into routine TB care. Methods The development of training materials to promote HIV services for TB patients involved the definition of target health care workers (HCWs; identification of required tasks, skills and knowledge; review of international guidelines; and adaptation of existing training materials for voluntary counseling and testing, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and management of opportunistic infections (OIs. Training effectiveness was assessed by means of questionnaires administered pre- and post-training, by correlating post-training results of HCWs with the centre's HIV testing acceptance rates, and through participatory observations at the time of on-site supervisory visits and monthly meetings. Results Pre-training assessment identified gaps in basic knowledge of HIV epidemiology, the link between TB and HIV, interpretation of CD4 counts, prevention and management of OIs, and occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP. Opinions on patients' rights and confidentiality varied. Mean test results increased from 72% pre-training to 87% post-training (p Conclusion Many HCWs did not possess the knowledge or skills necessary to integrate HIV activities into routine care for patients with TB. A participatory approach resulted in training materials that fulfilled local needs.

  17. A Locus of Control-based HIV and AIDS Risk Reduction Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effi cacy of a locus of control-based training programme in reducing HIV and AIDS risk among university students. The locus of control-based variables that formed the training programme were social systems control, deferment of gratifi cation, personal values and expectancies, ...

  18. Training needs assessment of service providers: targeted intervention for HIV/AIDS in Jharkhand, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anant; Kumar, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Training needs assessments are pivotal for any capacity building program. Building capacity of service providers and staff involved in HIV/AIDS intervention programs is crucial because of the distinct nature of such programs. It requires specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are of utmost importance, influencing the reach of the program and its impact in halting and reversing the epidemic. This study was conducted to identify the training needs assessment of personnel involved in targeted intervention for high risk populations vulnerable to HIV infection in Jharkhand, India. Through the study the authors critically examine the existing training needs and gaps and suggest strategies to address them.

  19. [Team work and interdiciplinarity: challenges facing the implementation of comprehensive outpatient care for people with HIV/Aids in Pernambuco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Maria Jucineide Lopes; Sampaio, Aletheia Soares; Gurgel, Idê Gomes Dantas

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of providing healthcare to people with HIV/Aids requires investment in comprehensive action and care, constituting a challenge for the multidisciplinary work teams to build an interdisciplinary practice. This study sought to analyze comprehensive healthcare in the Specialized Assistance Services for HIV/Aids (SAE-HIV/Aids) in Recife, in the State of Pernambuco, starting with the process and organization of team work. This is a case study developed in three SAE-HIV/Aids units, based on a qualitative approach using different research techniques. The results show that SAE-HIV/Aids have complied with most of the Brazilian Health Ministry recommendations in terms of basic infrastructure, though none of them had a team of appropriate size. These services have shown signs of fragmentation and difficulty in establishing a systematic intersectorial and interdisciplinary practice, with failings in ensuring the reference and counter-reference flow. It was seen that there was little appreciation of the role of the manager as team leader. The need to perceive the user as a whole was identified, as well as for the team to work in a coordinated manner in order to ensure communicative and relational activities.

  20. Frequency and determinants of consistent STI/HIV testing among men who have sex with men testing at STI outpatient clinics in the Netherlands: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maartje; Heijne, Janneke C M; Hogewoning, Arjan A; van Aar, Fleur

    2017-09-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at highest risk for STIs and HIV infections in the Netherlands. However, official guidelines on STI testing among MSM are lacking. They are advised to test for STIs at least every six months, but their testing behaviour is not well known. This study aimed to get insight into the proportion and determinants of consistent 6-monthly STI testing among MSM testing at STI outpatient clinics in the Netherlands. This study included longitudinal surveillance data of STI consultations among MSM from all 26 STI outpatient clinics in the Netherlands between 1 June 2014 and 31 December 2015. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants of consistent 6-monthly testing compared with single testing and inconsistent testing. Determinants of time between consultations among men with multiple consultations were analysed using a Cox Prentice-Williams-Peterson gap-time model. A total of 34 605 STI consultations of 18 634 MSM were included. 8966 (48.1%) men had more than one consultation, and 3516 (18.9%) men tested consistently 6-monthly. Indicators of high sexual risk behaviour, including having a history of STI, being HIV positive and having more than 10 sex partners, were positively associated with both being a consistent tester and returning to the STI clinic sooner. Men who were notified by a partner or who reported STI symptoms were also more likely to return to the STI clinic sooner, but were less likely to be consistent testers, identifying a group of event-driven testers. The proportion of consistent 6-monthly testers among MSM visiting Dutch STI outpatient clinics was low. Testing behaviour was associated with sexual risk behaviour, but exact motives to test consistently remain unclear. Evidence-based testing guidelines are needed to achieve optimal reductions in STI transmission in the future. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  1. Pain in amaXhosa women living with HIV/AIDS: a cross-sectional study of ambulant outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Romy; Jelsma, Jennifer; Stein, Dan J

    2017-04-13

    Pain is one of the most commonly reported symptoms in people living with HIV/AIDS, whether or not they are receiving anti-retroviral therapy. A recent systematic review identified a paucity of studies exploring pain in women in low and middle income countries. The prevalence and characteristics of pain in women living with HIV/AIDS may differ from that of men as many chronic pain conditions are more prevalent in women. The aims of this study were to establish pain prevalence, characteristics and management in amaXhosa women living with HIV/AIDS. In addition, we aimed to identify whether there were associations between pain in this population and the psychosocial factors of employment, education, self-efficacy, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, health related quality of life and childhood trauma. A cross-sectional study of 229 women who had undergone HIV testing and were registered patients at a community health centre was conducted. Data were collected by interview with a demographic questionnaire, the Brief Pain Inventory-Xhosa, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Xhosa, Harvard Trauma Questionnaire-Xhosa for PTSD, Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease 6-Item Scale-Xhosa; the EQ-5D health related quality of life instrument, and the Beck Depression Inventory. 170 of the women had pain, a prevalence rate of 74.24% (95%CI 68.2 - 79.47%). The women reported significant pain with pain severity of 5.06 ± 1.57 and pain interference of 6.39 ± 1.96 out of 10. Only two women were receiving adequate pain management according to the pain management index. Participants reported a mean of 2.42 ± 1.21 different anatomical sites of pain. There were more unemployed participants in the group with pain and they had significantly fewer years of schooling. Those with pain had lower self-efficacy; health related quality of life and increased depression and PTSD symptom severity. This study highlights that pain is a common problem for amaXhosa women living with

  2. Can trained lay providers perform HIV testing services? A review of national HIV testing policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, David E; Johnson, Cheryl; Sands, Anita; Wong, Vincent; Figueroa, Carmen; Baggaley, Rachel

    2017-01-04

    Only an estimated 54% of people living with HIV are aware of their status. Despite progress scaling up HIV testing services (HTS), a testing gap remains. Delivery of HTS by lay providers may help close this testing gap, while also increasing uptake and acceptability of HIV testing among key populations and other priority groups. 50 National HIV testing policies were collated from WHO country intelligence databases, contacts and testing program websites. Data regarding lay provider use for HTS was extracted and collated. Our search had no geographical or language restrictions. This data was then compared with reported data from the Global AIDS Response Progress Reporting (GARPR) from July 2015. Forty-two percent of countries permit lay providers to perform HIV testing and 56% permit lay providers to administer pre-and post-test counseling. Comparative analysis with GARPR found that less than half (46%) of reported data from countries were consistent with their corresponding national HIV testing policy. Given the low uptake of lay provider use globally and their proven use in increasing HIV testing, countries should consider revising policies to support lay provider testing using rapid diagnostic tests.

  3. Comparison of Corporate Image a nd Patient Loyalty Perceptions of Outpatients and Inpatients: Example of a Training and Research Hospital in Ankara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Rıfkı Önder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the level of corporate image and patient loyalty of outpatients and inpatients who get services from a hospital and to evaluate the relationship between corporate images’ factors and patient loyalty. Totally 600 patients from a training and research hospitals in Ankara, formed the study sample. As a result, outpatients’ loyalty and image perceptions found medium level; while inpatients’ level found high. In addition, the effect of corporate image factors on patient loyalty was determined that there is a statistically significant , strong and positive correlation and 83% of patient loyalty is explained by corporate image factors. Based on the research findings, making improvements especially in quality and also physical, communication, social responsibility factors can obtain loyal patients. It is suggested to adopt different strategies to outpatients and inpatients while implementing these improvements.

  4. An evaluation of a refresher training intervention for HIV lay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Charles Msisuka a , Ikuma Nozaki b i-nozaki@it.ncgm.go.jpinozaki@hsph.harvard.edu, Kazuhiro Kakimoto c , Motoko Seko d & Mercy M S Ulaya e

    Twenty-five lay counsellors were selected by District Health Office and participated in ... The workshop included: the opening, a pre-training exercise, lectures on quality ... We conclude that the refresher training was effective for improving the ...

  5. Training needs and evaluation of a neuro-HIV training module for non-physician healthcare workers in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cettomai, Deanna; Kwasa, Judith; Birbeck, Gretchen L; Price, Richard W; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Meyer, Ana-Claire

    2011-08-15

    Recent efforts to improve neurological care in resource-limited settings have focused on providing training to non-physician healthcare workers. A one-day neuro-HIV training module emphasizing HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and peripheral neuropathy was provided to 71 health care workers in western Kenya. Pre- and post-tests were administered to 55 participants. Mean age of participants was 29 years, 53% were clinical officers and 40% were nurses. Self-reported comfort was significantly higher for treating medical versus neurologic conditions (ptraining, participants identified more neuropathy etiologies (pre=5.6/9 possible correct etiologies; post=8.0/9; ptraining could correctly identify HAD diagnostic criteria, though there were fewer mis-identified criteria such as abnormal level of consciousness (pre=82%; post=43%; ptraining significantly improved knowledge about etiologies of neuropathy and decreased some misconceptions about HAD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program: building a community partnership through a community health worker training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jesús; Silva-Suarez, Georgina; Serna, Claudia A; De La Rosa, Mario

    2012-01-01

    There is limited information on the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on Latino migrant workers (LMWs), although available data indicate that this community is being disproportionally affected. The need for prevention programs that address the specific needs of LMWs is becoming well recognized. HIV prevention interventions that train and employ community health workers are a culturally appropriate way to address the issues of community trust and capacity building in this community. This article describes the Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program and its efforts to train and engage community health workers in the prevention of HIV among LMWs in South Florida.

  7. Associations between the phosphatidylethanol (PEth) alcohol biomarker and self-reported alcohol use in a sample of HIV-infected outpatient drinkers in western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K.; Gakinya, Benson N.; Mwaniki, Michael M.; Keter, Alfred K.; Lee, Hana; Loxley, Michelle P.; Klein, Debra A.; Sidle, John E.; Martino, Steve; Baliddawa, Joyce B.; Schlaudt, Kathryn L.; Maisto, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background To counteract the syndemics of HIV and alcohol in sub-Saharan Africa, international collaborations have developed interventions to reduce alcohol consumption. Reliable and accurate methods are needed to estimate alcohol use outcomes. A direct alcohol biomarker called phosphatidylethanol (PEth) has been shown to validate heavy, daily drinking, but the literature indicates mixed results for moderate and non-daily drinkers, including among HIV-infected populations. This study examined the associations of the PEth biomarker with self-report alcohol use at 2 time points in 127 HIV-infected outpatient drinkers in western Kenya. Methods Participants were consecutively enrolled in a randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of a behavioral intervention to reduce alcohol use in Eldoret, Kenya. They endorsed current alcohol use, and a minimum score of 3 on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption or consuming ≥ 6 drinks per occasion at least monthly in the past year. Study interviews and blood draws were conducted at baseline and at 3 months post-treatment from July 2012 through September 2013. Alcohol use was assessed using the Timeline Followback questionnaire. Blood samples were analyzed for presence of the PEth biomarker and were compared to self-reported alcohol use. We also conducted semi-structured interviews with 14 study completers in February through March 2014. Results Baseline data indicated an average of moderate-heavy alcohol use: 50% drinking days and a median of 4.5 drinks per drinking day. At baseline, 46% of women (31 of 67) and 8% of men (5 of 60) tested negative for PEth (p<.001). At the 3-month follow-up, 93% of women (25 of 27) and 97% of men (30 of 31) who reported drinking tested positive, while 70% of women (28 of 40) and 35% of men (10 of 29) who denied drinking tested negative for PEth. Interviews were consistent with self-reported alcohol use among 13 individuals with negative baseline results. Conclusions These

  8. The International Classification of Function Disability and Health (ICF) in adults visiting the HIV outpatient clinic at a regional hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van As, Melissa; Myezwa, Hellen; Stewart, Aimee; Maleka, Douglas; Musenge, Eustasius

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, 16.6% of South Africans between 15 and 49 years of age were HIV positive. The advent of anti-retroviral therapy has led to improved longevity, CD4 counts and clinical well-being of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Physical impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions of PLWHA have profound effects on the Health-related Quality of Life and functional abilities of those with the disease, and understanding thereof may assist in the formulation of rehabilitation protocols, health care interventions as well as vocational and legislative policies. The International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) is a standardised tool, endorsed by the World Health Assembly for international use, which aims to classify functioning and disability. It is structured to assess body functions and structure, functional activities and associated personal and environmental factors.This study aimed to develop a profile of the level of functional activity, using the ICF Checklist, of an urban cohort of 45 South African individuals who are HIV positive attending an outpatient clinic at the Helen Joseph Memorial Hospital, Gauteng, South Africa. The results showed a high prevalence of physical impairments, participation restrictions and selective activity limitations and that environmental factors influence their level of ability. Specific impairments where patients had problems were mental functions (69% (n=31), sensory and pain -- 71% (n=32), digestive and metabolic functions 45% (n=20) and neuromuscular 27% (n=12). Activity limitations included major life areas' 58% (n=26), interpersonal relationships 56% (n=25), mobility 40% (n=18) and general tasks and demands 38% (n=17). Limitations in mobility were significantly associated with problems of sensory functions (p=0.05), pain (p=0.006), neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related functions (p=0.006), muscle power (p=0.006) as well as energy and drive functions (p=0.001). The study identifies

  9. Gender Moderates the Association of Depressive Symptoms to Sexual Risk Behavior Among HIV-Positive African-American Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babowitch, Jacklyn D; Vanable, Peter A; Carey, Michael P

    2018-05-01

    Previous research has reported an association between depressive symptoms and sexual risk behavior. The purpose of this study was to explore whether gender moderates this association in a sample of HIV-positive African-Americans. Participants (N = 93) self-reported depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale; CES-D), and sexual risk behavior for the past 4 months. Analyses revealed that the depressive symptoms-by-gender interaction was associated with condomless sex and substance use proximal to sex. When analyses were stratified by gender, depressive symptoms were associated with condomless sex and frequency of substance use only for women. We conclude that depressive symptoms may be a more powerful sexual risk factor among women relative to men.

  10. The role of emotions in the reduction of HIV/AIDS stigma among physicians in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas-Díaz, Nelson; Neilands, Torsten B; Rodríguez-Madera, Sheilla L; Padilla, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Scientific literature has systematically documented the negative effects of social stigma for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). HIV/AIDS stigma has the potential to negatively impact self-care strategies for those already affected, and simultaneously hinder prevention efforts to deter the emergence of new infections. When health professionals manifest these negative attitudes access to quality health-care and prevention strategies can be seriously affected. Scientifically tested interventions to reduce HIV/AIDS stigma among health professionals are still scarce. Although the number of tested interventions has increased over the past decade, few of them target Latino health professionals or Spanish-speaking populations. Furthermore, although some of those interventions have been reported as effective for stigma reduction, more work is needed to better understand the underlying variables that account for the reduction of stigma attitudes in those efforts. The SPACES intervention has been documented as an effective HIV/AIDS stigma-reduction intervention focusing on health-care professionals in training. The intervention, which is delivered in Spanish, has been previously tested with medical students in Puerto Rico and shown significant results in addressing negative attitudes toward PLWHA. The main objective of this study was to document the underlying variables that fostered reduction of HIV/AIDS stigma due to participation in the SPACES intervention. Results evidence that health professionals in training who participated in the intervention (n = 507) had less stigmatizing attitudes toward PLWHA due to an increase in their positive emotions toward this population. In light of these results, we discuss the importance of engaging health professionals in HIV/AIDS stigma-reduction interventions that go beyond the provision of information and skills for interacting with PLWHA, and address the emotional component of HIV/AIDS stigma.

  11. Formal training in general movement assessment is required to effectively evaluate infants with perinatal asphyxia in outpatient settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Annemette K; Greisen, Gorm; Haugsted, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    recordings to assess GMA, in a busy Danish outpatient clinic. METHODS: The study comprised 30-term infants born with perinatal asphyxia, who were video recorded at three months. They were assessed by two certified GMA observers and re-assessed two weeks later. Interobserver and intra-observer agreements were...

  12. Feasibility of Using Soccer and Job Training to Prevent Drug Abuse and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Tomlinson, Mark; Durkin, Andrew; Baird, Kelly; DeCelles, Jeff; Swendeman, Dallas

    2016-09-01

    Many young, South African men use alcohol and drugs and have multiple partners, but avoid health care settings-the primary site for delivery of HIV intervention activities. To identify the feasibility of engaging men in HIV testing and reducing substance use with soccer and vocational training programs. In two Cape Town neighborhoods, all unemployed men aged 18-25 years were recruited and randomized by neighborhood to: (1) an immediate intervention condition with access to a soccer program, random rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) for alcohol and drug use, and an opportunity to enter a vocational training program (n = 72); or (2) a delayed control condition (n = 70). Young men were assessed at baseline and 6 months later by an independent team. Almost all young men in the two neighborhoods participated (98 %); 85 % attended at least one practice (M = 42.3, SD = 34.4); 71 % typically attended practice. Access to job training was provided to the 35 young men with the most on-time arrivals at practice, drug-free RDT, and no red cards for violence. The percentage of young men agreeing to complete RDT at soccer increased significantly over time; RDTs with evidence of alcohol and drug use decreased over time. At the pre-post assessments, the frequency of substance use decreased; and employment and income increased in the immediate condition compared to the delayed condition. HIV testing rates, health care contacts, sexual behaviors, HIV knowledge, condom use and attitudes towards women were similar over time. Alternative engagement strategies are critical pathways to prevent HIV among young men. This feasibility study shows that soccer and job training offer such an alternative, and suggest that a more robust evaluation of this intervention strategy be pursued.

  13. A Live Threat Violence Simulation Exercise for Psychiatric Outpatient Departments: A Valuable Aid to Training in Violence Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Robert E; Yager, Joel

    2017-10-30

    Violence in psychiatric outpatient settings is a ubiquitous concern. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a live threat violence simulation exercise, designed to reduce the risk of future outpatient clinic violence and minimize the effects of future incidents on staff. The psychiatric outpatient clinic at the University of Colorado Hospital developed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-hour live violence threat simulation exercise as a companion to a 7-hour violence prevention program. The simulation includes an orientation, two threat simulation scenarios, three debriefings, satisfaction surveys, problem identification, action plans, and annual safety and process improvements. The authors have conducted live violence simulation exercises from 2011-2016, and have collected survey data about our annual simulation exercise from 2014-2016. Each year ≥ 52% of participants responded, and each year ≥ 90% of respondents rated the simulation as "very helpful/helpful", ≥ 86% believed themselves to be "much better/better" prepared to deal with violent episodes, and simulation side effects such as worries about past trauma; anxiety; sleep problems; increase in workplace concerns. From 2011-2016, the clinic experienced 4 major violent episodes and 36 episodes of potential violence with no staff injuries and minimal psychological sequelae to one staff member. Violence prevention efforts and the development of close police/staff relationships may have contributed to these fortunate outcomes. Satisfaction surveys suggest that the simulations are very helpful/helpful, with participants feeling much better/ better prepared to manage violence. The exercises led the authors to initiate staff safety related behavioral changes as well as physical space and safety processes improvements. The violence prevention program and simulation exercises have promoted excellent relationships with police and a consistent safety record over six years. This

  14. Training social workers to enhance patient-centered care for drug-resistant TB-HIV in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelnick, J R; Seepamore, B; Daftary, A; Amico, K R; Bhengu, X; Friedland, G; Padayatchi, N; Naidoo, K; O'Donnell, M R

    2018-03-21

    KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is the epicenter of an epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection, characterized by low rates of medication adherence and retention in care. Social workers may have a unique role to play in improving DR-TB-HIV outcomes. We designed, implemented and evaluated a model-based pilot training course on patient-centered care, treatment literacy in DR-TB and HIV coinfection, patient support group facilitation, and self-care. Ten social workers participated in a 1-day training course. Post-training questionnaire scores showed significant overall gains ( P = 0.003). A brief training intervention may be a useful and feasible way to engage social workers in patient-centered care for DR-TB and HIV coinfection.

  15. South Africa’s private sector investment in training and its erosion as a result of HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin George

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available South Africa’s economic prospects depend on the productivity of its labour, and productivity can only be maximised when the labour force possess the appropriate skills. Business is playing its part by offering training opportunities to employees. Collectively, they are spending more than the government’s mandated level on training. However, the HIV and AIDS epidemic is eroding this investment in southern Africa where the HIV epidemic is at its worst. While there has been empirical work that provides estimates on the cost of HIV and AIDS to business, there is very little data on the actual amounts large companies spend on training, and how much of this investment is eroded as a result of HIV and AIDS deaths. Using an estimate of the HIV and AIDS death rate in the private sector and survey data which identifies training expenditure by sector, the authors estimate the extent to which HIV and AIDS has potentially eroded this investment. The loss for all sectors was estimated at almost R10 million (R9,871,732 during the study year, which equates to USD1,183,661 per annum. This amount represented on average 0.73 per cent of the actual investment in training. The real costs of HIV and AIDS on business, which includes absenteeism, declining productivity and other costs are difficult to quantify, but they are likely to significantly exceed this lost training investment as a result of increasing morbidity and mortality rates due to HIV. It is therefore in a company’s best interest to: (1 ensure that a sound HIV and AIDS policy is in place; (2 invest in effective prevention programmes; and (3 provide the appropriate ARV treatment to infected employees if this treatment is not easily accessible through the public health sector.

  16. Progressive resistance training in elderly hiv-positive patients: does it work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Maria Loiola de Souza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elderly people present alterations in body composition and physical fitness, compromising their quality of life. Chronic diseases, including HIV/AIDS, worsen this situation. Resistance exercises are prescribed to improve fitness and promote healthier and independent aging. Recovery of strength and physical fitness is the goal of exercise in AIDS wasting syndrome. OBJECTIVE: This study describes a case series of HIV-positive elderly patients who participated in a progressive resistance training program and evaluates their body composition, muscular strength, physical fitness and the evolution of CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts. METHODS: Subjects were prospectively recruited for nine months. The training program consisted of three sets of 8-12 repetitions of leg press, seated row, lumbar extension and chest press, performed with free weight machines hts, twice/week for one year. Infectious disease physicians followed patients and reported all relevant clinical data. Body composition was assessed by anthropometric measures and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry before and after the training program. RESULTS: Fourteen patients, aged 62-71 years old, of both genders, without regular physical activity who had an average of nine years of HIV/AIDS history were enrolled. The strengths of major muscle groups increased (74%-122%, p=0.003-0.021 with a corresponding improvement in sit-standing and walking 2.4 m tests (p=0.003. There were no changes in clinical conditions and body composition measures, but triceps and thigh skinfolds were significantly reduced (p=0.037. In addition, there were significant increases in the CD4+ counts (N=151 cells; p=0.008 and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio (0.63 to 0.81, p=0.009. CONCLUSION: Resistance training increased strength, improved physical fitness, reduced upper and lower limb skinfolds, and were associated with an improvement in the CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ counts in HIV positive elderly patients without significant side effects.

  17. A concise evaluation and management curriculum for physicians in training improved billing at an outpatient academic rheumatology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Joel M; Collier, David H; Boyle, Dennis J; Gardner, Edward M

    2010-04-01

    To study whether providing house staff with a brief lecture and handout about proper documentation could improve billing at an academic rheumatology clinic. The authors created an educational sheet about documentation and billing after a review of the common documentation omissions responsible for down coding (Appendix, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/RHU/A8). Beginning in November of 2006, the house staff were provided with this sheet and a brief lecture regarding how outpatient evaluation and management levels of service are coded. The results of clinic billing from January 1, 2006 to October 31, 2006 and November 1, 2006 to August 31, 2007 were obtained from the physician billing office. The authors compared the average level of service, by appointment type, in the prepost comparison periods using the student t test. There was a significant improvement in the level of service billed for new visits (P < 0.001), consults (P < 0.001), and return visits (P < 0.001) after November 1, 2006. The percentage of patients evaluated for the first time who were billed as consults improved from 15% to 78% (P < 0.001 by chi2). These changes resulted in $34,342 of additional billing during the postintervention period. A simple strategy for educating the house staff about proper documentation of the history, physical examination, and clinical decision making resulted in a significant improvement in an academic rheumatology division's outpatient billing.

  18. A combined microfinance and training intervention can reduce HIV risk behaviour in young female participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronyk, Paul M; Kim, Julia C; Abramsky, Tanya; Phetla, Godfrey; Hargreaves, James R; Morison, Linda A; Watts, Charlotte; Busza, Joanna; Porter, John Dh

    2008-08-20

    To assess effects of a combined microfinance and training intervention on HIV risk behavior among young female participants in rural South Africa. : Secondary analysis of quantitative and qualitative data from a cluster randomized trial, the Intervention with Microfinance for AIDS and Gender Equity study. Eight villages were pair-matched and randomly allocated to receive the intervention. At baseline and after 2 years, HIV risk behavior was assessed among female participants aged 14-35 years. Their responses were compared with women of the same age and poverty group from control villages. Intervention effects were calculated using adjusted risk ratios employing village level summaries. Qualitative data collected during the study explored participants' responses to the intervention including HIV risk behavior. After 2 years of follow-up, when compared with controls, young participants had higher levels of HIV-related communication (adjusted risk ratio 1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.12), were more likely to have accessed voluntary counseling and testing (adjusted risk ratio 1.64, 95% confidence interval 1.06-2.56), and less likely to have had unprotected sex at last intercourse with a nonspousal partner (adjusted risk ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.96). Qualitative data suggest a greater acceptance of intrahousehold communication about HIV and sexuality. Although women noted challenges associated with acceptance of condoms by men, increased confidence and skills associated with participation in the intervention supported their introduction in sexual relationships. In addition to impacts on economic well being, women's empowerment and intimate partner violence, interventions addressing the economic and social vulnerability of women may contribute to reductions in HIV risk behavior.

  19. Should trained lay providers perform HIV testing? A systematic review to inform World Health Organization guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C E; Yeh, P T; Johnson, C; Baggaley, R

    2017-12-01

    New strategies for HIV testing services (HTS) are needed to achieve UN 90-90-90 targets, including diagnosis of 90% of people living with HIV. Task-sharing HTS to trained lay providers may alleviate health worker shortages and better reach target groups. We conducted a systematic review of studies evaluating HTS by lay providers using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Peer-reviewed articles were included if they compared HTS using RDTs performed by trained lay providers to HTS by health professionals, or to no intervention. We also reviewed data on end-users' values and preferences around lay providers preforming HTS. Searching was conducted through 10 online databases, reviewing reference lists, and contacting experts. Screening and data abstraction were conducted in duplicate using systematic methods. Of 6113 unique citations identified, 5 studies were included in the effectiveness review and 6 in the values and preferences review. One US-based randomized trial found patients' uptake of HTS doubled with lay providers (57% vs. 27%, percent difference: 30, 95% confidence interval: 27-32, p lay providers. Studies from Cambodia, Malawi, and South Africa comparing testing quality between lay providers and laboratory staff found little discordance and high sensitivity and specificity (≥98%). Values and preferences studies generally found support for lay providers conducting HTS, particularly in non-hypothetical scenarios. Based on evidence supporting using trained lay providers, a WHO expert panel recommended lay providers be allowed to conduct HTS using HIV RDTs. Uptake of this recommendation could expand HIV testing to more people globally.

  20. Meaning of care for terminally Ill HIV-infected patients by HIV-infected peer caregivers in a simulation-based training program in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghee; Shin, Gisoo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simulation-based training program for people living with HIV (PLWH) as peer caregivers who would take care of terminally ill, HIV-infected patients. We used qualitative research methods and standardized patients to explore the meaning of caring for patients as peer caregivers. Study participants included 32 patients registered as PLWH at the South Korea Federation for HIV/AIDS. The meanings of peer caregiving were categorized into four dimensions: physical, psychological, relational, and economic. Our study had benefits in knowledge acquisition for caregivers as well as care recipients, empathy with HIV-infected care recipients, improvement in self-esteem and social participation, and financial self-sufficiency to enable independent living for caregivers. The simulation training program for PLWH peer caregivers for terminally ill HIV-infected patients demonstrated value, for both PLWH caregivers and terminally ill HIV-infected patients in South Korea, to improve the quality of care. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A systematic review of income generation interventions, including microfinance and vocational skills training, for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Caitlin E; Fonner, Virginia A; O'Reilly, Kevin R; Sweat, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Income generation interventions, such as microfinance or vocational skills training, address structural factors associated with HIV risk. However, the effectiveness of these interventions on HIV-related outcomes in low- and middle-income countries has not been synthesized. The authors conducted a systematic review by searching electronic databases from 1990 to 2012, examining secondary references, and hand-searching key journals. Peer-reviewed studies were included in the analysis if they evaluated income generation interventions in low- or middle-income countries and provided pre-post or multi-arm measures on behavioral, psychological, social, care, or biological outcomes related to HIV prevention. Standardized forms were used to abstract study data in duplicate and study rigor was assessed. Of the 5218 unique citations identified, 12 studies met criteria for inclusion. Studies were geographically diverse, with six conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, three in South or Southeast Asia, and three in Latin America and the Caribbean. Target populations included adult women (N = 6), female sex workers/bar workers (N = 3), and youth/orphans (N = 3). All studies targeted females except two among youth/orphans. Study rigor was moderate, with two group-randomized trials and two individual-randomized trials. All interventions except three included some form of microfinance. Only a minority of studies found significant intervention effects on condom use, number of sexual partners, or other HIV-related behavioral outcomes; most studies showed no significant change, although some may have had inadequate statistical power. One trial showed a 55% reduction in intimate partner violence (adjusted risk ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.91). No studies measured incidence/prevalence of HIV or sexually transmitted infections among intervention recipients. The evidence that income generation interventions influence HIV-related behaviors and outcomes is inconclusive. However, these

  2. A systematic review of income generation interventions, including microfinance and vocational skills training, for HIV prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Caitlin E.; Fonner, Virginia A.; O'Reilly, Kevin R.; Sweat, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Income generation interventions, such as microfinance or vocational skills training, address structural factors associated with HIV risk. However, the effectiveness of these interventions on HIV-related outcomes in low- and middle-income countries has not been synthesized. We conducted a systematic review by searching electronic databases from 1990-2012, examining secondary references, and hand searching key journals. Peer-reviewed studies were included in the analysis if they evaluated income generation interventions in low- or middle-income countries and provided pre-post or multi-arm measures on behavioral, psychological, social, care or biological outcomes related to HIV prevention. Standardized forms were used to abstract study data in duplicate and study rigor was assessed. Of 5,218 unique citations identified, 12 studies met criteria for inclusion. Studies were geographically diverse, with 6 conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, 3 in South or Southeast Asia, and 3 in Latin America and the Caribbean. Target populations included adult women (N=6), female sex workers/bar workers (N=3), and youth/orphans (N=3). All studies targeted females except 2 among youth/orphans. Study rigor was moderate, with 2 group-randomized trials and 2 individual-randomized trials. All interventions except 3 included some form of microfinance. Only a minority of studies found significant intervention effects on condom use, number of sexual partners or other HIV-related behavioral outcomes; most studies showed no significant change, although some may have had inadequate statistical power. One trial showed a 55% reduction in intimate partner violence (adjusted risk ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.91). No studies measured incidence/prevalence of HIV or sexually transmitted infections among intervention recipients. The evidence that income generation interventions influence HIV-related behaviors and outcomes is inconclusive. However, these interventions may have important effects

  3. Mobile learning for HIV/AIDS healthcare worker training in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolfo Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present an innovative approach to healthcare worker (HCW training using mobile phones as a personal learning environment. Twenty physicians used individual Smartphones (Nokia N95 and iPhone, each equipped with a portable solar charger. Doctors worked in urban and peri-urban HIV/AIDS clinics in Peru, where almost 70% of the nation's HIV patients in need are on treatment. A set of 3D learning scenarios simulating interactive clinical cases was developed and adapted to the Smartphones for a continuing medical education program lasting 3 months. A mobile educational platform supporting learning events tracked participant learning progress. A discussion forum accessible via mobile connected participants to a group of HIV specialists available for back-up of the medical information. Learning outcomes were verified through mobile quizzes using multiple choice questions at the end of each module. Methods In December 2009, a mid-term evaluation was conducted, targeting both technical feasibility and user satisfaction. It also highlighted user perception of the program and the technical challenges encountered using mobile devices for lifelong learning. Results With a response rate of 90% (18/20 questionnaires returned, the overall satisfaction of using mobile tools was generally greater for the iPhone. Access to Skype and Facebook, screen/keyboard size, and image quality were cited as more troublesome for the Nokia N95 compared to the iPhone. Conclusions Training, supervision and clinical mentoring of health workers are the cornerstone of the scaling up process of HIV/AIDS care in resource-limited settings (RLSs. Educational modules on mobile phones can give flexibility to HCWs for accessing learning content anywhere. However lack of softwares interoperability and the high investment cost for the Smartphones' purchase could represent a limitation to the wide spread use of such kind mLearning programs in RLSs.

  4. Brief Training of HIV Medical Providers Increases Their Frequency of Delivering Prevention Counselling to Patients at Risk of Transmitting HIV to Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shilpa N.; Marks, Gary; Gardner, Lytt; Golin, Carol E.; Shinde, Sanjyot; O'Daniels, Christine; Wilson, Tracey E.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; Banderas, Julie W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine whether brief training of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) medical providers increased the frequency with which they routinely delivered prevention counselling to patients, and whether patient characteristics were associated with receipt of that counselling. Design: Longitudinal. Setting: Seven HIV…

  5. A pilot study of the efficacy of a computerized executive functioning remediation training with game elements for children with ADHD in an outpatient setting: outcome on parent and teacher-rated executive functioning and ADHD behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Oord, S.; Ponsioen, A.J.G.B.; Geurts, H.M.; ten Brink, E.L.; Prins, P.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study tested the short- and long-term efficacy (9 weeks follow-up) of an executive functioning (EF) remediation training with game elements for children with ADHD in an outpatient clinical setting, using a randomized controlled wait-list design. Furthermore, in a subsample,

  6. Saints and sinners: training Papua New Guinean (PNG) Christian Clergy to respond to HIV and AIDS using a model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Kerry William Kim

    2008-09-01

    Papua New Guinea has experienced a growing HIV/AIDS epidemic. The Christian Churches have played a vital role in responding to HIV, through community support, encouragement and social change. Strong, effective Church leadership can help create safe environments of care and support for those infected and for prevention of HIV. Method A series of trainings in capacity development for clergy were undertaken by the National AIDS Council Secretariat (NACS)/National HIV/AIDS Support Project (NHASP). Results A model "Church's Response to HIV and AIDS in a Care Continuum" was developed to assist the training. This paper discusses the model and the lessons learned.

  7. Harnessing Online Peer Education (HOPE): integrating C-POL and social media to train peer leaders in HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganath, Devan; Gill, Harkiran K; Cohen, Adam Carl; Young, Sean D

    2012-01-01

    Novel methods, such as Internet-based interventions, are needed to combat the spread of HIV. While past initiatives have used the Internet to promote HIV prevention, the growing popularity, decreasing digital divide, and multi-functionality of social networking sites, such as Facebook, make this an ideal time to develop innovative ways to use online social networking sites to scale HIV prevention interventions among high-risk groups. The UCLA Harnessing Online Peer Education study is a longitudinal experimental study to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of using social media for peer-led HIV prevention, specifically among African American and Latino Men who have Sex with Men (MSM). No curriculum currently exists to train peer leaders in delivering culturally aware HIV prevention messages using social media. Training was created that adapted the Community Popular Opinion Leader (C-POL) model, for use on social networking sites. Peer leaders are recruited who represent the target population and have experience with both social media and community outreach. The curriculum contains the following elements: discussion and role playing exercises to integrate basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS, awareness of sociocultural HIV/AIDS issues in the age of technology, and communication methods for training peer leaders in effective, interactive social media-based HIV prevention. Ethical issues related to Facebook and health interventions are integrated throughout the sessions. Training outcomes have been developed for long-term assessment of retention and efficacy. This is the first C-POL curriculum that has been adapted for use on social networking websites. Although this curriculum has been used to target African-American and Latino MSM, it has been created to allow generalization to other high-risk groups.

  8. The Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program: Building a Community Partnership Through a Community Health Worker Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Jesús; Silva-Suarez, Georgina; Serna, Claudia A.; De La Rosa, Mario

    2012-01-01

    There is limited information on the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on Latino migrant workers (LMWs), although available data indicate that this community is being disproportionally affected. The need for prevention programs that address the specific needs of LMWs is becoming well recognized. HIV prevention interventions that train and employ community health workers are a culturally appropriate way to address the issues of community trust and capacity building in this community. This article...

  9. Creatine fails to augment the benefits from resistance training in patients with HIV infection: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos K Sakkas

    Full Text Available Progressive resistance exercise training (PRT improves physical functioning in patients with HIV infection. Creatine supplementation can augment the benefits derived from training in athletes and improve muscle function in patients with muscle wasting. The objective of this study was to determine whether creatine supplementation augments the effects of PRT on muscle strength, energetics, and body composition in HIV-infected patients.This is a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, clinical research center-based, outpatient study in San Francisco. 40 HIV-positive men (20 creatine, 20 placebo enrolled in a 14-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive creatine monohydrate or placebo for 14 weeks. Treatment began with a loading dose of 20 g/day or an equivalent number of placebo capsules for 5 days, followed by maintenance dosing of 4.8 g/day or placebo. Beginning at week 2 and continuing to week 14, all subjects underwent thrice-weekly supervised resistance exercise while continuing on the assigned study medication (with repeated 6-week cycles of loading and maintenance. The main outcome measurements included muscle strength (one repetition maximum, energetics ((31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, composition and size (magnetic resonance imaging, as well as total body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Thirty-three subjects completed the study (17 creatine, 16 placebo. Strength increased in all 8 muscle groups studied following PRT, but this increase was not augmented by creatine supplementation (average increase 44 vs. 42%, difference 2%, 95% CI -9.5% to 13.9% in creatine and placebo, respectively. There were no differences between groups in changes in muscle energetics. Thigh muscle cross-sectional area increased following resistance exercise, with no additive effect of creatine. Lean body mass (LBM increased to a significantly greater extent with creatine. CONCLUSIONS / SIGNIFICANCE: Resistance exercise improved

  10. "We Are Now Free to Speak": Qualitative Evaluation of an Education and Empowerment Training for HIV Patients in Namibia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen W MacLachlan

    Full Text Available Although numerous studies provide evidence that active patient engagement with health care providers improves critical outcomes such as medication adherence, very few of these have been done in low resource settings. In Namibia, patient education and empowerment trainings were conducted in four antiretroviral (ART clinics to increase patient engagement during patient-provider interactions. This qualitative study supplements findings from a randomized controlled trial, by analyzing data from 10 in-depth patient interviews and 94 training evaluation forms. A blended approach of deductive and inductive coding was used to understand training impact. Findings indicated the trainings increased patients' self-efficacy through a combination of improved HIV-related knowledge, greater communication skills and enhanced ability to overcome complex psychosocial barriers, such as fear of speaking up to providers. This study suggests patient empowerment training may be a powerful method to engage HIV patients in their own care and treatment.

  11. Randomized controlled trial of caregiver training for HIV-infected child neurodevelopment and caregiver well being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Judith K; Opoka, Robert; Familiar, Itziar; Nakasujja, Noeline; Sikorskii, Alla; Awadu, Jorem; Givon, Deborah; Shohet, Cilly; Murray, Sarah M; Augustinavicius, Jura; Mendelson, Tamar; Boivin, Michael

    2017-08-24

    HIV infection places children at neurodevelopmental risk; for young children in poverty, risk is compounded by compromised caregiving quality. The mediational intervention for sensitizing caregivers (MISC) program trained caregivers on fostering daily interactions with young children. We hypothesized that MISC could enhance neurodevelopment of rural Ugandan HIV-infected children and improve mental health outcomes of their caregivers, which might mediate improved caregiving quality. A randomized trial of HIV-infected young children (ages 2-5 years) and their female caregivers; cluster randomization was to MISC or a nutrition curriculum. A total of 18 geographic clusters in rural Uganda. Children and caregivers were evaluated at baseline, 6 months, 1 year, and 1-year post-training. Mullen Scales of Early Learning, the Color-Object Association Test for memory, the Early Childhood Vigilance Test of attention, and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function for the children. Caregivers completed measures of depression and anxiety symptoms and daily functioning. MISC had a significant impact on postintervention receptive language (adjusted mean difference = 3.13, 95% confidence interval 0.08, 6.18) that persisted at 1-year follow-up. MISC caregivers reported significantly less functional impairment postprogram (adjusted mean difference = -0.15, 95% confidence interval -0.28, -0.01). Other outcomes were NS. Both intervention conditions resulted in improvements in the study children over time. MISC showed additional impacts on child language and caregiver well-being. Future directions that include assessing the extent enhanced language development resulting from improved caregiving may better prepare impoverished children for school.

  12. The MEDIA model: An innovative method for digitizing and training community members to facilitate an HIV prevention intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfro, Tiffaney; Johnson, Erin; Lambert, Danielle N; Wingood, Gina; DiClemente, Ralph J

    2018-02-17

    As human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to disproportionately affect African American women, practitioners remain committed to developing innovative strategies to reduce HIV prevalence. These strategies include training community organizations, such as churches, and utilizing digital media to make intervention dissemination more sustainable. This article describes one such effort to train lay community members within predominantly Black churches in Atlanta, GA, to implement an HIV prevention intervention. Lay educators were trained by translating a face-to-face Training of Facilitators (TOF) to a digital platform using the MEDIA (Motivate-Engage-Digitize-Implement-Assess) model. Formative evaluations, consultation with experts in the digital platform of choice, and the experience of two P4 for Women Master Trainers informed our translation. The model guided the translation process as our research team worked alongside topical experts and a production company to develop storyboards for core curriculum activities, which were later scripted and filmed with mock participants. A user guide, toolkit, and program website were also developed as supplemental materials to accompany the video training. Lessons learned from this study indicate future attempts at digitizing TOFs should keep in mind that digitization can be a time-consuming process, pilot testing in the new format is necessary even for a previously tested intervention, and the structure provided by facilitators in face-to-face training must be embedded into the format of digitized trainings.

  13. An open trial of outpatient group therapy for bulimic disorders: combination program of cognitive behavioral therapy with assertive training and self-esteem enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Akihiro; Nakazato, Michiko; Mitsumori, Makoto; Koizumi, Hiroki; Shimizu, Eiji; Fujisaki, Mihisa; Iyo, Masaomi

    2005-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the therapeutic efficacy of combined group cognitive behavioral therapy (CGCBT) and to explore the characteristics of the patients who failed to complete it. Our group cognitive behavioral therapy combined with assertiveness training for alexithymia and self-esteem enhancement therapy were attended over a 10-week period. Twenty-five participants were enrolled in the study. The clinical symptoms were assessed before and after treatment, using rating scales including the Eating Disorder Inventory-2, the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning. Sixteen participants (64%) completed the CGCBT program. Completion of the CGCBT resulted in significant improvements in reducing binge-eating behavior and improving social functioning. Eight patients (32%) significantly improved using the Clinical Global Impression Change (CGI-C). Stepwise logistic regression analysis of the results indicated that a lower age (P=0.04) and psychiatric comorbidity (P=0.06) were predictors of dropout from the CGCBT program. Our CGCBT program is a promising first-line treatment for bulimic outpatients. Lower age and the presence of comorbidity had effects on dropout rates.

  14. The Knowledge and Attitude of Teachers about HIV/AIDS; before and after Training in Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Hoseinpour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a retrovirus that infects cells of the immune system, destroying or impairing their function. As the infection progresses, the immune system becomes weaker, and the person becomes more susceptible to infections. The most advanced stage of HIV infection is acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of  intervention training on knowledge and attitude of teachers about HIV/AIDS. Materials and Methods This quasi-experimental study, 11 cities were selected randomly cluster among 27 cities of Khorasan Razavi province- Iran. The study teachers were selected multi stage cluster sampling method; so, in the selected cities, randomly selected a number of 4 high schools of each cluster, and all the teachers of these schools were invited to participate in this research. At pre-test basic knowledge and attitude of teachers about HIV/AIDS were evaluated. Then their educational needs and curriculum were designed. Then 2 weeks after conducting the education, teacher's knowledge and attitude were evaluated (post-test. Results 1,838 teachers with the mean age of 39.81+6.104 participated in this study. The mean score of their knowledge about HIV/AIDS rose from 11.84+2.116 to 12.2+ 1.450 after intervention. The mean score of their attitude about HIV/AIDS rose from 18.07+4.740 to 20.64+4.905 after intervention. The results showed that there was a significant difference between teachers’ knowledge and attitude before and after the training program (P=0.000. Conclusion According to the study it can be concluded teachers training to increase knowledge about HIV/AIDS and improve their attitude towards the disease AIDS.

  15. Evaluating an HIV and AIDS Community Training Partnership Program in Five Diamond Mining Communities in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispel, L. C.; Peltzer, K.; Nkomo, N.; Molomo, B.

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, De Beers Consolidated Diamond Mines in South Africa entered into a partnership, with the Soul City Institute for Health and Development Communications to implement an HIV and AIDS Community Training Partnership Program (CTPP), initially in five diamond mining areas in three provinces of South Africa. The aim of CTPP was to improve HIV…

  16. Prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors among individuals attending outpatient department of rural health training centre, Haldwani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janki Bartwal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hypertension is one of the major health and development challenges of the 21st century, which, for most countries, has developed together with rapid cultural and social changes, ageing populations, increasing urbanization, dietary changes, reduced physical activity, and other unhealthy behaviours. Objectives: 1 To find out the prevalence of Hypertension in study subjects 2 To identify the risk factors associated with Hypertension. Materials and Methods: A Cross-sectional study was carried out among 369 individuals of 30 years and above attending Out Patient Department (OPD in Rural Health Training Centre (RHTC under the Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Haldwani during June 2013-August 2013. A pretested predesigned questionnaire was used to collect demographic data by interview technique .The blood pressure was recorded and classified using JNC VII criteria to grade hypertension. Data was compiled, entered & analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: Among 369 patients, the prevalence of hypertension was 41.7%; out of this, 28.7% were aware of their hypertensive status while 13% were newly diagnosed cases. The association between hypertension with increase in age, family history of hypertension, increase salt intake, consuming mixed diet, increase waist circumference, waist hip ratio and body mass index was found significant. Physical inactivity, gender, tobacco and alcohol consumption were not significantly associated with hypertension. Conclusions: The prevalence of hypertension in rural area is relatively high. Extensive efforts are required for raising the awareness level & regular screening of high-risk population is recommended for preventing the complications & disability.

  17. Aerobic and resistance training improves mood state among adults living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggers, J R; Hand, G A; Dudgeon, W D; Burgess, S; Phillips, K D; Durstine, J L; Blair, S N

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training among self-reported mood disturbances, perceived stress, frequency of self-reported symptoms, and symptom distress in a sample of HIV+ adults. For this purpose, 49 participants were randomly assigned into an exercise (EX) or control (CON) group. Those in the EX group completed 50 min of supervised aerobic and resistance training at a moderate intensity twice a week for 6 weeks. The CON group reported to the university and engaged in sedentary activities. Data were collected at baseline before randomization and 6 weeks post intervention. Measures included the symptom distress scale (SDS), perceived stress scale (PSS), profile of mood states (POMS) total score, and the POMS sub-scale for depression and fatigue. A 2 way ANOVA was used to compare between and within group interactions. The EX group showed a significant decrease in reported depression scores (p=0.03) and total POMS (p=0.003). The CON group reported no change in POMS or SDS, but showed a significant increase in PSS. These findings indicate that combination aerobic and resistance training completed at a moderate intensity at least twice a week provides additional psychological benefits independent of disease status and related symptoms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Increase in sexually transmitted infections in a cohort of outpatient HIV-positive men who have sex with men in the Parisian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfour, E; Dimi, S; Majerholc, C; Fourn, E; Séné, T; Chaida, M B; Vasse, M; Zucman, D

    2017-11-01

    To describe the increased incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in a cohort of HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), followed in a tertiary hospital of the Île-de-France region. We performed a monocentric, retrospective, and prospective study. We included symptomatic HIV-infected MSM patients who consulted for their annual consultation. One hundred and eighty patients were seen between 2008-2011 and 215 between 2012-2015. We observed an increased incidence of STIs between the two periods (14 and 29.3%, respectively). These STIs includes: syphilis, hepatitis C, urethritis, and proctitis due to Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhea. A better management of symptomatic and asymptomatic STIs is needed for HIV-infected MSM patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Mindfulness meditation training effects on CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infected adults: A small randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, J. David; Myers, Hector F.; Cole, Steven W.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation training has stress reduction benefits in various patient populations, but its effects on biological markers of HIV-1 progression are unknown. The present study tested the efficacy of an 8-week Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation program compared to a 1-day control seminar on CD4+ T lymphocyte counts in stressed HIV infected adults. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with enrollment and follow-up occurring between November 2005 and December 2007. A diverse community sample of 48 HIV-1 infected adults was randomized and entered treatment in either an 8-week MBSR or a 1-day control stress reduction education seminar. The primary outcome was circulating counts of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Participants in the 1-day control seminar showed declines in CD4+ T lymphocyte counts whereas counts among participants in the 8-week MBSR program were unchanged from baseline to post-intervention (time × treatment condition interaction, p = .02). This effect was independent of antiretroviral (ARV) medication use. Additional analyses indicated that treatment adherence to the mindfulness meditation program, as measured by class attendance, mediated the effects of mindfulness meditation training on buffering CD4+ T lymphocyte declines. These findings provide an initial indication that mindfulness meditation training can buffer CD4+ T lymphocyte declines in HIV-1 infected adults. PMID:18678242

  20. Performance, costs and cost-effectiveness analysis of the Tay Ho HIV integrative prevention and care & treatment outpatient clinic, Vietnam. : is the model worth scale up?

    OpenAIRE

    Guérard, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, Vietnam has been experiencing an HIV/AIDS epidemic with a general prevalence rate of 0.42 % in 2008 and a projected prevalence rate in 2012 of 0.47%. Although the general HIV prevalence rate is considered low, the virus heavily affects some at-risk population groups in Vietnam, including commercial sex workers, injectable drug users and the men who have sex with men. According to studies, prevalence among these groups is considerable, up to 65%. Risky sexual behaviours ...

  1. HIV/AIDS e Treinamento Concorrente: a Revisão Sistemática HIV/Aids and Concurrent Training: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Ramos Lazzarotto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O uso da terapia anti-retroviral combinada (TARV aumentou a expectativa de vida dos portadores do vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV e, como conseqüência, torna-se constante o estudo do processo fisiopatológico da infecção e das estratégias de intervenção que possam melhorar a qualidade de vida destes indivíduos. O treinamento concorrente, definido como a associação dos componentes aeróbios e força na mesma sessão de exercícios pode ser inserido neste contexto. O objetivo deste artigo é revisar os aspectos centrais da infecção pelo HIV e as evidências existentes sobre o treinamento concorrente com séries múltiplas e simples nos parâmetros imunológico, virológico, cardiorrespiratório e neuromuscular de pessoas infectadas pelo HIV. O método utilizado foi uma revisão sistemática, com artigos publicados entre 2000-2007, nas bases de dados scielo e pubmed e também em dissertações e teses da biblioteca digital da educação física, esporte e saúde. As evidências científicas encontradas nos 8 estudos analisados indicam que o treinamento concorrente, tanto com séries múltiplas quanto séries simples, melhora os parâmetros cardiorrespiratório e neuromuscular; no entanto, os resultados dos parâmetros imunológico e virológico ainda não estão completamente esclarecidos, principalmente sobre os protocolos com séries simples. Considerando o número restrito de trabalhos apresentados, sugere-se o desenvolvimento de estudos com treinamento concorrente em vários desfechos clínicos para pessoas infectadas pelo HIV.The highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART increased life expectancy in individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Alternative strategies have been used in order to improve their quality of life and minimize the HAART effect; among these we can name physical exercise. Concurrent training, the combination of aerobic and strength training in the same exercise session, is used

  2. Predictors of skin and soft tissue infections in HIV-infected outpatients in the community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmige, V; McNulty, M; Silverman, E; David, M Z

    2015-02-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are common in the era of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but the risk factors are not well defined. We sought to elucidate the risk factors for SSTI occurrence in an HIV cohort. This investigation was a retrospective, single-center cohort study, carried out during the period 2005-2009. In this cohort of 511 HIV-infected individuals, 133 SSTIs occurred in 87 individuals over 1,228.6 person-years of follow-up, for an incidence of 108 SSTIs/1,000 person-years [95 % confidence interval (CI) 87-135]. The incidence declined significantly over time (p < 0.01). In a multivariable Cox regression, diabetes [hazard ratio (HR) 2.01; 95 % CI 1.04-3.89], psoriasis (HR 5.77; 95 % CI 1.86-17.9), lymphedema (HR 6.84; 95 % CI 2.59-18.1), intravenous catheter presence (HR 3.38; 95 % CI 1.00-11.5), and HIV viral load greater than 1,000 copies/mL (HR 2.13; 95 % CI 1.33-3.41) were most strongly associated with development of the first SSTI. Trends toward an association between SSTI risk and Medicaid insurance (HR 1.67; 95 % CI 0.98-2.83) and sexually transmitted disease during follow-up (HR 1.66; 0.99-2.78) were present. CD4+ count and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use were not associated with SSTI risk. HIV-infected individuals are at high risk for SSTIs. In a primarily urban, African-American cohort, we found that a number of immunologic and demographic factors were associated with SSTI risk.

  3. Health systems in the Republic of Congo: challenges and opportunities for implementing tuberculosis and HIV collaborative service, research, and training activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linguissi, Laure Stella Ghoma; Gwom, Luc Christian; Nkenfou, Celine Nguefeu; Bates, Matthew; Petersen, Eskild; Zumla, Alimuddin; Ntoumi, Francine

    2017-03-01

    The Republic of Congo is on the World Health Organization (WHO) list of 'high burden' countries for tuberculosis (TB) and HIV. TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected patients in the Republic of Congo. In this viewpoint, the available data on TB and HIV in the Republic of Congo are reviewed, and the gaps and bottlenecks that the National TB Control Program (NTCP) faces are discussed. Furthermore, priority requirements for developing and implementing TB and HIV collaborative service activities are identified. HIV and TB control programs operate as distinct entities with separate case management plans. The implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities to evaluate and monitor the management of TB/HIV co-infected individuals remains inefficient in most regions, and these activities are sometimes non-existent. This reveals major challenges that require definition in order to improve the delivery of healthcare. The NTCP lacks adequate resources for optimal implementation of control measures of TB and HIV compliance and outcomes. The importance of aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services (including follow-up) and adherence support services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is discussed. Aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is required. However, the WHO recommendations are generic, and health services in the Republic of Congo need to tailor their TB and HIV programs according to the availability of resources and operational feasibility. This will also open opportunities for synergizing collaborative TB/HIV research and training activities, which should be prioritized by the donors supporting the TB/HIV programs. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Health systems in the Republic of Congo: challenges and opportunities for implementing tuberculosis and HIV collaborative service, research, and training activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Stella Ghoma Linguissi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Congo is on the World Health Organization (WHO list of ‘high burden’ countries for tuberculosis (TB and HIV. TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected patients in the Republic of Congo. In this viewpoint, the available data on TB and HIV in the Republic of Congo are reviewed, and the gaps and bottlenecks that the National TB Control Program (NTCP faces are discussed. Furthermore, priority requirements for developing and implementing TB and HIV collaborative service activities are identified. HIV and TB control programs operate as distinct entities with separate case management plans. The implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities to evaluate and monitor the management of TB/HIV co-infected individuals remains inefficient in most regions, and these activities are sometimes non-existent. This reveals major challenges that require definition in order to improve the delivery of healthcare. The NTCP lacks adequate resources for optimal implementation of control measures of TB and HIV compliance and outcomes. The importance of aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services (including follow-up and adherence support services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is discussed. Aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is required. However, the WHO recommendations are generic, and health services in the Republic of Congo need to tailor their TB and HIV programs according to the availability of resources and operational feasibility. This will also open opportunities for synergizing collaborative TB/HIV research and training activities, which should be prioritized by the donors supporting the TB/HIV programs.

  5. Training Drug Treatment Patients to Conduct Peer-Based HIV Outreach: An Ethnographic Perspective on Peers' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Honoria; Deren, Sherry; Mino, Milton; Kang, Sung-Yeon; Shedlin, Michele

    2010-01-01

    From 2005 to 2008, the Bienvenidos Project trained Puerto Rican patients of New York City and New Jersey methadone maintenance treatment programs to conduct peer-based community outreach to migrant Puerto Rican drug users to reduce migrants' HIV risk behaviors. Ethnographic research, including focus groups, individual interviews and observations, was conducted with a subset of the patients trained as peers (n=49; 67% male; mean age 40.3 years) to evaluate the self-perceived effects of the intervention. Results of the ethnographic component of this study are summarized. The role of ethnographic methods in implementing and evaluating this kind of intervention is also discussed. PMID:20141456

  6. TestMeEast: a campaign to increase HIV testing in hospitals and to reduce late diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, R; O'Connell, R; Lascar, M; Ferrand, R; Strachan, S; Matin, N; Bassnet, I; Orkin, C

    2016-01-01

    Late diagnosis occurs in almost half of those diagnosed in the UK (HIV Prevention England, 2013. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from HIV Prevention England: http://www.hivpreventionengland.org.uk/Campaigns-Current/National-HIV-Testing-Week ). Testing occurs mainly in sexual health and antenatal clinics despite recommendations to test more broadly [Ellis, S., & Curtis, H. (2012). HIV diagnoses and missed opportunities. Results of the British HIV association (BHIVA) National Audit 2010. Clinical Medicine, 12(5), 430-434]. We report the findings of an HIV-testing week campaign to offer testing to those who have blood tests as part of routine care within outpatient clinics and emergency departments of six London hospitals. The campaign target was to test 500 patients a day during the 2013 National HIV Testing Week (NHTW). Clinic staff and medical students were trained to offer routine HIV testing. Linkage to care was arranged for those who tested HIV-positive. During NHTW we tested 2402 of the planned 2500 test target. 2402/4317 (55.6% 95% CI 54.1-57.1%) of those who had routine blood tests were tested for HIV. There were eight HIV-positive tests; three were new diagnoses (all linked to care). The campaign hashtag #TestMeEast achieved a total Twitter "reach" of 238, 860 and the campaign had widespread news coverage. Our campaign showed that staff and students could be trained and mobilised to do thousands of routine HIV tests during a campaign.

  7. Avaliação da estrutura organizacional da assistência ambulatorial em HIV/Aids no Brasil Evaluation of the organizational structure of HIV/AIDS outpatient care in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Melchior

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: No contexto de acesso universal à terapia antiretroviral, os resultados do Programa de Aids dependem da qualidade do cuidado prestado. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a qualidade do cuidado dos serviços ambulatoriais que assistem pacientes de Aids. MÉTODOS: Estudo realizado em sete Estados brasileiros, em 2001 e 2002. Foi avaliada a qualidade do atendimento a pacientes com Aids quanto à disponibilidade de recursos e a organização do trabalho de assistência. Um questionário com 112 questões estruturadas abordando esses aspectos, foi enviado a 336 serviços. RESULTADOS: A taxa de resposta foi de 95,8% (322. Os indicadores de disponibilidade de recursos mostram uma adequação maior do que os indicadores de organização do trabalho. Não faltam antiretrovirais em 95,5% dos serviços, os exames de CD4 e Carga Viral estão disponíveis em quantidade adequada em 59 e 41% dos serviços, respectivamente. Em 90,4% dos serviços há pelo menos um profissional não médico (psicólogo, enfermeiro ou assistente social. Quanto à organização, 80% não agendavam consulta médica com hora marcada; 40,4% agendavam mais que 10 consultas médicas por período; 17% não possuíam gerentes exclusivos na assistência e 68,6% não realizavam reuniões sistemáticas de trabalho com a equipe. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados apontam que além de garantir a distribuição mais homogênea de recursos, o programa precisa investir no treinamento e disseminação do manejo do cuidado, conforme evidenciado nos resultados da organização de trabalho.OBJECTIVE: In the context of universal access to antiretroviral treatment, the results of the Brazilian AIDS Program will depend on the quality of the care provided. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the healthcare provided by outpatient services for the treatment of AIDS patients. METHODS: The present study was carried out in seven Brazilian States between 2001 and 2002. We evaluated the quality of

  8. A pilot study of the efficacy of a computerized executive functioning remediation training with game elements for children with ADHD in an outpatient setting: outcome on parent- and teacher-rated executive functioning and ADHD behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Oord, S; Ponsioen, A J G B; Geurts, H M; Ten Brink, E L; Prins, P J M

    2014-11-01

    This pilot study tested the short- and long-term efficacy (9 weeks follow-up) of an executive functioning (EF) remediation training with game elements for children with ADHD in an outpatient clinical setting, using a randomized controlled wait-list design. Furthermore, in a subsample, that is, those treated with methylphenidate, additive effects of the EF training were assessed. A total of 40 children (aged 8-12 years) were randomized to the EF training or wait-list. The training consisted of a 25-session training of inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and working memory. Treatment outcome was assessed by parent- and teacher-rated EF, ADHD, oppositional deviant disorder, and conduct disorder symptoms. Children in the EF training showed significantly more improvement than those in the wait-list condition on parent-rated EF and ADHD behavior in the total sample and in the subsample treated with methylphenidate. Effects were maintained at follow-up. This pilot study shows promising evidence for the efficacy of an EF training with game elements. © 2012 SAGE Publications.

  9. Closing the gap: training for healthcare workers and people with disabilities on the interrelationship of HIV and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanass-Hancock, Jill; Alli, Farzana

    2015-01-01

    HIV and disability are interrelated providing a double burden to HIV endemic countries in East and Southern Africa and their already fragile health systems. Although literature reveals that people with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to HIV and that HIV, its opportunistic infections and treatments can cause disability, only few interventions target this issue and none have been evaluated in this region. Formative evaluation was undertaken with regard to the effectiveness of a workshop-based intervention for healthcare workers and people with disabilities on the intersection of disability and HIV in order to inform the further development of this intervention. The formative evaluation assessed participants' perception of the inclusion of disability in HIV services and of opportunities to initiate change after the workshops. It also captured their experiences in utilising knowledge and skills after the workshops using quantitative (short checklist and ranking exercise) and qualitative (semi-structured interviews) methods of inquiry. Frequencies and conventional content analysis were used in the analysis of the data. This study presents an example of applied research conducted under real-world conditions. 60 healthcare workers and people with disabilities took part in this pilot workshop training and participated in the formative evaluation. Healthcare workers and people with disabilities alike identified various barriers to access health services. Reasonable accommodation was perceived as being mainly absent by most participants, while some participants indicated a lack of physical accessibility in the form of universal design. Participants also identified a lack of integration of services and disability-related skills within the healthcare staff. Participants reported a number of enablers, success and challenges while implementing the knowledge from the workshops related to structural issues, service provision and integration. While participants worked on

  10. Counselors' Perceptions of HIV/AIDS Counseling in Botswana: Professional Identity, Practice, and Training Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Rex; Paul, Tebatso; Voils-Levenda, Amanda; Robbins, Melanie; Li, Peiwei; Zaitsoff, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Mental health concerns can exacerbate the progression and transmission of HIV/AIDS. Thus there have been calls for increased research and integration of mental health care into HIV/AIDS treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease has reached pandemic levels. This qualitative study analyzed the open-ended survey responses of 181 individuals…

  11. Autopsy Prevalence of Tuberculosis and Other Potentially Treatable Infections among Adults with Advanced HIV Enrolled in Out-Patient Care in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Tanvier; von Gottberg, Anne; Tlali, Mpho; Chihota, Violet N.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Fielding, Katherine L.; Johnson, Suzanne; Martinson, Neil A.; McCarthy, Kerrigan; Wolter, Nicole; Wong, Emily B.; Charalambous, Salome; Grant, Alison D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early mortality among HIV-positive adults starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains high in resource-limited settings, with tuberculosis (TB) the leading cause of death. However, current methods to estimate TB-related deaths are inadequate and most autopsy studies do not adequately represent those attending primary health clinics (PHCs). This study aimed to determine the autopsy prevalence of TB and other infections in adults enrolled at South African PHCs in the context of a pragmatic trial of empiric TB treatment (“TB Fast Track”). Methods and Findings Adults with CD4 ≤150 cells/μL, not on ART or TB treatment, were enrolled to TB Fast Track and followed up for at least six months. Minimally invasive autopsy (MIA) was conducted as soon as possible after death. Lungs, liver, and spleen were biopsied; blood, CSF, and urine aspirated; and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained. Samples underwent mycobacterial, bacterial, and fungal culture; molecular testing (including Xpert® MTB/RIF); and histological examination. 34 MIAs were conducted: 18 (53%) decedents were female; median age was 39 (interquartile range 33–44) years; 25 (74%) deaths occurred in hospitals; median time from death to MIA was five (IQR 3–6) days. 16/34 (47%) had evidence of TB (14/16 [88%] with extrapulmonary disease; 6/16 [38%] not started on treatment antemortem); 23 (68%) had clinically important bacterial infections; four (12%) cryptococcal disease; three (9%) non-tuberculous mycobacterial disease; and two (6%) Pneumocystis pneumonia. Twenty decedents (59%) had evidence of two or more concurrent infections; 9/16 (56%) individuals with TB had evidence of bacterial disease and two (13%) cryptococcal disease. Conclusions TB, followed by bacterial infections, were the leading findings at autopsy among adults with advanced HIV enrolled from primary care clinics. To reduce mortality, strategies are needed to identify and direct those at highest risk into a structured pathway

  12. Does provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling lead to higher HIV testing rate and HIV case finding in Rwandan clinics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; van Santen, Daniëla; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Lammers, Judith; Mugisha, Veronicah; Bagiruwigize, Emmanuel; de Naeyer, Ludwig; Asiimwe, Anita; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) is promoted as a means to increase HIV case finding. We assessed the effectiveness of PITC to increase HIV testing rate and HIV case finding among outpatients in Rwandan health facilities (HF). PITC was introduced in six HFs in 2009-2010. HIV

  13. Slow cortical potential Neurofeedback and self-management training in outpatient care for children with ADHD: study protocol and first preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna eChristiansen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment for children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD today is predominantly pharmacological. While it is the most common treatment, it might not always be the most appropriate one. Moreover, long term effects remain unclear. Behavior therapy and non-pharmacological treatments such as neurofeedback (NF are promising alternatives, though there are no routine outpatient care/effectiveness studies yet that have included children with medication or changes in medication.Methods/design: This paper presents the protocol of a randomized controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of a Slow Cortical Potential (SCP NF protocol with self-management (SM in a high frequent outpatient care setting. Both groups (NF/SM receive a total of 30 high frequent therapy sessions. Additionally, 6 sessions are reserved for comorbid problems. The primary outcome measure is the reduction of ADHD core symptoms according to parent and teacher ratings.Preliminary Results: Untill now 58 children were included in the study (48 males, with a mean age of 8.42 (1.34 years, and a mean IQ of 110 (13.37. Conners-3 parent and teacher ratings were used to estimate core symptom change. Since the study is still ongoing, and children are in different study stages, pre-post and follow-up results are not yet available for all children included. Preliminary results suggest overall good pre-post effects, though. For parent and teacher ratings an ANOVA with repeated measures yielded overall satisfying pre-post effects (η2 .175 to .513. Differences between groups (NF vs. SM could not yet be established (p = .81.Discussion: This is the first randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a NF protocol in a high frequent outpatient care setting that does not exclude children on or with changes in medication. First preliminary results show positive effects. The rationale for the trial, the design, and the strengths and limitations of the study are

  14. Managing outpatient consultations: from referral to discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rachael; Jacob, Hannah; Morrissey, Benita; Macaulay, Chloe; Gomez, Kumudini; Fertleman, Caroline

    2017-08-01

    Although a great deal of paediatric consultations are not urgent, doctors in training spend so much time providing service for acute conditions that they spend little time focusing on outpatient work before they become a consultant. Engaging clinicians in the managerial aspects of providing clinical care is a key to improving outcomes, and this article addresses these aspects of the outpatient consultation from referral to discharge. We aim to provide doctors in training with a tool to use during their training and their first few years as a consultant, to think about how outpatient work is organised and how it can be improved to maximise patient experience. The non-urgent consultation varies across the world; this article is aimed to be relevant to an international audience. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Randomised controlled trial examining the effect of an outpatient exercise training programme on haemodynamics and cardiac MR parameters of right ventricular function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: the ExPAH study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Karen S W; Faux, Steven G; Wong, Peter K K; Holloway, Cameron; Assareh, Hassan; McLachlan, Craig S; Kotlyar, Eugene

    2017-02-06

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a potentially life-threatening condition characterised by elevated pulmonary artery pressure. Early stage PH patients are often asymptomatic. Disease progression is associated with impairment of right ventricular function and progressive dyspnoea. Current guidelines recommend exercise training (grade IIa, level B). However, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms of improvement, intensity of supervision and optimal frequency, duration and intensity of exercise. This study will assess the effect of an outpatient rehabilitation programme on haemodynamics and cardiac right ventricular function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a subgroup of PH. This randomised controlled trial involves both a major urban tertiary and smaller regional hospital in New South Wales, Australia. The intervention will compare an outpatient rehabilitation programme with a control group (home exercise programme). Participants will be stable on oral PAH-specific therapy. The primary outcome measure will be right ventricular ejection fraction measured by cardiac MRI. Secondary outcomes will include haemodynamics measured by right heart catheterisation, endurance, functional capacity, health-related quality of life questionnaires and biomarkers of cardiac function and inflammation. Ethical approval has been granted by St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney (HREC/14/SVH/341). Results of this study will be disseminated through presentation at scientific conferences and in scientific journals. ACTRN12615001041549; pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Clinical presentation and opportunistic infections in HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Allan; Jespersen, Sanne; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2016-01-01

    HIV-2 is prevalent. In this study, we aimed to characterize the clinical presentations among HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, newly diagnosed HIV patients attending the HIV outpatient clinic at Hospital Nacional Sim~ao Mendes in Guinea......-Bissau were enrolled. Demographical and clinical data were collected and compared between HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. Results: A total of 169 patients (76% HIV-1, 17% HIV-2 and 6% HIV 1/2) were included in the study between 21 March 2012 and 14 December 2012. HIV-1 seropositive...... antigen. Conclusion: HIV-1 and HIV-1/2 seropositive patients have lower CD4 cell counts than HIV-2 seropositive patients when diagnosed with HIV with only minor clinical and demographic differences among groups. Few patients were diagnosed with TB and cryptococcal disease was not found to be a major...

  17. A pilot study of cognitive training with and without transcranial direct current stimulation to improve cognition in older persons with HIV-related cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ownby RL

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Raymond L Ownby,1 Amarilis Acevedo2 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, 2College of Psychology, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA Background: In spite of treatment advances, HIV infection is associated with cognitive deficits. This is even more important as many persons with HIV infection age and experience age-related cognitive impairments. Both computer-based cognitive training and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have shown promise as interventions to improve cognitive function. In this study, we investigate the acceptability and efficacy of cognitive training with and without tDCS in older persons with HIV. Patients and methods: In this single-blind randomized study, participants were 14 individuals of whom 11 completed study procedures (mean age =51.5 years; nine men and two women with HIV-related mild neurocognitive disorder. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological and self-report measures and then six 20-minute cognitive training sessions while receiving either active or sham anodal tDCS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. After training, participants completed the same measures. Success of the blind and participant reactions were assessed during a final interview. Assessments were completed by an assessor blind to treatment assignment. Pre- and post-training changes were evaluated via analysis of covariance yielding estimates of effect size. Results: All participants believed that they had been assigned to active treatment; nine of the 11 believed that the intervention had improved their cognitive functioning. Both participants who felt the intervention was ineffective were assigned to the sham condition. None of the planned tested interactions of time with treatment was significant, but 12 of 13 favored tDCS (P=0.08. All participants indicated that they would participate in similar studies in the future. Conclusion: Results show that both cognitive training via

  18. Helping the Helpers: An International Training Program for Professionals Providing Social Services for HIV-Positive Children and Their Families in Southern Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Over one hundred children and some of their parents were infected with HIV in state hospitals in the Chimkent region in Southern Kazakhstan. After this tragedy, the Regional Department of Public Health organized social services for these families and asked the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) to provide them with training and…

  19. An Analysis of Training Effects on School Personnel's Knowledge, Attitudes, Comfort, and Confidence Levels toward Educating Students about HIV/AIDS in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschlander, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the training effects on school personnel's knowledge, attitudes, comfort, and confidence levels toward educating students about HIV/AIDS in Pennsylvania. The following four research questions were explored: (a) What is the knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and comfort levels of school personnel regarding…

  20. Setting Research Priorities for HIV/AIDS-related research in a post-graduate training programme: lessons learnt from the Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme scientific workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggensee, Gabriele; Waziri, Ndadilnasiya Endie; Bashorun, Adebobola; Nguku, Patrick Mboya; Fawole, Olufunmilayo Ibitola; Sabitu, Kabir

    2014-01-01

    In Nigeria the current prevalence of HIV is 4.1% with over 3.5 million infected and estimated 1.5 million in need of anti-retroviral treatment. Epidemiological and implementation studies are necessary for monitoring and evaluation of interventions. To define research areas which can be addressed by participants of the Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Training Programme (NFELTP) a workshop was held in April 2013 in Abuja, Nigeria. Priority research areas were identified using criteria lists for ranking of the relevance of research questions. Based on a research matrix, NFELTP residents developed the aims and objectives, study design for HIV-related research proposals. This workshop was the first workshop held by the NFELTP to establish an inventory of research questions which can be addressed by the residents within their training period. This inventory will help to increase HIV/AIDS-related activities of NFELTP which are in accordance with research needs in Nigeria and PEPFAR objectives. PMID:25426209

  1. Bloodstream Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among HIV patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast looks at bloodstream infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogens among outpatients infected with HIV in Southeast Asia. CDC health scientist Kimberly McCarthy discusses the study and why bloodstream infections occur in HIV-infected populations.

  2. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - national data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical...

  3. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - state data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical imaging...

  4. Internet-based attentional bias modification training as add-on to regular treatment in alcohol and cannabis dependent outpatients: a study protocol of a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Janika; van Hemel-Ruiter, Madelon E; Vermeulen, Karin M; Ostafin, Brian D; MacLeod, Colin; Wiers, Reinout W; DeFuentes-Merillas, Laura; Fledderus, Martine; Markus, Wiebren; de Jong, Peter J

    2017-05-23

    The automatic tendency to attend to and focus on substance-related cues in the environment (attentional bias), has been found to contribute to the persistence of addiction. Attentional bias modification (ABM) interventions might, therefore, contribute to treatment outcome and the reduction of relapse rates. Based on some promising research findings, we designed a study to test the clinical relevance of ABM as an add-on component of regular intervention for alcohol and cannabis patients. The current protocol describes a study which will investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a newly developed home-delivered, multi-session, internet-based ABM (iABM) intervention as an add-on to treatment as usual (TAU). TAU consists of cognitive behavioural therapy-based treatment according to the Dutch guidelines for the treatment of addiction. Participants (N = 213) will be outpatients from specialized addiction care institutions diagnosed with alcohol or cannabis dependency who will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions: TAU + iABM; TAU + placebo condition; TAU-only. Primary outcome measures are substance use, craving, and rates of relapse. Changes in attentional bias will be measured to investigate whether changes in primary outcome measures can be attributed to the modification of attentional bias. Indices of cost-effectiveness and secondary physical and psychological complaints (depression, anxiety, and stress) are assessed as secondary outcome measures. This randomized control trial will be the first to investigate whether a home-delivered, multi-session iABM intervention is (cost-) effective in reducing relapse rates in alcohol and cannabis dependency as an add-on to TAU, compared with an active and a waiting list control group. If proven effective, this ABM intervention could be easily implemented as a home-delivered component of current TAU. Netherlands Trial Register, NTR5497 , registered on 18th September 2015.

  5. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keypour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member. Methods: There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self and parent report, General Health Questionnare-28 (GHQ-28 and Family Assessment Device (FAD, conducted before, after and three months after the intervention. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measure test using SPSS software (Version 18.0. Results: Adolescents with one HIV positive family member showed high level of emotional problem (40% and conduct problem (33.3%. There was a significant difference between before, after and 3months after intervention based on GHQ-28 mean scores and FAD mean sores (p < 0.001. There was a significant difference between mean scores of peers′ relationship based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms before and after intervention, but there was no significant difference between mean scores of pro social behavior based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms in all three stages (before, after and three months after intervention. Conclusions: Stress management training is effective in improving mental health, family function and social interaction among adolescents living with parents infected with HIV/AIDS.

  6. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keypour, Maryam; Arman, Soroor; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member. There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old) with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self and parent report), General Health Questionnare-28 (GHQ-28) and Family Assessment Device (FAD), conducted before, after and three months after the intervention. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measure test using SPSS software (Version 18.0). Adolescents with one HIV positive family member showed high level of emotional problem (40%) and conduct problem (33.3%). There was a significant difference between before, after and 3months after intervention based on GHQ-28 mean scores and FAD mean sores (p social behavior based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms) in all three stages (before, after and three months after intervention). Stress management training is effective in improving mental health, family function and social interaction among adolescents living with parents infected with HIV/AIDS.

  7. The Acceptability and Potential Utility of Cognitive Training to Improve Working Memory in Persons Living With HIV: A Preliminary Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towe, Sheri L; Patel, Puja; Meade, Christina S

    HIV-associated neurocognitive impairments that impact daily function persist in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy. Cognitive training, a promising low-cost intervention, has been shown to improve neurocognitive functioning in some clinical populations. We tested the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of computerized cognitive training to improve working memory in persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) and working memory impairment. In this randomized clinical trial, we assigned 21 adult PLWH to either an experimental cognitive training intervention or an attention-matched control training intervention. Participants completed 12 training sessions across 10 weeks with assessments at baseline and post-training. Session attendance was excellent and participants rated the program positively. Participants in the experimental arm demonstrated improved working memory function over time; participants in the control arm showed no change. Our results suggest that cognitive training may be a promising intervention for working memory impairment in PLWH and should be evaluated further. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HIV-infected mental health patients: characteristics and comparison with HIV-infected patients from the general population and non-infected mental health patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schadé Annemiek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing mental health symptoms, which negatively influence the treatment of the HIV-infection. Mental health problems in HIV-infected patients may affect public health. Psychopathology, including depression and substance abuse, can increase hazardous sexual behaviour and, with it, the chance of spreading HIV. Therefore, it is important to develop an optimal treatment plan for HIV-infected patients with mental health problems. The majority of HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands (almost 60% are homosexual men. The main objectives of this study were to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with HIV who seek treatment for their mental health symptoms in the Netherlands. Secondly, we tested whether HIV infected and non-infected homosexual patients with a lifetime depressive disorder differed on several mental health symptoms. Methods We compared a cohort of 196 patients who visited the outpatient clinic for HIV and Mental Health with HIV-infected patients in the general population in Amsterdam (ATHENA-study and with non-HIV infected mental health patients (NESDA-study. DSM-IV diagnoses were determined, and several self-report questionnaires were used to assess mental health symptoms. Results Depressive disorders were the most commonly occurring diagnoses in the cohort and frequent drug use was common. HIV-infected homosexual men with a depressive disorder showed no difference in depressive symptoms or sleep disturbance, compared with non-infected depressive men. However, HIV-positive patients did express more symptoms like fear, anger and guilt. Although they showed significantly more suicidal ideation, suicide attempts were not more prevalent among HIV-infected patients. Finally, the HIV-infected depressive patients displayed a considerably higher level of drug use than the HIV-negative group. Conclusion Habitual drug use is a risk factor for

  9. Changes in self-reported and parent-reported health-related quality of life in overweight children and adolescents participating in an outpatient training: findings from a 12-month follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finne Emily

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQoL was found to improve in participants of weight management interventions. However, information on moderately overweight youth as well as on maintaining HRQoL improvements following treatment is sparse. We studied the HRQoL of 74 overweight, but not obese participants (32.4% male, mean age = 11.61 ± 1.70 SD of a comprehensive and effective six-month outpatient training at four time-points up to 12 months after end of treatment. Methods HRQoL was measured by self-report and proxy-report versions of the generic German KINDL-R, including six sub domains, and an obesity-specific additional module. Changes in original and z-standardized scores were analyzed by (2×4 doubly multivariate analysis of variance. This was done separately for self- and proxy-reported HRQoL, taking into account further socio-demographic background variables and social desirability. Additionally, correlations between changes in HRQoL scores and changes in zBMI were examined. Results There were significant multivariate time effects for self-reported and proxy-reported HRQoL and a significant time-gender interaction in self-reports revealed (p 2 = 0.14-0.19. Generic HRQoL further increased after end of treatment. The largest effects were found on the dimension self-esteem (partial η2 = 0.08-0.09 for proxy- and self-reported z-scores, respectively. Correlations with changes in weight were gender-specific, and weight reduction was only associated with HRQoL improvements in girls. Conclusions Positive effects of outpatient training on generic and weight-specific HRQoL of moderately overweight (not obese children and adolescents could be demonstrated. Improvements in HRQoL were not consistently bound to weight reduction. While changes in weight-specific HRQoL were more immediate, generic HRQoL further increased after treatment ended. An extended follow-up may therefore be needed to scrutinize HRQo

  10. HIV/AIDS Medicines: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Also in Spanish Recreational Drugs and HIV (New Mexico AIDS Education and Training Center) Also in Spanish Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Diabetes (AIDSinfo) Also in Spanish Side Effects of HIV ...

  11. Attitudinal Changes Using Peer Education Training in the Prevention of HIV/AIDS: A Case Study of Youths in North Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeen Abu-Saeed

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: HIV/AIDS is a major public health issue. Studies have shown that young people between the ages of 15 to 24 years accounts for more than 40% of new HIV infections. However, new infections could be prevented if the desired impact is made on young people through interventions such as effective peer education program to improve their knowledge, attitude and practice. Therefore, this study is aimed at assessing the impact of peer education vis-a-vis attitudinal changes and practices on issues relating to HIV/AIDS among youths in North central Nigeria. Methods: This classical experimental study was carried out in three stages, that is: pre-intervention, intervention and post-intervention stages among students of Government High School, Ilorin between the ages of 15 and 24 years. The sample size was 80 students each for study and control groups. Proportional gender distribution was ensured in the selection and the sampling technique was multistage sampling technique. Data collection was through semi structured self administered pre and post evaluation questionnaire. Peer education training and forth night mentoring sessions was conducted for the study group. Impact of the intervention was assessed after eight weeks. Results: Analysis of the result shows that out of the sixteen questions asked on respondents‟ attitude, only four showed statistical significance between the study and control group before the intervention which shot up to eleven after intervention. Also, the frequency of those having bad practices regarding prevention of HIV/AIDS also reduced after intervention. This reduction was much more in many instances when compared to the control group. Conclusion: This study has revealed that peer education training among youth can go a long way in educating them on issues relating to HIV/AIDS prevention. It can also bring about attitudinal changes and better practices that may help in reducing incidence and prevalence of HIV/AIDS in our

  12. Police Training to Align Law Enforcement and HIV Prevention: Preliminary Evidence From the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Alpna; Moreau, Bruce; Kumar, Pratima; Weiss-Laxer, Nomi; Heimer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Having identified gaps in implementation of Rhode Island's syringe access law and police occupational safety education, public health and police professionals developed police training to boost legal knowledge, improve syringe access attitudes, and address needlestick injuries. Baseline data (94 officers) confirmed anxiety about needlestick injuries, poor legal knowledge, and occupational risk overestimation. Before training, respondents believed that syringe access promotes drug use (51%), increases likelihood of police needlestick injuries (58%), and fails to reduce epidemics (38%). Pretraining to posttraining evaluation suggested significant shifts in legal and occupational safety knowledge; changes in attitudes toward syringe access were promising. Training that combines occupational safety with syringe access content can help align law enforcement with public health goals. Additional research is needed to assess street-level effect and to inform intervention tailoring. PMID:21940924

  13. Care of HIV-infected adults at Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Part I. Clinical management and costs of outpatient care. Objective. To provide a detailed breakdown of clinical presentations and management of outpatients with HIV. and associated costs, in order to inform clinical practice, health service planning and projections of the costs of HIV care in South Africa Setting.

  14. A year-long caregiver training program to improve neurocognition in preschool Ugandan HIV-exposed children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Michael J; Bangirana, Paul; Nakasujja, Noeline; Page, Connie F; Shohet, Cilly; Givon, Deborah; Bass, Judith K; Opoka, Robert O; Klein, Pnina S

    2013-05-01

    Mediational intervention for sensitizing caregivers (MISC) is a structured program enabling caregivers to enhance their child's cognitive and emotional development through daily interactions. The principal aim was to evaluate if a year-long MISC caregiver training program produced greater improvement in child cognitive and emotional development compared with a control program. One hundred and nineteen uninfected HIV-exposed preschool children and their caregivers were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment arms: biweekly MISC training alternating between home and clinic for 1 year or a health and nutrition curriculum. All children were evaluated at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year with the Mullen Early Learning Scales, Color-Object Association Test for memory, and Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist for psychiatric symptoms. Caregivers were evaluated on the same schedule with the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-25 for depression and anxiety. The treatment arms were compared using repeated-measures analysis of covariance with child age, gender, weight, socioeconomic status, caregiving quality, caregiver anxiety, and caregiver education as covariates. The MISC children had significantly greater gains compared to controls on the Mullen Receptive and Expressive Language development, and on the Mullen composite score of cognitive ability. Color-Object Association Test total memory for MISC children was marginally better than controls. No Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist differences between the groups were noted. Caldwell Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment scores and observed mediational interaction scores from videotapes measuring caregiving quality also improved significantly more for the MISC group. The MISC enhanced cognitive performance, especially in language development. These benefits were possibly mediated by improved caregiving and positive emotional benefit to the caregiver.

  15. Demographic determinants of survival of people living with HIV attending an outpatient reference unit in the city of Três Lagoas, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, in the period 1984-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angelina da Silva Zuque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While the incidence of HIV infection and AIDS is increasing in small Brazilian cities, epidemiological studies are often conducted in large urban centers. METHODS: Our group conducted a retrospective analysis of survival determinants among 358 patients who attended a reference unit in a small city. RESULTS: Death risk was lower among men that had sex with men, patients with an HIV-seropositive partner, and those admitted after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART was available. CONCLUSIONS: The study documents the striking beneficial effect of HAART. The finding of other groups with improved survival may aid in the development of programmatic strategies.

  16. Hiv/hbv, hiv/hcv and hiv/htlv-1 co infection among injecting drug user patients hospitalized at the infectious disease ward of a training hospital in iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, S.M.; Etemadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and risk factors for HBV, HCV and HTLV-I co-infection in the Iranian HIV positive Injecting Drug Users (IDU) patients admitted in hospital. Analyses were based on 154 male IDU patients admitted in Infectious disease ward of Razi Hospital, Ahwaz, Iran, from April 2001 to March 2003. All of them had been tested for HIV infection (Elisa-antibody and Western blot), HBV surface antigen, HCV antibody and HTLV-1 antibody. One hundred and four patients (67.53%) were identified as HIV infected. Among HIV infected, HB surface antigen, HCV antibody and HTLV-I antibody were positive in 44.23% and 74.04% and 16.33% patients respectively. HCV/HBV/HIV and HCV/HBV/HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection were 20.20% and 8.65% respectively. Co-infection with HBV or HCV or HTLV-1 is common among hospitalized HIV-infected IDU patients in the region of study. HIV disease outcomes appear to be adversely affected by HBV/HCV/HTLV-I co-infection, so identification of these viral infections is recommended as routine tests for this population. (author)

  17. Qualitative Assessment of the Impact of Implementing Reiki Training in a Supported Residence for People Older Than 50 Years with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis; Renfrew, Nita M; Mainguy, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Reiki is a Japanese form of energy healing that has become popular in the US. Reiki training involves three stages—levels I, II, and III—to a master practitioner level and requires both giving and receiving Reiki. We set out to implement a program to train clients of a supported residence in Brooklyn, NY. They were all older than age 50 years and had HIV/AIDS and substance-abuse and/or mental-health disorders. Methods: A qualitative, narrative-inquiry study was conducted. The Reiki master kept a journal of her 3 years of providing 90 minutes of Reiki treatment and/or training once weekly at the residence. Forty-five of 50 potential participants attended these sessions with various frequencies. Stories were collected from 35 participants regarding their experience of Reiki training. We posited success as continued involvement in the program. Results: All 35 participants reported receiving benefit from participation in Reiki. Participants first took part in training because of the offered subway tokens; however, 40 continued their involvement despite a lack of compensation. When asked why they continued, participants reported life-changing experiences, including a greater ability to cope with addictions, a greater ability to manage counseling, healing of wounds, improvement of T-cell counts, and improved skills of daily living. Conclusion: Reiki training can be successfully implemented in a supported housing facility with people with HIV/AIDS and comorbid disorders. Some people in our study population reported areas of improvement and life-changing experiences. Our study did not establish the efficacy of Reiki, but our findings support the effect of the entire gestalt of implementing a program related to spirituality and healing and supports the goal of implementing a larger randomized, controlled trial in this setting to establish the efficacy of Reiki. PMID:22058669

  18. HTLV-1 and HIV-1 co-infection: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Isache

    2016-01-01

    HTLV and HIV share the same routes of transmission and the same tropism for T-lymphocytes. Co-infection occurs probably more frequently than we are aware, since testing for HTLV is not routinely performed in outpatient HIV clinics.

  19. Readiness of Ugandan health services for the management of outpatients with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katende, David; Mutungi, Gerald; Baisley, Kathy; Biraro, Samuel; Ikoona, Eric; Peck, Robert; Smeeth, Liam; Hayes, Richard; Munderi, Paula; Grosskurth, Heiner

    2015-10-01

    Traditionally, health systems in sub-Saharan Africa have focused on acute conditions. Few data exist on the readiness of African health facilities (HFs) to address the growing burden of chronic diseases (CDs), specifically chronic, non-communicable diseases (NCDs). A stratified random sample of 28 urban and rural Ugandan HFs was surveyed to document the burden of selected CDs by analysing the service statistics, service availability and service readiness using a modified WHO Service Availability and Readiness Assessment questionnaire. Knowledge, skills and practice in the management of CDs of 222 health workers were assessed through a self-completed questionnaire. Among adult outpatient visits at hospitals, 33% were for CDs including HIV vs. 14% and 4% at medium-sized and small health centres, respectively. Many HFs lacked guidelines, diagnostic equipment and essential medicines for the primary management of CDs; training and reporting systems were weak. Lower-level facilities routinely referred patients with hypertension and diabetes. HIV services accounted for most CD visits and were stronger than NCD services. Systems were weaker in lower-level HFs. Non-doctor clinicians and nurses lacked knowledge and experience in NCD care. Compared with higher level HFs, lower-level ones are less prepared and little used for CD care. Health systems in Uganda, particularly lower-level HFs, urgently need improvement in managing common NCDs to cope with the growing burden. This should include the provision of standard guidelines, essential diagnostic equipment and drugs, training of health workers, supportive supervision and improved referral systems. Substantially better HIV basic service readiness demonstrates that improved NCD care is feasible. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Low HIV-testing rates and awareness of HIV infection among high-risk heterosexual STI clinic attendees in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bij, Akke K.; Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Fennema, Han S. A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Since 1999, HIV testing is routinely offered to all attendees of the sexually transmitted infections (STI) outpatient clinic in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. This study evaluates whether this more active HIV-testing policy increased uptake of HIV testing and awareness of an HIV-positive

  1. The Outpatient Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artandi, Maja K; Stewart, Rosalyn W

    2018-05-01

    The physical examination in the outpatient setting is a valuable tool. Even in settings where there is lack of evidence, such as the annual physical examination of an asymptomatic adult, the physical examination is beneficial for the physician-patient relationship. When a patient has specific symptoms, the physical examination-in addition to a thorough history-can help narrow down, or in many cases establish, a diagnosis. In a time where imaging and laboratory tests are easily available, but are expensive and can be invasive, a skilled physical examination remains an important component of patient evaluation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Outpatient management of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R L

    1991-03-01

    As effective antipsychotic pharmacotherapy has become available, patients with schizophrenia are increasingly managed in an outpatient setting by primary care physicians. Pharmacotherapy is generally effective in treating "positive," or psychotic, symptoms and lessening the risks of relapse, but ineffective in improving "negative," or deficit, symptoms. Aggressive attempts to totally control positive symptoms and to ameliorate negative symptoms tend to increase side effects and may be detrimental to the patient. Intensive psychotherapeutic and rehabilitative approaches are generally unproductive. Attempting to obtain a cure is unrealistic. A moderate approach is recommended, taking into consideration the limitations of existing treatments, achieving control of extreme symptoms and minimizing social and occupational limitations.

  3. Unsafe sex in regular partnerships among heterosexual persons living with HIV: evidence from a large representative sample of individuals attending outpatients services in France (ANRS-EN12-VESPA Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhnik, Anne-Déborah; Préau, Marie; Lert, France; Peretti-Watel, Patrick; Schiltz, Marie-Ange; Obadia, Yolande; Spire, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Risky sexual behaviour remains frequent among people living with HIV. We analysed factors associated with unsafe sex within serodiscordant couples among heterosexual individuals living with HIV in France. In 2003, a face-to-face survey was conducted among individuals selected in a random stratified sample of 102 French hospital departments delivering HIV care. This analysis included adults heterosexual participants in a regular partnership for at least 12 months with a seronegative/unknown serostatus partner, HIV-diagnosed for at least 12 months. Unsafe sex was defined as reporting inconsistent condom use in the prior 12 months. Among men and women, participants who reported unsafe sex were compared with those who did not. 663 heterosexual adults reported being in a serodiscordant regular partnership. Women accounted for 41% of participants and 26% of the sample were immigrants. Unsafe sex with the steady partner was reported by 26% of men and 34% of women (p=0.024). For men, factors independently associated with unsafe sex were being in a relationship for more than 10 years, being in a difficult financial situation and reporting regular consumption of alcohol to excess. Among women, having a history of drug use, not being aware of partner's serostatus, and reporting a difficult financial situation were independently associated with unsafe sex. In addition, immigrant women were associated with safer sex. A high number of serodiscordant couples continue to report risky sexual behaviour, and related factors are gender-specific. Couple-level interventions are essential in order to prevent HIV-transmission and to encourage negotiation within couples.

  4. The SISTA pilot project: understanding the training and technical assistance needs of community-based organizations implementing HIV prevention interventions for African American women--implications for a capacity building strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Taleria R; Brown, Mari; King, Winifred; Prather, Cynthia; Cazaubon, Janine; Mack, Justin; Russell, Brandi

    2007-01-01

    The disproportionate rates of HIV/AIDS among African American women in the U.S. signify the ongoing need for targeted HIV prevention interventions. Additionally, building the capacity of service providers to sustain prevention efforts is a major concern. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted a pilot project to disseminate the Sisters Informing Sisters about Topics on AIDS (SISTA), an HIV prevention intervention designed for African American women. The project was to inform the diffusion process and examine the training and technical assistance needs of participating community-based organizations. Results demonstrated a need for extensive pre-planning and skills-building prior to implementation.

  5. The Happy Teen programme: a holistic outpatient clinic-based approach to prepare HIV-infected youth for the transition from paediatric to adult medical care services in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolekha, Rangsima; Boon-Yasidhi, Vitharon; Na-Nakorn, Yossawadee; Manaboriboon, Boonying; Vandepitte, Warunee Punpanich; Martin, Michael; Tarugsa, Jariya; Nuchanard, Wipada; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Lapphra, Ketwadee; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Thaineua, Vorapathu; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2017-05-16

    We developed an 18-month Happy Teen 2 (HT2) programme comprised of a one-day workshop, two half-day sessions, and three individual sessions to prepare HIV-infected youth for the transition from paediatric to adult HIV care services. We describe the programme and evaluate the change in youth's knowledge scores. We implemented the HT2 programme among HIV-infected Thai youth aged 14-22 years who were aware of their HIV status and receiving care at two hospitals in Bangkok (Siriraj Hospital, Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health [QSNICH]). Staff interviewed youth using a standardized questionnaire to assess HIV and health-related knowledge at baseline and at 12 and 18 months while they participated in the programme. We examined factors associated with a composite knowledge score ≥95% at month 18 using logistic regression. During March 2014-July 2016, 192 of 245 (78%) eligible youth were interviewed at baseline. Of these, 161 (84%) returned for interviews at 12 and 18 months. Among the 161 youth, the median age was 17 years, 74 (46%) were female, and 99% were receiving antiretroviral treatment. The median composite score was 45% at baseline and increased to 82% at 12 months and 95% at 18 months ( P  95% was associated with education level >high school (aOR: 2.15, 95%CI, 1.03-4.48) and receipt care at QSNICH (aOR: 2.43, 95%CI, 1.18-4.98). Youth whose mother and father had died were less likely to have score ≥95% (aOR: 0.22, 95%CI, 0.07-0.67) than those with living parents. Knowledge useful for a successful transition from paediatric to adult HIV care increased among youth participating in the HT2 programme. Youth follow-up will continue to assess the impact of improved knowledge on outcomes following the transition to adult care services.

  6. The HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute: Training Early-Career Scientists to Conduct Research on Research Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B.; Yuko, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    The responsible conduct of HIV/drug abuse prevention research requires investigators with both the knowledge of and ability to generate empirical data that can enhance global ethical practices and policies. This article describes a multidisciplinary program offering early-career professionals a 2-year intensive summer curriculum along with funding to conduct a mentored research study on a wide variety of HIV/drug abuse research ethics topics. Now in its fifth year, the program has admitted 29 trainees who have to date demonstrated increased knowledge of research ethics, produced 17 peer-reviewed publications, 46 professional presentations, and submitted or been awarded five related federal grants. The institute also hosts a global information platform providing general and HIV/drug abuse relevant research ethics educational and research resources that have had more than 38,800 unique visitors from more than 150 countries. PMID:26564944

  7. The HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute: Training Early-Career Scientists to Conduct Research on Research Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B; Yuko, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    The responsible conduct of HIV/drug abuse prevention research requires investigators with both the knowledge of and ability to generate empirical data that can enhance global ethical practices and policies. This article describes a multidisciplinary program offering early-career professionals a 2-year intensive summer curriculum along with funding to conduct a mentored research study on a wide variety of HIV/drug abuse research ethics topics. Now in its fifth year, the program has admitted 29 trainees who have to date demonstrated increased knowledge of research ethics, produced 17 peer-reviewed publications, 46 professional presentations, and submitted or been awarded five related federal grants. The institute also hosts a global information platform providing general and HIV/drug abuse relevant research ethics educational and research resources that have had more than 38,800 unique visitors from more than 150 countries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Factors associated with willingness to accept a routine offer of HIV test in a large referral hospital in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangeni, J N; Ballidawa, J B; Ndege, S

    2012-03-01

    Although Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) has existed for more than 10 years, majority of Kenyans still do not know their HIV status, thus necessitating the introduction of other testing strategies to increase the number of people taking the test. The routine offer of an HIV test to all patients in health-care settings has been proposed to increase access to care. The main objective of this study was to identify factors associated with willingness to accept a routine offer of an HIV test. This was a cross sectional study. The Setting was in the Outpatient department at a large Referral Hospital in Western Kenya. A total of 384 adult patients (both males and females) were recruited using systematic random sampling. Information was collected on basic socio demographic characteristics, knowledge about the routine offer of an HIV test, attitudes towards the testing and HIV testing practise. Of the 384 respondents, 64.3% were unaware about the routine offer of HIV testing in Health facilities. Multivariate analysis identified the main predictors of willingness to accept an HIV test offered in hospital as the age (OR 3.7, C.I 0.068-1.075), level of education (OR 3.4, C.I 0.186-62.602), Knowledge about the routine HIV testing (OR 4.6,C.I 2.118-9.847), self-perception of HIV risk (OR 8.4,C.I 3.424-20.496) and attitude towards routine offer of HIV testing (OR 9.2, C.I 0.042-0.284). There is a need to come up with tailored training on the routine offer of an HIV test and devising strategies to address the main factors that influence the decision for patients to test as identified above.

  9. HIV-associated anal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Newsom-Davis, T; Bower, M

    2010-01-01

    HIV-associated anal carcinoma, a non-AIDS-defining cancer, is a human papillomavirus-associated malignancy with a spectrum of preinvasive changes. The standardized incidence ratio for anal cancer in patients with HIV/AIDS is 20-50. Algorithms for anal cancer screening include anal cytology followed by high-resolution anoscopy for those with abnormal findings. Outpatient topical treatments for anal intraepithelial neoplasia include infrared coagulation therapy, trichloroacetic acid, and imiqui...

  10. Implementation of Couples' Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Couples' Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing (CVCT) is an effective HIV ... Through this project, the Rwanda Zambia HIV Research Group will apply more than 20 ... training, and technical assistance to pilot the expansion of CVCT in local ...

  11. Implementation of Couples' Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Couples' Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing (CVCT) is an effective HIV ... Through this project, the Rwanda Zambia HIV Research Group will apply more than ... to provide support, training, and technical assistance to pilot the expansion of ...

  12. "+CLICK": pilot of a web-based training program to enhance ART adherence among HIV-positive youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shegog, Ross; Markham, Christine M; Leonard, Amy D; Bui, Thanh C; Paul, Mary E

    2012-01-01

    Youth account for almost half of all new HIV infections in the United States. Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) is critical for successful management, yet reported adherence rates for youth are often low. This study pilot-tested "+CLICK," an innovative, web-based, adherence intervention for HIV-positive youth as an adjunct to traditional clinic-based, self-management education. The theory-based application, developed for HIV-infected youth, 13-24 years of age, provides tailored activities addressing attitudes, knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy related to ART adherence. HIV-positive youth (N=10) pilot-tested "+CLICK" to assess usability (ease of use, credibility, understandability, acceptability, motivation) and short-term psychosocial outcomes (importance and self-efficacy related to ART adherence) using a single-group, pre-/post-test study design in a hospital-based pediatric clinic (n=8) and home (n=2) location. Youth were mostly female (80%) and Black (80%). Mean age was 17.8 years (SD=2.65, range 14-22). All were infected perinatally and had been living with HIV all their lives. Most learned their HIV status by age 10 years. Sixty percent reported an undetectable viral load, whilst 10% reported a viral load of over 50,000. Half (50%) reported a normal CD4 count, whilst 20% reported having low CD4 (90%). Most (70%) indicated they would use "+CLICK" again. Short-term psychosocial outcomes indicate significant increase in medication adherence self-efficacy (pART adherence. Further research on long-term and behavioral effects is indicated prior to broader dissemination into clinical practice.

  13. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data - Outpatient

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Outpatient Utilization and Payment Public Use File (Outpatient PUF) presents information on common outpatient services provided to Medicare fee-for-service...

  14. Monitoring Outpatient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Each year, health care costs for managing chronically ill patients increase as the life expectancy of Americans continues to grow. To handle this situation, many hospitals, doctors practices, and home care providers are turning to disease management, a system of coordinated health care interventions and communications, to improve outpatient care. By participating in daily monitoring programs, patients with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions requiring significant self-care are facing fewer emergency situations and hospitalizations. Cybernet Medical, a division of Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Cybernet Systems Corporation, is using the latest communications technology to augment the ways health care professionals monitor and assess patients with chronic diseases, while at the same time simplifying the patients interaction with technology. Cybernet s newest commercial product for this purpose evolved from research funded by NASA, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The research focused on the physiological assessment of astronauts and soldiers, human performance evaluation, and human-computer interaction. Cybernet Medical's MedStar Disease Management Data Collection System is an affordable, widely deployable solution for improving in-home-patient chronic disease management. The system's battery-powered and portable interface device collects physiological data from off-the-shelf instruments.

  15. Osteoarthrosis in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Andreyevna Galushko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elucidate the awareness of osteoarthrosis - OA (the most common location and treatment methods among primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. The questionnaire developed at the Research Institute of Rheumatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, was used to interview 1912 specialists (therapists, rheumatologists, neurologists, and surgeons who made a primary outpatient reception in the local polyclinics of 25 Russian Federation’s cities with a population of more than 500,000. Results. In the opinion of the physicians of all specialties, knee joints turned out to be the most location of OA. In practice, the rheumatologists encountered knee, hip, and hand joint lesions in OA in 92, 42, and 38%, respectively. Analysis of therapeutic preferences has shown that virtually all the physicians prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and only two thirds do structure-modifying drugs (chondroprotectors for OA patients. When treating OA, only the rheumatologists use slow-acting drugs in practically 100% of cases, by preferring chondroitin sulfate. The physicians of all specialties use topical glucocorticoid therapy extensively. The rheumatologists use this therapy most probably due to the fact that patients with severe polyarticular OA come to see them. Notwithstanding the fact that new guidelines for the treatment of OA were published in 2008, most physicians are oriented to the 1995 guidelines, frequently giving rise to therapeutic errors and wrong treatment.

  16. Sociodemographic and Substance Use Disorder Determinants of HIV Sexual Risk Behavior in Men and Women in Outpatient Drug Treatment in the NIDA National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Jeremy D; Tross, Susan; Pavlicova, Martina; Hu, Mei-Chen; Campbell, Aimee N C; Nunes, Edward V

    2017-06-07

    Sexual risk behavior is now the primary vector of HIV transmission among substance users in the United States with gender as a crucial moderator of risk behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in factors (age, race/ethnicity, education) that predict main-partner unprotected sexual occasions (USO) using the unique platform of two parallel NIDA National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network gender-specific safer sex intervention trials. Baseline assessments of male (N = 430) and female (N = 377) participants included demographic characteristics; past 3-month sexual activity; and a diagnostic assessment for alcohol, cocaine/stimulant, and opioid use disorders. Using mixed effects generalized linear modeling of the main outcome USO, two-way interactions of gender with age, race/ethnicity, and education were evaluated and adjusted by alcohol, cocaine/stimulant, or opioid use disorder. When adjusted for alcohol use disorder, the interaction of education and gender was significant. For men, a high school or greater education was significantly associated with more USO compared to men with less than high school. For women, greater than high school education was significantly associated with less USO compared to women with a high school education. None of the other interactions were significant when adjusted for cocaine/stimulant or opioid use disorder. Conclusions/Importance: This study demonstrates gender differences in the relationship of education, alcohol use disorder, and main-partner USO in individuals in substance abuse treatment. This underscores the importance of considering demographic and substance use factors in HIV sexual risk behavior and in crafting prevention messages for this population.

  17. Developing a communication skills training program for pharmacists working in Southern African HIV/AIDS contexts: some notes on process and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermeyer, Jennifer

    2011-10-01

    In an attempt to understand why patients do not take medications, researchers are increasingly focusing on how communication processes influence adherence behaviors. Pharmacists have an important role to play in this regard. However, existing communication skills training (CST) programs for pharmacists are not necessarily sensitive to the needs of pharmacists working in specific contexts such as Southern Africa. In addition, CST programs are often poorly described in the literature, lack a theoretical background, and focus excessively on evaluation. This article describes the process of developing a CST program for pharmacists working in Southern African HIV/AIDS contexts, focusing on conceptualization and design. Some shortfalls in current approaches to CST are addressed. A number of sources were consulted during the development phase of the project, including interactional and focus group research, previously developed training models, analysis of currently available CST materials for pharmacists, and a literature review. These are discussed and some attention is also given to the challenges of implementing and evaluating the program. The project highlights the importance of providing CST that is disease- and context-specific, grounded in appropriate research and theoretical frameworks, and based on a rigorous process of development.

  18. Intensive Outpatient Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe a novel model of intensive outpatient cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT indicated for eating disorder patients who are having difficulty modifying their eating habits in response to conventional outpatient CBT. Intensive outpatient CBT is a manual based treatment derived by the CBT-Enhanced (CBT-E for eating disorders. The treatment has four features that distinguish it from the conventional outpatient CBT-E: (1 it is designed to be suitable for both adult and adolescent patients, (2 it is delivered by a multidisciplinary non-eclectic team trained in CBT, (3 there is assistance with eating, (4 there is a family therapy module for patients under the age of 18 years. Preliminary outcome of intensive outpatient CBT-E are encouraging. The treatment has been applied to 20 consecutive underweight eating disorder patients (age 18.2 ± 6.5 years; BMI 14.6 ± 1.5 kg/m2. Thirteen patients (65% concluded the treatment, five (25% were admitted at an eating disorder inpatient unit, and two (10% prematurely interrupted the treatment. Completers obtained significant weight regain and improvement of eating disorder and general psychopathology. Most of the improvements were maintained at six-month follow-up.

  19. Family physicians and HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, N; Crochette, N; Blanchi, S; Lavoix, A; Billaud, E; Baron, C; Abgueguen, P; Perré, P; Rabier, V

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to describe the current and desired involvement of family physicians (FPs) in the treatment of HIV patients (screening practices, potential training and patient follow-up) to reduce the duration and frequency of their hospital treatment. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional survey between 2011 and 2012 with the support of COREVIH (Regional Coordinating Committee on HIV). We sent a self-assessment questionnaire to all FPs of the Pays de la Loire region to enquire about their HIV screening practices and expectations for the management of HIV patients. A total of 871 FPs completed the questionnaire (response rate: 30.4%). A total of 54.2% said to provide care to HIV patients; the mean number of HIV patients per FP was estimated at 1.4. With regard to HIV screening, 12.2% systematically suggest an HIV serology to their patients and 72.7% always suggest it to pregnant women. About 45.4% of responding FPs said to be willing to manage HIV patients (clinical and biological monitoring, compliance checks and prescription renewal). FPs mainly reported the lack of training and the low number of HIV patients as a barrier to their further involvement in the management of HIV patients. The responding FPs provide care to very few HIV patients. They are, however, willing to be more involved in the routine care of these patients. Medical training provided by COREVIH would help improve HIV screening. The management of HIV patients could thus be handed over to willing FPs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Trabalho em equipe e interdisciplinaridade: desafios para a efetivação da integralidade na assistência ambulatorial às pessoas vivendo com HIV/Aids em Pernambuco Team Work and Interdiciplinarity: Challenges facing the implementation of Comprehensive Outpatient Care for People with HIV/Aids in Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jucineide Lopes Borges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A complexidade da atenção à saúde das pessoas vivendo com HIV/Aids requer o investimento na integralidade das ações e do cuidado, lançando às equipes multiprofissionais o desafio da construção de uma prática interdisciplinar. Este estudo teve o objetivo de analisar a integralidade da atenção à saúde em Serviços de Assistência Especializada em HIV/Aids (SAE-HIV/Aids de Recife/Pernambuco, a partir do processo e organização do trabalho em equipe. Trata-se de um estudo de caso desenvolvido em três unidades de SAE-HIV/Aids, com base em abordagem qualitativa, por meio de diferentes técnicas de investigação. Os resultados apontam que os SAE atendem a grande parte das recomendações do Ministério da Saúde, sobre a infraestrutura básica, mas nenhum serviço apresentava a constituição da equipe mínima satisfatória. Há o reconhecimento da fragmentação do trabalho em equipe e da dificuldade de sistematizar uma prática interdisciplinar e intersetorial, sendo apontadas falhas para garantir o fluxo de referência e contrarreferência. Identificou-se pouca valorização do papel do gerente como articulador da equipe; a necessidade de perceber o usuário como um todo; e de a equipe trabalhar de forma articulada, buscando a prática comunicativa e as atividades relacionais.The complexity of providing healthcare to people with HIV/Aids requires investment in comprehensive action and care, constituting a challenge for the multidisciplinary work teams to build an interdisciplinary practice. This study sought to analyze comprehensive healthcare in the Specialized Assistance Services for HIV/Aids (SAE-HIV/Aids in Recife, in the State of Pernambuco, starting with the process and organization of team work. This is a case study developed in three SAE-HIV/Aids units, based on a qualitative approach using different research techniques. The results show that SAE-HIV/Aids have complied with most of the Brazilian Health Ministry

  1. Perfil epidemiológico dos clientes com HIV/AIDS da unidade ambulatorial de hospital escola de grande porte: município de São Paulo Perfil epidemiológico de pacientes con VIH/SIDA en atención ambulatoria de un hospital escuela: municipio de São Paulo Epidemiological profile of outpatients with HIV/AIDS at a school hospital: São Paulo city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeire Gabriel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste estudo foram: caracterizar o perfil epidemiológico dos clientes com HIV/AIDS de Ambulatório de hospital/escola no Município de São Paulo de 1993 a 2001; analisar a fase da infecção dos clientes que compareceram ao retorno; a letalidade e a evasão do atendimento. O método de estudo epidemiológico descritivo analítico, foi utilizado durante as consultas de enfermagem com 1837 clientes. Resultados: relação homem/mulher 1,71/1; maiores concentrações: faixa etária 30 a 39 anos (46,8%, residentes no Município (86,5%, baixa escolaridade (76,3%. Entre as mulheres 45,4% viviam com companheiros; 53,3% dos homens eram solteiros. Categoria sexual com comportamento heterossexual foi predominante (83,5% dos homens e 71,2% das mulheres. Ambos (57% descobriram ser portadores em estágios considerados avançados. A infecção oportunista predominante foi a tuberculose (26,2%, CD4 El objetivo del estudio fue caracterizar la población con VIH/SIDA; analizar la fase de infección, la letalidad y deserción del programa. Método: estudio epidemiológico descriptivo analítico realizado durante las consultas de enfermería con 1837 clientes. La relación hombre-mujer era de 1,71/1. El grupo de edad predominante fue de 30 a 39 años (46,8%. La mayoría de los participantes vivía en el Municipio de São Paulo (86,5%, con bajo grado de instrucción (76,3%. Las mujeres vivían con una pareja (45,4% y los hombres eran solteros (53,3%. La categoría de exposición predominante en la transmisión del VIH fue la sexual con comportamiento heterosexual (el 83,5% entre los hombres y el 71,2% entra las mujeres. Ambos descubrieron ser portadores del VIH/SIDA en estadios avanzados (57%. Para ambos la infección oportunista predominante fue la tuberculosis (26,2%, CD4 This study aimed to characterize the epidemiological profile of patients with HIV/AIDS at an outpatient service, to analyze the infection stage on the patient's first return

  2. Benefits of HIV testing during military exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, M L; Rendin, R W; Childress, C W; Kerstein, M D

    1989-12-01

    During U.S. Marine Corps Reserve summer 2-week active duty for training periods, 6,482 people were tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Testing at an initial exercise, Solar Flare, trained a cadre of contact teams to, in turn, train other personnel in phlebotomy and the HIV protocol at three other exercises (141 Navy Reserve and Inspector-Instructor hospital corpsmen were trained). Corpsmen could be trained with an indoctrination of 120 minutes and a mean of 15 phlebotomies. After 50 phlebotomies, the administration, identification, and labeling process plus phlebotomy could be completed in 90 seconds. HIV testing during military exercises is both good for training and cost-effective.

  3. Clostridium difficile Infection in Outpatients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-07

    Dr. Jon Mark Hirshon, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses Clostridium difficile infection in outpatients.  Created: 11/7/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2011.

  4. Elderly alcoholics in outpatient treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent; Nielsen, Anette Søgaard; Lolk, Anette

    2010-01-01

    In Denmark, the treatment of alcoholics is provided by public outpatient alcohol clinics. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether elderly patients differ from younger patients with regards to sociodemographic data, drinking pattern and psychiatric comorbidity which may affect...

  5. Vaginal hysterectomy, an outpatient procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh, Marie Ellström; Hauso, Wenche

    2012-11-01

    To report our experience of treating women undergoing vaginal hysterectomy in an outpatient setting and to identify risk factors for hospital admission and women dissatisfied with care. Prospective observational report. department of obstetrics and gynecology, university hospital in Norway. 150 women who underwent vaginal hysterectomy at the outpatient clinic from February 2009 to April 2010. Perioperative data were collected prospectively and case notes were searched for complications. On the first postoperative day all women were contacted by telephone by a nurse. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to monitor pain and nausea during the stay at the outpatient clinic and the day after surgery. VAS was also used to specify the women's degree of satisfaction with care the day after surgery. The number of women who could be discharged from the outpatient unit and had a satisfaction score of ≥7 the day after surgery. Of the 150 women, 84% could be discharged after a mean observation period of 276 min (SD ± 80 min). The mean satisfaction score was 9.0, SD ± 1.4, and 92.6% of the women reported ≥7 points in the satisfaction score. No women with serious complications were sent home. Using a multivariable logistic regression model only pain at discharge was found as significant (p= 0.009) for admittance to hospital. Vaginal hysterectomy is a feasible outpatient procedure and the majority of women were satisfied with the care they received. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. [Promotion of breast feeding in paediatric outpatient settings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böse-O'Reilly, S; Wermuth, I; Hellmann, J; Siebert, U; Lob-Corzilius, T

    2008-03-01

    With some data and examples it can be shown that the competence and the knowledge of paediatric doctor's assistants and paediatric nurses can and should be improved. The training courses to become a "prevention assistant" have been very positively accepted by doctor's assistants and paediatric nurses, and it seems an appropriate method to reach these aims. Prevention and especially promotion of breast feeding is possible in paediatric outpatient settings. The immediate contact between infants, parents, paediatric doctor's assistants, paediatric nurses, and doctors offers a unique opportunity to promote the health of children, mainly due to the high acceptance of regular check-ups. So why not introduce the promotion of breast feeding in paediatric outpatient settings with specially trained doctor's assistants and paediatric nurses?

  7. Effects of Training Programme on HIV/AIDS Prevention among Primary Health Care Workers in Oyo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, Ademola; Funmilayo, Fawole; Oladepo, Oladimeji; Osungbade, Kayode; Asuzu, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to train primary health care workers to be trainers and implementers of community-based AIDS prevention activities in Oyo State, Nigeria, by describing an evaluation of the project. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 148 primary health care workers recruited from the 33 local government areas (LGA) of the…

  8. Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Lim...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Limited Data Set This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 hospital outpatient PPS...

  9. Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program: Hospital-Based Stroke Outpatient Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Danielle; Janzen, Shannon; McIntyre, Amanda; Vermeer, Julianne; Britt, Eileen; Teasell, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have considered the effectiveness of outpatient rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a hospital-based interdisciplinary outpatient stroke rehabilitation program with respect to physical functioning, mobility, and balance. The Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program provides a hospital-based interdisciplinary approach to stroke rehabilitation in Southwestern Ontario. Outcome measures from physiotherapy and occupational therapy sessions were available at intake and discharge from the program. A series of paired sample t-tests were performed to assess patient changes between time points for each outcome measure. A total of 271 patients met the inclusion criteria for analysis (56.1% male; mean age = 62.9 ± 13.9 years). Significant improvements were found between admission and discharge for the Functional Independence Measure, grip strength, Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment, two-minute walk test, maximum walk test, Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, and one-legged stance (P rehabilitation program was effective at improving the physical functioning, mobility, and balance of individuals after a stroke. A hospital-based, stroke-specific rehabilitation program should be considered when patients continue to experience deficits after inpatient rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Outpatient invasive radiologic procedures - Diagnostic and therapeutic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dublin, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a ''how-to'' book for radiologists who are planning to, or considering whether to establish outpatient practice in response to DRGs. It provides practical, expert advice on both the administrative and clinical sides of outpatient radiology. It focuses on the essentials of clinical practice in the outpatient setting - and how it differs from inpatient practice

  11. HIV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... All Collapse All Should I get tested for HIV? CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of ...

  12. Correlates of HIV stigma in HIV-positive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anne C; Hart, Trevor A; Mohammed, Saira; Ivanova, Elena; Wong, Joanna; Loutfy, Mona R

    2010-06-01

    We examined the variables associated with HIV stigma in HIV-positive women currently living in Ontario, Canada. Based on previous literature, we predicted that variables of social marginalization (e.g., ethnicity, income, education), medical variables (e.g., higher CD4 count, lower viral load), and increased psychological distress would be associated with higher perceived HIV stigma among HIV-positive women. One hundred fifty-nine HIV-positive women between the ages of 18 and 52 in Ontario completed self-report measures of the aforementioned variables. Women were recruited through 28 AIDS service organizations, eight HIV clinics, and two community health centers. In multiple regression analyses, for women born in Canada, lower educational level and higher anxiety were associated with higher HIV stigma. For women born outside of Canada, having been judged by a physician in Canada for trying to become pregnant was associated with higher HIV stigma. For HIV-positive women born outside of Canada, negative judgment by a physician regarding intentions to become pregnant should be addressed to reduce perceived HIV stigma and vice versa. Health care providers should be trained in the provision of sensitive and effective health care for women living with HIV, especially when providing reproductive health care.

  13. Social support and delays seeking care after HIV diagnosis, North Carolina, 2000–2006

    OpenAIRE

    McCoy, Sandra I.; Strauss, Ronald P.; MacDonald, Pia D. M.; Leone, Peter A.; Eron, Joseph J.; Miller, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Many adults in the United States enter primary care late in the course of HIV infection, countering the clinical benefits of timely HIV services and missing opportunities for risk reduction. Our objective was to determine if perceived social support was associated with delay entering care after an HIV diagnosis. Two hundred sixteen patients receiving primary care at a large, university-based HIV outpatient clinic in North Carolina were included in the study. Dimensions of functional social su...

  14. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    Keywords:ARV, training, evaluation, HIV, health care provider. RÉSUMÉ .... workers, adequate laboratory facilities for measuring viral load and .... questionnaire guide, the head of unit of the ART ...... begins its scale-up programme. Some of ...

  15. Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Health Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Other Pacific Islanders MMWR Publications HIV and AIDS Viral Hepatitis STDs Tuberculosis Training and Networking Resources Call for ...

  16. Intensive outpatient treatment of elephantiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira De Godoy, J M; Amador Franco Brigidio, P; Buzato, E; Fátima Guerreiro De Godoy, M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to report on a novel approach to the intensive outpatient treatment of elephantiasis of an underprivileged population. Prospective, random study, the diagnosis of lymphedema was clinical and the inclusion of patients was by order of arrival in the treatment center where all were invited to participate in the study. Intensive outpatient therapy was performed for 6 to 8 hours daily over a period of four weeks. Eleven legs with grade III elephantiasis of 8 patients were evaluated in a random prospective study. Three patients were men and five were women with ages ranging between 28 and 66 years old. Treatment included mechanical lymph drainage using the RAGodoy® apparatus for a period of 6 to 8 hours daily and the Godoy & Godoy cervical stimulation technique for 20 minutes per day, both associated to the use of a home-made medical compression stocking using a low-stretch cotton-polyester material. Additionally, manual lymph drainage using the Godoy & Godoy technique was performed for one hour. Perimetry was used to compare measurements made before and after treatment, of the three points of the limb with the largest circumferences. The paired t-test was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error greater than 5% (P-value elephantiasis.

  17. Dysfluent Handwriting in Schizophrenic Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawda, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Taking into account findings in the literature, the author aimed to test whether specific graphical characteristics of handwriting can distinguish patients diagnosed with schizophrenic disorders from healthy controls. Handwriting samples (one sample from each person) from 60 outpatients (29 women, 31 men; age M = 28.5, SD = 5.4) with paranoid schizophrenia were analyzed by three documents examiners and were compared to samples from 60 controls (30 men, 30 women, age M = 28.0, SD = 3.0) without psychiatric disorders. Document examiners assessed 32 graphical features potentially related to schizophrenia. The comparisons between groups revealed that only 7 out of 32 handwriting properties were significantly different in the handwriting of schizophrenic outpatients from controls: the calligraphic forms of letters, loops in ovals, lacking of dots, tremor, sinusoidal baseline, and irregularities size of lower zone. These findings are discussed in terms of motor disturbances in schizophrenia and in relation to the previous research on handwriting of other mental disorders. Similarities between the graphical patterns of handwriting of schizophrenic patients and those of other mental disorders and/or other mental states have been demonstrated. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Fatigue Experiences Among OCD Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Massimo; Piacentino, Daria; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Maraone, Annalisa; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Biondi, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Patients with OCD are impaired in multiple domains of functioning and quality of life. While associated psychopathology complaints and neuropsychological deficits were reported, the subjective experience of general fatigue and mental fatigue was scarcely investigated. In this single-center case-control study we compared 50 non-depressed OCD outpatients consecutively recruited and 50 panic disorder (PD) outpatients, to determine whether they experienced fatigue differently. Assessment consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, severity and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. Fatigue was assessed by using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI). Regarding MFI physical fatigue, an OR of 0.196 (95 % CI 0.080-0.478) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD compared to PD. The same can be said for MFI mental fatigue, as an OR of 0.138 (95 % CI 0.049-0.326) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD. Notably, OCD patients with OCDP co-morbidity reported higher scores of mental fatigue. In this study fatigue, including mental fatigue, seems not to be a prominent experience among adult non-depressed OCD patients.

  19. Mucocutaneous manifestations of HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobhana A

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with various mucocutaneous features, which may be the first pointer towards the existence of HIV infection. This study was done to note the different mucocutaneous lesions present in the HIV population in eastern India. METHODS: Four hundred and ten HIV seropositive patients attending the outpatient and inpatient departments were included in the study. RESULTS: Out of 410 HIV positives, 40% had mucocutaneous involvement at presentation. The mean age of the study population was 29 years and male to female ratio was 2.5:1. The common mucocutaneous morbidities included oral candidiasis (36%, dermatophytosis and gingivitis (13% each, herpes zoster (6%, herpes simplex and scabies (5% each. A striking feature, noted in 36% males, was straightening of hairs. Genital herpes was the commonest genital ulcer disease. Lesions associated with declining immunity included oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia and herpes zoster with median CD4 counts of 98, 62 and 198/ L respectively. CONCLUSION: Early recognition of mucocutaneous manifestations and associated STDs help in better management of HIV/AIDS.

  20. Building partnerships to address the HIV epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, A C; Leo, Y S; Lee, C C

    2008-05-01

    Batam is one of the islands comprising the Riau Province in Indonesia, and is closest to Singapore. It is a popular destination of many Singaporeans. Surveillance reports among commercial sex workers conducted in Batam showed the prevalence rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is 16.2 percent. At the end of 2006, the total number of HIV-infected Singaporeans was 3,060, the majority being infected via heterosexual transmission. The aim of the Indonesian government is to rapidly scale up HIV treatment to those needing it. One of the factors critical to the rapid scale-up is healthcare worker training. An intersectoral collaboration addressing the issue of HIV care and treatment with a hospital in Batam was created. The first activity of the collaboration was a two-day HIV training course conducted in February 2007. The aim of the course was to provide a basic understanding of HIV, as well as knowledge on common opportunistic infections that may present to a general hospital or clinical setting. 34 doctors from 23 institutions in Batam and three doctors from two hospitals in the Riau Islands attended the two-day HIV training course. The participants found the training very useful and highly relevant. This first HIV training provided a foundation to build on further HIV education. It is our belief that through the HIV training programme, there will be more awareness of HIV among the various medical institutions in Batam. As the HIV epidemic knows no borders, working with neighbouring countries is one strategy that deserves attention.

  1. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... outpatient prospective payment system. 419.21 Section 419.21 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM... Excluded From the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System § 419.21 Hospital outpatient services...

  2. Women and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV: Get the Facts on HIV Testing, Prevention, and Treatment Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... How can you lower your chance of HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  3. Creating a National HIV Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spach, David H; Wood, Brian R; Karpenko, Andrew; Unruh, Kenton T; Kinney, Rebecca G; Roscoe, Clay; Nelson, John

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the HIV care provider workforce has not kept pace with an expanding HIV epidemic. To effectively address this HIV workforce shortage, a multipronged approach is needed that includes high-quality, easily accessible, up-to-date HIV education for trainees and practicing providers. Toward this objective, the University of Washington, in collaboration with the AIDS Education and Training Center National Coordinating Resource Center, is developing a modular, dynamic curriculum that addresses the entire spectrum of the HIV care continuum. Herein, we outline the general principles, content, organization, and features of this federally funded National HIV Curriculum, which allows for longitudinal, active, self-directed learning, as well as real-time evaluation, tracking, and feedback at the individual and group level. The online curriculum, which is in development, will provide a free, comprehensive, interactive HIV training and resource tool that can support national efforts to expand and strengthen the United States HIV clinical care workforce. Copyright © 2016 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jesús; Silva-Suarez, Georgina; Serna, Claudia A.; De La Rosa, Mario

    2017-01-01

    There is limited information on the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on Latino migrant workers (LMWs), although available data indicate that this community is being disproportionally affected. The need for prevention programs that address the specific needs of LMWs is becoming well recognized. HIV prevention interventions that train and employ community health workers are a culturally appropriate way to address the issues of community trust and capacity building in this community. This article describes the Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program and its efforts to train and engage community health workers in the prevention of HIV among LMWs in South Florida. PMID:22367261

  5. Aspiration Curettage and its Outpatient Usage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspiration Curettage and its Outpatient Usage. D. A. G. BARFORD, M, NOTELOVITZ. SUMMARY ... its use on a number of outpatients without anaesthesia is discussed. S. Afr. Med. l., 48, 22 (1974). In order to ... plastic aspiration chamber and suction is applied centrally at the base of the chamber, a cylindrical filter within the.

  6. Outpatient treatment for acute uncomplicated diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ünlü, Çagdas; Gunadi, Patrick M.; Gerhards, Michael F.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Vrouenraets, Bart C.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, treatment of acute diverticulitis has mostly been based on inpatient care. The question arises whether these patients can be treated on an outpatient basis as the admissions for diverticular disease have been shown to be increasing every year. We studied whether outpatient treatment

  7. [Impact of HIV infection in hospital environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Avilés, P; López Benito, I; Berbegal Serra, J

    1998-12-01

    Retrospective study to review the admissions at the Hospital Marina Alta due to infection for HIV or its complications and look for risk factors. Clinical charts of patients admitted at the hospital from 1989 to 1996 were analyzed. From 11,932 admissions, 199 (1.7%) were due to patients with infection from HIV, resulting in the 2.4% of the total stay. The medium stays were higher (8.6 +/- 7.4 vs 6 +/- 4.5) more re-admissions (42.7% vs 25.5%) and higher mortality (11% vs 7.8%). The parasitic infestations of the nervous central system and cardiovascular were the most numerous number of admissions and also the longer stays. Throughout the years we saw a increase in the patients at the outpatient clinic with HIV infection and a paradogic decrease in the inpatient admissions, and also a decrease in the media stay and total stays. There is a decrease in the admissions at the inpatient level in contrast with a increment of the prevalence in the outpatients with HIV infection. The improved treatments, the experience of the physicians, the use of the Day Hospital and the use of the service of Home Care Hospitalization allows to keep more patients with less admissions and more outpatient visits.

  8. Impact of animal-assisted therapy for outpatients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Constantin, Janet M; Kunkel, Frank A; Breuer, Paula; Hanlon, Raymond B

    2013-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy using dogs trained to be calm and provide comfort to strangers has been used as a complementary therapy for a range of medical conditions. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of brief therapy dog visits for fibromyalgia patients attending a tertiary outpatient pain management facility compared with time spent in a waiting room. Open label with waiting room control. Tertiary care, university-based, outpatient pain management clinic. A convenience sample of fibromyalgia patients was obtained through advertisements posted in the clinic. Participants were able to spend clinic waiting time with a certified therapy dog instead of waiting in the outpatient waiting area. When the therapy dog was not available, individuals remained in the waiting area. OUTCOME MEASURES.: Self-reported pain, fatigue, and emotional distress were recorded using 11-point numeric rating scales before and after the therapy dog visit or waiting room time. Data were evaluated from 106 therapy dog visits and 49 waiting room controls, with no significant between-group demographic differences in participants. Average intervention duration was 12 minutes for the therapy dog visit and 17 minutes for the waiting room control. Significant improvements were reported for pain, mood, and other measures of distress among patients after the therapy dog visit, but not the waiting room control. Clinically meaningful pain relief (≥2 points pain severity reduction) occurred in 34% after the therapy dog visit and 4% in the waiting room control. Outcome was not affected by the presence of comorbid anxiety or depression. Brief therapy dog visits may provide a valuable complementary therapy for fibromyalgia outpatients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Testing the Efficacy of Combined Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive Behavioral Skills Training to Reduce Methamphetamine Use and Improve HIV Medication Adherence Among HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jeffrey T; John, Steven A; Millar, Brett M; Starks, Tyrel J

    2018-03-13

    Prior research has identified subgroups of HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (GBM) based upon information, motivation, and behavioral skills (IMB) profiles related to HIV medication adherence and methamphetamine use. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a combined motivational interview (MI) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention tailored specifically to the unique context of HIV-positive GBM, and tested whether IMB profiles moderated treatment effects. HIV-positive GBM (N = 210) were randomized to MI + CBT or an attention-matched education control. Both conditions resulted in reduced methamphetamine use, improved medication adherence (and higher CD4 and lower viral loads), and fewer acts of condomless anal sex at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-intervention. Furthermore, the MI + CBT condition achieved greater improvements in medication adherence for men who had greater barriers to change compared to similarly-classified men in the control condition, suggesting the importance of pre-intervention profiles for tailoring future interventions.

  10. Access to oral health care for HIV patients in Nigeria: Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the knowledge of attending physicians on oral manifestations of HIV infection and their attitude and practice towards dental referral for HIV patients. Method: A self-administered questionnaire survey of attending physicians in outpatient clinics of two teaching hospitals in Lagos and the National hospital, ...

  11. Intensive Behavioral Treatment of Urinary Incontinence of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Archival Analysis of Procedures and Outcomes from an Outpatient Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanney, Nicole M.; Jostad, Candice M.; LeBlanc, Linda A.; Carr, James E.; Castile, Allison J.

    2013-01-01

    LeBlanc, Crossett, Bennett, Detweiler, and Carr (2005) described an outpatient model for conducting intensive toilet training with young children with autism using a modified Azrin and Foxx, protocol. In this article, we summarize the use of the protocol in an outpatient setting and the outcomes achieved with a large sample of children with autism…

  12. Effects of an intervention aimed at improving nurse-patient communication in an oncology outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Mette Trøllund; Jensen, Mette Lund; Andersen, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    skills training program in nursing cancer care. Twenty-four nurses in an oncology outpatient clinic participated and were randomly assigned to the intervention program or a control group. A total of 413 patients treated in the clinic during 2 recruitment periods (before and after the communication skills...

  13. Observational study of outpatients with schizophrenia in the Middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Observational study of outpatients with schizophrenia in the Middle East and Africa — 3- and 6-month efficacy and safety results. The Intercontinental Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes Study.

  14. Bloodstream Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among HIV patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-23

    This podcast looks at bloodstream infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogens among outpatients infected with HIV in Southeast Asia. CDC health scientist Kimberly McCarthy discusses the study and why bloodstream infections occur in HIV-infected populations.  Created: 9/23/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/23/2010.

  15. [Leisure-time sport activities and cardiac outpatient therapy in coronary patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitkamp, Hans-Christian; Schimpf, Thomas M; Hipp, Arno; Niess, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    Exercise intensity in coronary patients is controlled by heart rate measurements. Very few investigations have compared the maximum heart rate in cardiac outpatient groups, in leisure-time sport activities, and especially in swimming. Within different exercise conditions 21 coronary patients, nine in well-compensated cardiac condition joining a training group and twelve joining the exercise group with lower intensity, without signs of heart failure, engaged in an incremental bicycle ergometry. A six-lead ECG was derived at the same time with a 24-h ECG. The performance tolerance was measured by the pulse limit derived in 20 patients; one patient failed to show signs of subjective or objective ischemia. During a 24-h ECG monitoring, the patients took part in a 1-h standardized cardiac outpatient program, a standardized swimming program 4 x 25 m, and a typical self-selected leisure-time activity. The patients showed a peak work capacity of 2.2 W/kg and a symptom-free work capacity of 1.3 W/kg. The derived upper heart rate limit was passed during swimming by 19, during leisure-time activity by 16, and during cardiac outpatient program by two patients. The maximum of the mean overriding the limit occurred in leisure-time activity. Signs of ischemia occurred during ergometry in 15, during swimming training in ten patients, during leisure-time activity in eight, and during cardiac outpatient therapy in one. Arrhythmia leisure-time sport activity in 15, during cardiac outpatient therapy in 17, and during swimming in eight patients. Arrhythmia Lown IVa occurred in one patient each during ergometry, leisure sports, and during the night. Coronary patients are in danger to exercise beyond the pulse limit during swimming and other leisure-time sports and not during cardiac outpatient therapy. The upper heart rate limit should be observed during swimming and other endurance leisure-time activities, and is of little importance during cardiac outpatient therapy.

  16. High Acceptability of HIV Self-Testing among Technical Vocational Education and Training College Students in Gauteng and North West Province: What Are the Implications for the Scale Up in South Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgatle, Mathildah Mpata; Madiba, Sphiwe

    2017-01-01

    Although HIV self-testing (HIVST) is globally accepted as an important complement to existing HIV testing approaches, South Africa has lagged behind in its adoption. As a result, data on the acceptability and uptake of HIVST testing is limited. The study investigated the acceptability of HIVST among students in Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges in two provinces in South Africa. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered structured questionnaire was used to collect data among 3,662 students recruited from 13 TVET colleges. The mean age of the students was 21.9 years. The majority (80.9%) were sexually active; while 66.1% reported that they had one sexual partner, and 33.9% had two or more sexual partners in the past year, and66.5% used condoms during the last sexual act. Three-quarters tested for HIV in the past year but less than half knew about HIVST prior to the survey. The acceptability of HIVST was high; about three-quarters showed a willingness to purchase a self-test kit and a majority would self-test with partners. Acceptability of HIVST was associated with being sexually active (OR = 1.73, p = 0.02, confidence interval (CI): 1.08-2.75), having ever been tested for HIV (OR = 1.74, p = 0.001, CI: 1.26-2.38), and having multiple sexual partners (OR = 0.61, p = 0.01, CI: 0.42-0.88). Three-quarters would confirm test results at a local health facility. In terms of counselling, telephone hotlines were acceptable to only 39.9%, and less than half felt that test-kit leaflets would provide sufficient information to self-test. The high acceptability of HIVST among the students calls for extensive planning and preparation for the scaling up of HIVST in South Africa. In addition, campaigns similar to those conducted to promote HIV counselling and testing (HCT) should be considered to educate communities about HIVST.

  17. High Acceptability of HIV Self-Testing among Technical Vocational Education and Training College Students in Gauteng and North West Province: What Are the Implications for the Scale Up in South Africa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathildah Mpata Mokgatle

    Full Text Available Although HIV self-testing (HIVST is globally accepted as an important complement to existing HIV testing approaches, South Africa has lagged behind in its adoption. As a result, data on the acceptability and uptake of HIVST testing is limited. The study investigated the acceptability of HIVST among students in Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET colleges in two provinces in South Africa.A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered structured questionnaire was used to collect data among 3,662 students recruited from 13 TVET colleges.The mean age of the students was 21.9 years. The majority (80.9% were sexually active; while 66.1% reported that they had one sexual partner, and 33.9% had two or more sexual partners in the past year, and66.5% used condoms during the last sexual act. Three-quarters tested for HIV in the past year but less than half knew about HIVST prior to the survey. The acceptability of HIVST was high; about three-quarters showed a willingness to purchase a self-test kit and a majority would self-test with partners. Acceptability of HIVST was associated with being sexually active (OR = 1.73, p = 0.02, confidence interval (CI: 1.08-2.75, having ever been tested for HIV (OR = 1.74, p = 0.001, CI: 1.26-2.38, and having multiple sexual partners (OR = 0.61, p = 0.01, CI: 0.42-0.88. Three-quarters would confirm test results at a local health facility. In terms of counselling, telephone hotlines were acceptable to only 39.9%, and less than half felt that test-kit leaflets would provide sufficient information to self-test.The high acceptability of HIVST among the students calls for extensive planning and preparation for the scaling up of HIVST in South Africa. In addition, campaigns similar to those conducted to promote HIV counselling and testing (HCT should be considered to educate communities about HIVST.

  18. Hospital Outpatient PPS Partial Hospitalization Program LDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Partial Hospitalization Program LDS This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 claims...

  19. The quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse and compare the quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing in Denmark and Aragón (in northeastern Spain), with the objective of assessing inappropriate prescribing....

  20. Outpatient management of pediatric acute mastoiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Morin, Francis; Aziz, Haya; Manogaran, Mayuri; Guertin, William; Duval, Melanie

    2017-11-01

    Evaluate the Montreal Children's Hospital experience with outpatient management of uncomplicated acute mastoiditis with parenteral antibiotic therapy alone and determine if it is a safe alternative to inpatient management. A retrospective review of pediatric patients diagnosed with acute mastoiditis at a tertiary care pediatric hospital between 2013 and 2015 was performed. Patients with syndromes, immunodeficiency, cholesteatoma, chronic otitis media, cochlear implant in the affected ear, or incidental mastoid opacity were excluded. 56 children age 6 months to 15 years old were treated for acute mastoiditis, including 29 hospitalizations and 27 outpatients. Patients managed as outpatient with daily intravenous ceftriaxone had a 93% cure rate. Eighteen hospitalized and one outpatient had complications of acute mastoiditis. Children with complications were more likely to be febrile (p = 0.045). Two patients failed outpatient therapy and were admitted; one for myringotomy and piperacillin-tazobactam treatment and one required a mastoidectomy. 4/27 children treated as outpatient underwent myringotomy and tube insertion, 2 underwent myringotomy and tube along with admission and 21 did not require tube insertion. The average total duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy was respectively 4.9 and 18.9 days in the outpatient and hospitalized group. The average duration of admission was 5.9 days. Outpatient medical therapy of uncomplicated pediatric mastoiditis is safe, successful, and efficient. Benefits include efficient use of surgical beds, cost savings and patient and family convenience. Careful patient selection and close monitoring are keys for successful outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Vitreoretinal outpatient surgery: clinical and financial considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creuzot-Garcher, C; Aubé, H; Candé, F; Dupont, G; Guillaubey, A; Malvitte, L; Arnavielle, S; Bron, A

    2008-11-01

    Vitreoretinal surgery has benefited from great advances opening the opportunity for outpatient management. We report on the 6-month experience of outpatient surgery for vitreoretinal diseases. From November 2007 to April 2008, 270 patients benefited from a vitreoretinal surgery, with 173 retinal detachments, 63 epiretinal membranes, and 34 other procedures. Only 8.5% (n=23) of the patients had to stay at the hospital one or two nights. The main reasons were the distance from the hospital and surgery on a single-eye patient. The questionnaire given after the surgery showed that almost all the patients were satisfied with the outpatient setting. In contrast, the financial results showed a loss of income of around 400,000 euros due to the low level of payment of outpatient surgery in France by the national health insurance system. Vitreoretinal surgery can be achieved in outpatient surgery with an improvement in the information given to the patients and the overall organization of the hospitalization. However, the current income provided with vitreoretinal outpatient surgery is highly disadvantageous in France, preventing this method from being generalized.

  2. Knowledge of HIV Testing Guidelines Among US Internal Medicine Residents: A Decade After the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Routine HIV Testing Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandachi, Dima; Dang, Bich N; Wilson Dib, Rita; Friedman, Harvey; Giordano, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Ten years after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended universal HIV screening, rates remain low. Internal medicine residents are the front-line medical providers for large groups of patients. We evaluated the knowledge of internal medicine residents about HIV testing guidelines and examined adherence to universal HIV testing in an outpatient setting. A cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents at four residency programs in Chicago was conducted from January to March 2016. Aggregate data on HIV screening were collected from 35 federally qualified community health centers in the Chicago area after inclusion of an HIV testing best practice alert in patients' electronic medical records. Of the 192 residents surveyed, 130 (68%) completed the survey. Only 58% were aware of universal HIV screening and 49% were aware that Illinois law allows for an opt-out HIV testing strategy. Most of the residents (64%) ordered no more than 10 HIV tests in 6 months. The most frequently reported barriers to HIV testing were deferral because of urgent care issues, lack of time, and the perception that patients were uncomfortable discussing HIV testing. From July 2015 to February 2016, the average HIV testing adherence rate in the 35 health centers was 18.2%. More effort is needed to change HIV testing practices among internal medicine residents so that they will adopt this approach in their future clinical practice. Improving knowledge about HIV testing and addressing other HIV testing barriers are essential for such a successful change.

  3. A Controlled Study of an HIV/AIDS/STI/TB Intervention with Faith ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to develop an HIV and AIDS training manual, and to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and management of faith healers of Apostolic churches regarding HIV and AIDS, before and after they attended an HIV and AIDS training programme. A quasi-experimental intervention design was used with faith ...

  4. BREASTFEEDING: THE MEANING FOR PREGNANT POSITIVE HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristina Silva Vinhas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In The actions of prevention to the HIV AIDS, in the prenatal lens the advising of women infected by the HIV about the risk from the vertical transmission causing to prohibition from the lactation and from the breast-feeding crossed. Objective it identify joined the pregnants HIV positive the main worries as regards the impediment from the breast-feeding natural and evaluate the individual educational needs of activities as form alternative to the affectionate and psychic emotional support to the pregnant. Methodology treats itself of a boarding qualitative, they were interviewed pregnants soropositivas inscription in the outpatient clinic of prenatal of high risk, of a Public Hospital, in Goiânia GO. Analyzing the facts: them interviewed were unanimous in affirm that to pregnancy was not planned. It be pregnant and uncover that they are bearers of the virus HIV brought bigger expectations regarding the pregnancy: fear, insecurity, anguish and doubts are emotions by them related. And, they stood out that the specific groups permit bigger liberty for argument and change of experiences, the work helps to pregnant react to the consequences of the virus HIV. Like this being, we understand that the aid to the pregnant soroposotive, in the institution studied attends a standard quality, however, is important thing systematize the specific formation of groups of pregnant soropositives for HIV. KEY WORDS: Risk Prenatal; Nursing; HIV.

  5. Care of HIV-infected adults at Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and associated costs, in order to inform clinical practice, health service ... Setting. The outpatient department of a public sector, academic hospital in Soweto, South Africa. Design. ... primary care leveL The average cost per consultation was. R112.03. ... HIV-related illness, care strategies and costs of HIVlAJDS care is ...

  6. HIV Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about steps people can take to protect their health from HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  7. Theory of Mind intervention for outpatients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechi, Margherita; Spangaro, Marco; Bosia, Marta; Zanoletti, Andrea; Fresi, Francesco; Buonocore, Mariachiara; Cocchi, Federica; Guglielmino, Carmelo; Smeraldi, Enrico; Cavallaro, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Social disability is one of the critical areas known to be a predictor of daily functioning in schizophrenia. Recent studies showed that impairments in Theory of Mind (ToM) contribute to real-world social functioning and are more strongly associated with community outcomes than other neuropsychological domains of cognition. Several experiments revealed an improving potential of social cognition targeted training, particularly through introduction of verbalisation and explicit manipulation of information about others' mental states. Based on these data, we evaluated longitudinally, with a controlled trial, the feasibility and efficacy of ToM training and the possible influences of daily functioning and IQ on the enhancement of ToM abilities. Thirty outpatients with schizophrenia were recruited and randomly allocated to two groups: ToM Intervention (ToMI), based on verbalisation of selected comic strips representing ToM scenarios, or active control group (ACG). Results showed a significant improvement of ToM abilities among subjects allocated to ToMI compared to ACG, confirming the hypothesis of the enhancing potential of training methods targeting ToM functions. Moreover, we observed no influences of neuropsychological and functional variables on ToM improvement. Development of future studies should take into account possible effects of ToM training on functional outcome, according to the strong associations between ToM abilities and real-world social functioning.

  8. Billing for outpatient transplant pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Angela Q; Seiger, Todd C; Urann, Christina L; McCleary, Jo Ann; Goroski, Angela L; Ojogho, Okechukwu N

    2012-01-15

    The economic impact of out-patient pharmacy services in a transplant program was evaluated. Full-time kidney transplant pharmacy services were implemented at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center (PSHMC) in the fall of 2008, with two pharmacists combining hours to provide one full-time-equivalent position. At PSHMC, posttransplantation patients are seen three times per week. The number of patient visits with pharmacists for 2010 was compared with the total number of patient visits. The face-to-face time spent with the patient was translated to a level of billing that was associated with a set reimbursement schedule. For each patient encounter in which a pharmacist was involved, the incremental difference between the nursing and pharmacy levels of billing was examined, as were the levels most often billed by pharmacists. The difference in billing levels between pharmacists and nurses for the same patient encounter was also evaluated. Overall, pharmacist visits accounted for 208 (22%) of the 994 out-patient kidney transplant visits in 2010, with pharmacists billing at a higher level of acuity compared with nursing for the same patient encounter 48% of the time. This translated to an approximate increase of $100 per patient visit. For the one-year study period, pharmacists utilizing facility- fee billing increased out-patient reimbursement by approximately $10,000. By utilizing outpatient facility-fee billing for pharmacy services, the transplant program at PSHMC increased reimbursement in the outpatient setting.

  9. [Evaluation of 12 pilot projects to improve outpatient palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Wolf, G; Elsner, F; Lindena, G; Hilgers, R-D; Heussen, N; Rolke, R; Ostgathe, C; Radbruch, L

    2013-12-01

    With a priority programme the German Cancer Aid supported the development of quality-assured outpatient palliative care to cover the whole country. The 12 regional pilot projects funded with the aim to improve outpatient palliative care in different models and different frameworks were concurrently monitored and evaluated. The supported projects, starting and ending individually, documented all patients who were cared for using HOPE (Hospice and palliative care evaluation) and MIDOS (Minimal documentation system for palliative patients). Total data were analyzed for 3239 patients decriptively. In addition to the quantitative data the experiences of the projects were recorded in a number of workshops (2008, 2009, 2010, and 2012). In particular, the experiences reported in the final meeting in July 2012 were considered for this article as well as the final reports for the German Cancer Aid. In the quantitative evaluation 85.6% of 3239 palliative care patients had a cancer diagnosis. In all model projects the goal of a network with close cooperation of primary providers, social support, and outpatient and inpatient specialist services has been achieved. For all projects, the initial financing of the German Cancer Aid was extremely important, because contracts with health insurance funds were negotiated slowly, and could then be built on the experiences with the projects. The participants of the project-completion meeting emphasized the need to carry out a market analysis before starting palliative care organizations considering the different regional structures and target groups of patients. Education, training and continuing education programs contribute significantly to the network. A reliably funded coordination center/case management across all institutions is extremely important. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. HIV Associated Sensory Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G, Amruth; S, Praveen-Kumar; B, Nataraju; Bs, Nagaraja

    2014-07-01

    In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, sensory neuropathies have increased in prevalence. We have documented the frequency and profile of the two most common forms of sensory neuropathies associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and looked into clinicoelectrophysiological correlates to differentiate the two entities. The study population comprised of all consecutive patients detected to be HIV positive and attending the Neurology outpatient department (from March 2011 to March 2012) who were aged ≥ 18 years and were able to give informed consent. The data were collected from the patient records (including CD4 counts and treatment details) and questionnaire based interview with each patient. All patients underwent detailed clinical examination and nerve conduction studies (NCSs). Among the total study population of 50 patients, there were 31 men and 19 women. Thirty two patients were in age range of 21 - 40 years and rest were above 40 years. 25 were on antiretroviral therapy (18 on regimen containing zidovudine; seven on regimen containing stavudine). The mean duration of antiretroviral therapy was 16.6±8.4 months. Low CD4 counts ( 40 years. Subclinical neuropathy was common in those on antiretroviral therapy. Axonal neuropathy was the commonest pattern noted in patients who were receiving antiretroviral therapy and demyelinating neuropathy in patients not on antiretroviral therapy. Surprisingly no significant correlation was found between low CD4 counts and symptomatic neuropathy.

  11. Emergency in the clinic: a simulation curriculum to improve outpatient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve; Baty, Gillian; Rask, John; Chungtuyco, Michelle; Pereda, Brenda; Leeman, Lawrence

    2017-12-01

    Emergency response skills are essential when events such as seizure, anaphylaxis, or hemorrhage occur in the outpatient setting. As services and procedures increasingly move outside the hospital, training to manage complications may improve outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate a simulation-based curriculum in outpatient emergency management skills with the outcome measures of graded objective performance and learner self-efficacy. This pre- and postcurriculum study enrolled residents and fellows in Obstetrics and Gynecology and Family Medicine in a simulation-based, outpatient emergency management curriculum. Learners completed self-efficacy questionnaires and were videotaped managing 3 medical emergency scenarios (seizure, over-sedation/cardiopulmonary arrest, and hemorrhage) in the simulation laboratory both before and after completion of the curriculum. Evaluators who were blinded to training level scored the simulation performance videotapes using a graded rubric with critical action checklists. Scenario scores were assigned in 5 domains and globally. Paired t-tests were used to determine differences pre- and postcurriculum. Thirty residents completed the curriculum and pre- and postcurriculum testing. Subjects' objective performance scores improved in all 5 domains (Pimprovement. When scores were stratified by previous outpatient simulation experience, subjects with previous experience improved in all but management of excess sedation. Pre- and postcurriculum self-efficacy evaluations demonstrated improvement in all 7 measured areas: confidence, use of appropriate resources, communication skills, complex airway management, bag mask ventilation, resuscitation, and hemorrhage management. Self-efficacy assessment showed improvement in confidence managing outpatient emergencies (P=.001) and ability to communicate well in emergency situations (Pimproved both self-efficacy and objectively rated performance scores in management of outpatient medical

  12. 75 FR 73110 - Part C Early Intervention Services Grant under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... Intervention Services Grant under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services.../AIDS Program, Part C funds for the Louisiana State University, Health Sciences Center, Viral Disease... HIV/AIDS, including primary medical care, laboratory testing, oral health care, outpatient mental...

  13. Nutritional status of HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-05-04

    May 4, 2010 ... infections. HIV infection, nutritional status and immune function are ... dominant aspect in this relationship is the effect of HIV infection on nutritional .... as part of the medical treatment of the patient, and training and monitoring ...

  14. [Perception of safety climate in outpatient pediatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldegger, Claudia; Zeller, Adelheid

    2013-02-01

    In ambulant pediatric care, patients situations are becoming increasingly complex, because the lenght of hospital stay is reduced since the introduction of Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG). Consequently, the patients' safety is constantly becoming more important. The patients' safety is closely associated with the nurses' awareness of risks and the safety climate within the institution. This study is investigating how nurses of a pediatric outpatient service estimate the patients' safety and how that can be optimized, if necessary. As part of a cross-sectional study, a total of 106 nurses of the pediatric outpatient service were interviewed with a modified German version of the "Patient Safety Climate Inventory (Patientensicherheitsklima-Inventar, PaSKI)". Data was analysed by a descriptive statistical method. The return rate was 80.2 percent. The results show a very high awareness of patients' safety issues as well as a high level of satisfaction concerning team collaboration. Both results have a positive influence on the safety-climate. Problems are associated mainly with the incident reporting system, e.g. with reporting critical incidents and communicating after reporting. This indicates the importance of a useable incident reporting system, which--in combination with staff training--may be an important step towards a structured risk management. Furthermore, it clarifies the importance of transparent communication after a reported incident, as also described in the literature.

  15. Reviewing independent access to HIV testing, counselling and treatment for adolescents in HIV-specific laws in sub-Saharan Africa: implications for the HIV response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eba, Patrick M.; Lim, HyeYoung

    2017-01-01

    . Conclusions: Efforts to end legal barriers to access to HIV services for adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa should address HIV-specific laws. Restrictive provisions in these laws should be reformed, and their protective norms effectively implemented including by translating them into national policies and ensuring sensitization and training of healthcare workers and communities. This study reiterates the need for action in all countries across Africa and beyond to review their laws and policies to create an enabling environment to accelerate access to HIV prevention, testing and treatment services for adolescents. PMID:28799324

  16. Reviewing independent access to HIV testing, counselling and treatment for adolescents in HIV-specific laws in sub-Saharan Africa: implications for the HIV response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eba, Patrick M; Lim, HyeYoung

    2017-08-11

    for adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa should address HIV-specific laws. Restrictive provisions in these laws should be reformed, and their protective norms effectively implemented including by translating them into national policies and ensuring sensitization and training of healthcare workers and communities. This study reiterates the need for action in all countries across Africa and beyond to review their laws and policies to create an enabling environment to accelerate access to HIV prevention, testing and treatment services for adolescents.

  17. HIV testing in dermatology - a national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, Gavin A; Holme, S A

    2018-05-01

    Forty percent of individuals have late-stage HIV at the time of diagnosis, resulting in increased morbidity. Identifying key diseases which may indicate HIV infection can prompt clinicians to trigger testing, which may result in more timely diagnosis. The British HIV Association has published guidelines on such indicator diseases in dermatology. We audited the practice of HIV testing in UK dermatologists and General Practitioners (GPs) and compared results with the national guidelines. This audit showed that HIV testing in key indicator diseases remains below the standard set out by the national guidelines, and that GPs with special interest in dermatology have a lower likelihood for testing, and lower confidence when compared to consultants, registrars and associate specialists. Large proportions of respondents believed further training in HIV testing would be beneficial.

  18. Continuous Intravenous Milrinone Therapy in Pediatric Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Michelle; Liebers, Jill; Maynard, Roy

    Milrinone is a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor with both positive inotropic and vasodilator properties. Administered as a continuous infusion, milrinone is indicated for the short-term treatment of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Despite limited data supporting long-term milrinone therapy in adults with congestive heart failure, children managed as outpatients may benefit from continuous milrinone as a treatment for cardiac dysfunction, as a destination therapy for cardiac transplant, or as palliative therapy for cardiomyopathy. The aim of this article is to review the medical literature and describe a home infusion company's experience with pediatric outpatient milrinone therapy.

  19. Perception of sexuality and fertility in women living with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Maria; Aho, Inka; Thorsteinsson, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: As the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive population ages, issues concerning sexuality and fertility, among others, are becoming relevant. HIV is still surrounded by stigma and taboos, and there have been few studies conducted in industrialized settings concerning...... these questions. We therefore wanted to investigate the perception of sexuality and fertility in women living with HIV (WLWH) in an industrialized setting, using a questionnaire. METHODS: WLWH were recruited at their regular outpatient clinic visits, at the major Departments of Infectious Diseases in Denmark...... Finland) or from a national HIV cohort (in Denmark). Statistical analysis was performed using STATA, version 11. RESULTS: In total, 560 women were included in the study. The median age was 44 years. The majority were of white European origin, with fully suppressed HIV viral load, CD4 cell count >350 µ...

  20. Identifying Symptom Patterns in People Living With HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natalie L.; Azuero, Andres; Vance, David E.; Richman, Joshua S.; Moneyham, Linda D.; Raper, James L.; Heath, Sonya L.; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms guide disease management, and patients frequently report HIV-related symptoms, but HIV symptom patterns reported by patients have not been described in the era of improved antiretroviral treatment. The objectives of our study were to investigate the prevalence and burden of symptoms in people living with HIV and attending an outpatient clinic. The prevalence, burden, and bothersomeness of symptoms reported by patients in routine clinic visits during 2011 were assessed using the 20-item HIV Symptom Index. Principal component analysis was used to identify symptom clusters and relationships between groups using appropriate statistic techniques. Two main clusters were identified. The most prevalent and bothersome symptoms were muscle aches/joint pain, fatigue, and poor sleep. A third of patients had seven or more symptoms, including the most burdensome symptoms. Even with improved antiretroviral drug side-effect profiles, symptom prevalence and burden, independent of HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell count, are high. PMID:26790340

  1. Handbook of pediatric HIV care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Read, Jennifer S; Zeichner, Steven L. (Steven Leonard)

    2006-01-01

    ... and guidelines necessary for effective management of infected children. Dr. Stephen L. Zeichner received his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Chicago. He trained in pediatrics and infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. An investigator in the HIV and AIDS Malignancy Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, and an adjunc...

  2. Violence prevention education program for psychiatric outpatient departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Robert E

    2014-10-01

    Approximately 40 % of psychiatrists and up to 64 % of psychiatric residents have been physically assaulted. Ranges of 72-96 % of psychiatric residents in various studies have been verbally threatened. As violence risk occurs in outpatient settings, our department developed a quality and safety curriculum designed to prepare psychiatric residents and staff to optimally respond to aggressive outpatients and violence threats or events. In 2011 and 2012, we offered an 8-part violence prevention performance improvement curriculum/program including (1) situational awareness/creating a safe environment; (2) violence de-escalation training; (3) violence risk assessment training, use of risk assessment tools, and medical record documentation; (4) violence safety discharge planning; (5) legal issues and violence; (6) "shots fired on campus" video/discussion; (7) "2011 violence threat simulation" video/discussion; and (8) violence threat simulation exercise. This program was offered to approximately 60 psychiatric residents/staff in each year. We obtained qualitative comments about the entire program and data from 2 years of post-event surveys on the usefulness of the "violence threat simulation exercise." The large majority of comments about program elements 1 to 7 were positive. In 2011 and 2012, respectively, 76 and 86 % of participants responded to a post-event survey of the violence threat simulation exercise; 90 and 88 % of participants, respectively, reported the simulation to be very helpful/somewhat helpful; and 86 and 82 % of participants, respectively, reported feeling much better/better prepared to deal with a violent event. Although some participants experienced anxiety, sleep disturbances, increase in work safety concerns, and/or traumatic memories, the majority reported no post-simulation symptoms (72 and 80 %, respectively). Although we are unable to demonstrate that this program effectively prevents violence, the overall positive response from participants

  3. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  4. Ethnic diversity outpatient clinic in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahhan, Nordin; Meijssen, Dominique; Chegary, Malika; Bosman, Diederik; Wolf, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Background: The health status of chronic sick ethnic minority children in the Netherlands is unequal compared with indigenous Dutch children. In order to optimize the health care for these children a specific patient-oriented clinic in ethnic-cultural diversity: the Mosaic Outpatient Clinic (MOC)

  5. Outpatient total hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vehmeijer, Stephan B.W.; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    , but efforts to control undesirable pathophysiological responses will be a prerequisite to improve the success rate of an outpatient setting. Also, care must be taken to avoid extra activities or investments solely to enable discharge on the day of surgery. Further cost analyses will have to be performed...

  6. Pain management in the outpatient surgical setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-14

    May 14, 2003 ... Pain management in the outpatient surgical setting. Robert S. Wolf MD. American Sports Medicine Institute. Birmingham, AL USA emptive and post-operative setting. These medications inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, promote analgesia, and consequently decrease the post-operative demand for opioids.

  7. Benefícios do treinamento aeróbio e/ou resistido em indivíduos HIV+: uma revisão sistemática Benefits of aerobic and/or resistance training in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Fábio Souza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A aids é uma doença crônica, caracterizada pela depleção dos linfócitos T, sendo o vírus HIV o seu agente causador. A sua infecção e tratamento farmacológico estão ligados às alterações físicas e fisiológicas, que podem diminuir a qualidade de vida. Sendo assim, o objetivo do estudo foi elaborar uma revisão sistemática sobre os estudos publicados no PubMed e Capes entre 1998 e 2008, com humanos soropositivos e que investigaram os impactos do treinamento aeróbio e/ou resistido nos aspectos fisiológicos, metabólicos, psicológicos, imunológicos e físicos. Foram discutidos protocolos que utilizaram apenas treinamento de força ou aeróbio e os que utilizaram ambos e a grande maioria encontrou resultados favoráveis às variáveis pesquisadas. Quanto ao modelo de prescrição para essa população, este deve ser composto por exercícios de força, de oito a 15 repetições máximas (trabalho de hipertrofia e por exercícios aeróbios (contínuo ou intervalado, com duração de 20 a 60 minutos e intensidade variando de 50 a 85% da frequência cardíaca máxima ou 45-85% do consumo máximo de oxigênio, ambos três a cinco vezes por semana. Dessa forma, ao elaborar um programa de atividade física, é importante conhecer a atual condição física e fisiológica do indivíduo HIV+, para que a sua condição de esforço não seja superestimada ou subestimada.AIDS is considered a chronic disease, characterized for depletion of the lymphocyte T CD4+, caused by the HIV virus. The HIV infection and its pharmacological treatment are linked to physiological and physical disorders, which can induce to lower quality of life. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to elaborate a systematic review about studies published in Pubmed and Capes between 1998 and 2008, which investigated physiological, metabolic, psychological and immunological changes mediated by aerobic and strength training in seropositive individuals. Protocols which only

  8. Humanizing HIV/AIDS and its (re)stigmatizing effects: HIV public 'positive' speaking in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Mark; Sarangi, Srikant

    2009-01-01

    Social stigma has been inextricably linked with HIV and AIDS since the epidemic erupted in the early 1980s. The stigma that has built up around HIV and AIDS is generally regarded as having a negative impact on the quality of life of HIV-positive people and on general prevention efforts. Current attempts to combat HIV-related stigma focus on increasing the acceptance of HIV among the stigmatizing public and stigmatized individuals alike. In this, the global HIV-positive community is being increasingly called upon to ;humanize' the virus, not least through public displays of HIV 'positive' health and public ;positive' speaking. This article critically explores the constitutive effects and inherent power relations of HIV Positive Speakers' Bureaus (PSBs) as a platform for such a display. Adopting a post-structuralist discourse analytic approach, we explore accounts of positive-speaking and HIV health from HIV-related non-government organizations in India and in PSB training manuals. In particular, we highlight ways in which positive-speaking in India can be seen to have significant (re)stigmatizing effects by way of ambivalent and hyper-real configurations of HIV 'positive' identity and life.

  9. Mobile information and communication in the hospital outpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Chao, Chia-Chen; Hung, Ming-Chien; Li, Yu-Chuan; Chi, Y P

    2007-08-01

    Most healthcare providers provide mobile service for their medical staff; however, few healthcare providers provide mobile service as part of their outpatient service. The mobile outpatient service system (MOSS) focuses on illness treatment, illness prevention and patient relation management for outpatient service users. Initiated in a local hospital in Taiwan, the MOSS pilot project was developed to improve outpatient service quality and pursue higher patient safety. This study focuses on the development of the MOSS. The workflow, architecture and target users of the MOSS are delineated. In addition, there were two surveys conducted as part of this study. After a focus group of medical staff identified areas in which outpatient services might be improved by the MOSS, the first survey was administered to outpatients to confirm the focus group's intuitions. The second administration of the survey explored outpatient satisfaction after they used the MOSS service. With regard to outpatient attitudes, about 93% of participants agreed that the mobile outpatient service improved outpatient service quality. In the area of outpatient satisfaction, about 89% of participants indicated they were satisfied with the mobile outpatient service. Supported by our study finding, we propose that more diverse mobile outpatient services can be provided in the future.

  10. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  11. HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It harms your immune system by destroying the white blood cells ... It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most ...

  12. HIV and Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Immunizations Last Reviewed: February 6, 2018 Key ...

  13. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: January 17, 2018 Key ...

  14. HIV and AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español HIV and AIDS KidsHealth / For Kids / HIV and AIDS ... actually the virus that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV ...

  15. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Treatment: The Basics Last Reviewed: March 22, 2018 ...

  16. HIV and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG HIV and Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs HIV ... HIV and Pregnancy FAQ113, July 2017 PDF Format HIV and Pregnancy Pregnancy What is human immunodeficiency virus ( ...

  17. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  18. Volume, structure and funding of specialized outpatient care at the outpatient Advisory Department of Mariinskaya hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Kutyrev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of technologies, and discovery of new methods of diagnostics and treatment of diseases, a shift of the disease towards chronic disease is observed. Growth in prosperity will increase average life expectancy and mean age of population. Year after year, the elderly sector grows, with several chronic diseases per person. This is especially true for St. Petersburg, where 25 % of the populations of over working age. Thus, the demand for specialized medical care, particularly outpatient, will increase. Given that outpatient care is more profitable than hospital care, particular attention should be paid to its organization and expansion (increase in area, number of personnel, logistics, and so on. The article attempts to analyze changes in the volume of specialized outpatient medical care delivered at the outpatient Advisory Department of St. Petersburg state establishment of healthcare Mariinsky hospital in the period from 2008 through 2013.

  19. HIV/AIDS - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV - Newly diagnosed with HIV, part 5 - English MP3 Children and HIV - Newly diagnosed with HIV, part 5 - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) MP3 Children and HIV - Newly diagnosed with HIV, part ...

  20. Basic HIV/AIDS Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Basic Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir HIV and ... HIV. Interested in learning more about CDC's HIV statistics? Terms, Definitions, and Calculations Used in CDC HIV ...

  1. Living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Living With HIV Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  2. HIV Risk and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Risk and Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  3. Quality of life of lung cancer patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUDA, AYAKO; KOBAYASHI, MIKA; SAKAKIBARA, YUMI; TAMAOKA, MEIYO; FURUIYE, MASASHI; INASE, NAOHIKO; MATSUSHIMA, EISUKE

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of cancer patients receive outpatient chemotherapy as an alternative to inpatient chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether quality of life (QOL) during outpatient chemotherapy was better than QOL prior to hospital discharge, and to explore possible related factors prior to hospital discharge that affected the QOL of lung cancer patients who received outpatient chemotherapy. Lung cancer inpatients who were scheduled for outpatient chemotherapy were as...

  4. The impact of outpatient clinical teaching on students' academic performance in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Bahaeldin A; Elfaki, Omer A; Khan, Muhammed A

    2017-01-01

    Clinical teaching at outpatient settings is an essential part of undergraduate medical students' training. The increasing number of students in many medical schools and short hospital stays makes inpatient teaching alone insufficient to provide students with the required clinical skills. To make up this shortfall, outpatient clinical teaching has been implemented by our Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Khalid University, KSA, throughout the academic year 2015-2016. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of clinical teaching at outpatient settings on the academic performance of our students. In this comparative retrospective study, the effects of outpatient clinical teaching of obstetrics and gynecology on the academic performance of student was assessed through an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). During their course on obstetrics and gynecology, 58 students had their clinical teaching both at inpatient and outpatient settings and constituted "study group". The remaining 52 students had clinical teaching only at inpatient settings and were considered "control group". Students in both groups sat for OSCE at the end of week 8 of the gynecology course. Students in both groups sat for OSCE at the end of week 8 of the gynecology course. Four stations were used for assessment: obstetric history, gynecological history, obstetric physical examination of pregnant women, and gynecological procedure station. Twenty marks were allocated for each station giving a total score of 80. The OSCE scores for study group were compared with those of the control group using Student's t -test; p performance in OSCE. There is evidence of remarkable improvement in the mastery of clinical skills as manifested in the students' scores in physical examination and procedures stations. These results will encourage us to have clinical teaching in other disciplines at outpatient settings.

  5. 77 FR 5317 - Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 447 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs; Proposed... Part 447 [CMS-2345-P] RIN 0938-AQ41 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs AGENCY: Centers for... requirements pertaining to Medicaid reimbursement for covered outpatient drugs to implement provisions of the...

  6. Utilisation of outpatient services at Red Cross War Memorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The demand for outpatient services continues to grow at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital (RCCH). To determine current utilisation patterns, we conducted a 2-week survey in the outpatient department (OPD). In addition, we reviewed the RCCH Annual Reports for the period 1961 - 1988. Annual outpatient ...

  7. Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS) survey for hospital outpatient departments - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital outpatient department ratings for the Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS)...

  8. Bacterial vaginosis, human papilloma virus and herpes viridae do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding in women living with HIV in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Maria; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Jensen, Jørgen S

    2017-01-01

    in the genital tract despite undetectable HIV RNA plasma viral load. We examined the prevalence and diagnostic predictors of BV and HIV-1 RNA vaginal shedding in women living with HIV (WLWH) in Denmark, taking into account the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes viridae. METHODS: WLWH between 18......-51 years were recruited from six Departments of Infectious Diseases in Denmark during enrolment in the SHADE cohort; a prospective cohort study of WLWH attending regular outpatient care. BV was diagnosed by microscopy of vaginal swabs and PCR was used for detection of BV-associated bacteria, HPV, herpes...... RNA. Both before and after adjustment for BV, age, ethnicity, plasma HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, herpes viridae and HPV, we found no significant predictors of HIV RNA vaginal shedding. CONCLUSION: In well-treated WLWH, BV, herpes viridae or HPV do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding. This implies...

  9. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of mental disorders in cardiology outpatients to the number of patients with psychological problems identified by cardiologists. In a cardiology outpatient service, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these 86...... were included and screened for mental disorder with the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD), Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) psychosis screening, the Clock Drawing Test, and the WHO-5 Well-being Index. The cardiologists were asked to rate the severity of somatic...... and mental problems in each patient on visual analogue scales (VAS-som and VAS-men). The current treatments, including psychiatric and psychological treatments, were noted, and the survival was followed for 3 years. Of the 86 patients included, 34 (40%) had a diagnosis of mental disorder. Eleven (12.8%) had...

  10. Primary epiploic appendagitis and successful outpatient management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J.; Krause, Robert; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra J.; Tafeit, Erwin; Mangge, Harald; Tillich, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA) is a rare cause of abdominal acute or subacute complaints. Diagnosis of PEA is made with ultrasonography (US) or when computed tomography (CT) reveals a characteristic lesion. Case Report We report on two patients with PEA. In one patient PEA was first seen with US and confirmed with contrast enhanced CT, and in the second patient CT without contrast enhancement demonstrated PEA. In both patients an outpatient recovery with conservative non-surgical treatment is described. Conclusions Medical personnel should be aware of this rare disease, which mimics many other intra-abdominal acute and subacute conditions. A correct diagnosis of PEA with imaging procedures enables conservative and successful outpatient management avoiding unnecessary surgical intervention and additional costs. PMID:22648258

  11. Dexamethasone for pain after outpatient shoulder surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholdt, K. T.; Mønsted, P. N.; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone has analgesic properties when given intravenously before surgery, but the optimal dose has not been determined. We hypothesised that a dose of 40 mg dexamethasone would improve analgesia after outpatient shoulder surgery compared with 8 mg. Methods A randomised, double...... a dose–response relationship, increasing the dexamethasone dose from 8 to 40 mg did not improve analgesia significantly after outpatient shoulder surgery.......) or placebo (D0) before surgery. The primary outcome was pain intensity 8 h after surgery rated on a numeric rating scale of 0 to 10. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity, analgesic consumption and side effects during the first 3 days after surgery. Results Data from 73 patients were available for analysis...

  12. [Gdansk HIV-AIDS project, yesterday, today and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, W

    1995-09-01

    Medical care project for HIV positive and AIDS patients in Gdańsk voivodship was established in 1988 in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases of Gdańsk Medical University. The aim of this modern and multidirectional program was to provide full medical care for HIV/AIDS patients and introduce effective prophylaxis against spread of HIV infection. According to the project-clinical ward, outpatient clinic for HIV positive and AIDS patients, diagnostic and laboratory units, were established. Close cooperation including specialistic and general medical care, was set with detoxication ward, rehabilitation centers for drug addicts, prison medical services and the Korczak Orphanage. Education of medical staff and some social groups was provided (teachers, teenagers of secondary schools, journalists, police employees). Clinical ward for HIV positive patients who are in need of inpatient medical care is localized in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases of Gdańsk Medical University. The ward has 16 double - bed Melcer's boxes which are used for other HIV/AIDS patients according to present needs. Free beds are used for HIV negative patients. HIV/AIDS Outpatient Clinic is localized in Venerologic Outpatient Unit. This was because of some psychological, social, professional and organization aspects. Outpatient Clinic staff is responsible for first patients' examination. Serological diagnostics of HIV infection is follow up for everyone (anonymous testing is possible); testing for STD is available also. Diagnostic laboratory base for clinical ward and other units are the laboratories of Gdańsk Voivodship Hospital for Infectious Diseases. Clinic for Infectious Diseases supervises all co-operating units. These are the following: 10-beds detoxication ward for drug addicts in Psychiatric - Neurological Hospital "Srebrzysko", 70-80 places in rehabilitation centers for drug addicts in Zapowiednik and Smazyno, remand prison ward for HIV positive patients (this is the first ward

  13. Platelet activation in outpatients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagripanti, A.; Polloni, A.; Materazzi, F.; Ferdeghini, M.; Pinori, E.; Bianchi, R.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of emotional stress on platelet function mesured by radioimmunoassay in plasma two platelet factor 4, in a series of outpatients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for upper digestive complaints has been measured. The plasma levels of β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4, determined just before the instrumental examination, were significantly more elevated as compared to basal values, checked a week later. These results provide evidence of enhanced in vivo platelet release reaction during emotional stress

  14. Continuous Intravenous Milrinone Therapy in Pediatric Outpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Curley, Michelle; Liebers, Jill; Maynard, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Milrinone is a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor with both positive inotropic and vasodilator properties. Administered as a continuous infusion, milrinone is indicated for the short-term treatment of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Despite limited data supporting long-term milrinone therapy in adults with congestive heart failure, children managed as outpatients may benefit from continuous milrinone as a treatment for cardiac dysfunction, as a destination therapy for cardiac tran...

  15. Myelography conducted on an outpatient basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kausch, W

    1981-03-01

    The introduction of the non-ionogenic product metrizamide made lumbosacral myelography a low-risk, invasive diagnostic procedure. Examination carried out on an outpatient basis does not involve greater risks or side effects than examination on a inpatient basis. However, it is essential that - apart from informing the patient properly - the patient shows discipline and remains available for the examining physician during a period of 36 hours.

  16. Impact of HIV exposure on health outcomes in HIV-negative infants born to HIV-positive mothers in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraleda, Cinta; de Deus, Nilsa; Serna-Bolea, Celia; Renom, Montse; Quintó, Llorenç; Macete, Eusebio; Menéndez, Clara; Naniche, Denise

    2014-02-01

    Up to 30% of infants may be HIV-exposed noninfected (ENI) in countries with high HIV prevalence, but the impact of maternal HIV on the child's health remains unclear. One hundred fifty-eight HIV ENI and 160 unexposed (UE) Mozambican infants were evaluated at 1, 3, 9, and 12 months postdelivery. At each visit, a questionnaire was administered, and HIV DNA polymerase chain reaction and hematologic and CD4/CD8 determinations were measured. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate differences in hematologic parameters and T-cell counts between the study groups. All outpatient visits and admissions were registered. ENI infants received cotrimoxazol prophylaxis (CTXP). Negative binomial regression models were estimated to compare incidence rates of outpatient visits and admissions. Hematocrit was lower in ENI than in UE infants at 1, 3, and 9 months of age (P = 0.024, 0.025, and 0.012, respectively). Percentage of CD4 T cells was 3% lower (95% confidence interval: 0.86 to 5.15; P = 0.006) and percentage of CD8 T cells 1.15 times higher (95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 1.25; P = 0.001) in ENI vs. UE infants. ENI infants had a lower weight-for-age Z score (P = 0.049) but reduced incidence of outpatient visits, overall (P = 0.042), diarrhea (P = 0.001), and respiratory conditions (P = 0.042). ENI children were more frequently anemic, had poorer nutritional status, and alterations in some immunologic profiles compared with UE children. CTXP may explain their reduced mild morbidity. These findings may reinforce continuation of CTXP and the need to understand the consequences of maternal HIV exposure in this vulnerable group of children.

  17. Brachial artery approach for outpatient arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jai Kyung; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun; Won, Jae Hwan

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brachial approach arteriography for outpatients, with particular regard to safety and image quality. The angiographic findings and follow-up medical records of 131 brachial approach arteriographies in 121 outpatients were retrospectively analysed. 5 F pigtail catheters were used in 125 cases and 5-F OCU-A catheters were used in three cases of renal arteriography, and three of upper extremity arteriography without catheter. Except for three cases of brachial artery puncture failure, all procedures were performed successfully. One hundred and fifteen of 119 lower extremity arteriographies were visualized down to the level of the tibioperoneal artery. The non-visualized cases were three in which there was multiple obstruction at the distal common iliac artery and one with insufficient contrast amount due to renal failure In four cases there were complications : two involved arterial thrombosis, one was an intramuscular hematoma, and one an A-V fistula. For outpatients, brachial approach arteriography can replace the femoral approach. Its image quality is excellent, there are time-cost benefits, and the rate of complications is relatively low

  18. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University, Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic.

  19. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic

  20. Disparities in internet use among orthopedic outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth P; Rehman, Saqib; Goldhirsh, Jessie

    2014-02-01

    Internet access has lagged behind for patients with lower incomes and from certain ethnic groups. This study investigated the possible improvement of access to health-related information on the Internet for all patients in an urban outpatient setting, regardless of socioeconomic background. A 28-question survey was completed by 100 orthopedic outpatients evaluating associations between their age, ethnicity, income, or education level and their access to the Internet. The survey also examined how patients used the Internet to obtain information about their medical condition, their privacy concerns when conducting online research, and their use of mobile phones as a primary means of Internet access. The Internet was used by 57% of orthopedic outpatients in this urban setting. Internet access decreased with advancing age but increased with increasing income and education, findings consistent with similar studies. Despite the inability to identify an association between ethnicity and Internet access in this patient population, fewer Latinos (33%) than whites (67%) or African Americans (77%) sought information about their medical condition. Among patients who used a mobile phone as the primary method for online access, 74% were African American or Latino and 26% were white. This difference in mobile phone use for online access suggests that mobile phones have provided ethnic minorities with greater Internet access and thus may have narrowed the digital divide among the races. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. A comparison of work-related physical activity levels between inpatient and outpatient physical therapists: an observational cohort trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Wayne; Ogbazi, Raluchukwu; Ohl, Devan; Daniels, Jeffry; Ortiz, Alexis

    2016-06-16

    Physical therapists (PTs) work in a variety of healthcare settings with varied levels of physical activity demands placed on them. The purpose of this study is to compare the physical activity (PA) levels between PTs in inpatient versus outpatient environments for one work week using a cross-sectional design. Sixty-one PTs (30 inpatient, 31 outpatient) wore a tri-axial accelerometer and inclinometer for one work-week. The number steps-per-day, PA intensities, energy expenditures and postural positions adopted during the work day were recorded. Significantly longer amounts of time spent sitting was found for inpatient PTs regardless of the significantly higher number of steps-per-day. Outpatient PTs had a higher number of breaks from sedentary activity with those breaks being longer than the inpatient PTs. The percentage of time spent performing moderate-vigorous PA approached significance implying more time was spent performing these types of activities for outpatient PTs. The energy expenditures between the two groups of PTs were not different. This study compared the differences in physical activity levels between physical therapists who worked at inpatient versus outpatient environment as little is known about their activity levels. Inpatient physical therapists took more steps per day than outpatient physical therapists but the outpatient physical therapists were less sedentary and took more frequent and longer breaks from sedentary activities. The energy expenditures were similar between both types of therapists and this may be reflective of the gender and bodyweight differences between the groups that equalizes the energy expenditures. The findings of this study suggests that there are differences in the physical activity demands between inpatient and outpatient physical therapists. The results of this study may serve dual purposes: (1) employers may be able to more accurately describe the expected physical activity demands to future employees; (2

  2. Intensive interdisciplinary outpatient pain management program for chronic back pain: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Juraj Artner, Stephan Kurz, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, RKU, GermanyBackground: Chronic back pain is relatively resistant to unimodal therapy regimes. The aim of this study was to introduce and evaluate the short-term outcome of a three-week intensive multidisciplinary outpatient program for patients with back pain and sciatica, measured according to decrease of functional impairment and pain.Methods: The program was designed for patients suffering from chronic back pain to provide intensive interdisciplinary therapy in an outpatient setting, consisting of interventional injection techniques, medication, exercise therapy, back education, ergotherapy, traction, massage therapy, medical training, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, aquatraining, and relaxation.Results: Based on Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS scores, a significant improvement in pain intensity and functionality of 66.83% NRS and an ODI of 33.33% were achieved by our pain program within 3 weeks.Conclusion: This paper describes the organization and short-term outcome of an intensive multidisciplinary program for chronic back pain on an outpatient basis provided by our orthopedic department, with clinically significant results.Keywords: chronic back pain, intense, multidisciplinary, program, outpatient

  3. Early repeated infections with Trichomonas vaginalis among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Patricia; Secor, W Evan; Leichliter, Jami S; Clark, Rebecca A; Schmidt, Norine; Curtin, Erink; Martin, David H

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine whether early repeated infections due to Trichomonas vaginalis among human immunuodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative women are reinfections, new infections, or cases of treatment failure. Women attending an HIV outpatient clinic and a family planning clinic in New Orleans, Louisiana, who had culture results positive for T. vaginalis were treated with 2 g of metronidazole under directly observed therapy. At 1 month, detailed sexual exposure and sexual partner treatment information was collected. Isolates from women who had clinical resistance (i.e., who tested positive for a third time after treatment at a higher dose) were tested for metronidazole susceptibility in vitro. Of 60 HIV-positive women with trichomoniasis, 11 (18.3%) were T. vaginalis positive 1 month after treatment. The 11 recurrences were classified as 3 probable reinfections (27%), 2 probable infections from a new sexual partner (18%), and 6 probable treatment failures (55%); 2 of the 6 patients who experienced probable treatment failure had isolates with mild resistance to metronidazole. Of 301 HIV-negative women, 24 (8.0%) were T. vaginalis positive 1 month after treatment. The 24 recurrences were classified as 2 probable reinfections (8%) and 22 probable treatment failures (92%); of the 22 patients who experienced probable treatment failure, 2 had strains with moderate resistance to metronidazole, and 1 had a strain with mild resistance to metronidazole. HIV-positive women were more likely to have sexual re-exposure than were HIV-negative women, although the rate of treatment failure was similar in both groups. High rates of treatment failure among both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women indicate that a 2-g dose of metronidazole may not be adequate for treatment of some women and that rescreening should be considered.

  4. HIV-related symptoms and patient clusters among Chileans living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, A X; Norr, K F; Pérez, C M; Levy, J A; Park, C G; Kim, M J

    2013-01-01

    Identifying both Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related and co-morbid symptoms experienced by people living with HIV (PLWH) who are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment is a major challenge for healthcare providers globally. Yet, little research to date has examined the symptoms of illness experienced by PLWH including patients living in Central and South American. To address this gap, this study was designed to identify symptoms of HIV by socio-demographic and/or clinical characteristics among Chilean patients living with the virus. A convenience sample of 209 Chilean PLWH was recruited from an outpatient clinic in Santiago, Chile. A structured interview was used to elicit socio-demographic information and HIV symptoms status. Additional clinical information was obtained through a review of the participants' medical records. Results show that patients' most commonly reported HIV-related symptoms were fear/worries (66%), anxiety (52%), gas/bloating (50%), and thirst (50%). Multivariate analysis revealed a positive association between the number of reported HIV-related symptoms and number of years living with HIV. Having completed college was negatively associated with number of symptoms. Latent class analysis indicated that PLWH in the sample who had completed college were two times more likely to experience a mild intensity of HIV-related symptoms than their lesser educated counterparts. Similarly, logistic regression revealed that college-educated PLWH were twice as likely to be classified in the subgroup reporting mild intensity of symptoms than those who lacked a college degree. Overall, the study's results reveal that many Chilean PLWH, even those with high CD4 counts and low or undetectable viral loads, are not symptom free. The findings point to the need for clinicians to tailor a plan of care for individuals living with HIV that is based on their symptomatology.

  5. [Physiotherapy in outpatients with osteoporosis. Insufficient evidence for therapy success].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U; Teichmann, J

    2012-06-01

    This prospective study analyzed the quality and number of physiotherapeutic reports, the cooperation between physiotherapists and rheumatologists/osteologists as well as the correctness of the physiotherapy in relation to the respective prescription within the German medical healthcare system. Furthermore, it was evaluated whether reported information is sufficient to evaluate outpatient physiotherapy. In 475 physiotherapeutic prescriptions for conservative treatment of patients with osteoporosis, the report quality was evaluated prospectively. The types of prescription and actually performed physiotherapy were compared. The ability of the patients to demonstrate the exercises, as had to be learned during therapy, was analyzed and also the number of mandatory documented questioned follow-up forms. Furthermore, the efficiency of different types of physiotherapy was evaluated. Only 46 reports from 475 prescriptions were received, i.e., the obligation to report was performed only in 9.7% of the cases. Depending on the type of physiotherapy, there was a different range in reporting (classical massage 6.8%, thermotherapy 12.8%, active muscle training with weights and resistant exercises or in water 9.1-20.4% and electrical field treatment 20%). In 141 prescriptions the patients should have learned to do the exercises by themselves as a home program. However, only 38 patients (27%) were able to demonstrate this at the reassessment appointment. In addition in 38 cases of the 46 reports, i.e. in 82.6%, the physiotherapist asked for another prescription. The data illustrate that for outpatient treatment of osteoporosis patients there is insufficient cooperation between physiotherapists and rheumatologists and/or osteologists. Owing to this shortcoming, the efficiency of physiotherapy could not be evaluated due to lack of prescription reports. Therefore, new control mechanisms as well as sufficient education in prescription of physiotherapy should be implemented.

  6. Pneumococcal pneumonia: clinical features, diagnosis and management in HIV-infected and HIV noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Giordano; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Mura, Maria Stella

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we focus on the clinical features, diagnosis and management of pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, with particular attention to the most recent advances in this area. Classical clinical features are found in young adults, whereas atypical forms occur in immunocompromised patients including HIV-infected individuals. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is more frequently observed in HIV-infected and also in low-risk patients, according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Pneumococcal pneumonia diagnostic process includes physical examination, radiologic findings and microbiologic diagnosis. However, etiologic diagnosis using traditional culture methods is difficult to obtain. In this setting, urinary antigen test, which recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall C-polysaccharide, increases the probability of etiologic diagnosis. A correct management approach is crucial in reducing pneumococcal pneumonia mortality. The use of the PSI helps clinicians in deciding between inpatient and outpatient management in immunocompetent individuals, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)-American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. Recent findings support PSI utility also in HIV-infected patients. Recently, efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in reducing pneumococcal disease incidence has been evidenced in both HIV-infected and noninfected individuals. Rapid diagnosis and correct management together with implementation of preventive measures are crucial in order to reduce pneumococcal pneumonia related incidence and mortality in HIV-infected and noninfected patients.

  7. Managerial capacity and adoption of culturally competent practices in outpatient substance abuse treatment organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G

    2010-12-01

    The field of cultural competence is shifting its primary emphasis from enhancement of counselors' skills to management, organizational policy, and processes of care. This study examined managers' characteristics associated with adoption of culturally competent practices in the nation's outpatient substance abuse treatment field. Findings indicate that in 1995, supervisors' cultural sensitivity played the most significant role in adopting practices, such as matching counselors and clients based on race and offering bilingual services. Staff's exposure to cross-cultural training increased from 1995 to 2005. In this period, positive associations were found between managers' cultural sensitivity and connection with the community and staff receiving cross-cultural training and the number of training hours completed. However, exposure to and investment in this training were negatively correlated with managers' formal education. Health administration policy should consider the extent to which the decision makers' education, community involvement, and cultural sensitivity contribute to building culturally responsive systems of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HIV communication capacity strengthening: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettenmaier, Cheryl; Kraft, Joan Marie; Raisanen, Keris; Serlemitsos, Elizabeth

    2014-08-15

    HIV communication is most effective and sustainable when it is designed and implemented locally and tailored to the local context. This requires capacity strengthening at national, subnational, and community levels. Through a review of the published and selected "grey" literature, we examine HIV communication capacity strengthening: definitions, measurements, implementation, and effects. We found limited documentation of HIV communication capacity needs or systematic approaches to address them. Most HIV communication capacity strengthening to date has focused on building individual competencies to design and manage social and behavior change communication programs through training courses, often coupled with networking opportunities for participants, post-training mentoring, and technical assistance. A few of these efforts have been evaluated through pre- and post-training tests and qualitative interviews with participants and have shown potential for improvement in individual skills and knowledge. Health communication capacity assessment tools that measure individual and organizational competencies exist, but they have most often been used to identify capacity building needs, not for evaluating capacity strengthening efforts. A new definition of capacity strengthening, grown out of recent efforts to improve effectiveness of international health and development programs, focuses on improving organizational and societal systems that support performance and individual competencies. We propose a holistic model for HIV communication capacity strengthening and call for rigorous documentation and evaluation to determine and scale-up optimal capacity building interventions for strengthening social and behavior change communication for HIV prevention, care, and treatment in developing countries.

  9. Preventing HIV/AIDS through education: the role of primary and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was aimed at assessing the knowledge, opinion and practices of Nigerian primary and secondary school teachers on HIV/AIDS education. Method: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on demography, knowledge of HIV transmission and prevention, training on HIV transmission ...

  10. Outpatient Management of Children With World Health Organization Chest Indrawing Pneumonia: Implementation Risks and Proposed Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Eric D; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah

    2017-10-16

    This Viewpoints article details our recommendation for the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines to consider additional referral or daily monitoring criteria for children with chest indrawing pneumonia in low-resource settings. We review chest indrawing physiology in children and relate this to the risk of adverse pneumonia outcomes. We believe there is sufficient evidence to support referring or daily monitoring of children with chest indrawing pneumonia and signs of severe respiratory distress, oxygen saturation <93% (when not at high altitude), moderate malnutrition, or an unknown human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status in an HIV-endemic setting. Pulse oximetry screening should be routine and performed at the earliest point in the patient care pathway as possible. If outpatient clinics lack capacity to conduct pulse oximetry, nutritional assessment, or HIV testing, then we recommend considering referral to complete the evaluation. When referral is not possible, careful daily monitoring should be performed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  11. Anemia and growth failure among HIV-infected children in India: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shet Anita

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia and poor nutrition have been previously described as independent risk factors for death among HIV-infected children. We sought to describe nutritional status, anemia burden and HIV disease correlates among infected children in India. Methods We analyzed retrospective data from 248 HIV-infected children aged 1–12 years attending three outpatient clinics in South India (2004–2006. Standard WHO definitions were used for anemia, HIV staging and growth parameters. Statistical analysis included chi square, t tests, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results The overall prevalence of anemia (defined as hemoglobin Conclusion The high prevalence and strong interrelationship of anemia and poor nutrition among HIV-infected children in India, particularly those living in rural areas underscores the need for incorporating targeted nutritional interventions during national scale up of care, support and treatment among HIV-infected children.

  12. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic.Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation.Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting.

  13. Get Tested for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS: What is HIV/AIDS? Women and HIV/AIDS Next section ... Tested? Why do I need to get tested for HIV? The only way to know if you have HIV is to get tested. Many people with HIV don’t have any symptoms. In the United States, about 1 in 7 ...

  14. Outpatient percutaneous renal biopsy in adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hweish, Abdulla K.; Abdul-Rehman, I. Saeed

    2007-01-01

    To study the safety and efficacy of performing percutanaeous renal biopsy in the outpatient department compared to the traditional inpatient policy, we studied 44 consecutive patients with proteinuria and other urinary sediment abnormalities, at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, during the period from September 2004 to August 2006. The patients were divided into two groups: group I, in whom kidney biopsy was performed and followed by 1-day hospital admission; and group II, in whom renal biopsy was performed in the outpatient department and followed by 6 hours observation period and then by regular outpatient visits. All biopsies were performed with the use of real-time ultrasound and automated biopsy needle. Patients with a history of bleeding diathesis or abnormal coagulation profile and those receiving warfarin, heparin, aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were excluded from the study. Only minor biopsy-related complications such as gross hematuria, perinephric hematoma that resolved without the need for blood transfusion or surgical intervention occurred in three (13.6%) patients in group I and in two (9.1%) patients in group II. The complications were apparent within 6 hours in all but one patient (97.7%). Overall, hematuria was identified in 52% of patients at <-72 hours, 85% at <-4 hours and 97.7% at <- 6 hours. The 24-hour hematocrit levels were not significantly different between the study groups. One (4.5%) patient from group II had a small perinephric hematoma, which was detected by ultrasound examination at 24 hours but not at 6 hours post biopsy period; it resolved spontaneously without intervention. We conclude that in selected patients, same day discharge after 6 hours of renal biopsy may be given safety without increased risk of complications. (author)

  15. Multisource feedback analysis of pediatric outpatient teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiao, Mao-Meng; Huang, Li-Tung; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Tang, Kuo-Shu; Chen, Chih-Jen

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the outpatient communication skills of medical students via multisource feedback, which may be useful to map future directions in improving physician-patient communication. Family respondents of patients, a nurse, a clinical teacher, and a research assistant evaluated video-recorded medical students' interactions with outpatients by using multisource feedback questionnaires; students also assessed their own skills. The questionnaire was answered based on the video-recorded interactions between outpatients and the medical students. A total of 60 family respondents of the 60 patients completed the questionnaires, 58 (96.7%) of them agreed with the video recording. Two reasons for reluctance were "personal privacy" issues and "simply disagree" with the video recording. The average satisfaction score of the 58 students was 85.1 points, indicating students' performance was in the category between satisfied and very satisfied. The family respondents were most satisfied with the "teacher"s attitude," followed by "teaching quality". In contrast, the family respondents were least satisfied with "being open to questions". Among the 6 assessment domains of communication skills, the students scored highest on "explaining" and lowest on "giving recommendations". In the detailed assessment by family respondents, the students scored lowest on "asking about life/school burden". In the multisource analysis, the nurses' mean score was much higher and the students' mean self-assessment score was lower than the average scores on all domains. The willingness and satisfaction of family respondents were high in this study. Students scored the lowest on giving recommendations to patients. Multisource feedback with video recording is useful in providing more accurate evaluation of students' communication competence and in identifying the areas of communication that require enhancement.

  16. Development and evaluation of an internet and personal health record training program for low-income patients with HIV or hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, D Keith; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Shimada, Stephanie L; Petrakis, Beth A; Bokhour, Barbara G; Asch, Steven M; Nazi, Kim M; Houston, Thomas K; Gifford, Allen L

    2013-03-01

    Vulnerable populations face difficulties accessing and using the internet and personal health record (PHR) systems for health-related purposes. Populations disconnected from the internet also tend to be disconnected from health care services. To develop and evaluate an intervention to increase skills in health-related internet and PHR use for vulnerable populations with limited computer and internet experience. Preevaluation and postevaluation using quantitative surveys, semistructured interviews, focus groups, and ethnographic observation. Fourteen low-income Veterans receiving care at Veterans Affairs medical centers for human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis C. Internet and PHR use, self-efficacy, patient activation, disease knowledge, predictors of medication adherence. At follow-up one (FU1), mean number of internet for health features used increased from 1.57 to 4.07 (Pinternet and PHRs and their contribution to increased engagement in care. Training cost per participant was $287. Group training of vulnerable patients represents a cost-effective method to increase internet and PHR skills, and improve patient confidence in finding health-related information, making online health-related transactions, and interacting with health care providers.

  17. HIV Infection in hospitalized under-5 children with acute watery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-12-31

    Dec 31, 2011 ... HIV with acute watery diarrhea as a clinical manifesta- tion.5,6,9,10 This study therefore attempts to find out the prevalence of HIV among children admitted into the. Diarrhoea Treatment and Training Unit of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. This study will help in identifying ...

  18. Understanding and responding to HIV risk in young South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    recipient and aim to include discussions about healthy relationships and female genital ... HIV-prevalence areas might consider developing specially trained ... Preventing new HIV infections in adolescent girls and young SA women is a .... younger siblings. .... Young women's life experiences and perceptions of sexual.

  19. Outpatient care utilization in urban Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Jean-Frédéric; Haddad, Slim; Narayana, Delampady; Fournier, Pierre

    2006-07-01

    Kerala is characterized by a high density of public and private health infrastructure. While less inequality in access has been reported in this Indian state, few studies have looked at problems found within cities. Escalation of costs of private services and reduced public investments could generate some inequalities in access for the poor. To assess factors associated with utilization and source of outpatient care in urban Kerala, and to discuss policy implications with regards to access to care. A multilevel analysis of individual and urban characteristics associated with utilization and source of outpatient care was conducted using data from a 1995-96 survey by the National Sample Survey Organisation on health care in urban Kerala. There is a high level of utilization (83.6%) of allopathic medical services. Controlling for illness severity and age, utilization thereof was lower for the very poor (OR 0.13 [0.03; 0.49]), inhabitants of medium towns (OR 0.20 [0.05; 0.70]), and inhabitants of cities with a lower proportion of permanent material (pucca) houses (0.21 [0.06; 0.72]). Among all users, 77% resorted to a private source of care. Utilization of a private provider was less likely for the very poor (OR 0.13 [0.03; 0.51]) and individuals from casual worker households (OR 0.54 [0.30; 0.97]), while it was more likely for inhabitants of cities from both low public bed density districts (OR 4.08 [1.05; 15.95]) and high private bed density districts (OR 5.83 [2.34; 14.53]). Problems of quality and accessibility of the public sector were invoked to justify utilization of private clinics. A marked heterogeneity in utilization of outpatient care was found between cities of various sizes and characteristics. This study confirms high utilization of private outpatient care in Kerala and suggests problems of access for the poorest. Even in a context of high public availability and considering the health transition factor, relying on the development of the private sector

  20. Attribute correlates of hospital outpatient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueckeberg, H F; Hubbert, A

    1995-01-01

    Customer satisfaction (patient satisfaction) with hospital outpatient or ambulatory services is an important factor in influencing patient patronage and loyalty. Based on an empirical study, this article examines the attributes of the ambulatory care experience which were significantly associated with the level of satisfaction resulting from the most recent hospital ambulatory visit. This study focuses on identifying attributes of ambulatory services. This article brings to the health care marketing literature information on ambulatory satisfaction comparable to that which has been contributed to the literature regarding satisfaction with physician and hospital experiences.

  1. Compulsory outpatient treatment can prevent involuntary commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene Nørregård; Svensson, Eva Maria Birgitta; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2014-01-01

    Compulsory outpatient treatment (co-pt) has been possible in Denmark since 2010. The aim is to secure necessary treatment, reduce involuntary commitment and improve quality of life for patients with a severe psychiatric illness. Co-pt has been brought into use in 33 cases. This case report...... describes a patient with paranoid schizophrenia who several times developed severe psychotic symptoms shortly after discharge due to lack of compliance with treatment. Within one year of co-pt the patient was not admitted to hospital and improved in overall functioning. After terminating co-pt the patient...

  2. Involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Viadel, M; Cañete-Nicolás, C; Bellido-Rodriguez, C; Asensio-Pascual, P; Lera-Calatayud, G; Calabuig-Crespo, R; Leal-Cercós, C

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades there have been significant legislative changes in Spain. Society develops faster than laws, however, and new challenges have emerged. In 2004, the Spanish Association of Relatives of the Mentally Ill (FEAFES) proposed amending the existing legislation to allow for the implementation of involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) for patients with severe mental illness. Currently, and after having made several attempts at change, there is no specific legislation governing the application of this measure. Although IOT may be implemented in local programmes, we consider legal regulation to be needed in this matter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence and course of pseudothrombocytopenia in outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froom, Paul; Barak, Mira

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and course of pseudothrombocytopenia in outpatients is uncertain. In a cohort study of 687,955 members of a health maintenance organization, we extracted 36,780 consecutive automated complete blood count test results and determined the point prevalence of pseudothrombocytopenia during a one-month period. We also calculated a retrospective cumulative prevalence over the past 5 years. There were 1105 (2.7%) patients with platelet counts of 100-149×10(9)/L and 304 (0.8%) with counts values, or the reference limit value should be lowered to 100×10(9)/L.

  4. Payment methods for outpatient care facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beibei; He, Li; Meng, Qingyue; Jia, Liying

    2017-01-01

    Background Outpatient care facilities provide a variety of basic healthcare services to individuals who do not require hospitalisation or institutionalisation, and are usually the patient's first contact. The provision of outpatient care contributes to immediate and large gains in health status, and a large portion of total health expenditure goes to outpatient healthcare services. Payment method is one of the most important incentive methods applied by purchasers to guide the performance of outpatient care providers. Objectives To assess the impact of different payment methods on the performance of outpatient care facilities and to analyse the differences in impact of payment methods in different settings. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2016, Issue 3, part of the Cochrane Library (searched 8 March 2016); MEDLINE, OvidSP (searched 8 March 2016); Embase, OvidSP (searched 24 April 2014); PubMed (NCBI) (searched 8 March 2016); Dissertations and Theses Database, ProQuest (searched 8 March 2016); Conference Proceedings Citation Index (ISI Web of Science) (searched 8 March 2016); IDEAS (searched 8 March 2016); EconLit, ProQuest (searched 8 March 2016); POPLINE, K4Health (searched 8 March 2016); China National Knowledge Infrastructure (searched 8 March 2016); Chinese Medicine Premier (searched 8 March 2016); OpenGrey (searched 8 March 2016); ClinicalTrials.gov, US National Institutes of Health (NIH) (searched 8 March 2016); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (searched 8 March 2016); and the website of the World Bank (searched 8 March 2016). In addition, we searched the reference lists of included studies and carried out a citation search for the included studies via ISI Web of Science to find other potentially relevant studies. We also contacted authors of the main included studies regarding any further published or unpublished work. Selection criteria Randomised

  5. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of HIV in the United States, please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids- ... HIV, STD, and TB Prevention. About HIV/AIDS. ( https://www.cdc.gov/actagainstaids/basics/whatishiv.html ). Atlanta, ...

  6. Improving outpatient services for elderly patients in Taiwan: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ren-Jieh; Wu, Yung-Hung; Hsu, Tsung-Shin; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2011-01-01

    The rapid pace of population aging poses significant importance of establishing an age-friendly health care system, including outpatient, inpatient, intermediate, and long-term care. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the quality of outpatient services for elderly patients in Taiwan. Quality function deployment (QFD) is a tool effectively shortening the research-and-development period, reducing costs, and fulfilling customer needs (CNs). This study applied Kano's model and the analytic network process (ANP) to improve the basic framework of QFD. Kano's model enables a thorough understanding of elderly patients' needs and problems with regard to medical care services, so that appropriate outpatient services can be offered to them from the outset. In addition, adapting the supermatrix of ANP to the calculation of the house of quality (HoQ) will reduce subjective judgments. Using Kano's model and an integrated ANP-QFD approach, we extracted five needs of elderly patients and calculated their priorities: 'Professional medical care services convincing patients' (27%), 'With sufficient knowledge to answer patients' questions' (23.5%), 'Providing fast services to solve patients' problems' (19.3%), 'Voluntarily serving patients' (19.1%), and 'Providing proper medical equipment to patients' (11.1%). We then identified six outpatient service attributes deserving of improvement and their priorities: 'Physician with a high level of professionalism and giving clear interpretation of patient's condition' (25%), 'Staff with good communication skills and assistance to patients' (22%), 'High standardization of operating procedures' (18%), 'Staff getting on-the-job training periodically' (15%), 'Facilities sufficient and fitting for elderly patients' (10%), and 'Applying IT (internet) to help patients to receive medical care' (10%). In conclusion, we reconstructed an integrated QFD model which will not only reduce costs but also reveal the crucial outpatient service items

  7. Decreasing cardiovascular risk in HIV infection between 2005 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Socio, Giuseppe V; Parruti, Giustino; Ricci, Elena; Maggi, Paolo; Celesia, Benedetto M; Penco, Giovanni; Martinelli, Canio; Franzetti, Marco; Di Biagio, Antonio; Bonfanti, Paolo; Pucci, Giacomo; Schillaci, Giuseppe

    2014-02-20

    Cardiovascular risk profile was compared in 765 Italian HIV-infected outpatients enrolled in 2005 and in 765 individually age-matched and sex-matched patients enrolled in 2011. Median Framingham risk score was 8.6% in 2005 vs. 7.9% in 2011 (P = 0.04); metabolic syndrome was present in 40.3% vs. 33.4% (P = 0.006). Blood glucose, triglycerides, prevalence of smokers, and lipodystrophy were all significantly lower in 2011 (all P < 0.0001). Cardiovascular risk improved over a 6-year period in Italian HIV-infected patients.

  8. Facilitators and barriers to discussing HIV prevention with adolescents: perspectives of HIV-infected parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Laura L; Reis, Janet S; Weber, Kathleen M

    2013-08-01

    We examined HIV-infected parents' conversations about HIV prevention with their uninfected children, including what facilitated or hindered communication. Parents with HIV/AIDS (n = 90) who had children aged 10 to 18 years were recruited for a mixed method study from 2009 to 2010. Interviews assessed facilitators and barriers to discussing HIV prevention. A questionnaire identified the frequency and content of conversations, parental confidence level, and perceived importance of discussing preventive topics. Eighty-one percent of parents reported "sometimes" or "often" communicating about HIV prevention. A subset of parents found these conversations difficult; 44% indicated their desire for support. Facilitators to communication included utilizing support, focusing on the benefits of talking, and having a previous relationship with one's child. Barriers to discussions included fear of negative consequences, living in denial, and lacking a parental role model who discussed safer sex. Parents varied as to how they believed their HIV status affected communication. Those who did not disclose their HIV status to their children reported less frequent communication; self-efficacy partially mediated this relationship. Findings highlighted the need for communication skills training that support HIV-infected parents in their efforts to discuss HIV-related information with adolescents.

  9. The role of enacted stigma in parental HIV disclosure among HIV-infected parents in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies have delineated that HIV-infected parents face numerous challenges in disclosing their HIV infection to the children ("parental HIV disclosure"), and practices of parental HIV disclosure vary with individual characteristics, family contexts, and social environment. Using cross-sectional data from 1254 HIV-infected parents who had children aged 5-16 years in southwest China, the current study examined the association of parental HIV disclosure with mental health and medication adherence among parents and explored the possible effect of enacted stigma on such association. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that parents who had experienced disclosure to children reported higher level enacted stigma, worse mental health conditions, and poorer medication adherence. Enacted stigma partially mediated the associations between disclosure and both mental health and medication adherence after controlling basic background characteristics. Our findings highlight the importance of providing appropriate disclosure-related training and counseling service among HIV-infected parents. In a social setting where HIV-related stigma is still persistent, disclosure intervention should address and reduce stigma and discrimination in the practice of parental HIV disclosure.

  10. Facilitators and Barriers to Discussing HIV Prevention With Adolescents: Perspectives of HIV-Infected Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Janet S.; Weber, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined HIV-infected parents’ conversations about HIV prevention with their uninfected children, including what facilitated or hindered communication. Methods. Parents with HIV/AIDS (n = 90) who had children aged 10 to 18 years were recruited for a mixed method study from 2009 to 2010. Interviews assessed facilitators and barriers to discussing HIV prevention. A questionnaire identified the frequency and content of conversations, parental confidence level, and perceived importance of discussing preventive topics. Results. Eighty-one percent of parents reported “sometimes” or “often” communicating about HIV prevention. A subset of parents found these conversations difficult; 44% indicated their desire for support. Facilitators to communication included utilizing support, focusing on the benefits of talking, and having a previous relationship with one’s child. Barriers to discussions included fear of negative consequences, living in denial, and lacking a parental role model who discussed safer sex. Parents varied as to how they believed their HIV status affected communication. Those who did not disclose their HIV status to their children reported less frequent communication; self-efficacy partially mediated this relationship. Conclusions. Findings highlighted the need for communication skills training that support HIV-infected parents in their efforts to discuss HIV-related information with adolescents. PMID:23763390

  11. Psychiatric symptoms, quality of life, and HIV status among people using opioids in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Alethea; Blokhina, Elena; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Zvartau, Edwin; Schottenfeld, Richard; Chawarski, Marek

    2017-03-01

    The Russian Federation is experiencing a very high rate of HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, few studies have explored characteristics of people with co-occurring opioid use disorders and HIV, including psychiatric symptom presentations and how these symptoms might relate to quality of life. The current study therefore explored a.) differences in baseline psychiatric symptoms among HIV+ and HIV- individuals with opioid use disorder seeking naltrexone treatment at two treatment centers in Saint Petersburg, Russia and b.) associations between psychiatric symptom constellations and quality of life. Participants were 328 adults enrolling in a randomized clinical trial evaluating outpatient treatments combining naltrexone with different drug counseling models. Psychiatric symptoms and quality of life were assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory and The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF, respectively. Approximately 60% of participants were HIV+. Those who were HIV+ scored significantly higher on BSI anxiety, depression, psychoticism, somatization, paranoid ideation, phobic anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and GSI indexes (all pHIV-. A K-means cluster analysis identified three distinct psychiatric symptom profiles; the proportion of HIV+ was significantly greater and quality of life indicators were significantly lower in the cluster with the highest psychiatric symptom levels. Higher levels of psychiatric symptoms and lower quality of life indicators among HIV+ (compared to HIV-) individuals injecting drugs support the potential importance of combining interventions that target improving psychiatric symptoms with drug treatment, particularly for HIV+ patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tablet computers to support outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas J.; Lavesen, Marie; Lange, Peter

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A minicomputer (tablet) with instructions and a training diary has the potential of facilitating adherence to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of adding a tablet to a classic outpatient PR programme for COPD patients. METHODS: A total of 115 patients...... participated in a 7- to 10-week outpatient PR programme in groups of 10-12 individuals. Half of the groups were assigned to PR plus a tablet (tablet group) and the other groups were assigned to PR only (controls). Primary effect parameters were endurance shuttle walk time (ESWT) and disease-specific health...... status (COPD Assessment Test=CAT). RESULTS: The change in ESWT was significantly better in the control group (mean 167 sec) compared with the tablet group (mean 51 sec) (p

  13. Risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation at initial HIV diagnosis in Durban, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul K Drain

    Full Text Available After observing persistently low CD4 counts at initial HIV diagnosis in South Africa, we sought to determine risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation among adults.We surveyed adults prior to HIV testing at four outpatient clinics in Durban from August 2010 to November 2011. All HIV-infected adults were offered CD4 testing, and late-stage HIV disease was defined as a CD4 count <100 cells/mm(3. We used multivariate regression models to determine the effects of sex, emotional health, social support, distance from clinic, employment, perceived barriers to receiving healthcare, and foregoing healthcare to use money for food, clothing, or housing ("competing needs to healthcare" on presentation with late-stage HIV disease.Among 3,669 adults screened, 830 were enrolled, newly-diagnosed with HIV and obtained a CD4 result. Among those, 279 (33.6% presented with late-stage HIV disease. In multivariate analyses, participants who lived ≥5 kilometers from the test site [adjusted odds ratio (AOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.7-4.7], reported competing needs to healthcare (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4, were male (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.3, worked outside the home (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, perceived health service delivery barriers (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, and/or had poor emotional health (AOR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.9 had higher odds of late-stage HIV disease presentation.Independent risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation were from diverse domains, including geographic, economic, demographic, social, and psychosocial. These findings can inform various interventions, such as mobile testing or financial assistance, to reduce the risk of presentation with late-stage HIV disease.

  14. Routine monitoring and assessment of adults living with HIV: results of the British HIV Association (BHIVA) national audit 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, A; Curtis, H; Burns, F; Freedman, A

    2017-09-13

    The clinical care of people living with HIV changed fundamentally as a result of the development of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIV infection is now a long-term treatable condition. We report a national audit to assess adherence to British HIV Association guidelines for the routine investigation and monitoring of adult HIV-1-infected individuals. All UK sites known as providers of adult HIV outpatient services were invited to complete a case-note review and a brief survey of local clinic practices. Participating sites were asked to randomly select 50-100 adults, who attended for specialist HIV care during 2014 and/or 2015. Each site collected data electronically using a self-audit spreadsheet tool. This included demographic details (gender, ethnicity, HIV exposure, and age) and whether 22 standardised and pre-defined clinical audited outcomes had been recorded. Data were collected on 8258 adults from 123 sites, representing approximately 10% of people living with HIV reported in public health surveillance as attending UK HIV services. Sexual health screening was provided within 96.4% of HIV services, cervical cytology and influenza vaccination within 71.4% of HIV services. There was wide variation in resistance testing across sites. Only 44.9% of patients on ART had a documented 10-year CVD risk within the past three years and fracture risk had been assessed within the past three years for only 16.7% patients aged over 50 years. There was high participation in the national audit and good practice was identified in some areas. However improvements can be made in monitoring of cardiovascular risk, bone and sexual health.

  15. Evaluation of HIV Surveillance System in Rivers State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sony Computer (Iby)

    HIV surveillance system generates information for timely and appropriate ..... active type of surveillance.14 Nonetheless, it requires training, supervision and motivation ... very effectively.14 The introduction of reward-system could be included.

  16. Cross-cultural opening in German outpatient mental healthcare service: an exploratory study of structural and procedural aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösko, Mike-Oliver; Gil-Martinez, Fernanda; Schulz, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Mental healthcare services need to be sensitive towards the cultural needs of patients. Cross-cultural opening is an organizational process to fulfil these needs. This study aims to provide representative structural and procedural data regarding the use of German outpatient mental healthcare services by allochthonous patients, the diversity of psychotherapists in outpatient mental healthcare service, the cross-cultural encounters of therapists and the cross-cultural sensitivity of psychotherapists working in this healthcare area. Of all public outpatient psychotherapists in Hamburg, 81% (n = 485) participated in this survey. Regarding the distribution of the population in this metropolis, allochthonous therapists were underrepresented. Unlike the overall distribution of foreign inhabitants, the largest groups of immigrant therapists came from England, German-speaking countries and other countries within the European Union. The proportion of allochthonous patients in outpatient mental healthcare service was almost half of the proportion of the allochthonous in the general population. Psychotherapists with a migration background regarded themselves as having a higher level of cross-cultural sensitivity than their native colleagues, especially those who have had fewer cross-cultural encounters. Overall, psychotherapists named different challenges in providing cross-cultural treatment. For the German outpatient mental healthcare service to be more accessible to immigrants and their descendants, a greater number of bilingual psychotherapists must gain access to the mental healthcare service, and more advanced cross-cultural sensitivity training and supervision should be provided. German outpatient psychotherapists are culturally and linguistically diverse. Nevertheless, psychotherapists with a migration background are underrepresented in outpatient mental healthcare services. Patients with a migration background are also underrepresented in the German outpatient mental

  17. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of HIV/AIDS during which there are no symptoms of HIV infection. During this phase, the immune system in someone with HIV slowly weakens, but the person has no symptoms. How long this phase lasts depends on how ...

  18. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What do I need to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and ... Should an HIV patient be tested for pulmonary hypertension? HIV patients know that medical supervision is critical ...

  19. Outpatient provider concentration and commercial colonoscopy prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozen, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the magnitude of various contributors to outpatient commercial colonoscopy prices, including market- and provider-level factors, especially market share. We used adjudicated fee-for-service facility claims from a large commercial insurer for colonoscopies occurring in hospital outpatient department or ambulatory surgery center from October 2005 to December 2012. Claims were matched to provider- and market-level data. Linear fixed effects regressions of negotiated colonoscopy price were run on provider, system, and market characteristics. Markets were defined as counties. There were 178,433 claims from 169 providers (104 systems). The mean system market share was 76% (SD = 0.34) and the mean real (deflated) price was US$1363 (SD = 374), ranging from US$169 to US$2748. For every percentage point increase in a system or individual facility's bed share, relative price increased by 2 to 4 percentage points; this result was stable across a number of specifications. Market population and price were also consistently positively related, though this relation was small in magnitude. No other factor explained price as strongly as market share. Price variation for colonoscopy was driven primarily by market share, of particular concern as the number of mergers increases in wake of the recession and the Affordable Care Act. Whether variation is justified by better quality care requires further research to determine whether quality is subsumed in prices. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates

  1. Elderly outpatient profile and predictors of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Cintra, Fernanda Aparecida; Batista, Fernanda Sotelo; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Guariento, Maria Elena; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosario de; D'Elboux, Maria José

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES Falls are a serious public health problem and are one of the biggest reasons for hospitalization, morbidity and mortality among elderly people. Moreover, few studies on predictors of falls have been conducted in low and middle income countries. The aim here was to identify elderly outpatient profiles according to sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional variables and correlate them with occurrences of falls among these subjects. DESIGN AND SETTING Cross-sectional descriptive study forming part of the project "Quality of Life of Frail Elderly People", carried out in Campinas, Brazil. METHODS The subjects were 145 elderly individuals (76.3 ± 7.8 years old), of whom 65% were women, who were living in the city of Campinas or nearby and were attended at the geriatric outpatient clinic of a University Hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional data, as well as fall occurrence data, were gathered. Cluster analyses and comparisons between groups were carried out. RESULTS Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups related to the study variables, and the determinants for this distinction were: gender, marital status, physical performance, handgrip strength and functional independence. These groups were compared according to occurrences of falls over the last year, and significant differences between them were found. CONCLUSIONS The results showed that greater occurrences of falls were associated with a profile of elderly people comprising female gender, single status, lower muscle strength and physical performance regarding balance and gait, and lower independence in motor tasks for activities of daily living.

  2. Elderly outpatient profile and predictors of falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Angélica de Oliveira Gomes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVESFalls are a serious public health problem and are one of the biggest reasons for hospitalization, morbidity and mortality among elderly people. Moreover, few studies on predictors of falls have been conducted in low and middle income countries. The aim here was to identify elderly outpatient profiles according to sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional variables and correlate them with occurrences of falls among these subjects.DESIGN AND SETTINGCross-sectional descriptive study forming part of the project “Quality of Life of Frail Elderly People”, carried out in Campinas, Brazil.METHODSThe subjects were 145 elderly individuals (76.3 ± 7.8 years old, of whom 65% were women, who were living in the city of Campinas or nearby and were attended at the geriatric outpatient clinic of a University Hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional data, as well as fall occurrence data, were gathered. Cluster analyses and comparisons between groups were carried out.RESULTSCluster analysis identified two distinct groups related to the study variables, and the determinants for this distinction were: gender, marital status, physical performance, handgrip strength and functional independence. These groups were compared according to occurrences of falls over the last year, and significant differences between them were found.CONCLUSIONSThe results showed that greater occurrences of falls were associated with a profile of elderly people comprising female gender, single status, lower muscle strength and physical performance regarding balance and gait, and lower independence in motor tasks for activities of daily living.

  3. Commonization of HIV/AIDS services in Nigeria: the need, the processes and the prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleribe, Obinna Ositadimma; Oladipo, Olabisi; Osita-Oleribe, Princess; Nwachukwu, Chukwuemeka; Nkwopara, Frank; Ekom, Ekei; Nwabuzor, Solomon; Iyalla, Grace; Onyewuchi, Kenneth; Olutola, Ayodotun; Nwanyanwu, Okey; Nsubuga, Peter

    2014-01-01

    With the first case of Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) identified in 1986, the management of HIV/AIDS in Nigeria has evolved through the years. The emergency phase of the HIV/AIDS program, aimed at containing the HIV/AIDS epidemic within a short time frame, was carried out by international agencies that built structures separate from hospitals' programs. It is imperative that Nigeria shifts from the previous paradigm to the concept of Commonization of HIV to achieve sustainability. Commonization ensures that HIV/AIDS is seen as a health condition like others. It involves making HIV services available at all levels of healthcare. Excellence & Friends Management Consult (EFMC) undertook this process by conducting HIV tests in people's homes and work places, referring infected persons for treatment and follow up, establishing multiple HIV testing points and HIV services in private and public primary healthcare facilities. EFMC integrated HIV services within existing hospital care structures and trained all healthcare workers at all supported sites on HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment modalities. Commonization has improved the uptake of HIV testing and counseling and enrolment into HIV care as more people are aware that HIV services are available. It has integrated HIV services into general hospital services and minimized the cost of HIV programming as the existing structures and personnel in healthcare facilities are utilized for HIV services. Commonization of HIV services i.e. integrating HIV care into the existing fabric of the healthcare system, is highly recommended for a sustainable and efficient healthcare system as it makes HIV services acceptable by all.

  4. Margin alert: time to revisit your outpatient strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Steven M; Tyler, David

    2006-04-01

    An increasingly competitive market for outpatient services has made it necessary for acute care hospitals to reevaluate their outpatient, and inpatient, strategies. Many acute care hospitals are in a strong market position to command premium payment for their inpatient services. Under current market conditions, hospitals are in danger of pricing themselves out of the outpatient market. Hospitals can benefit from the increased focus of consumers and payers on quality and the rise of pay for performance by investing in service excellence.

  5. Psychosocial risk factors and personality disorders in outpatient cardiology setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Suárez-Bagnasco

    2015-01-01

    Psychological risk factors and personality disorders comorbidities are more frequent than psychological risk factors only or personality disorders only in outpatient cardiology setting without cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Trends in HIV seropositivity among young adults in the Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects for this descriptive study included a total of 2033 consecutively recruited young symptomatic persons referred from the outpatient clinic and wards for retroviral screening at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital for the period 1999-2003. HIV antibody test was carried out using the commercially available ...

  7. The HIV prevalence among pregnant women in the Amsterdam region (1988-1991)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, P. J.; Mulder-Folkerts, D. K.; Boer, K.; Schutte, M. F.; van der Velde, W. j; Wong, F. J.; van den Hoek, A. J.; van Doornum, G. J.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the study was to monitor the HIV prevalence in the years 1988-1991 among pregnant women in the Amsterdam region, visitors to an abortion clinic and 3 outpatient infertility clinics. All women attending these clinics were asked to participate in the study on a voluntary basis and

  8. Multicenter European Prevalence Study of Neurocognitive Impairment and Associated Factors in HIV Positive Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddow, Lewis J; Laverick, Rosanna; Daskalopoulou, Marina

    2018-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study in 448 HIV positive patients attending five European outpatient clinics to determine prevalence of and factors associated with neurocognitive impairment (NCI) using computerized and pen-and-paper neuropsychological tests. NCI was defined as a normalized Z scor...

  9. High Incidence of Asymptomatic Syphilis in HIV-Infected MSM Justifies Routine Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branger, Judith; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; van Ketel, Ruud J.; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Prins, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recently, the incidence of syphilis has risen, mainly among men having sex with men (MSM), many of whom are coinfected with HIV. Current guidelines recommend at least yearly syphilis testing in this group. In this study, we assessed the yield of routine syphilis screening in outpatient

  10. Ocular manifestations in HIV-AIDS patients in a Nigerian community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... on limited financial, medical and human resources.3,4 The first HIV ... acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) among the study population. Method: A ... medical outpatient centre and the eye clinic of the hospital. ..... Energy Information Administration: official energy statistics from the US Government.

  11. The paediatric change laboratory: optimising postgraduate learning in the outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Mads; Musaeus, Peter; Nøhr, Susanne Backman

    2016-02-02

    This study aimed to analyse and redesign the outpatient clinic in a paediatric department. The study was a joint collaboration with the doctors of the department (paediatric residents and specialists) using the Change Laboratory intervention method as a means to model and implement change in the outpatient clinic. This study was motivated by a perceived failure to integrate the activities of the outpatient clinic, patient care and training of residents. The ultimate goal of the intervention was to create improved care for patients through resident learning and development. We combined the Change Laboratory intervention with an already established innovative process for residents, 3-h meetings. The Change Laboratory intervention method consists of a well-defined theory (Cultural-historical activity theory) and concrete actions where participants construct a new theoretical model of the activity, which in this case was paediatric doctors' workplace learning modelled in order to improve medical social practice. The notion of expansive learning was used during the intervention in conjunction with thematic analysis of data in order to fuel the process of analysis and intervention. The activity system of the outpatient clinic can meaningfully be analysed in terms of the objects of patient care and training residents. The Change Laboratory sessions resulted in a joint action plan for the outpatient clinic structured around three themes: (1) Before: Preparation, expectations, and introduction; (2) During: Structural context and resources; (3) After: Follow-up and feedback. The participants found the Change Laboratory method to be a successful way of sharing reflections on how to optimise the organisation of work and training with patient care in mind. The Change Laboratory approach outlined in this study succeeded to change practices and to help medical doctors redesigning their work. Participating doctors must be motivated to uncover inherent contradictions in their

  12. Payment methods for outpatient care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beibei; He, Li; Meng, Qingyue; Jia, Liying

    2017-03-03

    Outpatient care facilities provide a variety of basic healthcare services to individuals who do not require hospitalisation or institutionalisation, and are usually the patient's first contact. The provision of outpatient care contributes to immediate and large gains in health status, and a large portion of total health expenditure goes to outpatient healthcare services. Payment method is one of the most important incentive methods applied by purchasers to guide the performance of outpatient care providers. To assess the impact of different payment methods on the performance of outpatient care facilities and to analyse the differences in impact of payment methods in different settings. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2016, Issue 3, part of the Cochrane Library (searched 8 March 2016); MEDLINE, OvidSP (searched 8 March 2016); Embase, OvidSP (searched 24 April 2014); PubMed (NCBI) (searched 8 March 2016); Dissertations and Theses Database, ProQuest (searched 8 March 2016); Conference Proceedings Citation Index (ISI Web of Science) (searched 8 March 2016); IDEAS (searched 8 March 2016); EconLit, ProQuest (searched 8 March 2016); POPLINE, K4Health (searched 8 March 2016); China National Knowledge Infrastructure (searched 8 March 2016); Chinese Medicine Premier (searched 8 March 2016); OpenGrey (searched 8 March 2016); ClinicalTrials.gov, US National Institutes of Health (NIH) (searched 8 March 2016); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (searched 8 March 2016); and the website of the World Bank (searched 8 March 2016).In addition, we searched the reference lists of included studies and carried out a citation search for the included studies via ISI Web of Science to find other potentially relevant studies. We also contacted authors of the main included studies regarding any further published or unpublished work. Randomised trials, non-randomised trials, controlled before

  13. HIV serostatus disclosure: Experiences and perceptions of people living with HIV/AIDS and their service providers in Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita V Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disclosure offers important benefits to people living with HIV/AIDS. However, fear of discrimination, blame, and disruption of family relationships can make disclosure a difficult decision. Barriers to HIV disclosure are influenced by the particular culture within which the individuals live. Although many studies have assessed such barriers in the U.S., very few studies have explored the factors that facilitate or prevent HIV disclosure in India. Understanding these factors is critical to the refinement, development, and implementation of a counseling intervention to facilitate disclosure. Materials and Methods: To explore these factors, we conducted 30 in-depth interviews in the local language with HIV- positive individuals from the Integrated Counselling and Testing Centre in Gujarat, India, assessing the experiences, perceived barriers, and facilitators to disclosure. To triangulate the findings, we conducted two focus group discussions with HIV medical and non-medical service providers, respectively. Results: Perceived HIV-associated stigma, fear of discrimination, and fear of family breakdown acted as barriers to HIV disclosure. Most people living with HIV/AIDS came to know of their HIV status due to poor physical health, spousal HIV-positive status, or a positive HIV test during pregnancy. Some wives only learned of their husbands′ HIV positive status after their husbands died. The focus group participants confirmed similar findings. Disclosure had serious implications for individuals living with HIV, such as divorce, maltreatment, ostracism, and decisions regarding child bearing. Interpretation and Conclusion: The identified barriers and facilitators in the present study can be used to augment training of HIV service providers working in voluntary counseling and testing centers in India.

  14. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonisation in HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebold, D; Enoh, D O; Kinge, T N; Akam, W; Bumah, M K; Russow, K; Klammt, S; Loebermann, M; Fritzsche, C; Eyong, J E; Eppel, G; Kundt, G; Hemmer, C J; Reisinger, E C

    2014-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), a major opportunistic infection in AIDS patients in Europe and the USA, in Cameroon. Induced sputum samples from 237 patients without pulmonary symptoms (126 HIV-positive and 111 HIV-negative outpatients) treated at a regional hospital in Cameroon were examined for the prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii by specific nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and staining methods. CD 4 counts and the history of antiretroviral therapy of the subjects were obtained through the ESOPE database system. Seventy-five of 237 study participants (31.6%) were colonised with Pneumocystis, but none showed active PCP. The Pneumocystis colonisation rate in HIV-positive subjects was more than double that of HIV-negative subjects (42.9% vs. 18.9%, P 500 cells/μl were colonised at a rate of 20.0%, subjects with CD 4 counts between 200 and 500 cells/μl of 42.5%, and subjects with CD 4 counts <200 cells/μl of 57.1%. Colonisation with Pneumocystis in Cameroon seems to be comparable to rates found in Western Europe. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures against Pneumocystis should be taken into account in HIV care in western Africa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Delivering an effective outpatient service in gynaecology. A randomised controlled trial analysing the cost of outpatient versus daycase hysteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Fiona; Kremer, Christian; Duffy, Sean

    2004-03-01

    To examine the cost implications of outpatient versus daycase hysteroscopy to the National Health Service, the patient and their employer. Randomised controlled trial. The gynaecology clinic of a large teaching hospital. Ninety-seven women with abnormal uterine bleeding requiring investigation. Women were randomly allocated to either outpatient or daycase hysteroscopy. They were asked to complete diaries recording expenses and time off work. The National Health Service costs were calculated for a standard outpatient and daycase hysteroscopy. Costs to the National Health Service, costs to the employer, loss of income, childcare costs and travel expenses. The outpatient group required significantly less time off work compared with the daycase group (0.8 days vs 3.3 days), P Service approximately pound 53.88 more per patient, than performing an outpatient hysteroscopy. Purchasing the hysteroscopes necessary to perform an outpatient hysteroscopy is a more expensive outlay than those required for daycase hysteroscopy. However, there are so many other savings that only 38 patients need to undergo outpatient hysteroscopy (even with a 4% failure rate) rather than daycase hysteroscopy in order to recoup the extra money required to set up an outpatient hysteroscopy service. Outpatient hysteroscopy offers many benefits over its traditional counterpart including faster recovery, less time away from work and home and cost savings to the woman and her employer and the National Health Service. Resources need to be made available to rapidly develop this service across the UK in order to better serve both patient and taxpayer.

  16. Molecular HIV screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlet, Thomas; Memmi, Meriam; Saoudin, Henia; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear acid testing is more and more used for the diagnosis of infectious diseases. This paper focuses on the use of molecular tools for HIV screening. The term 'screening' will be used under the meaning of first-line HIV molecular techniques performed on a routine basis, which excludes HIV molecular tests designed to confirm or infirm a newly discovered HIV-seropositive patient or other molecular tests performed for the follow-up of HIV-infected patients. The following items are developed successively: i) presentation of the variety of molecular tools used for molecular HIV screening, ii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of blood products, iii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of organs and tissue from human origin, iv) use of HIV molecular tools in medically assisted procreation and v) use of HIV molecular tools in neonates from HIV-infected mothers.

  17. Missed opportunities: poor linkage into ongoing care for HIV-positive pregnant women in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Watson-Jones

    Full Text Available Global coverage of prevention of mother-to-child (PMTCT services reached 53% in 2009. However the number of pregnant women who test positive for HIV in antenatal clinics and who link into long-term HIV care is not known in many resource-poor countries. We measured the proportion of HIV-positive pregnant women in Mwanza city, Tanzania, who completed the cascade of care from antenatal HIV diagnosis to assessment and engagement in care in adult HIV clinics.Thirty antenatal and maternity ward health workers were interviewed about PMTCT activities. Nine antenatal HIV education sessions were observed. A prospective cohort of 403 HIV-positive women was enrolled by specially-trained clinicians and nurses on admission to delivery and followed for four months post-partum. Information was collected on referral and attendance at adult HIV clinics, eligibility for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and reasons for lack of attendance.Overall, 70% of PMTCT health workers referred HIV-positive pregnant women to the HIV clinic for assessment and care. Antenatal HIV education sessions did not cover on-going care for HIV-infected women. Of 310 cohort participants tested in pregnancy, 51% had received an HIV clinic referral pre-delivery. Only 32% of 244 women followed to four months post-partum had attended an HIV clinic and been assessed for HAART eligibility. Non-attendance for HIV care was independently associated with fewer antenatal visits, poor PMTCT prophylaxis compliance, non-disclosure of HIV status, and non-Sukuma ethnicity.Most women identified as HIV-positive during pregnancy were not assessed for HAART eligibility during pregnancy or in the first four months post-partum. Initiating HAART at the antenatal clinic, improved counselling and linkages to care between PMTCT and adult HIV treatment services and reducing stigma surrounding disclosure of HIV results would benefit on-going care of HIV-positive pregnant women.

  18. Supervisory Turnover in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Edwards, Jennifer R.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover. PMID:19949883

  19. Risk Factors for Non-Adherence to cART in Immigrants with HIV Living in the Netherlands: Results from the ROtterdam ADherence (ROAD Project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina K Been

    Full Text Available In the Netherlands, immigrant people living with HIV (PLWH have poorer psychological and treatment outcomes than Dutch PLWH. This cross-sectional field study examined risk factors for non-adherence to combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART among immigrant PLWH. First and second generation immigrant PLWH attending outpatient clinics at two HIV-treatment centers in Rotterdam were selected for this study. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics for all eligible participants were collected from an existing database. Trained interviewers subsequently completed questionnaires together with consenting participants (n = 352 to gather additional data on socio-demographic characteristics, psychosocial variables, and self-reported adherence to cART. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted among 301 participants who had used cART ≥6 months prior to inclusion. Independent risk factors for self-reported non-adherence were (I not having attended formal education or only primary school (OR = 3.25; 95% CI: 1.28-8.26, versus University, (II experiencing low levels of social support (OR = 2.56; 95% CI: 1.37-4.82, and (III reporting low treatment adherence self-efficacy (OR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.59-5.64. Additionally, HIV-RNA >50 copies/ml and internalized HIV-related stigma were marginally associated (P<0.10 with non-adherence (OR = 2.53; 95% CI: 0.91-7.06 and OR = 1.82; 95% CI: 0.97-3.43. The findings that low educational attainment, lack of social support, and low treatment adherence self-efficacy are associated with non-adherence point to the need for tailored supportive interventions. Establishing contact with peer immigrant PLWH who serve as role models might be a successful intervention for this specific population.

  20. Pure analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pure analgesics are only rarely used by Italian clinicians and this holds true also for rheumatologists. This work is concerned with an evaluation of the use of analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic during the period 1989-1999. Methods: The records of 1705 patients consecutively seen at the clinic were downloaded on a specifically built website. Results: 4469 visits were considered. In 260 of them (5.8%, analgesics were prescribed to 234 (13.7% patients. The number of patients with a prescription of analgesics steadily increased during the years 1989-1999. The diagnoses in patients assuming analgesics were: osteoarthritis (47.1%, inflammatory arthritis (24.2%, soft tissue rheumatisms (13.7%, nonspecific arthralgia/myalgia (7.5%, and connective tissue diseases (2.6%. Peripheral analgesics were used in 188 (82.5% patients and central analgesics were used in the remaining 40 patients (17.5%. Analgesic drugs were used mainly in degenerative joint conditions. The indications for analgesics in the 55 patients with inflammatory arthrits were: (a partial or total remission of arthritis; for this reason non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were no longer required in 18 patients; (b to increase the analgesic effect of NSAIDs in 23 patients; (c contraindications to NSAIDs in 14 patients (renal failure in 2 patients, gastritis in 10, allergy and bleeding in the remaining two. Conclusions: About 14% of our outpatients were treated with analgesics with an increasing trend in the examined period. The main indications for analgesics are degenerative conditions but they can be used also in selected patients with arthritis.

  1. Testing initiatives increase rates of HIV diagnosis in primary care and community settings: an observational single-centre cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prini Mahendran

    Full Text Available The primary objective was to examine trends in new HIV diagnoses in a UK area of high HIV prevalence between 2000 and 2012 with respect to site of diagnosis and stage of HIV infection.Single-centre observational cohort study.An outpatient HIV department in a secondary care UK hospital.1359 HIV-infected adults.Demographic information (age, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, site of initial HIV diagnosis (Routine settings such as HIV/GUM clinics versus Non-Routine settings such as primary care and community venues, stage of HIV infection, CD4 count and seroconversion symptoms were collated for each participant.There was a significant increase in the proportion of new HIV diagnoses made in Non-Routine settings (from 27.0% in 2000 to 58.8% in 2012; p<0.001. Overall there was a decrease in the rate of late diagnosis from 50.7% to 32.9% (p=0.001. Diagnosis of recent infection increased from 23.0% to 47.1% (p=0.001. Of those with recent infection, significantly more patients were likely to report symptoms consistent with a seroconversion illness over the 13 years (17.6% to 65.0%; p<0.001.This is the first study, we believe, to demonstrate significant improvements in HIV diagnosis and a shift in diagnosis of HIV from HIV/GUM settings to primary practice and community settings due to multiple initiatives.

  2. Treatment outcomes of a stage 1 cognitive-behavioral trial to reduce alcohol use among human immunodeficiency virus-infected out-patients in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Sidle, John E; Gakinya, Benson N; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Martino, Steve; Mwaniki, Michael M; Songole, Rogers; Omolo, Otieno E; Kamanda, Allan M; Ayuku, David O; Ojwang, Claris; Owino-Ong'or, Willis D; Harrington, Magdalena; Bryant, Kendall J; Carroll, Kathleen M; Justice, Amy C; Hogan, Joseph W; Maisto, Stephen A

    2011-12-01

    Dual epidemics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and alcohol use disorders, and a dearth of professional resources for behavioral treatment in sub-Saharan Africa, suggest the need for development of culturally relevant and feasible interventions. The purpose of this study was to test the preliminary efficacy of a culturally adapted six-session gender-stratified group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention delivered by paraprofessionals to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected out-patients in Eldoret, Kenya. Randomized clinical trial comparing CBT against a usual care assessment-only control. A large HIV out-patient clinic in Eldoret, Kenya, part of the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare collaboration. Seventy-five HIV-infected out-patients who were antiretroviral (ARV)-initiated or ARV-eligible and who reported hazardous or binge drinking. Percentage of drinking days (PDD) and mean drinks per drinking days (DDD) measured continuously using the Time line Follow back method. There were 299 ineligible and 102 eligible out-patients with 12 refusals. Effect sizes of the change in alcohol use since baseline between the two conditions at the 30-day follow-up were large [d=0.95, P=0.0002, mean difference=24.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 12.43, 37.43 PDD; d=0.76, P=0.002, mean difference=2.88, 95% CI: 1.05, 4.70 DDD]. Randomized participants attended 93% of the six CBT sessions offered. Reported alcohol abstinence at the 90-day follow-up was 69% (CBT) and 38% (usual care). Paraprofessional counselors achieved independent ratings of adherence and competence equivalent to college-educated therapists in the United States. Treatment effect sizes were comparable to alcohol intervention studies conducted in the United States. Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be adapted successfully to group paraprofessional delivery in Kenya and may be effective in reducing alcohol use among HIV-infected Kenyan out-patients. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011

  3. 38 CFR 17.163 - Posthospital outpatient dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.163 Section 17.163 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.163 Posthospital outpatient dental treatment. The Chief, Dental Service may authorize outpatient dental care which is reasonably necessary to complete treatment of a...

  4. Continuity of care of outpatients with schizophrenia in Pretoria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To study the needs of outpatients suffering from schizophrenia and their primary caregivers. Methods. A qualitative descriptive design was selected to study the needs of a non-probability purposive sample of 50 outpatients with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers. Data were collected on their ...

  5. 42 CFR 410.59 - Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient occupational therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.59 Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule... occupational therapy services only if they are furnished by an individual meeting the qualifications in part...

  6. 76 FR 49458 - TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary Appeal Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary TRICARE; Hospital Outpatient Radiology Discretionary...: This notice is to advise hospitals of an opportunity for net adjusted payments for radiology services... hospital outpatient services, DoD has determined that, for radiology services specified in the regulation...

  7. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  8. Feasibility and safety of outpatient breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duriaud, Helle Molter; Kroman, Niels; Kehlet, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Improvement in perioperative care programmes has facilitated post-operative recovery and use of short-term or outpatient procedures. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of an outpatient breast cancer programme in patients referred to a large breast cancer...

  9. Outpatient antibiotic prescriptions from 1992 to 2001 in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyvenhoven, MM; van Balen, FAM; Verheij, TJM

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Although Dutch outpatient antibiotic prescription rates are low compared with other European countries, continuing to scrutinize trends in outpatient antibiotic use is important in order to identify possible increases in antibiotic use or inappropriate increases in the use of particular

  10. Drug prescribing patterns for outpatients in three hospitals in north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Information about drug utilization at the out patient departments of the Hospitals in Ethiopia is scanty although a large segment of the patients are being served at the outpatient departments. Objective: To evaluate and compare patterns of drug prescribing practiced in the outpatient departments of three ...

  11. User-driven innovation of an outpatient department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole; Edwards, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents experiences from a user-driven innovation process of an outpatient department in a hospital. The mixing of methods from user-driven innovation and participatory design contributed to develop an innovative concept of the spatial and organizational design of an outpatient...

  12. Prevalence and determinants for malnutrition in geriatric outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; Lonterman-Monasch, S.; de Vries, O.J.; Danner, S.A.; Kramer, M.H.H.; Muller, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background & aims: Few data is available on the nutritional status of geriatric outpatients. The aim of this study is to describe the nutritional status and its clinical correlates of independently living geriatric older individuals visiting a geriatric outpatient department. Methods: From 2005 to

  13. 42 CFR 410.60 - Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services furnished under § 410.62; (iii) Outpatient physical therapy and speech-language pathology services... physical therapy and speech-language pathology services furnished by a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions...

  14. Detecting delirium in elderly outpatients with cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroomer-van Wijk, Anne J. M.; Jonker, Barbara W.; Kok, Rob M.; van der Mast, Roos C.; Luijendijk, Hendrika J.

    Background: Delirium may be more prevalent in elderly outpatients than has long been assumed. However, it may be easily missed due to overlap with dementia. Our aim was to study delirium symptoms and underlying somatic disorders in psycho-geriatric outpatients. Methods: We performed a case-control

  15. Outpatient waiting time in Jos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problem Long waiting time for services has been identified as a reason people avoid presenting to for care in African countries. Design Examination of causes for long outpatient waiting time and the effect of measures to reduce waiting time. Setting Outpatient department of the Jos University Teaching Hospital.

  16. Masculinity and HIV disclosure among heterosexual South African men: implications for HIV/AIDS intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dageid, Wenche; Govender, Kaymarlin; Gordon, Sarah F

    2012-01-01

    Relationships and constructions of masculinity are central to understanding the process of male HIV disclosure, which is an important step towards accessing HIV-related services. Data from in-depth interviews and focus-group discussions with 23 HIV-positive, self-identified heterosexual, Black South African men were used to explore the disclosure process and how this process was negotiated in the context of constructions of masculinity. Of these men, 20 had disclosed to one or more persons, with partners and siblings being the preferred confidants. Disclosure was dependent on the acceptance of HIV status, perceived support and healthy relationships with others, HIV counselling and participation in educational and training activities. Non-disclosure was explained as a result of stigma, fear of rejection, discrimination, a lack of healthy relationships with others and lack of access to suitable disclosure strategies. Negative perceptions of HIV and hegemonic conceptions of masculinity hindered men from disclosing and seeking health services. Many men, however, managed to renegotiate their masculine identities to become responsible, knowledgeable HIV-positive individuals, protecting their families and becoming community educators. Findings suggest the need to consider gendered, contextual, skills-building/income-generating and guided interventions to promote male HIV disclosure and service uptake.

  17. Bacterial vaginosis, human papilloma virus and herpes viridae do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding in women living with HIV in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessman, Maria; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Jensen, Jørgen S; Storgaard, Merete; Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Johansen, Isik S; Pedersen, Gitte; Nørregård Nielsen, Lars; Bonde, Jesper; Katzenstein, Terese L; Weis, Nina; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2017-05-31

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been found to be associated with HIV acquisition and transmission. This is suggested to be due to higher HIV RNA levels in cervicovaginal fluids in women living with HIV (WLWH) with BV, as bacteria associated with BV may induce viral replication and shedding in the genital tract despite undetectable HIV RNA plasma viral load. We examined the prevalence and diagnostic predictors of BV and HIV-1 RNA vaginal shedding in women living with HIV (WLWH) in Denmark, taking into account the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes viridae. WLWH between 18-51 years were recruited from six Departments of Infectious Diseases in Denmark during enrolment in the SHADE cohort; a prospective cohort study of WLWH attending regular outpatient care. BV was diagnosed by microscopy of vaginal swabs and PCR was used for detection of BV-associated bacteria, HPV, herpes viridae, and vaginal HIV viral load. Median age of the 150 included women was 41 years; ethnicity was predominantly White (35%) or Black (47%). The majority (96%) was on ART and had undetectable (85%) plasma HIV RNA (<40 copies/mL). BV was diagnosed in 32%. Overall, 11% had detectable vaginal HIV RNA. Both before and after adjustment for BV, age, ethnicity, plasma HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, herpes viridae and HPV, we found no significant predictors of HIV RNA vaginal shedding. In well-treated WLWH, BV, herpes viridae or HPV do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding. This implies that HIV shedding does not seem to be increased by BV.

  18. Appropriate and inappropriate influences on outpatient discharge decision making in dermatology: a prospective qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, N A; Finlay, A Y; Salek, M S; Piguet, V

    2015-09-01

    Outpatient discharge decision making in dermatology is poorly understood. To identify the influences on clinicians' thought processes when making discharge decisions in dermatology outpatient clinics. Forty clinicians from 11 National Health Service Trusts in England were interviewed. The interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed, coded and thematically analysed. The mean age of the clinicians was 48.8 years (range 33.0-67.0), 17 (43%) were men and 19 (48%) had > 20 years of clinical experience. One hundred and forty-eight influences were reported, with five main themes: (i) disease-based influences included type of diagnosis (100% of clinicians), guidelines (100%) and treatment needed (100%); (ii) clinician-based influences included the clinician's level of experience (100%), seniority (37%), emotional attitude (95%), 'gut feeling' (25%), personal attitude towards discharge (45%) and level of perception (100%); (iii) patient-based influences included patients' ability to cope with their disease (100%), wishes (70%), quality of life (32%), command of English (40%) and cultural background (25%); (iv) practice-based influences included good primary care (100%), secondary support structure (100%) and clinic capacity pressure (67%); (v) policy-based influences included pressure from hospital managers (57%) and an active discharge policy (7%). Fourteen (9%) influences were potentially inappropriate. This study has identified multiple factors influencing outpatient discharge decision making. This provides the basis for developing evidence-based training to improve discharge decision appropriateness. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Evaluation of a hand hygiene campaign in outpatient health care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukanich, Kate Stenske; Kaur, Ramandeep; Freeman, Lisa C; Powell, Douglas A

    2013-03-01

    To improve hand hygiene in two outpatient health care clinics through the introduction of a gel sanitizer and an informational poster. In this interventional study, health care workers at two outpatient clinics were observed for frequency of hand hygiene (attempts versus opportunities). Gel sanitizer and informational posters were introduced together as an intervention. Direct observation of the frequency of hand hygiene was performed during baseline, intervention, and follow-up. A poststudy survey of health care workers was also distributed and collected. In both clinics, the frequency of hand hygiene was poor at baseline (11% and 21%) but improved significantly after intervention (36% and 54%) and was maintained through the follow-up period (32% and 51%). Throughout the study, postcontact hand hygiene was observed significantly more often than precontact hand hygiene. In both clinics, health care workers reported a preference for soap and water; yet observations showed that when the intervention made gel sanitizer available, sanitizer use predominated. Fifty percent of the surveyed health care workers considered the introduction of gel sanitizer to be an effective motivating tool for improving hand hygiene. Hand hygiene performance by health care workers in outpatient clinics may be improved through promoting the use of gel sanitizer and using informational posters. Compared with surveys, direct observation by trained observers may provide more accurate information about worker preferences for hand hygiene tools.

  20. HIV Structural Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  1. HIV Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  2. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.

  3. Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Steve Nesheim discusses perinatal HIV transmission, including the importance of preventing HIV among women, preconception care, and timely HIV testing of the mother. Dr. Nesheim also introduces the revised curriculum Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission intended for faculty of OB/GYN and pediatric residents and nurse midwifery students.

  4. Outpatient presentations to burn centers: data from the Burns Registry of Australia and New Zealand outpatient pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbe, Belinda J; Watterson, Dina M; Singer, Yvonne; Darton, Anne

    2015-05-01

    Most studies about burn injury focus on admitted cases. To compare outpatient and inpatient presentations at burn centers in Australia to inform the establishment of a repository for outpatient burn injury. Data for sequential outpatient presentations were collected at seven burn centers in Australia between December 2010 and May 2011 and compared with inpatient admissions from these centers recorded by the Burns Registry of Australia and New Zealand for the corresponding period. There were 788 outpatient and 360 inpatient presentations. Pediatric outpatients included more children burns (39% vs 24%). Adult outpatients included fewer males (58% vs 73%) and intentional injuries (3.3% vs 10%), and more scald (46% vs 30%) and contact burns (24% vs 13%). All pediatric, and 98% of adult, outpatient presentations involved a %TBSAburns presenting to burn centers differed to inpatient admission data, particularly with respect to etiology and burn severity, highlighting the importance of the need for outpatient data to enhance burn injury surveillance and inform prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Perception of Antiretroviral Generic Medicines: One-Day Survey of HIV-Infected Patients and Their Physicians in France

    OpenAIRE

    Jacomet, Christine; Allavena, Clotilde; Peyrol, Fleur; Pereira, Bruno; Joubert, Laurence Morand; Bagheri, Haleh; Cotte, Laurent; Garaffo, Rodolphe; Gerbaud, Laurent; Dellamonica, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background In the interest of cost effectiveness, switching antiretroviral brand name medications to generics is recommended in France since 2013. The study objective was to evaluate the perception of generics per se and antiretroviral generics in HIV-infected patients and their hospital physicians Methods and Findings 556 out of 703 (79%) adult HIV+ outpatients and 116 physicians in 33 clinics were included in a multicentric cross-sectional survey performed in September 2013. Patients comple...

  6. Tuberculous abdominal abscess in an HIV-infected man: Neither infection previously diagnosed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Yao Kao

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old man had a 1-week history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain; the initial impression was that he had diverticulitis of the ascending colon with an intra-abdominal abscess. Signs of peritonitis mandated an immediate right hemicolectomy. The unusual location of the abscess and the patient’s unusual postoperative course suggested that he might also have a systemic disease. Testing for HIV infection was positive. After 2 weeks in hospital, he was treated as an outpatient for both tuberculosis and HIV with a favourable outcome. In Taiwan a pre-operative HIV test is not performed routinely, and the HIV seroprevalence in surgical patient populations is unknown. Surgeons should keep the possibility of HIV infection in mind in a patient with an unusual clinical course.

  7. [Peripheral arterial disease and cardiovascular risk factors among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: a comparison between hospital out-patients and patients in a prison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri Pont, Marta; Borrallo Almansa, Rosa Maria; Almada Rivas, Guido; Carbó Díez, Miriam; Solé Arnau, Rosa; García Restoy, Enric

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients is more frequent than in the general population. Peripheral arterial disease measured by ankle-brachial index (ABI) and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) is not well known in all groups of HIV-infected patients. Transversal study of HIV-infected patients >45 years, seen as outpatients in hospital (HO) in 2008 and patients institutionalized in a prison in 2009. Cardiovascular risk factors, information on the HIV infection and healthy lifestyles were evaluated. ABI was measured at rest and was considered pathological when a value ≤ 0.9 or ≥ 1.3 was obtained. We included 71 patients (mean age of 50.6 ± 6.9 years, 86% male), 32 HO and 39 in prison. The most prevalent CVRF was smoking (80.2%) followed by an altered lipid profile (63.3%). The evolution time of HIV infection was 13.1 ± 7.1 years. 74.6% of patients didn't follow a heart-healthy diet and 25% were sedentary. The ABI was low in 7 cases (9.8%) and ≥ 1.3 in one. Patients in prison were younger, the rate of smokers and of individuals with low HDL were higher, the time of evolution of the HIV infections was longer and they were less adherent to a heart-healthy diet than in HO, reaching in all cases statistical significance (Pde Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  9. Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-26

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Steve Nesheim discusses perinatal HIV transmission, including the importance of preventing HIV among women, preconception care, and timely HIV testing of the mother. Dr. Nesheim also introduces the revised curriculum Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission intended for faculty of OB/GYN and pediatric residents and nurse midwifery students.  Created: 11/26/2012 by Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.   Date Released: 11/26/2012.

  10. Care of HIV-exposed and HIV-infected neonates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, further reduction in MTCT may be possible if newborns at high risk of acquiring HIV ... infants of breastfeeding mothers with newly diagnosed HIV infection, dual NVP/ .... birth HIV DNA PCR testing for HIV-exposed low birth weight.

  11. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children and Adolescents HIV and Women HIV and Gay and Bisexual Men HIV and Older Adults HIV ... throughout the body. A hormone called insulin helps move the glucose into the cells. Once in the ...

  12. HIV rapid diagnostic testing by lay providers in a key population-led health service programme in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkanya, Rapeeporn; Pankam, Tippawan; Wolf, Shauna; Pattanachaiwit, Supanit; Jantarapakde, Jureeporn; Pengnongyang, Supabhorn; Thapwong, Prasopsuk; Udomjirasirichot, Apichat; Churattanakraisri, Yutthana; Prawepray, Nanthika; Paksornsit, Apiluk; Sitthipau, Thidadaow; Petchaithong, Sarayut; Jitsakulchaidejt, Raruay; Nookhai, Somboon; Lertpiriyasuwat, Cheewanan; Ongwandee, Sumet; Phanuphak, Praphan; Phanuphak, Nittaya

    2018-01-01

    Introduction:  Rapid diagnostic testing (RDT) for HIV has a quick turn-around time, which increases the proportion of people testing who receive their result. HIV RDT in Thailand has traditionally been performed only by medical technologists (MTs), which is a barrier to its being scaled up. We evaluated the performance of HIV RDT conducted by trained lay providers who were members of, or worked closely with, a group of men who have sex with men (MSM) and with transgender women (TG) communities, and compared it to tests conducted by MTs. Methods:  Lay providers received a 3-day intensive training course on how to perform a finger-prick blood collection and an HIV RDT as part of the Key Population-led Health Services (KPLHS) programme among MSM and TG. All the samples were tested by lay providers using Alere Determine HIV 1/2. HIV-reactive samples were confirmed by DoubleCheckGold Ultra HIV 1&2 and SD Bioline HIV 1/2. All HIV-positive and 10% of HIV-negative samples were re-tested by MTs using Serodia HIV 1/2. Results:  Of 1680 finger-prick blood samples collected and tested using HIV RDT by lay providers in six drop-in centres in Bangkok, Chiang Mai, Chonburi and Songkhla, 252 (15%) were HIV-positive. MTs re-tested these HIV-positive samples and 143 randomly selected HIV-negative samples with 100% concordant test results. Conclusion:  Lay providers in Thailand can be trained and empowered to perform HIV RDT as they were found to achieve comparable results in sample testing with MTs. Based on the task-shifting concept, this rapid HIV testing performed by lay providers as part of the KPLHS programme has great potential to enhance HIV prevention and treatment programmes among key at-risk populations.

  13. Undertreatment of pain in HIV+ adults in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Nathaniel M; Chaiklang, Kanokporn; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai

    2013-06-01

    Chronic pain remains prevalent in HIV+ adults despite widespread antiretroviral use. Pain continues to be underrecognized and undertreated in this population. In Thailand, similar to the West, HIV care is transitioning toward chronic disease management. Despite the importance of pain management in chronic HIV, the prevalence of pain and adequacy of pain management is unknown in HIV+ adults in Thailand. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of chronic pain, the burden of inadequate analgesia, and risk factors for chronic pain in HIV+ adults in Thailand. A total of 254 HIV+ adults were recruited from an outpatient clinic in Thailand. Interviewers obtained information on demographics, clinical data, and pain characteristics. The burden of inadequate analgesia was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Risk factors were identified with logistic regression analysis. Frequent pain was reported by 27% of participants; 22% reported chronic pain. Pain was significantly associated with education less than primary school, a positive depression screen, and the number of years on combined antiretroviral therapy. Eighty-six percent of patients with frequent pain were inadequately treated. Of 34 patients with moderate or severe pain, none received adequate analgesia. Inadequate analgesia was a significant risk factor for poorer quality of life. Despite widespread antiretroviral use, pain remains common and undertreated in HIV+ adults in Thailand. Undertreated pain negatively impacts quality of life. It is imperative that policy makers and HIV caregivers address this treatment gap to advance the care of people living with HIV in Thailand. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Distal sensory polyneuropathy among HIV-infected patients at Parakou University Hospital, Benin, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoukonou, T A; Kouna-Ndouongo, P; Kpangon, A; Gnonlonfoun, D; Kpacha, B; Dovonou, A; Houinato, D

    2017-06-01

    Distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most frequent neurological complication among HIV patients, and its risk increases with use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We aimed to assess the prevalence of DSP and the factors associated with it among HIV-infected outpatients treated at Parakou University Hospital. This cross-sectional study took place from April 15 to July 15, 2011, and included 262 patients. All patients underwent a neurological examination by two neurologists with training and clinical experience in these examinations and in the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screening (BPNS), which was the primary tool used here. Data from nutritional status (body mass index: BMI), social and demographic information, HAART status, and CD4 count were recorded. The factors associated with DSP were studied with multivariate analysis, using a logistic regression model and a significance level of 0.05. The study included 60 men (22.9 %). Patients' ages ranged from 16 to 74 years and averaged 36.8±10 years. All patients but one patient were infected by HIV type 1 only; that one was coinfected by types 1 and 2. The mean BMI was 22.5+/-4.2 kg/m 2 . In all, 213 (81.3 %) received HAART, and the mean CD4 count was 355.0 cells/mm 3 +/-236.1. The prevalence of DSP was 42.4 %. The factors associated with it on univariate analysis were age, marital status, HAART status, duration of HIV infection, and duration of HAART. Only advanced age (OR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.1-5.3) and HAART use (OR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.5-4.9) were associated with DSP in the multivariate analysis. The main symptoms were paresthesia (numbness:75.7%; burning: 39.6%; pins and needles sensation 32.4 %) and pain (23.4 %). Vibration perception at the toes was missing or reduced for 84.4 %. According to the sensory symptoms grade, 93.7 % of patients were classified in Grades 2 or 3. This study showed that the prevalence of DSP is high and that it is associated with age and HAART.

  15. Intestinal parasitic infections in children presenting with diarrhoea in outpatient and inpatient settings in an informal settlement of Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbae, Cecilia Kathure; Nokes, David James; Mulinge, Erastus; Nyambura, Joyce; Waruru, Anthony; Kariuki, Samuel

    2013-05-27

    The distribution of and factors associated with intestinal parasitic infections are poorly defined in high risk vulnerable populations such as urban slums in tropical sub-Saharan Africa. In a cross sectional study, children aged 5 years and below who presented with diarrhoea were recruited from selected outpatient clinics in Mukuru informal settlement, and from Mbagathi District hospital, Nairobi, over a period of two years (2010-2011). Stool samples were examined for the presence of parasites using direct, formal-ether concentration method and the Modified Ziehl Neelsen staining technique. Overall, 541/2112 (25.6%) were positive for at least one intestinal parasite, with the common parasites being; Entamoeba histolytica, 225 (36.7%),Cryptosporidium spp. 187, (30.5%), Giardia lamblia, 98 (16%).The prevalence of intestinal parasites infection was higher among children from outpatient clinics 432/1577(27.4%) than among those admitted in hospital 109/535 (20.1%) p informal settlements' environment. Routine examinations of stool samples and treatment could benefit both the HIV infected and uninfected children in outpatient and inpatient settings.

  16. The prevalence of personality disorders in psychiatric outpatients with borderline intellectual functioning: Comparison with outpatients from regular mental health care and outpatients with mild intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Jannelien; Van Den Brink, Annemarie; Zitman, Frans G

    2015-01-01

    There is little research on the subject of personality disorder (PD) in individuals with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Unlike in most countries, in the Netherlands, patients with BIF are eligible for specialized mental health care. This offers the unique possibility of examining the rates of PDs in patients, who in other countries are treated relatively invisibly in regular mental health care. To compare, in a naturalistic setting, the frequency of PD diagnoses in outpatients with BIF with outpatients from regular mental health care and outpatients with mild ID. We compared the rates of all DSM-IV-TR axis II PDs in outpatients with BIF (BIF group; n = 235) with rates of the same disorders in outpatients from regular mental health care (RMHC group; n = 1026) and outpatients with mild intellectual disability (ID) (mild ID group; n = 152) in a naturalistic cross-sectional anonymized medical chart review. Over half of the patients with BIF (52.8%) were diagnosed with a PD, compared with one in five in the RMHC group (19.3%) and one in three of the mild ID group (33.6%). All PD diagnoses, except for cluster A PDs and histrionic PDs, were most frequently diagnosed in the BIF group. PD NOS and borderline PD were the most frequently diagnosed PDs in BIF. The majority of PD patients had one or more comorbid axis I disorder. There is a high frequency of PD diagnoses in BIF outpatients in daily clinical practice. In anticipation of further scientific research, results suggest that PDs should not be overlooked in patients with BIF.

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with ... Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the ...

  18. Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic Published: Nov 29, 2017 Facebook Twitter ... 2001-FY 2018 Request The Global Response to HIV/AIDS International efforts to combat HIV began in ...

  19. HIV/AIDS in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It harms your immune system by destroying the white blood cells ... It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV often ...

  20. HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden Past Issues / Summer 2009 ... high-risk category, emphasizes Dr. Cargill. Photo: iStock HIV and Pregnancy Are there ways to help HIV- ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contracting or transmitting HIV/AIDS or other infectious diseases. Research Reports: HIV/AIDS : Explores the link between drug misuse and HIV/AIDS, populations most at risk, trends in HIV/AIDS, and ...

  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help us Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) ... hiv-aids-101/statistics/ . Reference Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National ...

  3. The effect of treatment with zidovudine with or without acyclovir on HIV p24 antigenaemia in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Cooper, D A; Brun-Vézinet, F

    1992-01-01

    with AIDS, AIDS-related complex (ARC) or Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of less than or equal to 6 months' therapy. SETTING: Samples were obtained from patients attending teaching hospital outpatient clinics in seven European countries and Australia....... SUBJECTS: One hundred and ninety-seven HIV-infected patients (60 with AIDS and 137 with ARC or KS). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum HIV p24-antigen levels measured using the Abbott HIV solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: Of 76 ARC/KS patients who were initially HIV p24-antigen-positive, one out of 25...

  4. Serodiagnostic profiles of HIV and HIV pathogenesis in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; Lange, J. M.; Smit, L.; Bakker, M.; Klaver, B.; Danner, S. A.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Different stages of HIV infection are marked by expression of HIV genes, production of HIV antibodies, formation of antigen/antibody complexes and clearance of such complexes. Transient HIV antigenemia appearing generally 6-8 weeks prior to HIV antibody (HIV-Ab) seroconversion and lasting 3-4 months

  5. Research team training: moving beyond job descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, LaRon E; Morrison-Beedy, Dianne

    2008-08-01

    Providing appropriate training to research team members is essential to the effective implementation and overall operation of a research project. It is important to identify job requirements beyond those listed in the job description in order to fully assess basic and supplementary training needs. Training needs should be identified prior to and during the conduct of the study. Methods for delivering the training must also be identified. This article describes the identification of training needs and methods in the design of a research team training program using examples from an HIV prevention intervention trial with adolescent girls.

  6. Strategies for gender-equitable HIV services in rural India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Gita; Peters, David H; Bollinger, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of HIV in rural India has the potential to heighten gender inequity in a context where women already suffer significant health disparities. Recent Indian health policies provide new opportunities to identify and implement gender-equitable rural HIV services. In this review, we adapt Mosley and Chen's conceptual framework of health to outline determinants for HIV health services utilization and outcomes. Examining the framework through a gender lens, we conduct a comprehensive literature review for gender-related gaps in HIV clinical services in rural India, focusing on patient access and outcomes, provider practices, and institutional partnerships. Contextualizing findings from rural India in the broader international literature, we describe potential strategies for gender-equitable HIV services in rural India, as responses to the following three questions: (1) What gender-specific patient needs should be addressed for gender-equitable HIV testing and care? (2) What do health care providers need to deliver HIV services with gender equity? (3) How should institutions enforce and sustain gender-equitable HIV services? Data at this early stage indicate substantial gender-related differences in HIV services in rural India, reflecting prevailing gender norms. Strategies including gender-specific HIV testing and care services would directly address current gender-specific patient needs. Rural care providers urgently need training in gender sensitivity and HIV-related communication and clinical skills. To enforce and sustain gender equity, multi-sectoral institutions must establish gender-equitable medical workplaces, interdisciplinary HIV services partnerships, and oversight methods, including analysis of gender-disaggregated data. A gender-equitable approach to rural India's rapidly evolving HIV services programmes could serve as a foundation for gender equity in the overall health care system. PMID:19244284

  7. Characteristics and problems of 600 adolescent cannabis abusers in outpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tims, Frank M; Dennis, Michael L; Hamilton, Nancy; J Buchan, Betty; Diamond, Guy; Funk, Rod; Brantley, Laura B

    2002-12-01

    Risk factors among adolescent substance abusers have been shown to correlate with substance use severity. Characteristics related to severity, such as demographic and family factors, peer influences, psychiatric co-morbidity and HIV risk behaviors, are examined for a sample of adolescent cannabis users entering treatment. These data are from a clinical trial study utilizing blocked random assignment of clients to one of five treatment conditions. The study targeted adolescents entering outpatient treatment for primarily cannabis abuse or dependence. Treatment and research facilities in four metropolitan areas of the US were used to recruit study participants. Treatment was delivered in outpatient drug-free settings. Participants were 600 clients, ages 12-18, admitted to outpatient substance abuse treatment programs for cannabis problems, 96% with DSM-IV diagnoses of substance abuse or dependence, with the remaining 4% having at least one symptom of dependence plus significant problems indicating need for treatment. The Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) was used to collect the information presented in this paper. The GAIN incorporates DSM-IV criteria for substance use disorders, conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as dimensional (scale) measures for physical and mental health. All participants reported at least one symptom of substance use disorders, and 46% met the DSM-IV criteria for substance dependence, while 50% met criteria for a diagnosis of abuse. Only 20% of the participants perceived any need for help with problems associated with their drug or alcohol use. Clients participating in the study typically presented multiple problems at treatment entry, most often including conduct disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), internal (mental) distress, and physical health distress. The co-occurrence of conduct disorder and ADHD was found in 30% of the sample. Clients meeting criteria for substance

  8. Advancing Behavioral HIV Prevention: Adapting an Evidence-Based Intervention for People Living with HIV and Alcohol Use Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Armstrong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorders (AUDs are highly prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA and are associated with increased HIV risk behaviors, suboptimal treatment adherence, and greater risk for disease progression. We used the ADAPT-ITT strategy to adapt an evidence-based intervention (EBI, the Holistic Health Recovery Program (HHRP+, that focuses on secondary HIV prevention and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and apply it to PLWHA with problematic drinking. Focus groups (FGs were conducted with PLWHA who consume alcohol and with treatment providers at the largest HIV primary care clinic in New Orleans, LA. Overall themes that emerged from the FGs included the following: (1 negative mood states contribute to heavy alcohol consumption in PLWHA; (2 high levels of psychosocial stress, paired with few adaptive coping strategies, perpetuate the use of harmful alcohol consumption in PLWHA; (3 local cultural norms are related to the permissiveness and pervasiveness of drinking and contribute to heavy alcohol use; (4 healthcare providers unanimously stated that outpatient options for AUD intervention are scarce, (5 misperceptions about the relationships between alcohol and HIV are common; (6 PLWHA are interested in learning about alcohol’s impact on ART and HIV disease progression. These data were used to design the adapted EBI.

  9. Living with HIV/AIDS - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV - Newly diagnosed with HIV, part 5 - English MP3 Children and HIV - Newly diagnosed with HIV, part 5 - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) MP3 Children and HIV - Newly diagnosed with HIV, part ...

  10. Clinical implications of aging with HIV infection: perspectives and the future medical care agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldi, Giovanni; Palella, Frank J

    2017-06-01

    : The increasing number of aging HIV-infected (HIV+) persons comprises a unique population at risk for illnesses and syndromes traditionally associated with the elderly. As a result, similar to the current need for primary care providers to manage chronic noninfectious comorbidities among aging persons with well controlled HIV infection, HIV clinical care will need to routinely involve geriatric medicine in a new HIV-geriatric discipline. The objective of this article is to provide a conceptual framework in which HIV and geriatric management considerations for healthcare professionals caring for HIV+ persons are integrated. The provision of contemporary HIV clinical care extends well beyond the achievement of HIV virologic suppression and antiretroviral therapy management and includes a need for careful characterization of geriatric syndromes based upon functional capacity and extent of disability. Screening for geriatric syndromes is both a multidisciplinary and multidimensional process, designed to evaluate an older person's functional ability, physical health, cognition, overall mental health, and socio-environmental circumstances. Although routine incorporation of geriatric assessment into clinical trials involving HIV+ persons is feasible, a current challenge is the availability of a consensus clinical definition of frailty or vulnerability. To maximize the efficiency, value, and convenience of outpatient care visits for older HIV+ persons, these visits should include encounters with multiple providers, including primary care clinicians, social workers, and geriatricians. Challenges may exist in the routine provision of these assessments to older HIV+ persons, but clearly such cross-disciplinary collaboration will not only markedly enhance the care of aging HIV+ persons but may also constitute a model of successful healthcare management that can be applied to all aging persons with changing healthcare needs.

  11. Drop-out from a psychodynamic group psychotherapy outpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2014-11-01

    BACKGROUND. Drop-out from psychotherapy is common and represents a considerable problem in clinical practice and research. Aim. To explore pre-treatment predictors of early and late drop-out from psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient unit for non-psychotic disorders in Denmark. Methods. Naturalistic design including 329 patients, the majority with mood, neurotic and personality disorders referred to 39-session group therapy. Predictors were socio-demographic and clinical variables, self-reported symptoms (Symptom Check List-90-Revised) and personality style (Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II). Drop-out was classified into early and late premature termination excluding patients who dropped out for external reasons. Results. Drop-out comprised 20.6% (68 patients) of the sample. Logistic regression revealed social functioning, vocational training, alcohol problems and antisocial behavior to be related to drop-out. However, early drop-outs had prominent agoraphobic symptoms, lower interpersonal sensitivity and compulsive personality features, and late drop-outs cognitive and somatic anxiety symptoms and antisocial personality features. Clinical and psychological variables accounted for the major part of variance in predictions of drop-out, which ranged from 15.6% to 19.5% (Nagelkerke Pseudo R-Square). Conclusion. Social functioning was consistently associated with drop-out, but personality characteristics and anxiety symptoms differentiated between early and late drop-out. Failure to discriminate between stages of premature termination may explain some of the inconsistencies in the drop-out literature. Clinical implications. Before selection of patients to time-limited psychodynamic groups, self-reported symptoms should be thoroughly considered. Patients with agoraphobic symptoms should be offered alternative treatment. Awareness of and motivation to work with interpersonal issues may be essential for compliance with group therapy.

  12. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic. Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation. Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting. Type: Original Research

  13. Psychiatric disorders in outpatients with borderline intellectual functioning: comparison with both outpatients from regular mental health care and outpatients with mild intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Jannelien; Kapitein-de Haan, Sara; Zitman, Frans G

    2014-04-01

    In the Netherlands, patients with borderline intellectual functioning are eligible for specialized mental health care. This offers the unique possibility to examine the mix of psychiatric disorders in patients who, in other countries, are treated in regular outpatient mental health care clinics. Our study sought to examine the rates of all main Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in outpatients with borderline intellectual functioning of 2 specialized regional psychiatric outpatient departments and to compare these with rates of the same disorders in outpatients from regular mental health care (RMHC) and outpatients with mild intellectual disabilities (IDs). Our study was a cross-sectional, anonymized medical chart review. All participants were patients from the Dutch regional mental health care provider Rivierduinen. Diagnoses of patients with borderline intellectual functioning (borderline intellectual functioning group; n = 235) were compared with diagnoses of patients from RMHC (RMHC group; n = 1026) and patients with mild ID (mild ID group; n = 152). Compared with the RMHC group, psychotic and major depressive disorders were less common in the borderline intellectual functioning group, while posttraumatic stress disorder and V codes were more common. Compared with the mild ID group, psychotic disorders were significantly less common. Mental health problems in people with borderline intellectual functioning may not be well addressed in general psychiatry, or by standard psychiatry for patients with ID. Specific attention to this group in clinical practice and research may be warranted lest they fall between 2 stools.

  14. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addictions treatment. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Methods Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (N = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Results Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Conclusions Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program. PMID:26048457

  15. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addiction treatments. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (n = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program.

  16. HIV / AIDS, STDs and the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, H

    1995-01-01

    Even though the workplace is ideal for promoting HIV/STD (sexually transmitted disease) prevention to benefit workers and employers, many workplaces are not convinced that they should be involved in HIV/AIDS and STD education, prevention, and support. They do not realize that time and money spent on health programs save them money. Perhaps they do not feel obligated to protect the health of their employees. The AIDS epidemic adversely affects society and the economy at both the macro and micro level. AIDS tends to strike the productive age group, thereby seriously affecting the workplace. In many Sub-Saharan African countries, at least 20% of the urban workforce may be infected with HIV. Persons living with HIV include top management, skilled professionals, general hands, and farm laborers. HIV/AIDS costs for formal employment are assumed through reduced productivity; increased costs of occupational benefits and social security measures; loss of skilled labor, professionals, and managerial expertise as well as the experience among workers; increased costs of training and recruitment; and low morale from stigmatization, discrimination, and subsequent industrial relation problems. Needed are comprehensive HIV/AIDS and STD workplace programs that ensure the rights of persons with HIV and compassionate treatment of these persons. Trade union or other labor representatives, management, and appropriate government departments should work together and build on existing health legislation and policy to bring about effective negotiation and policy development concerning AIDS and employment. Training of peer educators, support services (counseling, STD referral and/or treatment), community action, management commitment, monitoring and evaluation, and supportive workplace conditions make for effective comprehensive workplace programs. Successful programs operate in fishing villages in Tanzania, tea plantations in India, the University of Papua New Guinea, and Ugandan army

  17. A predominance of R5-like HIV genotypes in vaginal secretions is associated with elevated plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and the absence of anti-retroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacour Nedra

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV expressed in genital secretions provides the inoculum from which transmitting variants are selected, both in sexual transmission and mother-to-infant transmission during partuition. Characterization of HIV levels and genotypes found in vaginal secretions and the impact of anti-retroviral therapy (ART on this virus can provide valuable insight for the prevention of HIV transmission. Vaginal HIV was evaluated in a cohort of 43 women attending a New Orleans HIV outpatient clinic. Predominant vaginal genotypes were characterized as R5- or X4-like by heteroduplex tracking analyses of the envelope V3 region. Most women (67.4% shed R5-like genotypes in vaginal secretions which was associated with elevated plasma HIV levels (≥ 10,000 copies HIV-RNA/mL and absence of ART. Because R5-like genotypes are more frequently associated with transmission, these observations suggest that the majority of women shedding HIV in genital secretions present a transmission risk. The levels of vaginal virus were similar between both groups, but shedding of X4-like genotypes was associated with lower plasma viral loads and the use of ART, suggesting that ART use may impact the genotypes of virus found in the female genital compartment.

  18. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  19. A study of the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the HIV overview of problems evaluation system (HOPES) in assessing the quality of life of patients with AIDS and symptomatic HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J. B.; Sprangers, M. A.; Aaronson, N. K.; Lange, J. M.; van Dam, F. S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, validity and responsiveness of the HIV Overview of Problems Evaluation System (HOPES) in a Dutch sample. The HOPES was administered three times in a one-year period to a sample of 106 outpatients with a symptomatic

  20. Prevalence and predictors of Lymphogranuloma venereum in a high risk population attending a STD outpatients clinic in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschi, Claudio; Marangoni, Antonella; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Nardini, Paola; Compri, Monica; Bellavista, Sara; Filippini, Andrea; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Cevenini, Roberto

    2014-04-09

    We evaluated LGV prevalence and predictors in a high risk population attending a STI Outpatients Clinic in the North of Italy. A total of 108 patients (99 MSM and 9 women), with a history of unsafe anal sexual intercourses, were enrolled. Anorectal swabs and urine samples were tested for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) DNA detection by Versant CT/GC DNA 1.0 Assay (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Terrytown, USA). RFLP analysis was used for CT molecular typing. L2 CT genotype was identified in 13/108 (12%) rectal swabs. All LGV cases were from MSM, declaring high-risk sexual behaviour and complaining anorectal symptoms. Patients first attending the STI Outpatient Clinic received a significant earlier LGV diagnosis than those first seeking care from general practitioners or gastroenterologists (P = 0.0046). LGV prevalence and characteristics found in our population are in agreement with international reports. Statistical analysis showed that LGV positive patients were older (P = 0.0008) and presented more STIs (P = 0.0023) than LGV negative ones, in particular due to syphilis (P < 0.001), HIV (P < 0.001) and HBV (P = 0.001).Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HIV and syphilis infections are strong risk factors for LGV presence (respectively, P = 0.001 and P = 0.010). Even if our results do not provide sufficient evidence to recommend routine screening of anorectal swabs in high-risk population, they strongly suggest to perform CT NAAT tests and genotyping on rectal specimens in presence of ulcerative proctitis in HIV and/or syphilis-positive MSM. In this context, CT DNA detection by Versant CT/GC DNA 1.0 Assay, followed by RFLP analysis for molecular typing demonstrated to be an excellent diagnostic algorithm for LGV identification.

  1. Transportation and retention in outpatient drug abuse treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, P D; Lemon, S C; Stein, M D

    2001-09-01

    To determine whether certain types of transportation assistance improve outpatient treatment retention beyond thresholds shown to have therapeutic benefits, we analyzed data from 1,144 clients in 22 outpatient methadone maintenance (OMM) programs and 2,031 clients in 22 outpatient drug-free (ODF) programs in the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcomes Study (DATOS), a national, 12-month, longitudinal study of drug abuse treatment programs. Directors' surveys provided information about provision of car, van, or contracted transportation services or individual vouchers/payment for public transportation. Chart-abstracted treatment retention was dichotomized at 365 days for OMM and 90 days for ODF. Separate multivariate hierarchical linear models revealed that provision of car, van, or contracted transportation services improved treatment retention beyond these thresholds for both OMM and ODF, but individual vouchers or payment for public transportation did not. Future research should validate whether car, van, or contracted transportation services improve retention and other treatment outcomes in outpatient drug abuse treatment.

  2. Outcome of Pediatric Gastroenterology Outpatients With Fever and Central Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Thomas; Blatt, Julie; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Jhaveri, Ravi; Jobson, Meghan; Freeman, Katherine

    2016-11-01

    Although management algorithms for fever and central venous catheters (CVCs) have been implemented for pediatric oncology (PO) patients, management of pediatric outpatients with noncancer diagnoses and CVCs lacks clear protocols. The aim of the study was to assess outcomes for pediatric outpatients with gastrointestinal disorders presenting with fever and CVC. Using a microbiology database and emergency department records, we created a database of pediatric gastroenterology (PGI) and PO outpatients with fever and a CVC who presented to our emergency department or clinics from January 2010 through December 2012. We excluded patients who had severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count, gastroenterology outpatients with fever and a CVC have a high prevalence of bloodstream infection. Algorithms for management need to be subspecialty specific. Pediatric gastroenterology patients presenting to emergency departments or clinics with fever and CVC require admission for monitoring and management.

  3. Cardiovascular risk factors in outpatients with bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumpers, U.M.H.; Boom, K.; Janssen, F.M.G.; Tulen, J.H.M.; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: The mortality due to cardiovascular diseases in bipolar patients is much higher than in the general population. It is unclear whether lithium treatment contributes to this cardiovascular morbidity. Methods: The cardiovascular risk factors in outpatients with bipolar disorder on

  4. A South African outpatient drug treatment centre | Karassellos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Cape Town Drug Counselling Centre is an outpatient drug treatment ... Management of clients, which includes psychotherapy with an emphasis on ... medical intervention, is described, and proposed areas for further research are outlined.

  5. A survey of hospital outpatient services for chronic diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of hospital outpatient services for chronic diseases in Gauteng. ... aspects of the organisation of services, and indirect indicators of patient care. Design. A postal survey of services for asthma, epilepsy, diabetes and hypertension at ...

  6. Medical Mishap and Negligence: It happens in the Outpatients too

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2011-06-01

    When we consider medical negligence and clinical error we think of busy hospitals late at night and at week-ends. We think of crowded emergency medicine departments, complex surgery and the critically ill ICU patient. We think of prescribing errors in the administration of potent intravenous therapy. We think of high risk specialties such as obstetrics, anaesthesia and surgery. We are less likely to think of outpatients\\/ ambulatory care or a non-interventionist specialty as an important source of litigation. This is remiss on our part. Risks in this setting have gone relatively unnoticed. There 30 times more outpatients than inpatients annually. In the US there are 900 million outpatient visits compared with 30 million inpatients. It is not surprising that this quantum of patient-doctor interaction should also be a source of litigation claims. Furthermore it is likely to continue rising with the increased numbers of procedures now being undertaken at outpatients.

  7. Satisfaction with outpatient health services at Jimma Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess consumer satisfaction of outpatient health care services. Methods: A cross-sectional ... tend to influence utilization of services as well as compliance with ... P-value < 0.05 was considered significant. During the study ...

  8. 9. Staff competencies at health facilities implementing an outpatient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    2006-09-26

    Sep 26, 2006 ... an Outpatient Therapeutic Programme for Severely ... ¹Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia. ²National Food and ...... professional practices of a three-day course on.

  9. Scientific Letter: Gestalt psychotherapy in the outpatient treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientific Letter: Gestalt psychotherapy in the outpatient treatment of borderline personality disorder: a case report. ... African Journal of Psychiatry. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives.

  10. VA Outpatient Visits by Administrative Parent, FY2010-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Outpatient visits by Administrative Parent. A visit is counted as a visit to one or more clinics or units within 1 calendar day at the site of care level. A patient...

  11. Transitional care management in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldonado, Analiza; Hawk, Ofelia; Ormiston, Thomas; Nelson, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Patients who are high risk high cost (HRHC), those with severe or multiple medical issues, and the chronically ill elderly are major drivers of rising health care costs.1 The HRHC patients with complex health conditions and functional limitations may likely go to emergency rooms and hospitals, need more supportive services, and use long-term care facilities.2 As a result, these patient populations are vulnerable to fragmented care and "falling through the cracks".2 A large county health and hospital system in California, USA introduced evidence-based interventions in accordance with the Triple AIM3 focused on patient-centered health care, prevention, health maintenance, and safe transitions across the care continuum. The pilot program embedded a Transitional Care Manager (TCM) within an outpatient Family Medicine clinic to proactively assist HRHC patients with outreach assistance, problem-solving and facilitating smooth transitions of care. This initiative is supported by a collaborative team that included physicians, nurses, specialists, health educator, and pharmacist. The initial 50 patients showed a decrease in Emergency Department (ED) encounters (pre-vs post intervention: 33 vs 17) and hospital admissions (pre-vs post intervention: 32 vs 11), improved patient outcomes, and cost saving. As an example, one patient had 1 ED visit and 5 hospital admission with total charges of $217,355.75 in the 6 months' pre-intervention with no recurrence of ED or hospital admissions in the 6 months of TCM enrollment. The preliminary findings showed improvement of patient-centered outcomes, quality of care, and resource utilization however more data is required.

  12. The outpatient psychotherapy of the borderline patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessick, R D

    1993-01-01

    This paper discussed common problems in the outpatient psychotherapy of borderline patients, especially their rage, seductiveness, and abrupt negative shifts. The definition of "borderline" is not settled. Even DSM-III-R mixes it up with other personality disorders. There are no pathognomonic symptoms, no specific personality constellations, and no compelling evidence for a definitive stage in infant development when this disorder is fixed; all stages are involved, from faulty foundational to oedipal periods. It is a descriptive diagnosis and typical presentations of such patients are reviewed. In the psychotherapeutic approach, limits must be set first, but these must be flexible and reasonable. Medications are used rarely and with care. We attempt to form an alliance by (a) getting the patient to join us in a study of himself or herself, especially a study of when rage and maladaptive behavior emerges, and (b) providing a consistent and reasonable ambience. The ultimate aim is uncovering and interpreting when the patient is ready for it, more and more approximating psychoanalytic treatment as the patient's pathology permits. The special phenomena of the self-object (Kohut), transitional object (Modell), and disruptive extreme erotic or raging (Kernberg) transferences were reviewed, as well as the pitfalls of therapist anxiety and impatience in dealing with them. While archaic transferences predominate, we serve as an auxiliary microscopic ego and appeal to the rational adult part of the patient's ego in a phenomenological investigation. We interpret early only if we cannot get the patient to examine what has led to the explosions and when distortions or projection without insight continues to predominate. The dangers of early transference interpretations are discussed. Therapy is long, tedious, and requires the willingness to patiently catalyze the patient's resumed development and endure the periodic disruptions. Countertransference problems and what to do about

  13. Clinical Features of Refractory Ascites in Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Regina Caly

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To present the clinical features and outcomes of outpatients who suffer from refractory ascites. METHODS: This prospective observational study consecutively enrolled patients with cirrhotic ascites who submitted to a clinical evaluation, a sodium restriction diet, biochemical blood tests, 24 hour urine tests and an ascitic fluid analysis. All patients received a multidisciplinary evaluation and diuretic treatment. Patients who did not respond to the diuretic treatment were controlled by therapeutic serial paracentesis, and a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was indicated for patients who required therapeutic serial paracentesis up to twice a month. RESULTS: The most common etiology of cirrhosis in both groups was alcoholism [49 refractory (R and 11 non-refractory ascites (NR]. The majority of patients in the refractory group had Child-Pugh class B cirrhosis (p=0.034. The nutritional assessment showed protein-energy malnutrition in 81.6% of the patients in the R group and 35.5% of the patients in the NR group, while hepatic encephalopathy, hernia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, upper digestive hemorrhage and type 2 hepatorenal syndrome were present in 51%, 44.9%, 38.8%, 38.8% and 26.5% of the patients in the R group and 9.1%, 18.2%, 0%, 0% and 0% of the patients in the NR group, respectively (p=0.016, p=0.173, p=0.012, p=0.012, and p=0.100, respectively. Mortality occurred in 28.6% of the patients in the R group and in 9.1% of the patients in the NR group (p=0.262. CONCLUSION: Patients with refractory ascites were malnourished, suffered from hernias, had a high prevalence of complications and had a high postoperative death frequency, which was mostly due to infectious processes.

  14. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence.

  15. Refining Current Scientific Priorities and Identifying New Scientific Gaps in HIV-Related Heart, Lung, Blood, and Sleep Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Homer L; Crystal, Ronald; Currier, Judith; Ridker, Paul; Berliner, Nancy; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Rutherford, George; Zou, Shimian; Glynn, Simone; Wong, Renee; Peprah, Emmanuel; Engelgau, Michael; Creazzo, Tony; Colombini-Hatch, Sandra; Caler, Elisabet

    2017-09-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) AIDS Program's goal is to provide direction and support for research and training programs in areas of HIV-related heart, lung, blood, and sleep (HLBS) diseases. To better define NHLBI current HIV-related scientific priorities and with the goal of identifying new scientific priorities and gaps in HIV-related HLBS research, a wide group of investigators gathered for a scientific NHLBI HIV Working Group on December 14-15, 2015, in Bethesda, MD. The core objectives of the Working Group included discussions on: (1) HIV-related HLBS comorbidities in the antiretroviral era; (2) HIV cure; (3) HIV prevention; and (4) mechanisms to implement new scientific discoveries in an efficient and timely manner so as to have the most impact on people living with HIV. The 2015 Working Group represented an opportunity for the NHLBI to obtain expert advice on HIV/AIDS scientific priorities and approaches over the next decade.

  16. Move to outpatient settings may boost medical hotels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J

    1992-06-08

    The shift of surgeries to outpatient settings could be healthy for medical hotels, those amenity-equipped facilities originally developed to ease patients out of costly acute-care beds. Because fewer hospitals have a pressing need to use such alternative lodging, some medical hotels are hoping to hitch their fortunes to the outpatient trade, keeping patients overnight after surgeries that don't require hospital admission.

  17. Outpatient diagnostic of bladder tumours in flexible cystoscopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Gregers G; Mogensen, Karin; Toft, Birgitte Grønkær

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) in flexible cystoscopes and the diagnostic quality of biopsies for diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the outpatients department (OPD).......The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) in flexible cystoscopes and the diagnostic quality of biopsies for diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the outpatients department (OPD)....

  18. Collaborative HIV care in primary health care: nurses' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngunyulu, R N; Peu, M D; Mulaudzi, F M; Mataboge, M L S; Phiri, S S

    2017-12-01

    Collaborative HIV care between the nurses and traditional health practitioners is an important strategy to improve health care of people living with HIV. To explore and describe the views of nurses regarding collaborative HIV care in primary healthcare services in the City of Tshwane, South Africa. A qualitative, descriptive design was used to explore and describe the views of nurses who met the study's inclusion criteria. In-depth individual interviews were conducted to collect data from purposively selected nurses. Content analysis was used to analyse data. Two main categories were developed during the data analysis stage. The views of nurses and health system challenges regarding collaborative HIV care. The study findings revealed that there was inadequate collaborative HIV care between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners. It is evident that there is inadequate policy implementation, monitoring and evaluation regarding collaboration in HIV care. The study findings might influence policymakers to consider the importance of collaborative HIV care, and improve the quality of care by strengthening the referral system and follow-up of people living with HIV and AIDS, as a result the health outcomes as implied in the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 might be improved. Training and involvement of traditional health practitioners in the nursing and health policy should be considered to enhance and build a trustworthy working relationship between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners in HIV care. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Language Training Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  20. Language Training: English Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to 25 June 2004 (2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  1. Outpatient Vascular Intervention: A Two-Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Sumaira; Thomas, Steven M.; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcome of a range of interventional vascular procedures performed on outpatients. Methods: Suitability for outpatient procedures was assessed according to agreed protocols. An episode was defined as any procedure/s through a single access site at one attendance. Retrospective case-note review was performed. Results: There were 693 outpatient episodes between April 1998 and May 2000 (290 interventional, and 403 diagnostic procedures),comprising 25% (693/2769) of the total workload. Follow-up is available in 214; 38 of these were transfers from outlying hospitals and were excluded from analysis. One hundred and seventy-six were true outpatients. There were 98 iliac and 46 femoropopliteal interventions,2 aortic stents, 1 renal and 5 upper-limb angioplasties (PTAs), 5 embolizations, 8 Hickman lines, 1 line stripping, 3 atherectomies, 1 dialysis-graft PTA and 6 bypass-graft PTAs. Sixty-eight closure devices were used. Twelve patients were converted to inpatients (6.8%,12/176). The readmission rate was 3.4% (6/176). The reattendance rate was 1.1% (2/176), both subsequently attending for outpatient duplex ultrasound examination to exclude pseudoaneurysm. The major complication rate was 3.4% and the delayed major complication rate was 1.7%. Conclusion: Outpatient vascular intervention is safe with appropriate protocols and with careful patient selection. Local vascular services benefit from the release of inpatient beds

  2. Structured outpatient treatment of alcohol vs. drug dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washton, A M

    1990-01-01

    This chapter describes the rationale, indications, design, and use of a structured outpatient treatment approach as an effective alternative to residential treatment for alcohol and drug dependencies. An increasing demand for outpatient treatment services is being created by a combination of clinical and economic factors, including the influx of employed drug abusers who do not need or desire residential care and mounting financial pressures to contain health care costs. To be effective as a primary treatment modality, outpatient programs must be highly structured and intensive and able to deal with the full spectrum of alcohol and drug addictions. Perpetuating the historical separation between alcoholism and drug abuse treatment programs is unnecessary and counterproductive, although certain modifications in treatment approaches are needed to accommodate the distinctive characteristics of particular classes of drugs and the people who use them. The "outpatient rehab," a treatment model that approximates the intensity of inpatient treatment on an outpatient basis, may help to maximize the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of outpatient treatment as a viable alternative to residential care. Initial treatment results with this model are encouraging.

  3. Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS) survey for hospital outpatient departments - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The national average for the OAS CAHPS Survey categories. The OAS CAHPS survey collects information about patients’ experiences of care in hospital outpatient...

  4. Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS) survey for hospital outpatient departments - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of the state averages for the OAS CAHPS Survey responses. The OAS CAHPS survey collects information about patients’ experiences of care in hospital outpatient...

  5. Program collaboration and service integration activities among HIV programs in 59 U.S. health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz Harris, Lauren F; Toledo, Lauren; Dunbar, Erica; Aquino, Gustavo A; Nesheim, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    We identified the level and type of program collaboration and service integration (PCSI) among HIV prevention programs in 59 CDC-funded health department jurisdictions. Annual progress reports (APRs) completed by all 59 health departments funded by CDC for HIV prevention activities were reviewed for collaborative and integrated activities reported by HIV programs for calendar year 2009. We identified associations between PCSI activities and funding, AIDS diagnosis rate, and organizational integration. HIV programs collaborated with other health department programs through data-related activities, provider training, and providing funding for sexually transmitted disease (STD) activities in 24 (41%), 31 (53%), and 16 (27%) jurisdictions, respectively. Of the 59 jurisdictions, 57 (97%) reported integrated HIV and STD testing at the same venue, 39 (66%) reported integrated HIV and tuberculosis testing, and 26 (44%) reported integrated HIV and viral hepatitis testing. Forty-five (76%) jurisdictions reported providing integrated education/outreach activities for HIV and at least one other disease. Twenty-six (44%) jurisdictions reported integrated partner services among HIV and STD programs. Overall, the level of PCSI activities was not associated with HIV funding, AIDS diagnoses, or organizational integration. HIV programs in health departments collaborate primarily with STD programs. Key PCSI activities include integrated testing, integrated education/outreach, and training. Future assessments are needed to evaluate PCSI activities and to identify the level of collaboration and integration among prevention programs.

  6. HIV and Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Hepatitis C Last Reviewed: July 25, 2017 ...

  7. HIV/AIDS Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Partner Spotlight Awareness Days Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or ... AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets ...

  8. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) Last Reviewed: June 14, 2018 ...

  9. HIV and Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Hepatitis B Last Reviewed: July 24, 2017 ...

  10. Thrombocytopenia in HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-06-15

    infected community and can severely hamper thrombopoietin production, due to liver damage. HIV and platelets. Thrombocytopenia in HIV was first described in 1982. The prevalence is more or less 40%, depending on which ...

  11. HIV Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 14, 2016 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 126 HIV Resistance Testing WHAT IS RESISTANCE? HOW DOES RESISTANCE ... ARVs. If you miss doses of your medications, HIV will multiply more easily. More mutations will occur. ...

  12. HIV: Treatment and Comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Rokx (Casper)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractClinicians worldwide strive to improve HIV care for their patients. Antiretroviral therapy prevents HIV related mortality and is lifelong. A clinical evaluation of these treatment strategies is necessary to identify strategies that may jeopardize treatment effectiveness and patient

  13. Testing for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  14. Pregnancy and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 17, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 611 Pregnancy and HIV HOW DO BABIES GET AIDS? HOW CAN WE ... doses due to nausea and vomiting during early pregnancy, giving HIV a chance to develop resistance The risk of ...

  15. Early HIV Diagnosis Leads to Significantly Decreased Costs in the First 2 Years of HIV Care in an Urban Charity Hospital in New Orleans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Jason; Katz, Morgan; Pathmanathan, Ishani; Myers, Leann; Van Sickels, Nicholas; Seal, Paula Sereebutra; Richey, Lauren E

    We undertook a retrospective cohort study of patients with a positive HIV test in the emergency department who were then linked to care. Inpatient, outpatient, and emergency costs were collected for the first 2 years after HIV diagnosis. Fifty-six patients met the inclusion criteria; they were predominantly uninsured (73%) and African American (89%). The median total cost for a newly diagnosed patient over the first 2 years was US$36 808, driven predominantly by outpatient costs of US$17 512. Median inpatient and total costs were significantly different between the lowest (499 cells/mm 3 ) CD4 count categories (US$21 878 vs US$6607, P <.05; US$61 378 vs US$18 837, P <.05, respectively). Total costs were significantly different between viral load categories <100 000 HIV-RNA copies/mL and ≥100 000 HIV-RNA copies/mL (US$28 219 vs US$49 482, P <.05). Costs were significantly lower among patients diagnosed earlier in their disease. Decreased cost is another factor supporting early diagnosis and linkage to care for patients with HIV.

  16. FAmily CEntered (FACE) advance care planning: Study design and methods for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for patients with HIV/AIDS and their surrogate decision-makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Allison L; Wang, Jichuan; Scott, Rachel K; Briggs, Linda; Lyon, Maureen E

    2015-07-01

    Although the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has become a chronic illness, disease-specific advance care planning has not yet been evaluated for the palliative care needs of adults with HIV/AIDS. This prospective, longitudinal, randomized, two-arm controlled clinical trial aims to test the efficacy of FAmily CEntered advance care planning among adults living with AIDS and/or HIV with co-morbidities on congruence in treatment preferences, healthcare utilization, and quality of life. The FAmily CEntered intervention arm is two face-to-face sessions with a trained, certified facilitator: Session 1) Disease-Specific Advance Care Planning Respecting Choices Interview; Session 2) Completion of advance directive. The Healthy Living Control arm is: Session 1) Developmental/Relationship History; Session 2) Nutrition. Follow-up data will be collected at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months post-intervention. A total of 288 patient/surrogate dyads will be enrolled from five hospital-based, out-patient clinics in Washington, District of Columbia. Participants will be HIV positive and ≥ 21 years of age; surrogates will be ≥ 18 years of age. Exclusion criteria are homicidality, suicidality, psychosis, and impaired cognitive functioning. We hypothesize that this intervention will enhance patient-centered communication with a surrogate decision-maker about end of life treatment preferences over time, enhance patient quality of life and decrease health care utilization. We further hypothesize that this intervention will decrease health disparities for Blacks in completion of advance directives. If proposed aims are achieved, the benefits of palliative care, particularly increased treatment preferences about end-of-life care and enhanced quality of life, will be extended to people living with AIDS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Analysis of HIV antibody positive cases in Peking University Hospital of Stomatology during 9 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian-fen; Qiu, Juan; Shen, Shu-ming

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of HIV patients found in Peking University Hospital of Stomatology during 9 years, and provide management strategy for early diagnosis and control of HIV in Stomatology Hospital. A retrospective study of the HIV positive patients diagnosed by HIV antibody screening was carried out. The related information about these patients found in Peking University School of Stomatology during 2005-2013 was obtained from China Disease Control Information System. 68,562 patients accepted HIV antibody screening in Peking University Hospital of Stomatology during 2005-2013. Thirty one patients were found HIV antibody positive. The ratio of HIV antibody positive was about 0.045%, which was composed of 25 males and 6 females. 61.29% patients aged between 20-40 years, and their career was mainly commercial service with a education level of junior high school. The proportion of sexual route of transmission was about 74.91%, and 34.78% of them were male homosexuality. Most of the patients with HIV antibody positive were found in the out-patient clinic, especially in the department of oral mucosal diseases, accounting for 70.97%. HIV antibody positive rate in Peking University School of Stomatology was slightly lower than that in general hospitals. Medical staff should increase their awareness of AIDS prevention and control, for higher HIV risk departments, such as oral mucosal diseases and periodontal disease, efforts should be made to increase HIV screening, expand the scope of screening, and promote provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling.

  18. Understanding HIV-related stigma among Indonesian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waluyo, Agung; Culbert, Gabriel J; Levy, Judith; Norr, Kathleen F

    2015-01-01

    Evidence indicates widespread stigmatization of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in Indonesia. Such attitudes among health care workers could impede the country's policies for effective diagnosis and medical treatment of PLWH. Nonetheless, research to guide interventions to reduce stigma in health care settings is lacking. Also, the contributions of workplace, religion, and HIV knowledge to nurses' HIV-related stigma are poorly understood. Our cross-sectional study aimed to describe factors associated with nurses' stigmatizing attitudes toward PLWH. Four hundred nurses recruited from four hospitals in Jakarta, Indonesia, were surveyed using the Nurse AIDS Attitude Scale to measure stigma. Stigmatizing attitudes were significantly predicted by education, HIV training, perceived workplace stigma, religiosity, Islamic religious identification, and affiliation with the Islamic hospital. HIV knowledge was not a significant predictor of stigmatizing attitudes. Organization changes fostering workplace diversity are likely to substantially reduce stigmatizing attitudes in nurses. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Research participants' skills development as HIV prevention peer educators in their communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morar, Neetha Shagan; Naidoo, Sarita; Goolam, Ahmed; Ramjee, Gita

    2016-06-01

    This article describes the influence of a peer education programme on skills development among 22 women participating in HIV prevention trials. Interviews were used to collect data on peer educator experiences and their opinions of the trainings. The training enhanced their agency and confidence to engage their family and community on health promotion, including HIV prevention research procedures, thus improving their self-esteem and communication skills. Training and partnering with clinical trial participants as peer educators is an effective and sustainable community-based approach for HIV prevention.

  20. The HIV Airway

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    dren living with HIV/AIDS. Annual national antenatal surveil- lance shows an HIV prevalence of 26.5% among pregnant women. Anaesthetists are confronted with an increasing number of HIV infected patients, presenting for both emergency and elective sur- gery. They range from having asymptomatic infection to end stage.

  1. HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Key populations are groups who are at increased risk of HIV irrespective of epidemic type or local context. They include: men who have sex with men, ... HIV testing and counselling; HIV treatment and care; risk-reduction ... management of STIs, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis. Elimination of ...

  2. HIV Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 65 in the case of the USPSTF) and pregnant women be screened for HIV at least once. The CDC and American College ... to make sure she is not infected with HIV before getting pregnant may opt to get tested (see Pregnancy: HIV .) ...

  3. Rheumatology training in Poland vs. United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lazarewicz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available When evaluating the quality of Rheumatology specialty training, it can be useful to explore similarities and differences between countries. In this article we compare the training in the UK and Poland. The two training programmes are similar in length and in the competencies that must be achieved, although they do have significant differences in the way the training is structured. The UK-based system is more out-patient based, which can be advantageous, as after completion of training the doctor is more confident in treating common rheumatological problems. On the other hand, having exposure to paediatric rheumatology and orthopaedics like one has in Polish-based training, despite a short placement time, is definitely beneficial for the trainee in gaining all-round knowledge. In conclusion, each system has its merits and can be further enhanced by observing how junior doctors are sub-speciality trained in different countries.

  4. Pregnancy Desire, Partner Serodiscordance, and Partner HIV Disclosure among Reproductive Age HIV-Infected Women in an Urban Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Corinne M; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Rana, Aadia I

    2016-01-01

    Women comprise 25% of the US HIV epidemic, with many women of reproductive age. There is a need for providers to address the reproductive needs and desires of women with HIV given that effective antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV into a chronic disease. This cross-sectional study shows high rates of partner serodiscordance (61%) and moderate HIV disclosure to partners (61%). Patients surveyed reported practitioners discuss condoms (94%) and contraception (71%) more often than pregnancy desire (38%). In our sample, 44% of the surveyed women intended future pregnancy, whereas women who did not intend future pregnancy cited HIV/health and serodiscordance as the most common reasons (56% and 35%, resp.). There was no difference in the knowledge of mother-to-child transmission risk between women who intended or did not intend future pregnancy (p = 0.71). These results underline the need for provider training in reproductive counseling to promote risk reduction and education.

  5. e-Consultation Improves Efficacy in Thoracic Surgery Outpatient Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M; Gómez, Maria Teresa; Rodríguez, María; Jiménez López, Marcelo F; Aranda, Jose L; Bollo de Miguel, Elena; Diez, Florentino; Hernández Hernández, Jesús; Varela, Gonzalo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is analysing the impact of the systematic versus occasional videoconferencing discussion of patients with two respiratory referral units along 6 years of time over the efficiency of the in-person outpatient clinics of a thoracic surgery service. Retrospective and comparative study of the evaluated patients through videoconferencing and in-person first visits during two equivalents periods of time: Group A (occasional discussion of cases) between 2008-2010 and Group B (weekly regular discussion) 2011-2013. Data were obtained from two prospective and electronic data bases. The number of cases discussed using e-consultation, in-person outpatient clinics evaluation and finally operated on under general anaesthesia in each period of time are presented. For efficiency criteria, the index: number of operated on cases/number of first visit outpatient clinic patients is created. Non-parametric Wilcoxon test is used for comparison. The mean number of patients evaluated at the outpatient clinics/year on group A was 563 versus 464 on group B. The median number of cases discussed using videoconferencing/year was 42 for group A versus 136 for group B. The mean number of operated cases/first visit at the outpatient clinics was 0.7 versus 0.87 in group B (P=.04). The systematic regular discussion of cases using videoconferencing has a positive impact on the efficacy of the outpatient clinics of a Thoracic Surgery Service measured in terms of operated cases/first outpatient clinics visit. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Economic assessment of the general thoracic surgery outpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David R; Vaughters, Ann B R; Smith, Philip W; Daniel, Thomas M; Shen, K Robert; Heinzmann, Janet L

    2006-09-01

    One aspect of the definition of institutional value for any program is based on the return on investment (ROI) for that program. Program requests for future resource allocations depend, in part, on that information. The purpose of this project was to determine the ROI for initial outpatient visits only for our General Thoracic Surgery (GTS) program. The number of GTS outpatient visits, studies, and requested consultations ordered by GTS surgeons only was determined after review of the hospital database and office records for the calendar year 2003. Only charges associated with the initial outpatient visits (no inpatient or physician charges) were included. Charges were based on hospital finance department data. The ROI for GTS outpatient services was calculated using total hospital costs and hospital collections. There were 689 initial outpatient GTS visits. The majority were for lung cancer (48%), benign lung diseases (21%), and esophageal diseases (14%). Total outpatient charges were 1.25M dollars and by disease process were lung cancer (644,000 dollars), benign lung disease (90,000 dollars), esophageal disease (159,000 dollars), and other (357,000 dollars). The most significant hospital charges were the following: radiology (850,000 dollars), laboratory studies (82,000 dollars), gastrointestinal medicine studies (59,000 dollars), and cardiology (42,000 dollars). Total operational costs for the GTS clinic were 415,000 dollars and hospital collections were 513,000 dollars, yielding an ROI of 98,000 dollars or an operating margin of 19%. An operating margin of 19% for GTS outpatient services is better than most Fortune 500 companies. Acquisition of this type of information by GTS surgeons may be helpful for future program development and institutional resource allocation.

  7. Enhancing outpatient clinics management software by reducing patients’ waiting time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Almomani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA gives great attention to improving the quality of services provided by health care sectors including outpatient clinics. One of the main drawbacks in outpatient clinics is long waiting time for patients—which affects the level of patient satisfaction and the quality of services. This article addresses this problem by studying the Outpatient Management Software (OMS and proposing solutions to reduce waiting times. Many hospitals around the world apply solutions to overcome the problem of long waiting times in outpatient clinics such as hospitals in the USA, China, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan. These clinics have succeeded in reducing wait times by 15%, 78%, 60% and 50%, respectively. Such solutions depend mainly on adding more human resources or changing some business or management policies. The solutions presented in this article reduce waiting times by enhancing the software used to manage outpatient clinics services. Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to understand current OMS and examine level of patient’s satisfaction. Five main problems that may cause high or unmeasured waiting time have been identified: appointment type, ticket numbering, doctor late arrival, early arriving patient and patients’ distribution list. These problems have been mapped to the corresponding OMS components. Solutions to the above problems have been introduced and evaluated analytically or by simulation experiments. Evaluation of the results shows a reduction in patient waiting time. When late doctor arrival issues are solved, this can reduce the clinic service time by up to 20%. However, solutions for early arriving patients reduces 53.3% of vital time, 20% of the clinic time and overall 30.3% of the total waiting time. Finally, well patient-distribution lists make improvements by 54.2%. Improvements introduced to the patients’ waiting time will consequently affect patients’ satisfaction and improve

  8. Effects of incarceration on HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M M; Ryan, J G; Briscoe, V S; Shadle, K M

    1996-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a critical problem among the incarcerated population, with rates as high as 17% being reported for prison systems in New York. The literature suggests that stressful living conditions and inherent defects in the immune system associated with HIV infection make prison populations more susceptible to a disproportionate decrease in their CD4 counts. To determine the effects of incarceration on HIV-infected individuals, the charts of 800 inmates were reviewed. Baseline (draw 1), 2- to 5-month (draw 2), and 6- to 12-month (draw 3) CD4 cell counts were obtained. Mean cell counts were calculated, and paired t-tests were used to identify differences. The group receiving antiretrovirals throughout showed no difference in mean CD4 cell count between draws 1 and 2 or between draws 1 and 3. The group not receiving HIV medications did not show a significant difference in CD4 cell counts between draws 1 and 2, but did show a significant difference between draws 1 and 3. For this group, the rate of decline in CD4 cells was greater than among an outpatient setting. The subsample of subjects initiating therapy prior to the second blood draw showed a significant increase in mean CD4 cell counts at draw 1 versus draw 2, but did not show a significant change when comparing draw 1 to draw 3. When examining subjects based on their antiviral status, the mean CD4 cell count at each of the draws was statistically associated with subjects' antiviral status. We conclude that incarceration causes a more rapid decrease in CD4 cells compared with an outpatient population, causing clinical significance on the normal course of HIV disease.

  9. HIV Infection Is Associated With Poor Outcomes for Patients With Anal Cancer in the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grew, David; Bitterman, Danielle; Leichman, Cynthia G; Leichman, Lawrence; Sanfilippo, Nicholas; Moore, Harvey G; Du, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    HIV status may affect outcomes after definitive chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer. Here, we report a large series in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era comparing outcomes between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with anal cancer. This was a retrospective chart review. The study was conducted at an outpatient oncology clinic at large academic center. A total of 107 patients were reviewed, 39 HIV positive and 68 HIV negative. All of the patients underwent definitive chemoradiation for anal cancer. Data on patient characteristics, treatment, toxicity, and outcomes were collected. Overall survival, colostomy-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival were analyzed. Median follow-up was 15 months. HIV-positive patients were younger (median, 52 vs 64 years; p HIV-positive patients had a significantly longer duration from biopsy to start of chemoradiation (mean number of days, 82 vs 54; p = 0.042). There were no differences in rates of acute toxicities including diarrhea, fatigue, or dermatitis. HIV-positive patients had significantly higher rates of hospitalization (33% vs 15%; p = 0.024). The 3-year overall survival rate was 42% in HIV-positive and 76% in HIV-negative patients (p = 0.037; HR, 2.335 (95% CI, 1.032-5.283)). Three-year colostomy-free survival was 67% in HIV-positive and 88% in HIV-negative patients (p = 0.036; HR, 3.231 (95% CI, 1.014-10.299)). Differences in overall survival rates were not significant on multivariate analysis. This study was limited by its retrospective design and small patient numbers. In this cohort, HIV-positive patients had significantly worse overall and colostomy-free survival rates than HIV-negative patients. However, differences in survival were not significant on multivariate analysis. Additional studies are necessary to establish the etiology of this difference.

  10. Participation in HIV research: the importance of clinic contact factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Catherine A; Gill, M John

    2008-08-01

    Recruiting minority populations living with HIV to many types of clinic-based HIV research is a concern. This study examined an expanded range of predictors of HIV research participation (clinic contact, clinical, and personal characteristics) to investigate observed ethnocultural differences in HIV research participation. Research participation was defined as participation in any of diagnostic, pathogenesis, drug trial or survey research. Logistic regression modeling was used to predict research participation of 657 eligible patients (93% of the patient population) who began care between January 1997 and the end of September 2003 at a regional outpatient HIV care program in Calgary, Canada. Approximately one third (32%) were non-white, including 18% Aboriginal, 9% black, 4% Asian, and 1% Hispanic individuals. Twenty-nine percent (187/657) of the patients participated in at least one study of any kind. Multivariate analysis indicated that the strongest predictors of any research participation (including diagnostic, pathogenesis, drug trial, or survey studies) are clinical (including nadir CD4 count [odds ratio {OR} = 0.132, p percentage of appointments kept [OR = 1.022, p service use shown by these groups that may influence research participation. To attract under researched populations, attention should shift from the "who" of research participation to the "how" of clinical interactions.

  11. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, David M; Koup, Richard A; Ferrari, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However, antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Furthermore, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small-molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Developing a complex intervention for the outpatient management of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, June; Bozas, George; Stephens, Andrew; Johnson, Miriam; Avery, Ged; O'Toole, Lorcan; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2013-06-27

    Most patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) spend 5-7 days in hospital even though only 4.5% will develop serious complications during this time. In particular, the group of patients with incidentally diagnosed PE (i-PE) includes many patients with low risk features potentially ideal for outpatient management; however the evidence for their optimal management is lacking hence relative practices may vary considerably. We describe the development process, components, links and function of a nurse-led service for the management of patients with i-PE, developed in accordance to the UK Medical Research Council complex intervention guidance. Phase 0 (Theoretical underpinning): The Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) was selected for patient risk assessment and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline for the management of PE in cancer patients (2007) was selected as quality measure. Historical registry and audit data from our centre regarding i-PE incidence and management for the period between 2006 and 2009 illustrating the then current practices were reviewed. Phase 1 (Modelling): Modelling of the pathway included the following: a) Identification of training needs, planning and implementation of training schemes and development of transferable competencies and training materials. b) Mapping patient pathways and flow and c) Production of key documentation and Standard Operating Procedures for the delivery of the service. Phase 2 (Implementation and testing of the intervention): During the initial 12 months of implementation, remedial action was taken to address identified deficiencies regarding patient referral to the pathway, compliance with treatment protocol, patient follow up, selection challenges from the use of PESI in cancer patients and challenges regarding the "first-pass" identification of i-PE. We have developed and piloted a complex intervention to manage cancer patients with incidental PE in an outpatient setting. Adherence to evidence

  13. An open trial of a comprehensive anger treatment program on an outpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J Ryan; Digiuseppe, Raymond; O'Leary, Siobhan; Fountain, Tina; Lang, Colleen

    2010-07-01

    This pilot study was designed to investigate the efficacy of a cognitive behavioral treatment for anger. Twelve (5 men and 7 women) outpatient adults completed 2-hour group sessions for 16 sessions. Participants were diagnosed with 29 Axis I and 34 Axis II disorders with high rates of comorbidity. Empirically supported techniques of skills training, cognitive restructuring, and relaxation were utilized. In this protocol, cognitive restructuring emphasized the use of the ABC model to understand anger episodes and the Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) techniques of disputing irrational beliefs and rehearsing rational coping statements, but additional cognitive techniques were used, e.g. self-instructional training (SIT). Skills training included problem-solving and assertiveness. Relaxation training was paced respiration. Motivational interviewing, imaginal exposure with coping, and relapse prevention were also included. Significant improvements were found from pre- to post-treatment on the following measures: the Trait Anger Scale of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-II; and Anger Disorder Scale total scores; idiosyncratic anger measurements of situational intensity and symptom severity; and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. In order to extend the significant research findings of this pilot study, future investigations should involve larger sample sizes, populations drawn from various settings, and contact control groups.

  14. Social network approaches to recruitment, HIV prevention, medical care, and medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkin, Carl A; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa A; Knowlton, Amy R; Alexander, Kamila A; Williams, Chyvette T; Boodram, Basmattee

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the current issues and advancements in social network approaches to HIV prevention and care. Social network analysis can provide a method to understand health disparities in HIV rates, treatment access, and outcomes. Social network analysis is a valuable tool to link social structural factors to individual behaviors. Social networks provide an avenue for low-cost and sustainable HIV prevention interventions that can be adapted and translated into diverse populations. Social networks can be utilized as a viable approach to recruitment for HIV testing and counseling, HIV prevention interventions, optimizing HIV medical care, and medication adherence. Social network interventions may be face-to-face or through social media. Key issues in designing social network interventions are contamination due to social diffusion, network stability, density, and the choice and training of network members. There are also ethical issues involved in the development and implementation of social network interventions. Social network analyses can also be used to understand HIV transmission dynamics.

  15. Outpatient treatment costs and their potential impact on cancer care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isshiki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Cancer creates a tremendous financial burden. Cancer-related costs are categorized into direct, indirect, and psychosocial costs. Although there have been many reports on medical care costs, which are direct, those on other costs are extremely scarce. We estimated travel time and costs required for cancer patients to receive outpatient treatment. We studied 521 cancer patients receiving anti-cancer treatment between February 2009 and December 2012 at the Outpatient Chemotherapy Center of Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center. Address data were extracted from Data Warehouse electronic medical records, and travel distance and time required for outpatient treatment were calculated via MapInfo and ACT Distance Calculator Package. Transportation costs were estimated on the basis of ¥274 (=$3.00) per kilometer. The study design was approved by an ethics review board of Teikyo University (12-851). Average round-trip travel distance, time, and cost for all patients were 26.7 km, 72.5 min, and ¥7,303 ($79.99), respectively. Cancer patients incurred a travel cost of ¥4000–¥9000 ($40.00 to $100.00) for each outpatient treatment. With population aging, seniors living alone and senior households are increasing, and outpatient visits are becoming a common burden

  16. Cost associated with stroke: outpatient rehabilitative services and medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Kyler M; Wasserman, Joan; Ostwald, Sharon K

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to capture direct costs of outpatient rehabilitative stroke care and medications for a 1-year period after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Outpatient rehabilitative services and medication costs for 1 year, during the time period of 2001 to 2005, were calculated for 54 first-time stroke survivors. Costs for services were based on Medicare reimbursement rates. Medicaid reimbursement rates and average wholesale price were used to estimate medication costs. Of the 54 stroke survivors, 40 (74.1%) were categorized as independent, 12 (22.2%) had modified dependence, and 2 (3.7%) were dependent at the time of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Average cost for outpatient stroke rehabilitation services and medications the first year post inpatient rehabilitation discharge was $17,081. The corresponding average yearly cost of medication was $5,392, while the average cost of yearly rehabilitation service utilization was $11,689. Cost attributed to medication remained relatively constant throughout the groups. Outpatient rehabilitation service utilization constituted a large portion of cost within each group: 69.7% (dependent), 72.5% (modified dependence), and 66.7% (independent). Stroke survivors continue to incur significant costs associated with their stroke for the first 12 months following discharge from an inpatient rehabilitation setting. Changing public policies affect the cost and availability of care. This study provides a snapshot of outpatient medication and therapy costs prior to the enactment of major changes in federal legislation and serves as a baseline for future studies.

  17. Cost-effectiveness assessment in outpatient sinonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuaire, G; Theis, D; Fackeure, R; Chevalier, D; Gengler, I

    2018-02-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of outpatient sinonasal surgery in terms of clinical efficacy and control of expenses. A retrospective study was conducted from January 2014 to January 2016. Patients scheduled for outpatient sinonasal surgery were systematically included. Clinical data were extracted from surgical and anesthesiology computer files. The cost accounting methods applied in our institution were used to evaluate logistic and technical costs. The standardized hospital fees rating system based on hospital stay and severity in diagnosis-related groups (Groupes homogènes de séjours: GHS) was used to estimate institutional revenue. Over 2years, 927 outpatient surgical procedures were performed. The crossover rate to conventional hospital admission was 2.9%. In a day-1 telephone interview, 85% of patients were very satisfied with the procedure. All outpatient cases showed significantly lower costs than estimated for conventional management with overnight admission, while hospital revenue did not differ between the two. This study confirmed the efficacy of outpatient surgery in this indication. Lower costs could allow savings for the health system by readjusting the rating for the procedure. More precise assessment of cost-effectiveness will require more fine-grained studies based on micro costing at hospital level and assessment of impact on conventional surgical activity and post-discharge community care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Transient elastography discloses identical distribution of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C between HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients on HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünhage F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Progressive immunodeficiency associated with HIV-infection leads to a progressive course of liver disease in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART efficiently restores and preserves immune functions and has recently been demonstrated to also result in reduced liver-related mortality in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Methods To analyse differences in current liver fibrosis as a possible effect of HAART on fibrosis progression we assessed hepatic fibrosis by transient elastography in a cross-sectional comparison between HCV-mono-infected and HIV/HCV-co-infected patients presenting at our outpatient department in 2007. Results Overall, we did not find any difference in the distribution of liver stiffness between mono- (n = 84 and double-infected (n = 57 patients (14.4 kPa (10.8 - 18.2 versus 12.4 kPa (9.1 - 16.1, mean (95%-CI. However, in the 8 HIV+ patients with CD4 counts Conclusions These findings are in line with other data that show an improved prognosis of chronic hepatitis C in HIV+ patients under effective HAART, and may be a hint that fibrosis progression in well-treated HIV+ patients will no longer be different from that in HCV-mono-infected patients.

  19. Benefits of a 7-week outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Alina; Ioniţă, Diana; Stroescu, Carmen; Pele, Irina; Gologanu, Daniela; Dumitrescu, Andreea; Marinescu, Lucia; Anghelescu, Dana; Alexandru, Miron; Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory rehabilitation programs (RR) are essential tools in the management of COPD. We present the results of a 7-week outpatient rehabilitation program in terms of dyspnea, exercise tolerance and quality of life. The following parameters were evaluated before and after RR: dyspnea (mMRC scale), pulmonary function (FEVI, RV- residual volume), exercise tolerance (6MWT- 6 minutes walk test, CPET - cardiopulmonary exercise test), quality of life (SGROQ questionnaire). The RR program was outpatient, hospital based (7 weeks, 3 sessions/ week) and included: exercise training, therapeutic education, and psychological support. 25 patients, COPD stage II-IV GOLD (mean FEVI 44.5 +/-13% predicted), mean age 60.4 +/-12 years, 7 females, average BMI 27.14+/-4 kg/m2, average RV residual volume 221.55+/-86% predicted. Mean 6MWTdistance: 407.48 +/- 84 m and mean maximum power (Pmax) obtained on CPET: 75.67+/-30 Watts. All patients were symptomatic with significant dyspnea (3.06+/-0.7 on mMRC scale) and showed a significant impairment of quality of life: SGRO score 46.23+/- 14. At the end of RR program: dyspnea decreased with 0.67points on mMRC scale (p = 0.000), 6MWT distance increased with 58.5 m (p = 0.0071), Pmax obtained during CPET increased with 11.2 W, without reaching statistical significance (p> 0.05). SGRO score decreased by 5.59 points (p = 0.02). There were no significant improvements in FEV1 and RV values (p> 0.05). In our COPD patients, the 7 week outpatient rehabilitation program was effective, leading to improvement ofsymptoms, exercise tolerance and quality of life.

  20. Observable Effects of Atmospheric Pollution on Outpatient and Inpatient Morbidity in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platikanova, Magdalena; Penkova-Radicheva, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    One of Europe's most well-developed industrial regions is found in the Republic of Bulgaria. The industrialization of the region has a big impact on air pollution. Thermal power plant "Maritza East" (the largest of its kind in southeastern Europe), the army training range, machine manufacturers, household heating and high volume of automobile traffic are all major sources of pollution in the region. A five year study (2009-2013) followed yearly concentrations of principal atmospheric pollutants such as sulfur dioxide, dust, nitrogen dioxide, lead aerosols and hydrogen sulfide, and the way in which those levels had an effect on morbidity (outpatient and inpatient medical care) in the area. Statistical processing of data has been completed to represent and analyze the collected data in nonparametric and alternative format. Atmospheric pollution affects human health directly through pathological changes in the human organism. The registered outpatient care provided for the period 2009-2013 is highest for diseases of the cardiovascular system (11.85%), the respiratory system (17.34%) and the genitourinary system (9.76%). The registered rate of hospitalization for the same period is for diseases of the digestive system (11.90%), the cardiovascular system (11.85%), respiratory system (10.86%) and the genitourinary system (8.88%). The observed period shows a decrease in average yearly concentrations of the principal atmospheric pollutants in the industrial region (Bulgaria) and reflects a decrease in morbidity based on outpatient care and an increase in morbidity by inpatient care (hospitalization). Our findings should be corroborated in future longitudinal studies.

  1. Improving Patient Satisfaction in a Midsize Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustino, Nicholas J; Kochanski, Justin J

    2015-09-01

    The study of patient satisfaction is a rapidly emerging area of importance within health care. High levels of patient satisfaction are associated with exceptional physician-patient communication, superior patient compliance, reduced risk of medical malpractice, and economic benefit in the value-based purchasing era. To our knowledge, no previous reports have evaluated methods to improve the patient experience within the pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) outpatient clinic. Patient satisfaction was measured using returned Press-Ganey surveys at Blank Children's Hospital PHO outpatient clinic (UnityPoint Health). The aim of this study was to raise the overall patient satisfaction score to the 75th percentile and raise the care provider score (CP) to the 90th percentile nationally. After analyzing data from 2013, interventions were implemented in January 2014, including weekly review of returned surveys, review of goals and progress at monthly staff meetings, distribution of written materials addressing deficiencies, score transparency among providers, provider use of Web-based patient satisfaction training modules, devotion of additional efforts to address less satisfied demographics (new patient consultations), and more liberal use of service recovery techniques. In the PHO outpatient clinic, overall patient satisfaction improved from the 56th to 97th percentile. Care provider scores improved from the 70th to 99 th percentile. For new patients, overall satisfaction improved from the 27th to 92 nd percentile, and care provider scores improved from the 29th to 98 th percentile. Patient satisfaction was improved in a midsize PHO clinic by implementing provider- and staff-driven initiatives. A combination of minor behavioral changes among care providers and staff in conjunction with systems-related modifications drove improvement. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Impact of Family Medicine Implementation in outpatient admissions in an Education and Research Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdülkadir Aydın

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With the health transformation program in Turkey, the Family Medicine Implementation (FMI was started across the nation in the end of 2010. This study attempted to assess the influence of the FMI on outpatient applications to a third level state hospital.Methods: The number of outpatient applications from 2007 to 2014 was screened through an automation system. Eight clinics were examined including the clinics which Ministry of Health, the Board of Medical Specialties assigned as a part of obligatory rotation within the scope of Family Medicine assistant training, and emergency service. The year 2011 was taken as beginning year of the Family Medicine system. The period from 2007 to 2010 was taken as the pre-FMI period while the term from 2010 to 2014 was taken as the post-FMI period. The outpatient application rates of the selected clinics were compared by periods in correlation with population changes in the Anatolian site of İstanbul. In the analysis of the data, descriptive statistics, mean and standard deviation for continuous variables, Mann Whitney U Test for abnormal distribution comparisons of measured values were used. Significance was assessed at p<0,01 and p<0,05 levels.Results: It was found that no significant increase occurred in the number of patients who applied to the clinics of chest diseases and cardiology in parallel to population growth. In other clinics, the number of applications increased in correlation with population growth.Conclusion: The family medicine implementation made positive effects on the third level hospital in the beginning phase. We are of the opinion that, in order for these positive effects to be improved further, patients should be encouraged to apply to family physicians, and a health referral chain should be implemented with sufficient numbers of primary care personnel.

  3. [Turnover of Non-medical Staff in Outpatient Oncology Practices: Is Building Social Capital a Solution?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloede, T D; Ernstmann, N; Baumann, W; Groß, S E; Ansmann, L; Nitzsche, A; Neumann, M; Wirtz, M; Schmitz, S; Schulz-Nieswandt, F; Pfaff, H

    2015-11-01

    While a lot is known about potential and actual turnover of non-medical hospital staff, only few data exist for the outpatient setting. In addition, little is known about actual instruments which leaders can use to influence staff turnover in physician practices. In the literature, the social capital of an organisation, which means the amount of trust, common values and reciprocal behaviour in the organisation, has been discussed as a possible field of action. In the present study, staff turnover as perceived by outpatient haematologists and oncologists is presented and analysed as to whether social capital is associated with that staff turnover. In conclusion, measures to increase the social capital of a practice are presented. The present study is based on data gathered in a questionnaire-based survey with members of the Professional Organisation of -Office-Based Haematologists and Oncologists (N=551). The social capital of the practice was captured from the haematologists and oncologists using an existing and validated scale. To analyse the impact of the practice's social capital on staff turnover, as perceived by the physicians, bivariate correlations and linear regression analyses were calculated. In total, 152 haematologists and oncologists participated in the study which represents a response rate of 28%. In the regression analyses, social capital appears as a significant and strong predictor of staff turnover (beta=-0.34; pturnover although the underlying study design does not allow for drawing causal conclusions regarding this relationship. To create social capital in their practice, outpatient physicians may apply measures that facilitate social interaction among staff, foster trust and facilitate cooperation. Such measures may already be applied when hiring and training new staff, but also continuously when leading employees and when organising work tasks, e.g., by establishing regular team meetings. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. A paediatric and perinatal HIV/AIDS leadership initiative in Kingston, Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, C D C

    2004-10-01

    In Jamaica 1-2% of pregnant women are HIV-positive; 876 HIV-positive pregnant women will deliver and at least 283 newly infected HIV-infected infants will be born in 2003; HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of death in children aged one to four years. We describe a collaborative "Town and Gown" programme to address the paediatric and perinatal HIV epidemic in Kingston. A team of academic and government healthcare personnel, comprising paediatricians, obstetricians, public health practitioners, nurses, microbiologists, data management and information technology personnel collaborated to address this public health emergency. A five-point plan was implemented This comprised leadership and training of a core group of paediatric/perinatal HIVprofessionals to serve Greater Kingston and St Catherine and be a model for the rest of Jamaica. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS is prevented by counselling and HIV-testing women in the antenatal clinics, giving azidothymidine (AZT) to HIV pregnant women beginning at 28 weeks gestation, throughout labour and to the HIV-exposed infants for the first six weeks of life. A unified parallel programme for identifying the HIV-infected infant and delivering paediatric HIV care at the major paediatric centres was implemented In three years, over 30,000 pregnant women are being tested for HIV; 600 HIV-exposed babies are being identified and about 140 paediatric HIV infections will be prevented The team is building research capacity which emphasizes a strong outcomes-based research agenda and implementation of clinical trials. We are collaborating, locally, regionally and internationally. Collaboratively, the mission of reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS and improving the quality of life for those already living and affected by HIV/AIDS can be achieved.

  5. Attendance at an outpatient follow-up clinic by HIV-positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antiretroviral treatment (ART) is vital for virological suppression and successful long-term ... Female predominance in this setting should also be further investigated. S Afr J Psychiatr 2015 ... to better serve this potentially vulnerable population.

  6. HIV in East London: ethnicity, gender and risk. Design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukutu Cecilia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While men who have sex with men remain the group at greatest risk of acquiring HIV infection in the UK, the number of new diagnoses among heterosexuals has risen steadily over the last five years. In the UK, three-quarters of heterosexual men and women diagnosed with HIV in 2004 probably acquired their infection in Africa. This changing epidemiological pattern is particularly pronounced in East London because of its ethnically diverse population. Design and methods The objective of the study was to examine the social, economic and behavioural characteristics of patients with HIV infection currently receiving treatment and care in hospitals in East London. The research focused on ethnicity, gender, sexuality, education, employment, housing, HIV treatment, stigma, discrimination, religion, migration and sexual risk behaviour. People diagnosed with HIV infection attending outpatient treatment clinics at St Bartholomew's, the Royal London, Whipp's Cross, Homerton, Newham and Barking hospitals (all in East London over a 4–6 month period were invited to participate in the study in 2004–2005. Those who agreed to participate completed a confidential, self-administered pen-and-paper questionnaire. During the study period, 2680 patients with HIV attended the outpatient clinics in the six participating hospitals, of whom 2299 were eligible for the study and 1687 completed a questionnaire. The response rate was 73% of eligible patients and 63% of all patients attending the clinics during the survey period. Discussion A clinic-based study has allowed us to survey nearly 1700 patients with HIV from diverse backgrounds receiving treatment and care in East London. The data collected in this study will provide valuable information for the planning and delivery of appropriate clinical care, social support and health promotion for people living with HIV not only in East London but in other parts of the capital as well as elsewhere in the UK.

  7. Dentistry and HIV/AIDS related stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, Jesus Eduardo; Treviño, Ana Cecilia; Violant, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    To analyze HIV/AIDS positive individual's perception and attitudes regarding dental services. One hundred and thirty-four subjects (30.0% of women and 70.0% of men) from Nuevo León, Mexico, took part in the study (2014). They filled out structured, analytical, self-administered, anonymous questionnaires. Besides the sociodemographic variables, the perception regarding public and private dental services and related professionals was evaluated, as well as the perceived stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, through a Likert-type scale. The statistical evaluation included a factorial and a non-hierarchical cluster analysis. Social inequalities were found regarding the search for public and private dental professionals and services. Most subjects reported omitting their HIV serodiagnosis and agreed that dentists must be trained and qualified to treat patients with HIV/AIDS. The factorial analysis revealed two elements: experiences of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments and feelings of concern regarding the attitudes of professionals or their teams concerning patients' HIV serodiagnosis. The cluster analysis identified three groups: users who have not experienced stigma or discrimination (85.0%); the ones who have not had those experiences, but feel somewhat concerned (12.7%); and the ones who underwent stigma and discrimination and feel concerned (2.3%). We observed a low percentage of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments; however, most HIV/AIDS patients do not reveal their serodiagnosis to dentists out of fear of being rejected. Such fact implies a workplace hazard to dental professionals, but especially to the very own health of HIV/AIDS patients, as dentists will not be able to provide them a proper clinical and pharmaceutical treatment.

  8. Dentistry and HIV/AIDS related stigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eduardo Elizondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze HIV/AIDS positive individual’s perception and attitudes regarding dental services.METHODS One hundred and thirty-four subjects (30.0% of women and 70.0% of men from Nuevo León, Mexico, took part in the study (2014. They filled out structured, analytical, self-administered, anonymous questionnaires. Besides the sociodemographic variables, the perception regarding public and private dental services and related professionals was evaluated, as well as the perceived stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, through a Likert-type scale. The statistical evaluation included a factorial and a non-hierarchical cluster analysis.RESULTS Social inequalities were found regarding the search for public and private dental professionals and services. Most subjects reported omitting their HIV serodiagnosis and agreed that dentists must be trained and qualified to treat patients with HIV/AIDS. The factorial analysis revealed two elements: experiences of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments and feelings of concern regarding the attitudes of professionals or their teams concerning patients’ HIV serodiagnosis. The cluster analysis identified three groups: users who have not experienced stigma or discrimination (85.0%; the ones who have not had those experiences, but feel somewhat concerned (12.7%; and the ones who underwent stigma and discrimination and feel concerned (2.3%.CONCLUSIONS We observed a low percentage of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments; however, most HIV/AIDS patients do not reveal their serodiagnosis to dentists out of fear of being rejected. Such fact implies a workplace hazard to dental professionals, but especially to the very own health of HIV/AIDS patients, as dentists will not be able to provide them a proper clinical and pharmaceutical treatment.

  9. Asia: fighting HIV / AIDS makes business sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-15

    Three Asian companies are investing in HIV/AIDS education and prevention schemes because they are starting to feel the effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic on their workforces. A total of 17 companies from the region signed a document in the Fifth International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific committing to the fight against AIDS. The group said that effective workplace programs can prevent an increase in absenteeism, health care costs and labor turnover, a decrease in productivity, loss of experienced personnel and the need for increased resources to hire and retrain replacements. American International Assurance in Thailand accredits companies with effective HIV/AIDS campaigns in the workplace and gives them a 5-10% discount on premiums on group life insurance policies. At Freeport Mining in Indonesia, an HIV/AIDS campaign markedly improved condom usage rates and decreased incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among workers. Meanwhile, India's Tata Tea Limited expanded its health services to include surveys, training, education, and counseling on HIV/AIDS and STDs.

  10. Disrespect and abuse during childbirth in Tanzania: are women living with HIV more vulnerable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, David; Kendall, Tamil; Lyatuu, Goodluck; Ratcliffe, Hannah; McDonald, Kathleen; Mwanyika-Sando, Mary; Emil, Faida; Chalamilla, Guerino; Langer, Ana

    2014-12-01

    HIV-related stigma and discrimination and disrespect and abuse during childbirth are barriers to use of essential maternal and HIV health services. Greater understanding of the relationship between HIV status and disrespect and abuse during childbirth is required to design interventions to promote women's rights and to increase uptake of and retention in health services; however, few comparative studies of women living with HIV (WLWH) and HIV-negative women exist. Mixed methods included interviews with postpartum women (n = 2000), direct observation during childbirth (n = 208), structured questionnaires (n = 50), and in-depth interviews (n = 18) with health care providers. Bivariate and multivariate regressions analyzed associations between HIV status and disrespect and abuse, whereas questionnaires and in-depth interviews provided insight into how provider attitudes and workplace culture influence practice. Of the WLWH and HIV-negative women, 12.2% and 15.0% reported experiencing disrespect and abuse during childbirth (P = 0.37), respectively. In adjusted analyses, no significant differences between WLWH and HIV-negative women's experiences of different types of disrespect and abuse were identified, with the exception of WLWH having greater odds of reporting non-consented care (P = 0.03). None of the WLWH reported violations of HIV confidentiality or attributed disrespect and abuse to their HIV status. Provider interviews indicated that training and supervision focused on prevention of vertical HIV transmission had contributed to changing the institutional culture and reducing HIV-related violations. In general, WLWH were not more likely to report disrespect and abuse during childbirth than HIV-negative women. However, the high overall prevalence of disrespect and abuse measured indicates a serious problem. Similar institutional priority as has been given to training and supervision to reduce HIV-related discrimination during childbirth should be focused on

  11. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level of s...

  12. Language Training: French Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. LANGUAGE TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 language.training@cern.ch General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. These courses are open to all persons working on the Cern site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Mrs. Benz: Tel. 73127. Writing Professional Documents in French The next session will take place from 26 April to 02 July 2004. This course is designed for people with a good level...

  13. Fear and Guilt in HIV and AIDS Prevention | Gwandure | Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The social learning theory concepts of fear and guilt are regarded as inhibitory factors in disease prevention, and this article examines the possibility of incorporating fear and guilt training courses into HIV and AIDS prevention programmes. HIV and AIDS educators could help participants understand the role of fear and guilt ...

  14. HIV/AIDS Stigma Attitudes among Educators in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li-Wei; Gow, Jeff; Akintola, Goke; Pauly, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background: One hundred and twenty educators from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, underwent HIV/AIDS training. The educators were surveyed about their attitudes toward people with HIV. Methods: The educators completed self-administered survey questionnaires both before and after 2 interventions. Measures included demographic characteristics,…

  15. Cardiometabolic disease risk and HIV status in rural South Africa : establishing a baseline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, Samuel J.; Gomez-Olive, F. Xavier; Houle, Brian; Thorogood, Margaret; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Angotti, Nicole; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa; Williams, Jill; Menken, Jane; Tollman, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background: To inform health care and training, resource and research priorities, it is essential to establish how non-communicable disease risk factors vary by HIV-status in high HIV burden areas; and whether long-term anti-retroviral therapy (ART) plays a modifying role. Methods: As part of a

  16. HIV/AIDS prisoners: a case study on quality of life in Roumieh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prisons often lack the basic health services required by HIV/AIDS patients. As with many other chronic illnesses, the treatment of HIV is expensive in terms of medication, hygiene, testing and staff training. Strategies to combat the disease have been thoroughly developed, particularly in Europe (WHO/UNAIDS, 2006).

  17. Rhabdomyolysis in an HIV cohort: epidemiology, causes and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koubar, Sahar H; Estrella, Michelle M; Warrier, Rugmini; Moore, Richard D; Lucas, Gregory M; Atta, Mohamed G; Fine, Derek M

    2017-07-17

    The Literature on rhabdomyolysis in the HIV-positive population is sparse and limited. We aimed to explore the incidence, patient characteristics, etiologies and outcomes of rhabdomyolysis in a cohort of HIV-positive patients identified through the Johns Hopkins HIV clinical registry between June 1992 and April 2014. A retrospective analysis of 362 HIV-positive patients with non-cardiac CK elevation ≥1000 IU/L was performed. Both inpatients and outpatients were included. Incidence rate and potential etiologies for rhabdomyolysis were ascertained. The development of acute kidney injury (AKI, defined as doubling of serum creatinine), need for dialysis, and death in the setting of rhabdomyolysis were determined. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of peak CK level with the development of AKI. Three hundred sixty two cases of rhabdomyolysis were identified in a cohort of 7079 patients with a 38,382 person years follow-up time. The incidence rate was nine cases per 1000 person-years (95% CI: 8.5-10.5). Infection was the most common etiology followed by compression injury and drug/alcohol use. One-third of cases had multiple potential etiologies. AKI developed in 46% of cases; 20% of which required dialysis. Thirteen percent died during follow-up. After adjustment, AKI was associated with higher CK (OR 2.05 for each 1-log increase in CK [95% CI: 1.40-2.99]), infection (OR 5.48 [95% CI 2.65-11.31]) and higher HIV viral load (OR 1.22 per 1-log increase [95% CI: 1.03-1.45]). Rhabdomyolysis in the HIV-positive population has many possible causes and is frequently multifactorial. HIV-positive individuals with rhabdomyolysis have a high risk of AKI and mortality.

  18. Co-occurrence of Trichomonas vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis and vaginal shedding of HIV-1 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastring, Danielle R; Amedee, Angela; Gatski, Megan; Clark, Rebecca A; Mena, Leandro A; Levison, Judy; Schmidt, Norine; Rice, Janet; Gustat, Jeanette; Kissinger, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV) are independently associated with increased risk of vaginal shedding in HIV-positive women. Because these 2 conditions commonly co-occur, this study was undertaken to examine the association between TV/BV co-occurrence and vaginal shedding of HIV-1 RNA. HIV-positive women attending outpatient HIV clinics in 3 urban US cities underwent a clinical examination; were screened for TV, BV, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and vulvovaginal candidiasis; and completed a behavioral survey. Women shedding HIV-1 RNA vaginally (≥50 copies/mL) were compared with women who had an undetectable (women who were TV positive and BV positive or had co-occurrence of TV/BV had higher odds of shedding vaginally when compared with women who did not have these conditions. In this sample of 373 HIV-positive women, 43.1% (n = 161) had co-occurrence of TV/BV and 33.2% (n = 124) were shedding HIV-1 RNA vaginally. The odds of shedding HIV vaginally in the presence of TV alone or BV alone and when TV/BV co-occurred were 4.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-9.37), 5.65 (95% CI, 2.64-12.01), and 18.63 (95% CI, 6.71-51.72), respectively, when compared with women with no diagnosis of TV or BV, and after adjusting for age, antiretroviral therapy status, and plasma viral load. T. vaginalis and BV were independently and synergistically related to vaginal shedding of HIV-1 RNA. Screening and prompt treatment of these 2 conditions among HIV-positive women are important not only clinically but for HIV prevention, as well.

  19. Smoking Cessation Counseling Beliefs and Behaviors of Outpatient Oncology Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Tooze, Janet A.; Blackstock, A. William; Spangler, John; Thomas, Leslie; Sutfin, Erin L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Many cancer patients continue to smoke after diagnosis, increasing their risk for treatment complications, reduced treatment efficacy, secondary cancers, and reduced survival. Outpatient oncology providers may not be using the “teachable moment” of cancer diagnosis to provide smoking cessation assistance. Providers and Methods. Physicians and midlevel providers (n = 74) who provide outpatient oncology services completed an online survey regarding smoking cessation counseling behaviors, beliefs, and perceived barriers. Outpatient medical records for 120 breast, lung, head and neck, colon, prostate, and acute leukemia cancer patients were reviewed to assess current smoking cessation assessment and intervention documentation practices. Results. Providers reported commonly assessing smoking in new patients (82.4% frequently or always), but rates declined at subsequent visits for both current smokers and recent quitters. Rates of advising patients to quit smoking were also high (86.5% frequently or always), but oncology setting. PMID:22334454

  20. Measurement of nurses' workload in an oncology outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Alves de Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand and the degree of patient care in oncological outpatient services, as well as the complexity of treatment have had an impact on the workload of nurses. This study aimed at measuring the workload and productivity of nurses in an oncological outpatient service. An observational study using a work sampling technique was conducted and included seven nurses working in an oncological outpatient service in the south-eastern region of Brazil. A total of 1,487 intervention or activity samples were obtained. Nurses used 43.2% of their time on indirect care, 33.2% on direct care, 11.6% on associated activities, and 12% on personal activities. Their mean productivity was 88.0%. The findings showed that nurses in this service spend most of their time in indirect care activities. Moreover, the productivity index in this study was above that recommended in the literature.

  1. Correlates of HIV infection among people visiting public HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlates of HIV infection among people visiting public HIV counseling and testing clinics in Mpumalanga, ... Background: HIV voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) reduces high-risk sexual behaviour. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  2. HIV/AIDS in Women - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines and women - HIV medicines, part 7 - English MP3 HIV medicines and women - HIV medicines, part 7 - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) MP3 HIV medicines and women - HIV medicines, part 7 - ...

  3. The implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy in HIV clinics: the experience from the TB/HIV in Rio (THRio) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durovni, Betina; Cavalcante, Solange C; Saraceni, Valeria; Vellozo, Vitoria; Israel, Giselle; King, Bonnie S; Cohn, Silvia; Efron, Anne; Pacheco, Antonio G; Moulton, Lawrence H; Chaisson, Richard E; Golub, Jonathan E

    2010-11-01

    The TB/HIV in Rio (THRio) study was launched in September 2005 to assess the impact of integrated tuberculosis (TB) and HIV treatment strategies in 29 HIV clinics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. THRio is a cluster-randomized trial (CRT) to determine whether routine screening for and treatment of latent TB in HIV clinic patients with access to antiretroviral therapy will reduce TB incidence at the clinic level. THRio is part of the Consortium to Respond Effectively to AIDS/TB Epidemic that is implementing research studies to assess the impact of bold, new public health paradigms for controlling the AIDS/TB epidemic. Twenty-nine public primary HIV clinics were randomly assigned a date to begin implementing TB screening procedures and provision of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for TB/HIV coinfected patients. Final analysis of the CRT is expected in 2011. Starting at date of tuberculin skin test (TST)/IPT implementation at each clinic through August 2010, 1670 HIV-infected patients initiated IPT, of which 215 are still receiving treatment. Of the remaining 1455 patients, 1230 (85%) completed therapy and only 20 (1.2%) patients initiating IPT reported adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of therapy. IPT completion was higher among HIV-infected patients receiving HAART (87%) than those not yet receiving HAART (79%, P effort requires a package of activities including training, advocacy and reorganization of services.

  4. Service quality of hospital outpatient departments: patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of patient perceptions of health service quality as an important element in quality assessments has attracted much attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to assess the service quality of hospital outpatient departments affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from the patients' perspective. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in Tehran, Iran. The study samples included 500 patients who were selected by multi-stage random sampling from four hospitals. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of 50 items, and the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed. For data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Friedman test, and descriptive statistics were used through LISREL 8.54 and SPSS 18 applications. Eight significant factors were extracted for outpatient service quality, which explained about 67 per cent of the total variance. Physician consultation, information provided to the patient, and the physical environment of the clinic were the three determining factors of the quality of outpatient services. The highest and lowest perceptions were related to physician consultation and perceived waiting time dimension, respectively. The mean score of patients' perception of outpatient service quality was 3.89 (±0.60). About 59.5 per cent of patients assessed the quality of outpatient services as good, 38.2 per cent as moderate, and 2.3 per cent as poor. Practical implications - The instrument developed for this study is valid and reliable, and it can help hospital managers to identify the areas needing improvement and correction. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience with outpatient departments of teaching hospitals, and the services provided in these centres were of adequate quality, based on patient assessments.

  5. Animal-assisted therapy at an outpatient pain management clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Constantin, Janet M; Kunkel, Frank A; Breuer, Paula; Hanlon, Raymond B

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of brief therapy dog visits to an outpatient pain management facility compared with time spent in a waiting room. The design of this study is open-label. Setting.  This study was conducted in a university tertiary care adult chronic pain outpatient clinic. The subjects of this study include outpatients, adults accompanying outpatients to their appointments, and clinic staff. Intervention.  Participants were able to spend clinic waiting time with a certified therapy dog instead of waiting in the outpatient waiting area. When the therapy dog was not available, individuals remained in the waiting area. Self-reported pain, fatigue, and emotional distress were recorded using 11-point numeric rating scales before and after the therapy dog visit or waiting room time. Two hundred ninety-five therapy dog visits (235 with patients, 34 family/friends, and 26 staff) and 96 waiting room surveys (83 from patients, 6 family/friends, and 7 staff) were completed over a 2-month study period. Significant improvements were reported for pain, mood, and other measures of distress among patients after the therapy dog visit but not the waiting room control, with clinically meaningful pain relief (decrease ≥2 points) in 23% after the therapy dog visit and 4% in the waiting room control. Significant improvements were likewise seen after therapy dog visits for family/friends and staff. Therapy dog visits in an outpatient setting can provide significant reduction in pain and emotional distress for chronic pain patients. Therapy dog visits can also significantly improve emotional distress and feelings of well-being in family and friends accompanying patients to appointments and clinic staff. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Perfectionism Group Treatment for Eating Disorders in an Inpatient, Partial Hospitalization, and Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A; Brosof, Leigh C; Vanzhula, Irina A; Bumberry, Laura; Zerwas, Stephanie; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-11-01

    Perfectionism is elevated in individuals with eating disorders and is posited to be a risk factor, maintaining factor, and treatment barrier. However, there has been little literature testing the feasibility and effectiveness of perfectionism interventions in individuals specifically with eating disorders in an open group format. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of (a) a short cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism intervention delivered in an inpatient, partial hospitalization, and outpatient for eating disorders setting (combined N = 28; inpatient n = 15; partial hospital n = 9; outpatient n = 4), as well as (b) a training for disseminating the treatment in these settings (N = 9). Overall, we found that it was feasible to implement a perfectionism group in each treatment setting, with both an open and closed group format. This research adds additional support for the implementation of perfectionism group treatment for eating disorders and provides information on the feasibility of implementing such interventions across multiple settings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  7. Quality of life among dually diagnosed and non-substance-using male schizophrenia outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Imer Aras

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the quality of life (QoL in an outpatient setting among male patients dually diagnosed with schizophrenia and substance use disorder (SUD, and non-substance-using male schizophrenia patients. Methods. The study was conducted in an outpatient setting with 52 male schizophrenia patients and 49 male schizophrenia patients with SUD comorbidity, who were admitted to Bakirköy Research and Training Hospital between 1 May 2010 and 30 September 2010. The patients had been in remission for a minimum of 6 months. The subjects were re-evaluated for the persistence of the diagnosis by using the Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID I socio-demographic data form, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF and positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS were administered to detect the factors affecting diagnostic stability and clinical course. Results. Schizophrenia patients with no SUD comorbidity had a significantly earlier age of disease onset than the comorbid group. SUD comorbidity in schizophrenia patients leads to increased rates of unemployment and homicidality. WHOQOL-Bref psychological health scores were significantly lower among patients in the comorbidity group. No statistically significant difference was identified between the groups with regard to the PANSS scores. Conclusions. It is necessary to focus on the treatment challenges for schizophrenia patients with SUD comorbidity, such as the provision of treatment in criminal justice settings, in which a high proportion of such patients are found.

  8. Lessons learned developing a diagnostic tool for HIV-associated dementia feasible to implement in resource-limited settings: pilot testing in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kwasa

    Full Text Available To conduct a preliminary evaluation of the utility and reliability of a diagnostic tool for HIV-associated dementia (HAD for use by primary health care workers (HCW which would be feasible to implement in resource-limited settings.In resource-limited settings, HAD is an indication for anti-retroviral therapy regardless of CD4 T-cell count. Anti-retroviral therapy, the treatment for HAD, is now increasingly available in resource-limited settings. Nonetheless, HAD remains under-diagnosed likely because of limited clinical expertise and availability of diagnostic tests. Thus, a simple diagnostic tool which is practical to implement in resource-limited settings is an urgent need.A convenience sample of 30 HIV-infected outpatients was enrolled in Western Kenya. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of a diagnostic tool for HAD as administered by a primary HCW. This was compared to an expert clinical assessment which included examination by a physician, neuropsychological testing, and in selected cases, brain imaging. Agreement between HCW and an expert examiner on certain tool components was measured using Kappa statistic.The sample was 57% male, mean age was 38.6 years, mean CD4 T-cell count was 323 cells/µL, and 54% had less than a secondary school education. Six (20% of the subjects were diagnosed with HAD by expert clinical assessment. The diagnostic tool was 63% sensitive and 67% specific for HAD. Agreement between HCW and expert examiners was poor for many individual items of the diagnostic tool (K = .03-.65. This diagnostic tool had moderate sensitivity and specificity for HAD. However, reliability was poor, suggesting that substantial training and formal evaluations of training adequacy will be critical to enable HCW to reliably administer a brief diagnostic tool for HAD.

  9. Erectile dysfunction drug receipt, risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Robert L; McGinnis, Kathleen A; Samet, Jeffrey H; Fiellin, David A; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Rodriquez-Barradas, Maria C; Kraemer, Kevin L; Gibert, Cynthia L; Braithwaite, R Scott; Goulet, Joseph L; Mattocks, Kristin; Crystal, Stephen; Gordon, Adam J; Oursler, Krisann K; Justice, Amy C

    2010-02-01

    Health care providers may be concerned that prescribing erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD) will contribute to risky sexual behavior. To identify characteristics of men who received EDD prescriptions, determine whether EDD receipt is associated with risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and determine whether these relationships vary for certain sub-groups. Cross-sectional study. Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven sexually-active, HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men recruited from eight Veterans Health Affairs outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from participant surveys, electronic medical records, and administrative pharmacy data. EDD receipt was defined as two or more prescriptions for an EDD, risky sex as having unprotected sex with a partner of serodiscordant or unknown HIV status, and STDs, according to self-report. Overall, 28% of men received EDD in the previous year. Eleven percent of men reported unprotected sex with a serodiscordant/unknown partner in the past year (HIV-infected 15%, HIV-uninfected 6%, P sexual behavior (11% vs. 10%, p = 0.9) and STDs (7% vs 7%, p = 0.7). In multivariate analyses, EDD receipt was not significantly associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in the entire sample or in subgroups of substance users or men who had sex with men. EDD receipt was common but not associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in this sample of HIV-infected and uninfected men. However, risky sexual behaviors persist in a minority of HIV-infected men, indicating ongoing need for prevention interventions.

  10. Empirical analysis of scaling and fractal characteristics of outpatients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li-Jiang; Liu, Zi-Xian; Guo, Jin-Li

    2014-01-01

    The paper uses power-law frequency distribution, power spectrum analysis, detrended fluctuation analysis, and surrogate data testing to evaluate outpatient registration data of two hospitals in China and to investigate the human dynamics of systems that use the “first come, first served” protocols. The research results reveal that outpatient behavior follow scaling laws. The results also suggest that the time series of inter-arrival time exhibit 1/f noise and have positive long-range correlation. Our research may contribute to operational optimization and resource allocation in hospital based on FCFS admission protocols.

  11. Empirical analysis of scaling and fractal characteristics of outpatients

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    Zhang, Li-Jiang, E-mail: zljjiang@gmail.com [College of Management and Economics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Management Institute, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang 453003, Henan (China); Liu, Zi-Xian, E-mail: liuzixian@tju.edu.cn [College of Management and Economics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guo, Jin-Li, E-mail: phd5816@163.com [Business School, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2014-01-31

    The paper uses power-law frequency distribution, power spectrum analysis, detrended fluctuation analysis, and surrogate data testing to evaluate outpatient registration data of two hospitals in China and to investigate the human dynamics of systems that use the “first come, first served” protocols. The research results reveal that outpatient behavior follow scaling laws. The results also suggest that the time series of inter-arrival time exhibit 1/f noise and have positive long-range correlation. Our research may contribute to operational optimization and resource allocation in hospital based on FCFS admission protocols.

  12. Youth as research fieldworkers in a context of HIV/AIDS | Francis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Youth as research fieldworkers in a context of HIV/AIDS. ... observations of the process of training out-of-school youths as research fieldworkers, reflections on ... qualitative research, research methodology, South Africa, youth-toyouth research

  13. Lymphogranuloma venereum and HIV infection: misdiagnosed as Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sheel; Hay, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The report describes a young Caucasian homosexual man who presented with a 4-month history of bloody diarrhoea and weight loss. Over the next 4 months he was investigated for inflammatory bowel disease and subsequently started on mesalazine and prednisolone as an outpatient. Within a month of starting treatment his symptoms worsened, leading to his self-referral to the genitourinary medicine clinic. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with advanced HIV infection and lymphogranuloma venereum infection. The patient was treated with doxycycline for 3 weeks and started on antiretrovirals. One month later the patient is symptom free with a recovering immune system. PMID:22797476

  14. Case Report: HIV test misdiagnosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Study: HIV test misdiagnosis 124. Case Report: HIV ... A positive rapid HIV test does not require ... 3 College of Medicine - Johns Hopkins Research Project, Blantyre,. Malawi ... test results: a pilot study of three community testing sites.

  15. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the body’s immune ... and often leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The U.S. CDC reported that in 2015, 39, ...

  16. Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... destroying the white blood cells that fight infection. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. Infection with HIV is serious. But thanks to ...

  17. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 ... turn Javascript on. Photo: The NAMES Project Foundation HIV and AIDS are a global catastrophe. While advances ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hiv-aids-101/statistics/ . Reference Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National ... not just injection) can put a person at risk for getting HIV. Drug and alcohol intoxication affect ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). AIDS ... but no cure, at the present time. The virus (HIV) and the disease it causes (AIDS) are ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors ... GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved November 2017. How are Drug Misuse and HIV Related? Drug misuse and addiction ...