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Sample records for hiv gag p24

  1. Oral immunization with a live coxsackievirus/HIV recombinant induces gag p24-specific T cell responses.

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    Rui Gu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of an HIV/AIDS vaccine has proven to be elusive. Because human vaccine trials have not yet demonstrated efficacy, new vaccine strategies are needed for the HIV vaccine pipeline. We have been developing a new HIV vaccine platform using a live enterovirus, coxsackievirus B4 (CVB4 vector. Enteroviruses are ideal candidates for development as a vaccine vector for oral delivery, because these viruses normally enter the body via the oral route and survive the acidic environment of the stomach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We constructed a live coxsackievirus B4 recombinant, CVB4/p24(73(3, that expresses seventy-three amino acids of the gag p24 sequence (HXB2 and assessed T cell responses after immunization of mice. The CVB4 recombinant was physically stable, replication-competent, and genetically stable. Oral or intraperitoneal immunization with the recombinant resulted in strong systemic gag p24-specific T cell responses as determined by the IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay and by multiparameter flow cytometry. Oral immunization with CVB4/p24(73(3 resulted in a short-lived, localized infection of the gut without systemic spread. Because coxsackieviruses are ubiquitous in the human population, we also evaluated whether the recombinant was able to induce gag p24-specific T cell responses in mice pre-immunized with the CVB4 vector. We showed that oral immunization with CVB4/p24(73(3 induced gag p24-specific immune responses in vector-immune mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CVB4/p24(73(3 recombinant retained the physical and biological characteristics of the parental CVB4 vector. Oral immunization with the CVB4 recombinant was safe and resulted in the induction of systemic HIV-specific T cell responses. Furthermore, pre-existing vector immunity did not preclude the development of gag p24-specific T cell responses. As the search continues for new vaccine strategies, the present study suggests that live CVB4/HIV recombinants are

  2. Blood donors with indeterminate anti-p24gag reactivity in HIV-1 western blot: absence of infectivity to transfused patients and in virus culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, C. L.; Lelie, P. N.; Reesink, H. W.; van Exel-Oehlers, P. J.; Tersmette, M.; van den Akker, R.; Gonzalves, M.; Huisman, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    During a follow-up period of 23-40 months, 7 regular blood donors had persistently, and 4 had intermittently indeterminate anti-p24gag reactivity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 Western Blot. Serological testing and viral cultures revealed that these donors had no signs of infection for

  3. Broadening of the T-cell repertoire to HIV-1 Gag p24 by vaccination of HLA-A2/DR transgenic mice with overlapping peptides in the CAF05 adjuvant

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    Korsholm, Karen S; Karlsson, Ingrid; Tang, Sheila T

    2013-01-01

    -cell responses in CB6F1 mice. The adjuvanted vaccine also induced functional antigen-specific cytotoxicity in vivo. Furthermore, we found that when fragmenting the Gag p24 protein into overlapping Gag p24 peptides, a broader T-cell epitope specificity was induced in the humanized human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2....../DR-transgenic mouse model. Thus, combining overlapping Gag p24 peptides with CAF05 appears to be a promising and simple strategy for inducing broader T-cell responses to multiple conserved epitopes which will be relevant for both prophylactic and therapeutic HIV-1 vaccines....

  4. Sequence conservation, HLA-E-Restricted peptide, and best-defined CTL/CD8+ epitopes in gag P24 (capsid) of HIV-1 subtype B

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    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Dharmawan, Ruben; Sari, Yulia; Sariyatun, Ratna

    2017-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a cause of global health problem. Continuous studies of HIV-1 genetic and immunological profiles are important to find strategies against the virus. This study aimed to conduct analysis of sequence conservation, HLA-E-restricted peptide, and best-defined CTL/CD8+ epitopes in p24 (capsid) of HIV-1 subtype B worldwide. The p24-coding sequences from 3,557 HIV subtype B isolates were aligned using MUSCLE and analysed. Some highly conserved regions (sequence conservation ≥95%) were observed. Two considerably long series of sequences with conservation of 100% was observed at base 349-356 and 550-557 of p24 (HXB2 numbering). The consensus from all aligned isolates was precisely the same as consensus B in the Los Alamos HIV Database. The HLA-E-restricted peptide in amino acid (aa) 14-22 of HIV-1 p24 (AISPRTLNA) was found in 55.9% (1,987/3,557) of HIV-1 subtype B worldwide. Forty-four best-defined CTL/CD8+ epitopes were observed, in which VKNWMTETL epitope (aa 181-189 of p24) restricted by B*4801 was the most frequent, as found in 94.9% of isolates. The results of this study would contribute information about HIV-1 subtype B and benefits for further works willing to develop diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against the virus.

  5. HIV-1–Infected Individuals in Antiretroviral Therapy React Specifically With Polyfunctional T-Cell Responses to Gag p24

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    Brandt, Lea; Benfield, Thomas; Kronborg, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Still no effective HIV-1 prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines are available. However, as the proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral treatment is increasing, knowledge about the residual immune response is important for the possible development of an HIV-1 vaccine....

  6. Selection of an HLA-C*03:04-Restricted HIV-1 p24 Gag Sequence Variant Is Associated with Viral Escape from KIR2DL3+ Natural Killer Cells: Data from an Observational Cohort in South Africa

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    Jimenez Cruz, Camilo A.; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; van Teijlingen, Nienke H.; Mann, Jaclyn K.; Jaggernath, Manjeetha; Kang, Seung-gu; Körner, Christian; Chung, Amy W.; Schafer, Jamie L.; Evans, David T.; Alter, Galit; Walker, Bruce D.; Goulder, Philip J.; Carrington, Mary; Hartmann, Pia; Pertel, Thomas; Zhou, Ruhong; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Altfeld, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Background Viruses can evade immune surveillance, but the underlying mechanisms are insufficiently understood. Here, we sought to understand the mechanisms by which natural killer (NK) cells recognize HIV-1-infected cells and how this virus can evade NK-cell-mediated immune pressure. Methods and Findings Two sequence mutations in p24 Gag associated with the presence of specific KIR/HLA combined genotypes were identified in HIV-1 clade C viruses from a large cohort of infected, untreated individuals in South Africa (n = 392), suggesting viral escape from KIR+ NK cells through sequence variations within HLA class I—presented epitopes. One sequence polymorphism at position 303 of p24 Gag (TGag303V), selected for in infected individuals with both KIR2DL3 and HLA-C*03:04, enabled significantly better binding of the inhibitory KIR2DL3 receptor to HLA-C*03:04-expressing cells presenting this variant epitope compared to the wild-type epitope (wild-type mean 18.01 ± 10.45 standard deviation [SD] and variant mean 44.67 ± 14.42 SD, p = 0.002). Furthermore, activation of primary KIR2DL3+ NK cells from healthy donors in response to HLA-C*03:04+ target cells presenting the variant epitope was significantly reduced in comparison to cells presenting the wild-type sequence (wild-type mean 0.78 ± 0.07 standard error of the mean [SEM] and variant mean 0.63 ± 0.07 SEM, p = 0.012). Structural modeling and surface plasmon resonance of KIR/peptide/HLA interactions in the context of the different viral sequence variants studied supported these results. Future studies will be needed to assess processing and antigen presentation of the investigated HIV-1 epitope in natural infection, and the consequences for viral control. Conclusions These data provide novel insights into how viruses can evade NK cell immunity through the selection of mutations in HLA-presented epitopes that enhance binding to inhibitory NK cell receptors. Better understanding of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades

  7. Efavirenz Enhances HIV-1 Gag Processing at the Plasma Membrane through Gag-Pol Dimerization

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    Sudo, Sho; Haraguchi, Hiyori; Hirai, Yoko; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Sakuragi, Jun-ichi; Momose, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV), a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor, also inhibits HIV-1 particle release through enhanced Gag/Gag-Pol processing by protease (PR). To better understand the mechanisms of the EFV-mediated enhancement of Gag processing, we examined the intracellular localization of Gag/Gag-Pol processing products and their precursors. Confocal microscopy revealed that in the presence of EFV, the N-terminal p17 matrix (p17MA) fragment was uniformly distributed at the plasma membrane (PM) but the central p24 capsid (p24CA) and the Pol-encoded RT antigens were diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm, and all of the above were observed in puncta at the PM in the absence of EFV. EFV did not impair PM targeting of Gag/Gag-Pol precursors. Membrane flotation analysis confirmed these findings. Such uniform distribution of p17MA at the PM was not seen by overexpression of Gag-Pol and was suppressed when EFV-resistant HIV-1 was used. Forster's fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay revealed that Gag-Pol precursor dimerization occurred mainly at the PM and that EFV induced a significant increase of the Gag-Pol dimerization at the PM. Gag-Pol dimerization was not enhanced when HIV-1 contained the EFV resistance mutation in RT. Bacterial two-hybrid assay showed that EFV enhanced the dimerization of PR-RT fragments and restored the dimerization impaired by the dimerization-defective mutation in the RT tryptophan repeat motif but not that impaired by the mutation at the PR dimer interface. Collectively, our data indicate that EFV enhances Gag-Pol precursor dimerization, likely after PM targeting but before complete particle assembly, resulting in uniform distribution of p17MA to and dissociation of p24CA and RT from the PM. PMID:23302874

  8. HLA Alleles Associated with Slow Progression to AIDS Truly Prefer to Present HIV-1 p24

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    Borghans, J. A.; Molgaard, A.; Boer, R. J. de

    2007-01-01

    and effect, we predicted HIV-1 epitopes from the whole genome of HIV-1, and found that protective HLA alleles have a true preference for the p24 Gag protein, while non-protective HLA alleles preferentially target HIV-1 Nef. In line with this, we found a significant negative correlation between the predicted......BACKGROUND: The mechanism behind the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression is still poorly understood. Recent data suggest that "protective" HLA molecules, i.e. those associated with a low HIV-1 viral load and relatively slow disease...... progression, tend to present epitopes from the Gag capsid protein. Although this suggests that preferential targeting of Gag delays disease progression, the apparent preference for Gag could also be a side-effect of the relatively high immunogenicity of the protein. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To separate cause...

  9. HLA alleles associated with slow progression to AIDS truly prefer to present HIV-1 p24

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    Borghans, José A M; Mølgaard, Anne; de Boer, Rob J

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanism behind the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression is still poorly understood. Recent data suggest that "protective" HLA molecules, i.e. those associated with a low HIV-1 viral load and relatively slow disease...... and effect, we predicted HIV-1 epitopes from the whole genome of HIV-1, and found that protective HLA alleles have a true preference for the p24 Gag protein, while non-protective HLA alleles preferentially target HIV-1 Nef. In line with this, we found a significant negative correlation between the predicted...... affinity of the best-binding p24 epitopes and the relative hazard of HIV-1 disease progression for a large number of HLA molecules. When the epitopes targeted by protective HLA alleles were mapped to the known p24 structure, we found that mutations in these epitopes are likely to disturb the p24 dimer...

  10. Mucosal and systemic anti-GAG immunity induced by neonatal immunization with HIV LAMP/gag DNA vaccine in mice.

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    Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Maciel, Milton; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Piubelli, Orlando; de Brito, Cyro Alves; Melo, Andrea; Marques, Ernesto Torres; August, Joseph Thomas; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2011-04-01

    Vaccines capable of inducing mucosal immunity in early postnatal life until adulthood, protecting early sexual initiation, should be considered as strategies to vaccination against HIV. The HIV-1 GAG protein as a chimera with the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP/gag), encoded by a DNA vaccine, is targeted to the endosomal/lysosomal compartment that contains class II MHC molecules and has been shown to be immunogenic in adult mice. Assuming that one such strategy could help to overcome the immunological immaturity in the early postnatal period, we have evaluated the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of LAMP/gag immunization in neonatal mice. Intranasal immunization with LAMP/gag vaccine induced higher levels of sIgA and IgG anti-GAG antibodies in intestinal washes than did the gag vaccine. The combination of ID injections and the IN protocol with the chimeric vaccine promoted the increase of Ab levels in sera. Both vaccines induced splenic IFN-γ- secreting cells against GAG peptide pools, as well as in vivo cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function, and increased the percentage of CD8+ T cells to the immunodominant class I peptide in gut and spleen. However, only the chimeric vaccine was able to enhance Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion in response to class II GAG peptide and to enhance IL-4-secreting cells against GAG peptides and p24 protein stimuli. Long-lasting humoral and cellular responses were detected until adult age, following neonatal immunization with the chimeric vaccine. The LAMP/gag vaccination was able to induce potent GAG-specific T and B cell immune responses in early life which are essential to elicit sustained and long-lasting mucosal and systemic humoral response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Solution Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Protein: Differences from HIV-1 Gag

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    Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Clark, Patrick K.; Campbell, Stephen J.; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan (SAIC); (NCI)

    2012-05-09

    Immature retrovirus particles are assembled from the multidomain Gag protein. In these particles, the Gag proteins are arranged radially as elongated rods. We have previously characterized the properties of HIV-1 Gag in solution. In the absence of nucleic acid, HIV-1 Gag displays moderately weak interprotein interactions, existing in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Neutron scattering and hydrodynamic studies suggest that the protein is compact, and biochemical studies indicate that the two ends can approach close in three-dimensional space, implying the need for a significant conformational change during assembly. We now describe the properties of the Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), a gammaretrovirus. We found that this protein is very different from HIV-1 Gag: it has much weaker protein-protein interaction and is predominantly monomeric in solution. This has allowed us to study the protein by small-angle X-ray scattering and to build a low-resolution molecular envelope for the protein. We found that MLV Gag is extended in solution, with an axial ratio of {approx}7, comparable to its dimensions in immature particles. Mutational analysis suggests that runs of prolines in its matrix and p12 domains and the highly charged stretch at the C terminus of its capsid domain all contribute to this extended conformation. These differences between MLV Gag and HIV-1 Gag and their implications for retroviral assembly are discussed.

  12. Molecular mechanisms by which HERV-K Gag interferes with HIV-1 Gag assembly and particle infectivity.

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    Monde, Kazuaki; Terasawa, Hiromi; Nakano, Yusuke; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Maeda, Yosuke; Ono, Akira

    2017-04-26

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), the remnants of ancient retroviral infections, constitute approximately 8% of human genomic DNA. Since HERV-K Gag expression is induced by HIV-1 Tat in T cells, induced HERV-K proteins could affect HIV-1 replication. Indeed, previously we showed that HERV-K Gag and HIV-1 Gag coassemble and that this appears to correlate with the effect of HERV-K Gag expression on HIV-1 particle release and its infectivity. We further showed that coassembly requires both MA and NC domains, which presumably serve as scaffolding for Gag via their abilities to bind membrane and RNA, respectively. Notably, however, despite possessing these abilities, MLV Gag failed to coassemble with HIV-1 Gag and did not affect assembly and infectivity of HIV-1 particles. It is unclear how the specificity of coassembly is determined. Here, we showed that coexpression of HERV-K Gag with HIV-1 Gag changed size and morphology of progeny HIV-1 particles and severely diminished infectivity of such progeny viruses. We further compared HERV-K-MLV chimeric constructs to identify molecular determinants for coassembly specificity and for inhibition of HIV-1 release efficiency and infectivity. We found that the CA N-terminal domain (NTD) of HERV-K Gag is important for the reduction of the HIV-1 release efficiency, whereas both CA-NTD and major homology region of HERV-K Gag contribute to colocalization with HIV-1 Gag. Interestingly, these regions of HERV-K Gag were not required for reduction of progeny HIV-1 infectivity. Our results showed that HERV-K Gag CA is important for reduction of HIV-1 release and infectivity but the different regions within CA are involved in the effects on the HIV-1 release and infectivity. Altogether, these findings revealed that HERV-K Gag interferes the HIV-1 replication by two distinct molecular mechanisms.

  13. HIV Pol inhibits HIV budding and mediates the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol.

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    Xin Gan

    Full Text Available The prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding posits that the viral Gag protein drives budding, and that the Gag p6 peptide plays an essential role by recruiting host-cell budding factors to sites of HIV assembly. HIV also expresses a second Gag protein, p160 Gag-Pol, which lacks p6 and fails to bud from cells, consistent with the prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding. However, we show here that the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is not caused by the absence of p6, but rather, by the presence of Pol. Specifically, we show that (i the budding defect of Gag-Pol is unaffected by loss of HIV protease activity and is therefore an intrinsic property of the Gag-Pol polyprotein, (ii the N-terminal 433 amino acids of Gag and Gag-Pol are sufficient to drive virus budding even though they lack p6, (iii the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is caused by a dominant, cis-acting inhibitor of budding in the HIV Pol domain, and (iv Gag-Pol inhibits Gag and virus budding in trans, even at normal levels of Gag and Gag-Pol expression. These and other data support an alternative hypothesis of HIV budding as a process that is mediated by the normal, non-viral pathway of exosome/microvesicle biogenesis.

  14. Ultrasensitive HIV-1 p24 Assay Detects Single Infected Cells and Differences in Reservoir Induction by Latency Reversal Agents.

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    Passaes, Caroline Pereira Bittencourt; Bruel, Timothée; Decalf, Jérémie; David, Annie; Angin, Mathieu; Monceaux, Valerie; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Noel, Nicolas; Bourdic, Katia; Lambotte, Olivier; Albert, Matthew L; Duffy, Darragh; Schwartz, Olivier; Sáez-Cirión, Asier

    2017-03-15

    The existence of HIV reservoirs in infected individuals under combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) represents a major obstacle toward cure. Viral reservoirs are assessed by quantification of HIV nucleic acids, a method which does not discriminate between infectious and defective viruses, or by viral outgrowth assays, which require large numbers of cells and long-term cultures. Here, we used an ultrasensitive p24 digital assay, which we report to be 1,000-fold more sensitive than classical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in the quantification of HIV-1 Gag p24 production in samples from HIV-infected individuals. Results from ultrasensitive p24 assays were compared to those from conventional viral RNA reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR)-based assays and from outgrowth assay readout by flow cytometry. Using serial dilutions and flow-based single-cell sorting, we show that viral proteins produced by a single infected cell can be detected by the ultrasensitive p24 assay. This unique sensitivity allowed the early (as soon as day 1 in 43% of cases) and more efficient detection and quantification of p24 in phytohemagglutinin-L (PHA)-stimulated CD4(+) T cells from individuals under effective cART. When seven different classes of latency reversal agents (LRA) in resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-infected individuals were tested, the ultrasensitive p24 assay revealed differences in the extent of HIV reactivation. Of note, HIV RNA production was infrequently accompanied by p24 protein production (19%). Among the drugs tested, prostratin showed a superior capacity in inducing viral protein production. In summary, the ultrasensitive p24 assay allows the detection and quantification of p24 produced by single infected CD4(+) T cells and provides a unique tool to assess early reactivation of infectious virus from reservoirs in HIV-infected individuals.IMPORTANCE The persistence of HIV reservoirs in infected individuals under effective antiretroviral

  15. Production and purification of immunologically active core protein p24 from HIV-1 fused to ricin toxin B subunit in E. coli

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    Gómez-Lim Miguel A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gag protein from HIV-1 is a polyprotein of 55 kDa, which, during viral maturation, is cleaved to release matrix p17, core p24 and nucleocapsid proteins. The p24 antigen contains epitopes that prime helper CD4 T-cells, which have been demonstrated to be protective and it can elicit lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, p24 is likely to be an integral part of any multicomponent HIV vaccine. The availability of an optimal adjuvant and carrier to enhance antiviral responses may accelerate the development of a vaccine candidate against HIV. The aim of this study was to investigate the adjuvant-carrier properties of the B ricin subunit (RTB when fused to p24. Results A fusion between ricin toxin B subunit and p24 HIV (RTB/p24 was expressed in E. coli. Affinity chromatography was used for purification of p24 alone and RTB/p24 from cytosolic fractions. Biological activity of RTB/p24 was determined by ELISA and affinity chromatography using the artificial receptor glycoprotein asialofetuin. Both assays have demonstrated that RTB/p24 is able to interact with complex sugars, suggesting that the chimeric protein retains lectin activity. Also, RTB/p24 was demonstrated to be immunologically active in mice. Two weeks after intraperitoneal inoculation with RTB/p24 without an adjuvant, a strong anti-p24 immune response was detected. The levels of the antibodies were comparable to those found in mice immunized with p24 alone in the presence of Freund adjuvant. RTB/p24 inoculated intranasally in mice, also elicited significant immune responses to p24, although the response was not as strong as that obtained in mice immunized with p24 in the presence of the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin. Conclusion In this work, we report the expression in E. coli of HIV-1 p24 fused to the subunit B of ricin toxin. The high levels of antibodies obtained after intranasal and intraperitoneal immunization of mice demonstrate the adjuvant-carrier properties of RTB when

  16. T-cell epitopes identified by BALB/c mice immunized with vaccinia expressing HIV-1 gag lie within immunodominant regions recognized by HIV-infected Indian patients

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    Ashwini V Shete

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV antigens from transmitted strains of HIV would prove crucial in vaccine designing for prevention of HIV infection. Immune response generated by Vaccinia construct expressing the HIV-1 gag gene from transmitted Indian HIV-1 subtype C strain (Vgag in BALB/c mice is reported in the present study along with the identification of epitopes responsible for induction of the immune response. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine immune response generated by the constructs in a mouse model and to understand the epitope specificities of the response. Settings and Design: This was an observational study carried out in BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods: The immunogenecity of Vgag construct was evaluated in BALB/c mice after multiple immunizations. T-cell response was monitored by the interferon-γ ELISPOT assay using HIV-1 C Gag overlapping peptides and anti-P24 antibodies were estimated by ELISA. Statistical Analysis Used: Graphpad prism software was used for statistical analysis and for plotting graphs. Results: IFN-γ-secreting T cells and antibodies were detected against HIV Gag in mice after immunization. Although after repeated immunizations, antibody-mediated immune response increased or remained sustained, the magnitude of IFN-γ-secreting T cell was found to be decreased over time. The Gag peptides recognized by mice were mainly confined to the P24 region and had a considerable overlap with earlier reported immunodominant regions recognized by HIV-infected Indian patients. Conclusion: Vaccinia construct with a gag gene from transmitted HIV-1 virus was found to be immunogenic. The Gag regions identified by mice could have important implications in terms of future HIV vaccine designing.

  17. p24 as a predictor of mortality in a cohort of HIV-1-infected adults in rural Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, C.; Kallestrup, P.; Zinyama-Gutsire, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implementation of antiretroviral treatment in sub-Saharan Africa requires efficient tools to monitor HIV patients. p24 measurements have been proposed as an alternative to HIV-RNA because of the low cost of reagents and equipment needed. Here, we evaluate p24 as a prognostic marker...... and Prevention classification) were assessed. RESULTS: p24 correlated with HIV-RNA (Plogistic...... regression. p24 predicted mortality in univariate Cox analysis (Panalysis, but it was inferior to HIV-RNA and CD4 count. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to evaluate the prognostic strength of p24 in an area with a predominance of HIV subtype C infections. p24 correlated...

  18. Dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein vaccine provides help to a recombinant Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccine including mobilization of protective CD8+T cells.

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    Ngu, Loveline N; Nji, Nadesh N; Ambada, Georgia; Ngoh, Apeh A; Njambe Priso, Ghislain D; Tchadji, Jules C; Lissom, Abel; Magagoum, Suzanne H; Sake, Carol N; Tchouangueu, Thibau F; Chukwuma, George O; Okoli, Arinze S; Sagnia, Bertrand; Chukwuanukwu, Rebecca; Tebit, Denis M; Esimone, Charles O; Waffo, Alain B; Park, Chae G; Überla, Klaus; Nchinda, Godwin W

    2018-03-01

    Recombinant Newcastle Disease virus (rNDV) vectored vaccines are safe mucosal applicable vaccines with intrinsic immune-modulatory properties for the induction of efficient immunity. Like all viral vectored vaccines repeated inoculation via mucosal routes invariably results to immunity against viral vaccine vectors. To obviate immunity against viral vaccine vectors and improve the ability of rNDV vectored vaccines in inducing T cell immunity in murine air way we have directed dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein (DEC-Gag) vaccine; for the induction of helper CD4 + T cells to a Recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing codon optimized HIV-1 Gag P55 (rNDV-L-Gag) vaccine. We do so through successive administration of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein plus polyICLC (DEC-Gag) vaccine and rNDV-L-Gag. First strong gag specific helper CD4 + T cells are induced in mice by selected targeting of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein vaccine to dendritic cells (DC) in situ together with polyICLC as adjuvant. This targeting helped T cell immunity develop to a subsequent rNDV-L-Gag vaccine and improved both systemic and mucosal gag specific immunity. This sequential DEC-Gag vaccine prime followed by an rNDV-L-gag boost results to improved viral vectored immunization in murine airway, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site. Thus, complementary prime boost vaccination, in which prime and boost favor distinct types of T cell immunity, improves viral vectored immunization, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site such as the murine airway. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and DiseasePublished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Conserved epitopes on HIV-1, FIV and SIV p24 proteins are recognized by HIV-1 infected subjects.

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    Roff, Shannon R; Sanou, Missa P; Rathore, Mobeen H; Levy, Jay A; Yamamoto, Janet K

    2015-01-01

    Cross-reactive peptides on HIV-1 and FIV p24 protein sequences were studied using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from untreated HIV-1-infected long-term survivors (LTS; >10 y of infection without antiretroviral therapy, ART), short-term HIV-1 infected subjects not on ART, and ART-treated HIV-1 infected subjects. IFNγ-ELISpot and CFSE-proliferation analyses were performed with PBMC using overlapping HIV-1 and FIV p24 peptides. Over half of the HIV-1 infected subjects tested (22/31 or 71%) responded to one or more FIV p24 peptide pools by either IFNγ or T-cell proliferation analysis. PBMC and T cells from infected subjects in all 3 HIV(+) groups predominantly recognized one FIV p24 peptide pool (Fp14) by IFNγ production and one additional FIV p24 peptide pool (Fp9) by T-cell proliferation analysis. Furthermore, evaluation of overlapping SIV p24 peptide sequences identified conserved epitope(s) on the Fp14/Hp15-counterpart of SIV, Sp14, but none on Fp9-counterpart of SIV, Sp9. The responses to these FIV peptide pools were highly reproducible and persisted throughout 2-4 y of monitoring. Intracellular staining analysis for cytotoxins and phenotyping for CD107a determined that peptide epitopes from Fp9 and Fp14 pools induced cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated molecules including perforin, granzyme B, granzyme A, and/or expression of CD107a. Selected FIV and corresponding SIV epitopes recognized by HIV-1 infected patients indicate that these protein sequences are evolutionarily conserved on both SIV and HIV-1 (e.g., Hp15:Fp14:Sp14). These studies demonstrate that comparative immunogenicity analysis of HIV-1, FIV, and SIV can identify evolutionarily-conserved T cell-associated lentiviral epitopes, which could be used as a vaccine for prophylaxis or immunotherapy.

  20. Beta 2-microglobulin, HIV-1 p24 antibody and acid-dissociated HIV-1 p24 antigen levels: predictive markers for vertical transmission of HIV-1 in pregnant Ugandan women.

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    Jackson, J B; Kataaha, P; Hom, D L; Mmiro, F; Guay, L; Ndugwa, C; Marum, L; Piwowar, E; Brewer, K; Toedter, G

    1993-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical utility of plasma beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) levels, acid-dissociated HIV-1 p24 antigen, and HIV-1 p24-antibody titers in predicting HIV-1 vertical transmission in 227 HIV-1-infected Ugandan pregnant women. Plasma beta 2M levels, acid-dissociated HIV-1 p24-antigen positivity, and HIV-1 p24-antibody titers were determined using commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIA) in a Ugandan cohort of 52 HIV-1-seropositive transmitting mothers, 175 HIV-1-seropositive non-transmitting mothers, and 52 seronegative mothers within 6 weeks prior to delivery. Transmitter mothers had significantly higher plasma concentrations of beta 2M (1.80 +/- 1.13 mg/l) than non-transmitter seropositive mothers (1.32 +/- 0.81 mg/l; P = 0.0013). Similarly, a significantly higher proportion of transmitter mothers had detectable p24 antigen than non-transmitter mothers [six out of 51 (11.8%) versus six out of 173 (3.5%); P = 0.03]. Compared with the vertical transmission rate of 23% in the seropositive group, the positive predictive values of a beta 2M level > 1.5 mg/l or detectable HIV-1 p24 antigen for vertical transmission were 34 and 50%, respectively. Five of six (83.3%) seropositive mothers with both a beta 2M level > 1.5 mg/l and detectable p24 antigenemia transmitted HIV-1 infection to their infants compared with 25 of 124 (20.2%) seropositive mothers with values below the cut-off values for both tests (P = 0.00249). However, beta 2M was not found to be a significant independent predictor of vertical transmission when analyzed in a multivariate model with p24 antigenemia. There was no significant difference in HIV-1 p24-antibody titers in transmitter mothers versus non-transmitter mothers (P = 0.299). beta 2M levels and acid-dissociated HIV-1 p24-antigen assays may be used to predict which HIV-1-infected pregnant women are at greatest risk for vertical transmission. However, only the p24-antigen test was independently predictive of vertical transmission and its

  1. p24 as a predictor of mortality in a cohort of HIV-1-infected adults in rural Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, Christian; Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo B L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implementation of antiretroviral treatment in sub-Saharan Africa requires efficient tools to monitor HIV patients. p24 measurements have been proposed as an alternative to HIV-RNA because of the low cost of reagents and equipment needed. Here, we evaluate p24 as a prognostic marker...... in a cohort of HIV-1-infected individuals in Zimbabwe. METHODS: Treatment-naive HIV-1-infected individuals (n=198) from the Mupfure Schistosomiasis and HIV Cohort were followed until death or censoring (3-4.3 years). At baseline, p24, HIV-RNA, CD4 cell counts, and clinical staging (Centers for Disease Control...... and Prevention classification) were assessed. RESULTS: p24 correlated with HIV-RNA (PHIV-RNA measurements was undetectable. p24 predicted Centers for Disease Control and Prevention category (P

  2. Endosomal Trafficking of HIV-1 Gag and Genomic RNAs Regulates Viral Egress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molle, Dorothée; Segura-Morales, Carollna; Camus, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag can assemble and generate virions at the plasma membrane, but it is also present in endosomes where its role remains incompletely characterized. Here, we show that HIV-1 RNAs and Gag are transported on endosomal vesicles positive for TiVamp, a v-SNARE involved in fusion events with the ...

  3. Two ribosome recruitment sites direct multiple translation events within HIV1 Gag open reading frame

    OpenAIRE

    Deforges, Jules; De Breyne, Sylvain; Ameur, Melissa; Ulryck, Nathalie; Chamond, Nathalie; Saaidi, Afaf; Ponty, Yann; Ohlmann, Théophile; Sargueil, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In the late phase of the HIV virus cycle, the full length unspliced genomic RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and serves as mRNA to translate the Gag and Gag-pol polyproteins. Three different translation initiation mechanisms responsible for Gag production have been described. However a rationale for the involvement of as many translation pathways in gRNA translation is yet to be defined. The Gag-IRES has the singularity to be located within the Gag open reading frame a...

  4. Impact of tuberculosis treatment on CD4 cell count, HIV RNA, and p24 antigen in patients with HIV and tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejse, Christian; Furtado, A.; Camara, C.

    2013-01-01

    To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment.......To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment....

  5. Interactions Between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle...... production when Gag is expressed at levels similar to those in cells containing one provirus. However, such enhancement is diminished when Gag is overexpressed, suggesting that the effects of viral RNA can be replaced by increased Gag concentration in cells. We also showed that the specific interactions...... between Gag and viral RNA are required for the enhancement of particle production. Taken together, these studies are consistent with our previous hypothesis that specific dimeric viral RNA:Gag interactions are the nucleation event of infectious virion assembly, ensuring that one RNA dimer is packaged...

  6. HIV-associated benign lymphoepithelial cysts of the parotid glands confirmed by HIV-1 p24 antigen immunostaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekikawa, Yoshiyuki; Hongo, Igen

    2017-09-28

    Approximately 1%-10% of patients with HIV infection have been reported to have salivary gland enlargement. Parotid swelling in patients with HIV is often associated with salivary gland disease, including benign lymphoepithelial cysts (BLECs). The presence of BLEC can serve as an indicator of HIV infection, and the diagnosis of HIV-associated BLEC is usually based on clinical course, HIV confirmatory blood testing, such as western blot or viral detection, and imaging studies, but not on biopsies or immunostaining. To exclude other diseases such as tuberculosis and malignant lymphoma and to further improve the diagnostic accuracy of BLEC, the detection of the HIV-1 p24 antigen by immunohistochemistry is a useful diagnostic method. We report a case of a 65-year-old Japanese man with swelling of the parotid glands and HIV-associated BLEC confirmed via HIV-1 p24 immunohistochemical staining. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. [Investigation of a new HIV-1 p24 antigen detection kit based on the enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T; Saito, T; Kondo, M; Watanabe, S; Imai, M

    2000-09-01

    We investigated the performance of the new p24 antigen detection kit (VIDAS HIV p24) with the conventional antigen kit (HIV-1 Ag monoclonal; Abbott). The new kit is an enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay (ELFA) and all of the assay steps are performed automatically by the VIDAS instrument within 100 minutes. With the seven HIV-1 seroconversion panels, three seroconversions were detected on an average of 6.8 days earlier with ELFA than the conventional EIA kit. ELFA showed negative results for all of the 11 false positive samples by the combined (p24, anti-HIV) detection kit (VIDAS HIV DUO). The results obtained suggest that ELFA are very useful for an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection and re-test for false positive samples by other HIV diagnosis kits.

  8. High level production of the recombinant gag24 protein from HIV-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gag24 gene of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) was expressed under the control of the tryptophan promoter in Escherichia coli. The effect of several parameters on the production of gag24 was studied. The expression level achieved (25%) depended on the host strain and the induction conditions.

  9. Identifying HIV infection in diagnostic histopathology tissue samples--the role of HIV-1 p24 immunohistochemistry in identifying clinically unsuspected HIV infection: a 3-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonim, Mufaddal T; Alarcon, Lida; Freeman, Janet; Mahadeva, Ula; van der Walt, Jon D; Lucas, Sebastian B

    2010-03-01

    Because of the clinical difficulty in identifying the early stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the histopathologist often has to consider the diagnosis of HIV in tissue samples from patients with no previous suspicion of HIV infection. The aim was to investigate the practicality and utility of routine HIV-1 p24 immunohistochemistry on tissue samples received at a London histopathology laboratory. Over a 3-year period, HIV-1 p24 was evaluated immunohistochemically on 123 cases. Of these, 37 (30%) showed positive expression of p24 in lesional follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Of these 37 cases, 11 were not clinically suspected to be HIV+ and had no prior serological evidence of HIV infection. These cases represented lymph node biopsies, tonsillar and nasopharyngeal biopsies and a parotid excision. In addition to expression on FDCs, in 22 cases (60%), p24 also highlighted mononuclear cells and macrophages. p24 was also useful in confirming the presence of HIV in lymphoid tissue in non-lymphoid organs such as the lung, anus, salivary gland and brain. Immunonegativity occurred in occasional known HIV+ cases, probably related to treatment or tissue processing. This study confirms the usefulness of this technique in detecting unsuspected HIV infection in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs on histopathological material and should be part of routine evaluation of lymph nodes and lymphoid tissue in other organs if morphological or clinical features suggest HIV infection.

  10. Differential control of CXCR4 and CD4 downregulation by HIV-1 Gag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiathan Rajeshwari R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport machinery functions to sort cellular receptors into the lumen of the multivesicular body (MVB prior to lysosomal degradation. ESCRT components can also be recruited by enveloped viruses to sites of viral assembly where they have been proposed to mediate viral egress. For example, HIV-1 budding is dependent on Gag-mediated recruitment of the cellular ESCRTs-I, -III, AIP1/Alix and Vps4 proteins. Viral recruitment of ESCRT proteins could therefore impact on host cell processes such as receptor downregulation. Results Here we show that downregulation of the HIV-1 co-receptor, CXCR4, by its ligand SDF-1, is ESCRT-I dependent. Expression of HIV-1 Gag attenuated downregulation of CXCR4, resulting in accumulation of undegraded receptors within intracellular compartments. The effect of Gag was dependent on an ESCRT-I interacting motif within the C-terminal p6 region of Gag. In contrast, PMA-induced downregulation of the HIV-1 receptor CD4 was independent of ESCRT-I and Vps4; HIV-1 Gag had no effect on this process. Conclusion These results establish that the HIV-1 receptor, CD4, and co-receptor, CXCR4 are differentially regulated by ESCRT proteins. HIV-1 Gag selectively modulates protein sorting at the MVB, interfering with ESCRT-I dependent but not ESCRT-I independent processes.

  11. Inhibition of HIV-1 Gag-membrane interactions by specific RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Gabrielle C; Duchon, Alice; Inlora, Jingga; Olson, Erik D; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Ono, Akira

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 particle assembly, which occurs at the plasma membrane (PM) of cells, is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Gag recognizes phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2], a PM-specific phospholipid, via the highly basic region (HBR) in its N-terminal matrix (MA) domain. The HBR is also known to bind to RNA. We have previously shown, using an in vitro liposome binding assay, that RNA inhibits Gag binding to membranes that lack PI(4,5)P2 If this RNA block is removed by RNase treatment, Gag can bind nonspecifically to other negatively charged membranes. In an effort to identify the RNA species that confer this inhibition of Gag membrane binding, we have tested the impact of purified RNAs on Gag interactions with negatively charged liposomes lacking PI(4,5)P2 We found that some tRNA species and RNAs containing stem-loop 1 of the psi region in the 5' untranslated region of the HIV-1 genome impose inhibition of Gag binding to membranes lacking PI(4,5)P2 In contrast, a specific subset of tRNAs, as well as an RNA sequence previously selected in vitro for MA binding, failed to suppress Gag-membrane interactions. Furthermore, switching the identity of charged residues in the HBR did not diminish the susceptibility of Gag-liposome binding for each of the RNAs tested, while deletion of most of the NC domain abrogates the inhibition of membrane binding mediated by the RNAs that are inhibitory to WT Gag-liposome binding. These results support a model in which NC facilitates binding of RNA to MA and thereby promotes RNA-based inhibition of Gag-membrane binding. © 2017 Todd et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihu Fan

    Full Text Available The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA. Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL. The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens.

  13. Two types of nanoparticle-based bio-barcode amplification assays to detect HIV-1 p24 antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Huahuang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 p24 antigen is a major viral component of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 which can be used to identify persons in the early stage of infection and transmission of HIV-1 from infected mothers to infants. The detection of p24 is usually accomplished by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA with low detection sensitivity. Here we report the use of two bio-barcode amplification (BCA assays combined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gel electrophoresis to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. Method A pair of anti-p24 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were used in BCA assays to capture HIV-1 p24 antigen in a sandwich format and allowed for the quantitative measurement of captured p24 using PCR and gel electrophoresis. The first 1 G12 mAb was coated on microplate wells or magnetic microparticles (MMPs to capture free p24 antigens. Captured p24 in turn captured 1D4 mAb coated gold nanoparticle probes (GNPs containing double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. One strand of the oligonucleotides was covalently immobilized whereas the unbound complimentary bio-barcode DNA strand could be released upon heating. The released bio-barcode DNA was amplified by PCR, electrophoresed in agarose gel and quantified. Results The in-house ELISA assay was found to quantify p24 antigen with a limit of detection (LOD of 1,000 pg/ml and a linear range between 3,000 and 100,000 pg/ml. In contrast, the BCA-based microplate method yielded an LOD of 1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 1 to 10,000 pg/ml. The BCA-based MMP method yielded an LOD of 0.1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 0.1 to 1,000 pg/ml. Conclusions When combined with PCR and simple gel electrophoresis, BCA-based microplate and MMPs assays can be used to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. These methods are 3–4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than our in-house ELISA-based assay and may provide a useful approach to detect p24 in patients newly infected

  14. Subcellular Localization of HIV-1 gag-pol mRNAs Regulates Sites of Virion Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jordan T; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-03-15

    Full-length unspliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNAs serve dual roles in the cytoplasm as mRNAs encoding the Gag and Gag-Pol capsid proteins as well as genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged by Gag into virions undergoing assembly at the plasma membrane (PM). Because Gag is sufficient to drive the assembly of virus-like particles even in the absence of gRNA binding, whether viral RNA trafficking plays an active role in the native assembly pathway is unknown. In this study, we tested the effects of modulating the cytoplasmic abundance or distribution of full-length viral RNAs on Gag trafficking and assembly in the context of single cells. Increasing full-length viral RNA abundance or distribution had little-to-no net effect on Gag assembly competency when provided in trans In contrast, artificially tethering full-length viral RNAs or surrogate gag-pol mRNAs competent for Gag synthesis to non-PM membranes or the actin cytoskeleton severely reduced net virus particle production. These effects were explained, in large part, by RNA-directed changes to Gag's distribution in the cytoplasm, yielding aberrant subcellular sites of virion assembly. Interestingly, RNA-dependent disruption of Gag trafficking required either of two cis-acting RNA regulatory elements: the 5' packaging signal (Psi) bound by Gag during genome encapsidation or, unexpectedly, the Rev response element (RRE), which regulates the nuclear export of gRNAs and other intron-retaining viral RNAs. Taken together, these data support a model for native infection wherein structural features of the gag-pol mRNA actively compartmentalize Gag to preferred sites within the cytoplasm and/or PM.IMPORTANCE The spatial distribution of viral mRNAs within the cytoplasm can be a crucial determinant of efficient translation and successful virion production. Here we provide direct evidence that mRNA subcellular trafficking plays an important role in regulating the assembly of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV

  15. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, A.O.; DeMaster, L.K.; Kootstra, N.A.; Reiss, P.; O'Doherty, U.; Berkhout, B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent

  16. Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium as a Vaccine Vector for HIV-1 Gag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyasha Chin'ombe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains a global health problem, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. An effective HIV-1 vaccine is therefore badly required to mitigate this ever-expanding problem. Since HIV-1 infects its host through the mucosal surface, a vaccine for the virus needs to trigger mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. Oral, attenuated recombinant Salmonella vaccines offer this potential of delivering HIV-1 antigens to both the mucosal and systemic compartments of the immune system. So far, a number of pre-clinical studies have been performed, in which HIV-1 Gag, a highly conserved viral antigen possessing both T- and B-cell epitopes, was successfully delivered by recombinant Salmonella vaccines and, in most cases, induced HIV-specific immune responses. In this review, the potential use of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a live vaccine vector for HIV-1 Gag is explored.

  17. Cytoplasmic HIV-1 RNA is mainly transported by diffusion in the presence or absence of Gag protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jianbo; Grunwald, David; Sardo, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Full-length HIV-1 RNA plays a central role in viral replication by serving as the mRNA for essential viral proteins and as the genome packaged into infectious virions. Proper RNA trafficking is required for the functions of RNA and its encoded proteins; however, the mechanism by which HIV-1 RNA...... is transported within the cytoplasm remains undefined. Full-length HIV-1 RNA transport is further complicated when group-specific antigen (Gag) protein is expressed, because a significant portion of HIV-1 RNA may be transported as Gag-RNA complexes, whose properties could differ greatly from Gag-free RNA...... protein on HIV-1 RNA transport, we analyzed the cytoplasmic HIV-1 RNA movement in the presence of sufficient Gag for virion assembly and found that HIV-1 RNA is still transported by diffusion with mobility similar to the mobility of RNAs unable to express functional Gag. These studies define a major...

  18. A novel minimal in vitro system for analyzing HIV-1 Gag mediated budding

    CERN Document Server

    Gui, Dong; Xu, Jun; Zandi, Roya; Gill, Sarjeet; Huang, I-Chueh; Rao, A L N; Mohideen, Umar

    2013-01-01

    A biomimetic minimalist model membrane is used to study the mechanism and kinetics of the in vitro HIV-1 Gag budding from a giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV). The real time interaction of the Gag, RNA and lipid leading to the formation of minivesicles is measured in real time using confocal microscopy. The Gag is found to lead to resolution limited punctae on the lipid membranes of the GUV. The introduction of the Gag to a GUV solution containing RNA led to the budding of minivesicles on the inside surface of the GUV. The diameter of the GUV decreased due to the bud formation. The corresponding rate of decrease of the GUV diameter was found to be linear in time. The bud formation and the decrease in GUV size were found to be proportional to the Gag concentration. The method is promising and will allow the systematic study of the dynamics of assembly of immature HIV and help classify the hierarchy of factors that impact the Gag protein initiated assembly of retroviruses such as HIV. The GUV system might also be ...

  19. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Claudia S; Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel; Kozak, Susan L; Kabat, David; Barklis, Eric

    2014-08-01

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Valutazione di un test per la determinazione simultanea degli anticorpi e antigene p24 dell’HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Zanchetta

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A fourth generation immunoassay for the detection of antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2 and of HIV antigen p24 (Abbott Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo has been evaluated in comparison with two Ab-only third generation assays on 894 routine specimens and on preselected repository specimens.The Combo assay showed a better specificity (99.88% vs. 99.43-99.83% and an analytical sensitivity for p24 of 22 pg/mL on a BBI commercial panel. The Architect assays gave a negative result on 22/24 repository false positive specimens from 18 subjects and, conversely, was positive on all the 39 repository specimens from 24 HIV-positive patients. On six patients with acute HIV infection the Architect assay gave an earlier positivity than the antibody-only assays (EIA and WB on three cases, all viremic and positive for HIV p24.The performance characteristics of the new HIV Combo assay guarantee an advanced clinical sensitivity and a high specificity.

  1. Human HERC5 restricts an early stage of HIV-1 assembly by a mechanism correlating with the ISGylation of Gag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Matthew W

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and characterization of several interferon (IFN-induced cellular HIV-1 restriction factors, defined as host cellular proteins or factors that restrict or inhibit the HIV-1 life cycle, have provided insight into the IFN response towards HIV-1 infection and identified new therapeutic targets for HIV-1 infection. To further characterize the mechanism underlying restriction of the late stages of HIV-1 replication, we assessed the ability of IFNbeta-induced genes to restrict HIV-1 Gag particle production and have identified a potentially novel host factor called HECT domain and RCC1-like domain-containing protein 5 (HERC5 that blocks a unique late stage of the HIV-1 life cycle. Results HERC5 inhibited the replication of HIV-1 over multiple rounds of infection and was found to target a late stage of HIV-1 particle production. The E3 ligase activity of HERC5 was required for blocking HIV-1 Gag particle production and correlated with the post-translational modification of Gag with ISG15. HERC5 interacted with HIV-1 Gag and did not alter trafficking of HIV-1 Gag to the plasma membrane. Electron microscopy revealed that the assembly of HIV-1 Gag particles was arrested at the plasma membrane, at an early stage of assembly. The mechanism of HERC5-induced restriction of HIV-1 particle production is distinct from the mechanism underlying HIV-1 restriction by the expression of ISG15 alone, which acts at a later step in particle release. Moreover, HERC5 restricted murine leukemia virus (MLV Gag particle production, showing that HERC5 is effective in restricting Gag particle production of an evolutionarily divergent retrovirus. Conclusions HERC5 represents a potential new host factor that blocks an early stage of retroviral Gag particle assembly. With no apparent HIV-1 protein that directly counteracts it, HERC5 may represent a new candidate for HIV/AIDS therapy.

  2. Ubiquitin conjugation to Gag is essential for ESCRT-mediated HIV-1 budding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 relies on the host ESCRTs for release from cells. HIV-1 Gag engages ESCRTs by directly binding TSG101 or Alix. ESCRTs also sort ubiquitinated membrane proteins through endosomes to facilitate their lysosomal degradation. The ability of ESCRTs to recognize and process ubiquitinated proteins suggests that ESCRT-dependent viral release may also be controlled by ubiquitination. Although both Gag and ESCRTs undergo some level of ubiquitination, definitive demonstration that ubiquitin is required for viral release is lacking. Here we suppress ubiquitination at viral budding sites by fusing the catalytic domain of the Herpes Simplex UL36 deubiquitinating enzyme (DUb) onto TSG101, Alix, or Gag. Results Expressing DUb-TSG101 suppressed Alix-independent HIV-1 release and viral particles remained tethered to the cell surface. DUb-TSG101 had no effect on budding of MoMLV or EIAV, two retroviruses that rely on the ESCRT machinery for exit. Alix-dependent virus release such as EIAV’s, and HIV-1 lacking access to TSG101, was instead dramatically blocked by co-expressing DUb-Alix. Finally, Gag-DUb was unable to support virus release and dominantly interfered with release of wild type HIV-1. Fusion of UL36 did not effect interactions with Alix, TSG101, or Gag and all of the inhibitory effects of UL36 fusion were abolished when its catalytic activity was ablated. Accordingly, Alix, TSG101 and Gag fused to inactive UL36 functionally replaced their unfused counterparts. Interestingly, coexpression of the Nedd4-2s ubiquitin ligase suppressed the ability of DUb-TSG101 to inhibit HIV-1 release while also restoring detectable Gag ubiquitination at the membrane. Similarly, incorporation of Gag-Ub fusion proteins into virions lifted DUb-ESCRT inhibitory effect. In contrast, Nedd4-2s did not suppress the inhibition mediated by Gag-DUb despite restoring robust ubiquitination of TSG101/ESCRT-I at virus budding sites. Conclusions These studies demonstrate a necessary and

  3. Mathematical modeling and quantitative analysis of HIV-1 Gag trafficking and polymerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuewu Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gag, as the major structural protein of HIV-1, is necessary for the assembly of the HIV-1 sphere shell. An in-depth understanding of its trafficking and polymerization is important for gaining further insights into the mechanisms of HIV-1 replication and the design of antiviral drugs. We developed a mathematical model to simulate two biophysical processes, specifically Gag monomer and dimer transport in the cytoplasm and the polymerization of monomers to form a hexamer underneath the plasma membrane. Using experimental data, an optimization approach was utilized to identify the model parameters, and the identifiability and sensitivity of these parameters were then analyzed. Using our model, we analyzed the weight of the pathways involved in the polymerization reactions and concluded that the predominant pathways for the formation of a hexamer might be the polymerization of two monomers to form a dimer, the polymerization of a dimer and a monomer to form a trimer, and the polymerization of two trimers to form a hexamer. We then deduced that the dimer and trimer intermediates might be crucial in hexamer formation. We also explored four theoretical combined methods for Gag suppression, and hypothesized that the N-terminal glycine residue of the MA domain of Gag might be a promising drug target. This work serves as a guide for future theoretical and experimental efforts aiming to understand HIV-1 Gag trafficking and polymerization, and might help accelerate the efficiency of anti-AIDS drug design.

  4. Galectin-3 promotes HIV-1 budding via association with Alix and Gag p6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Tsao, Ching-Han; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Daniel K; Chiang, Meng-Lin; Lo, Chia-Hui; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chen, Peilin; Arthur Chen, Yi-Ming; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-3 has been reported to regulate the functions of a number of immune cell types. We previously reported that galectin-3 is translocated to immunological synapses in T cells upon T-cell receptor engagement, where it associates with ALG-2-interacting protein X (Alix). Alix is known to coordinate with the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) to promote human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 virion release. We hypothesized that galectin-3 plays a role in HIV-1 viral budding. Cotransfection of cells of the Jurkat T line with galectin-3 and HIV-1 plasmids resulted in increased HIV-1 budding, and suppression of galectin-3 expression by RNAi in Hut78 and primary CD4+ T cells led to reduced HIV-1 budding. We used immunofluorescence microscopy to observe the partial colocalization of galectin-3, Alix and Gag in HIV-1-infected cells. Results from co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that galectin-3 expression promotes Alix-Gag p6 association, whereas the results of Alix knockdown suggest that galectin-3 promotes HIV-1 budding through Alix. HIV-1 particles released from galectin-3-expressing cells acquire the galectin-3 protein in an Alix-dependent manner, with proteins primarily residing inside the virions. We also found that the galectin-3 N-terminal domain interacts with the proline-rich region of Alix. Collectively, these results suggest that endogenous galectin-3 facilitates HIV-1 budding by promoting the Alix-Gag p6 association. PMID:24996823

  5. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV-1 p24 Protein and Its Application in Colloidal Gold Immunochromatographic Assay for HIV-1 Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 p24 protein is the most abundant viral protein of HIV-1. This protein is secreted in blood serum at high levels during the early stages of HIV-1 infection, making it a biomarker for early diagnosis. In this study, a colloidal gold immunochromatographic assay (GICA was established for detecting p24 protein using mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. The HIV-1 p24 protein was expressed in E. coli strain BL21 and the purified protein was used to immunize mice. Stable hybridoma cell lines secreting anti-p24 monoclonal antibodies were obtained after ELISA screening and subcloning by limiting dilution. 34 different capture and labeling mAb pairs were selected by a novel antibody-capture indirect sandwich ELISA and then applied in GICA to detect p24 protein. The GICA method has a limit of detection (LOD of 25 pg/mL and could detect p24 protein in all 10 positive samples obtained from the National Reference of HIV-1 p24 antigen. Out of 153 negative samples tested, 3 false positives results were obtained. The overall specificity of this test was 98.03%. The good sensitivity and specificity of this method make it a suitable alternative to provide a more convenient and efficient tool for early diagnosis of HIV infection.

  6. ALIX is recruited temporarily into HIV-1 budding sites at the end of gag assembly.

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    Pei-I Ku

    Full Text Available Polymerization of Gag on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane drives the assembly of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1. Gag recruits components of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT to facilitate membrane fission and virion release. ESCRT assembly is initiated by recruitment of ALIX and TSG101/ESCRT-I, which bind directly to the viral Gag protein and then recruit the downstream ESCRT-III and VPS4 factors to complete the budding process. In contrast to previous models, we show that ALIX is recruited transiently at the end of Gag assembly, and that most ALIX molecules are recycled into the cytosol as the virus buds, although a subset remains within the virion. Our experiments imply that ALIX is recruited to the neck of the assembling virion and is mostly recycled after virion release.

  7. ALIX is recruited temporarily into HIV-1 budding sites at the end of gag assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Pei-I; Bendjennat, Mourad; Ballew, Jeff; Landesman, Michael B; Saffarian, Saveez

    2014-01-01

    Polymerization of Gag on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane drives the assembly of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1). Gag recruits components of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) to facilitate membrane fission and virion release. ESCRT assembly is initiated by recruitment of ALIX and TSG101/ESCRT-I, which bind directly to the viral Gag protein and then recruit the downstream ESCRT-III and VPS4 factors to complete the budding process. In contrast to previous models, we show that ALIX is recruited transiently at the end of Gag assembly, and that most ALIX molecules are recycled into the cytosol as the virus buds, although a subset remains within the virion. Our experiments imply that ALIX is recruited to the neck of the assembling virion and is mostly recycled after virion release.

  8. Fusion of ubiquitin to HIV gag impairs human monocyte-derived dendritic cell maturation and reduces ability to induce gag T cell responses.

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    Shanthi Herath

    Full Text Available The efficient induction of CD8 T cell immunity is dependent on the processing and presentation of antigen on MHC class I molecules by professional antigen presenting cells (APC. To develop an improved T cell vaccine for HIV we investigated whether fusing the ubiquitin gene to the N terminus of the HIV gag gene enhanced targeting to the proteasome resulting in better CD8 T cell responses. Human monocyte derived dendritic cells (moDC, transduced with adenovirus vectors carrying either ubiquitinated or non-ubiquitinated gag transgene constructs, were co-cultured with autologous naïve T cells and T cell responses were measured after several weekly cycles of stimulation. Despite targeting of the ubiquitin gag transgene protein to the proteasome, ubiquitination did not increase CD8 T cell immune responses and in some cases diminished responses to gag peptides. There were no marked differences in cytokines produced from ubiquitinated and non-ubiquitinated gag stimulated cultures or in the expression of inhibitory molecules on expanded T cells. However, the ability of moDC transduced with ubiquitinated gag gene to upregulate co-stimulatory molecules was reduced, whilst no difference in moDC maturation was observed with a control ubiquitinated and non-ubiquitinated MART gene. Furthermore moDC transduced with ubiquitinated gag produced more IL-10 than transduction with unmodified gag. Thus failure of gag ubiquitination to enhance CD8 responses may be caused by suppression of moDC maturation. These results indicate that when designing a successful vaccine strategy to target a particular cell population, attention must also be given to the effect of the vaccine on APCs.

  9. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-04-25

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (L-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane.

  10. Identification of new HIV-1 Gag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in BALB/c mice

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    Caputo Antonella

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As HIV-specific cytotoxic T cells play a key role during acute and chronic HIV-1 infection in humans, the ability of potential anti-HIV vaccines to elicit strong, broad T cell responses is likely to be crucial. The HIV-1 Gag antigen is widely considered a relevant antigen for the development of an anti-HIV vaccine since it is one of the most conserved viral proteins and is also known to induce T cell responses. In the majority of studies reporting Gag-specific cellular immune responses induced by Gag-based vaccines, only a small number of Gag T cell epitopes were tested in preclinical mouse models, thus giving an incomplete picture of the numerous possible cellular immune responses against this antigen. As is, this partial knowledge of epitope-specific T cell responses directed to Gag will unavoidably result in a limited preclinical evaluation of Gag-based vaccines. Results In this study we identified new Gag CD8+ T cell epitopes in BALB/c mice vaccinated with the HIV-1 Gag antigen alone or in combination with the HIV-1 Tat protein, which was recently shown to broaden T cell responses directed to Gag. Specifically, we found that CTL responses to Gag may be directed to nine different CTL epitopes, and four of these were mapped as minimal CTL epitopes. Conclusion These newly identified CTL epitopes should be considered in the preclinical evaluation of T cell responses induced by Gag-based vaccines in mice.

  11. Interactions between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea; Burdick, Ryan C; Levine, Louis; Li, Kelvin; Rein, Alan; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2017-08-15

    Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious viruslike particles, and the viral RNA is dispensable in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle production when Gag is expressed at levels similar to those in cells containing one provirus. However, such enhancement is diminished when Gag is overexpressed, suggesting that the effects of viral RNA can be replaced by increased Gag concentration in cells. We also showed that the specific interactions between Gag and viral RNA are required for the enhancement of particle production. Taken together, these studies are consistent with our previous hypothesis that specific dimeric viral RNA-Gag interactions are the nucleation event of infectious virion assembly, ensuring that one RNA dimer is packaged into each nascent virion. These studies shed light on the mechanism by which HIV-1 achieves efficient genome packaging during virus assembly.IMPORTANCE Retrovirus assembly is a well-choreographed event, during which many viral and cellular components come together to generate infectious virions. The viral RNA genome carries the genetic information to new host cells, providing instructions to generate new virions, and therefore is essential for virion infectivity. In this report, we show that the specific interaction of the viral RNA genome with the structural protein Gag facilitates virion assembly and particle production. These findings resolve the conundrum that HIV-1 RNA is selectively packaged into virions with high efficiency despite being dispensable for virion assembly

  12. Isotype Diversification of IgG Antibodies to HIV Gag Proteins as a Therapeutic Vaccination Strategy for HIV Infection

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    Sonia Fernandez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of vaccines to treat and prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection has been hampered by an incomplete understanding of “protective” immune responses against HIV. Natural control of HIV-1 infection is associated with T-cell responses against HIV-1 Gag proteins, particularly CD8+ T-cell responses restricted by “protective” HLA-B alleles, but other immune responses also contribute to immune control. These immune responses appear to include IgG antibodies to HIV-1 Gag proteins, interferon-a-dependant natural killer (NK cell responses and plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC responses. Here, it is proposed that isotype diversification of IgG antibodies against HIV-1 Gag proteins, to include IgG2, as well as IgG3 and IgG1 antibodies, will broaden the function of the antibody response and facilitate accessory cell responses against HIV-1 by NK cells and pDCs. We suggest that this should be investigated as a vaccination strategy for HIV-1 infection.

  13. HIV-1 and MLV Gag proteins are sufficient to recruit APOBEC3G into virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaisi, Marc; Dussart, Sylvie; Courcoul, Marianne; Bessou, Gilles; Vigne, Robert; Decroly, Etienne

    2004-08-27

    The cytidine deaminase hAPOBEC3G is an antiviral human factor that counteracts the replication of HIV-1 in absence of the Vif protein. hAPOBEC3G is packaged into virus particles and lethally hypermutates HIV-1. In this work, we examine the mechanisms governing hAPOBEC3G packaging. By GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we show that hAPOBEC3G binds to HIV-1 Pr55 Gag and its NC domain and to the RT and IN domains contained in Pr160 Gag-Pol. We demonstrate that the expression of HIV-1 Gag is sufficient to induce the packaging of hAPOBEC3G into Gag particles. Gag-Pol polypeptides containing RT and IN domains, as well as HIV-1 genomic RNA, seem not to be necessary for hAPOBEC3G packaging. Lastly, we show that hAPOBEC3G and its murine ortholog are packaged into HIV-1 and MLV Gag particles. We conclude that the Gag polypeptides from distant retroviruses have conserved domains allowing the packaging of the host antiviral factor APOBEC3G.

  14. Galectin-3 promotes HIV-1 budding via association with Alix and Gag p6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Tsao, Ching-Han; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Daniel K; Chiang, Meng-Lin; Lo, Chia-Hui; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chen, Peilin; Arthur Chen, Yi-Ming; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2014-11-01

    Galectin-3 has been reported to regulate the functions of a number of immune cell types. We previously reported that galectin-3 is translocated to immunological synapses in T cells upon T-cell receptor engagement, where it associates with ALG-2-interacting protein X (Alix). Alix is known to coordinate with the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) to promote human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 virion release. We hypothesized that galectin-3 plays a role in HIV-1 viral budding. Cotransfection of cells of the Jurkat T line with galectin-3 and HIV-1 plasmids resulted in increased HIV-1 budding, and suppression of galectin-3 expression by RNAi in Hut78 and primary CD4+ T cells led to reduced HIV-1 budding. We used immunofluorescence microscopy to observe the partial colocalization of galectin-3, Alix and Gag in HIV-1-infected cells. Results from co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that galectin-3 expression promotes Alix-Gag p6 association, whereas the results of Alix knockdown suggest that galectin-3 promotes HIV-1 budding through Alix. HIV-1 particles released from galectin-3-expressing cells acquire the galectin-3 protein in an Alix-dependent manner, with proteins primarily residing inside the virions. We also found that the galectin-3 N-terminal domain interacts with the proline-rich region of Alix. Collectively, these results suggest that endogenous galectin-3 facilitates HIV-1 budding by promoting the Alix-Gag p6 association. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. ESCRT-independent budding of HIV-1 gag virus-like particles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae spheroplasts.

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    Andrew P Norgan

    Full Text Available Heterologous expression of HIV-1 Gag in a variety of host cells results in its packaging into virus-like particles (VLPs that are subsequently released into the extracellular milieu. This phenomenon represents a useful tool for probing cellular factors required for viral budding and has contributed to the discovery of roles for ubiquitin ligases and the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs in viral budding. These factors are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and have been studied extensively in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryote previously utilized as a host for the production of VLPs. We used heterologous expression of HIV Gag in yeast spheroplasts to examine the role of ESCRTs and associated factors (Rsp5, a HECT ubiquitin ligase of the Nedd4 family; Bro1, a homolog of Alix; and Vps4, the AAA-ATPase required for ESCRT function in all contexts/organisms investigated in the generation of VLPs. Our data reveal: 1 characterized Gag-ESCRT interaction motifs (late domains are not required for VLP budding, 2 loss of function alleles of the essential HECT ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 do not display defects in VLP formation, and 3 ESCRT function is not required for VLP formation from spheroplasts. These results suggest that the egress of HIV Gag from yeast cells is distinct from the most commonly described mode of exit from mammalian cells, instead mimicking ESCRT-independent VLP formation observed in a subset of mammalian cells. As such, budding of Gag from yeast cells appears to represent ESCRT-independent budding relevant to viral replication in at least some situations. Thus the myriad of genetic and biochemical tools available in the yeast system may be of utility in the study of this aspect of viral budding.

  16. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic HIV-1 gag proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette T.; Perkins, Simon; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Fischer, William M.; Theiler, James; Letvin, Norman; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Yusim, Karina; Kuiken, Carla

    2016-11-15

    The disclosure generally relates to an immunogenic composition (e.g., a vaccine) and, in particular, to a polyvalent immunogenic composition, such as a polyvalent HIV vaccine, and to methods of using same.

  17. Specificity of two HIV screening tests detecting simultaneously HIV-1 p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 and -2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaich, Annette; Buser, Andreas; Stöckle, Marcel; Gehringer, Christian; Hirsch, Hans H; Battegay, Manuel; Klimkait, Thomas; Frei, Reno

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed at assessing the specificity of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT in comparison to the ARCHITECT® HIV Ag/Ab Combo. With both of these assays, 3997 unselected sera from patients of a tertiary health care centre in Basel, Switzerland, were screened for HIV. Reactive sera were reanalysed on the VIDAS® HIV Duo Ultra to identify false-reactive specimens prior to confirmation by quantitative PCR and line immunoassay. The Elecsys® compared to the ARCHITECT® shows a similar specificity (99.7% versus 99.8%) but a slightly lower positive predictive value (71.8% versus 80%). Samples tested with a cut-off index (COI) between 0.91 and 4.85 (cut-off false-reactive. There was no false-reactive result with the VIDAS®. Of the false-reactive samples, 66.7% could be related to patient-specific underlying conditions. The HIV two-tiered diagnostic algorithm proposed in this work improved the positive predictive values of the Elecsys® or ARCHITECT® to 100% when the results of the VIDAS® were included. Values just above the cut-off are highly suspicious to be false-reactive and high COI or S/CO ratios are associated with true positivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-immunogenicity of overlapping gag peptides pulsed on autologous cells after vaccination of HIV infected individuals.

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    Henrik N Kløverpris

    Full Text Available HIV Gag-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses are important for HIV immune control. Pulsing overlapping Gag peptides on autologous lymphocytes (OPAL has proven immunogenic and effective in reducing viral loads in multiple pigtail macaque studies, warranting clinical evaluation.We performed a phase I, single centre, placebo-controlled, double-blinded and dose-escalating study to evaluate the safety and preliminary immunogenicity of a novel therapeutic vaccine approach 'OPAL-HIV-Gag(c'. This vaccine is comprised of 120 15mer peptides, overlapping by 11 amino acids, spanning the HIV Gag C clade sequence proteome, pulsed on white blood cells enriched from whole blood using a closed system, followed by intravenous reinfusion. Patients with undetectable HIV viral loads (<50 copies/ml plasma on HAART received four administrations at week 0, 4, 8 and 12, and were followed up for 12 weeks post-treatment. Twenty-three people were enrolled in four groups: 12 mg (n = 6, 24 mg (n = 7, 48 mg (n = 2 or matching placebo (n = 8 with 18 immunologically evaluable. T-cell immunogenicity was assessed by IFNγ ELIspot and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS.The OPAL-HIV-Gag(c peptides were antigenic in vitro in 17/17 subjects. After vaccination with OPAL-HIV-Gag(c, 1/6 subjects at 12 mg and 1/6 subjects at 24 mg dose groups had a 2- and 3-fold increase in ELIspot magnitudes from baseline, respectively, of Gag-specific CD8+ T-cells at week 14, compared to 0/6 subjects in the placebo group. No Gag-specific CD4+ T-cell responses or overall change in Rev, Nef, Tat and CMV specific responses were detected. Marked, transient and self-limiting lymphopenia was observed immediately post-vaccination (4 hours in OPAL-HIV-Gag(c but not in placebo recipients, with median fall from 1.72 to 0.67 million lymphocytes/mL for active groups (P<0.001, compared to post-placebo from 1.70 to 1.56 lymphocytes/ml (P = 0.16.Despite strong immunogenicity observed in

  19. [Value of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of p24 antigen of human immunodeficiency virus in confirmation of HIV-infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzaeva, L A; Ol'khovskiĭ, I A; Neshumaev, D A; Shevchenko, N M; Vinogradova, M N

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate diagnostic value of p24 antigen detection for algorithm of confirmatory diagnostics of HIV-infection. Concurrently with Western blot assay (WB, "New Lav Blot1", Bio-Rad), tests for detection of p24 antigen of HIV (Genetic Systems HIV-1 Ag EIA", "VectoHIV-1 p24-antigen confirming test", and "DS-EIA-HIV-AG-SCREEN") were used for confirmation of first-positive result of immuno-enzyme assay. p24 HIV antigen was detected in serum samples in 8.4% of patients with equivocal result of WB and in 4.2% of patients with negative and positive results of WB. Presence of p24 was correlated with high viral load, and, in patients with confirmed diagnosis, with low CD4 cells count (testing. In groups of persons with negative and equivocal results of WB assay, detection of HIV p24 antigen points to the presence of infection and could be the reason for the final diagnosis. Detection of p24 in patients with positive result of WB assay allows to consider them as probable candidates for highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  20. Interactions Between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle......Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious virus-like particles and the viral RNA is dispensable...... into each nascent virion. These studies shed light on the mechanism by which HIV-1 achieves efficient genome packaging during virus assembly.IMPORTANCE Retrovirus assembly is a well-choreographed event, during which many viral and cellular components come together to generate infectious virions. The viral...

  1. Interactions Between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious virus-like particles and the viral RNA is dispensable...... in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle...... into each nascent virion. These studies shed light on the mechanism by which HIV-1 achieves efficient genome packaging during virus assembly.IMPORTANCE Retrovirus assembly is a well-choreographed event, during which many viral and cellular components come together to generate infectious virions. The viral...

  2. ARCHITECT® HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay: correlation of HIV-1 p24 antigen sensitivity and RNA viral load using genetically diverse virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Catherine A; Yamaguchi, Julie; Vallari, Ana; Swanson, Priscilla; Hackett, John R

    2013-06-01

    HIV antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combination assays represent a significant advancement in assays used for diagnosing HIV infection based on their ability to detect acute and chronic infections. During acute HIV infection (AHI), detection depends on assay sensitivity for p24 Ag. To directly compare the Ag sensitivity of the ARCHITECT(®) HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay to RNA viral load using cell culture supernatants of virus isolates. HIV-1 isolates allow correlation in the total absence of an antibody response to infection and across genetically diverse HIV-1 group M strains. Thirty-five HIV-1 isolates comprising subtypes A-D, F and G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, and unique recombinant forms were evaluated. Cell-free culture supernatant for each isolate was diluted to four levels and tested in the HIV Combo assay to determine a signal to cutoff ratio and the RealTime(®) HIV-1 assay to quantify RNA. The RNA copies/mL at the HIV Combo assay cutoff was determined. The median RNA copies/mL at the HIV Combo assay cutoff was 57,900 for individual virus isolates (range 26,440-102,400). A single plot of all the data gave a value of 58,500RNA copies/mL. An analysis of data published for acute HIV infection in human subjects gave a similar result; HIV Combo detected 97% of AHIs with RNA copies/mL > 30,700. Based on analysis of virus isolates, the ARCHITECT HIV Combo assay can detect p24 Ag when RNA is above approximately 58,000copies/mL. The correlation of viral load and Ag sensitivity was consistent across genetically diverse HIV-1 group M strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Higher-order oligomerization targets plasma membrane proteins and HIV gag to exosomes.

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    Yi Fang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are secreted organelles that have the same topology as the cell and bud outward (outward is defined as away from the cytoplasm from endosome membranes or endosome-like domains of plasma membrane. Here we describe an exosomal protein-sorting pathway in Jurkat T cells that selects cargo proteins on the basis of both higher-order oligomerization (the oligomerization of oligomers and plasma membrane association, acts on proteins seemingly without regard to their function, sequence, topology, or mechanism of membrane association, and appears to operate independently of class E vacuolar protein-sorting (VPS function. We also show that higher-order oligomerization is sufficient to target plasma membrane proteins to HIV virus-like particles, that diverse Gag proteins possess exosomal-sorting information, and that higher-order oligomerization is a primary determinant of HIV Gag budding/exosomal sorting. In addition, we provide evidence that both the HIV late domain and class E VPS function promote HIV budding by unexpectedly complex, seemingly indirect mechanisms. These results support the hypothesis that HIV and other retroviruses are generated by a normal, nonviral pathway of exosome biogenesis.

  4. Presence of p24-Antigen Associated to Erythrocyte in HIV-Positive Individuals Even in Patients with Undetectable Plasma Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Maria Noé; dos Ramos Farias, Maria Sol; Ávila, Maria Mercedes; Rabinovich, Roberto Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV adherence to erythrocytes has been demonstrated in vitro, and it has been suggested that erythrocytes may be carriers of the virus. However, the association between HIV particles or viral proteins and erythrocytes in HIV-infected individuals is still to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings HIV-positive participants (n = 112) were classified into two groups according to values of three plasma viral loads (pVL) determined during the 12-month period prior to the study. The first group included 71 individuals with detectable pVL, whereas the second group included 41 individuals with undetectable pVL. Plasma viral load, erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen and p24-antigen in plasma were determined at the moment of the study. A total of 51 out of the 71 patients with detectable pVL showed erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen whereas 13 showed p24-antigen in plasma. Twenty-two out of the 51 patients with erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen showed pVLerythrocyte-associated p24-antigen was not related to p24-antigen in plasma or pVL levels in this group. Among the 41 patients with prior undetectable pVL, eight presented detectable pVL and erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen at the moment of the study. The other 33 showed undetectable pVL and five of these presented erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen. A positive relationship was found between the presence of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen and the detectable pVL at the moment of the study (perythrocytes was determined and it was always accompanied by erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen detection. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the presence of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen in HIV-infected individuals. Since erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen is not always related to pVL or p24-antigen in plasma, erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen showed viral expression not represented in plasma. Therefore, the determination of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen may contribute to better

  5. Genetic Changes in HIV-1 Gag-Protease Associated with Protease Inhibitor-Based Therapy Failure in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giandhari, Jennifer; Basson, Adriaan E; Coovadia, Ashraf; Kuhn, Louise; Abrams, Elaine J; Strehlau, Renate; Morris, Lynn; Hunt, Gillian M

    2015-08-01

    Studies have shown a low frequency of HIV-1 protease drug resistance mutations in patients failing protease inhibitor (PI)-based therapy. Recent studies have identified mutations in Gag as an alternate pathway for PI drug resistance in subtype B viruses. We therefore genotyped the Gag and protease genes from 20 HIV-1 subtype C-infected pediatric patients failing a PI-based regimen. Major protease resistance mutations (M46I, I54V, and V82A) were identified in eight (40%) patients, as well as Gag cleavage site (CS) mutations (at codons 373, 374, 378, 428, 431, 449, 451, and 453) in nine (45%) patients. Four of these Gag CS mutations occurred in the absence of major protease mutations at PI failure. In addition, amino acid changes were noted at Gag non-CS with some predicted to be under HLA/KIR immune-mediated pressure and/or drug selection pressure. Changes in Gag during PI failure therefore warrant further investigation of the Gag gene and its role in PI failure in HIV-1 subtype C infection.

  6. An amperometric immunosensor based on a polyelectrolyte/gold magnetic nanoparticle supramolecular assembly--modified electrode for the determination of HIV p24 in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ning; Hou, Jianguo; Hu, Futao; Zheng, Lei; Ni, Minjun; Cao, Yuting

    2010-07-23

    A novel supramolecular amperometric immunosensor for the determination of Human Immunodeficiency Virus antigen p24 (HIV p24) was built up using the electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly technique upon a gold electrode with HIV p24 antibody (anti-p24) being immobilized on polyelectrolyte/gold nanoparticle multilayer films. The multilayer films were composed of poly(L-lysine) (pLys) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) stabilized Fe(3)O(4)(core)/gold(shell) nano particles (GMPs).The immunosensor preparation steps were monitored by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In pH 6.5 PBS, after the immunosensor was incubated with HIV p24 solution at 25 degrees C for 5 min, the electron transfer access of FeCN is partially inhibited, which leads to a linear decrease of peak current. In addition, the performance of the immunosensor was studied in detail. It offers high-sensitivity for the detection of p24 and has good correlation for the detection of p24 in the range of 0.1 to 100.0 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.05 ng/mL estimated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The proposed immunosensor was used to analyze p24 in human serum specimens and the results showed the developed immunosensor provides a promising alternative approach for detecting p24 in the early diagnosis of AIDS patients.

  7. Live cell visualization of the interactions between HIV-1 Gag and the cellular RNA-binding protein Staufen1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouland Andrew J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 uses cellular proteins and machinery to ensure transmission to uninfected cells. Although the host proteins involved in the transport of viral components toward the plasma membrane have been investigated, the dynamics of this process remain incompletely described. Previously we showed that the double-stranded (dsRNA-binding protein, Staufen1 is found in the HIV-1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP that contains the HIV-1 genomic RNA (vRNA, Gag and other host RNA-binding proteins in HIV-1-producing cells. Staufen1 interacts with the nucleocapsid domain (NC domain of Gag and regulates Gag multimerization on membranes thereby modulating HIV-1 assembly. The formation of the HIV-1 RNP is dynamic and likely central to the fate of the vRNA during the late phase of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Results Detailed molecular imaging of both the intracellular trafficking of virus components and of virus-host protein complexes is critical to enhance our understanding of factors that contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis. In this work, we visualized the interactions between Gag and host proteins using bimolecular and trimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC and TriFC analyses. These methods allow for the direct visualization of the localization of protein-protein and protein-protein-RNA interactions in live cells. We identified where the virus-host interactions between Gag and Staufen1 and Gag and IMP1 (also known as VICKZ1, IGF2BP1 and ZBP1 occur in cells. These virus-host interactions were not only detected in the cytoplasm, but were also found at cholesterol-enriched GM1-containing lipid raft plasma membrane domains. Importantly, Gag specifically recruited Staufen1 to the detergent insoluble membranes supporting a key function for this host factor during virus assembly. Notably, the TriFC experiments showed that Gag and Staufen1 actively recruited protein partners when tethered to mRNA. Conclusions The

  8. Rapid, Fully Automated Digital Immunoassay for p24 Protein with the Sensitivity of Nucleic Acid Amplification for Detecting Acute HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Carlos; Chang, Lei; Stone, Mars; Busch, Michael; Wilson, David H

    2015-11-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) has become the standard for high sensitivity in detecting low levels of virus. However, adoption of NAT can be cost prohibitive in low-resource settings where access to extreme sensitivity could be clinically advantageous for early detection of infection. We report development and preliminary validation of a simple, low-cost, fully automated digital p24 antigen immunoassay with the sensitivity of quantitative NAT viral load (NAT-VL) methods for detection of acute HIV infection. We developed an investigational 69-min immunoassay for p24 capsid protein for use on a novel digital analyzer on the basis of single-molecule-array technology. We evaluated the assay for sensitivity by dilution of standardized preparations of p24, cultured HIV, and preseroconversion samples. We characterized analytical performance and concordance with 2 NAT-VL methods and 2 contemporary p24 Ag/Ab combination immunoassays with dilutions of viral isolates and samples from the earliest stages of HIV infection. Analytical sensitivity was 0.0025 ng/L p24, equivalent to 60 HIV RNA copies/mL. The limit of quantification was 0.0076 ng/L, and imprecision across 10 runs was 4000-fold greater sensitivity than contemporary immunoassays for p24 and sensitivity equivalent to that of NAT methods for early detection of HIV. The data indicate that NAT-level sensitivity for acute HIV infection is possible with a simple, low-cost digital immunoassay. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  9. Retrospective Proteomic Analysis of Cellular Immune Responses and Protective Correlates of p24 Vaccination in an HIV Elite Controller Using Antibody Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneth S. Perera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV p24 is an extracellular HIV antigen involved in viral replication. Falling p24 antibody responses are associated with clinical disease progression and their preservation with non-progressive disease. Stimulation of p24 antibody production by immunization to delay progression was the basis of discontinued p24 vaccine. We studied a therapy-naive HIV+ man from Sydney, Australia, infected in 1988. He received the HIV-p24-virus like particle (VLP vaccine in 1993, and continues to show vigorous p24 antigen responses (>4% p24-specific CD4+ T cells, coupled with undetectable plasma viremia. We defined immune-protective correlates of p24 vaccination at the proteomic level through parallel retrospective analysis of cellular immune responses to p24 antigen in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD14+ monocytes at viremic and aviremic phases using antibody-array. We found statistically significant coordinated up-regulation by all three cell-types with high fold-changes in fractalkine, ITAC, IGFBP-2, and MIP-1α in the aviremic phase. TECK and TRAIL-R4 were down-regulated in the viremic phase and up-regulated in the aviremic phase. The up-regulation of fractalkine in all three cell-types coincided with protective effect, whereas the dysfunction in anti-apoptotic chemokines with the loss of immune function. This study highlights the fact that induction of HIV-1-specific helper cells together with coordinated cellular immune response (p < 0.001 might be important in immunotherapeutic interventions and HIV vaccine development.

  10. Specific reverse transcriptase slippage at the HIV ribosomal frameshift sequence: potential implications for modulation of GagPol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penno, Christophe; Kumari, Romika; Baranov, Pavel V; van Sinderen, Douwe; Atkins, John F

    2017-09-29

    Synthesis of HIV GagPol involves a proportion of ribosomes translating a U6A shift site at the distal end of the gag gene performing a programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift event to enter the overlapping pol gene. In vitro studies here show that at the same shift motif HIV reverse transcriptase generates -1 and +1 indels with their ratio being sensitive to the relative concentration ratio of dNTPs specified by the RNA template slippage-prone sequence and its 5' adjacent base. The GGG sequence 3' adjacent to the U6A shift/slippage site, which is important for ribosomal frameshifting, is shown here to limit reverse transcriptase base substitution and indel 'errors' in the run of A's in the product. The indels characterized here have either 1 more or less A, than the corresponding number of template U's. cDNA with 5 A's may yield novel Gag product(s), while cDNA with an extra base, 7 A's, may only be a minor contributor to GagPol polyprotein. Synthesis of a proportion of non-ribosomal frameshift derived GagPol would be relevant in efforts to identify therapeutically useful compounds that perturb the ratio of GagPol to Gag, and pertinent to the extent in which specific polymerase slippage is utilized in gene expression. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. The effect of treatment with zidovudine with or without acyclovir on HIV p24 antigenaemia in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Cooper, D A; Brun-Vézinet, F

    1992-01-01

    . SUBJECTS: One hundred and ninety-seven HIV-infected patients (60 with AIDS and 137 with ARC or KS). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum HIV p24-antigen levels measured using the Abbott HIV solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: Of 76 ARC/KS patients who were initially HIV p24-antigen-positive, one out of 25......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in serum HIV p24-antigen levels in a subset of patients who participated in a European/Australian double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of zidovudine (250 mg every 6 h) alone or in combination with acyclovir (800 mg every 6 h) in patients...... with AIDS, AIDS-related complex (ARC) or Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of less than or equal to 6 months' therapy. SETTING: Samples were obtained from patients attending teaching hospital outpatient clinics in seven European countries and Australia...

  12. CD4 lymphocyte counts and serum p24 antigen of no diagnostic value in monitoring HIV-infected patients with pulmonary symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Nielsen, T L; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1990-01-01

    .200 x 10(9)/l, and 60% of patients without OI had CD4 counts less than 0.200 x 10(9)/l; 47 and 42% of patients with and without OI, respectively, had detectable p24 antigen in serum. Only 36% of the patients with OI presented the combination of CD4 cells less than 0.200 x 10(9)/l and p24 in serum......The diagnostic value of the CD4 cell counts and the HIV p24 antigen were evaluated in a consecutive series of 105 HIV-infected patients experiencing 128 episodes of pulmonary symptoms which required bronchoscopy. One-third of patients with opportunistic infection (OI) had CD4 counts greater than 0....... In conclusion, the CD4 cell counts and the presence of p24 antigen in serum had a very limited predictive value for the presence of OI in HIV-infected patients with pulmonary symptoms....

  13. Role of the HIV-1 Matrix Protein in Gag Intracellular Trafficking and Targeting to the Plasma Membrane for Virus Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruba H Ghanam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 encodes a polypeptide called Gag that is able to form virus-like particles (VLPs in vitro in the absence of any cellular or viral constituents. During the late phase of the HIV-1 infection, Gag polyproteins are transported to the plasma membrane (PM for assembly. In the past two decades, in vivo, in vitro and structural studies have shown that Gag trafficking and targeting to the PM are orchestrated events that are dependent on multiple factors including cellular proteins and specific membrane lipids. The matrix (MA domain of Gag has been the focus of these studies as it appears to be engaged in multiple intracellular interactions that are suggested to be critical for virus assembly and replication. The interaction between Gag and the PM is perhaps the most understood. It is now established that the ultimate localization of Gag on punctate sites on the PM is mediated by specific interactions between the MA domain of Gag and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2, a minor lipid localized on the inner leaflet of the PM. Structure-based studies revealed that binding of PI(4,5P2 to MA induces minor conformational changes, leading to exposure of the myristyl (myr group. Exposure of the myr group is also triggered by binding of calmodulin, enhanced by factors that promote protein self-association like the capsid domain of Gag, and is modulated by pH. Despite the steady progress in defining both the viral and cellular determinants of retroviral assembly and release, Gag’s intracellular interactions and trafficking to its assembly sites in the infected cell are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the structural and functional role of MA in HIV replication.

  14. CD4 lymphocyte counts and serum p24 antigen of no diagnostic value in monitoring HIV-infected patients with pulmonary symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Nielsen, T L; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1990-01-01

    The diagnostic value of the CD4 cell counts and the HIV p24 antigen were evaluated in a consecutive series of 105 HIV-infected patients experiencing 128 episodes of pulmonary symptoms which required bronchoscopy. One-third of patients with opportunistic infection (OI) had CD4 counts greater than 0....... In conclusion, the CD4 cell counts and the presence of p24 antigen in serum had a very limited predictive value for the presence of OI in HIV-infected patients with pulmonary symptoms....

  15. Influence of Gag-Protease-Mediated Replication Capacity on Disease Progression in Individuals Recently Infected with HIV-1 Subtype C▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jaclyn K.; Novitsky, Vladimir; Brockman, Mark A.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brumme, Chanson J.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; Wang, Bingxia; Losina, Elena; Leshwedi, Mopo; van der Stok, Mary; Maphumulo, Lungile; Mkhwanazi, Nompumelelo; Chonco, Fundisiwe; Goulder, Philip J. R.; Essex, Max; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2011-01-01

    HLA class I-mediated selection of immune escape mutations in functionally important Gag epitopes may partly explain slower disease progression in HIV-1-infected individuals with protective HLA alleles. To investigate the impact of Gag function on disease progression, the replication capacities of viruses encoding Gag-protease from 60 individuals in early HIV-1 subtype C infection were assayed in an HIV-1-inducible green fluorescent protein reporter cell line and were correlated with subsequent disease progression. Replication capacities did not correlate with viral load set points (P = 0.37) but were significantly lower in individuals with below-median viral load set points (P = 0.03), and there was a trend of correlation between lower replication capacities and lower rates of CD4 decline (P = 0.09). Overall, the proportion of host HLA-specific Gag polymorphisms in or adjacent to epitopes was negatively associated with replication capacities (P = 0.04), but host HLA-B-specific polymorphisms were associated with higher viral load set points (P = 0.01). Further, polymorphisms associated with host-specific protective HLA alleles were linked with higher viral load set points (P = 0.03). These data suggest that transmission or early HLA-driven selection of Gag polymorphisms results in reduced early cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses and higher viral load set points. In support of the former, 46% of individuals with nonprotective alleles harbored a Gag polymorphism exclusively associated with a protective HLA allele, indicating a high rate of their transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. Overall, HIV disease progression is likely to be affected by the ability to mount effective Gag CTL responses as well as the replication capacity of the transmitted virus. PMID:21289112

  16. Selective in vitro expansion of HLA class I-restricted HIV-1 gag-specific CD8+ T cells: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes and precursor frequencies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. van Baalen (Carel); M.R. Klein (Michèl); A.M. Geretti (Anna Maria); R.I.P.M. Keet; F. Miedema (Frank); C.A.C.M. van Els (Cécile); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To identify HIV-1 Gag cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes and HLA restriction of their recognition, and to define precursor frequencies of HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL in the blood of seropositive individuals. METHODS: B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) infected with recombinant

  17. Regulation of HIV-Gag Expression and Targeting to the Endolysosomal/Secretory Pathway by the Luminal Domain of Lysosomal-Associated Membrane Protein (LAMP-1) Enhance Gag-Specific Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J. Thomas; de Azevedo Marques, Ernesto Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field. PMID:24932692

  18. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Cinti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1. In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms.

  19. HIV controllers exhibit enhanced frequencies of major histocompatibility complex class II tetramer+ Gag-specific CD4+ T cells in chronic clade C HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laher, Faatima; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Porichis, Filippos

    2017-01-01

    = 0.0001), and these expanded Gag-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV controllers showed higher levels of expression of the cytolytic proteins granzymes A and B. Importantly, targeting of the immunodominant Gag41 peptide in the context of HLA class II DRB1*1101 was associated with HIV control (r = -0.5, P......Immune control of viral infections is heavily dependent on helper CD4+ T cell function. However, the understanding of the contribution of HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses to immune protection against HIV-1, particularly in clade C infection, remains incomplete. Recently, major histocompatibility......, and then used these to define the magnitude, function, and relation to the viral load of HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses in a cohort of untreated HIV clade C-infected persons. We observed significantly higher frequencies of MHC class II tetramer-positive CD4+ T cells in HIV controllers than progressors (P...

  20. Modulation of HIV-1 Gag NC/p1 cleavage efficiency affects protease inhibitor resistance and viral replicative capacity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maarseveen van, N. M.; Andersson, Dan; Lepšík, Martin; Fun, A.; Schipper, P. J.; Jong de, D.; Boucher, Ch. A. B.; Nijhuis, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 29 (2012), s. 1-7 ISSN 1742-4690 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 37693 - HIV PI RESISTANCE Grant - others:Dutch AIDS Fund(XE) 2006028; (NWO) VIDI(XE) 91796349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV -1 * protease * Gag * resistance * cleavage Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.657, year: 2012

  1. Targeting of conserved gag-epitopes in early HIV infection is associated with lower plasma viral load and slower CD4+ T cell depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Carina L.; Milush, Jeffrey M.; Buggert, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether the character of the immunodominant HIV-Gag peptide (variable or conserved) targeted by CD8+ T cells in early HIV infection would influence the quality and quantity of T cell responses, and whether this would affect the rate of disease progression. Treatment......-naive HIV-infected study subjects within the OPTIONS cohort at the University of California, San Francisco, were monitored from an estimated 44 days postinfection for up to 6 years. CD8+ T cells responses targeting HLA-matched HIV-Gag-epitopes were identified and characterized by multicolor flow cytometry....... The autologous HIV gag sequences were obtained. We demonstrate that patients targeting a conserved HIV-Gag-epitope in early infection maintained their epitope-specific CD8+ T cell response throughout the study period. Patients targeting a variable epitope showed decreased immune responses over time, although...

  2. Conserved Interaction of Lentiviral Vif Molecules with HIV-1 Gag and Differential Effects of Species-Specific Vif on Virus Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenwen; Ling, Limian; Li, Zhaolong; Wang, Hong; Rui, Yajuan; Gao, Wenying; Wang, Shaohua; Su, Xing; Wei, Wei; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2017-04-01

    The virion infectivity factor (Vif) open reading frame is conserved among most lentiviruses. Vif molecules contribute to viral replication by inactivating host antiviral factors, the APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases. However, various species of lentiviral Vif proteins have evolved different strategies for overcoming host APOBEC3. Whether different species of lentiviral Vif proteins still preserve certain common features has not been reported. Here, we show for the first time that diverse lentiviral Vif molecules maintain the ability to interact with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag precursor (Pr55(Gag)) polyprotein. Surprisingly, bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) Vif, but not HIV-1 Vif, interfered with HIV-1 production and viral infectivity even in the absence of APOBEC3. Further analysis revealed that BIV Vif demonstrated an enhanced interaction with Pr55(Gag) compared to that of HIV-1 Vif, and BIV Vif defective for the Pr55(Gag) interaction lost its ability to inhibit HIV-1. The C-terminal region of capsid (CA) and the p2 region of Pr55(Gag), which are important for virus assembly and maturation, were involved in the interaction. Transduction of CD4(+) T cells with BIV Vif blocked HIV-1 replication. Thus, the conserved Vif-Pr55(Gag) interaction provides a potential target for the future development of antiviral strategies.IMPORTANCE The conserved Vif accessory proteins of primate lentiviruses HIV-1, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and BIV all form ubiquitin ligase complexes to target host antiviral APOBEC3 proteins for degradation, with different cellular requirements and using different molecular mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that BIV Vif can interfere with HIV-1 Gag maturation and suppress HIV-1 replication through interaction with the precursor of the Gag (Pr55(Gag)) of HIV-1 in virus-producing cells. Moreover, the HIV-1 and SIV Vif proteins are conserved in terms of their interactions with HIV-1 Pr55(Gag) although HIV-1 Vif proteins

  3. Quantitative effect of suboptimal codon usage on translational efficiency of mRNA encoding HIV-1 gag in intact T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholiswa C Ngumbela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sequences of wild-isolate strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 are characterized by low GC content and suboptimal codon usage. Codon optimization of DNA vectors can enhance protein expression both by enhancing translational efficiency, and by altering RNA stability and export. Although gag codon optimization is widely used in DNA vectors and experimental vaccines, the actual effect of altered codon usage on gag translational efficiency has not been quantified. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To quantify translational efficiency of gag mRNA in live T cells, we transfected Jurkat cells with increasing doses of capped, polyadenylated synthetic mRNA corresponding to wildtype or codon-optimized gag sequences, measured Gag production by quantitative ELISA and flow cytometry, and estimated the translational efficiency of each transcript as pg of Gag antigen produced per microg of input mRNA. We found that codon optimization yielded a small increase in gag translational efficiency (approximately 1.6 fold. In contrast when cells were transfected with DNA vectors requiring nuclear transcription and processing of gag mRNA, codon optimization resulted in a very large enhancement of Gag production. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that suboptimal codon usage by HIV-1 results in only a slight loss of gag translational efficiency per se, with the vast majority of enhancement in protein expression from DNA vectors due to altered processing and export of nuclear RNA.

  4. Quantitative effect of suboptimal codon usage on translational efficiency of mRNA encoding HIV-1 gag in intact T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngumbela, Kholiswa C; Ryan, Kieran P; Sivamurthy, Rohini; Brockman, Mark A; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Bhardwaj, Nina; Kavanagh, Daniel G

    2008-06-04

    The sequences of wild-isolate strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) are characterized by low GC content and suboptimal codon usage. Codon optimization of DNA vectors can enhance protein expression both by enhancing translational efficiency, and by altering RNA stability and export. Although gag codon optimization is widely used in DNA vectors and experimental vaccines, the actual effect of altered codon usage on gag translational efficiency has not been quantified. To quantify translational efficiency of gag mRNA in live T cells, we transfected Jurkat cells with increasing doses of capped, polyadenylated synthetic mRNA corresponding to wildtype or codon-optimized gag sequences, measured Gag production by quantitative ELISA and flow cytometry, and estimated the translational efficiency of each transcript as pg of Gag antigen produced per microg of input mRNA. We found that codon optimization yielded a small increase in gag translational efficiency (approximately 1.6 fold). In contrast when cells were transfected with DNA vectors requiring nuclear transcription and processing of gag mRNA, codon optimization resulted in a very large enhancement of Gag production. We conclude that suboptimal codon usage by HIV-1 results in only a slight loss of gag translational efficiency per se, with the vast majority of enhancement in protein expression from DNA vectors due to altered processing and export of nuclear RNA.

  5. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gunzenhäuser

    Full Text Available The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  6. Efficient in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 gag reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) at minimal ratios of PNA/RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Zachar, Vladimir; Nielsen, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    ) was investigated. We found that a bis-PNA (parallel antisense 10mer linked to antiparallel antisense 10mer) was superior to both the parallel antisense 10mer and antiparallel antisense 10mer in inhibiting reverse transcription of the gene, thus indicating triplex formation at the target sequence. A complete arrest......We have tested the inhibitory potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) on in vitro reverse transcription of the HIV-1 gag gene. PNA was designed to target different regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and the effect on reverse transcription by HIV-1, MMLV and AMV reverse transcriptases (RTs...... of reverse transcription was obtained at approximately 6-fold molar excess of the bis-PNA with respect to the gag RNA. At this molar ratio we found no effect on in vitro translation of gag RNA. A 15mer duplex-forming PNA was also found to inhibit reverse transcription at very low molar ratios of PNA/ gag RNA...

  7. Subtype-Specific Differences in Gag-Protease-Driven Replication Capacity Are Consistent with Intersubtype Differences in HIV-1 Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguoya, Marion W; Mann, Jaclyn K; Chopera, Denis; Gounder, Kamini; Lee, Guinevere Q; Hunt, Peter W; Martin, Jeffrey N; Ball, T Blake; Kimani, Joshua; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brockman, Mark A; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2017-07-01

    There are marked differences in the spread and prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes worldwide, and differences in clinical progression have been reported. However, the biological reasons underlying these differences are unknown. Gag-protease is essential for HIV-1 replication, and Gag-protease-driven replication capacity has previously been correlated with disease progression. We show that Gag-protease replication capacity correlates significantly with that of whole isolates (r = 0.51; P = 0.04), indicating that Gag-protease is a significant contributor to viral replication capacity. Furthermore, we investigated subtype-specific differences in Gag-protease-driven replication capacity using large well-characterized cohorts in Africa and the Americas. Patient-derived Gag-protease sequences were inserted into an HIV-1 NL4-3 backbone, and the replication capacities of the resulting recombinant viruses were measured in an HIV-1-inducible reporter T cell line by flow cytometry. Recombinant viruses expressing subtype C Gag-proteases exhibited substantially lower replication capacities than those expressing subtype B Gag-proteases (P protease sequences were engineered into an HIV-1 subtype C backbone. We identified Gag residues 483 and 484, located within the Alix-binding motif involved in virus budding, as major contributors to subtype-specific replicative differences. In East African cohorts, we observed a hierarchy of Gag-protease-driven replication capacities, i.e., subtypes A/C protease-driven replication capacity of subtypes A and C slows disease progression in individuals infected with these subtypes, which in turn leads to greater opportunity for transmission and thus increased prevalence of these subtypes.IMPORTANCE HIV-1 subtypes are unevenly distributed globally, and there are reported differences in their rates of disease progression and epidemic spread. The biological determinants underlying these differences have not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that HIV-1

  8. Lack of a significant impact of Gag-Protease-mediated HIV-1 replication capacity on clinical parameters in treatment-naive Japanese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Keiko; Chikata, Takayuki; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brumme, Chanson J; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Gatanag, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2015-11-19

    HLA class I-associated escape mutations in HIV-1 Gag can reduce viral replication, suggesting that associated fitness costs could impact HIV-1 disease progression. Previous studies in North American and African cohorts have reported reduced Gag-Protease mediated viral replication capacity (Gag-Pro RC) in individuals expressing protective HLA class I alleles including HLA-B*57:01, B*27:05, and B*81:01. These studies also reported significant positive associations between Gag-Pro RCs and plasma viral load (pVL). However, these HLA alleles are virtually absent in Japan, and the importance of Gag as an immune target is not clearly defined in this population. We generated chimeric NL4-3 viruses carrying patient-derived Gag-Protease from 306 treatment-naive Japanese individuals chronically infected with HIV-1 subtype B. We analyzed associations between Gag-Pro RC and clinical markers of HIV-1 infection and host HLA expression. We observed no significant correlation between Gag-Pro RC and pVL in Japan in the overall cohort. However, upon exclusion of individuals expressing Japanese protective alleles HLA-B*52:01 and B*67:01, Gag-Pro RC correlated positively with pVL and negatively with CD4 T-cell count. Our results thus contrast with studies from other global cohorts reporting significantly lower Gag-Pro RC among persons expressing protective HLA alleles, and positive relationships between Gag-Pro RC and pVL in the overall study populations. We also identified five amino acids in Gag-Protease significantly associated with Gag-Pro RC, whose effects on RC were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. However, of the four mutations that decreased Gag-Pro RC, none were associated with reductions in pVL in Japan though two were associated with lower pVL in North America. These data indicate that Gag fitness does not affect clinical outcomes in subjects with protective HLA class I alleles as well as the whole Japanese population. Moreover, the impact of Gag fitness costs on HIV

  9. Characteristics and outcomes of initial virologic suppressors during analytic treatment interruption in a therapeutic HIV-1 gag vaccine trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Z Li

    Full Text Available In the placebo-controlled trial ACTG A5197, a trend favoring viral suppression was seen in the HIV-1-infected subjects who received a recombinant Ad5 HIV-1 gag vaccine.To identify individuals with initial viral suppression (plasma HIV-1 RNA set point <3.0 log(10 copies/ml during the analytic treatment interruption (ATI and evaluate the durability and correlates of virologic control and characteristics of HIV sequence evolution.HIV-1 gag and pol RNA were amplified and sequenced from plasma obtained during the ATI. Immune responses were measured by flow cytometric analysis and intracellular cytokine expression assays. Characteristics of those with and without initial viral suppression were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum and Fisher's exact tests.Eleven out of 104 participants (10.6% were classified as initial virologic suppressors, nine of whom had received the vaccine. Initial virologic suppressors had significantly less CD4+ cell decline by ATI week 16 as compared to non-suppressors (median 7 CD4+ cell gain vs. 247 CD4+ cell loss, P = 0.04. However, of the ten initial virologic suppressors with a pVL at ATI week 49, only three maintained pVL <3.0 log(10 copies/ml. HIV-1 Gag-specific CD4+ interferon-γ responses were not associated with initial virologic suppression and no evidence of vaccine-driven HIV sequence evolution was detected. Participants with initial virologic suppression were found to have a lower percentage of CD4+ CTLA-4+ cells prior to treatment interruption, but a greater proportion of HIV-1 Gag-reactive CD4+ TNF-α+ cells expressing either CTLA-4 or PD-1.Among individuals participating in a rAd5 therapeutic HIV-1 gag vaccine trial, initial viral suppression was found in a subset of patients, but this response was not sustained. The association between CTLA-4 and PD-1 expression on CD4+ T cells and virologic outcome warrants further study in trials of other therapeutic vaccines in development.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  10. Transmission network characteristics based on env and gag sequences from MSM during acute HIV-1 infection in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Dai, Lili; Jiang, Yan; Feng, Kaidi; Liu, Lifeng; Xia, Wei; Yu, Fengjiao; Yao, Jun; Xing, Wenge; Sun, Lijun; Zhang, Tong; Wu, Hao; Su, Bin; Qiu, Maofeng

    2017-11-01

    Molecular epidemiology can be used to identify human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission clusters, usually using pol sequence for analysis. In the present study, we explored appropriate parameters to construct a simple network using HIV env and gag sequences instead of pol sequences for constructing a phylogenetic tree and a genetic transmission subnetwork, which were used to identify individuals with many potential transmission links and to explore the evolutionary dynamics of the virus among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beijing. We investigated 70 acute HIV-1 infections, which consisted of HIV-1 subtype B (15.71%), the circulating recombinant forms CRF01_AE (47.14%), CRF07_BC (21.43%), CRF55_01B (1.43%), and CRF65_cpx (4.29%), and an unknown subtype (10.00%). By exploring the similarities and differences among HIV env, gag and pol sequences in describing the dynamics of the HIV-1 CRF01_AE transmission subnetwork among Beijing MSM, we found that four key points of the env sequences (strains E-2011_BJ.CY_16014, E-2011_BJ.FT_16017, E-2011_BJ.TZ_16064, and E-2011_BJ.XW_16035) contained more transmission information than gag sequences (three key points: strains G-2011_BJ.CY_16014, G-2011_BJ.FT_16017, and G-2011_BJ.XW_16035) and pol sequences (two key points: strains P-2011_BJ.CY_16014 and P-2011_BJ.XW_16035). Although the env and gag sequence results were similar to pol sequences in describing the dynamics of the HIV-1 CRF01_AE transmission subnetwork, we were able to obtain more precise information, allowing identification of key points of subnetwork expansion, based on HIV env and gag sequences instead of pol sequences. Taken together, the key points we found will improve our current understanding of how HIV spreads between MSM populations in Beijing and help to better target preventative interventions for promoting public health.

  11. Structural basis and distal effects of Gag substrate coevolution in drug resistance to HIV-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, Ayşegül; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2014-11-11

    Drug resistance mutations in response to HIV-1 protease inhibitors are selected not only in the drug target but elsewhere in the viral genome, especially at the protease cleavage sites in the precursor protein Gag. To understand the molecular basis of this protease-substrate coevolution, we solved the crystal structures of drug resistant I50V/A71V HIV-1 protease with p1-p6 substrates bearing coevolved mutations. Analyses of the protease-substrate interactions reveal that compensatory coevolved mutations in the substrate do not restore interactions lost due to protease mutations, but instead establish other interactions that are not restricted to the site of mutation. Mutation of a substrate residue has distal effects on other residues' interactions as well, including through the induction of a conformational change in the protease. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that restoration of active site dynamics is an additional constraint in the selection of coevolved mutations. Hence, protease-substrate coevolution permits mutational, structural, and dynamic changes via molecular mechanisms that involve distal effects contributing to drug resistance.

  12. Induction of Gag-Specific CD4 T Cell Responses during Acute HIV Infection Is Associated with Improved Viral Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieffer, Miriam; Jessen, Heiko K.; Oster, Alexander F.; Pissani, Franco; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Jessen, Arne B.; Zedlack, Carmen; Schultz, Bruce T.; Davis, Isaiah; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Alter, Galit; Schumann, Ralf R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effector CD4 T cell responses have been shown to be critically involved in the containment and clearance of viral pathogens. However, their involvement in the pathogenesis of HIV infection is less clear, given their additional role as preferred viral targets. We previously demonstrated that the presence of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses is somewhat associated with HIV control and that specific CD4 T cell functions, such as direct cytolytic activity, can contribute to control of HIV viremia. However, little is known about how the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection influences disease progression and whether responses induced during the early phase of infection are preferentially depleted. We therefore longitudinally assessed, in a cohort of 55 acutely HIV-infected individuals, HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses from acute to chronic infection. Interestingly, we found that the breadth, magnitude, and protein dominance of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses remained remarkably stable over time. Moreover, we found that the epitopes targeted at a high frequency in acute HIV infection were recognized at the same frequency by HIV-specific CD4 T cells in chronic HIV infection. Interestingly the induction of Gag-specific CD4 T cell responses in acute HIV infection was significantly inversely correlated with viral set point in chronic HIV infection (R = −0.5; P = 0.03), while the cumulative contribution of Env-specific CD4 T cell responses showed the reverse effect. Moreover, individuals with HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses dominantly targeting Gag over Env in acute HIV infection remained off antiretroviral therapy significantly longer (P = 0.03; log rank). Thus, our data suggest that the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection is beneficial overall and does not fuel disease progression. IMPORTANCE CD4 T cells are critical for the clearance and control of viral infections. However, HIV

  13. Towards the Determination of the Structure of HIV-1 p24: A Possible Target for Antiviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prongay, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of targeting certain stages in the life cycle of the virus for antiviral therapy is discussed with reference to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1. Research conducted on a core antigen, p24, is described. (MSE)

  14. Maternal LAMP/p55gagHIV-1 DNA immunization induces in utero priming and a long-lasting immune response in vaccinated neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Maciel, Milton; Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Piubelli, Orlando Guerra; Orii, Noemia Mie; Marques, Ernesto Torres; August, Joseph Thomas; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2012-01-01

    Infants born to HIV-infected mothers are at high risk of becoming infected during gestation or the breastfeeding period. A search is thus warranted for vaccine formulations that will prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. The LAMP/gag DNA chimeric vaccine encodes the HIV-1 p55gag fused to the lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) and has been shown to enhance anti-Gag antibody (Ab) and cellular immune responses in adult and neonatal mice; such a vaccine represents a new concept in antigen presentation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of LAMP/gag DNA immunization on neonates either before conception or during pregnancy. LAMP/gag immunization of BALB/c mice before conception by the intradermal route led to the transfer of anti-Gag IgG1 Ab through the placenta and via breastfeeding. Furthermore, there were an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T cells in the spleens of neonates. When offspring were immunized with LAMP/gag DNA, the anti-Gag Ab response and the Gag-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells were decreased. Inhibition of anti-Gag Ab production and cellular responses were not observed six months after immunization, indicating that maternal immunization did not interfere with the long-lasting memory response in offspring. Injection of purified IgG in conjunction with LAMP/gag DNA immunization decreased humoral and cytotoxic T-cell responses. LAMP/gag DNA immunization by intradermal injection prior to conception promoted the transfer of Ab, leading to a diminished response to Gag without interfering with the development of anti-Gag T- and B-cell memory. Finally, we assessed responses after one intravenous injection of LAMP/gag DNA during the last five days of pregnancy. The intravenous injection led to in utero immunization. In conclusion, DNA vaccine enconding LAMP-1 with Gag and other HIV-1 antigens should be considered in the development of a protective vaccine for the maternal/fetal and newborn periods.

  15. HIV reverse transcriptase inhibiting antibodies detected by a new technique: relation to p24 and gp41 antibodies, HIV antigenemia and clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumüller, M; Karlsson, A; Lennerstrand, J; Källander, C F; Holmberg, V; Långström-Persson, U; Thorstensson, R; Sandström, E; Gronowitz, J S

    1991-05-01

    A new assay for HIV reverse transcriptase activity inhibiting antibodies (RTI-ab) was used for the analysis of a large collection of sera sampled before and after confirmation of HIV infection. In this assay HIV-RT was preincubated with diluted serum, after which residual RT activity was determined by a technique using a template coupled to macrobeads and 125I-lodo-deoxyuridine-triphosphate as the tracer-substrate. Of the 936 sera analysed, 818 were found positive for RTI-ab, and 824 were positive in Western blot (Wb). The prevalence of RTI-ab compared to Wb was therefore 99.3%. The corresponding figure for 930 sera analysed for envelope-ab, i.e., gp41-ab, was 823 positive, and of these 930 sera 815 were Wb positive, giving a comparative prevalence of 101%. In contrast, only 678 samples of 993 analyzed for core ab, i.e., p24, were positive, giving a prevalence of 77.0% as 880 of these samples were Wb positive. Thus, RTI-ab was as prevalent as gp41-ab, and although the analyses of RTI-ab amounts in different stages showed decreasing levels in stage IV compared to stages II or III, all of the sera except 1 were found positive in stages III and IV. Further, it was found that both the few RTI-ab negative samples in stage II and the few RTI-ab positive samples among Wb negative sera were sampled in connection with seroconversion. The specificity of the RTI-ab assay was 100% in a test of 200 serum samples from HIV negative blood donors. It was concluded that RTI-ab analyses can be made highly sensitive and specific and useful for studies of HIV infection.

  16. Evaluation of a rapid and simple fourth-generation HIV screening assay for qualitative detection of HIV p24 antigen and/or antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beelaert, G; Fransen, K

    2010-09-01

    The performance was assessed of a new, rapid, visual and qualitative immunoassay for the detection of HIV p24 antigen (Ag) and antibodies (Ab) to HIV-1 and HIV-2. Characterised serum or plasma specimens from patients diagnosed with HIV infection were tested: 179 samples of known Ab-positive patients harbouring different subtypes of HIV-1 (n=154) and HIV-2 (n=25) and 200 samples from individuals not infected with HIV. The assay's Ag sensitivity was assessed by testing HIV seroconversion panels (n=10) and primary HIV infection specimens (n=57). In addition, the influence of the genetic variability of HIV-1 on Ag detection was evaluated using dilutions of culture supernatants infected with different subtypes (n=50). The performance of the rapid test was compared to a "gold standard" testing algorithm with the use of a single Ag ELISA and with the Vironostika((R)) HIV Uni-Form II Ag/Ab test, a fourth-generation ELISA. The new assay, the Determine HIV-1/2 Combo demonstrated 100% (98.2-100.0) Ab specificity (200/200) and 100% (98.0-100.0) Ab sensitivity (179/179). In these samples, the observed Ag sensitivity was 86.6% (58/67) with the Determine HIV-1/2 Combo test and 92.5% (62/67) with the Vironostika compared to the reference single Ag ELISA. The assay could not detect Ag in one group O, one subtype F and two subtype H cell supernatant isolates. None of the HIV-2 Ag could be detected. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission Bottleneck Selects for Consensus Virus with Lower Gag-Protease-Driven Replication Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Vanessa L; Mann, Jaclyn K; Noble, Christie; Adland, Emily; Carlson, Jonathan M; Thomas, Jake; Brumme, Chanson J; Thobakgale-Tshabalala, Christina F; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brockman, Mark A; Goulder, Philip J R; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2017-09-01

    In the large majority of cases, HIV infection is established by a single variant, and understanding the characteristics of successfully transmitted variants is relevant to prevention strategies. Few studies have investigated the viral determinants of mother-to-child transmission. To determine the impact of Gag-protease-driven viral replication capacity on mother-to-child transmission, the replication capacities of 148 recombinant viruses encoding plasma-derived Gag-protease from 53 nontransmitter mothers, 48 transmitter mothers, and 47 infected infants were assayed in an HIV-1-inducible green fluorescent protein reporter cell line. All study participants were infected with HIV-1 subtype C. There was no significant difference in replication capacities between the nontransmitter (n = 53) and transmitter (n = 44) mothers (P = 0.48). Infant-derived Gag-protease NL4-3 recombinant viruses (n = 41) were found to have a significantly lower Gag-protease-driven replication capacity than that of viruses derived from the mothers (P HIV mother-to-child transmission bottleneck favors the transmission of consensus-like viruses with lower viral replication capacities.IMPORTANCE Understanding the characteristics of successfully transmitted HIV variants has important implications for preventative interventions. Little is known about the viral determinants of HIV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). We addressed the role of viral replication capacity driven by Gag, a major structural protein that is a significant determinant of overall viral replicative ability and an important target of the host immune response, in the MTCT bottleneck. This study advances our understanding of the genetic bottleneck in MTCT by revealing that viruses transmitted to infants have a lower replicative ability as well as a higher similarity to the population consensus (in this case HIV subtype C) than those of their mothers. Furthermore, the observation that "consensus-like" virus sequences correspond to

  18. Deep sequencing of protease inhibitor resistant HIV patient isolates reveals patterns of correlated mutations in Gag and protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, William F; Chang, Max W; Tan, Zhiqiang; Oliveira, Glenn; Yuan, Jinyun; Okulicz, Jason F; Torbett, Bruce E; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-04-01

    While the role of drug resistance mutations in HIV protease has been studied comprehensively, mutations in its substrate, Gag, have not been extensively cataloged. Using deep sequencing, we analyzed a unique collection of longitudinal viral samples from 93 patients who have been treated with therapies containing protease inhibitors (PIs). Due to the high sequence coverage within each sample, the frequencies of mutations at individual positions were calculated with high precision. We used this information to characterize the variability in the Gag polyprotein and its effects on PI-therapy outcomes. To examine covariation of mutations between two different sites using deep sequencing data, we developed an approach to estimate the tight bounds on the two-site bivariate probabilities in each viral sample, and the mutual information between pairs of positions based on all the bounds. Utilizing the new methodology we found that mutations in the matrix and p6 proteins contribute to continued therapy failure and have a major role in the network of strongly correlated mutations in the Gag polyprotein, as well as between Gag and protease. Although covariation is not direct evidence of structural propensities, we found the strongest correlations between residues on capsid and matrix of the same Gag protein were often due to structural proximity. This suggests that some of the strongest inter-protein Gag correlations are the result of structural proximity. Moreover, the strong covariation between residues in matrix and capsid at the N-terminus with p1 and p6 at the C-terminus is consistent with residue-residue contacts between these proteins at some point in the viral life cycle.

  19. Mutational Heterogeneity in p6 Gag Late Assembly (L) Domains in HIV-1 Subtype C Viruses from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; Engelbrecht, Susan; Claassen, Mathilda; Jacobs, Graeme Brendon; van Zyl, Gert; Preiser, Wolfgang; Sonnerborg, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Contradictory results have been reported on the impact of duplications/insertions in the HIV-1 gag-p6 late assembly domains [TSG101-binding P(T/S)APP motif and ALIX-binding LYPxnLxxL motif] heterogeneity following therapy failure. However, most studies are limited to small numbers of patients and do not include samples from South Africa, which has the largest number of HIV-1C-infected patients (HIV-1CZA). In this study we compared the gag-p6 variability among HIV-1CZA-infected patients from a South African clinical cohort who experienced antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure (n = 845) with ART-naive HIV-1CZA sequences (n = 706) downloaded from the Los Alamos database. Partial (PTA/PTV/APP) or complete P(T/S)APP duplications were less frequent in HIV-1CZA with ART failure compared to therapy-naive ones (14% vs. 30%; p < 0.001). In contrast, the tetrapeptide PYxE insertion, recently described by us, occurred more frequently (5-fold) in therapy-failure patients (p < 0.001) and was associated with a higher number of reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) mutations (p = 0.04) among patients failing ART.

  20. Diagnosing acute HIV infection at point of care: a retrospective analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of a fourth-generation point-of-care test for detection of HIV core protein p24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Naomi; Cross, Maria; O'Shea, Siobhan; Fox, Julie

    2017-03-01

    Detection of acute HIV infection is vital in preventing onward transmission. HIV point-of-care testing (POCT) has improved uptake of HIV testing but has been limited to third-generation assays, which only detect chronic HIV infection. Previous evaluation of the fourth-generation Alere Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo POCT showed only 50% sensitivity for HIV core protein p24 (p24 antigen) detection, which is suboptimal for diagnosis of acute HIV infection with limited advantage over third-generation POCT. We aimed to assess the sensitivity of the new Alere HIV Combo POCT to detect acute HIV infection. Stored samples in samples already identified as p24-positive using standard-of-care fourth-generation assays were randomly selected alongside groups of antibody-positive samples and HIV-negative samples. Each sample was tested using the new Alere POCT according to manufacturer's instructions. Sensitivity and specificity were then calculated. The Alere HIV Combo POCT test demonstrated 88% sensitivity 95% CI (78% to 98%) and 100% specificity 95% CI (99.7% to 100%) for detection of p24 antigen. This new POCT shows improved sensitivity for detection of p24 antigen and may be of value for clinical use in detecting acute HIV infection. Further evaluation of its use in a clinical setting is still required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Ultrasensitive detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen by a hybrid nanomechanical-optoplasmonic platform with potential for detecting HIV-1 at first week after infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Priscila M; Pini, Valerio; Calleja, Montserrat; Tamayo, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of HIV infection is the best way to prevent spread of the disease and to improve the efficiency of the antiretroviral therapy. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) have become the gold-standard for detecting low-concentrations of the virus in blood. However, these methods are technically demanding and cost-prohibitive in developing countries. Immunoassays are more affordable and can be more easily adapted for point-of-care diagnosis. However, the sensitivity so far of these methods has been too low. We here report the development of a sandwich immunoassay that combines nanomechanical and optoplasmonic transduction methods for detecting the HIV-1 capsid antigen p24 in human serum. The immunoreactions take place on the surface of a compliant microcantilever where gold nanoparticles are used as both mechanical and plasmonic labels. The microcantilever acts as both a mechanical resonator and an optical cavity for the transduction of the mechanical and plasmonic signals. The limit of detection of the immunoassay is 10-17 g/mL that is equivalent to one virion in 10 mL of plasma. This is 5 orders of magnitude better than last generation of approved immunoassays and 2 orders of magnitude better than NAAT. This technology meets the demands to be produced en masse at low cost and the capability for miniaturization to be used at the point-of-care.

  2. No evidence for selection of HIV-1 with enhanced gag-protease or Nef function among breakthrough infections in the CAPRISA 004 tenofovir microbicide trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis R Chopera

    Full Text Available Use of antiretroviral-based microbicides for HIV-1 prophylaxis could introduce a transmission barrier that inadvertently facilitates the selection of fitter viral variants among incident infections. To investigate this, we assessed the in vitro function of gag-protease and nef sequences from participants who acquired HIV-1 during the CAPRISA 004 1% tenofovir microbicide gel trial.We isolated the earliest available gag-protease and nef gene sequences from 83 individuals and examined their in vitro function using recombinant viral replication capacity assays and surface protein downregulation assays, respectively. No major phylogenetic clustering and no significant differences in gag-protease or nef function were observed in participants who received tenofovir gel versus placebo gel prophylaxis.Results indicate that the partial protective effects of 1% tenofovir gel use in the CAPRISA 004 trial were not offset by selection of transmitted/early HIV-1 variants with enhanced Gag-Protease or Nef fitness.

  3. Assessment of the ability of a fourth-generation immunoassay for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody and p24 antigen to detect both acute and recent HIV infections in a high-risk setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandori, Mark W; Hackett, John; Louie, Brian; Vallari, Ana; Dowling, Teri; Liska, Sally; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2009-08-01

    An immunoassay (IA) that simultaneously detects both antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HIV p24 antigen (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo) was evaluated for its ability to detect HIV infection by using a panel of specimens collected from individuals recently infected with HIV type 1 (HIV-1). This IA was found to be capable of detecting the majority (89%) of infections, including 80% of those considered acute infections based on the presence of HIV RNA and the lack of detectable antibody to HIV. Substantial improvements in detection of recent infections by the Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo relative to previous generations of IAs as well as the capacity to detect acute infections have important implications for HIV prevention strategies.

  4. Efficacious early antiviral activity of HIV Gag- and Pol-specific HLA-B 2705-restricted CD8+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Rebecca P; Kløverpris, Henrik; Sacha, Jonah B

    2010-01-01

    The association between HLA-B 2705 and the immune control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has previously been linked to the targeting of the HLA-B 2705-restricted Gag epitope KRWIILGLNK (KK10) by CD8(+) T cells. In order to better define the mechanisms of the HLA-B 2705 immune...... control of HIV, we first characterized the CD8(+) T-cell responses of nine highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naïve B 2705-positive subjects. Unexpectedly, we observed a strong response to an HLA-B 2705-restricted Pol epitope, KRKGGIGGY (KY9), in 8/9 subjects. The magnitude of the KY9 response...... by the respective CD8(+) T-cell response. By comparing inhibitions of viral replication by CD8(+) T cells specific for the Gag KK10, Pol KY9, and Vpr VL9 HLA-B 2705-restricted epitopes, we observed a consistent hierarchy of antiviral efficacy (Gag KK10 > Pol KY9 > Vpr VL9). This hierarchy was associated with early...

  5. HIV Controllers Exhibit Enhanced Frequencies of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Tetramer+Gag-Specific CD4+T Cells in Chronic Clade C HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Faatima; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Porichis, Filippos; Mewalal, Nikoshia; Pretorius, Karyn; Ismail, Nasreen; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Carrington, Mary; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Ndhlovu, Zaza M

    2017-04-01

    Immune control of viral infections is heavily dependent on helper CD4 + T cell function. However, the understanding of the contribution of HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses to immune protection against HIV-1, particularly in clade C infection, remains incomplete. Recently, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II tetramers have emerged as a powerful tool for interrogating antigen-specific CD4 + T cells without relying on effector functions. Here, we defined the MHC class II alleles for immunodominant Gag CD4 + T cell epitopes in clade C virus infection, constructed MHC class II tetramers, and then used these to define the magnitude, function, and relation to the viral load of HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses in a cohort of untreated HIV clade C-infected persons. We observed significantly higher frequencies of MHC class II tetramer-positive CD4 + T cells in HIV controllers than progressors ( P = 0.0001), and these expanded Gag-specific CD4 + T cells in HIV controllers showed higher levels of expression of the cytolytic proteins granzymes A and B. Importantly, targeting of the immunodominant Gag41 peptide in the context of HLA class II DRB1*1101 was associated with HIV control ( r = -0.5, P = 0.02). These data identify an association between HIV-specific CD4 + T cell targeting of immunodominant Gag epitopes and immune control, particularly the contribution of a single class II MHC-peptide complex to the immune response against HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, these results highlight the advantage of the use of class II tetramers in evaluating HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses in natural infections. IMPORTANCE Increasing evidence suggests that virus-specific CD4 + T cells contribute to the immune-mediated control of clade B HIV-1 infection, yet there remains a relative paucity of data regarding the role of HIV-specific CD4 + T cells in shaping adaptive immune responses in individuals infected with clade C, which is responsible for the majority of HIV

  6. Significant Reductions in Gag-Protease-Mediated HIV-1 Replication Capacity during the Course of the Epidemic in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shigeru; Hosoya, Noriaki; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brockman, Mark A.; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Koga, Michiko; Nakamura, Hitomi; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Fujii, Takeshi; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolves rapidly in response to host immune selection pressures. As a result, the functional properties of HIV-1 isolates from earlier in the epidemic may differ from those of isolates from later stages. However, few studies have investigated alterations in viral replication capacity (RC) over the epidemic. In the present study, we compare Gag-Protease-associated RC between early and late isolates in Japan (1994 to 2009). HIV-1 subtype B sequences from 156 antiretroviral-naïve Japanese with chronic asymptomatic infection were used to construct a chimeric NL4-3 strain encoding plasma-derived gag-protease. Viral replication capacity was examined by infecting a long terminal repeat-driven green fluorescent protein-reporter T cell line. We observed a reduction in the RC of chimeric NL4-3 over the epidemic, which remained significant after adjusting for the CD4+ T cell count and plasma virus load. The same outcome was seen when limiting the analysis to a single large cluster of related sequences, indicating that our results are not due to shifts in the molecular epidemiology of the epidemic in Japan. Moreover, the change in RC was independent of genetic distance between patient-derived sequences and wild-type NL4-3, thus ruling out potential temporal bias due to genetic similarity between patient and historic viral backbone sequences. Collectively, these data indicate that Gag-Protease-associated HIV-1 replication capacity has decreased over the epidemic in Japan. Larger studies from multiple geographical regions will be required to confirm this phenomenon. PMID:23152532

  7. Immunogenicity and virulence of attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan encoding HIV-1 muti-epitope genes, p24 and cholera toxin B subunit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shouwen; Wang, Yuhang; Liu, Cunxia; Wang, Maopeng; Zhu, Yilong; Tan, Peng; Ren, Dayong; Li, Xiao; Tian, Mingyao; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Chang; Jin, Ningyi

    2015-07-01

    No effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine against HIV-1 in humans is currently available. This study analyzes the immunogenicity and safety of a recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus. A chimeric gene of HIV-1 multi-epitope genes containing CpG ODN and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was inserted into Chinese vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) mutant strain. The recombinant virus rddVTT(-CCMp24) was assessed for immunogenicity and safety in mice. Results showed that the protein CCMp24 was expressed stably in BHK-21 infected with rddVTT(-CCMp24). And the recombinant virus induced the production of HIV-1 p24 specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IL-2 and IL-4. The recombinant vaccine induced γ-interferon secretion against HIV peptides, and elicited a certain levels of immunological memory. Results indicated that the recombinant virus had certain immunogenicity to HIV-1. Additionally, the virulence of the recombinant virus was been attenuated in vivo of mice compared with wild type VTT (wtVTT), and the introduction of CTB and HIV Mp24 did not alter the infectivity and virulence of defective vaccinia virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CTL epitope distribution patterns in the Gag and Nef proteins of HIV-1 from subtype A infected subjects in Kenya: Use of multiple peptide sets increases the detectable breadth of the CTL response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birx Deborah L

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtype A is a major strain in the HIV-1 pandemic in eastern Europe, central Asia and in certain regions of east Africa, notably in rural Kenya. While considerable effort has been focused upon mapping and defining immunodominant CTL epitopes in HIV-1 subtype B and subtype C infections, few epitope mapping studies have focused upon subtype A. Results We have used the IFN-γ ELIspot assay and overlapping peptide pools to show that the pattern of CTL recognition of the Gag and Nef proteins in subtype A infection is similar to that seen in subtypes B and C. The p17 and p24 proteins of Gag and the central conserved region of Nef were targeted by CTL from HIV-1-infected Kenyans. Several epitope/HLA associations commonly seen in subtype B and C infection were also observed in subtype A infections. Notably, an immunodominant HLA-C restricted epitope (Gag 296–304; YL9 was observed, with 8/9 HLA-CW0304 subjects responding to this epitope. Screening the cohort with peptide sets representing subtypes A, C and D (the three most prevalent HIV-1 subtypes in east Africa, revealed that peptide sets based upon an homologous subtype (either isolate or consensus only marginally improved the capacity to detect CTL responses. While the different peptide sets detected a similar number of responses (particularly in the Gag protein, each set was capable of detecting unique responses not identified with the other peptide sets. Conclusion Hence, screening with multiple peptide sets representing different sequences, and by extension different epitope variants, can increase the detectable breadth of the HIV-1-specific CTL response. Interpreting the true extent of cross-reactivity may be hampered by the use of 15-mer peptides at a single concentration and a lack of knowledge of the sequence that primed any given CTL response. Therefore, reagent choice and knowledge of the exact sequences that prime CTL responses will be important factors in

  9. BCA2/Rabring7 targets HIV-1 Gag for lysosomal degradation in a tetherin-independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Nityanandam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BCA2 (Rabring7, RNF115 or ZNF364 is a RING-finger E3 ubiquitin ligase that was identified as a co-factor in the restriction imposed by tetherin/BST2 on HIV-1. Contrary to the current model, in which BCA2 lacks antiviral activity in the absence of tetherin, we found that BCA2 possesses tetherin-independent antiviral activity. Here we show that the N-terminus of BCA2 physically interacts with the Matrix region of HIV-1 and other retroviral Gag proteins and promotes their ubiquitination, redistribution to endo-lysosomal compartments and, ultimately, lysosomal degradation. The targeted depletion of BCA2 in tetherin-expressing and tetherin-deficient cells results in a significant increase in virus release and replication, indicating that endogenous BCA2 possesses antiviral activity. Therefore, these results indicate that BCA2 functions as an antiviral factor that targets HIV-1 Gag for degradation, impairing virus assembly and release.

  10. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; Rao, Shwetha D; Bontell, Irene; Verheyen, Jens; Rao, Vasudev R; Gore, Sagar C; Soni, Neelesh; Shet, Anita; Schülter, Eugen; Ekstrand, Maria L; Wondwossen, Amogne; Kaiser, Rolf; Madhusudhan, Mallur S; Prasad, Vinayaka R; Sonnerborg, Anders

    2014-09-24

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region, which appeared in protease inhibitor failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (odds ratio=17.1, P ALIX-mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of the insertion needs to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions wherein the use of protease inhibitor drugs are being scaled up.

  11. Broad and persistent Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses are associated with viral control but rarely drive viral escape during primary HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebe, Mopo; Gounder, Kamini; Mokgoro, Mammekwa; Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Mncube, Zenele; Mkhize, Lungile; van der Stok, Mary; Jaggernath, Manjeetha; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung’u, Thumbi

    2015-01-01

    Objective We characterized protein-specific CD8+ T-cell immunodominance patterns during the first year of HIV-1 infection, and their impact on viral evolution and immune control. Methods We analyzed CD8+ T-cell responses to the full HIV-1 proteome during the first year of infection in eighteen antiretroviral-naïve individuals with acute HIV-1 subtype C infection, all identified prior to seroconversion. Ex vivo and cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT assays were performed and viruses from plasma were sequenced within defined CTL Gag epitopes. Results Nef-specific CD8+ T-cell responses were dominant during the first 4 weeks post infection and made up 40% of total responses at this time, yet by 1 year responses against this region had declined and Gag responses made up to 47% of all T-cell responses measured. An inverse correlation between the breadth of Gag-specific responses and viral load set point was evident at 26 weeks post infection (p=0.0081; r= −0.60) and beyond. An inverse correlation between the number of persistent responses targeting Gag and viral set point was also identified (p=0.01; r=−0.58). Gag-specific responses detectable by the cultured ELISPOT assay correlated negatively with viral load set point (p=0.0013; r=−0.91). Sequence evolution in targeted and non-targeted Gag epitopes in this cohort was infrequent. Conclusions These data underscore the importance of HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, particularly to the Gag protein, in the maintenance of low viral load levels during primary infection and show that these responses are initially poorly elicited by natural infection. These data have implications for vaccine design strategies. PMID:25387316

  12. Rapid, easy and economical dot EIA for detection of antibodies to HIV-1 using recombinant env- and gag-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R; Glathe, H; Lang, H; Simon, H; Clausnitzer, R; Petzold, G; Dittmann, S

    1991-01-01

    A rapid and simple screening test for antibodies to HIV-1 was designed on the principle of dot-EIA. Recombinant HIV-1 env and gag polypeptides are fixed on nitrocellulose sheets. Peroxidase conjugated protein A is used for detection of bound antibodies. After addition of hydrogen peroxide and 2-bromo-1-naphtol antigen-antibody complexes are visualized as discrete blue coloured spots. The test is completed within 15 min. Out of 111 sera positive by commercial EIA and Western blot analysis 110 were recognized by dot-EIA (sensitivity: 99.1%). False positive results compared with commercial EIA were found in 2 of 423 healthy blood donors (specificity: 99.5%).

  13. Performance evaluation of the Bio-Rad Laboratories GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA, a 4th generation HIV assay for the simultaneous detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O) and HIV-2 in human serum or plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentsen, Christopher; McLaughlin, Lisa; Mitchell, Elizabeth; Ferrera, Carol; Liska, Sally; Myers, Robert; Peel, Sheila; Swenson, Paul; Gadelle, Stephane; Shriver, M Kathleen

    2011-12-01

    A multi-center study was conducted to evaluate the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA, a 4th generation HIV-1/HIV-2 assay for the simultaneous detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O) and HIV-2 in human serum or plasma in adult and pediatric populations. The objectives of the study were to assess assay performance for the detection of acute HIV infections; sensitivity in known HIV positive samples; percent agreement with HIV status; specificity in low and high risk individuals of unknown HIV status; and to compare assay performance to a 3rd generation HIV assay. The evaluation included testing 9150 samples at four U.S. clinical trial sites, using three kit lots. Unlinked samples were from routine testing, repositories or purchased from vendors. GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA detection in samples from individuals in two separate populations with acute HIV infection was 95.2% (20/21) and 86.4% (38/44). Sensitivity was 100% (1603/1603) in known antibody positive [HIV-1 Groups M and O, and HIV-2] samples. HIV p24 antigen detection was 100% (53/53) in HIV-1 culture supernatants. HIV-1 seroconversion panel detection improved by a range of 0-20 days compared to a 3rd generation HIV test. Specificity was 99.9% (5989/5996) in low risk, 99.9% (959/960) in high risk and 100% (100/100) in pediatric populations. The GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA significantly reduced the diagnostic window when compared to the 3rd generation screening assay, enabling earlier diagnosis of HIV infection. The performance parameters of the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA are well suited for use in HIV diagnostic settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. High Frequency of Transmitted HIV-1 Gag HLA Class I-Driven Immune Escape Variants but Minimal Immune Selection over the First Year of Clade C Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Kamini; Padayachi, Nagavelli; Mann, Jaclyn K.; Radebe, Mopo; Mokgoro, Mammekwa; van der Stok, Mary; Mkhize, Lungile; Mncube, Zenele; Jaggernath, Manjeetha; Reddy, Tarylee; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung’u, Thumbi

    2015-01-01

    In chronic HIV infection, CD8+ T cell responses to Gag are associated with lower viral loads, but longitudinal studies of HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell-driven selection pressure in Gag from the time of acute infection are limited. In this study we examined Gag sequence evolution over the first year of infection in 22 patients identified prior to seroconversion. A total of 310 and 337 full-length Gag sequences from the earliest available samples (median = 14 days after infection [Fiebig stage I/II]) and at one-year post infection respectively were generated. Six of 22 (27%) individuals were infected with multiple variants. There was a trend towards early intra-patient viral sequence diversity correlating with viral load set point (p = 0.07, r = 0.39). At 14 days post infection, 59.7% of Gag CTL epitopes contained non-consensus polymorphisms and over half of these (35.3%) comprised of previously described CTL escape variants. Consensus and variant CTL epitope proportions were equally distributed irrespective of the selecting host HLA allele and most epitopes remained unchanged over 12 months post infection. These data suggest that intrapatient diversity during acute infection is an indicator of disease outcome. In this setting, there is a high rate of transmitted CTL escape variants and limited immune selection in Gag during the first year of infection. These data have relevance for vaccine strategies designed to elicit effective CD8+ T cell immune responses. PMID:25781986

  15. High frequency of transmitted HIV-1 Gag HLA class I-driven immune escape variants but minimal immune selection over the first year of clade C infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamini Gounder

    Full Text Available In chronic HIV infection, CD8+ T cell responses to Gag are associated with lower viral loads, but longitudinal studies of HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell-driven selection pressure in Gag from the time of acute infection are limited. In this study we examined Gag sequence evolution over the first year of infection in 22 patients identified prior to seroconversion. A total of 310 and 337 full-length Gag sequences from the earliest available samples (median = 14 days after infection [Fiebig stage I/II] and at one-year post infection respectively were generated. Six of 22 (27% individuals were infected with multiple variants. There was a trend towards early intra-patient viral sequence diversity correlating with viral load set point (p = 0.07, r = 0.39. At 14 days post infection, 59.7% of Gag CTL epitopes contained non-consensus polymorphisms and over half of these (35.3% comprised of previously described CTL escape variants. Consensus and variant CTL epitope proportions were equally distributed irrespective of the selecting host HLA allele and most epitopes remained unchanged over 12 months post infection. These data suggest that intrapatient diversity during acute infection is an indicator of disease outcome. In this setting, there is a high rate of transmitted CTL escape variants and limited immune selection in Gag during the first year of infection. These data have relevance for vaccine strategies designed to elicit effective CD8+ T cell immune responses.

  16. Short communication: evaluating the level of expressed HIV type 1 gp120 and gag proteins in the vCP1521 vector by two immunoplaque methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Ali; Edamura, Kerrie Nichol; Leung, Glenda; Gisonni-Lex, Lucy; Mallet, Laurent

    2013-02-01

    Over the past few years, several recombinant ALVAC constructs have been used as delivery systems in various vaccine research studies and trials. The ALVAC-HIV vCP1521 vector has been used as a vaccine delivery system in the RV144 study, a phase III HIV study that displayed over 31% protective efficacy. One of the important parameters for evaluating the potency of an ALVAC construct is the stable expression of proteins encoded by the inserted genes. Herein, the expression of inserted gp120 and gag genes in two manufactured ALVAC-HIV vCP1521 lots have been determined by two immunoplaque methods (dish and plaque lift). Both methods were specific and robust and demonstrated that the ALVAC-HIV vCP1521 lots were able to express gp120 and gag proteins in over 99% of the infectious plaques.

  17. The fitness landscape of HIV-1 gag: advanced modeling approaches and validation of model predictions by in vitro testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jaclyn K; Barton, John P; Ferguson, Andrew L; Omarjee, Saleha; Walker, Bruce D; Chakraborty, Arup; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2014-08-01

    Viral immune evasion by sequence variation is a major hindrance to HIV-1 vaccine design. To address this challenge, our group has developed a computational model, rooted in physics, that aims to predict the fitness landscape of HIV-1 proteins in order to design vaccine immunogens that lead to impaired viral fitness, thus blocking viable escape routes. Here, we advance the computational models to address previous limitations, and directly test model predictions against in vitro fitness measurements of HIV-1 strains containing multiple Gag mutations. We incorporated regularization into the model fitting procedure to address finite sampling. Further, we developed a model that accounts for the specific identity of mutant amino acids (Potts model), generalizing our previous approach (Ising model) that is unable to distinguish between different mutant amino acids. Gag mutation combinations (17 pairs, 1 triple and 25 single mutations within these) predicted to be either harmful to HIV-1 viability or fitness-neutral were introduced into HIV-1 NL4-3 by site-directed mutagenesis and replication capacities of these mutants were assayed in vitro. The predicted and measured fitness of the corresponding mutants for the original Ising model (r = -0.74, p = 3.6×10-6) are strongly correlated, and this was further strengthened in the regularized Ising model (r = -0.83, p = 3.7×10-12). Performance of the Potts model (r = -0.73, p = 9.7×10-9) was similar to that of the Ising model, indicating that the binary approximation is sufficient for capturing fitness effects of common mutants at sites of low amino acid diversity. However, we show that the Potts model is expected to improve predictive power for more variable proteins. Overall, our results support the ability of the computational models to robustly predict the relative fitness of mutant viral strains, and indicate the potential value of this approach for understanding viral immune evasion, and

  18. The fitness landscape of HIV-1 gag: advanced modeling approaches and validation of model predictions by in vitro testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn K Mann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Viral immune evasion by sequence variation is a major hindrance to HIV-1 vaccine design. To address this challenge, our group has developed a computational model, rooted in physics, that aims to predict the fitness landscape of HIV-1 proteins in order to design vaccine immunogens that lead to impaired viral fitness, thus blocking viable escape routes. Here, we advance the computational models to address previous limitations, and directly test model predictions against in vitro fitness measurements of HIV-1 strains containing multiple Gag mutations. We incorporated regularization into the model fitting procedure to address finite sampling. Further, we developed a model that accounts for the specific identity of mutant amino acids (Potts model, generalizing our previous approach (Ising model that is unable to distinguish between different mutant amino acids. Gag mutation combinations (17 pairs, 1 triple and 25 single mutations within these predicted to be either harmful to HIV-1 viability or fitness-neutral were introduced into HIV-1 NL4-3 by site-directed mutagenesis and replication capacities of these mutants were assayed in vitro. The predicted and measured fitness of the corresponding mutants for the original Ising model (r = -0.74, p = 3.6×10-6 are strongly correlated, and this was further strengthened in the regularized Ising model (r = -0.83, p = 3.7×10-12. Performance of the Potts model (r = -0.73, p = 9.7×10-9 was similar to that of the Ising model, indicating that the binary approximation is sufficient for capturing fitness effects of common mutants at sites of low amino acid diversity. However, we show that the Potts model is expected to improve predictive power for more variable proteins. Overall, our results support the ability of the computational models to robustly predict the relative fitness of mutant viral strains, and indicate the potential value of this approach for understanding viral immune evasion

  19. Efficient in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 gag reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) at minimal ratios of PNA/RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Zachar, Vladimir; Nielsen, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    We have tested the inhibitory potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) on in vitro reverse transcription of the HIV-1 gag gene. PNA was designed to target different regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and the effect on reverse transcription by HIV-1, MMLV and AMV reverse transcriptases (RTs...... that would indicate PNA-mediated RNase H activation of the tested RTs. In conclusion, PNA appears to have a potential to become a specific and efficient inhibitor of reverse transcription in vivo , provided sufficient intracellular levels are achievable.......) was investigated. We found that a bis-PNA (parallel antisense 10mer linked to antiparallel antisense 10mer) was superior to both the parallel antisense 10mer and antiparallel antisense 10mer in inhibiting reverse transcription of the gene, thus indicating triplex formation at the target sequence. A complete arrest...

  20. A Phase I Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Adjuvanted HIV-1 Gag-Pol-Nef Fusion Protein and Adenovirus 35 Gag-RT-Int-Nef Vaccine in Healthy HIV-Uninfected African Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Omosa-Manyonyi

    Full Text Available Sequential prime-boost or co-administration of HIV vaccine candidates based on an adjuvanted clade B p24, RT, Nef, p17 fusion protein (F4/AS01 plus a non-replicating adenovirus 35 expressing clade A Gag, RT, Int and Nef (Ad35-GRIN may lead to a unique immune profile, inducing both strong T-cell and antibody responses.In a phase 1, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 146 healthy adult volunteers were randomized to one of four regimens: heterologous prime-boost with two doses of F4/AS01E or F4/AS01B followed by Ad35-GRIN; Ad35-GRIN followed by two doses of F4/AS01B; or three co-administrations of Ad35-GRIN and F4/AS01B. T cell and antibody responses were measured.The vaccines were generally well-tolerated, and did not cause serious adverse events. The response rate, by IFN-γ ELISPOT, was greater when Ad35-GRIN was the priming vaccine and in the co-administration groups. F4/AS01 induced CD4+ T-cells expressing primarily CD40L and IL2 +/- TNF-α, while Ad35-GRIN induced predominantly CD8+ T-cells expressing IFN-γ +/- IL2 or TNF-α. Viral inhibition was induced after Ad35-GRIN vaccination, regardless of the regimen. Strong F4-specific antibody responses were induced. Immune responses persisted at least a year after the last vaccination. The complementary response profiles, characteristic of each vaccine, were both expressed after co-administration.Co-administration of an adjuvanted protein and an adenovirus vector showed an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile and resulted in strong, multifunctional and complementary HIV-specific immune responses.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01264445.

  1. Safety and immunogenicity of an HIV-1 gag DNA vaccine with or without IL-12 and/or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvant in healthy, HIV-1 uninfected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros A Kalams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA vaccines are a promising approach to vaccination since they circumvent the problem of vector-induced immunity. DNA plasmid cytokine adjuvants have been shown to augment immune responses in small animals and in macaques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed two first in human HIV vaccine trials in the US, Brazil and Thailand of an RNA-optimized truncated HIV-1 gag gene (p37 DNA derived from strain HXB2 administered either alone or in combination with dose-escalation of IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Vaccinations with both the HIV immunogen and cytokine adjuvant were generally well-tolerated and no significant vaccine-related adverse events were identified. A small number of subjects developed asymptomatic low titer antibodies to IL-12 or IL-15. Cellular immunogenicity following 3 and 4 vaccinations was poor, with response rates to gag of 4.9%/8.7% among vaccinees receiving gag DNA alone, 0%/11.5% among those receiving gag DNA+IL-15, and no responders among those receiving DNA+high dose (1500 ug IL-12 DNA. However, after three doses, 44.4% (4/9 of vaccinees receiving gag DNA and intermediate dose (500 ug of IL-12 DNA demonstrated a detectable cellular immune response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This combination of HIV gag DNA with plasmid cytokine adjuvants was well tolerated. There were minimal responses to HIV gag DNA alone, and no apparent augmentation with either IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Despite the promise of DNA vaccines, newer formulations or methods of delivery will be required to increase their immunogenicity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00115960 NCT00111605.

  2. Gag mutations strongly contribute to HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors in highly drug-experienced patients besides compensating for fitness loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dam

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 resistance to protease inhibitors (PI results from mutations in the viral protease (PR that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC. Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying different sequences from six patients who had failed multiple lines of treatment. Mutations in Gag strongly and directly contributed to PI resistance besides compensating for fitness loss. This effect was essentially carried by the C-terminal region of Gag (containing NC-SP2-p6 with little or no contribution from MA, CA, and SP1. The effect of Gag on resistance depended on the presence of cleavage site mutations A431V or I437V in NC-SP2-p6 and correlated with processing of the NC/SP2 cleavage site. By contrast, reverting the A431V or I437V mutation in these highly evolved sequences had little effect on RC. Mutations in the NC-SP2-p6 region of Gag can be dually selected as compensatory and as direct PI resistance mutations, with cleavage at the NC-SP2 site behaving as a rate-limiting step in PI resistance. Further compensatory mutations render viral RC independent of the A431V or I437V mutations while their effect on resistance persists.

  3. A heterologous prime-boosting strategy with replicating Vaccinia virus vectors and plant-produced HIV-1 Gag/dgp41 virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Lydia R; Kessans, Sarah A; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Kibler, Karen V; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Roderiguez, Mariano Esteban; Blattman, Joseph N; Jacobs, Bertram L; Mor, Tsafrir S

    2017-07-01

    Showing modest efficacy, the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine clinical trial utilized a non-replicating canarypox viral vector and a soluble gp120 protein boost. Here we built upon the RV144 strategy by developing a novel combination of a replicating, but highly-attenuated Vaccinia virus vector, NYVAC-KC, and plant-produced HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs). Both components contained the full-length Gag and a membrane anchored truncated gp41 presenting the membrane proximal external region with its conserved broadly neutralizing epitopes in the pre-fusion conformation. We tested different prime/boost combinations of these components in mice and showed that the group primed with NYVAC-KC and boosted with both the viral vectors and plant-produced VLPs have the most robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses, at 12.7% of CD8 T cells expressing IFN-γ in response to stimulation with five Gag epitopes. The same immunization group elicited the best systemic and mucosal antibody responses to Gag and dgp41 with a bias towards IgG1. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The nucleocapsid region of HIV-1 Gag cooperates with the PTAP and LYPXnL late domains to recruit the cellular machinery necessary for viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Dussupt

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 release is mediated through two motifs in the p6 region of Gag, PTAP and LYPX(nL, which recruit cellular proteins Tsg101 and Alix, respectively. The Nucleocapsid region of Gag (NC, which binds the Bro1 domain of Alix, also plays an important role in HIV-1 release, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that the first 202 residues of the Bro1 domain (Bro(i are sufficient to bind Gag. Bro(i interferes with HIV-1 release in an NC-dependent manner and arrests viral budding at the plasma membrane. Similar interrupted budding structures are seen following over-expression of a fragment containing Bro1 with the adjacent V domain (Bro1-V. Although only Bro1-V contains binding determinants for CHMP4, both Bro(i and Bro1-V inhibited release via both the PTAP/Tsg101 and the LYPX(nL/Alix pathways, suggesting that they interfere with a key step in HIV-1 release. Remarkably, we found that over-expression of Bro1 rescued the release of HIV-1 lacking both L domains. This rescue required the N-terminal region of the NC domain in Gag and the CHMP4 binding site in Bro1. Interestingly, release defects due to mutations in NC that prevented Bro1 mediated rescue of virus egress were rescued by providing a link to the ESCRT machinery via Nedd4.2s over-expression. Our data support a model in which NC cooperates with PTAP in the recruitment of cellular proteins necessary for its L domain activity and binds the Bro1-CHMP4 complex required for LYPX(nL-mediated budding.

  5. Distinct changes in HIV type 1 RNA versus p24 antigen levels in serum during short-term zidovudine therapy in asymptomatic individuals with and without progression to AIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurriaans, S.; Weverling, G. J.; Goudsmit, J.; Boogaard, J.; Brok, M.; van Strijp, D.; Lange, J.; Koot, M.; van Gemen, B.

    1995-01-01

    Serum HIV-1 RNA and p24 antigen levels were examined in 28 seropositive asymptomatic individuals participating in a trial on the efficacy of zidovudine. Sixteen individuals remained asymptomatic until 4 years after the onset of the trial, whereas 12 individuals were diagnosed with an AIDS-defining

  6. Antiviral activity of recombinant ankyrin targeted to the capsid domain of HIV-1 Gag polyprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Nangola Sawitree; Urvoas Agathe; Valerio-Lepiniec Marie; Khamaikawin Wannisa; Sakkhachornphop Supachai; Hong Saw-See; Boulanger Pierre; Minard Philippe; Tayapiwatana Chatchai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Ankyrins are cellular mediators of a number of essential protein-protein interactions. Unlike intrabodies, ankyrins are composed of highly structured repeat modules characterized by disulfide bridge-independent folding. Artificial ankyrin molecules, designed to target viral components, might act as intracellular antiviral agents and contribute to the cellular immunity against viral pathogens such as HIV-1. Results A phage-displayed library of artificial ankyrins was constr...

  7. Human Ubc9 is involved in intracellular HIV-1 Env stability after trafficking out of the trans-Golgi network in a Gag dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Bohl

    Full Text Available The cellular E2 Sumo conjugase, Ubc9 interacts with HIV-1 Gag, and is important for the assembly of infectious HIV-1 virions. In the previous study we demonstrated that in the absence of Ubc9, a defect in virion assembly was associated with decreased levels of mature intracellular Envelope (Env that affected Env incorporation into virions and virion infectivity. We have further characterized the effect of Ubc9 knockdown on HIV Env processing and assembly. We found that gp160 stability in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and its trafficking to the trans-Golgi network (TGN were unaffected, indicating that the decreased intracellular mature Env levels in Ubc9-depleted cells were due to a selective degradation of mature Env gp120 after cleavage from gp160 and trafficked out of the TGN. Decreased levels of Gag and mature Env were found to be associated with the plasma membrane and lipid rafts, which suggest that these viral proteins were not trafficked correctly to the assembly site. Intracellular gp120 were partially rescued when treated with a combination of lysosome inhibitors. Taken together our results suggest that in the absence of Ubc9, gp120 is preferentially degraded in the lysosomes likely before trafficking to assembly sites leading to the production of defective virions. This study provides further insight in the processing and packaging of the HIV-1 gp120 into mature HIV-1 virions.

  8. Human Ubc9 is involved in intracellular HIV-1 Env stability after trafficking out of the trans-Golgi network in a Gag dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Christopher R; Abrahamyan, Levon G; Wood, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The cellular E2 Sumo conjugase, Ubc9 interacts with HIV-1 Gag, and is important for the assembly of infectious HIV-1 virions. In the previous study we demonstrated that in the absence of Ubc9, a defect in virion assembly was associated with decreased levels of mature intracellular Envelope (Env) that affected Env incorporation into virions and virion infectivity. We have further characterized the effect of Ubc9 knockdown on HIV Env processing and assembly. We found that gp160 stability in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and its trafficking to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) were unaffected, indicating that the decreased intracellular mature Env levels in Ubc9-depleted cells were due to a selective degradation of mature Env gp120 after cleavage from gp160 and trafficked out of the TGN. Decreased levels of Gag and mature Env were found to be associated with the plasma membrane and lipid rafts, which suggest that these viral proteins were not trafficked correctly to the assembly site. Intracellular gp120 were partially rescued when treated with a combination of lysosome inhibitors. Taken together our results suggest that in the absence of Ubc9, gp120 is preferentially degraded in the lysosomes likely before trafficking to assembly sites leading to the production of defective virions. This study provides further insight in the processing and packaging of the HIV-1 gp120 into mature HIV-1 virions.

  9. Intracellular interactions between APOBEC3G, RNA, and HIV-1 Gag: APOBEC3G multimerization is dependent on its association with RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friew Yeshitila N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host restriction factor APOBEC3G (A3G blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replication by G-to-A hypermutation, and by inhibiting DNA synthesis and provirus formation. Previous reports have suggested that A3G is a dimer and its virion incorporation is mediated through interactions with viral or nonviral RNAs and/or HIV-1 Gag. We have now employed a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay (BiFC to analyze the intracellular A3G-A3G, A3G-RNA, and A3G-Gag interactions in living cells by reconstitution of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP from its N- or C-terminal fragments. Results The results obtained with catalytic domain 1 and 2 (CD1 and CD2 mutants indicate that A3G-A3G and A3G-Gag multimerization is dependent on an intact CD1 domain, which is required for RNA binding. A mutant HIV-1 Gag that exhibits reduced RNA binding also failed to reconstitute BiFC with wild-type A3G, indicating a requirement for both HIV-1 Gag and A3G to bind to RNA for their multimerization. Addition of a non-specific RNA binding peptide (P22 to the N-terminus of a CD1 mutant of A3G restored BiFC and virion incorporation, but failed to inhibit viral replication, indicating that the mutations in CD1 resulted in additional defects that interfere with A3G's antiviral activity. Conclusion These studies establish a robust BiFC assay for analysis of intracellular interactions of A3G with other macromolecules. The results indicate that in vivo A3G is a monomer that forms multimers upon binding to RNA. In addition, we observed weak interactions between wild-type A3G molecules and RNA binding-defective mutants of A3G, which could explain previously described protein-protein interactions between purified A3G molecules.

  10. Preferential Targeting of Conserved Gag Regions after Vaccination with a Heterologous DNA Prime-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Boost HIV-1 Vaccine Regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Asli; Podola, Lilli; Mann, Philipp; Missanga, Marco; Haule, Antelmo; Sudi, Lwitiho; Nilsson, Charlotta; Kaluwa, Bahati; Lueer, Cornelia; Mwakatima, Maria; Munseri, Patricia J; Maboko, Leonard; Robb, Merlin L; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Kijak, Gustavo; Marovich, Mary; McCormack, Sheena; Joseph, Sarah; Lyamuya, Eligius; Wahren, Britta; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Hoelscher, Michael; Bakari, Muhammad; Kroidl, Arne; Geldmacher, Christof

    2017-09-15

    Prime-boost vaccination strategies against HIV-1 often include multiple variants for a given immunogen for better coverage of the extensive viral diversity. To study the immunologic effects of this approach, we characterized breadth, phenotype, function, and specificity of Gag-specific T cells induced by a DNA-prime modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-boost vaccination strategy, which uses mismatched Gag immunogens in the TamoVac 01 phase IIa trial. Healthy Tanzanian volunteers received three injections of the DNA-SMI vaccine encoding a subtype B and AB-recombinant Gagp37 and two vaccinations with MVA-CMDR encoding subtype A Gagp55 Gag-specific T-cell responses were studied in 42 vaccinees using fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells. After the first MVA-CMDR boost, vaccine-induced gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) Gag-specific T-cell responses were dominated by CD4+ T cells (P viruses. While including multiple variants for a given immunogen in prime-boost vaccination strategies is one approach that aims to improve coverage for global virus variants, the immunologic consequences of this strategy have been poorly defined so far. It is unclear whether inclusion of multiple variants in prime-boost vaccination strategies improves recognition of variant viruses by T cells and by which mechanisms this would be achieved, either by improved cross-recognition of multiple variants for a given antigenic region or through preferential targeting of antigenic regions more conserved between prime and boost. Engineering vaccines to induce adaptive immune responses that preferentially target conserved antigenic regions of viral vulnerability might facilitate better immune control after preventive and therapeutic vaccination for HIV and for other variable viruses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. In vivo Biodistribution of a Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing HIV-1 Gag Following Intramuscular, Intranasal, or Intravenous Inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. Erik; Coleman, John W.; Kalyan, Narender K.; Calderon, Priscilla; Wright, Kevin J.; Obregon, Jennifer; Ogin-Wilson, Eleanor; Natuk, Robert J.; Clarke, David K.; Udem, Stephen A.; Cooper, David; Hendry, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (rVSVs) are being developed as potential HIV-1 vaccine candidates. To characterize the in vivo replication and dissemination of rVSV vectors in mice, high doses of a highly attenuated vector expressing HIV-1 Gag, rVSVIN- N4CT9-Gag1, and a prototypic reference virus, rVSVIN-HIVGag5, were delivered intramuscularly (IM), intranasally (IN), or intravenously (IV). We used quantitative, real-time RT-PCR (Q-PCR) and standard plaque assays to measure the temporal dissemination of these viruses to various tissues. Following IM inoculation, both viruses were detected primarily at the injection site as well as in draining lymph nodes; neither virus induced significant weight loss, pathologic signs, or evidence of neuroinvasion. In contrast, following IN inoculation, the prototypic virus was detected in all tissues tested and caused significant weight loss leading to death. IN administration of rVSVIN- N4CT9-Gag1 resulted in detection in numerous tissues (brain, lung, nasal turbinates, and lymph nodes) albeit in significantly reduced levels, which caused little or no weight loss nor any mortality. Following IV inoculation, both prototypic and attenuated viruses were detected by Q-PCR in all tissues tested. In contrast to the prototype, rVSVIN-N4CT9-Gag1 viral loads were significantly lower in all organs tested, and no infectious virus was detected in the brain following IV inoculation, despite the presence of viral RNA. These studies demonstrated significant differences in the biodistribution patterns of and the associated pathogenicity engendered by the prototypic and attenuated vectors in a highly susceptible host. PMID:19428903

  12. Membrane interaction of retroviral Gag proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Alfred Dick

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of an infectious retroviral particle relies on multimerization of the Gag polyprotein at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The three domains of Gag common to all retroviruses-- MA, CA, and NC-- provide the signals for membrane binding, assembly, and viral RNA packaging, respectively. These signals do not function independently of one another. For example, Gag multimerization enhances membrane binding and is more efficient when NC is interacting with RNA. MA binding to the plasma membrane is governed by several principles, including electrostatics, recognition of specific lipid head groups, hydrophobic interactions, and membrane order. HIV-1 uses many of these principles while Rous sarcoma virus (RSV appears to use fewer. This review describes the principles that govern Gag interactions with membranes, focusing on RSV and HIV-1 Gag. The review also defines lipid and membrane behavior, and discusses the complexities in determining how lipid and membrane behavior impact Gag membrane binding.

  13. [Evaluation of a new screening assay kit for the combined detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibody--comparison of the performance of the new kit and HIV antibody assay kits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T; Watanabe, S; Kondo, M; Saito, T; Imai, M

    1999-07-01

    DUO is an automated HIV infection screening test kit based on the combined detection of p24 Ag and anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 IgG in human sera or plasma using the ELFA technique (Enzyme-Linked Fluorescent Assay). The performance of DUO was compared with that of HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation EIA plus and particle agglutination (PA) test. A total of 141 seropositive sera, 3 seroconversion panels, 300 seronegative sera and 387 potentially cross-reactive serum samples were tested. One hundred and forty one seropositive sera in Japan and Cameroon were all positive with DUO. Three seroconversion panels (panel Q, Z, AE) were tested to evaluate sensitivity. In Panel Q, infecution was detected seven days earlier with DUO than with the 3rd generation EIA plus and PA. In Panel AE, infection was detected four days earlier with DUO than with the single antibody assays. Three hundred seronegative sera from Kanagawa prefectural public health centers were all negative with DUO as well as PA test. Three hundred and eighty seven potentially cross-reacting samples were tested to challenge the specificity of the assay. These included samples from pregnant women and hepatitis patients. In four of the 204 samples from pregnant women, false-positive results were observed with DUO. In three of the 183 samples from hepatitis patients, false-positive results were also obtained with DUO. All samples of 7 DUO positive results were negative with western blot test. Five of them were negative with RT-PCR and 2 of them were not tested because there were not enough samples. Thirty cross-reacting (false-positive) samples by PA test from blood donors were tested by DUO, and all of these were negative by DUO.

  14. Development of a one-tube multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay for the simultaneous amplification of HIV type 1 group M gag and env heteroduplex mobility assay fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Cham, F.; Heyndrickx, L; Janssens, W; Vereecken, K.; Houwer, K.; Coppens, S.; Van Der Auwera, G.; Whittle, H; van der Groen, G

    2000-01-01

    The emergence of intersubtype recombinant HIV-1 isolates has made it imperative to analyze different regions of HIV-1 genomes. For this purpose a one-tube multiplex RT-PCR, coamplifying first-round amplicons that allow amplification of gag and env heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) fragments from different HIV-1 group M isolates, was developed, starting with plasma samples. The multiplex RT-PCR assay is sensitive: 115 of 136 (84.5%) samples were positive for both gag and env, positive amplific...

  15. HIV-1 replication fitness of HLA-B*57/58:01 CTL escape variants is restored by the accumulation of compensatory mutations in gag.

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    Esther F Gijsbers

    Full Text Available Expression of HLA-B*57 and the closely related HLA-B*58:01 are associated with prolonged survival after HIV-1 infection. However, large differences in disease course are observed among HLA-B*57/58:01 patients. Escape mutations in CTL epitopes restricted by these HLA alleles come at a fitness cost and particularly the T242N mutation in the TW10 CTL epitope in Gag has been demonstrated to decrease the viral replication capacity. Additional mutations within or flanking this CTL epitope can partially restore replication fitness of CTL escape variants. Five HLA-B*57/58:01 progressors and 5 HLA-B*57/58:01 long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs were followed longitudinally and we studied which compensatory mutations were involved in the restoration of the viral fitness of variants that escaped from HLA-B*57/58:01-restricted CTL pressure. The Sequence Harmony algorithm was used to detect homology in amino acid composition by comparing longitudinal Gag sequences obtained from HIV-1 patients positive and negative for HLA-B*57/58:01 and from HLA-B*57/58:01 progressors and LTNPs. Although virus isolates from HLA-B*57/58:01 individuals contained multiple CTL escape mutations, these escape mutations were not associated with disease progression. In sequences from HLA-B*57/58:01 progressors, 5 additional mutations in Gag were observed: S126N, L215T, H219Q, M228I and N252H. The combination of these mutations restored the replication fitness of CTL escape HIV-1 variants. Furthermore, we observed a positive correlation between the number of escape and compensatory mutations in Gag and the replication fitness of biological HIV-1 variants isolated from HLA-B*57/58:01 patients, suggesting that the replication fitness of HLA-B*57/58:01 escape variants is restored by accumulation of compensatory mutations.

  16. First-in-Human Evaluation of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Intranasally Administered Replication-Competent Sendai Virus–Vectored HIV Type 1 Gag Vaccine: Induction of Potent T-Cell or Antibody Responses in Prime-Boost Regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyombayire, Julien; Anzala, Omu; Gazzard, Brian; Karita, Etienne; Bergin, Philip; Hayes, Peter; Kopycinski, Jakub; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Jackson, Akil; Bizimana, Jean; Farah, Bashir; Sayeed, Eddy; Parks, Christopher L.; Inoue, Makoto; Hironaka, Takashi; Hara, Hiroto; Shu, Tsugumine; Matano, Tetsuro; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Park, Harriet; Gilmour, Jill; Lombardo, Angela; Excler, Jean-Louis; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna S.; Cox, Josephine H.

    2017-01-01

    Background. We report the first-in-human safety and immunogenicity assessment of a prototype intranasally administered, replication-competent Sendai virus (SeV)–vectored, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine. Methods. Sixty-five HIV-1–uninfected adults in Kenya, Rwanda, and the United Kingdom were assigned to receive 1 of 4 prime-boost regimens (administered at 0 and 4 months, respectively; ratio of vaccine to placebo recipients, 12:4): priming with a lower-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with an adenovirus 35–vectored vaccine encoding HIV-1 Gag, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) given intramuscularly (SLA); priming with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly (SHA); priming with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly, followed by boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (ASH); and priming and boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (SHSH). Results. All vaccine regimens were well tolerated. Gag-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot–determined response rates and geometric mean responses were higher (96% and 248 spot-forming units, respectively) in groups primed with SeV-Gag and boosted with Ad35-GRIN (SLA and SHA) than those after a single dose of Ad35-GRIN (56% and 54 spot-forming units, respectively) or SeV-Gag (55% and 59 spot-forming units, respectively); responses persisted for ≥8 months after completion of the prime-boost regimen. Functional CD8+ T-cell responses with greater breadth, magnitude, and frequency in a viral inhibition assay were also seen in the SLA and SHA groups after Ad35-GRIN boost, compared with those who received either vaccine alone. SeV-Gag did not boost T-cell counts in the ASH group. In contrast, the highest Gag-specific antibody titers were seen in the ASH group. Mucosal antibody responses were sporadic. Conclusions. SeV-Gag primed functional, durable HIV-specific T

  17. Association of human mitochondrial lysyl-tRNA synthetase with HIV-1 GagPol does not require other viral proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Kobbi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In human, the cytoplasmic (cLysRS and mitochondrial (mLysRS species of lysyl-tRNA synthetase are encoded by a single gene. Following HIV-1 infection, mLysRS is selectively taken up into viral particles along with the three tRNALys isoacceptors. The GagPol polyprotein precursor is involved in this process. With the aim to reconstitute in vitro the HIV-1 tRNA3Lys packaging complex, we first searched for the putative involvement of another viral protein in the selective viral hijacking of mLysRS only. After screening all the viral proteins, we observed that Vpr and Rev have the potential to interact with mLysRS, but that this association does not take place at the level of the assembly of mLysRS into the packaging complex. We also show that tRNA3Lys can form a ternary complex with the two purified proteins mLysRS and the Pol domain of GagPol, which mimicks its packaging complex.

  18. Natural deletion of L35Y36 in p6 gag eliminate LYPXnL/ALIX auxiliary virus release pathway in HIV-1 subtype C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ajit; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2012-12-01

    Natural loss of L35Y36 residues in ALIX binding site of HIV-1 subtype C was found to prevent the p6 gag-ALIX interaction. Over expression of ALIX 364-716 (V-domain) unlike pNL4.3 (subtype B), also did not inhibit the release of chimeric pNL4.3 expressing subtype C p6 late domain. Loss of V domain binding consequently affected the ALIX mediated particle release in the absence of PTAP/TSG101 pathway. Our data indicated absence of LYPXnL/ALIX pathway in HIV-1 subtype C. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of a new fourth generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the LG HIV Ag-Ab Plus, with a combined HIV p24 antigen and anti-HIV-1/2/O screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Joon-Sup; Jun, Gyo; Chang, Young; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Yoo, Seungbum; Kim, Eunkyung; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Kang, Hee-Jung; Kim, Young-A; Ahn, Sun-Young; Cha, Je-Eun; Youn, Sung-Tae; Park, Jae-Won

    2006-11-01

    The LG HIV Ag-Ab Plus, a new fourth generation diagnostic assay for HIV infection, was evaluated in comparison to the Enzygnost HIV Integral, an established fourth generation HIV assay. The LG assay showed 100% sensitivity with 109 samples with anti-HIV-1, anti-HIV-2 or anti-HIV-1 group O reactivity. It also detected correctly all 51 positives on three BBI performance panels, slightly outperforming the Enzygnost HIV Integral, which detected 50. The specificity of the LG HIV Ag-Ab Plus was 99.9% with 999 sera from healthy blood donors, which was slightly inferior to the performance of the Enzygnost HIV Integral, which had 100% specificity. The LG assay showed 100% specificity with 81 specimens with underlying diseases including hepatitis B, demonstrating a low risk of cross-reactivity with other infections. The reduction of the diagnostic window by the LG HIV Ag-Ab Plus, compared to a third generation HIV assay, was 6.3 days. The LG assay also showed sufficiently high intra-person and inter-person reproducibility. The overall performance of this new fourth generation HIV assay was adequate for screening and diagnosis of HIV infection.

  20. Intra- and inter-clade cross-reactivity by HIV-1 Gag specific T-cells reveals exclusive and commonly targeted regions: implications for current vaccine trials.

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    Lycias Zembe

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of HIV-1 across the globe is a major challenge for developing an HIV vaccine. To facilitate immunogen design, it is important to characterize clusters of commonly targeted T-cell epitopes across different HIV clades. To address this, we examined 39 HIV-1 clade C infected individuals for IFN-γ Gag-specific T-cell responses using five sets of overlapping peptides, two sets matching clade C vaccine candidates derived from strains from South Africa and China, and three peptide sets corresponding to consensus clades A, B, and D sequences. The magnitude and breadth of T-cell responses against the two clade C peptide sets did not differ, however clade C peptides were preferentially recognized compared to the other peptide sets. A total of 84 peptides were recognized, of which 19 were exclusively from clade C, 8 exclusively from clade B, one peptide each from A and D and 17 were commonly recognized by clade A, B, C and D. The entropy of the exclusively recognized peptides was significantly higher than that of commonly recognized peptides (p = 0.0128 and the median peptide processing scores were significantly higher for the peptide variants recognized versus those not recognized (p = 0.0001. Consistent with these results, the predicted Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I IC(50 values were significantly lower for the recognized peptide variants compared to those not recognized in the ELISPOT assay (p<0.0001, suggesting that peptide variation between clades, resulting in lack of cross-clade recognition, has been shaped by host immune selection pressure. Overall, our study shows that clade C infected individuals recognize clade C peptides with greater frequency and higher magnitude than other clades, and that a selection of highly conserved epitope regions within Gag are commonly recognized and give rise to cross-clade reactivities.

  1. Interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vif with Gag and Gag-Pol precursors: co-encapsidation and interference with viral protease-mediated Gag processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardy, M; Gay, B; Pébernard, S; Chazal, N; Courcoul, M; Vigne, R; Decroly, E; Boulanger, P

    2001-11-01

    Interactions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vif protein with various forms of Gag and Gag-Pol precursors expressed in insect cells were investigated in vivo and in vitro by co-encapsidation, co-precipitation and viral protease (PR)-mediated Gag processing assays. Addressing of Gag to the plasma membrane, its budding as extracellular virus-like particles (VLP) and the presence of the p6 domain were apparently not required for Vif encapsidation, as non-N-myristoylated Deltap6-Gag and Vif proteins were co-encapsidated into intracellular VLP. Encapsidation of Vif occurred at significantly higher copy numbers in extracellular VLP formed from N-myristoylated, budding-competent Gag-Pol precursors harbouring an inactive PR domain or in chimaeric VLP composed of Gag and Gag-Pol precursors compared with the Vif content of Pr55Gag VLP. Vif encapsidation efficiency did not seem to correlate directly with VLP morphology, since these chimaeric VLP were comparable in size and shape to Pr55Gag VLP. Vif apparently inhibited PR-mediated Pr55Gag processing in vitro, with preferential protection of cleavage sites at the MA-CA and CA-NC junctions. Vif was resistant to PR action in vitro under conditions that allowed full Gag processing, and no direct interaction between Vif and PR was detected in vivo or in vitro. This suggested that inhibition by Vif of PR-mediated Gag processing resulted from interaction of Vif with the Gag substrate and not with the enzyme. Likewise, the higher efficiency of Vif encapsidation by Gag-Pol precursor compared with Pr55Gag was probably not mediated by direct binding of Vif to the Gag-Pol-embedded PR domain, but more likely resulted from a particular conformation of the Gag structural domains of the Gag-Pol precursor.

  2. A Conserved Target Site in HIV-1 Gag RNA is Accessible to Inhibition by Both an HDV Ribozyme and a Short Hairpin RNA

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    Robert J Scarborough

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-based molecules targeting HIV-1 RNA have the potential to be used as part of gene or drug therapy to treat HIV-1 infection. In this study, HIV-1 RNA was screened to identify more conserved and accessible target sites for ribozymes based on the hepatitis delta virus motif. Using a quantitative screen for effects on HIV-1 production, we identified a ribozyme targeting a highly conserved site in the Gag coding sequence with improved inhibitory potential compared to our previously described candidates targeting the overlapping Tat/Rev coding sequence. We also demonstrate that this target site is highly accessible to short hairpin directed RNA interference, suggesting that it may be available for the binding of antisense RNAs with different modes of action. We provide evidence that this target site is structurally conserved in diverse viral strains and that it is sufficiently different from the human transcriptome to limit off-target effects from antisense therapies. We also show that the modified hepatitis delta virus ribozyme is more sensitive to a mismatch in its target site compared to the short hairpin RNA. Overall, our results validate the potential of a new target site in HIV-1 RNA to be used for the development of antisense therapies.

  3. Stability studies of HIV-1 Pr55gag virus-like particles made in insect cells after storage in various formulation media

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    Lynch Alisson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Pr55gag virus-like particles (VLPs expressed by baculovirus in insect cells are considered to be a very promising HIV-1 vaccine candidate, as they have been shown to elicit broad cellular immune responses when tested in animals, particularly when used as a boost to DNA or BCG vaccines. However, it is important for the VLPs to retain their structure for them to be fully functional and effective. The medium in which the VLPs are formulated and the temperature at which they are stored are two important factors affecting their stability. Findings We describe the screening of 3 different readily available formulation media (sorbitol, sucrose and trehalose for their ability to stabilise HIV-1 Pr55gag VLPs during prolonged storage. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was done on VLPs stored at two different concentrations of the media at three different temperatures (4°C, –20°C and −70°C over different time periods, and the appearance of the VLPs was compared. VLPs stored in 15% trehalose at −70°C retained their original appearance the most effectively over a period of 12 months. VLPs stored in 5% trehalose, sorbitol or sucrose were not all intact even after 1 month storage at the temperatures tested. In addition, we showed that VLPs stored under these conditions were able to be frozen and re-thawed twice before showing changes in their appearance. Conclusions Although the inclusion of other analytical tools are essential to validate these preliminary findings, storage in 15% trehalose at −70°C for 12 months is most effective in retaining VLP stability.

  4. Differential clade-specific HLA-B*3501 association with HIV-1 disease outcome is linked to immunogenicity of a single Gag epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Philippa C; Koyanagi, Madoka; Kløverpris, Henrik N

    2012-01-01

    The strongest genetic influence on immune control in HIV-1 infection is the HLA class I genotype. Rapid disease progression in B-clade infection has been linked to HLA-B*35 expression, in particular to the less common HLA-B*3502 and HLA-B*3503 subtypes but also to the most prevalent subtype, HLA......-B*3501. In these studies we first demonstrated that whereas HLA-B*3501 is associated with a high viral set point in two further B-clade-infected cohorts, in Japan and Mexico, this association does not hold in two large C-clade-infected African cohorts. We tested the hypothesis that clade......-specific differences in HLA associations with disease outcomes may be related to distinct targeting of critical CD8(+) T-cell epitopes. We observed that only one epitope was significantly targeted differentially, namely, the Gag-specific epitope NPPIPVGDIY (NY10, Gag positions 253 to 262) (P = 2 × 10(-5)). In common...

  5. Human endogenous retrovirus K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-specific T-cell responses are infrequently detected in HIV-1-infected subjects using standard peptide matrix-based screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Jones (R. Brad); V.M. John (Vivek); D.V. Hunter (Diana); E. Martin (Eric); S. Mujib (Shariq); V. Mihajlovic (Vesna); P.C. Burgers (Peter); T.M. Luider (Theo); G. Gyenes (Gabor); N.C. Sheppard (Neil); D. SenGupta (Devi); R. Tandon (Ravi); F.-Y. Yue (Feng-Yun); W.S. Benko (William); C. Kovacs (Carrie); R. Nixon; M.A. Ostrowski (Mario)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractT-cell responses to human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) K(HML-2) Gag and Env were mapped in HIV-1-infected subjects using 15mer peptides. Small peptide pools and high concentrations were used to maximize sensitivity. In the 23 subjects studied, only three bona fide HERV-K(HML-2)-specific

  6. Conserved immunogenic region of a major core protein (p24) of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koito, A; Hattori, T; Matsushita, S; Maeda, Y; Nozaki, C; Sagawa, K; Takatsuki, K

    1988-12-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb), VAK 4, has been known to specifically react with a major core protein (p24) as well as with its precursor (p55-57) and intermediate precursor (p40) of human immunodeficiency virus strain IIIB (HTLV-IIIB). Radioimmunoprecipitation assays revealed that VAK 4 MoAb precipitated a major core protein and its precursors from a variety of strains of HIV and also from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), although the molecular weights of the precursor proteins in each viral strain were slightly different. A protein synthesized by transfected Escherichia coli containing amino acid sequences corresponding to residues 121-436 of the HTLV-IIIB gag gene was reactive with VAK 4 MoAb, but the protein carrying only residues 121-309 was not reactive, suggesting that the epitope recognized by VAK 4 MoAb resides at the carboxyl terminus of p24 protein. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that patient sera containing anticore protein antibody inhibited the binding of VAK 4 to HTLV-IIIB. These findings suggested that VAK 4 MoAb recognized an immunogenic and conserved epitope belonging to a major core protein of HIV-related viruses.

  7. Oral vaccination with a recombinant Salmonella vaccine vector provokes systemic HIV-1 subtype C Gag-specific CD4+ Th1 and Th2 cell immune responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Anna-Lise

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant Salmonella vaccine vectors may potentially be used to induce specific CD4+ T cell responses against foreign viral antigens. Such immune responses are required features of vaccines against pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. The aim of this study was to investigate the induction of systemic HIV-1-specific CD4+ T helper (Th responses in mice after oral immunization with a live attenuated Salmonella vaccine vector that expressed HIV-1 subtype C Gag. Groups of BALB/c mice were vaccinated orally three times (4 weeks apart with this recombinant Salmonella. At sacrifice, 28 days after the last immunization, systemic CD4+ Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunospot assay and cytometric bead array. HIV-1 Gag-specific IgG1 and IgG2a humoral responses in the serum were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Mice vaccinated with the recombinant Salmonella elicited both HIV-1-specific Th1 (interferon-gamma (IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and Th2 (interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interleukin-5 (IL-5 cytokine responses. The vaccine induced 70 (IFN-γ spot-forming units (SFUs/10e6 splenocytes and 238 IL-4 SFUs/10e6 splenocytes. Splenocytes from vaccinated mice also produced high levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines upon stimulation with a Gag CD4 peptide. The levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-5 were 7.5-, 29.1-, 26.2- and 89.3-fold above the background, respectively. Both HIV-1 Gag-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies were detected in the sera of vaccinated mice. Conclusion The study highlights the potential of orally-delivered attenuated Salmonella as mucosal vaccine vectors for HIV-1 Subtype C Gag to induce Gag-specific CD4+ Th1 and Th2 cellular immune responses and antibodies which may be important characteristics required for protection against HIV-1 infection.

  8. Determination of HIV status of infants born to HIV-infected mothers: A review of the diagnostic methods with special focus on the applicability of p24 antigen testing in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Maria J; Theilgaard, Zahra Persson; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2012-01-01

    children infected with HIV contract the infection in utero, during delivery, or via breast milk. This review outlines the current diagnostic methods to determine the HIV status of infants born to HIV-infected mothers. The HIV DNA and RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests are highly accurate...

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection interferes with HIV vaccination in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Ignatowicz

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB has emerged as the most prominent bacterial disease found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive individuals worldwide. Due to high prevalence of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infections, the future HIV vaccine in areas highly endemic for TB will often be administrated to individuals with an ongoing Mtb infection. The impact of concurrent Mtb infection on the immunogenicity of a HIV vaccine candidate, MultiHIV DNA/protein, was investigated in mice. We found that, depending on the vaccination route, mice infected with Mtb before the administration of the HIV vaccine showed impairment in both the magnitude and the quality of antibody and T cell responses to the vaccine components p24Gag and gp160Env. Mice infected with Mtb prior to intranasal HIV vaccination exhibited reduced p24Gag-specific serum IgG and IgA, and suppressed gp160Env-specific serum IgG as compared to respective titers in uninfected HIV-vaccinated controls. Importantly, in Mtb-infected mice that were HIV-vaccinated by the intramuscular route the virus neutralizing activity in serum was significantly decreased, relative to uninfected counterparts. In addition mice concurrently infected with Mtb had fewer p24Gag-specific IFN-γ-expressing T cells and multifunctional T cells in their spleens. These results suggest that Mtb infection might interfere with the outcome of prospective HIV vaccination in humans.

  10. Lipid Nanocapsule as Vaccine Carriers for His-Tagged Proteins: Evaluation of Antigen-Specific Immune Responses to HIV I His-Gag p41 and Systemic Inflammatory Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Saurabh; Jain, Anekant; Woodward, Jerold G.; Mumper, Russell J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design novel nanocapsules (NCs) with surface-chelated nickel (Ni-NCs) as a vaccine delivery system for histidine (His)-tagged protein antigens. Ni-NCs were characterized for binding His-tagged model proteins through high affinity non-covalent interactions. The mean diameter and zeta potential of the optimized Ni-NCs was 214.9 nm and - 14.8 mV, respectively. The optimal binding ratio of His-tagged Green Fluorescent Protein (His-GFP) and His-tagged HIV-1 Gag p41 (His-Gag p41) to the Ni-NCs was 1:221 and 1:480 w/w, respectively. Treatment of DC2.4 cells with Ni-NCs did not result in significant loss in the cell viability up to 24 h (His-Gag p41 as a model antigen. Formulations were administered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice at day 0 (prime) and 14 (boost) followed by serum collection on day 28. Serum His-Gag p41 specific antibody levels were found to be significantly higher at 1 and 0.5 μg doses of Gag p41-His-Ni-NCs (His-Gag p41 equivalent) compared to His-Gag p41 (1 μg) adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide (AH). The serum IgG2a levels induced by Gag p41-His-Ni-NCs (1 μg) were significantly higher than AH adjuvanted His-Gag p41. The Ni-NCs alone did not result in elevation of systemic IL-12/p40 and CCL5/RANTES inflammatory cytokine levels upon subcutaneous administration in BALB/c mice. In conclusion, the proposed Ni-NCs can bind His-tagged proteins and have the potential to be used as antigen delivery system capable of generating strong antigen specific antibodies at doses much lower than with aluminum based adjuvant and causing no significant elevation of systemic proinflammatory IL-12/p40 and CCL5/RANTES cytokines. PMID:22068049

  11. Selection of an HLA-C*03:04-Restricted HIV-1 p24 Gag Sequence Variant Is Associated with Viral Escape from KIR2DL3+ Natural Killer Cells: Data from an Observational Cohort in South Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Angelique Hölzemer; Thobakgale, Christina F.; Jimenez Cruz, Camilo A.; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; van Teijlingen, Nienke H.; Mann, Jaclyn K.; Manjeetha Jaggernath; Seung-gu Kang; Christian Körner; Chung, Amy W.; Schafer, Jamie L.; Evans, David T.; Galit Alter; Bruce D Walker

    2015-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Throughout life, our immune system?a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs?protects us from attack by viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi. The body?s first line of defense against these ?pathogens? is the innate immune system, a collection of cells and proteins that is always ready to identify and kill a wide range of foreign invaders. As well as directly killing pathogens, the innate immune system activates the adaptive immune response, which recognize...

  12. Mutations in HIV-1 gag and pol Compensate for the Loss of Viral Fitness Caused by a Highly Mutated Protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Milan; Henke, S.; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Jacobs, G. B.; Schuch, A.; Buchholz, B.; Müller, V.; Kräusslich, H. G.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan; Bodem, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 8 (2012), s. 4320-4330 ISSN 0066-4804 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/1798 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : HIV protease * resistance * inhibitor * viral fitness * AG subtype Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.565, year: 2012

  13. Fusion of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1-derived glycine-alanine repeat to trans-dominant HIV-1 Gag increases inhibitory activities and survival of transduced cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Diana; Wild, Jens; Ludwig, Christine; Asbach, Benedikt; Notka, Frank; Wagner, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Trans-dominant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag derivatives have been shown to efficiently inhibit late steps of HIV-1 replication in vitro by interfering with Gag precursor assembly, thus ranking among the interesting candidates for gene therapy approaches. However, efficient antiviral activities of corresponding transgenes are likely to be counteracted in particular by cell-mediated host immune responses toward the transgene-expressing cells. To decrease this potential immunogenicity, a 24-amino acid Gly-Ala (GA) stretch derived from Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) and known to overcome proteasomal degradation was fused to a trans-dominant Gag variant (sgD1). To determine the capacity of this fusion polypeptide to repress viral replication, PM-1 cells were transduced with sgD1 and GAsgD1 transgenes, using retroviral gene transfer. Challenge of stably transfected permissive cell lines with various viral strains indicated that N-terminal GA fusion even enhanced the inhibitory properties of sgD1. Further studies revealed that the GA stretch increased protein stability by blocking proteasomal degradation of Gag proteins. Immunization of BALB/c mice with a DNA vaccine vector expressing sgD1 induced substantial Gag-specific immune responses that were, however, clearly diminished in the presence of GA. Furthermore, recognition of cells expressing the GA-fused transgene by CD8(+) T cells was drastically reduced, both in vitro and in vivo, resulting in prolonged survival of the transduced cells in recipient mice.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of a fourth-generation combination immunoassay for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody and p24 antigen for the detection of HIV infections in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragin, Lael; Pan, Feng; Peng, Siyang; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Green, Julia; Doucet, Cynthia; Chalfin, Donald B; de Lissovoy, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved the first 4th-generation HIV test. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of the 4th-generation assay versus a 3rd-generation test in screening for HIV infections in the United States. An exploratory microsimulation model was developed that follows hypothetical individuals and simulates the course of HIV/AIDS, treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy, and transmissions. With a 1% HIV prevalence, screening 1.5 million individuals with the 4th- versus 3rd-generation assay resulted in detection of 266 additional HIV cases at an incremental cost per additional HIV case detected of $63,763, an additional 489 life years and 395 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and 26 HIV transmissions prevented. Although lifetime costs were increased by $33.6 million, the incremental cost/QALY gained was $85,206. The 4th-generation test was more cost-effective in high incidence settings. The number needed to screen to detect one additional HIV case was 5,635. Screening using the 4th-generation assay may be cost-effective for HIV detection in appropriate settings, resulting in increased case identification, fewer transmissions, extended life, and increased quality of life. With early and accurate detection, this 4th-generation test may provide a suitable alternative to current 3rd-generation tests.

  15. Interrelationship Between Cytoplasmic Retroviral Gag Concentration and Gag-Membrane Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Keir H.; Berk, Serkan; Grigsby, Iwen F.; Chen, Yan; Mansky, Louis M.; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2014-01-01

    The early events in the retrovirus assembly pathway, particularly the timing and nature of Gag translocation from the site of protein translation to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, are poorly understood. We have investigated the interrelationship between cytoplasmic Gag concentration and plasma membrane association using complementary live-cell biophysical fluorescence techniques in real-time with both the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag proteins. In particular, dual-color, z-scan fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (dcz-FFS) in conjunction with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and conventional, epi-illumination imaging were utilized. Our results demonstrate that HTLV-1 Gag is capable of membrane targeting and particle assembly at low (i.e., nM) cytoplasmic concentrations, and that there is a critical threshold concentration (approaching μM) prior to the observation of HIV-1 Gag associated with the plasma membrane. These observations imply fundamental differences between HIV-1 and HTLV-1 Gag trafficking and membrane association. PMID:24316368

  16. Efficient in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 gag reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) at minimal ratios of PNA/RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Zachar, Vladimir; Nielsen, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    of reverse transcription was obtained at approximately 6-fold molar excess of the bis-PNA with respect to the gag RNA. At this molar ratio we found no effect on in vitro translation of gag RNA. A 15mer duplex-forming PNA was also found to inhibit reverse transcription at very low molar ratios of PNA/ gag RNA...... that would indicate PNA-mediated RNase H activation of the tested RTs. In conclusion, PNA appears to have a potential to become a specific and efficient inhibitor of reverse transcription in vivo , provided sufficient intracellular levels are achievable....

  17. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Robert A.; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M. (NCI); (Cornell); (CM); (NIST)

    2016-05-06

    Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactionsin vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particlesin vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interactionin vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization.

    Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our

  18. Expression of HIV-1 antigens in plants as potential subunit vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzer Fiona L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has infected more than 40 million people worldwide, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. The high prevalence of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa necessitates the development of cheap, effective vaccines. One means of production is the use of plants, for which a number of different techniques have been successfully developed. HIV-1 Pr55Gag is a promising HIV-1 vaccine candidate: we compared the expression of this and a truncated Gag (p17/p24 and the p24 capsid subunit in Nicotiana spp. using transgenic plants and transient expression via Agrobacterium tumefaciens and recombinant tobamovirus vectors. We also investigated the influence of subcellular localisation of recombinant protein to the chloroplast and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER on protein yield. We partially purified a selected vaccine candidate and tested its stimulation of a humoral and cellular immune response in mice. Results Both transient and transgenic expression of the HIV antigens were successful, although expression of Pr55Gag was low in all systems; however, the Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of p24 and p17/p24 yielded best, to more than 1 mg p24/kg fresh weight. Chloroplast targeted protein levels were highest in transient and transgenic expression of p24 and p17/p24. The transiently-expressed p17/p24 was not immunogenic in mice as a homologous vaccine, but it significantly boosted a humoral and T cell immune response primed by a gag DNA vaccine, pTHGagC. Conclusion Transient agroinfiltration was best for expression of all of the recombinant proteins tested, and p24 and p17/p24 were expressed at much higher levels than Pr55Gag. Our results highlight the usefulness of plastid signal peptides in enhancing the production of recombinant proteins meant for use as vaccines. The p17/p24 protein effectively boosted T cell and humoral responses in mice primed by the DNA vaccine pTHGagC, showing that this plant

  19. Epitope-tagging approach to determine the stoichiometry of the structural and nonstructural proteins in the virus particles: amount of Vpr in relation to Gag in HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S P; Lai, D; Cartas, M; Serio, D; Murali, R; Kalyanaraman, V S; Srinivasan, A

    2000-03-15

    We used an epitope-tagging approach to determine the ratio of Gag (structural) to Vpr (nonstructural) in the virus particles directed by human immunodeficiency virus type 1. For this purpose, chimeric Gag and Vpr expression plasmids were constructed with the Flag epitope (DYKDDDDK), and the sequences corresponding to the chimeric protein were introduced into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proviral DNA (NL4-3) to determine the ratio in the virus particles when these proteins are expressed in cis. In addition, NL4-3 DNA was modified to disrupt Vpr synthesis to determine the extent of incorporation of Vpr-FL when it is expressed in trans through a heterologous promoter. The analysis of virus particles generated by transfection of proviral DNA into RD cells indicated that (1) the ratio of Gag to Vpr in virus particles, when Vpr-FL is expressed in cis (in the context of proviral DNA), is in the range of 150-200:1 (14-18 molecules of Vpr per virion) and (2) the expression of Vpr-FL in trans showed efficient incorporation with a Gag to Vpr ratio of 5-7:1 (392-550 molecules of Vpr). These results suggest that the presence of the same epitope on different viral proteins may provide an accurate comparison of these proteins in the virus particles. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Clustering patterns of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proteins reveal imprints of immune evasion on HIV-1 global variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusim, K.; Kesmir, Can; Gaschen, B.

    2002-01-01

    The human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been intensely studied, and hundreds of CTL epitopes have been experimentally defined, published, and compiled in the HIV Molecular Immunology Database. Maps of CTL epitopes on HIV-1 protein sequences...... reveal that defined epitopes tend to cluster. Here we integrate the global sequence and immunology databases to systematically explore the relationship between HIV-1 amino acid sequences and CTL epitope distributions. CTL responses to five HIV-1 proteins, Gag p17, Gag p24, reverse transcriptase (RT), Env......, and Nef, have been particularly well characterized in the literature to date. Through comparing CTL epitope distributions in these five proteins to global protein sequence alignments, we identified distinct characteristics of HIV amino acid sequences that correlate with CTL epitope localization. First...

  1. Cytoplasmic utilization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomic RNA is not dependent on a nuclear interaction with gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Bastian; Hoffmann, Bianca; Ohs, Inga; Blissenbach, Maik; Brandt, Sabine; Tippler, Bettina; Grunwald, Thomas; Uberla, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    In some retroviruses, such as Rous sarcoma virus and prototype foamy virus, Gag proteins are known to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and are implicated in nuclear export of the viral genomic unspliced RNA (gRNA) for subsequent encapsidation. A similar function has been proposed for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag based on the identification of nuclear localization and export signals. However, the ability of HIV-1 Gag to transit through the nucleus has never been confirmed. In addition, the lentiviral Rev protein promotes efficient nuclear gRNA export, and previous reports indicate a cytoplasmic interaction between Gag and gRNA. Therefore, functional effects of HIV-1 Gag on gRNA and its usage were explored. Expression of gag in the absence of Rev was not able to increase cytoplasmic gRNA levels of subgenomic, proviral, or lentiviral vector constructs, and gene expression from genomic reporter plasmids could not be induced by Gag provided in trans. Furthermore, Gag lacking the reported nuclear localization and export signals was still able to mediate an efficient packaging process. Although small amounts of Gag were detectable in the nuclei of transfected cells, a Crm1-dependent nuclear export signal in Gag could not be confirmed. Thus, our study does not provide any evidence for a nuclear function of HIV-1 Gag. The encapsidation process of HIV-1 therefore clearly differs from that of Rous sarcoma virus and prototype foamy virus.

  2. Renin modulates HIV replication in T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandel, Nirupama; Ayasolla, Kamesh; Lan, Xiqian; Rai, Partab; Mikulak, Joanna; Husain, Mohammad; Malhotra, Ashwani; McGowan, Joseph; Singhal, Pravin C.

    2014-01-01

    HIV is known to subvert cellular machinery to enhance its replication. Recently, HIV has been reported to enhance TC renin expression. We hypothesized that HIV induces and maintains high renin expression to promote its own replication in TCs. Renin enhanced HIV replication in TCs in a dose-dependent manner. (P)RR-deficient TCs, as well as those lacking renin, displayed attenuated NF-κB activity and HIV replication. TCs treated with renin and Hpr displayed activation of the (P)RR-PLZF protein signaling cascade. Renin, HIV, and Hpr activated the PI3K pathway. Both renin and Hpr cleaved Agt (a renin substrate) to Ang I and also cleaved Gag polyproteins (protease substrate) to p24. Furthermore, aliskiren, a renin inhibitor, reduced renin- and Hpr-induced cleavage of Agt and Gag polyproteins. These findings indicate that renin contributes to HIV replication in TCs via the (P)RR-PLZF signaling cascade and through cleavage of the Gag polyproteins. PMID:24970860

  3. Disparate effects of p24alpha and p24delta on secretory protein transport and processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen R P M Strating

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The p24 family is thought to be somehow involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER-to-Golgi protein transport. A subset of the p24 proteins (p24alpha(3, -beta(1, -gamma(3 and -delta(2 is upregulated when Xenopus laevis intermediate pituitary melanotrope cells are physiologically activated to produce vast amounts of their major secretory cargo, the prohormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we find that transgene expression of p24alpha(3 or p24delta(2 specifically in the Xenopus melanotrope cells in both cases causes an effective displacement of the endogenous p24 proteins, resulting in severely distorted p24 systems and disparate melanotrope cell phenotypes. Transgene expression of p24alpha(3 greatly reduces POMC transport and leads to accumulation of the prohormone in large, ER-localized electron-dense structures, whereas p24delta(2-transgenesis does not influence the overall ultrastructure of the cells nor POMC transport and cleavage, but affects the Golgi-based processes of POMC glycomaturation and sulfation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Transgenic expression of two distinct p24 family members has disparate effects on secretory pathway functioning, illustrating the specificity and non-redundancy of our transgenic approach. We conclude that members of the p24 family furnish subcompartments of the secretory pathway with specific sets of machinery cargo to provide the proper microenvironments for efficient and correct secretory protein transport and processing.

  4. Expression of Functional Anti-p24 scFv 183-H12-5C in HEK293T and Jurkat T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Omar, Mohammad Tasyriq

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: More than half of the diagnostic and therapeutic recombinant protein production depends on mammalian-based expression system. However, the generation of recombinant antibodies remains a challenge in mammalian cells due to the disulfide bond formation and reducing cytoplasm. Therefore, the production of functional recombinant antibodies in target cell line is necessary to be evaluated before used in therapeutic application such intrabodies against HIV-1. Methods: The work was to test expression of a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody against HIV-1 Capsid p24 protein in a human mammalian-based expression system using HEK293T and Jurkat T cells as a model. Three expression plasmid vectors expressing scFv 183-H12-5C were generated and introduced into HEK293T. Expression of the scFv was analyzed, while ELISA and immunoblotting analysis verified its binding. The evaluation of the recombinant antibody was confirmed by HIV-1 replication and MAGI infectivity assay in Jurkat T cells. Results: Three plasmid vectors expressing scFv 183-H12-5C was successfully engineered in this study. Recombinant antibodies scFv (~29 kDa) and scFv-Fc (~52 kDa) in the cytoplasm of HEK293T were effectively obtained by transfected the cells with engineered pCDNA3.3-mu-IgGk-scFv 183-H12-5C and pCMX2.5-scFv 183-H12-5C-hIgG1-Fc plasmid vectors respectively. scFv and scFv-Fc are specifically bound recombinant p24, and HIV-1 derived p24 (gag) evaluated by ELISA and Western blot. Jurkat T cells transfected by pCDNA3.3-scFv 183-H12-5C inhibit the replication-competent NL4-3 viral infectivity up to 60%. Conclusion: Anti-p24 scFv 183-H12-5C antibody generated is suitable to be acted as intrabodies and may serve as a valuable tool for the development of antibody-based biotherapeutics against HIV-1.

  5. Recombinant adenovirus type 5 HIV gag/pol/nef vaccine in South Africa: unblinded, long-term follow-up of the phase 2b HVTN 503/Phambili study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Glenda E; Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Gilbert, Peter B; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Churchyard, Gavin; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Laher, Fatima; Roux, Surita; Mngadi, Kathryn; Innes, Craig; Mathebula, Matsontso; Allen, Mary; McElrath, M Julie; Robertson, Michael; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-05-01

    The HVTN 503/Phambili study, which assessed the efficacy of the Merck Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine in South Africa, was stopped when futility criteria in the Step study (assessing the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia) were met. Here we report long-term follow-up data. HVTN 503/Phambili was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised trial that recruited HIV-1 uninfected, sexually active adults aged 18-35 years from five sites in South Africa. Eligible participants were randomly assigned (1:1) by computer-generated random numbers to either vaccine or placebo, stratified by site and sex. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate HIV-1 infection in the modified intention-to-treat cohort, all of whom were unmasked early in follow-up. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00413725 and the South African National Health Research Database, number DOH-27-0207-1539. Between Jan 24, 2007, and Sept 19, 2007, 801 participants (26·7%) of a planned 3000 were randomly assigned (400 to vaccine, 401 to placebo); 216 (27%) received only one injection, 529 (66%) received only two injections, and 56 (7%) received three injections. At a median follow-up of 42 months (IQR 31-42), 63 vaccine recipients (16%) had HIV-1 infection compared with 37 placebo recipients (9%; adjusted HR 1·70, 95% CI 1·13-2·55; p=0·01). Risk for HIV-1 infection did not differ according to the number of vaccinations received, sex, circumcision, or adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) serostatus. Differences in risk behaviour at baseline or during the study, or annualised dropout rate (7·7% [95% CI 6·2-9·5] for vaccine recipients vs 8·8% [7·1-10·7] for placebo recipients; p=0·40) are unlikely explanations for the increased rate of HIV-1 infections seen in vaccine recipients. The increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition in vaccine recipients, irrespective of number of doses received, warrants further investigation to understand the biological

  6. Cytoplasmic Utilization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genomic RNA Is Not Dependent on a Nuclear Interaction with Gag

    OpenAIRE

    Grewe, Bastian; Hoffmann, Bianca; Ohs, Inga; Blissenbach, Maik; Brandt, Sabine; Tippler, Bettina; Grunwald, Thomas; Überla, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In some retroviruses, such as Rous sarcoma virus and prototype foamy virus, Gag proteins are known to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and are implicated in nuclear export of the viral genomic unspliced RNA (gRNA) for subsequent encapsidation. A similar function has been proposed for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag based on the identification of nuclear localization and export signals. However, the ability of HIV-1 Gag to transit through the nucleus has never been...

  7. Protection against SHIV-KB9 Infection by Combining rDNA and rFPV Vaccines Based on HIV Multiepitope and p24 Protein in Chinese Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing an effective vaccine against HIV infection remains an urgent goal. We used a DNA prime/fowlpox virus boost regimen to immunize Chinese rhesus macaques. The animals were challenged intramuscularly with pathogenic molecularly cloned SHIV-KB9. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines were investigated by measuring IFN-γ levels, monitoring HIV-specific binding antibodies, examining viral load, and analyzing CD4/CD8 ratio. Results show that, upon challenge, the vaccine group can induce a strong immune response in the body, represented by increased expression of IFN-γ, slow and steady elevated antibody production, reduced peak value of acute viral load, and increase in the average CD4/CD8 ratio. The current research suggests that rapid reaction speed, appropriate response strength, and long-lasting immune response time may be key protection factors for AIDS vaccine. The present study contributes significantly to AIDS vaccine and preclinical research.

  8. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; hide

    1997-01-01

    between the anti HIV-1 gag ribozyme and its abortive DNA substrate manifests in the detection of a continuous track of A.T base pairs; this suggests that the interaction between the ribozyme and its DNA substrate is stronger than the one observed in the case of the free ribozyme where the bases in stem I and stem III regions interact strongly with the ribozyme core region (Sarma, R. H., et al. FEBS Letters 375, 317-23, 1995). The complex formation provides certain guidelines in the design of suitable therapeutic ribozymes. If the residues in the ribozyme stem regions interact with the conserved core, it may either prevent or interfere with the formation of a catalytically active tertiary structure.

  9. Determinants of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Prydz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteoglycans (PGs are glycosylated proteins of biological importance at cell surfaces, in the extracellular matrix, and in the circulation. PGs are produced and modified by glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains in the secretory pathway of animal cells. The most common GAG attachment site is a serine residue followed by a glycine (-ser-gly-, from which a linker tetrasaccharide extends and may continue as a heparan sulfate, a heparin, a chondroitin sulfate, or a dermatan sulfate GAG chain. Which type of GAG chain becomes attached to the linker tetrasaccharide is influenced by the structure of the protein core, modifications occurring to the linker tetrasaccharide itself, and the biochemical environment of the Golgi apparatus, where GAG polymerization and modification by sulfation and epimerization take place. The same cell type may produce different GAG chains that vary, depending on the extent of epimerization and sulfation. However, it is not known to what extent these differences are caused by compartmental segregation of protein cores en route through the secretory pathway or by differential recruitment of modifying enzymes during synthesis of different PGs. The topic of this review is how different aspects of protein structure, cellular biochemistry, and compartmentalization may influence GAG synthesis.

  10. HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidates Based on Replication-Competent Recombinant Poxvirus NYVAC-C-KC Expressing Trimeric gp140 and Gag-Derived Virus-Like Particles or Lacking the Viral Molecule B19 That Inhibits Type I Interferon Activate Relevant HIV-1-Specific B and T Cell Immune Functions in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Montefiori, David C.; Yates, Nicole L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Roederer, Mario; Self, Steven G.; Borate, Bhavesh; Gottardo, Raphael; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Barnett, Susan W.; Burke, Brian; Cristillo, Anthony D.; Weiss, Deborah E.; Lee, Carter; Kibler, Karen V.; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Wagner, Ralf; Ding, Song; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nonreplicating attenuated poxvirus vector NYVAC expressing clade C(CN54) HIV-1 Env(gp120) and Gag-Pol-Nef antigens (NYVAC-C) showed limited immunogenicity in phase I clinical trials. To enhance the capacity of the NYVAC vector to trigger broad humoral responses and a more balanced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, here we compared the HIV-1-specific immunogenicity elicited in nonhuman primates immunized with two replicating NYVAC vectors that have been modified by the insertion of the K1L and C7L vaccinia virus host range genes and express the clade C(ZM96) trimeric HIV-1 gp140 protein or a Gag(ZM96)-Pol-Nef(CN54) polyprotein as Gag-derived virus-like particles (termed NYVAC-C-KC). Additionally, one NYVAC-C-KC vector was generated by deleting the viral gene B19R, an inhibitor of the type I interferon response (NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R). An immunization protocol mimicking that of the RV144 phase III clinical trial was used. Two groups of macaques received two doses of the corresponding NYVAC-C-KC vectors (weeks 0 and 4) and booster doses with NYVAC-C-KC vectors plus the clade C HIV-1 gp120 protein (weeks 12 and 24). The two replicating NYVAC-C-KC vectors induced enhanced and similar HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, similar levels of binding IgG antibodies, low levels of IgA antibodies, and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses and HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies. Small differences within the NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R group were seen in the magnitude of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, the induction of some cytokines, and the neutralization of some HIV-1 isolates. Thus, replication-competent NYVAC-C-KC vectors acquired relevant immunological properties as vaccine candidates against HIV/AIDS, and the viral B19 molecule exerts some control of immune functions. IMPORTANCE It is of special importance to find a safe and effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can induce strong and broad T cell and humoral immune responses correlating with HIV-1

  11. HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidates Based on Replication-Competent Recombinant Poxvirus NYVAC-C-KC Expressing Trimeric gp140 and Gag-Derived Virus-Like Particles or Lacking the Viral Molecule B19 That Inhibits Type I Interferon Activate Relevant HIV-1-Specific B and T Cell Immune Functions in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Heeney, Jonathan L; Seaman, Michael S; Montefiori, David C; Yates, Nicole L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Ferrari, Guido; Foulds, Kathryn E; Roederer, Mario; Self, Steven G; Borate, Bhavesh; Gottardo, Raphael; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Barnett, Susan W; Burke, Brian; Cristillo, Anthony D; Weiss, Deborah E; Lee, Carter; Kibler, Karen V; Jacobs, Bertram L; Wagner, Ralf; Ding, Song; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Esteban, Mariano

    2017-05-01

    The nonreplicating attenuated poxvirus vector NYVAC expressing clade C(CN54) HIV-1 Env(gp120) and Gag-Pol-Nef antigens (NYVAC-C) showed limited immunogenicity in phase I clinical trials. To enhance the capacity of the NYVAC vector to trigger broad humoral responses and a more balanced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, here we compared the HIV-1-specific immunogenicity elicited in nonhuman primates immunized with two replicating NYVAC vectors that have been modified by the insertion of the K1L and C7L vaccinia virus host range genes and express the clade C(ZM96) trimeric HIV-1 gp140 protein or a Gag(ZM96)-Pol-Nef(CN54) polyprotein as Gag-derived virus-like particles (termed NYVAC-C-KC). Additionally, one NYVAC-C-KC vector was generated by deleting the viral gene B19R, an inhibitor of the type I interferon response (NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R). An immunization protocol mimicking that of the RV144 phase III clinical trial was used. Two groups of macaques received two doses of the corresponding NYVAC-C-KC vectors (weeks 0 and 4) and booster doses with NYVAC-C-KC vectors plus the clade C HIV-1 gp120 protein (weeks 12 and 24). The two replicating NYVAC-C-KC vectors induced enhanced and similar HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, similar levels of binding IgG antibodies, low levels of IgA antibodies, and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses and HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies. Small differences within the NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R group were seen in the magnitude of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, the induction of some cytokines, and the neutralization of some HIV-1 isolates. Thus, replication-competent NYVAC-C-KC vectors acquired relevant immunological properties as vaccine candidates against HIV/AIDS, and the viral B19 molecule exerts some control of immune functions.IMPORTANCE It is of special importance to find a safe and effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can induce strong and broad T cell and humoral immune responses correlating with HIV-1 protection

  12. HIV-1 replication fitness of HLA-B*57/58:01 CTL escape variants is restored by the accumulation of compensatory mutations in Gag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Esther F; Feenstra, K Anton; van Nuenen, Ad C; Navis, Marjon; Heringa, Jaap; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A

    2013-01-01

    Expression of HLA-B*57 and the closely related HLA-B*58:01 are associated with prolonged survival after HIV-1 infection. However, large differences in disease course are observed among HLA-B*57/58:01 patients. Escape mutations in CTL epitopes restricted by these HLA alleles come at a fitness cost

  13. HIV-1 replication fitness of HLA-B*57/58:01 CTL escape variants is restored by the accumulation of compensatory mutations in gag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Esther F.; Feenstra, K. Anton; van Nuenen, Ad C.; Navis, Marjon; Heringa, Jaap; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of HLA-B*57 and the closely related HLA-B*58:01 are associated with prolonged survival after HIV-1 infection. However, large differences in disease course are observed among HLA-B*57/58:01 patients. Escape mutations in CTL epitopes restricted by these HLA alleles come at a fitness cost

  14. Discovery of a novel and potent class of anti-HIV-1 maturation inhibitors with improved virology profile against gag polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun; Jones, Stacey A; Jeffrey, Jerry L; Miranda, Sonia R; Galardi, Cristin M; Irlbeck, David M; Brown, Kevin W; McDanal, Charlene B; Johns, Brian A

    2017-06-15

    A new class of betulin-derived α-keto amides was identified as HIV-1 maturation inhibitors. Through lead optimization, GSK8999 was identified with IC50 values of 17nM, 23nM, 25nM, and 8nM for wild type, Q369H, V370A, and T371A respectively. When tested in a panel of 62 HIV-1 isolates covering a diversity of CA-SP1 genotypes including A, AE, B, C, and G using a PBMC based assay, GSK8999 was potent against 57 of 62 isolates demonstrating an improvement over the first generation maturation inhibitor BVM. The data disclosed here also demonstrated that the new α-keto amide GSK8999 has a mechanism of action consistent with inhibition of the proteolytic cleavage of CA-SP1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The mutation T477A in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT restores normal proteolytic processing of RT in virus with Gag-Pol mutated in the p51-RNH cleavage site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parniak Michael A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p51 subunit of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT p66/p51 heterodimer arises from proteolytic cleavage of the RT p66 subunit C-terminal ribonuclease H (RNH domain during virus maturation. Our previous work showed that mutations in the RT p51↓RNH cleavage site resulted in virus with defects in proteolytic processing of RT and significantly attenuated infectivity. In some cases, virus fitness was restored after repeated passage of mutant viruses, due to reversion of the mutated sequences to wild-type. However, in one case, the recovered virus retained the mutated p51↓RNH cleavage site but also developed an additional mutation, T477A, distal to the cleavage site. In this study we have characterized in detail the impact of the T477A mutation on intravirion processing of RT. Results While the T477A mutation arose during serial passage only with the F440V mutant background, introduction of this substitution into a variety of RT p51↓RNH cleavage site lethal mutant backgrounds was able to restore substantial infectivity and normal RT processing to these mutants. T477A had no phenotypic effect on wild-type HIV-1. We also evaluated the impact of T477A on the kinetics of intravirion Gag-Pol polyprotein processing of p51↓RNH cleavage site mutants using the protease inhibitor ritonavir. Early processing intermediates accumulated in p51↓RNH cleavage site mutant viruses, whereas introduction of T477A promoted the completion of processing and formation of the fully processed RT p66/p51 heterodimer. Conclusions This work highlights the extraordinary plasticity of HIV-1 in adapting to seemingly lethal mutations that prevent RT heterodimer formation during virion polyprotein maturation. The ability of T477A to restore RT heterodimer formation and thus intravirion stability of the enzyme may arise from increased conformation flexibility in the RT p51↓RNH cleavage site region, due to loss of a hydrogen bond associated with the

  16. Clade A HIV-1 Gag-Specific T Cell Responses Are Frequent but Do Not Correlate with Viral Loads in a Cohort of Treatment-Naive HIV-Infected Individuals Living in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Gómez Román, Victor Raúl; Skov Jensen, Sanne

    2012-01-01

    In a phase I clinical trial in Guinea-Bissau, we have tested an immunotherapeutic 33 HIV-1 vaccine candidate in HIV-1-infected subjects (Gómez Román et al., under review).…......In a phase I clinical trial in Guinea-Bissau, we have tested an immunotherapeutic 33 HIV-1 vaccine candidate in HIV-1-infected subjects (Gómez Román et al., under review).…...

  17. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Zachary S.; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R.

    2016-01-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4+ T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. PMID:27431232

  18. Orthoretroviral-like prototype foamy virus gag-pol expression is compatible with viral replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reh Juliane

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foamy viruses (FVs unlike orthoretroviruses express Pol as a separate precursor protein and not as a Gag-Pol fusion protein. A unique packaging strategy, involving recognition of briding viral RNA by both Pol precursor and Gag as well as potential Gag-Pol protein interactions, ensures Pol particle encapsidation. Results Several Prototype FV (PFV Gag-Pol fusion protein constructs were generated to examine whether PFV replication is compatible with an orthoretroviral-like Pol expression. During their analysis, non-particle-associated secreted Pol precursor protein was discovered in extracellular wild type PFV particle preparations of different origin, copurifying in simple virion enrichment protocols. Different analysis methods suggest that extracellular wild type PFV particles contain predominantly mature p85PR-RT and p40IN Pol subunits. Characterization of various PFV Gag-Pol fusion constructs revealed that PFV Pol expression in an orthoretroviral manner is compatible with PFV replication as long as a proteolytic processing between Gag and Pol proteins is possible. PFV Gag-Pol translation by a HIV-1 like ribosomal frameshift signal resulted in production of replication-competent virions, although cell- and particle-associated Pol levels were reduced in comparison to wild type. In-frame fusion of PFV Gag and Pol ORFs led to increased cellular Pol levels, but particle incorporation was only marginally elevated. Unlike that reported for similar orthoretroviral constructs, a full-length in-frame PFV Gag-Pol fusion construct showed wildtype-like particle release and infectivity characteristics. In contrast, in-frame PFV Gag-Pol fusion with C-terminal Gag ORF truncations or non-removable Gag peptide addition to Pol displayed wildtype particle release, but reduced particle infectivity. PFV Gag-Pol precursor fusion proteins with inactivated protease were highly deficient in regular particle release, although coexpression of p71Gag

  19. Reduction of the diagnostic window with a new combined p24 antigen and human immunodeficiency virus antibody screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, L; Mühlbacher, A; Michl, U; Hofmann, H; Paggi, G G; Bossi, V; Thorstensson, R; G-Villaescusa, R; Eiras, A; Hernandez, J M; Melchior, W; Donie, F; Weber, B

    1998-11-01

    In order to reduce the window phase between time of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and laboratory diagnosis, new fourth generation screening assays which permit a simultaneous detection of HIV antigen and antibody have been developed. In a multicenter study, a new automated fourth generation assay, Enzymun-Test HIV Combi (Boehringer Mannheim GmbH) was compared to third generation assay, p24 antigen tests and Western blot. A total of 37 seroconversion panels, samples of the early infection (n = 42), HIV-1 antibody positive sera, including subtypes A E, and O (n = 1118), HIV-2 positive samples (n = 252) and cell culture supernatants infected with different HIV-1 subtypes and HIV-2 (n = 50), blood donors (n = 6649), hospitalized patients (n = 475), HIV neg. sera with indeterminate Western blot (n = 32), potentially cross reactive serum samples (n = 435) and HIV negative specimens from Cameroon (n = 68) were tested. A total of 16 of 29 seroconversions were detected on average 8.5 days earlier with Enzymun-Test HIV Combi than HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation EIA (Abbott Laboratories). Overall, in the 29 panels investigated comparatively with the two assays, the mean time delay between Enzymun-Test HIV Combi and HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation EIA was 4.7 days. HIV antigen was detected in three out of 35 seroconversions one bleed earlier with HIV-1 Ag Monoclonal than with Enzymun-Test HIV Combi. Enzymun-Test HIV Combi showed a sensitivity of 100% for HIV antibody detection for HIV-1 group M and O and HIV-2 positive specimens. While p24 antigen of different HIV-1 subtypes was detected with Enzymun-Test HIV Combi in all the 49 cell culture supernatants, HIV Ag was not detected in an HIV-2 virus lysate. A total of 66 false positive results out of 7659 HIV negative samples were obtained with the Enzymun-Test HIV Combi. The specificity for unselected blood donors was 99.6%. The Enzymun-Test HIV Combi permits an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection than third generation

  20. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Campbell, Mary S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Mullins, James I [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Hughes, James P [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wong, Kim G [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Raugi, Dana N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Scrensen, Stefanie [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  1. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-07-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8-9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies.

  2. Role of HLA adaptation in HIV evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Leslie, Alasdair; Goulder, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Killing of HIV-infected cells by CD8+ T-cells imposes strong selection pressure on the virus toward escape. The HLA class I molecules that are successful in mediating some degree of control over the virus are those that tend to present epitopes in conserved regions of the proteome, such as in p24...... Gag, in which escape also comes at a significant cost to viral replicative capacity (VRC). In some instances, compensatory mutations can fully correct for the fitness cost of such an escape variant; in others, correction is only partial. The consequences of these events within the HIV-infected host......, and at the population level following transmission of escape variants, are discussed. The accumulation of escape mutants in populations over the course of the epidemic already shows instances of protective HLA molecules losing their impact, and in certain cases, a modest decline in HIV virulence in association...

  3. Production of recombinant scFv against p24 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Sara; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Fourozandeh, Mehdi; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    Phage display has a fundamental role in protein isolation and engineering. Isolated proteins produced with this method can be modified for specific binding and affinity. P24 is the most produced protein during human immune deficiency virus (HIV) replication; especially in the early steps of HIV-1 infection, its evaluation may have diagnostic values. To test the HIV-1 infection, p24 antigen assay appears to be a very promising alternative to RNA assays. In this study, we have generated a recombinant mouse single chain antibody fragment against p24 of the HIV-1 with the use of phage display technology. After isolation of antibody variable-region (V) gene of B cells extracted from the spleen of an immunized mouse, a library of single chain Fv fragments (scFv) was constructed. The library was used in a series of bio-panning processes against recombinant p24 protein expressed from Escherichia coli. The isolated scFv antibody specifically recognizes the HIV-1 capsid protein p24. The affinity constant of the isolated scFv antibody (MF85) was found to be 2×10(-9) M. Our studies showed that the MF85 scFV antibody has similar properties as that of monoclonal antibodies produced by the hybridoma technology.

  4. Comparison of Heterologous Prime-Boost Strategies against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Using Negative Stranded RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Tessa M; Wanjalla, Celestine N; Gomme, Emily A; Wirblich, Christoph; Gatt, Anthony; Carnero, Elena; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lyles, Douglas S; McGettigan, James P; Schnell, Matthias J

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed a heterologous prime-boost vaccine approach against HIV-1 using three different antigenically unrelated negative-stranded viruses (NSV) expressing HIV-1 Gag as vaccine vectors: rabies virus (RABV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV). We hypothesized that this approach would result in more robust cellular immune responses than those achieved with the use of any of the vaccines alone in a homologous prime-boost regimen. To this end, we primed BALB/c mice with each of the NSV-based vectors. Primed mice were rested for thirty-five days after which we administered a second immunization with the same or heterologous NSV-Gag viruses. The magnitude and quality of the Gag-specific CD8(+) T cells in response to these vectors post boost were measured. In addition, we performed challenge experiments using vaccinia virus expressing HIV-1 Gag (VV-Gag) thirty-three days after the boost inoculation. Our results showed that the choice of the vaccine used for priming was important for the detected Gag-specific CD8(+) T cell recall responses post boost and that NDV-Gag appeared to result in a more robust recall of CD8(+) T cell responses independent of the prime vaccine used. However, the different prime-boost strategies were not distinct for the parameters studied in the challenge experiments using VV-Gag but did indicate some benefits compared to single immunizations. Taken together, our data show that NSV vectors can individually stimulate HIV-Gag specific CD8(+) T cells that are effectively recalled by other NSV vectors in a heterologous prime-boost approach. These results provide evidence that RABV, VSV and NDV can be used in combination to develop vaccines needing prime-boost regimens to stimulate effective immune responses.

  5. Comparison of Heterologous Prime-Boost Strategies against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Using Negative Stranded RNA Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa M Lawrence

    Full Text Available This study analyzed a heterologous prime-boost vaccine approach against HIV-1 using three different antigenically unrelated negative-stranded viruses (NSV expressing HIV-1 Gag as vaccine vectors: rabies virus (RABV, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and Newcastle disease virus (NDV. We hypothesized that this approach would result in more robust cellular immune responses than those achieved with the use of any of the vaccines alone in a homologous prime-boost regimen. To this end, we primed BALB/c mice with each of the NSV-based vectors. Primed mice were rested for thirty-five days after which we administered a second immunization with the same or heterologous NSV-Gag viruses. The magnitude and quality of the Gag-specific CD8(+ T cells in response to these vectors post boost were measured. In addition, we performed challenge experiments using vaccinia virus expressing HIV-1 Gag (VV-Gag thirty-three days after the boost inoculation. Our results showed that the choice of the vaccine used for priming was important for the detected Gag-specific CD8(+ T cell recall responses post boost and that NDV-Gag appeared to result in a more robust recall of CD8(+ T cell responses independent of the prime vaccine used. However, the different prime-boost strategies were not distinct for the parameters studied in the challenge experiments using VV-Gag but did indicate some benefits compared to single immunizations. Taken together, our data show that NSV vectors can individually stimulate HIV-Gag specific CD8(+ T cells that are effectively recalled by other NSV vectors in a heterologous prime-boost approach. These results provide evidence that RABV, VSV and NDV can be used in combination to develop vaccines needing prime-boost regimens to stimulate effective immune responses.

  6. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... antiretroviral drugs. With genotypic resistance testing, the genetic code of the HIV a person has been infected ...

  7. Fluorescent reporter signals, EGFP and DsRed, encoded in HIV-1 facilitate the detection of productively infected cells and cell-associated viral replication levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka eTerahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric analysis is a reliable and convenient method for investigating molecules at the single cell level. Previously, recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains were constructed that express a fluorescent reporter, either enhanced green fluorescent protein or DsRed, which allow the monitoring of HIV-1-infected cells by flow cytometry. The present study further investigated the potential of these recombinant viruses in terms of whether the HIV-1 fluorescent reporters would be helpful in evaluating viral replication based on fluorescence intensity. When primary CD4+ T cells were infected with recombinant viruses, the fluorescent reporter intensity measured by flow cytometry was associated with the level of CD4 downmodulation and Gag p24 expression in infected cells. Interestingly, some HIV-1-infected cells, in which CD4 was only moderately downmodulated, were reporter-positive but Gag p24-negative. Furthermore, when the activation status of primary CD4+ T cells was modulated by T cell receptor-mediated stimulation, we confirmed the preferential viral production upon strong stimulation and showed that the intensity of the fluorescent reporter within a proportion of HIV-1-infected cells was correlated with the viral replication level. These findings indicate that a fluorescent reporter encoded within HIV-1 is useful for the sensitive detection of productively-infected cells at different stages of infection and for evaluating cell-associated viral replication at the single cell level.

  8. Endophilins interact with Moloney murine leukemia virus Gag and modulate virion production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Camilli Pietro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroviral Gag protein is the central player in the process of virion assembly at the plasma membrane, and is sufficient to induce the formation and release of virus-like particles. Recent evidence suggests that Gag may co-opt the host cell's endocytic machinery to facilitate retroviral assembly and release. Results A search for novel partners interacting with the Gag protein of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV via the yeast two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assay resulted in the identification of endophilin 2, a component of the machinery involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We demonstrate that endophilin interacts with the matrix or MA domain of the Gag protein of Mo-MuLV, but not of human immunodeficiency virus, HIV. Both exogenously expressed and endogenous endophilin are incorporated into Mo-MuLV viral particles. Titration experiments suggest that the binding sites for inclusion of endophilin into viral particles are limited and saturable. Knock-down of endophilin with small interfering RNA (siRNA had no effect on virion production, but overexpression of endophilin and, to a lesser extent, of several fragments of the protein, result in inhibition of Mo-MuLV virion production, but not of HIV virion production. Conclusions This study shows that endophilins interact with Mo-MuLV Gag and affect virion production. The findings imply that endophilin is another component of the large complex that is hijacked by retroviruses to promote virion production.

  9. HDAC inhibition induces HIV-1 protein and enables immune-based clearance following latency reversal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guoxin; Swanson, Michael; Talla, Aarthi

    2017-01-01

    , and the measurement of clearance of infected cells, is essential to assessing therapeutic efficacy. Here, we apply enhanced methodology extending the sensitivity limits for the rapid detection of subfemtomolar HIV gag p24 capsid protein in CD4+ T cells from ART-suppressed HIV+ individuals, and we show viral protein...... bispecific antibody. These findings extend beyond classical nucleic acid endpoints, which are confounded by the predominance of mutated, defective proviruses and, of paramount importance, enable assessment of cells making HIV protein that can now be targeted by immunological approaches.......Promising therapeutic approaches for eradicating HIV include transcriptional activation of provirus from latently infected cells using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) and immune-mediated clearance to purge reservoirs. Accurate detection of cells capable of producing viral antigens and virions...

  10. The macrophage origin of the HIV-expressing multinucleated giant cells in hyperplastic tonsils and adenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, J M; Wahl, S M

    1999-01-01

    Replication and storage of virus are characteristic features of hyperplastic lymphoid tissues in HIV infection. In opportunistic infections, HIV is synthesized by phagocytic mononuclear and Langhans'-type multinucleated macrophages that coexpress the dendritic cell-associated S-100 and p55 antigens. However, similar cells in hyperplastic tonsils and adenoids from HIV+ individuals were alternatively identified as macrophages or, on the basis of the same S-100 and p55 staining, as dendritic cells. To consider establishing the role of these HIV-rich cells in HIV disease, it is important to reconcile this apparent discrepancy in identity. Hyperplastic tonsils and adenoid specimens were analyzed by HIV RNA in situ hybridization (ISH), light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) (HIV Gag p24 protein, S-100, p55, CD68, HAM56, lysozyme, alpha-1-anti-trypsin, and alpha-1-anti-chymotrypsin). In HIV+ pediatric and adult surgical specimens (n = 11), the giant cells and their mononuclear counterpart were positive for both macrophage and p55 and S-100 IHC markers. In addition, TEM, p24 IHC, and ISH showed HIV expression by cells with typical features of macrophages. Furthermore, these cells were not unique to HIV+ specimens, being seen in 20% of hyperplastic T&A surgical specimens (n = 57) lacking HIV as well as in several types of granulomatous processes, such as sarcoidosis. These cells appear to represent an activated phenotype that can develop independent of HIV, but that may represent a viral host in HIV-infected individuals. Thus, the giant and mononuclear cells that produce striking amounts of HIV in tonsils and adenoids are of macrophage origin, yet, as in opportunistic infections, share dendritic cell-associated antigens, reflecting a common CD34+ bone marrow progenitor.

  11. Fragmentation of SIV-gag vaccine induces broader T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Benlahrech

    Full Text Available High mutation rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV allows escape from T cell recognition preventing development of effective T cell vaccines. Vaccines that induce diverse T cell immune responses would help overcome this problem. Using SIV gag as a model vaccine, we investigated two approaches to increase the breadth of the CD8 T cell response. Namely, fusion of vaccine genes to ubiquitin to target the proteasome and increase levels of MHC class I peptide complexes and gene fragmentation to overcome competition between epitopes for presentation and recognition.three vaccines were compared: full-length unmodified SIV-mac239 gag, full-length gag fused at the N-terminus to ubiquitin and 7 gag fragments of equal size spanning the whole of gag with ubiquitin-fused to the N-terminus of each fragment. Genes were cloned into a replication defective adenovirus vector and immunogenicity assessed in an in vitro human priming system. The breadth of the CD8 T cell response, defined by the number of distinct epitopes, was assessed by IFN-γ-ELISPOT and memory phenotype and cytokine production evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed an increase of two- to six-fold in the number of epitopes recognised in the ubiquitin-fused fragments compared to the ubiquitin-fused full-length gag. In contrast, although proteasomal targeting was achieved, there was a marked reduction in the number of epitopes recognised in the ubiquitin-fused full-length gag compared to the full-length unmodified gene, but there were no differences in the number of epitope responses induced by non-ubiquitinated full-length gag and the ubiquitin-fused mini genes. Fragmentation and ubiquitination did not affect T cell memory differentiation and polyfunctionality, though most responses were directed against the Ad5 vector.Fragmentation but not fusion with ubiquitin increases the breadth of the CD8 T vaccine response against SIV-mac239 gag. Thus gene fragmentation of HIV vaccines may maximise

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV types Western blot (WB band profiles as potential surrogate markers of HIV disease progression and predictors of vertical transmission in a cohort of infected but antiretroviral therapy naïve pregnant women in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirenje Mike Z

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expensive CD4 count and viral load tests have failed the intended objective of enabling access to HIV therapy in poor resource settings. It is imperative to develop simple, affordable and non-subjective disease monitoring tools to complement clinical staging efforts of inexperienced health personnel currently manning most healthcare centres because of brain drain. Besides accurately predicting HIV infection, sequential appearance of specific bands of WB test offers a window of opportunity to develop a less subjective tool for monitoring disease progression. Methods HIV type characterization was done in a cohort of infected pregnant women at 36 gestational weeks using WB test. Student-t test was used to determine maternal differences in mean full blood counts and viral load of mothers with and those without HIV gag antigen bands. Pearson Chi-square test was used to assess differences in lack of bands appearance with vertical transmission and lymphadenopathy. Results Among the 64 HIV infected pregnant women, 98.4% had pure HIV-1 infection and one woman (1.7% had dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infections. Absence of HIV pol antigen bands was associated with acute infection, p = 0.002. All women with chronic HIV-1 infection had antibody reactivity to both the HIV-1 envelope and polymerase antigens. However, antibody reactivity to gag antigens varied among the women, being 100%, 90%, 70% and 63% for p24, p17, p39 and p55, respectively. Lack of antibody reactivity to gag p39 antigen was associated with disease progression as confirmed by the presence of lymphadenopathy, anemia, higher viral load, p = 0.010, 0.025 and 0.016, respectively. Although not statistically significant, women with p39 band missing were 1.4 times more likely to transmit HIV-1 to their infants. Conclusion Absence of antibody reactivity to pol and gag p39 antigens was associated with acute infection and disease progression, respectively. Apart from its use in HIV disease

  13. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Zachary S; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R; Echegoyen, Luis; Llano, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4(+) T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag engages the Bro1 domain of ALIX/AIP1 through the nucleocapsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Sergei; Popova, Elena; Inoue, Michio; Göttlinger, Heinrich G

    2008-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses harbor short peptide motifs in Gag that promote the release of infectious virions. These motifs, known as late assembly (L) domains, recruit a cellular budding machinery that is required for the formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). The primary L domain of HIV-1 maps to a PTAP motif in the p6 region of Gag and engages the MVB pathway by binding to Tsg101. Additionally, HIV-1 p6 harbors an auxiliary L domain that binds to the V domain of ALIX, another component of the MVB pathway. We now show that ALIX also binds to the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of HIV-1 Gag and that ALIX and its isolated Bro1 domain can be specifically packaged into viral particles via NC. The interaction with ALIX depended on the zinc fingers of NC, which mediate the specific packaging of genomic viral RNA, but was not disrupted by nuclease treatment. We also observed that HIV-1 zinc finger mutants were defective for particle production and exhibited a similar defect in Gag processing as a PTAP deletion mutant. The effects of the zinc finger and PTAP mutations were not additive, suggesting a functional relationship between NC and p6. However, in contrast to the PTAP deletion mutant, the double mutants could not be rescued by overexpressing ALIX, further supporting the notion that NC plays a role in virus release.

  15. Recent update in HIV vaccine development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shin, So Youn

    2016-01-01

    .... Disappointing results from previous clinical trials of VaxGen's AIDSVAXgp120 vaccine and MRKAd5 HIV-1 Gag/Pol/Nef vaccine emphasize that understanding the correlates of immune protection in HIV...

  16. Development of an HIV-1 Subtype Panel in China: Isolation and Characterization of 30 HIV-1 Primary Strains Circulating in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwan Han

    Full Text Available The complex epidemic and significant diversity of HIV-1 strains in China pose serious challenges for surveillance and diagnostic assays, vaccine development and clinical management. There is a lack of HIV-1 isolates in current canonical HIV-1 subtype panels that can represent HIV-1 diversity in China; an HIV-1 subtype panel for China is urgently needed.Blood samples were collected from HIV-1 infected patients participating in the drug-resistance surveillance program in China. The samples were isolated, cultured and stored as neat culture supernatant. The HIV-1 isolates were fully characterized. The panel was used to compare 2 viral load assays and 2 p24 assays as the examples of how this panel could be used.An HIV-1 subtype panel for China composed of 30 HIV-1 primary strains of four subtypes (B [including Thai-B], CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and G was established. The samples were isolated and cultured to a high-titer (10(6-10(9 copies/ml/high-volume (40 ml. The HIV-1 isolates were fully characterized by the final viral load, p24 concentration, gag-pol and envC2V3 sequencing, co-receptor prediction, determination of the four amino acids at the tip of the env V3-loop, glycosylation sites in the V3 loop and the drug-resistance mutations. The comparison of two p24 assays and two viral load assays on the isolates illustrated how this panel may be used for the evaluation of diagnostic assay performance. The Pearson value between p24 assays were 0.938. The viral load results showed excellent concordance and agreement for samples of Thai-B, but lower correlations for samples of CRF01_AE.The current panel of 30 HIV-1 isolates served as a basis for the development of a comprehensive panel of fully characterized viral isolates, which could reflect the current dynamic and complex HIV-1 epidemic in China. This panel will be available to support HIV-1 research, assay evaluation, vaccine and drug development.

  17. Histochemical determination of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 15% alcoholadministered embryos, while the heparine and heparane sulphate were dense around cells migrating from the NT, staining specificities were decreased in 20% alcohol-administered embryos in same regions. Increased alcohol degrees cause decrease of the GAG types in both areas. Key words: Neural tube ...

  18. Serotyping and genotyping of HIV-1 infection in residents of Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G B; de Beer, C; Fincham, J E; Adams, V; Dhansay, M A; van Rensburg, E Janse; Engelbrecht, S

    2006-12-01

    It is estimated that between 5.5 and 6.1 million people are infected with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in South Africa, with subtype C responsible for the majority of these infections. The Khayelitsha suburb of Cape Town has one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in South Africa. Overcrowding combined with unemployment and crime in parts of the area perpetuates high-risk sexual behavior, which increases exposure to infection by HIV. Against this background, the objective of this study was to characterize HIV-1 in residents confirmed to be seropositive. Serotyping was performed through a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cPEIA). Genotyping methods included RNA isolation followed by RT-PCR and sequencing of the gag p24, env gp41 immunodominant region (IDR), and env gp120 V3 genome regions of HIV-1. With the exception of a possible C/D recombinant strain, all HIV-1 strains were characterized as HIV-1 group M subtype C. One individual was shown to harbor multiple strains of HIV-1 subtype C. In Southern Africa, the focus has been to develop a subtype C candidate vaccine, as this is the major subtype found in this geographical area. Therefore, the spread of HIV-1 and its recombinant strains needs to be monitored closely. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells do not undergo maturation but can elicit IL-10 production and T cell regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Golebiowska, Angelika; Trumpfheller, Christine; Siegal, Frederick P.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation during virus infection and thereby become potent stimulators of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 replicates in immature DCs, but we now find that infection is not accompanied by many components of maturation in either infected cells or uninfected bystanders. The infected cultures do not develop potent stimulating activity for the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), and the DCs producing HIV-1 gag p24 do not express CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein maturation markers. If different maturation stimuli are applied to DCs infected with HIV-1, the infected cells selectively fail to mature. When DCs from HIV-1-infected patients are infected and cultured with autologous T cells, IL-10 was produced in 6 of 10 patients. These DC-T cell cocultures could suppress another immune response, the MLR. The regulation was partially IL-10-dependent and correlated in extent with the level of IL-10 produced. Suppressor cells only developed from infected patients, rather than healthy controls, and the DCs had to be exposed to live virus rather than HIV-1 gag peptides or protein. These results indicate that HIV-1-infected DCs have two previously unrecognized means to evade immune responses: maturation can be blocked reducing the efficacy of antigen presentation from infected cells, and T cell-dependent suppression can be induced.

  20. The Greek version of the Gagging Assessment Scale in children and adolescents: psychometric properties, prevalence of gagging, and the association between gagging and dental fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouda, Maria; Provatenou, Efthymia; Arapostathis, Konstantinos; Coolidge, Trilby; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2017-03-01

    No studies assessing the association between gagging and dental fear are available in pediatric samples. To assess the psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Gagging Assessment Scale (GAS), to explore the prevalence of gagging, and to evaluate the relationship between gagging and dental fear in a pediatric sample. A total of 849 8- and 14-year-old children filled out a questionnaire consisting of demographic items, the Greek version of the GAS, and the Greek Children's Fear Survey Schedule Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS); the older children also completed the Greek version of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS). The short form of dentist part of the Gagging Problem Assessment (GPA-de-c/SF) was used to objectively assess gagging. A total of 51 children (6.0%) demonstrated gagging on the GPA-de-c/SF. Children rated as gaggers on the GPA-de-c/SF had significantly higher GAS scores. There were no relationships between GPA-de-c/SF and the CFSS-DS or MDAS. The GAS ratings were significantly correlated with the CFSS-DS (rho = 0.420, P < 0.001) and MDAS (rho = 0.429, P < 0.001). The internal consistency was good (Cronbach's alpha = 0.697). The GAS demonstrated good psychometric properties. Dental fear was correlated with the self-report gagging assessment, but not with the objective gagging assessment. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Novel Acylguanidine-Based Inhibitor of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwimanzi, Philip; Tietjen, Ian; Miller, Scott C.; Shahid, Aniqa; Cobarrubias, Kyle; Kinloch, Natalie N.; Baraki, Bemuluyigza; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Fedida, David; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence of transmissible HIV-1 strains with resistance to antiretroviral drugs highlights a continual need for new therapies. Here we describe a novel acylguanidine-containing compound, 1-(2-(azepan-1-yl)nicotinoyl)guanidine (or SM111), that inhibits in vitro replication of HIV-1, including strains resistant to licensed protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase inhibitors, without major cellular toxicity. At inhibitory concentrations, intracellular p24Gag production was unaffected, but virion release (measured as extracellular p24Gag) was reduced and virion infectivity was substantially impaired, suggesting that SM111 acts at a late stage of viral replication. SM111-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 was partially overcome by a Vpu I17R mutation alone or a Vpu W22* truncation in combination with Env N136Y. These mutations enhanced virion infectivity and Env expression on the surface of infected cells in the absence and presence of SM111 but also impaired Vpu's ability to downregulate CD4 and BST2/tetherin. Taken together, our results support acylguanidines as a class of HIV-1 inhibitors with a distinct mechanism of action compared to that of licensed antiretrovirals. Further research on SM111 and similar compounds may help to elucidate knowledge gaps related to Vpu's role in promoting viral egress and infectivity. IMPORTANCE New inhibitors of HIV-1 replication may be useful as therapeutics to counteract drug resistance and as reagents to perform more detailed studies of viral pathogenesis. SM111 is a small molecule that blocks the replication of wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 strains by impairing viral release and substantially reducing virion infectivity, most likely through its ability to prevent Env expression at the infected cell surface. Partial resistance to SM111 is mediated by mutations in Vpu and/or Env, suggesting that the compound affects host/viral protein interactions that are important during viral egress. Further characterization of

  2. β-D-xylosides stimulate GAG synthesis in chondrocyte cultures due to elevation of the extracellular GAG domains, accompanied by the depletion of the intra-pericellular GAG pools, with alterations in the GAG profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Talia; Evron, Zoharia; Trebicz-Geffen, Meirav; Aviv, Moran; Robinson, Dror; Kollander, Yehuda; Nevo, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    The familial disease of hereditary multiple exostoses is characterized by abnormal skeletal deformities requiring extensive surgical procedures. In hereditary multiple exostoses patients there is a shortage in the pericellular glycosaminoglycan (GAG) of heparan sulfate (HS), related to defective activity of HS glycosyltransferases, mainly in the pericellular regions of chondrocytes. This study searched for a novel approach employing xylosides with different aglycone groups priming a variety of GAG chains, in attempting to alter the GAG compositional profile. Cell cultures of patients with osteochondroma responded to p-nitrophenyl β-D-xyloside by a significant increase in total GAG synthesis, expressed mainly in the extracellular domains, limited to chondroitin sulfate). The different β-D-xylosides, in addition to increasing the synthesis of extracellular GAGs, led to a significant depletion of the intracellular GAG domains. In mouse chondrocyte cultures, β-D-xylosides with different aglycones created a unique distribution of the GAG pools. Of special interest was the finding that the naphthalene methanol β-D-xyloside showed the highest absolute levels of HS-GAGs in both extracellular and intra-pericellular moieties compared with other β-D-xylosides and with controls without xyloside. In summary, β-D-xylosides can be utilized in chondrocyte cultures to modify the distribution of GAGs between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. In addition, xylosides may alter the profile of specific GAG chains in each moiety.

  3. A comparative analysis of HIV-specific mucosal/systemic T cell immunity and avidity following rDNA/rFPV and poxvirus-poxvirus prime boost immunisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Charani; Eyers, Fiona; Stambas, John; Boyle, David B; Ramshaw, Ian A; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2011-04-05

    In this study we have firstly compared a range of recombinant DNA poxvirus prime-boost immunisation strategies and shown that combined intramuscular (i.m.) 2× DNA-HIV/intranasal (i.n.) 2× FPV-HIV prime-boost immunisation can generate high-level of HIV-specific systemic (spleen) and mucosal (genito-rectal nodes, vaginal tissues and lung tissues) T cell responses and HIV-1 p24 Gag-specific serum IgG1, IgG2a and mucosal IgG, SIgA responses in vaginal secretions in BALB/c mice. Data indicate that following rDNA priming, two rFPV booster immunisations were necessary to generate good antibody and mucosal T cell immunity. This data also revealed that mucosal uptake of recombinant fowl pox (rFPV) was far superior to plasmid DNA. To further evaluate CD8+ T cell immunity, i.m. 2× DNA-HIV/i.n. 1× FPV-HIV immunisation strategy was directly compared with single shot poxvirus/poxvirus, i.n. FPV-HIV/i.m. VV-HIV immunisation. Results indicate that the latter strategy was able to generate strong sustained HIV-specific CD8+ T cells with higher avidity, broader cytokine/chemokine profiles and better protection following influenza-K(d)Gag(197-205) challenge compared to rDNA poxvirus prime-boost strategy. Our findings further substantiate the importance of vector selection/combination, order and route of delivery when designing effective vaccines for HIV-1. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. HIV-1 subtypes B and C unique recombinant forms (URFs and transmitted drug resistance identified in the Western Cape Province, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Brendon Jacobs

    Full Text Available South Africa has the largest worldwide HIV/AIDS population with 5.6 million people infected and at least 2 million people on antiretroviral therapy. The majority of these infections are caused by HIV-1 subtype C. Using genotyping methods we characterized HIV-1 subtypes of the gag p24 and pol PR and RT fragments, from a cohort of female participants in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. These participants were recruited as part of a study to assess the combined brain and behavioural effects of HIV and early childhood trauma. The partial HIV-1 gag and pol fragments of 84 participants were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Different online tools and manual phylogenetic analysis were used for HIV-1 subtyping. Online tools included: REGA HIV Subtyping tool version 3; Recombinant Identification Program (RIP; Context-based Modeling for Expeditious Typing (COMET; jumping profile Hidden Markov Models (jpHMM webserver; and subtype classification using evolutionary algorithms (SCUEAL. HIV-1 subtype C predominates within the cohort with a prevalence of 93.8%. We also show, for the first time, the presence of circulating BC strains in at least 4.6% of our study cohort. In addition, we detected transmitted resistance associated mutations in 4.6% of analysed sequences. With tourism and migration rates to South Africa currently very high, we are detecting more and more HIV-1 URFs within our study populations. It is still unclear what role these unique strains will play in terms of long term antiretroviral treatment and what challenges they will pose to vaccine development. Nevertheless, it remains vitally important to monitor the HIV-1 diversity in South Africa and worldwide as the face of the epidemic is continually changing.

  5. Crystallographic analysis of murine p24γ2 Golgi dynamics domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, Masamichi; Liebschner, Dorothee; Yamada, Yusuke; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Senda, Toshiya; Fujita, Morihisa; Kinoshita, Taroh; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    The p24 family proteins form homo- and hetero-oligomeric complexes for efficient transport of cargo proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. It consists of four subfamilies (p24α, p24β, p24γ, and p24δ). p24γ2 plays crucial roles in the selective transport of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. Here, we determined the crystal structure of mouse p24γ2 Golgi dynamics (GOLD) domain at 2.8 Å resolution by the single anomalous diffraction method using intrinsic sulfur atoms. In spite of low sequence identity among p24 family proteins, p24γ2 GOLD domain assumes a β-sandwich fold, similar to that of p24β1 or p24δ1. An additional short α-helix is observed at the C-terminus of the p24γ2 GOLD domain. Intriguingly, p24γ2 GOLD domains crystallize as dimers, and dimer formation seems assisted by the short α-helix. Dimerization modes of GOLD domains are compared among p24 family proteins. Proteins 2017; 85:764-770. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  7. HIV-1 diversity in an antiretroviral treatment naïve cohort from Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msimanga, Patrick Wela; Vardas, Efthyia; Engelbrecht, Susan

    2015-02-13

    South Africa has a generalized and explosive HIV/AIDS epidemic with the largest number of people infected with HIV-1 in the world. Molecular investigations of HIV-1 diversity can help enhance interventions to contain and combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic. However, many studies of HIV-1 diversity in South Africa tend to be limited to the major metropolitan centers and their surrounding provinces. Hardly any studies of HIV diversity have been undertaken in Mpumalanga Province, and this study sought to investigate the HIV-1 diversity in this province, as well as establish the occurrence and extent of transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance mutations. HIV-1 gag p24, pol p10 and p66/p51, pol p31 and env gp41 gene fragments from 43 participants were amplified and sequenced. Quality control on the sequences was carried out using the LANL QC online tool. HIV-1 subtype was preliminary assigned using the REGA 3.0 and jpHMM online tools. Subtype for the pol gene fragment was further designated using the SCUEAL online tool. Phylogenetic analysis was inferred using the Maximum Likelihood methods in MEGA version 6. HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were determined using the Stanford database. Phylogenetic analysis using Maximum Likelihood methods indicated that all sequences in the study clustered with HIV-1 subtype C. The exception was one putative subtype BC unique recombinant form. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations K103N and E138A were also detected, indicating possible transmission of anti-retroviral drug resistance mutations. The phylogenetic analysis of the HIV sequences revealed that, by 2009, patients in the Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga were predominantly infected with HIV-1 subtype C. However, the generalized, explosive nature of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa, in the context of extensive mobility by South Africans who inhabit rural areas, renders the continued molecular monitoring and surveillance of the epidemic imperative.

  8. Interactions between nattokinase and heparin/GAGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuming; Zhang, Jianhua; Linhardt, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    Nattokinase (NK) is a serine protease extracted from a traditional Japanese food called natto. Due to its strong fibrinolytic and thrombolytic activity, NK is regarded as a valuable dietary supplement or nutraceutical for the oral thrombolytic therapy. In addition, NK has been investigated for some other medical applications including treatment of hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, and vitreoretinal disorders. The most widely used clinical anticoagulants are heparin and low molecular weight heparins. The interactions between heparin and proteins modulate diverse patho-physiological processes and heparin modifies the activity of serine proteases. Indeed, heparin plays important roles in almost all of NK's potential therapeutically applications. The current report relies on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy to examine NK interacting with heparin as well as other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). These studies showed that NK is a heparin binding protein with an affinity of ~250 nM. Examination with differently sized heparin oligosaccharides indicated that the interaction between NK and heparin is chain-length dependent and the minimum size for heparin binding is a hexasaccharide. Studies using chemically modified heparin showed the 6-O-sulfo as well as the N-sulfo groups but not the 2-O-sulfo groups within heparin, are essential for heparin's interaction with NK. Other GAGs (including HS, DS, and CSE) displayed modest binding affinity to NK. NK also interfered with other heparin-protein interactions, including heparin's interaction with antithrombin and fibroblast growth factors.

  9. GB virus type C E2 protein inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag assembly by downregulating human ADP-ribosylation factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenliang; Timmons, Christine L; Shao, Qiujia; Kinlock, Ballington L; Turner, Tiffany M; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Huanliang; Liu, Bindong

    2015-12-22

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) glycoprotein E2 protein disrupts HIV-1 assembly and release by inhibiting Gag plasma membrane targeting, however the mechanism by which the GBV-C E2 inhibits Gag trafficking remains unclear. In the present study, we identified ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) contributed to the inhibitory effect of GBV-C E2 on HIV-1 Gag membrane targeting. Expression of GBV-C E2 decreased ARF1 expression in a proteasomal degradation-dependent manner. The restoration of ARF1 expression rescued the HIV-1 Gag processing and membrane targeting defect imposed by GBV-C E2. In addition, GBV-C E2 expression also altered Golgi morphology and suppressed protein traffic through the secretory pathway, which are all consistent with a phenotype of disrupting the function of ARF1 protein. Thus, our results indicate that GBV-C E2 inhibits HIV-1 assembly and release by decreasing ARF1, and may provide insights regarding GBV-C E2's potential for a new therapeutic approach for treating HIV-1.

  10. Comparative Immunogenicity in Rhesus Monkeys of DNA Plasmid, Recombinant Vaccinia Virus, and Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors Expressing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gag Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimiro, Danilo R.; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Minchun; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Freed, Daniel C.; Wilson, Keith A.; Dubey, Sheri; Zhu, De-Min; Nawrocki, Denise; Mach, Henryk; Troutman, Robert; Isopi, Lynne; Williams, Donna; Hurni, William; Xu, Zheng; Smith, Jeffrey G.; Wang, Su; Liu, Xu; Guan, Liming; Long, Romnie; Trigona, Wendy; Heidecker, Gwendolyn J.; Perry, Helen C.; Persaud, Natasha; Toner, Timothy J.; Su, Qin; Liang, Xiaoping; Youil, Rima; Chastain, Michael; Bett, Andrew J.; Volkin, David B.; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Cellular immune responses, particularly those associated with CD3+ CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), play a primary role in controlling viral infection, including persistent infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Accordingly, recent HIV-1 vaccine research efforts have focused on establishing the optimal means of eliciting such antiviral CTL immune responses. We evaluated several DNA vaccine formulations, a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vector, and a replication-defective adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector, each expressing the same codon-optimized HIV-1 gag gene for immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys. The DNA vaccines were formulated with and without one of two chemical adjuvants (aluminum phosphate and CRL1005). The Ad5-gag vector was the most effective in eliciting anti-Gag CTL. The vaccine produced both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, with the latter consistently being the dominant component. To determine the effect of existing antiadenovirus immunity on Ad5-gag-induced immune responses, monkeys were exposed to adenovirus subtype 5 that did not encode antigen prior to immunization with Ad5-gag. The resulting anti-Gag T-cell responses were attenuated but not abolished. Regimens that involved priming with different DNA vaccine formulations followed by boosting with the adenovirus vector were also compared. Of the formulations tested, the DNA-CRL1005 vaccine primed T-cell responses most effectively and provided the best overall immune responses after boosting with Ad5-gag. These results are suggestive of an immunization strategy for humans that are centered on use of the adenovirus vector and in which existing adenovirus immunity may be overcome by combined immunization with adjuvanted DNA and adenovirus vector boosting. PMID:12743287

  11. P24 Plasma Physics Summer School 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory Summer lecture series for students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Bruno [Univ Nevada, Reno; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, William S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weber, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Awe, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yong Ho [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-07

    This report covers the 2012 LANL summer lecture series for students. The lectures were: (1) Tom Intrator, P24 LANL: Kick off, Introduction - What is a plasma; (2) Bruno Bauer, Univ. Nevada-Reno: Derivation of plasma fluid equations; (3) Juan Fernandez, P24 LANL Overview of research being done in p-24; (4) Tom Intrator, P24 LANL: Intro to dynamo, reconnection, shocks; (5) Bill Daughton X-CP6 LANL: Intro to computational particle in cell methods; (6) Kirk Flippo, P24 LANL: High energy density plasmas; (7) Thom Weber, P24 LANL: Energy crisis, fission, fusion, non carbon fuel cycles; (8) Tom Awe, Sandia National Laboratory: Magneto Inertial Fusion; and (9) Yongho Kim, P24 LANL: Industrial technologies.

  12. Use of training dentures in management of gagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gagging is a frequent impediment to the performance of dental procedures. This stimulation of the gagging reflex, or more accurately, the vomiting reflex, is a special problem in prosthodontic service. A hypersensitive gagging reflex often prevents the dentist from carrying out critical procedures or causes them to performat a less than satisfactory level. In addition, once having suffered an unpleasant gagging experience in a dentist′s office, the patients develop a fear of further visits to dentists. The purpose of this paper is to describe methods of managing the gagging patient that has a sound rationale based on modified treatment approaches starting from impression making to design of the prosthesis aided by training dentures to help the patient to tolerate prosthesis in mouth before fabrication of definite prosthesis.

  13. Characterization of silencing suppressor p24 of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingjun; Zhang, Jiao; Feng, Ming; Wang, Xianyou; Luo, Chen; Wang, Qi; Cheng, Yuqin

    2018-02-01

    Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2 (GLRaV-2) p24 has been reported to be an RNA silencing suppressor (RSS). However, the mechanisms underlying p24's suppression of RNA silencing are unknown. Using Agrobacterium infiltration-mediated RNA silencing assays, we showed that GLRaV-2 p24 is a strong RSS triggered by positive-sense green fluorescent protein (GFP) RNA, and that silencing suppression by p24 effectively blocks the accumulation of small interfering RNAs. Deletion analyses showed that the region of amino acids 1-188, which contains all predicted α-helices and β-strands, is required for the RSS activity of p24. Hydrophobic residues I35/F38/V85/V89/W149 and V162/L169/L170, previously shown to be critical for p24 self-interaction, are also crucial for silencing suppression, and western blotting results suggested that a lack of self-interaction ability results in decreased p24 accumulation in plants. The mutants showed greatly weakened or a lack of RSS activity. Substitution with two basic residues at positions 2 or 86, putatively involved in RNA binding, totally abolished the RSS activity of p24, suggesting that p24 uses an RNA-binding strategy to suppress RNA silencing. Our results also showed that W54 in the WG/GW-like motif (W54/G55) is crucial for the RSS activity of p24, whereas p24 does not physically interact with AGO1 of Nicotiana benthamiana. Furthermore, p24 did not promote AGO1 degradation, but significantly up-regulated AGO1 mRNA expression, and this effect was correlated with the RSS activity of p24, indicating that p24 may interfere with microRNA-directed processes. The presented results contribute to our understanding of viral suppression of RNA silencing and the molecular mechanisms underlying GLRaV-2 infection. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. Positive selection pressure introduces secondary mutations at Gag cleavage sites in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 harboring major protease resistance mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, S.; Lillemark, M.R.; Gerstoft, J.

    2009-01-01

    resistance. We analyzed gag and pol sequence data from the following 313 HIV-1-infected patients: 160 treatment-naive patients, 93 patients failing antiretroviral treatment that included a PI (with no major PI mutations), and 60 patients failing antiretroviral treatment that included a PI (with major PI...

  15. HIV control through a single nucleotide on the HLA-B locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Harndahl, Mikkel; Leslie, Alasdair J

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation within the HLA-B locus has the strongest impact on HIV disease progression of any polymorphisms within the human genome. However, identifying the exact mechanism involved is complicated by several factors. HLA-Bw4 alleles provide ligands for NK cells and for CD8 T cells, and str......:02, which differ by only a single amino acid. Crucially, they occur primarily on identical HLA class I haplotypes and, as Bw6 alleles, do not act as NK cell ligands and are therefore largely unconfounded by other genetic factors. We show that in an outbred cohort (n = 2,093) of HIV C......-clade-infected individuals, a single amino acid change at position 9 of the HLA-B molecule critically affects peptide binding and significantly alters the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes targeted, measured directly ex vivo by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay (P = 2 × 10......(-10)) and functionally through CTL escape mutation (P = 2 × 10(-8)). HLA-B*42:01, which presents multiple Gag epitopes, is associated with a 0.52 log(10) lower viral-load set point than HLA-B*42:02 (P = 0.02), which presents no p24 Gag epitopes. The magnitude of this effect from a single amino acid difference in the HLA...

  16. The Effect of Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs on Amyloid Aggregation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Iannuzzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  17. Transmission of new CRF07_BC Strains with 7 amino acid deletion in Gag p6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Lu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 7 amino acid deletion in Gag p6 (P6delta7 emerged in Chinese prevalent HIV-1 strain CRF07_BC from different epidemic regions. It is important to determine whether this mutation could be transmitted and spread. In this study, HIV-1 Gag sequences from 5 different epidemic regions in China were collected to trace the transmission linkage and to analyze genetic evolution of P6delta7 strains. The sequence analysis demonstrated that P6delta7 is a CRF07_BC specific deletion, different P6delta7 strains could be originated from different parental CRF07_BC recombinants in different epidemic regions, and the transmission of P6delta7 strain has occurred in IDU populations. This is for the first time to identify the transmission linkage for P6delta7 strains and serves as a wake-up call for further monitoring in the future; In addition, P6delta7 deletion may represent an evolutionary feature which might exert influence on the fitness of CRF07_BC strain.

  18. Basic residues in the foamy virus Gag protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Daniel; Wiktorowicz, Tatiana; Zahn, Juliane; Bodem, Jochen; Stanke, Nicole; Lindemann, Dirk; Rethwilm, Axel

    2011-04-01

    Foamy virus (FV) capsid proteins have few lysines. Basic residues are almost exclusively represented by arginines indicating positive selective pressure. To analyze the possible functions of this peculiarity, we mutated an infectious molecular clone of the prototypic FV (PFV) to harbor lysines in the Gag protein at arginine-specifying positions and analyzed various aspects of the FV replication cycle. The majority of mutants replicated equally as well in permanent cell cultures as the original wild-type (wt) virus and were genetically stable in gag upon 10 cell-free passages. With respect to the features of late reverse transcription, nucleic acid content, and infectiousness of the virion DNA genome, the majority of mutants behaved like the wt. Several mutants of PFV were ubiquitinated in Gag but unable to generate virus-like particles (VLPs) or to undergo pseudotyping by a heterologous envelope. Using primary cells, however, a replicative disadvantage of the majority of mutants was disclosed. This disadvantage was enhanced upon interferon (IFN) treatment. We found no evidence that the lysine-bearing gag mutants showed more restriction than the wt virus by tetherin (CD317) or Trim5α. A single lysine in PFV Gag was found to be nonessential for transient replication in permanent cell culture if replaced by an arginine residue. Upon replication in primary cells, even without IFN treatment, this mutant was severely impaired, indicating the importance of specifying at least this lysine residue in PFV Gag. The paucity of lysines in FV Gag proteins may be a consequence of preventing proteasomal Gag degradation.

  19. Oral and vaginal epithelial cell lines bind and transfer cell-free infectious HIV-1 to permissive cells but are not productively infected.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arinder Kohli

    Full Text Available The majority of HIV-1 infections worldwide are acquired via mucosal surfaces. However, unlike the vaginal mucosa, the issue of whether the oral mucosa can act as a portal of entry for HIV-1 infection remains controversial. To address potential differences with regard to the fate of HIV-1 after exposure to oral and vaginal epithelium, we utilized two epithelial cell lines representative of buccal (TR146 and pharyngeal (FaDu sites of the oral cavity and compared them with a cell line derived from vaginal epithelium (A431 in order to determine (i HIV-1 receptor gene and protein expression, (ii whether HIV-1 genome integration into epithelial cells occurs, (iii whether productive viral infection ensues, and (iv whether infectious virus can be transferred to permissive cells. Using flow cytometry to measure captured virus by HIV-1 gp120 protein detection and western blot to detect HIV-1 p24 gag protein, we demonstrate that buccal, pharyngeal and vaginal epithelial cells capture CXCR4- and CCR5-utilising virus, probably via non-canonical receptors. Both oral and vaginal epithelial cells are able to transfer infectious virus to permissive cells either directly through cell-cell attachment or via transcytosis of HIV-1 across epithelial cells. However, HIV-1 integration, as measured by real-time PCR and presence of early gene mRNA transcripts and de novo protein production were not detected in either epithelial cell type. Importantly, both oral and vaginal epithelial cells were able to support integration and productive infection if HIV-1 entered via the endocytic pathway driven by VSV-G. Our data demonstrate that under normal conditions productive HIV-1 infection of epithelial cells leading to progeny virion production is unlikely, but that epithelial cells can act as mediators of systemic viral dissemination through attachment and transfer of HIV-1 to permissive cells.

  20. Characterization of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) Sulfatases from the Human Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Reveals the First GAG-specific Bacterial Endosulfatase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Jonathan E.; Vilén, Eric Morssing; Namburi, Ramesh Babu; Benjdia, Alhosna; Beneteau, Julie; Malleron, Annie; Bonnaffé, David; Driguez, Pierre-Alexandre; Descroix, Karine; Lassalle, Gilbert; Le Narvor, Christine; Sandström, Corine; Spillmann, Dorothe; Berteau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of the microbiota in human physiology, the molecular bases that govern the interactions between these commensal bacteria and their host remain poorly understood. We recently reported that sulfatases play a key role in the adaptation of a major human commensal bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, to its host (Benjdia, A., Martens, E. C., Gordon, J. I., and Berteau, O. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25973–25982). We hypothesized that sulfatases are instrumental for this bacterium, and related Bacteroides species, to metabolize highly sulfated glycans (i.e. mucins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)) and to colonize the intestinal mucosal layer. Based on our previous study, we investigated 10 sulfatase genes induced in the presence of host glycans. Biochemical characterization of these potential sulfatases allowed the identification of GAG-specific sulfatases selective for the type of saccharide residue and the attachment position of the sulfate group. Although some GAG-specific bacterial sulfatase activities have been described in the literature, we report here for the first time the identity and the biochemical characterization of four GAG-specific sulfatases. Furthermore, contrary to the current paradigm, we discovered that B. thetaiotaomicron possesses an authentic GAG endosulfatase that is active at the polymer level. This type of sulfatase is the first one to be identified in a bacterium. Our study thus demonstrates that bacteria have evolved more sophisticated and diverse GAG sulfatases than anticipated and establishes how B. thetaiotaomicron, and other major human commensal bacteria, can metabolize and potentially tailor complex host glycans. PMID:25002587

  1. Random mutagenesis MAPPIT analysis identifies binding sites for Vif and Gag in both cytidine deaminase domains of Apobec3G.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Uyttendaele

    Full Text Available The mammalian two-hybrid system MAPPIT allows the detection of protein-protein interactions in intact human cells. We developed a random mutagenesis screening strategy based on MAPPIT to detect mutations that disrupt the interaction of one protein with multiple protein interactors simultaneously. The strategy was used to detect residues of the human cytidine deaminase Apobec3G that are important for its homodimerization and its interaction with the HIV-1 Gag and Vif proteins. The strategy is able to identify the previously described head-to-head homodimerization interface in the N-terminal domain of Apobec3G. Our analysis further detects two new potential interaction surfaces in the N-and C-terminal domain of Apobec3G for interaction with Vif and Gag or for Apobec3G dimerization.

  2. Pericentriolar Targeting of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus GAG Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhi Zhang

    Full Text Available The Gag protein of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is the chief determinant of subcellular targeting. Electron microscopy studies show that MMTV Gag forms capsids within the cytoplasm and assembles as immature particles with MMTV RNA and the Y box binding protein-1, required for centrosome maturation. Other betaretroviruses, such as Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV, assemble adjacent to the pericentriolar region because of a cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the Matrix protein. Previous studies suggest that the MMTV Matrix protein may also harbor a similar cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal. Herein, we show that a substantial fraction of MMTV Gag localizes to the pericentriolar region. This was observed in HEK293T, HeLa human cell lines and the mouse derived NMuMG mammary gland cells. Moreover, MMTV capsids were observed adjacent to centrioles when expressed from plasmids encoding either MMTV Gag alone, Gag-Pro-Pol or full-length virus. We found that the cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the MMTV Matrix protein was sufficient for pericentriolar targeting, whereas mutation of the glutamine to alanine at position 56 (D56/A resulted in plasma membrane localization, similar to previous observations from mutational studies of M-PMV Gag. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy studies showed that MMTV capsids accumulate around centrioles suggesting that, similar to M-PMV, the pericentriolar region may be a site for MMTV assembly. Together, the data imply that MMTV Gag targets the pericentriolar region as a result of the MMTV cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal, possibly aided by the Y box protein-1 required for the assembly of centrosomal microtubules.

  3. Detection of transmission clusters of HIV-1 subtype C over a 21-year period in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Eduan; Engelbrecht, Susan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent breakthroughs in the fight against the HIV/AIDS epidemic within South Africa, the transmission of the virus continues at alarmingly high rates. It is possible, with the use of phylogenetic methods, to uncover transmission events of HIV amongst local communities in order to identify factors that may contribute to the sustained transmission of the virus. The aim of this study was to uncover transmission events of HIV amongst the infected population of Cape Town. We analysed gag p24 and RT-pol sequences which were generated from samples spanning over 21-years with advanced phylogenetic techniques. We identified two transmission clusters over a 21-year period amongst randomly sampled patients from Cape Town and the surrounding areas. We also estimated the origin of each of the identified transmission clusters with the oldest cluster dating back, on average, 30 years and the youngest dating back roughly 20 years. These transmission clusters represent the first identified transmission events among the heterosexual population in Cape Town. By increasing the number of randomly sampled specimens within a dataset over time, it is possible to start to uncover transmission events of HIV amongst local communities in generalized epidemics. This information can be used to produce targeted interventions to decrease transmission of HIV in Africa.

  4. The HIV epidemic in the Amazon Basin is driven by prototypic and recombinant HIV-1 subtypes B and F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, A C; Otsuki, K; Silva, N B; Castilho, M C; Barros, F S; Pieniazek, D; Hu, D; Rayfield, M A; Bretas, G; Tanuri, A

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes genetic subtypes of HIV-1 found in blood samples from 31 HIV-1-infected people who visited the Counseling and Testing AIDS Center of Instituto de Medicina Tropical in Manaus, Brazil. Manaus, the main city in Brazil's Amazon Basin, is also the closest urban connection for more than 100,000 Indians living in the rain forests of this region. Although to date there is no evidence of increased incidence of HIV-1 infection among the indigenous population, our understanding of both the prevalence and nature of the epidemic in the region as a whole is limited. From the 31 samples analyzed by C2V3 sequencing, we found almost equal proportions of HIV-1 strains belonging to subtype B (n = 16; 51.6%) and subtype F (n = 15; 48.4%), a finding that differs from results from previous studies conducted in urban areas of southeastern Brazil. We also observed the presence of the GWGR amino-acid sequence in the critical tetra-peptide crown of the env V3 loop in the HIV-1 subtype B samples analyzed. Among these samples, we also found 14 mosaic genomes (45.16%) in which different combinations of subtypes B, C, and F were identified between the p24 gag, pro, and env regions. Our data support the hypothesis that the Amazonian HIV-1 infections linked to the urban epidemic in southeastern Brazil. The genetic diversity and the prevalence of mosaic genomes among the isolates in our study confirm an integral role of recombination in the complex Brazilian epidemic.

  5. Predicting Bevirimat resistance of HIV-1 from genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral drugs. Bevirimat (BVM was the first substance in this class of inhibitors entering clinical trials. While the inhibitory function of BVM is well established, the molecular mechanisms of action and resistance are not well understood. It is known that mutations in the regions CS p24/p2 and p2 can cause phenotypic resistance to BVM. We have investigated a set of p24/p2 sequences of HIV-1 of known phenotypic resistance to BVM to test whether BVM resistance can be predicted from sequence, and to identify possible molecular mechanisms of BVM resistance in HIV-1. Results We used artificial neural networks and random forests with different descriptors for the prediction of BVM resistance. Random forests with hydrophobicity as descriptor performed best and classified the sequences with an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC curve of 0.93 ± 0.001. For the collected data we find that p2 sequence positions 369 to 376 have the highest impact on resistance, with positions 370 and 372 being particularly important. These findings are in partial agreement with other recent studies. Apart from the complex machine learning models we derived a number of simple rules that predict BVM resistance from sequence with surprising accuracy. According to computational predictions based on the data set used, cleavage sites are usually not shifted by resistance mutations. However, we found that resistance mutations could shorten and weaken the α-helix in p2, which hints at a possible resistance mechanism. Conclusions We found that BVM resistance of HIV-1 can be predicted well from the sequence of the p2 peptide, which may prove useful for personalized therapy if maturation inhibitors reach clinical practice. Results of secondary structure analysis are compatible with a possible route to BVM resistance in which mutations weaken a six-helix bundle discovered in recent experiments

  6. Electron cryotomography studies of maturing HIV-1 particles reveal the assembly pathway of the viral core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Cora L; Cheng, Sarah N; Jensen, Grant J

    2015-01-15

    To better characterize the assembly of the HIV-1 core, we have used electron cryotomography (ECT) to image infected cells and the viral particles cryopreserved next to them. We observed progressive stages of virus assembly and egress, including flower-like flat Gag lattice assemblies, hemispherical budding profiles, and virus buds linked to the plasma membrane via a thin membrane neck. The population of budded viral particles contains immature, maturation-intermediate, and mature core morphologies. Structural characteristics of the maturation intermediates suggest that the core assembly pathway involves the formation of a CA sheet that associates with the condensed ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. Our analysis also reveals a correlation between RNP localization within the viral particle and the formation of conical cores, suggesting that the RNP helps drive conical core assembly. Our findings support an assembly pathway for the HIV-1 core that begins with a small CA sheet that associates with the RNP to form the core base, followed by polymerization of the CA sheet along one side of the conical core toward the tip, and then closure around the body of the cone. During HIV-1 assembly and release, the Gag polyprotein is organized into a signature hexagonal lattice, termed the immature lattice. To become infectious, the newly budded virus must disassemble the immature lattice by proteolyzing Gag and then reassemble the key proteolytic product, the structural protein p24 (CA), into a distinct, mature hexagonal lattice during a process termed maturation. The mature HIV-1 virus contains a conical capsid that encloses the condensed viral genome at its wide base. Mutations or small molecules that interfere with viral maturation also disrupt viral infectivity. Little is known about the assembly pathway that results in the conical core and genome encapsidation. Here, we have used electron cryotomography to structurally characterize HIV-1 particles that are actively maturing

  7. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamata, Masakazu, E-mail: masa3k@ucla.edu [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kim, Patrick Y. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ng, Hwee L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ringpis, Gene-Errol E.; Kranz, Emiko; Chan, Joshua; O' Connor, Sean [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, Otto O. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States); AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chen, Irvin S.Y. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificially engineered receptors that confer a desired specificity to immune effector T cells. As an HIV-1-specific CAR, CD4ζ CAR has been extensively tested in vitro as well as in clinical trials. T cells modified with this CAR mediated highly potent anti-HIV-1 activities in vitro and were well-tolerated in vivo, but exerted limited effects on viral load and reservoir size due to poor survival and/or functionality of the transduced cells in patients. We hypothesize that ectopic expression of CD4ζ on CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection, resulting in poor survival of those cells. To test this possibility, highly purified CD8{sup +} T cells were genetically modified with a CD4ζ-encoding lentiviral vector and infected with HIV-1. CD8{sup +} T cells were vulnerable to HIV-1 infection upon expression of CD4ζ as evidenced by elevated levels of p24{sup Gag} in cells and culture supernatants. Concurrently, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells was reduced relative to control cells upon HIV-1 infection. To protect these cells from HIV-1 infection, we co-expressed two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs previously developed by our group together with CD4ζ. This combination vector was able to suppress HIV-1 infection without impairing HIV-1-dependent effector activities of CD4ζ. In addition, the number of CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells maintained similar levels to that of the control even under HIV-1 infection. These results suggest that protecting CD4ζ-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection is required for prolonged HIV-1-specific immune surveillance. - Highlights: • Ectopic expression of CD4ζ CAR in CD8{sup +} T cells renders them susceptible to HIV-1 infection. • Co-expression of two anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection. • Protecting CD4ζ CAR-modified CD8{sup +} T cells from HIV-1 infection suppresses its cytopathic effect.

  8. Identification of unique reciprocal and non reciprocal cross packaging relationships between HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV reveals an efficient SIV/HIV-2 lentiviral vector system with highly favourable features for in vivo testing and clinical usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldwell Maeve

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lentiviral vectors have shown immense promise as vehicles for gene delivery to non-dividing cells particularly to cells of the central nervous system (CNS. Improvements in the biosafety of viral vectors are paramount as lentiviral vectors move into human clinical trials. This study investigates the packaging relationship between gene transfer (vector and Gag-Pol expression constructs of HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV. Cross-packaged vectors expressing GFP were assessed for RNA packaging, viral vector titre and their ability to transduce rat primary glial cell cultures and human neural stem cells. Results HIV-1 Gag-Pol demonstrated the ability to cross package both HIV-2 and SIV gene transfer vectors. However both HIV-2 and SIV Gag-Pol showed a reduced ability to package HIV-1 vector RNA with no significant gene transfer to target cells. An unexpected packaging relationship was found to exist between HIV-2 and SIV with SIV Gag-Pol able to package HIV-2 vector RNA and transduce dividing SV2T cells and CNS cell cultures with an efficiency equivalent to the homologous HIV-1 vector however HIV-2 was unable to deliver SIV based vectors. Conclusion This new non-reciprocal cross packaging relationship between SIV and HIV-2 provides a novel way of significantly increasing bio-safety with a reduced sequence homology between the HIV-2 gene transfer vector and the SIV Gag-Pol construct thus ensuring that vector RNA packaging is unidirectional.

  9. Characterization of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sulfatases from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron reveals the first GAG-specific bacterial endosulfatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Jonathan E; Vilén, Eric Morssing; Namburi, Ramesh Babu; Benjdia, Alhosna; Beneteau, Julie; Malleron, Annie; Bonnaffé, David; Driguez, Pierre-Alexandre; Descroix, Karine; Lassalle, Gilbert; Le Narvor, Christine; Sandström, Corine; Spillmann, Dorothe; Berteau, Olivier

    2014-08-29

    Despite the importance of the microbiota in human physiology, the molecular bases that govern the interactions between these commensal bacteria and their host remain poorly understood. We recently reported that sulfatases play a key role in the adaptation of a major human commensal bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, to its host (Benjdia, A., Martens, E. C., Gordon, J. I., and Berteau, O. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25973-25982). We hypothesized that sulfatases are instrumental for this bacterium, and related Bacteroides species, to metabolize highly sulfated glycans (i.e. mucins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)) and to colonize the intestinal mucosal layer. Based on our previous study, we investigated 10 sulfatase genes induced in the presence of host glycans. Biochemical characterization of these potential sulfatases allowed the identification of GAG-specific sulfatases selective for the type of saccharide residue and the attachment position of the sulfate group. Although some GAG-specific bacterial sulfatase activities have been described in the literature, we report here for the first time the identity and the biochemical characterization of four GAG-specific sulfatases. Furthermore, contrary to the current paradigm, we discovered that B. thetaiotaomicron possesses an authentic GAG endosulfatase that is active at the polymer level. This type of sulfatase is the first one to be identified in a bacterium. Our study thus demonstrates that bacteria have evolved more sophisticated and diverse GAG sulfatases than anticipated and establishes how B. thetaiotaomicron, and other major human commensal bacteria, can metabolize and potentially tailor complex host glycans. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Crippling HIV one mutation at a time

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating data suggest that not all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1–specific immune responses are equally effective at controlling HIV-1 replication. A new study now demonstrates that multiple immune-driven sequence polymorphisms in the highly conserved HIV-1 Gag region of transmitted viruses are associated with reduced viral replication in newly infected humans. These data suggest that targeting these and other conserved viral regions may be the key to developing an effective HIV-1 v...

  11. Recombinant rubella vectors elicit SIV Gag-specific T cell responses with cytotoxic potential in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Margherita; Alicea, Candido; Kulkarni, Viraj; Virnik, Konstantin; Hockenbury, Max; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Pavlakis, George N; Valentin, Antonio; Berkower, Ira; Felber, Barbara K

    2015-04-27

    Live-attenuated rubella vaccine strain RA27/3 has been demonstrated to be safe and immunogenic in millions of children. The vaccine strain was used to insert SIV gag sequences and the resulting rubella vectors were tested in rhesus macaques alone and together with SIV gag DNA in different vaccine prime-boost combinations. We previously reported that such rubella vectors induce robust and durable SIV-specific humoral immune responses in macaques. Here, we report that recombinant rubella vectors elicit robust de novo SIV-specific cellular immune responses detectable for >10 months even after a single vaccination. The antigen-specific responses induced by the rubella vector include central and effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with cytotoxic potential. Rubella vectors can be administered repeatedly even after vaccination with the rubella vaccine strain RA27/3. Vaccine regimens including rubella vector and SIV gag DNA in different prime-boost combinations resulted in robust long-lasting cellular responses with significant increase of cellular responses upon boost. Rubella vectors provide a potent platform for inducing HIV-specific immunity that can be combined with DNA in a prime-boost regimen to elicit durable cellular immunity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Anxiety, fainting and gagging in dentistry: Separate or overlapping constructs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houtem, C.M.H.H.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aimed to increase the knowledge about severe forms of anxiety, gagging and fainting in dentistry and to investigate whether these phenomena are overlapping or separate constructs. In Chapter 2 a literature review of twin studies showed that the estimated heritability of specific phobias

  13. Issues on the Gagging of Nigerian Press with Obnoxious Laws ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the issues on the gagging of Nigerian press with obnoxious laws and it investigated the rate at which the Nigerian media had been prevented from expressing opinion freely by dictatorial leaders who enacted draconian laws to suppress facts and figures. Also, the study identified the major activities of ...

  14. Eficiencia de la respuesta superovulatoria del ganado Brahman al protocolo P-24

    OpenAIRE

    Roger Salgado O; Andrés Mejía A.; Pablo Suárez S.

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo. Evaluar la eficiencia de la respuesta superovulatoria del ganado Brahman al protocolo P-24. Materiales y métodos. Se utilizaron doce vacas Brahman donadoras con más de 60 días postparto, a las cuales se les realizó un total de 21 tratamientos superovulatorios con base en el protocolo P-24. Se realizó la colecta de los embriones a través del método convencional y los embriones fueron clasificados (IETS). Resultados. Se obtuvo un promedio de 9.1 estructuras, 4.4 embriones transferible...

  15. Análisis funcional del complejo p24 en Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilera Romero, María Auxiliadora

    2010-01-01

    El propósito general de esta tesis es el análisis molecular de la función del complejo p24 en los procesos selectivos de transporte vesicular entre el RE y el aparato de Golgi en la levadura Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ... y: 'Times New Roman','serif'; font-size: 12pt">Para abordar este objetivo general se han planteado los siguientes objetivos concretos:1. Estudio de la función del complejo p24 en la formación de las vesículas COPI derivadas del Golgi.2. Análisis del requerimiento del compl...

  16. HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The·human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be transmiHed from one person to onother through the use of non-sterile nee- dles, syringes, and other skin-piercing and invasive instruments. Proper .sterilization of all such instruments is therefore important to prevent its transmission. HIV is very sensitive to ...

  17. hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-31

    Mar 31, 2016 ... Indexed By: African Journal Online (AJOL); Texila American University; Genamics; Scholarsteer; EIJASR; CAS-American Chemical. Society; and IRMS Informatics India (J-Gate). ABSTRACT. This study evaluated the effect of HIV infection on CD4 T-lymphocyte depletion in people living with HIV/AIDS.

  18. p24 proteins play a role in peroxisome proliferation in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurbatova, Elena; Otzen, Marleen; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2009-01-01

    Emp24 is a member of the p24 protein family, which was initially localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and COP vesicles, but has recently shown to be associated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisomes as well. Using cell fractionation and electron- and fluorescence microscopy, we show that

  19. Evaluation of the Determine™ fourth generation HIV rapid assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Marieke; De Villiers, Johanna C; Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H

    2013-04-01

    Assays that detect p24 antigen reduce the diagnostic window period of HIV testing. Most point-of-care HIV assays have poor sensitivity to diagnose acute HIV infection as they only detect antibodies against HIV-1 and HIV-2 (HIV-1/2). This was a cross-sectional laboratory-based study that evaluated the performance of the Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo fourth generation rapid strip - currently the only rapid assay that detects both HIV-1/2 antibodies and p24 antigen. A total of 79 serum specimens (29 positive for HIV antibodies only, 14 positive for HIV antibodies and p24 antigen, 20 HIV-negative, and 16 positive for p24 antigen only) were used for the evaluation. Results were compared with those from validated fourth generation HIV ELISAs. The Determine™ Combo rapid strips had a sensitivity of 90.7% and a specificity of 100% for the detection of HIV-1/2 antibodies. Its sensitivity for the detection of p24 antigen was only 10% (3 out of 30 p24 antigen positive specimens). This implies that most acute HIV infections will be missed with this assay. The need for a point-of-care assay which can detect acute HIV infection reliably still remains, particularly for use in a high prevalence setting such as South Africa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Frequency and site mapping of HIV-1/SIVcpz, HIV- 2/SIVsmm and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 6 (10), pp. 1225-1232, 16 May 2007 ... out to analyze the effects of various restriction enzymes on the HIV genome. A computer simulated ... A background in vitro cytogenetic control analysis using HIV-1/SIVcpz GAG, POL and ENV genes was done. Of the 339 enzymes used, 238 ...

  1. Multiple transmissions of a stable human leucocyte antigen-B27 cytotoxic T-cell-escape strain of HIV-1 in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Marion; Hoogland, Frederik M; Back, Nicole K T; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Bakker, Margreet; Brinkman, Kees; Prins, Maria; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C

    2009-07-31

    The evolution of HIV-1 is largely shaped by the cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response of the host as encoded by the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes. Certain HLA-B alleles can delay disease progression, but it is uncertain whether this protection will sustain or whether the virus is in the process of adaptation. In The Netherlands, HLA-B27 is moderately prevalent (approximately 8-16% of HLA-B alleles). If adaptation to HLA-B alleles is in progress, virus strains carrying escape mutations to HLA-B27 should appear in the epidemic by now. A subtype B HIV-1 strain carrying a HLA-B27 CTL-escape mutation in the main Gag-p24 KK10 epitope, R264G, together with a compensatory mutation outside this epitope, E260D, was detected in four patients from Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by sequence analysis of the gag gene. The patients were a drug user and three men who have sex with men, and were infected with HIV-1 between 2002 and 2008. Characterization and evolutionary analysis of the HIV-1 CTL-escape strain was done by sequence analysis of serial blood plasma samples. The mutations involved were stable during follow-up and after transmission, also in two individuals lacking HLA-B27. The finding that a stable HLA-B27 CTL-escape strain is circulating in The Netherlands has important implications for the understanding of virus-host interactions and vaccine design alike. Vaccines targeted at inducing a CTL response might easily be circumvented by the virus. Also, patients carrying protective HLA alleles might not be protected anymore from disease progression in the future.

  2. The Foreseeable Harms of Trump's Global Gag Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingenheimer, Jeffrey B; Skuster, Patty

    2017-09-01

    As one of his first acts as President of the United States, Donald Trump signed an executive order reinstating a version of the global gag rule. Under this rule, US grantees are barred from receiving global health funding if they engage in abortion-related work: not only abortion services, but also abortion referrals and counseling or advocacy for the liberalization of abortion laws. Critics of the Trump global gag rule generally raise three classes of objections: (1) that the rule fails to accomplish its presumed objective of reducing the number of abortions; (2) that it negatively affects the health and well-being of individuals and populations in affected countries; and (3) that it interferes with governments' ability to meet their international obligations. In this commentary, we examine the scientific and policy bases for these criticisms. © 2017 The Population Council, Inc.

  3. Gag grouper larvae pathways on the West Florida Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Peebles, Ernst

    2014-10-01

    A numerical circulation model, quantitatively assessed against in situ observations, is used to describe the circulation on the West Florida Continental Shelf during spring 2007 when pre-settlement gag (Mycteroperca microlepis) were present in the surf zone near Tampa Bay, Florida. The pre-settlement fish were found to be isotopically distinct from settled juveniles in the area, which is consistent with recent arrival at near shore nursery habitats from offshore spawning grounds. Simulated particle trajectories are employed to test hypotheses relating to either a surface or a near-bottom route of across-shelf transport. The surface-route hypothesis is rejected, whereas the bottom-route hypothesis is found to be consistent with the location of pre-settlement fish and their co-occurrence with macroalgae of offshore, hard-bottom origin. We conclude that gag larvae are transported to the near shore via the bottom Ekman layer and that such transport is facilitated by remote forcing associated with Gulf of Mexico Loop Current interactions with the shelf slope near the Dry Tortugas. Being that such remote forcing occurs inter-annually and not always in phase with the preferred spawning months (late winter through early spring), gag recruitment success should similarly vary with year and location.

  4. Exosomes carring gag/env of ALV-J possess negative effect on immunocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhuang, Pingping; Zhao, Xiaomin; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2017-11-01

    J subgroup avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) is an exogenous retrovirus of avian. A key feature of ALV-J infection is leading to severe immunosuppressive characteristic of diseases. Viral components of retrovirus were reported closely associated with immunosuppression, and several similarities between exosomes and retrovirus preparations have lead to the hypotheses of retrovirus hijacker exosomes pathway. In this study, we purified exosomes from DF-1 cells infected and uninfected by ALV-J. Electron microscopy and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis showed that ALV-J not only increased the production of exosomes from ALV-J infected DF-1 cells (Exo-J) but also stimulated some proteins expression, especially ALV-J components secreted in exosomes. Immunosuppressive domain peptide (ISD) of envelope subunit transmembrane (TM) and gag of ALV-J were secreted in Exo-J. It has been reported that HIV gag was budded from endosome-like domains of the T cell plasma membrane. But env protein was first detected in exosomes from retrovirus infected cells. We found that Exo-J caused negative effects on splenocytes in a dose-dependant manner by flow cytometric analysis. And low dose of Exo-J activated immune activity of splenocytes, while high dose possessed immunosuppressive properties. Interestingly, Exo-J has no significant effects on the immunosuppression induced by ALV-J, and the immunosuppressive effects induced by Exo-J lower than that by ALV-J. Taken together, our data indicated that Exo-J supplied a microenvironment for the replication and transformation of ALV-J. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Characterizing the functions of Ty1 Gag and the Gag-derived restriction factor p22/p18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachulska-Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Błaszczyk, Leszek; Gumna, Julita; Nishida, Yuri; Saha, Agniva; Biesiada, Marcin; Garfinkel, David J; Purzycka, Katarzyna J

    2016-01-01

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) and non-LTR retrotransposons comprise approximately half of the human genome, and we are only beginning to understand their influence on genome function and evolution. The LTR retrotransposon Ty1 is the most abundant mobile genetic element in the S. cerevisiae reference genome. Ty1 replicates via an RNA intermediate and shares several important structural and functional characteristics with retroviruses. However, unlike retroviruses Ty1 retrotransposition is not infectious. Retrotransposons integrations can cause mutations and genome instability. Despite the fact that S. cerevisiae lacks eukaryotic defense mechanisms such as RNAi, they maintain a relatively low copy number of the Ty1 retrotransposon in their genomes. A novel restriction factor derived from the C-terminal half of Gag (p22/p18) and encoded by internally initiated transcript inhibits retrotransposition in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, Ty1 evolved a specific GAG organization and expression strategy to produce products both essential and antagonistic for retrotransposon movement. In this commentary we discuss our recent research aimed at defining steps of Ty1 replication influenced by p22/p18 with particular emphasis on the nucleic acid chaperone functions carried out by Gag and the restriction factor.

  6. Multiple barriers to recombination between divergent HIV-1 variants revealed by a dual-marker recombination assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea; Moore, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is a major force for generating human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) diversity and produces numerous recombinants circulating in the human population. We previously established a cell-based system using green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) as a reporter to study the mechanisms...... of HIV-1 recombination. We now report an improved system capable of detecting recombination using authentic viral sequences. Frameshift mutations were introduced into the gag gene so that parental viruses do not express full-length Gag; however, recombination can generate a progeny virus that expresses...... a functional Gag. We demonstrate that this Gag reconstitution assay can be used to detect recombination between two group M HIV-1 variants of the same or of different subtypes. Using both gfp and gag assays, we found that, similar to group M viruses, group O viruses also recombine frequently. When...

  7. Plasma membrane is the site of productive HIV-1 particle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolwenn Jouvenet

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently proposed models that have gained wide acceptance posit that HIV-1 virion morphogenesis is initiated by targeting the major structural protein (Gag to late endosomal membranes. Thereafter, late endosome-based secretory pathways are thought to deliver Gag or assembled virions to the plasma membrane (PM and extracellular milieu. We present several findings that are inconsistent with this model. Specifically, we demonstrate that HIV-1 Gag is delivered to the PM, and virions are efficiently released into the extracellular medium, when late endosome motility is abolished. Furthermore, we show that HIV-1 virions are efficiently released when assembly is rationally targeted to the PM, but not when targeted to late endosomes. Recently synthesized Gag first accumulates and assembles at the PM, but a proportion is subsequently internalized via endocytosis or phagocytosis, thus accounting for observations of endosomal localization. We conclude that HIV-1 assembly is initiated and completed at the PM, and not at endosomal membranes.

  8. Sequences within both the 5' UTR and Gag are required for optimal in vivo packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV genomic RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Mustafa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study mapped regions of genomic RNA (gRNA important for packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV. MMTV is a type B betaretrovirus which preassembles intracellularly, a phenomenon distinct from retroviruses that assemble the progeny virion at cell surface just before budding such as the type C human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV. Studies of FIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV, a type D betaretrovirus with similar intracellular virion assembly processes as MMTV, have shown that the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR and 5' end of gag constitute important packaging determinants for gRNA. METHODOLOGY: Three series of MMTV transfer vectors containing incremental amounts of gag or 5' UTR sequences, or incremental amounts of 5' UTR in the presence of 400 nucleotides (nt of gag were constructed to delineate the extent of 5' sequences that may be involved in MMTV gRNA packaging. Real time PCR measured the packaging efficiency of these vector RNAs into MMTV particles generated by co-transfection of MMTV Gag/Pol, vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G Env, and individual transfer vectors into human 293T cells. Transfer vector RNA propagation was monitored by measuring transduction of target HeLaT4 cells following infection with viral particles containing a hygromycin resistance gene expression cassette on the packaged RNA. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MMTV requires the entire 5' UTR and a minimum of ~120 nucleotide (nt at the 5' end of gag for not only efficient gRNA packaging but also propagation of MMTV-based transfer vector RNAs. Vector RNAs without the entire 5' UTR were defective for both efficient packaging and propagation into target cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results reveal that the 5' end of MMTV genome is critical for both gRNA packaging and propagation, unlike the recently delineated FIV and MPMV packaging determinants that have been shown to be of bipartite nature.

  9. Sequences within both the 5' UTR and Gag are required for optimal in vivo packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Farah; Al Amri, Dhuha; Al Ali, Farah; Al Sari, Noor; Al Suwaidi, Sarah; Jayanth, Preethi; Philips, Pretty S; Rizvi, Tahir A

    2012-01-01

    This study mapped regions of genomic RNA (gRNA) important for packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). MMTV is a type B betaretrovirus which preassembles intracellularly, a phenomenon distinct from retroviruses that assemble the progeny virion at cell surface just before budding such as the type C human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV). Studies of FIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), a type D betaretrovirus with similar intracellular virion assembly processes as MMTV, have shown that the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) and 5' end of gag constitute important packaging determinants for gRNA. Three series of MMTV transfer vectors containing incremental amounts of gag or 5' UTR sequences, or incremental amounts of 5' UTR in the presence of 400 nucleotides (nt) of gag were constructed to delineate the extent of 5' sequences that may be involved in MMTV gRNA packaging. Real time PCR measured the packaging efficiency of these vector RNAs into MMTV particles generated by co-transfection of MMTV Gag/Pol, vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G Env), and individual transfer vectors into human 293T cells. Transfer vector RNA propagation was monitored by measuring transduction of target HeLaT4 cells following infection with viral particles containing a hygromycin resistance gene expression cassette on the packaged RNA. MMTV requires the entire 5' UTR and a minimum of ~120 nucleotide (nt) at the 5' end of gag for not only efficient gRNA packaging but also propagation of MMTV-based transfer vector RNAs. Vector RNAs without the entire 5' UTR were defective for both efficient packaging and propagation into target cells. These results reveal that the 5' end of MMTV genome is critical for both gRNA packaging and propagation, unlike the recently delineated FIV and MPMV packaging determinants that have been shown to be of bipartite nature.

  10. Bone induction by biomimetic PLGA copolymer loaded with a novel synthetic RADA16-P24 peptide in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Haitao; Hao, Shaofei [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zheng, Qixin, E-mail: zheng-qx@163.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Li, Jingfeng [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Department of Orthopedics, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zheng, Jin; Hu, Zhilei; Yang, Shuhua; Guo, Xiaodong [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yang, Qin [Advanced Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is a key bone morphogenetic protein, and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) has been widely used as scaffold for clinical use to carry treatment protein. In the previous studies, we have synthesized BMP-2-related peptide (P24) and found its capacity of inducing bone regeneration. In this research, we have synthesized a new amphiphilic peptide Ac-RADA RADA RADA RADA S[PO4]KIPKASSVPTELSAISTLYLDDD-CONH2 (RADA16-P24) with an assembly peptide RADA16-Ion the P24 item of BMP2 to form divalent ion-induced gelatin. Two methods of physisorption and chemical cross-linking were used to bind RADA16-P24 onto the surface of the copolymer PLGA to synthesize RADA16-P24–PLGA, and its capacity of attaching bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was evaluated in vitro and inducing ectopic bone formation was examined in vivo. In vitro our results demonstrated that RADA16-P24–PLGA copolymer prepared by physisorbing or prepared by chemical cross-linking had a peptide binding rate of (2.0180 ± 0.5296)% or (10.0820 ± 0.8405)% respectively (P < 0.05). In addition the BMSCs proliferated vigorously in the RADA16-P24–PLGA biomaterials. Significantly the percentage of BMSCs attached to RADA16-P24–PLGA composite prepared by chemical cross-linking and physisorbing were (71.4 ± 7.5) % or (46.7 ± 5.8) % (P < 0.05). The in vivo study showed that RADA16-P24–PLGA chemical cross-linking could better induce ectopic bone formation compared with RADA16-P24–PLGA physisorbing and PLGA. It is concluded that the PLGA copolymer is a good RADA16-P24 carrier. This novel RADA16-P24–PLGA composite has strong osteogenic capability. - Highlights: • We have synthesized a new RADA16-P24 amphiphilic peptide. • It is an assembly peptide RADA16-Ion the P24 to form divalent ion-induced gelatin. • RADA16-P24/PLGA could better induce etopia osteogenesis compared with PLGA. • RADA16-P24–PLGA has strong osteogenic capability.

  11. Eficiencia de la respuesta superovulatoria del ganado Brahman al protocolo P-24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Salgado O.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar la eficiencia de la respuesta superovulatoria del ganado Brahman al protocolo P-24. Materiales y métodos. Se utilizaron doce vacas Brahman donadoras con más de 60 días postparto, a las cuales se les realizó un total de 21 tratamientos superovulatorios con base en el protocolo P-24. Se realizó la colecta de los embriones a través del método convencional y los embriones fueron clasificados (IETS. Resultados. Se obtuvo un promedio de 9.1 estructuras, 4.4 embriones transferibles, 3.7 embriones congelables y 3.2 embriones degenerados recuperados por colecta. Los estadíos de desarrollo que predominaron fueron mórula (32.6%, blastocisto temprano (38% y blastocisto (18.5%. Se presentó efecto (p0.05 sobre las demás variables estudiadas. Se presentó efecto (p0.05 de la producción promedio de embriones degenerados y ovocitos sin fecundar entre ambos grupos. No obstante, la proporción de éstos fue mayor en las donadoras con una menor producción de embriones transferibles (50 y 22.4% vs. las donadoras con mayor producción (39.3 y 14% para embriones degenerados y ovocitos sin fecundar respectivamente. Conclusiones. El ganado Brahman tuvo una respuesta superovulatoria eficiente al protocolo P-24 para transferencia de embriones a tiempo fijo.

  12. Algorithm for recall of HIV reactive Indian blood donors by sequential immunoassays enables selective donor referral for counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakral B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS pandemic brought into focus the importance of safe blood donor pool. Aims: To analyze true seroprevalence of HIV infection in our blood donors and devise an algorithm for donor recall avoiding unnecessary referrals to voluntary counseling and testing centre (VCTC. Materials and Methods: 39,784 blood units were screened for anti-HIV 1/2 using ELISA immunoassay (IA-1. Samples which were repeat reactive on IA-1 were further tested using two different immunoassays (IA-2 and IA-3 and Western blot (WB. Based on results of these sequential IAs and WB, an algorithm for recall of true HIV seroreactive blood donors is suggested for countries like India where nucleic acid testing or p24 antigen assays are not mandatory and given the limited resources may not be feasible. Results: The anti-HIV seroreactivity by repeat IA-1, IA-2, IA-3 and WB were 0.16%, 0.11%, 0.098% and 0.07% respectively. Of the 44 IA-1 reactive samples, 95.2% (20/21 of the seroreactive samples by both IA-2 and IA-3 were also WB positive and 100% (6/6 of the non-reactive samples by these IAs were WB negative. IA signal/cutoff ratio was significantly low in biological false reactive donors. WB indeterminate results were largely due to non-specific reactivity to gag protein (p55. Conclusions: HIV seroreactivity by sequential immunoassays (IA-1, IA-2 and IA-3; comparable to WHO Strategy-III prior to donor recall results in decreased referral to VCTC as compared to single IA (WHO Strategy-I being followed currently in India. Moreover, this strategy will repose donor confidence in our blood transfusion services and strengthen voluntary blood donation program.

  13. HIV Transmission Patterns Among The Netherlands, Suriname, and The Netherlands Antilles: A Molecular Epidemiological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Merlijn A.; Cornelissen, Marion; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Prins, Maria; Coutinho, Roel A.; van Sighem, Ard I.; Sabajo, Lesley; Duits, Ashley J.; Winkel, Cai N.; Prins, Jan M.; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Kauffmann, Robert H.; Op de Coul, Eline L.

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to study patterns of HIV transmission among Suriname, The Netherlands Antilles, and The Netherlands. Fragments of env, gag, and pol genes of 55 HIV-infected Surinamese, Antillean, and Dutch heterosexuals living in The Netherlands and 72 HIV-infected heterosexuals living in Suriname and the

  14. HIV-2 genomic RNA accumulates in stress granules in the absence of active translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Valiente-Echeverria, Fernando; Rubilar, Paulina S.; Garcia-de-Gracia, Francisco; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Limousin, Taran; Décimo, Didier; Mouland, Andrew J.; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2014-01-01

    During the post-transcriptional events of the HIV-2 replication cycle, the full-length unspliced genomic RNA (gRNA) is first used as an mRNA to synthesize Gag and Gag-Pol proteins and then packaged into progeny virions. However, the mechanisms responsible for the coordinate usage of the gRNA during these two mutually exclusive events are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence showing that HIV-2 expression induces stress granule assembly in cultured cells. This contrasts with HIV-1, which interferes with stress granules assembly even upon induced cellular stress. Moreover, we observed that the RNA-binding protein and stress granules assembly factor TIAR associates with the gRNA to form a TIAR-HIV-2 ribonucleoprotein (TH2RNP) complex localizing diffuse in the cytoplasm or aggregated in stress granules. Although the assembly of TH2RNP in stress granules did not require the binding of the Gag protein to the gRNA, we observed that increased levels of Gag promoted both translational arrest and stress granule assembly. Moreover, HIV-2 Gag also localizes to stress granules in the absence of a ‘packageable’ gRNA. Our results indicate that the HIV-2 gRNA is compartmentalized in stress granules in the absence of active translation prior to being selected for packaging by the Gag polyprotein. PMID:25352557

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies single nucleotide polymorphism in DYRK1A associated with replication of HIV-1 in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan M Bol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infected macrophages play an important role in rendering resting T cells permissive for infection, in spreading HIV-1 to T cells, and in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia. During highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART, macrophages keep producing virus because tissue penetration of antiretrovirals is suboptimal and the efficacy of some is reduced. Thus, to cure HIV-1 infection with antiretrovirals we will also need to efficiently inhibit viral replication in macrophages. The majority of the current drugs block the action of viral enzymes, whereas there is an abundance of yet unidentified host factors that could be targeted. We here present results from a genome-wide association study identifying novel genetic polymorphisms that affect in vitro HIV-1 replication in macrophages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monocyte-derived macrophages from 393 blood donors were infected with HIV-1 and viral replication was determined using Gag p24 antigen levels. Genomic DNA from individuals with macrophages that had relatively low (n = 96 or high (n = 96 p24 production was used for SNP genotyping with the Illumina 610 Quad beadchip. A total of 494,656 SNPs that passed quality control were tested for association with HIV-1 replication in macrophages, using linear regression. We found a strong association between in vitro HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived macrophages and SNP rs12483205 in DYRK1A (p = 2.16 × 10(-5. While the association was not genome-wide significant (p<1 × 10(-7, we could replicate this association using monocyte-derived macrophages from an independent group of 31 individuals (p = 0.0034. Combined analysis of the initial and replication cohort increased the strength of the association (p = 4.84 × 10(-6. In addition, we found this SNP to be associated with HIV-1 disease progression in vivo in two independent cohort studies (p = 0.035 and p = 0.0048. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that the kinase

  16. Productive HIV-1 infection is enriched in CD4(-)CD8(-) double negative (DN) T cells at pleural sites of dual infection with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglai; Canaday, David H; McDonald, David J; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Baseke, Joy; Toossi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    A higher human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) viral load at pleural sites infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) than in peripheral blood has been documented. However, the cellular source of productive HIV infection in HIV-1/MTB-coinfected pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMCs) remains unclear. In this study, we observed significant quantities of HIV-1 p24(+) lymphocytes in PFMCs, but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). HIV-1 p24(+) lymphocytes were mostly enriched in DN T cells. Intracellular CD4 expression was detectable in HIV-1 p24(+) DN T cells. HIV-1 p24(+) DN T cells showed lower surface expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-ABC and tetherin than did HIV-1 p24(+) CD4 T cells. Upon in vitro infection of PFMC CD4 T cells from TB mono-infected subjects, Nef- and/or Vpu-deleted HIV mutants showed lower generation of HIV-1 p24(+) DN T cells than the wild-type virus. These data indicate that productively HIV-1-infected DN T cells, generated through down-modulation of surface CD4, likely by HIV-1 Nef and Vpu, are the predominant source of HIV-1 at pleural sites of HIV/MTB coinfection.

  17. Dynamics of HIV-1 RNA Near the Plasma Membrane during Virus Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardo, Luca; Hatch, Steven C; Chen, Jianbo; Nikolaitchik, Olga; Burdick, Ryan C; Chen, De; Westlake, Christopher J; Lockett, Stephen; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2015-11-01

    To increase our understanding of the events that lead to HIV-1 genome packaging, we examined the dynamics of viral RNA and Gag-RNA interactions near the plasma membrane by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We labeled HIV-1 RNA with a photoconvertible Eos protein via an RNA-binding protein that recognizes stem-loop sequences engineered into the viral genome. Near-UV light exposure causes an irreversible structural change in Eos and alters its emitted fluorescence from green to red. We studied the dynamics of HIV-1 RNA by photoconverting Eos near the plasma membrane, and we monitored the population of photoconverted red-Eos-labeled RNA signals over time. We found that in the absence of Gag, most of the HIV-1 RNAs stayed near the plasma membrane transiently, for a few minutes. The presence of Gag significantly increased the time that RNAs stayed near the plasma membrane: most of the RNAs were still detected after 30 min. We then quantified the proportion of HIV-1 RNAs near the plasma membrane that were packaged into assembling viral complexes. By tagging Gag with blue fluorescent protein, we observed that only a portion, ∼13 to 34%, of the HIV-1 RNAs that reached the membrane were recruited into assembling particles in an hour, and the frequency of HIV-1 RNA packaging varied with the Gag expression level. Our studies reveal the HIV-1 RNA dynamics on the plasma membrane and the efficiency of RNA recruitment and provide insights into the events leading to the generation of infectious HIV-1 virions. Nascent HIV-1 particles assemble on plasma membranes. During the assembly process, HIV-1 RNA genomes must be encapsidated into viral complexes to generate infectious particles. To gain insights into the RNA packaging and virus assembly mechanisms, we labeled and monitored the HIV-1 RNA signals near the plasma membrane. Our results showed that most of the HIV-1 RNAs stayed near the plasma membrane for only a few minutes in the absence of Gag, whereas

  18. (GAGs) in normal and ethanol-induced chick embryo during neural

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-14

    Sep 14, 2011 ... 0.3, 0.65, 0.9 M) only sulfated acid mucins were stained (Table 1). While they did not show the total amount of GAG, the change in dying provides a subjective assay regarding the type of GAGs. (Bancroft et al., 1994; Scott, 1996). Stained sections were observed under light microscope. (Olympus BX40) and ...

  19. An Alix fragment potently inhibits HIV-1 budding: characterization of binding to retroviral YPXL late domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Utpal M; Kim, Jaewon; Nagashima, Kunio; Hurley, James H; Freed, Eric O

    2007-02-09

    The retroviral structural protein, Gag, contains small peptide motifs known as late domains that promote efficient virus release from the infected cell. In addition to the well characterized PTAP late domain, the p6 region of HIV-1 Gag contains a binding site for the host cell protein Alix. To better understand the functional role of the Gag/Alix interaction, we overexpressed an Alix fragment composed of residues 364-716 (Alix 364-716) and examined the effect on release of wild type (WT) and Alix binding site mutant HIV-1. We observed that Alix 364-716 expression significantly inhibited WT virus release and Gag processing and that mutation of the Alix binding site largely relieved this inhibition. Furthermore, Alix 364-716 expression induced a severe defect on WT but not mutant particle morphology. Intriguingly, the impact of Alix 364-716 expression on HIV-1 release and Gag processing was markedly different from that induced by mutation of the Alix binding site in p6. The association of Alix 364-716 with HIV-1 and equine infectious anemia virus late domains was quantitatively evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance techniques, and the effects of mutations in these viral sequences on Alix 364-716 binding was determined. This study identifies a novel Alix-derived dominant negative inhibitor of HIV-1 release and Gag processing and provides quantitative information on the interaction between Alix and viral late domains.

  20. The Use of an Alternative Extraoral Periapical Technique for Patients with Severe Gag Reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Henrique Chagas e Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gag reflex is a physiologic mechanism that promotes contraction of the muscles of the tongue and pharyngeal walls. Different factors, including intraoral radiographic films and sensors, may trigger this reflex. Patients with severe gag reflex may not be able to tolerate the presence of intraoral radiographic films or sensors during root canal therapy (RCT. This factor may prevent an appropriate intraoral radiograph, which is important in RCT. Different approaches have been used to facilitate dental procedures in patients suffering from severe gag reflex. The use of an extraoral radiographic technique is an alternative method to obtain working length confirmation in patients with severe gag reflex. In this report of 2 cases, the use of an extraoral radiographic technique as an alternative approach during RCT in patients with severe gag reflex associated with phobic behavior and trismus was successfully demonstrated.

  1. Caracterización de los dominios de interacción de la proteína Gag del virus de la inmunodeficiencia de felinos

    OpenAIRE

    Abdusetir Cerfoglio, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Universidad de Belgrano Abdusetir Cerfoglio, J. C. (2016). Caracterización de los dominios de interacción de la proteína Gag del virus de la inmunodeficiencia de felinos (Tesis de posgrado). Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Bernal, Argentina El virus de la inmunodeficiencia de felinos (FIV) es un lentivirus que induce en gatos domésticos un síndrome de inmunodeficiencia similar al SIDA causado por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia de humanos (HIV). FIV no sólo es un patógeno de importanc...

  2. Advances in non-peptidomimetic HIV protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, X; Liu, Z; Zhai, G

    2014-06-01

    HIV protease plays a crucial role in the viral life cycle. It can cleave a series of heptamers in the viral Gag and GagPol precursor proteins to generate mature infectious virus particles. Successful inhibition of the protease will prevent this maturation step and hence block the spreading of HIV. However, the rapid emergence of drug resistance makes it urgent to develop new HIV protease inhibitors to combat the global disease. Besides, poor oral bioavailability, unacceptable side effects, high treatment cost and pill burden also trouble the application of HIV protease inhibitors. In such situations, non-peptidomimetic HIV protease inhibitors have drawn an increasing interest as a potential therapeutic option due to their small molecular weight, favorable bioavailability, high stability in vivo, low resistance and cost of production. In this review, we present the recent advances in non-peptidomimetic HIV protease inhibitors. Their design strategies, biological activities, resistance profiles, as well as clinical application will also be discussed.

  3. Analysis of HIV Diversity in HIV-Infected Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (HPTN 061.

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    Iris Chen

    Full Text Available HIV populations often diversify in response to selective pressures, such as the immune response and antiretroviral drug use. We analyzed HIV diversity in Black men who have sex with men who were enrolled in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 study.A high resolution melting (HRM diversity assay was used to measure diversity in six regions of the HIV genome: two in gag, one in pol, and three in env. HIV diversity was analyzed for 146 men who were HIV infected at study enrollment, including three with acute infection and 13 with recent infection (identified using a multi-assay algorithm, and for 21 men who seroconverted during the study. HIV diversification was analyzed in a paired analysis for 62 HIV-infected men using plasma samples from the enrollment and 12-month (end of study visits.Men with acute or recent infection at enrollment and seroconverters had lower median HRM scores (lower HIV diversity than men with non-recent infection in all six regions analyzed. In univariate analyses, younger age, higher CD4 cell count, and HIV drug resistance were associated with lower median HRM scores in multiple regions; ARV drug detection was marginally associated with lower diversity in the pol region. In multivariate analysis, acute or recent infection (all six regions and HIV drug resistance (both gag regions were associated with lower median HRM scores. Diversification in the pol region over 12 months was greater for men with acute or recent infection, higher CD4 cell count, and lower HIV viral load at study enrollment.HIV diversity was significantly associated with duration of HIV infection, and lower gag diversity was observed in men who had HIV drug resistance. HIV pol diversification was more pronounced in men with acute or recent infection, higher CD4 cell count, and lower HIV viral load.

  4. Species tropism of HIV-1 modulated by viral accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Masako eNomaguchi; Naoya eDoi; Yui eMatsumoto; Yosuke eSakai; Sachi eFujiwara; Akio eAdachi

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tropic and pathogenic only for humans, and does not replicate in macaque monkeys routinely used for experimental infections. This specially narrow host range (species tropism) has impeded much the progress of HIV-1/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) basic research. Extensive studies on the underlying mechanism have revealed that Vif, one of viral accessory proteins, is critical for the HIV-1 species tropism in addition to Gag-capsid protei...

  5. Prostate cancer progression correlates with increased humoral immune response to a human endogenous retrovirus GAG protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Bernardo Sgarbi; Jungbluth, Achim A; Frosina, Denise; Holz, Megan; Ritter, Erika; Nakayama, Eiichi; Ishida, Toshiaki; Obata, Yuichi; Carver, Brett; Scher, Howard; Scardino, Peter T; Slovin, Susan; Subudhi, Sumit K; Reuter, Victor E; Savage, Caroline; Allison, James P; Melamed, Jonathan; Jäger, Elke; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Gnjatic, Sacha

    2013-11-15

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) encode 8% of the human genome. While HERVs may play a role in autoimmune and neoplastic disease, no mechanistic association has yet been established. We studied the expression and immunogenicity of a HERV-K GAG protein encoded on chromosome 22q11.23 in relation to the clinical course of prostate cancer. In vitro expression of GAG-HERV-K was analyzed in panels of normal and malignant tissues, microarrays, and cell lines, and effects of demethylation and androgen stimulation were evaluated. Patient sera were analyzed for seroreactivity to GAG-HERV-K and other self-antigens by ELISA and seromics (protein array profiling). GAG-HERV-K expression was most frequent in prostate tissues and regulated both by demethylation of the promoter region and by androgen stimulation. Serum screening revealed that antibodies to GAG-HERV-K are found in a subset of patients with prostate cancer (33 of 483, 6.8%) but rarely in male healthy donors (1 of 55, 1.8%). Autoantibodies to GAG-HERV-K occurred more frequently in patients with advanced prostate cancer (29 of 191 in stage III-IV, 21.0%) than in early prostate cancer (4 of 292 in stages I-II, 1.4%). Presence of GAG-HERV-K serum antibody was correlated with worse survival of patients with prostate cancer, with a trend for faster biochemical recurrence in patients with antibodies to GAG-HERV-K. Preferential expression of GAG-HERV-K ch22q11.23 in prostate cancer tissue and increased frequency of autoantibodies observed in patients with advanced prostate cancer make this protein one of the first bona fide retroviral cancer antigens in humans, with potential as a biomarker for progression and biochemical recurrence rate of prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 19(22); 6112-25. ©2013 AACR.

  6. A unique spumavirus Gag N-terminal domain with functional properties of orthoretroviral matrix and capsid.

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    David C Goldstone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Spumaretrovirinae, or foamyviruses (FVs are complex retroviruses that infect many species of monkey and ape. Although FV infection is apparently benign, trans-species zoonosis is commonplace and has resulted in the isolation of the Prototypic Foamy Virus (PFV from human sources and the potential for germ-line transmission. Despite little sequence homology, FV and orthoretroviral Gag proteins perform equivalent functions, including genome packaging, virion assembly, trafficking and membrane targeting. In addition, PFV Gag interacts with the FV Envelope (Env protein to facilitate budding of infectious particles. Presently, there is a paucity of structural information with regards FVs and it is unclear how disparate FV and orthoretroviral Gag molecules share the same function. Therefore, in order to probe the functional overlap of FV and orthoretroviral Gag and learn more about FV egress and replication we have undertaken a structural, biophysical and virological study of PFV-Gag. We present the crystal structure of a dimeric amino terminal domain from PFV, Gag-NtD, both free and in complex with the leader peptide of PFV Env. The structure comprises a head domain together with a coiled coil that forms the dimer interface and despite the shared function it is entirely unrelated to either the capsid or matrix of Gag from other retroviruses. Furthermore, we present structural, biochemical and virological data that reveal the molecular details of the essential Gag-Env interaction and in addition we also examine the specificity of Trim5α restriction of PFV. These data provide the first information with regards to FV structural proteins and suggest a model for convergent evolution of gag genes where structurally unrelated molecules have become functionally equivalent.

  7. A unique spumavirus Gag N-terminal domain with functional properties of orthoretroviral matrix and capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, David C; Flower, Thomas G; Ball, Neil J; Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Yap, Melvyn W; Ogrodowicz, Roksana W; Stanke, Nicole; Reh, Juliane; Lindemann, Dirk; Stoye, Jonathan P; Taylor, Ian A

    2013-05-01

    The Spumaretrovirinae, or foamyviruses (FVs) are complex retroviruses that infect many species of monkey and ape. Although FV infection is apparently benign, trans-species zoonosis is commonplace and has resulted in the isolation of the Prototypic Foamy Virus (PFV) from human sources and the potential for germ-line transmission. Despite little sequence homology, FV and orthoretroviral Gag proteins perform equivalent functions, including genome packaging, virion assembly, trafficking and membrane targeting. In addition, PFV Gag interacts with the FV Envelope (Env) protein to facilitate budding of infectious particles. Presently, there is a paucity of structural information with regards FVs and it is unclear how disparate FV and orthoretroviral Gag molecules share the same function. Therefore, in order to probe the functional overlap of FV and orthoretroviral Gag and learn more about FV egress and replication we have undertaken a structural, biophysical and virological study of PFV-Gag. We present the crystal structure of a dimeric amino terminal domain from PFV, Gag-NtD, both free and in complex with the leader peptide of PFV Env. The structure comprises a head domain together with a coiled coil that forms the dimer interface and despite the shared function it is entirely unrelated to either the capsid or matrix of Gag from other retroviruses. Furthermore, we present structural, biochemical and virological data that reveal the molecular details of the essential Gag-Env interaction and in addition we also examine the specificity of Trim5α restriction of PFV. These data provide the first information with regards to FV structural proteins and suggest a model for convergent evolution of gag genes where structurally unrelated molecules have become functionally equivalent.

  8. Clinical performance of the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test to correctly differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection in screening algorithms using third and fourth generation assays and to identify cross reactivity with the HIV-1 Western Blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric M; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Coombs, Robert W

    2013-12-01

    An accurate and rapid serologic method to differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection is required since the confirmatory HIV-1 Western Blot (WB) may demonstrate cross-reactivity with HIV-2 antibodies. To evaluate the performance of the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid assay as a supplemental test to correctly identify HIV-2 infection and identify HIV-1 WB cross-reactivity with HIV-2 in clinical samples tested at an academic medical center. Between August 2008 and July 2012, clinical samples were screened for HIV using either 3rd- or 4th-generation HIV-1/2 antibody or combination antibody and HIV-1 p24 antigen assays, respectively. All repeatedly reactive samples were reflexed for Multispot rapid testing. Multispot HIV-2 and HIV-1 and HIV-2-reactive samples were further tested using an HIV-2 immunoblot assay and HIV-1 or HIV-2 RNA assays when possible. The HIV-1 WB was performed routinely for additional confirmation and to assess for HIV-2 antibody cross-reactivity. Of 46,061 samples screened, 890 (89.6%) of 993 repeatedly reactive samples were also Multispot-reactive: 882 for HIV-1; three for only HIV-2; and five for both HIV-1 and HIV-2. All three HIV-2-only Multispot-positives along with a single dually reactive HIV-1/2 Multispot-positive were also HIV-2 immunoblot-positive; the latter was HIV-1 RNA negative and HIV-2 RNA positive. The Multispot rapid test performed well as a supplemental test for HIV-1/2 diagnostic testing. Four new HIV-2 infections (0.45%) were identified from among 890 Multispot-reactive tests. The use of HIV-1 WB alone to confirm HIV-1/2 screening assays may underestimate the true prevalence of HIV-2 infection in the United States. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Palateless custom bar supported overdenture: A treatment modality to treat patient with severe gag reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwarjeet Singh

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Palateless custom bar supported overdenture procedure can be successfully used for the management of patients with severe gag reflex with improved denture retention, stability, chewing efficiency and comfort of the patient.

  10. Microsatellite Alterations with Allelic Loss at 9p24.2 Signify Less-aggressive Colorectal Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koi, Minoru; Garcia, Melissa; Choi, Chan; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Koike, Junichi; Hemmi, Hiromichi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Toiyama, Yuji; Kitajima, Takahito; Imaoka, Hiroki; Kusunoki, Masato; Chen, Yin-Hsiu; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Boland, C Richard; Carethers, John M

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Molecular events that lead to recurrence and/or metastasis after curative treatment of patients with colorectal cancers (CRCs) are poorly understood. Patients with stage II or III primary CRC with increased numbers of microsatellite alterations at selected tetra-nucleotide repeats (EMAST) and low levels of microsatellite instability (E/L) are more likely to have disease recurrence after treatment. Hypoxia and/or inflammation not only promote metastasis but also induce EMAST by causing deficiency of MSH3 in the cancer cell nucleus. We aimed to identify genetic alterations associated with metastasis of primary colorectal tumors to liver and to determine their effects on survival. Methods We obtained 4 sets of primary colorectal tumors and matched liver metastases from hospitals in Korea and Japan. Intragenic microsatellites with large repeats at 141 loci were examined for frame-shift mutations and/or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) as possible consequences of MSH3 deficiency. Highly altered loci were examined for association with E/L in liver metastases. We analyzed data from 156 of the patients with stage II or III primary colorectal tumors to determine outcomes and whether altered loci were associated with E/L. Results LOH at several loci at chromosome 9p24.2 (9p24.2-LOH) was associated with E/L in liver metastases (odds ratio, 10.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.69–40.80; P=.0007). We found no significant difference in the frequency of E/L, 9p24.2-LOH, mutations in KRAS or BRAF, or the combination of E/L and 9p24.2-LOH between primary colorectal tumors and their matched metastases. Patients with stage II or III colorectal tumors with E/L and 9p24.2-LOH had increased survival following CRC recurrence (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.12–0.50; P=.0001), compared to patients without with E/L and 9p24.2-LOH. E/L with 9p24.2-LOH appeared to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of patients with stage III CRC (hazard ratio, 0.06; 95

  11. Microsatellite Alterations With Allelic Loss at 9p24.2 Signify Less-Aggressive Colorectal Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koi, Minoru; Garcia, Melissa; Choi, Chan; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Koike, Junichi; Hemmi, Hiromichi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Toiyama, Yuji; Kitajima, Takahito; Imaoka, Hiroki; Kusunoki, Masato; Chen, Yin-Hsiu; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Boland, C Richard; Carethers, John M

    2016-04-01

    Molecular events that lead to recurrence and/or metastasis after curative treatment of patients with colorectal cancers (CRCs) are poorly understood. Patients with stage II or III primary CRC with elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats and low levels of microsatellite instability (E/L) are more likely to have disease recurrence after treatment. Hypoxia and/or inflammation not only promote metastasis, but also induce elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats by causing deficiency of MSH3 in the cancer cell nucleus. We aimed to identify genetic alterations associated with metastasis of primary colorectal tumors to liver and to determine their effects on survival. We obtained 4 sets of primary colorectal tumors and matched liver metastases from hospitals in Korea and Japan. Intragenic microsatellites with large repeats at 141 loci were examined for frame-shift mutations and/or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) as possible consequences of MSH3 deficiency. Highly altered loci were examined for association with E/L in liver metastases. We analyzed data from 156 of the patients with stage II or III primary colorectal tumors to determine outcomes and whether altered loci were associated with E/L. LOH at several loci at chromosome 9p24.2 (9p24.2-LOH) was associated with E/L in liver metastases (odds ratio = 10.5; 95% confidence interval: 2.69-40.80; P = .0007). We found no significant difference in the frequency of E/L, 9p24.2-LOH, mutations in KRAS or BRAF, or the combination of E/L and 9p24.2-LOH, between primary colorectal tumors and their matched metastases. Patients with stage II or III colorectal tumors with E/L and 9p24.2-LOH had increased survival after CRC recurrence (hazard ratio = 0.25; 95% CI: 0.12-0.50; P = .0001), compared with patients without with E/L and 9p24.2-LOH. E/L with 9p24.2-LOH appeared to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of patients with stage III CRC (hazard

  12. Caveolin-1 interacts with the Gag precursor of murine leukaemia virus and modulates virus production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koester Mario

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviral Gag determines virus assembly at the plasma membrane and the formation of virus-like particles in intracellular multivesicular bodies. Thereby, retroviruses exploit by interaction with cellular partners the cellular machineries for vesicular transport in various ways. Results The retroviral Gag precursor protein drives assembly of murine leukaemia viruses (MLV at the plasma membrane (PM and the formation of virus like particles in multivesicular bodies (MVBs. In our study we show that caveolin-1 (Cav-1, a multifunctional membrane-associated protein, co-localizes with Gag in a punctate pattern at the PM of infected NIH 3T3 cells. We provide evidence that Cav-1 interacts with the matrix protein (MA of the Gag precursor. This interaction is mediated by a Cav-1 binding domain (CBD within the N-terminus of MA. Interestingly, the CBD motif identified within MA is highly conserved among most other γ-retroviruses. Furthermore, Cav-1 is incorporated into MLV released from NIH 3T3 cells. Overexpression of a GFP fusion protein containing the putative CBD of the retroviral MA resulted in a considerable decrease in production of infectious retrovirus. Moreover, expression of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant affected retroviral titres significantly. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Cav-1 interacts with MLV Gag, co-localizes with Gag at the PM and affects the production of infectious virus. The results strongly suggest a role for Cav-1 in the process of virus assembly.

  13. An earplug technique to reduce the gag reflex during dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Yusuf Ozgur; Ozdogmus, Omer; Günay, Yumusan; Gürbüzer, Bahadır; Tezulaş, Emre; Kaspar, Elif Ciğdem; Hacıoglu, Hüsniye

    2014-01-01

    The gag reflex is a frequent problem occurring during dental treatment procedures, especially while making impressions of the maxillary teeth. The present study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a simple earplug as an external auditory canal stimulator to supress the profound gag reflex and as a second step, to map areas of the oropharynx suppressed by this technique. In the first step of the study, 90 patients who had a gag reflex during the impression procedure were allocated to a study group, a sham group, and a control group for evaluating the efficacy of the earplug technique. Second, 20 new patients with a gag reflex were included in order to map the oropharnygeal areas suppressed by this technique. The severity of the gag reflex was reduced in the earplug group (but not in the sham or the control group). The affected area included the hard palate, uvula, and the tongue but not the posterior wall of oropharynx. An earplug technique can be a useful, practical, and effective tool to overcome the gag reflex during oral procedures, such as impression procedures of maxillary teeth.

  14. Determining the frequency and mechanisms of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNA copackaging by single-virion analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A

    2011-01-01

    -2 RNA can be copackaged into the same particle. To determine the frequency of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNA copackaging and to dissect the mechanisms that allow the heterologous RNA copackaging, we directly visualized the RNA content of each particle by using RNA-binding proteins tagged with fluorescent...... proteins to label the viral genomes. We found that when HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNA are present in viral particles at similar ratios, ∼10% of the viral particles encapsidate both HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNAs. Furthermore, heterologous RNA copackaging can be promoted by mutating the 6-nucleotide (6-nt) dimer initiation...... signal (DIS) to discourage RNA homodimerization or to encourage RNA heterodimerization, indicating that HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNA can heterodimerize prior to packaging using the DIS sequences. We also observed that the coassembly of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Gag proteins is not required for the heterologous RNA...

  15. Evaluation of three enzyme immunoassays for HIV-1 antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, P B; Lisker, A; Folds, J D

    1989-01-01

    Three enzyme immunoassay (EIA) methods for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) were evaluated. Serum or plasma samples from 22 individuals seropositive for HIV-1 antibodies were tested with the Abbott, Coulter, and DuPont kits for presence of HIV-1 p24 antigen. Another 12 samples were tested with two kits only. Discordant results were obtained with 9 of 34 (26%) HIV-1-antibody-positive patient samples tested. Most of these discrepancies were found in samples containing less than 30 pg/ml of HIV-1 p24 core antigen. A sampling of sera from normal blood donors and patients with infectious or autoimmune diseases revealed a low level of false positive reactions, especially with sera containing antinuclear antibodies or rheumatoid factor. Noteworthy is the frequency of false positive reactions seen with the DuPont EIA for HIV-1 p24 antigen. 18/111 sera (16.2%) containing auto-antibodies tested positively with the DuPont HIV-1 p24 antigen EIA. The nonspecific nature of the test reactivity for 9/10 of these samples was confirmed using an HIV-1 p24 antigen inhibition assay. These findings are discussed in light of the need for HIV-1 antigen detection in the clinical laboratory and of other methods for HIV-1 detection: the polymerase chain reaction and measurements of reverse transcriptase activity.

  16. Multiparametric characterization of rare HIV-infected cells using an RNA-flow FISH technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Amy E; Niessl, Julia; Fromentin, Rémi; Richard, Jonathan; Porichis, Filippos; Massanella, Marta; Brassard, Nathalie; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Finzi, Andrés; Chomont, Nicolas; Kaufmann, Daniel E

    2017-10-01

    Efforts to cure HIV are hampered by limited characterization of the cells supporting HIV replication in vivo and inadequate methods for quantifying the latent viral reservoir in individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We describe a protocol for flow cytometric identification of viral reservoirs, based on concurrent detection of cellular HIV Gagpol mRNA by in situ RNA hybridization combined with antibody staining for the HIV Gag protein. By simultaneously detecting both HIV RNA and protein, the CD4 T cells harboring translation-competent virus can be identified. The HIVRNA/Gag method is 1,000-fold more sensitive than Gag protein staining alone, with a detection limit of 0.5-1 Gagpol mRNA+/Gag protein+ cells per million CD4 T cells. Uniquely, the HIVRNA/Gag assay also allows parallel phenotyping of viral reservoirs, including reactivated latent reservoirs in clinical samples. The assay takes 2 d, and requires antibody labeling for surface and intracellular markers, followed by mRNA labeling and multiple signal amplification steps.

  17. Tráfico intracelular de proteínas de la familia p24 en células vegetales

    OpenAIRE

    Montesinos López, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Las proteínas p24 constituyen una familia única de proteínas transmembrana de tipo I, con un peso molecular aproximado de 24 kDa, que se localizan mayoritariamente en los compartimentos de la vía secretora temprana, retículo endoplásmico (ER) y complejo de Golgi, y son componentes mayoritarios de las vesículas recubiertas por proteínas COPI o COPII. Se dividen, por homología de secuencia, en cuatro subfamilias: p24α, p24β, p24δ y p24γ. En animales y levaduras hay representantes de cada una de...

  18. Differential effects of hnRNP D/AUF1 isoforms on HIV-1 gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Nicole; Milev, Miroslav P.; Wong, Raymond; Sanmuganantham, Tharmila; Woolaway, Kathryn; Chabot, Benoit; Abou Elela, Sherif; Mouland, Andrew J.; Cochrane, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Control of RNA processing plays a major role in HIV-1 gene expression. To explore the role of several hnRNP proteins in this process, we carried out a siRNA screen to examine the effect of depletion of hnRNPs A1, A2, D, H, I and K on HIV-1 gene expression. While loss of hnRNPs H, I or K had little effect, depletion of A1 and A2 increased expression of viral structural proteins. In contrast, reduced hnRNP D expression decreased synthesis of HIV-1 Gag and Env. Loss of hnRNP D induced no changes in viral RNA abundance but reduced the accumulation of HIV-1 unspliced and singly spliced RNAs in the cytoplasm. Subsequent analyses determined that hnRNP D underwent relocalization to the cytoplasm upon HIV-1 infection and was associated with Gag protein. Screening of the four isoforms of hnRNP D determined that, upon overexpression, they had differential effects on HIV-1 Gag expression, p45 and p42 isoforms increased viral Gag synthesis while p40 and p37 suppressed it. The differential effect of hnRNP D isoforms on HIV-1 expression suggests that their relative abundance could contribute to the permissiveness of cell types to replicate the virus, a hypothesis subsequently confirmed by selective depletion of p45 and p42. PMID:22187150

  19. HIV-1 Vpu promotes release and prevents endocytosis of nascent retrovirus particles from the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type-1 viral protein U (Vpu protein enhances the release of diverse retroviruses from human, but not monkey, cells and is thought to do so by ablating a dominant restriction to particle release. Here, we determined how Vpu expression affects the subcellular distribution of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MLV Gag proteins in human cells where Vpu is, or is not, required for efficient particle release. In HeLa cells, where Vpu enhances HIV-1 and MLV release approximately 10-fold, concentrations of HIV-1 Gag and MLV Gag fused to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP were initially detected at the plasma membrane, but then accumulated over time in early and late endosomes. Endosomal accumulation of Gag-CFP was prevented by Vpu expression and, importantly, inhibition of plasma membrane to early endosome transport by dominant negative mutants of Rab5a, dynamin, and EPS-15. Additionally, accumulation of both HIV and MLV Gag in endosomes required a functional late-budding domain. In human HOS cells, where HIV-1 and MLV release was efficient even in the absence of Vpu, Gag proteins were localized predominantly at the plasma membrane, irrespective of Vpu expression or manipulation of endocytic transport. While these data indicated that Vpu inhibits nascent virion endocytosis, Vpu did not affect transferrin endocytosis. Moreover, inhibition of endocytosis did not restore Vpu-defective HIV-1 release in HeLa cells, but instead resulted in accumulation of mature virions that could be released from the cell surface by protease treatment. Thus, these findings suggest that a specific activity that is present in HeLa cells, but not in HOS cells, and is counteracted by Vpu, traps assembled retrovirus particles at the cell surface. This entrapment leads to subsequent endocytosis by a Rab5a- and clathrin-dependent mechanism and intracellular sequestration of virions in endosomes.

  20. Differences in serum IgA responses to HIV-1 gp41 in elite controllers compared to viral suppressors on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiq Nabi

    Full Text Available Mechanisms responsible for natural control of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV replication in elite controllers (EC remain incompletely defined. To determine if EC generate high quality HIV-specific IgA responses, we used Western blotting to compare the specificities and frequencies of IgA to HIV antigens in serum of gender-, age- and race-matched EC and aviremic controllers (HC and viremic noncontrollers (HN on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Concentrations and avidity of IgA to HIV antigens were measured using ELISA or multiplex assays. Measurements for IgG were performed in parallel. EC were found to have stronger p24- and V1V2-specific IgG responses than HN, but there were no IgG differences for EC and HC. In contrast, IgA in EC serum bound more frequently to gp160 and gag proteins than IgA in HC or HN. The avidity of anti-gp41 IgA was also greater in EC, and these subjects had stronger IgA responses to the gp41 heptad repeat region 1 (HR1, a reported target of anti-bacterial RNA polymerase antibodies that cross react with gp41. However, EC did not demonstrate greater IgA responses to E. coli RNA polymerase or to peptides containing the shared LRAI sequence, suggesting that most of their HR1-specific IgA antibodies were not induced by intestinal microbiota. In both EC and HAART recipients, the concentrations of HIV-specific IgG were greater than HIV-specific IgA, but their avidities were comparable, implying that they could compete for antigen. Exceptions were C1 peptides and V1V2 loops. IgG and IgA responses to these antigens were discordant, with IgG reacting to V1V2, and IgA reacting to C1, especially in EC. Interestingly, EC with IgG hypergammaglobulinemia had greater HIV-specific IgA and IgG responses than EC with normal total IgG levels. Heterogeneity in EC antibody responses may therefore be due to a more focused HIV-specific B cell response in some of these individuals. Overall, these data suggest that development of

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in Chinese infected with HIV-1 B'/C Recombinant (CRF07_BC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xu G

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The characterization of HIV-1-specific T cell responses in people infected with locally circulating HIV-1 strain will facilitate the development of HIV-1 vaccine. Sixty intravenous drug users infected with HIV-1 circulating recombinant form 07_BC (CRF07_BC, which has been spreading rapidly in western China from north to south, were recruited from Xinjiang, China to assess the HIV-1-specific T cell responses at single peptide level with overlapping peptides (OLP covering the whole concensus clades B and C proteome. Results The median of the total magnitude and total number of OLPs recognized by CTL responses were 10925 SFC/million PBMC and 25 OLPs, respectively, when tested by clade C peptides, which was significantly higher than when tested by clade B peptides. The immunodominant regions, which cover 14% (58/413 of the HIV-1 proteome, are widely distributed throughout the HIV-1 proteome except in Tat, Vpu and Pol-PR, with Gag, Pol-RT, Pol-Int and Nef being most frequently targeted. The subdominant epitopes are mostly located in p24, Nef, integrase, Vpr and Vif. Of the responses directed to clade C OLPs, 61.75% (972/1574 can be observed when tested with corresponding clade B OLPs. However, Pol-PR and Vpu tend to be targeted in the clade B sequence rather than the clade C sequence, which is in line with the recombinant pattern of CRF07_BC. Stronger and broader CTL responses in subjects with CD4 cell counts ranging from 200 to 400/mm3 were observed when compared to those with less than 200/mm3 or more than 400/mm3, though there have been no significant correlations identified between the accumulative CTL responses or overall breadth and CD4 cell count or plasma viral load. Conclusion This is the first study conducted to comprehensively address T cell responses in Chinese subjects infected with HIV-1 CRF07_BC in which subtle differences in cross-reactivity were observed, though similar patterns of overall immune responses were

  2. The Effect of Various Concentrations of Nitrous Oxide and Oxygen on the Hypersensitive Gag Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Veaux, Candace K E; Montagnese, Thomas A; Heima, Masahiro; Aminoshariae, Anita; Mickel, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of various concentrations of N2O/O2 on obtunding a hypersensitive gag reflex. We hypothesized that the administration of nitrous oxide and oxygen would obtund a hypersensitive gag reflex enough to allow a patient to tolerate the placement and holding of a digital x-ray sensor long enough to obtain a dental radiograph. Volunteers claiming to have a hypersensitive gag reflex were first screened to validate their claim and then tested by placing a size 2 digital x-ray sensor in the position for a periapical radiograph of the right mandibular molar area and holding it in place for 10 seconds. Subjects were first tested using room air only, then 30%, 50%, or 70% nitrous oxide until they were able to tolerate the sensor without gagging or discomfort. A visual analog scale was used for subjective responses, and other statistical tests were used to analyze the results. We found that for some subjects, 30% nitrous oxide was sufficient; for others, 50% was needed; and for the remainder of the subjects, 70% was sufficient to tolerate the test. Using a combination of 70% nitrous oxide and 30% oxygen allowed all patients claiming to have a hypersensitive gag reflex to tolerate the placement and holding of a digital x-ray sensor long enough to take a periapical radiograph.

  3. Structure of a Spumaretrovirus Gag Central Domain Reveals an Ancient Retroviral Capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Neil J; Nicastro, Giuseppe; Dutta, Moumita; Pollard, Dominic J; Goldstone, David C; Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Ramos, Andres; Müllers, Erik; Stirnnagel, Kristin; Stanke, Nicole; Lindemann, Dirk; Stoye, Jonathan P; Taylor, William R; Rosenthal, Peter B; Taylor, Ian A

    2016-11-01

    The Spumaretrovirinae, or foamy viruses (FVs) are complex retroviruses that infect many species of monkey and ape. Despite little sequence homology, FV and orthoretroviral Gag proteins perform equivalent functions, including genome packaging, virion assembly, trafficking and membrane targeting. However, there is a paucity of structural information for FVs and it is unclear how disparate FV and orthoretroviral Gag molecules share the same function. To probe the functional overlap of FV and orthoretroviral Gag we have determined the structure of a central region of Gag from the Prototype FV (PFV). The structure comprises two all α-helical domains NtDCEN and CtDCEN that although they have no sequence similarity, we show they share the same core fold as the N- (NtDCA) and C-terminal domains (CtDCA) of archetypal orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA). Moreover, structural comparisons with orthoretroviral CA align PFV NtDCEN and CtDCEN with NtDCA and CtDCA respectively. Further in vitro and functional virological assays reveal that residues making inter-domain NtDCEN-CtDCEN interactions are required for PFV capsid assembly and that intact capsid is required for PFV reverse transcription. These data provide the first information that relates the Gag proteins of Spuma and Orthoretrovirinae and suggests a common ancestor for both lineages containing an ancient CA fold.

  4. Structure of a Spumaretrovirus Gag Central Domain Reveals an Ancient Retroviral Capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Ball

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Spumaretrovirinae, or foamy viruses (FVs are complex retroviruses that infect many species of monkey and ape. Despite little sequence homology, FV and orthoretroviral Gag proteins perform equivalent functions, including genome packaging, virion assembly, trafficking and membrane targeting. However, there is a paucity of structural information for FVs and it is unclear how disparate FV and orthoretroviral Gag molecules share the same function. To probe the functional overlap of FV and orthoretroviral Gag we have determined the structure of a central region of Gag from the Prototype FV (PFV. The structure comprises two all α-helical domains NtDCEN and CtDCEN that although they have no sequence similarity, we show they share the same core fold as the N- (NtDCA and C-terminal domains (CtDCA of archetypal orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA. Moreover, structural comparisons with orthoretroviral CA align PFV NtDCEN and CtDCEN with NtDCA and CtDCA respectively. Further in vitro and functional virological assays reveal that residues making inter-domain NtDCEN-CtDCEN interactions are required for PFV capsid assembly and that intact capsid is required for PFV reverse transcription. These data provide the first information that relates the Gag proteins of Spuma and Orthoretrovirinae and suggests a common ancestor for both lineages containing an ancient CA fold.

  5. Performance and logistical challenges of alternative HIV-1 virological monitoring options in a clinical setting of Harare, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ondoa, Pascale; Shamu, Tinei; Bronze, Michelle; Wellington, Maureen; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Manting, Corry; Steegen, Kim; Luethy, Rudi; Rinke de Wit, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a low-cost virological failure assay (VFA) on plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) specimens from HIV-1 infected patients attending an HIV clinic in Harare. The results were compared to the performance of the ultrasensitive heat-denatured p24 assay (p24). The COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan

  6. Experimental Leishmania major infection suppresses HIV-1 DNA vaccine induced cellular immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tara M; Nelson, Robin; Artis, David; Scott, Phillip; Boyer, Jean D

    2004-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic in the developing world represents a major global crisis and an effective vaccine is imperative. However, many parasites are common in developing countries and can result in a state of chronic immune activation that is polarized towards a Th2 profile and which can potentially impair responses to vaccines or other infectious challenges. In this study we demonstrate that experimental Leishmania major infection of BALB/c mice inhibits responses to a DNA-based HIV-1 gag vaccine. L. major infection in BALB/c results in a polarized Th2 immune response. In this study naïve BALB/c mice immunized with the HIV-1 gag DNA vaccine mounted a cellular immune response against the vaccine antigen, HIV-1 gag. CD8+ T lymphocytes were able to respond in vitro to HIV-1 gag stimulation and secrete interferon (IFN)-gamma. However, L. major-infected, vaccinated BALB/c mice had a significantly reduced number of IFN-gamma-producing CD8+ T cells following in vitro stimulation with gag antigen. These data suggest that parasitic infection, which results in a Th2 profile, reduces the efficacy of DNA vaccines that are designed to induce antiviral CD8+ T cell responses. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Quantitative Assessment of HIV Replication and Variation in Vivo: Relevance to Disease Pathogenesis and Response to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-20

    al. Long-term evaluation of HIV antigen and antibodies to p24 and gp4l in patients with hemophilia . N Engl J Med 1987; 317:1114-21. 15. Eyster ME...Ballard JO, Gail MH, Drummond JE, Goedert JJ. Predictive markers for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in hemophiliacs: persistence of p24...913-16, 20. Jackson GG, Paul DA, Falk LA, et al. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigenemia (p24) in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS

  8. Things that make Republican loyalists uneasy in a presidential year. Gagging on the rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, E

    1992-03-27

    The President of the United States has imposed a gag rule for health workers in government funded family planning clinics to prevent them from mentioning abortion to clients. In fact, the conservative dominated Supreme Court backs this rule. These workers had already been prohibited earlier from performing abortions. The gag rule forces them to say to any client who brings up abortion that the clinic regards abortion as an inappropriate family planning method. The government has now expanded from the bedroom to the examining room. President Bush has vetoed Congress' vote to overturn the rule. Yet later he announced that he added a modifier to the gag rule: physicians could mention abortion, but other health workers could not. It was brought to his attention that the modifier was elitist, sexist, and cynical since it allowed physicians who tend to be highly educated males to mention abortion and not allow less educated nurses who tend to be females to do so. So then de denied that he changed the gag rule. His contradictory position is further illustrated by the fact that he favors both the gag rule and a private physician patient relationship. The Republican party wants to force down the abortion issue at least until after the election in November since the majority of people are prochoice but passive. To remain in control, the party must appease the antiabortion fraction without taking away abortion rights of the prochoice fraction. Party members are betting that as long as the middle class still can obtain a legal abortion, it disregards the abortion limits since the limits apply to poor women, rural women, and young women. Abortion may very well be a campaign issue in 1992 unlike in 1988. Thus President Bush had no intentions of being clear on the gag rule.

  9. The use of low-level laser therapy for controlling the gag reflex in children during intraoral radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbay, Mesut; Tak, Önjen; Şermet Elbay, Ülkü; Kaya, Can; Eryılmaz, Kubilay

    2016-02-01

    The current literature suggests that low-level laser stimulation of the PC 6 acupuncture points may prevent gagging. This study aimed to determine if low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can reduce the gag reflex in children undergoing intraoral maxillary radiography. This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial was conducted with 25 children with moderate-to-very severe gag reflexes who required bilateral periapical radiographic examination of the maxillary molar region. Children's anxiety levels were initially evaluated using Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) to identify any possible relationship between gagging and anxiety. A control radiograph was taken of one randomly selected side in each patient after simulated laser application so that the patient was blinded to the experimental conditions (control group). Laser stimulation was then performed for the experimental side. A laser probe was placed on the Pericardium 6 (PC 6) acupuncture point on each wrist, and laser energy was delivered for 14 s (300 mW, energy density 4 J/cm(2)) at a distance of 1 cm from the target tissue. Following laser stimulation, the experimental radiograph was taken (experimental group). Gagging responses were measured using the Gagging Severity Criteria for each group. Data were analyzed using Spearman's rho correlations and Mann-Whitney U tests. Both mean and median gagging scores were higher in the control group than in the experimental group. Patients who were unable to tolerate the intraoral control radiography were able to tolerate the procedure after LLLT. Differences between gagging scores of the control and experimental groups were statistically significant (P = .000). There was no significant correlation between gagging severity and anxiety score (P > .05). A negative correlation was found between age and gagging score in the control group (P ˂ .05). Within the limitations of this study, LLLT of the PC 6 acupuncture points appears to be a useful technique

  10. Optimizing HIV-1 protease production in Escherichia coli as fusion protein

    OpenAIRE

    Piubelli Luciano; Volontè Federica; Pollegioni Loredano

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the etiological agent in AIDS and related diseases. The aspartyl protease encoded by the 5' portion of the pol gene is responsible for proteolytic processing of the gag-pol polyprotein precursor to yield the mature capsid protein and the reverse transcriptase and integrase enzymes. The HIV protease (HIV-1Pr) is considered an attractive target for designing inhibitors which could be used to tackle AIDS and therefore it is still the obje...

  11. The Representation of Americanization Myths in the Internet Memes on the 9gag Comedy Website

    OpenAIRE

    Achadiat, Ryan Aditya

    2013-01-01

    The use of Internet memes in the websites is believed to be a new media to disseminate important ideologies and cultural values which represent the current norms of people in today's life. Dealing with this issue, this study entitled “The Representation of Americanization Myths in the Internet Memes on the 9GAG Comedy Website” is aimed at investigating the Myths of Americanization of 9GAG Internet memes in the Hot Page of the website where the popular Internet memes are provided. The data con...

  12. HIV subtype influences HLA-B*07:02-associated HIV disease outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Adland, Emily; Koyanagi, Madoka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms within the MHC encoding region have the strongest impact on HIV disease progression of any in the human genome and provide important clues to the mechanisms of HIV immune control. Few analyses have been undertaken of HLA alleles associated with rapid disease progression. HLA......% versus 43% in HLA-B*07:02-negative subjects). These data support earlier studies suggesting that increased breadth of the Gag-specific CD8(+) T cell response may contribute to improved HIV immune control irrespective of the particular HLA molecules expressed....

  13. FAITH – Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadravová, Romana [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry IOCB Research Centre & Gilead Sciences, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Rumlová, Michaela, E-mail: michaela.rumlova@vscht.cz [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry IOCB Research Centre & Gilead Sciences, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Department of Biotechnology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Ruml, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.ruml@vscht.cz [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Due to the high number of drug-resistant HIV-1 mutants generated by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there is continuing demand for new types of inhibitors. Both the assembly of the Gag polyprotein into immature and mature HIV-1 particles are attractive candidates for the blocking of the retroviral life cycle. Currently, no therapeutically-used assembly inhibitor is available. One possible explanation is the lack of a reliable and simple assembly inhibitor screening method. To identify compounds potentially inhibiting the formation of both types of HIV-1 particles, we developed a new fluorescent high-throughput screening assay. This assay is based on the quantification of the assembly efficiency in vitro in a 96-well plate format. The key components of the assay are HIV-1 Gag-derived proteins and a dual-labelled oligonucleotide, which emits fluorescence only when the assembly of retroviral particles is inhibited. The method was validated using three (CAI, BM2, PF74) reported assembly inhibitors. - Highlights: • Allows screening of assembly inhibitors of both mature and immature HIV-1 particles. • Based on Gag-derived proteins with CA in mature or immature conformation. • Simple and sensitive method suitable for high-throughput screening of inhibitors. • Unlike in other HIV assembly methods, works under physiological conditions. • No washing steps are necessary.

  14. Subtype Classification of Iranian HIV-1 Sequences Registered in the HIV Databases, 2006-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesi, Kazem; Moallemi, Samaneh; Farrokhi, Molood; Alinaghi, Seyed Ahmad Seyed; Truong, Hong–Ha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in Iran has increased dramatically in the past few years. While the earliest cases were among hemophiliacs, injection drug users (IDUs) fuel the current epidemic. Previous molecular epidemiological analysis found that subtype A was most common among IDUs but more recent studies suggest CRF_35AD may be more prevalent now. To gain a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 infection in Iran, we analyzed all Iranian HIV sequence data from the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Methods All Iranian HIV sequences from subtyping studies with pol, gag, env and full-length HIV-1 genome sequences registered in the HIV databases (www.hiv.lanl.gov) between 2006 and 2013 were downloaded. Phylogenetic trees of each region were constructed using Neighbor-Joining (NJ) and Maximum Parsimony methods. Results A total of 475 HIV sequences were analyzed. Overall, 78% of sequences were CRF_35AD. By gene region, CRF_35AD comprised 83% of HIV-1 pol, 62% of env, 78% of gag, and 90% of full-length genome sequences analyzed. There were 240 sequences re-categorized as CRF_AD. The proportion of CRF_35AD sequences categorized by the present study is nearly double the proportion of what had been reported. Conclusions Phylogenetic analysis indicates HIV-1 subtype CRF_35AD is the predominant circulating strain in Iran. This result differed from previous studies that reported subtype A as most prevalent in HIV- infected patients but confirmed other studies which reported CRF_35AD as predominant among IDUs. The observed epidemiological connection between HIV strains circulating in Iran and Afghanistan may be due to drug trafficking and/or immigration between the two countries. This finding suggests the possible origins and transmission dynamics of HIV/AIDS within Iran and provides useful information for designing control and intervention strategies. PMID:25188443

  15. Subtype classification of Iranian HIV-1 sequences registered in the HIV databases, 2006-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Baesi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection in Iran has increased dramatically in the past few years. While the earliest cases were among hemophiliacs, injection drug users (IDUs fuel the current epidemic. Previous molecular epidemiological analysis found that subtype A was most common among IDUs but more recent studies suggest CRF_35AD may be more prevalent now. To gain a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 infection in Iran, we analyzed all Iranian HIV sequence data from the Los Alamos National Laboratory. METHODS: All Iranian HIV sequences from subtyping studies with pol, gag, env and full-length HIV-1 genome sequences registered in the HIV databases (www.hiv.lanl.gov between 2006 and 2013 were downloaded. Phylogenetic trees of each region were constructed using Neighbor-Joining (NJ and Maximum Parsimony methods. RESULTS: A total of 475 HIV sequences were analyzed. Overall, 78% of sequences were CRF_35AD. By gene region, CRF_35AD comprised 83% of HIV-1 pol, 62% of env, 78% of gag, and 90% of full-length genome sequences analyzed. There were 240 sequences re-categorized as CRF_AD. The proportion of CRF_35AD sequences categorized by the present study is nearly double the proportion of what had been reported. CONCLUSIONS: Phylogenetic analysis indicates HIV-1 subtype CRF_35AD is the predominant circulating strain in Iran. This result differed from previous studies that reported subtype A as most prevalent in HIV- infected patients but confirmed other studies which reported CRF_35AD as predominant among IDUs. The observed epidemiological connection between HIV strains circulating in Iran and Afghanistan may be due to drug trafficking and/or immigration between the two countries. This finding suggests the possible origins and transmission dynamics of HIV/AIDS within Iran and provides useful information for designing control and intervention strategies.

  16. HIV-1 molecular epidemiology among newly diagnosed HIV-1 individuals in Hebei, a low HIV prevalence province in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli Lu

    Full Text Available New human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 diagnoses are increasing rapidly in Hebei. The aim of this study presents the most extensive HIV-1 molecular epidemiology investigation in Hebei province in China thus far. We have carried out the most extensive systematic cross-sectional study based on newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive individuals in 2013, and characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 based on full length gag-partial pol gene sequences in the whole of Hebei. Nine HIV-1 genotypes based on full length gag-partial pol gene sequence were identified among 610 newly diagnosed naïve individuals. The four main genotypes were circulating recombinant form (CRF01_AE (53.4%, CRF07_BC (23.4%, subtype B (15.9%, and unique recombinant forms URFs (4.9%. Within 1 year, three new genotypes (subtype A1, CRF55_01B, CRF65_cpx, unknown before in Hebei, were first found among men who have sex with men (MSM. All nine genotypes were identified in the sexually contracted HIV-1 population. Among 30 URFs, six recombinant patterns were revealed, including CRF01_AE/BC (40.0%, CRF01_AE/B (23.3%, B/C (16.7%, CRF01_AE/C (13.3%, CRF01_AE/B/A2 (3.3% and CRF01_AE/BC/A2 (3.3%, plus two potential CRFs. This study elucidated the complicated characteristics of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology in a low HIV-1 prevalence northern province of China and revealed the high level of HIV-1 genetic diversity. All nine HIV-1 genotypes circulating in Hebei have spread out of their initial risk groups into the general population through sexual contact, especially through MSM. This highlights the urgency of HIV prevention and control in China.

  17. A Phase I clinical trial of the knee to assess the correlation of gagCEST MRI, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T2 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenbo; Lambach, Becky; Jia, Guang; Kaeding, Christopher; Flanigan, David; Knopp, Michael V

    2017-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with the loss of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) during disease progression, which can be detected by glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange-dependent saturation transfer (gagCEST) MRI. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is considered one of the standard methods for GAG quantification in vivo. This Phase I study assessed the correlation between gagCEST MRI and dGEMRIC in determining cartilage GAG concentration. Standard T2 mapping was used as a comparator with the two other methods. Eight athletic volunteers with no known knee diseases were recruited in this study. The sagittal images of both knees in each volunteer were obtained by a 3T MRI system. GAG concentration was calculated based on fixed charge density (FCD) within articular cartilage as calculated by T1 values obtained from dGEMRIC sequences. Magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTRasym) of the CEST spectrum at 1ppm was determined with gagCEST MRI. T2 values were calculated using a multi-echo turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence. The Pearson correlations among MTRasym were calculated from gagCEST analysis. There was moderate correlation (correlation coefficient r=0.55) between dGEMRIC and gagCEST MRI results. T2 had a low correlation (r=-0.30) with gagCEST and no correlation with dGEMRIC (r=0.003). Both gagCEST and dGEMRIC were able to distinguish between high GAG concentration cartilage compartments (higher than 210mM) and low GAG cartilage compartments (lower than 210mM). dGEMRIC was shown to be a more accurate and sensitive clinical imaging tool in evaluating cartilage GAG levels in vivo. While GagCEST showed less sensitivity to GAG concentration variations than dGEMRIC, further improvements may yet enable gagCEST to be a clinically robust methodology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Triple negative breast cancers with amplification of JAK2 at the 9p24 loci demonstrate JAK2-specific dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, Justin M.; Schwarz, Luis J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Estrada, Monica V.; Giltnane, Jennifer M.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Sánchez, Violeta; Dean, Phillip T.; Wang, Kai; Combs, Susan E.; Hicks, Donna; Pinto, Joseph A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Doimi, Franco D.; Gómez, Henry; Rimm, David L.; Yelensky, Roman; Miller, Vincent A.; Stephens, Phillip J.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2017-01-01

    Amplifications at 9p24 have been identified in breast cancer and other malignancies, but the genes within this locus casually associated with oncogenicity or tumor progression remain unclear. Targeted next-generation sequencing of post-chemotherapy triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) identified a group of 9p24-amplified tumors, which contained focal amplification of the Janus kinase-2 (JAK2) gene. These patients had markedly inferior recurrence-free and overall survival compared to patients with TNBC without JAK2 amplification. Presence of JAK2/9p24 amplifications occurred at higher rates in chemotherapy-treated TNBCs than in untreated TNBCs or basal-like breast cancers, or in other subtypes. Similar rates of JAK2 amplification were confirmed in patient-derived TNBC xenografts. In patients where longitudinal specimens were available, JAK2 amplification was selected for during neoadjuvant chemotherapy and eventual metastatic spread, suggesting a role in tumorigenicity and chemoresistance, phenotypes often attributed to a cancer stem-like cell population. In TNBC cell lines with JAK2 copy gains or amplification, specific inhibition of JAK2-STAT6 signaling reduced mammosphere formation and cooperated with chemotherapy in reducing tumor growth in vivo. In these cells, inhibition of JAK1-STAT3 signaling had little effect or, in some cases, counteracted JAK2-specific inhibition. Collectively, these results suggest that JAK2-specific inhibitors are more efficacious than dual JAK1/2 inhibitors against JAK2-amplified TNBCs. Furthermore, JAK2 amplification is a potential biomarker for JAK2-dependence which, in turn, can be used to select patients for clinical trials with JAK2 inhibitors. PMID:27075627

  19. Analysis of the functional compatibility of SIV capsid sequences in the context of the FIV gag precursor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A Ovejero

    Full Text Available The formation of immature lentiviral particles is dependent on the multimerization of the Gag polyprotein at the plasma membrane of the infected cells. One key player in the virus assembly process is the capsid (CA domain of Gag, which establishes the protein-protein interactions that give rise to the hexagonal lattice of Gag molecules in the immature virion. To gain a better understanding of the functional equivalence between the CA proteins of simian and feline immunodeficiency viruses (SIV and FIV, respectively, we generated a series of chimeric FIV Gag proteins in which the CA-coding region was partially or totally replaced by its SIV counterpart. All the FIV Gag chimeras were found to be assembly-defective; however, all of them are able to interact with wild-type SIV Gag and be recruited into extracellular virus-like particles, regardless of the SIV CA sequences present in the chimeric FIV Gag. The results presented here markedly contrast with our previous findings showing that chimeric SIVs carrying FIV CA-derived sequences are assembly-competent. Overall, our data support the notion that although the SIV and FIV CA proteins share 51% amino acid sequence similarity and exhibit a similar organization, i.e., an N-terminal domain joined by a flexible linker to a C-terminal domain, their functional exchange between these different lentiviruses is strictly dependent on the context of the recipient Gag precursor.

  20. Detection Of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus Gag-Gene By Rt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predominantly, cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage were specifically infected by the virus as proviral DNA was detected in infected cultures by amplification of a 414 base-pair (bp) fragment of the viral gag-gene by Reverse Transcription- Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) technique. The present study revealed ...

  1. Protein-GAG interactions: new surface-based techniques, spectroscopies and nanotechnology probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, E A; Terry, C J; Rees, C; Rudd, T R; Duchesne, L; Skidmore, M A; Lévy, R; Thanh, N T K; Nichols, R J; Clarke, D T; Fernig, D G

    2006-06-01

    New approaches, rooted in the physical sciences, have been developed to gain a more fundamental understanding of protein-GAG (glycosaminoglycan) interactions. DPI (dual polarization interferometry) is an optical technique, which measures real-time changes in the mass of molecules bound at a surface and the geometry of the bound molecules. QCM-D (quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation), an acoustic technique, measures the mass and the viscoelastic properties of adsorbates. The FTIR (Fourier-transform IR) amide bands I, II and III, resulting from the peptide bond, provide insight into protein secondary structure. Synchrotron radiation CD goes to much shorter wavelengths than laboratory CD, allowing access to chromophores that provide insights into the conformation of the GAG chain and of beta-strand structures of proteins. To tackle the diversity of GAG structure, we are developing noble metal nanoparticle probes, which can be detected at the level of single particles and so enable single molecule biochemistry and analytical chemistry. These new approaches are enabling new insights into structure-function relationships in GAGs and together they will resolve many of the outstanding problems in this field.

  2. The House Gag Rule Debate: The Wedge Dividing North and South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollen, Richard P.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses rules used in the House of Representatives from 1836 to 1844 to suppress discussions of slavery. Presents a lesson using primary documents that allows students to assess the role of the "gag rule" in creating sectional tension and to follow the transformation of an individual in the growing dispute. Includes documents. (DSK)

  3. Changes in Precipitate Distributions and the Microstructural Evolution of P24/P91 Dissimilar Metal Welds During PWHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Karl E.; Tatlock, Gordon J.; Chi, Kuangnan; Barnard, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The effect of post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) on the evolution of precipitate phases in dissimilar metal welds made between 9 pct Cr P91 alloy and 2.25 pct Cr T/P24-type weld metal has been investigated. Sections of multi-pass fusion welds were analyzed in their as welded condition and after PWHTs of 2 and 8 hour duration at 1003 K (730 °C). Thin foil specimens and carbon extraction replicas have been examined in transmission electron microscopes in order to identify precipitate phases and substantiate their distributions in close proximity to the fusion line. The findings of these studies confirm that a carbon-depleted region develops in the lower alloyed weld material, adjacent to the weld interface, during thermal processing. A corresponding carbon enriched region is formed, simultaneously, in the coarse grain heat affected zone of the P91 parent alloy. It has been demonstrated that carbon depletion from the weld alloy results in the dissolution of M7C3 and M23C6 chromium carbides. However, micro-alloying additions of vanadium and niobium which are made to both the P24 and P91 alloys facilitate the precipitation of stable, nano-scale, MX carbonitride particles. This work demonstrates that these particles, which are of key importance to the strength of ferritic creep resistant alloys, are retained in carbon-depleted regions. The microstructural stability which is conferred by their retention means that the pernicious effects of recrystallization are largely avoided.

  4. Detection of HIV-1 antigen based on magnetic tunnel junction sensor and magnetic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Zhou, Y; Pong, P W T

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it is evidenced that the individuals newly infected HIV are transmitting the virus prior to knowing their HIV status. Identifying individuals that are early in infection with HIV antibody negative (window period) remains problematic. In the newly infected individuals, HIV antigen p24 is usually present in their serum or plasma 7-10 days before the HIV antibody. After antibody production initiates, the p24 antigen is bound into immune complexes. That means the detectable p24 antigens in serum/plasma are short-lived, and their amount is in the pg/ml range. Thus, a rapid quantitative bio-detection system with high-sensitivity is required to achieve early disease diagnosis. Magnetoresistive (MR) biosensor with ultra-high sensitivity possesses great potential in this area. In this study, a p24 detection assay using MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensor and 20-nm magnetic nanoparticles is reported.

  5. The HIV-1 p6/EIAV p9 docking site in Alix is autoinhibited as revealed by a conformation-sensitive anti-Alix monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xi; Pan, Shujuan; Sun, Le; Corvera, Joe; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2008-09-01

    Alix [ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2)-interacting protein X], a component of the endosomal sorting machinery, contains a three-dimensional docking site for HIV-1 p6(Gag) or EIAV (equine infectious anaemia virus) p9(Gag), and binding of the viral protein to this docking site allows the virus to hijack the host endosomal sorting machinery for budding from the plasma membrane. In the present study, we identified a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes the docking site for p6(Gag)/p9(Gag) and we used this antibody to probe the accessibility of the docking site in Alix. Our results show that the docking site is not available in cytosolic or recombinant Alix under native conditions and becomes available upon addition of the detergent Nonidet P40 or SDS. In HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cell lysates, an active p6(Gag)/p9(Gag) docking site is specifically available in Alix from the membrane fraction. The findings of the present study demonstrate that formation or exposure of the p6(Gag)/p9(Gag) docking site in Alix is a regulated event and that Alix association with the membrane may play a positive role in this process.

  6. ACTIVITY MONITORING OF A NTIBODIES TO HIV-1 STRUCTURAL PROTEINS IN A BSENCE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL TREATMENT AND IN THE COURSE OF THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Ryasanova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In HIV-infected patients, the process of antibody production to certain HIV-I structural proteins proceeds in differential manner, depending on the antigen localization. Upon progression of the disease, an increased ratio of antibodies to env surface glycoproteins is found, along with decreased percentage of antibodies to gag gene proteins.

  7. Seroreversion in children born to HIV-positive and AIDS mothers from Central West Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcântara, Keila C; Pereira, Gisner A S; Albuquerque, Maly; Stefani, Mariane M A

    2009-06-01

    The spread of HIV-1 infection among women of childbearing age has led to increasing numbers of children at risk of vertical transmission. This study aimed to assess child outcomes among HIV-positive (n=19) and AIDS (n=22) mothers from Central West Brazil. CD4(+) T-cell counts (FACScount, BD) and viral loads (HIV-1 RT-PCR, Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor Roche) were assessed at delivery and during the first 6 months of life. Heteroduplex mobility assay identified env and gag HIV-1 subtypes. Frequencies and medians were calculated. HIV-positive and AIDS mothers did not differ with regard to age, antiretroviral prophylaxis, parity and viral load. AIDS mothers had lower CD4(+) T-cell counts. One vertical transmission and a neonatal death were observed. Gestational age, gender and oral zidovudine prophylaxis were similar regardless of maternal clinical status. Infants born to AIDS mothers had lower birthweight and shorter time to seroreversion. Eight infants were lost to follow-up, and two were breastfed due to delayed maternal diagnosis. HIV-1 B(env)/B(gag) subtype were 75.6%; discordant B(env)/F(gag) were 12.2%. Exposed uninfected infants born to AIDS mothers with lower CD4(+) T-cell counts seroreverted earlier than infants born to asymptomatic HIV-positive mothers. It is possible that maternal immunological status may impact on the time to seroreversion.

  8. (/sup 35/S)autoradiographic study of sulfated GAG accumulation and turnover in embryonic mouse tooth germs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, E.C.; Boukari, A.; Arechaga, J.; Osman, M.; Ruch, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    The accumulation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans(GAG) in embryonic mouse molars before, during, and after terminal differentiation of odontoblasts was localized by (/sup 35/S)autoradiography combined with the use of chondroitin ABC lyase. Much more sulfated GAG were accumulated in the dental papilla than in the dental epithelium. High incorporation of (/sup 35/S)sulfate occurred at the epithelio-mesenchymal junction, which is the site of dental basement membrane and predentin. Before terminal differentiation of odontoblasts, the distribution of sulfated GAG was uniform at the basement membrane. After the onset of terminal differentiation of odontoblasts, much more sulfated GAG accumulated at the tip of principal cusps than at the apical (inferior) parts of cusps, and sulfated GAG were then found to be degraded more rapidly at the epithelio-mesenchymal junction than at other parts of the tooth germ. Thus regional variation in the rate of degradation of GAG exists in the tooth germs. Trypsin-isolated dental epithelia cultured in vitro synthesized a new basement membrane that could be labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine but not with /sup 35/SO4(-2). The epithelial-derived basal lamina contains little or no sulfatated GAG.

  9. HLA-B*14:02-Restricted Env-Specific CD8(+) T-Cell Activity Has Highly Potent Antiviral Efficacy Associated with Immune Control of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitman, Ellen M; Willberg, Christian B; Tsai, Ming-Han; Chen, Huabiao; Buus, Søren; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Haas, David; Fellay, Jacques; Goedert, James J; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Walker, Bruce D; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven; Wolinsky, Steven M; Martinson, Jeremy; Martin, Maureen; Qi, Ying; Sáez-Cirión, Asier; Yang, Otto O; Matthews, Philippa C; Carrington, Mary; Goulder, Philip J R

    2017-11-15

    Immune control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection is typically associated with effective Gag-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. We here focus on HLA-B*14, which protects against HIV disease progression, but the immunodominant HLA-B*14-restricted anti-HIV response is Env specific (ERYLKDQQL, HLA-B*14-EL9). A subdominant HLA-B*14-restricted response targets Gag (DRYFKTLRA, HLA-B*14-DA9). Using HLA-B*14/peptide-saporin-conjugated tetramers, we show that HLA-B*14-EL9 is substantially more potent at inhibiting viral replication than HLA-B*14-DA9. HLA-B*14-EL9 also has significantly higher functional avidity (P B*14-DA9. However, these differences were HLA-B*14 subtype specific, applying only to HLA-B*14:02 and not to HLA-B*14:01. Furthermore, the HLA-B*14-associated protection against HIV disease progression is significantly greater for HLA-B*14:02 than for HLA-B*14:01, consistent with the superior antiviral efficacy of the HLA-B*14-EL9 response. Thus, although Gag-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses may usually have greater anti-HIV efficacy, factors independent of protein specificity, including functional avidity of individual responses, are also critically important to immune control of HIV.IMPORTANCE In HIV infection, although cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) play a potentially critical role in eradication of viral reservoirs, the features that constitute an effective response remain poorly defined. We focus on HLA-B*14, unique among HLAs associated with control of HIV in that the dominant CTL response is Env specific, not Gag specific. We demonstrate that Env-specific HLA-B*14-restricted activity is substantially more efficacious than the subdominant HLA-B*14-restricted Gag response. Env immunodominance over Gag and strong Env-mediated selection pressure on HIV are observed only in subjects expressing HLA-B*14:02, and not HLA-B*14:01. This reflects the increased functional avidity of the Env response over Gag, substantially more marked for HLA-B*14

  10. HLA-B*14:02-Restricted Env-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Activity Has Highly Potent Antiviral Efficacy Associated with Immune Control of HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willberg, Christian B.; Tsai, Ming-Han; Chen, Huabiao; Buus, Søren; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Haas, David; Fellay, Jacques; Goedert, James J.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Walker, Bruce D.; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Martinson, Jeremy; Martin, Maureen; Qi, Ying; Yang, Otto O.; Matthews, Philippa C.; Carrington, Mary; Goulder, Philip J. R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immune control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection is typically associated with effective Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. We here focus on HLA-B*14, which protects against HIV disease progression, but the immunodominant HLA-B*14-restricted anti-HIV response is Env specific (ERYLKDQQL, HLA-B*14-EL9). A subdominant HLA-B*14-restricted response targets Gag (DRYFKTLRA, HLA-B*14-DA9). Using HLA-B*14/peptide-saporin-conjugated tetramers, we show that HLA-B*14-EL9 is substantially more potent at inhibiting viral replication than HLA-B*14-DA9. HLA-B*14-EL9 also has significantly higher functional avidity (P B*14-DA9. However, these differences were HLA-B*14 subtype specific, applying only to HLA-B*14:02 and not to HLA-B*14:01. Furthermore, the HLA-B*14-associated protection against HIV disease progression is significantly greater for HLA-B*14:02 than for HLA-B*14:01, consistent with the superior antiviral efficacy of the HLA-B*14-EL9 response. Thus, although Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses may usually have greater anti-HIV efficacy, factors independent of protein specificity, including functional avidity of individual responses, are also critically important to immune control of HIV. IMPORTANCE In HIV infection, although cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) play a potentially critical role in eradication of viral reservoirs, the features that constitute an effective response remain poorly defined. We focus on HLA-B*14, unique among HLAs associated with control of HIV in that the dominant CTL response is Env specific, not Gag specific. We demonstrate that Env-specific HLA-B*14-restricted activity is substantially more efficacious than the subdominant HLA-B*14-restricted Gag response. Env immunodominance over Gag and strong Env-mediated selection pressure on HIV are observed only in subjects expressing HLA-B*14:02, and not HLA-B*14:01. This reflects the increased functional avidity of the Env response over Gag, substantially more marked for HLA

  11. Detection of Early Sero-Conversion HIV Infection Using the INSTITM HIV-1 Antibody Point-of-Care Test

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Darrel; Gilbert, Mark; DiFrancesco, Lillo; Krajden, Mel

    2010-01-01

    We compared the INSTITM HIV-1 Antibody Point-of-Care (POC) Test to laboratory-based tests for detection of early sero-conversion (i.e. acute) HIV infections. Fifty-three (53) individuals with early HIV infection, (i.e. 3rd generation anti-HIV EIA non-reactive or reactive, HIV-1 Western Blot non-reactive or indeterminate and HIV-1 p24 antigen reactive) were tested by INSTITM. The INSTITM test was reactive for 34/49 (sensitivity 69.4%; 95% confidence interval 54.6-81.8%) early-infected individu...

  12. A Truncated Nef Peptide from SIVcpz Inhibits the Production of HIV-1 Infectious Progeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Sabino Cunha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nef proteins from all primate Lentiviruses, including the simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz, increase viral progeny infectivity. However, the function of Nef involved with the increase in viral infectivity is still not completely understood. Nonetheless, until now, studies investigating the functions of Nef from SIVcpz have been conducted in the context of the HIV-1 proviruses. In an attempt to investigate the role played by Nef during the replication cycle of an SIVcpz, a Nef-defective derivative was obtained from the SIVcpzWTGab2 clone by introducing a frame shift mutation at a unique restriction site within the nef sequence. This nef-deleted clone expresses an N-terminal 74-amino acid truncated peptide of Nef and was named SIVcpz-tNef. We found that the SIVcpz-tNef does not behave as a classic nef-deleted HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques SIVmac. Markedly, SIVcpz-tNef progeny from both Hek-293T and Molt producer cells were completely non-infectious. Moreover, the loss in infectivity of SIVcpz-tNef correlated with the inhibition of Gag and GagPol processing. A marked accumulation of Gag and very low levels of reverse transcriptase were detected in viral lysates. Furthermore, these observations were reproduced once the tNef peptide was expressed in trans both in SIVcpzΔNef and HIV-1WT expressing cells, demonstrating that the truncated peptide is a dominant negative for viral processing and infectivity for both SIVcpz and HIV-1. We demonstrated that the truncated Nef peptide binds to GagPol outside the protease region and by doing so probably blocks processing of both GagPol and Gag precursors at a very early stage. This study demonstrates for the first time that naturally-occurring Nef peptides can potently block lentiviral processing and infectivity.

  13. Maturation-induced cloaking of neutralization epitopes on HIV-1 particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda S Joyner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To become infectious, HIV-1 particles undergo a maturation process involving proteolytic cleavage of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins. Immature particles contain a highly stable spherical Gag lattice and are impaired for fusion with target cells. The fusion impairment is relieved by truncation of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT, indicating that an interaction between the immature viral core and gp41 within the particle represses HIV-1 fusion by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that the conformation of Env on the viral surface is regulated allosterically by interactions with the HIV-1 core during particle maturation. To test this, we quantified the binding of a panel of monoclonal antibodies to mature and immature HIV-1 particles by immunofluorescence imaging. Surprisingly, immature particles exhibited markedly enhanced binding of several gp41-specific antibodies, including two that recognize the membrane proximal external region (MPER and neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains. Several of the differences in epitope exposure on mature and immature particles were abolished by truncation of the gp41 CT, thus linking the immature HIV-1 fusion defect with altered Env conformation. Our results suggest that perturbation of fusion-dependent Env conformational changes contributes to the impaired fusion of immature particles. Masking of neutralization-sensitive epitopes during particle maturation may contribute to HIV-1 immune evasion and has practical implications for vaccine strategies targeting the gp41 MPER.

  14. Application of mouth gag and temporomandibular joint pain and trismus in tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundi, Nasir Akram; Mehmood, Talat; Abid, Omair

    2015-04-01

    To determine the effect of duration of application of mouth gag on Temporomandibular (TM) joint pain and trismus after tonsillectomy. Descriptive study. Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Combined Military Hospital, Nowshera, from February to July 2012. A total of 40 patients undergoing tonsillectomy, in mouth opening prior to surgery was measured as inter incisor distance in cms. A stop watch was used to calculate the time of application of mouth gag. Mouth opening was again measured 06 hours after the surgery. Difference between the two readings was considered as trismus score and categorized as mild (1 cm), moderate (2 cm) and severe (3 cm). Patient was asked to score pain on a visual analogue scale (0 - 9). Score 0 was categorized as no pain; 1 - 3 as mild pain; 4 - 6 as moderate pain; 7 - 9 as severe pain. Spearman's rank correlation was used for finding correlation between time of mouth gag application and study outcome (pain and trismus). Trismus as observed by difference in inter incisor distance was mild in 11 patients; moderate in 15 patients and severe in 14 patients 06 hours after the surgery. Eleven (27.5%) had mild pain over temporomandibular joint, 15 (37.5%) had moderate and 14 (35%) had severe pain 06 hours after the surgery. Direct relationship was observed between duration of application of mouth gag with postoperative pain and trismus. Significant strong correlation was observed between length of mouth opening to severity of pain and trismus (rs = 0.738; p joint pain and trismus in early postoperative period in tonsillectomy.

  15. Maturation of the Gag core decreases the stability of retroviral lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Candice; Payne, Riley J; Willis, Sharon H; Doranz, Benjamin J; Rucker, Joseph B

    2012-11-25

    To better understand how detergents disrupt enveloped viruses, we monitored the biophysical stability of murine leukemia virus (MLV) virus-like particles (VLPs) against a panel of commonly used detergents using real-time biosensor measurements. Although exposure to many detergents, such as Triton X-100 and Empigen, results in lysis of VLP membranes, VLPs appeared resistant to complete membrane lysis by a significant number of detergents, including Tween 20, Tween 80, Lubrol, and Saponin. VLPs maintained their structural integrity after exposure to Tween 20 at concentrations up to 500-fold above its CMC. Remarkably, VLPs containing immature cores composed of unprocessed (uncleaved) Gag polyprotein were significantly more resistant to detergent lysis than VLPs with mature cores. Although the maturity of retroviral Gag is known to influence the stability of the protein core structure itself, our studies suggest that the maturity of the Gag core also influences the stability of the lipid bilayer surrounding the core. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-reported bruxism - associations with perceived stress, motivation for control, dental anxiety and gagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winocur, E; Uziel, N; Lisha, T; Goldsmith, C; Eli, I

    2011-01-01

    To examine possible associations between self-reported bruxism, stress, desirability of control, dental anxiety and gagging. Five questionnaires were distributed among a general adult population (402 respondents): the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Desirability of Control Scale (DC), Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), Gagging Assessment Scale (GAS), and Bruxism Assessment Questionnaire. A high positive correlation between DAS and GAS (R = 0·604, P bruxism were sleep bruxism (OR = 4·98, CI 95% 2·54-9·74) and GAS (OR = 1·10, CI 95% 1·04-1·17). The best predictors of sleep bruxism were awake bruxism (OR = 5·0, CI 95% 2·56-9·78) and GAS (OR = 1·19; CI 95% 1·11-1·27). Self-reported sleep bruxism significantly increases the odds for awake bruxism and vice versa. Tendency for gagging during dental care slightly increases the odds of both types of self-reported bruxism, but desirability of control is not associated with these phenomena. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Is an HIV vaccine possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A. Wilson

    Full Text Available The road to the discovery of a vaccine for HIV has been arduous and will continue to be difficult over the ensuing twenty years. Most vaccines are developed by inducing neutralizing antibodies against the target pathogen or by using attenuated strains of the particular pathogen to engender a variety of protective immune responses. Unfortunately, simple methods of generating anti-HIV antibodies have already failed in a phase III clinical trial. While attenuated SIV variants work well against homologous challenges in non-human primates, the potential for reversion to a more pathogenic virus and recombination with challenge viruses will preclude the use of attenuated HIV in the field. It has been exceedingly frustrating to vaccinate for HIV-specific neutralizing antibodies given the enormous diversity of the Envelope (Env glycoprotein and its well-developed glycan shield. However, there are several antibodies that will neutralize many different strains of HIV and inducing these types of antibodies in vaccinees remains the goal of a vigorous effort to develop a vaccine for HIV based on neutralizing antibodies. Given the difficulty in generating broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies, the HIV vaccine field has turned its attention to inducing T cell responses against the virus using a variety of vectors. Unfortunately, the results from Merck's phase IIb STEP trial proved to be disappointing. Vaccinees received Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 expressing Gag, Pol, and Nef of HIV. This vaccine regimen failed to either prevent infection or reduce the level of HIV replication after challenge. These results mirrored those in non-human primate testing of Ad5 using rigorous SIV challenge models. This review will focus on recent developments in HIV vaccine development. We will deal largely with attempts to develop a T cell-based vaccine using the non-human primate SIV challenge model.

  18. Effect of biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 on soil fungal community in cucumber rhizosphere using T-RFLP and DGGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guanpeng; Yin, Danhan; Chen, Shengju; Xia, Fei; Yang, Jie; Li, Qing; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Fungi and fungal community play important roles in the soil ecosystem, and the diversity of fungal community could act as natural antagonists of various plant pathogens. Biological control is a promising method to protect plants as chemical pesticides may cause environment pollution. Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 had strong inhibitory on Rastonia solanacearum, Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani, etc., and was isolated from the wheat rhizosphere take-all decline soils in Shandong province, China. However, its potential effect on soil fungal community was still unknown. In this study, the gfp-labeled P. fluorescens 2P24 was inoculated into cucumber rhizosphere, and the survival of 2P24 was monitored weekly. The amount decreased from 10(8) to 10(5) CFU/g dry soils. The effect of 2P24 on soil fungal community in cucumber rhizosphere was investigated using T-RFLP and DGGE. In T-RFLP analysis, principle component analysis showed that the soil fungal community was greatly influenced at first, digested with restriction enzyme Hinf I and Taq I. However, there was little difference as digested by different enzymes. DGGE results demonstrated that the soil fungal community was greatly shocked at the beginning, but it recovered slowly with the decline of P. fluorescens 2P24. Four weeks later, there was little difference between the treatment and control. Generally speaking, the effect of P. fluorescens 2P24 on soil fungal community in cucumber rhizosphere was just transient.

  19. Effect of biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 on soil fungal community in cucumber rhizosphere using T-RFLP and DGGE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanpeng Gao

    Full Text Available Fungi and fungal community play important roles in the soil ecosystem, and the diversity of fungal community could act as natural antagonists of various plant pathogens. Biological control is a promising method to protect plants as chemical pesticides may cause environment pollution. Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 had strong inhibitory on Rastonia solanacearum, Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani, etc., and was isolated from the wheat rhizosphere take-all decline soils in Shandong province, China. However, its potential effect on soil fungal community was still unknown. In this study, the gfp-labeled P. fluorescens 2P24 was inoculated into cucumber rhizosphere, and the survival of 2P24 was monitored weekly. The amount decreased from 10(8 to 10(5 CFU/g dry soils. The effect of 2P24 on soil fungal community in cucumber rhizosphere was investigated using T-RFLP and DGGE. In T-RFLP analysis, principle component analysis showed that the soil fungal community was greatly influenced at first, digested with restriction enzyme Hinf I and Taq I. However, there was little difference as digested by different enzymes. DGGE results demonstrated that the soil fungal community was greatly shocked at the beginning, but it recovered slowly with the decline of P. fluorescens 2P24. Four weeks later, there was little difference between the treatment and control. Generally speaking, the effect of P. fluorescens 2P24 on soil fungal community in cucumber rhizosphere was just transient.

  20. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang, E-mail: jiyou@catholic.ac.kr

    2016-05-15

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. - Highlights: • HIV-1 NC possess a NLS and leads to nuclear and nucleolus localization. • Mutations in basic residues between two ZFs in NC decrease the nucleus localization. • ZFs of NC affect cytoplasmic organelles localization rather than nucleus localization.

  1. Tsg101 and Alix interact with murine leukemia virus Gag and cooperate with Nedd4 ubiquitin ligases during budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Morales, Carolina; Pescia, Christina; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Sadoul, Remy; Bertrand, Edouard; Basyuk, Eugenia

    2005-07-22

    Retroviruses use endosomal machinery to bud out of infected cells, and various Gag proteins recruit this machinery by interacting with either of three cellular factors as follows: ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family, Tsg101, or Alix/Aip1. Here we show that the murine leukemia virus Gag has the unique ability to interact with all three factors. Small interfering RNAs against Tsg101 or Alix and dominant-negative forms of Nedd4 can all reduce production of virus-like particles. However, inactivating the Nedd4-binding site abolishes budding, whereas disrupting Tsg101 or Alix binding has milder effects. Nedd4 ubiquitin ligases are therefore essential, and Tsg101 and Alix play auxiliary roles. Most interestingly, overexpression of Alix can stimulate the release of Gag, and this occurs independently of most Alix partners Tsg101, Cin85, Alg-2, and endophilins. In addition, Gag mutants that do not bind Tsg101 or Alix concentrate on late endosomes and become very sensitive to dominant-negative forms of Nedd4 that do not conjugate ubiquitin. This suggests that the direct interaction of Gag with Tsg101 and Alix favors budding from the plasma membrane and relieves a requirement for ubiquitination by Nedd4.1. Other Nedd4-dependent Gag proteins also contain binding sites for Tsg101 or Alix, suggesting that this could be a common feature of retroviruses.

  2. Neuronal gagging activity patterns may be generated by neurons in the reticular area dorsomedial to the retrofacial nucleus in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, H; Koga, T

    1997-03-01

    Expulsion is induced when hypercapnea and hypoxia develop during retching, or when the oropharyngeal mucosa is irritated (the gag reflex). The central pattern generator (CPG) for expulsion has been suggested to coexist with the CPG for retching in the reticular area dorsomedial to the retrofacial nucleus, which may correspond to the Botzinger complex (BOT). However, its participation in gagging induced by oropharyngeal irritation is unclear. To elucidate such participation, the firing patterns of BOT neurons were observed during gagging induced by stimulation of superior laryngeal afferents in decerebrate, paralyzed dogs. Only 23% of inspiratory and 34% of expiratory BOT neurons increased their firing in response to stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. In contrast, 75% of nonrespiratory BOT neurons showed enhanced firing with this stimulation. During gagging, each nonrespiratory, inspiratory, and expiratory BOT neuron fired with the same pattern that they exhibited during expulsion caused by changes in blood gases. These firing patterns could be classified into five types and are thought to be appropriate for generating neuronal gagging activity. These results suggest that the CPG for expulsion in the BOT produces gagging when it is activated by oropharyngolaryngeal afferents.

  3. Acute HIV Discovered During Routine HIV Screening With HIV Antigen-Antibody Combination Tests in 9 US Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas A E; Giordano, Thomas P; Pasalar, Siavash; Jacobson, Kathleen R; Glick, Nancy R; Sha, Beverly E; Mammen, Priya E; Hunt, Bijou R; Todorovic, Tamara; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Adomolga, Vincent; Feaster, Daniel J; Branson, Bernard M

    2018-01-05

    Newer combination HIV antigen-antibody tests allow detection of HIV sooner after infection than previous antibody-only immunoassays because, in addition to HIV-1 and -2 antibodies, they detect the HIV-1 p24 antigen, which appears before antibodies develop. We determine the yield of screening with HIV antigen-antibody tests and clinical presentations for new diagnoses of acute and established HIV infection across US emergency departments (EDs). This was a retrospective study of 9 EDs in 6 cities with HIV screening programs that integrated laboratory-based antigen-antibody tests between November 1, 2012, and December 31, 2015. Unique patients with newly diagnosed HIV infection were identified and classified as having either acute HIV infection or established HIV infection. Acute HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result, a negative HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay, or Western blot result, but detectable HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA); established HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result and a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay or Western blot result. The primary outcomes were the number of new HIV diagnoses and proportion of patients with laboratory-defined acute HIV infection. Secondary outcomes compared reason for visit and the clinical presentation of acute HIV infection. In total, 214,524 patients were screened for HIV and 839 (0.4%) received a new diagnosis, of which 122 (14.5%) were acute HIV infection and 717 (85.5%) were established HIV infection. Compared with patients with established HIV infection, those with acute HIV infection were younger, had higher RNA and CD4 counts, and were more likely to have viral syndrome (41.8% versus 6.5%) or fever (14.3% versus 3.4%) as their reason for visit. Most patients with acute HIV infection displayed symptoms attributable to acute infection (median symptom count 5 [interquartile range 3 to 6]), with fever often

  4. Multicenter evaluation of a new 4th generation HIV screening assay Elecsys HIV combi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Orazi, B; Raineri, A; Thorstensson, R; Bürgisser, P; Mühlbacher, A; Areal, C; Eiras, A; Villaescusa, R; Camacho, R; Diogo, I; Roth, H J; Zahn, I; Bartel, J; Bossi, V; Piro, F; Atamasirikul, K; Permpikul, P; Webber, L; Singh, S

    2006-01-01

    Fourth-generation screening assays which permit a simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen and antibody reduce the diagnostic window on average by four days in comparison to third-generation antibody assays. Recently, the new automated Elecsys HIV combi was compared in a multicenter study to alternative fourth- and third-generation assays, p24 antigen test and HIV-1 RNA RT-PCR. A total of 104 serocon-version panels, samples of the acute phase of infection after seroconversion (n = 33), anti-HIV-1 positive specimens (n = 572) from patients in different stages of the disease, 535 subtyped samples from different geographical locations, including group M (subtypes A-J) and group O, anti-HIV-2 positive sera (n = 364), dilutions of cell culture supernatants (n = 60) infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, selected performance panels, 8406 unselected samples from blood donors originating from different blood transfusion centers, 3810 unselected sera from daily routine and from hospitalized patients, 9927 unselected samples from South Africa and 1943 potentially interfering samples were tested with the Elecsys HIV combi. Elecsys HIV combi showed a comparable sensitivity to HIV-1 Ag stand-alone assays for early detection of HIV infection in seroconversion panels. The mean time delay of Elecsys HIV combi (last negative sample + 1 day) in comparison to HIV-1 RT-PCR for 92 panels tested with both methods was 3.23 days. The diagnostic window was reduced with Elecsys HIV combi between 1.56 and 5.32 days in comparison to third-generation assays. The specificity of Elecsys HIV combi in blood donors was 99.80% after repeated testing. Our results show that a fourth-generation assay with improved specificity and sensitivity like the Elecsys HIV combi is suitable for blood donor screening due to its low number of false positives and since it detects HIV p24 antigen with a comparable sensitivity to single antigen assays.

  5. HIV Integration Targeting: A Pathway Involving Transportin-3 and the Nuclear Pore Protein RanBP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huegel, Alyssa; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Schaller, Torsten; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.; Young, John A. T.; Chanda, Sumit K.; König, Renate; Malani, Nirav; Berry, Charles C.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide siRNA screens have identified host cell factors important for efficient HIV infection, among which are nuclear pore proteins such as RanBP2/Nup358 and the karyopherin Transportin-3/TNPO3. Analysis of the roles of these proteins in the HIV replication cycle suggested that correct trafficking through the pore may facilitate the subsequent integration step. Here we present data for coupling between these steps by demonstrating that depletion of Transportin-3 or RanBP2 altered the terminal step in early HIV replication, the selection of chromosomal sites for integration. We found that depletion of Transportin-3 and RanBP2 altered integration targeting for HIV. These knockdowns reduced HIV integration frequency in gene-dense regions and near gene-associated features, a pattern that differed from that reported for depletion of the HIV integrase binding cofactor Psip1/Ledgf/p75. MLV integration was not affected by the Transportin-3 knockdown. Using siRNA knockdowns and integration targeting analysis, we also implicated several additional nuclear proteins in proper target site selection. To map viral determinants of integration targeting, we analyzed a chimeric HIV derivative containing MLV gag, and found that the gag replacement phenocopied the Transportin-3 and RanBP2 knockdowns. Thus, our data support a model in which Gag-dependent engagement of the proper transport and nuclear pore machinery mediate trafficking of HIV complexes to sites of integration. PMID:21423673

  6. HIV integration targeting: a pathway involving Transportin-3 and the nuclear pore protein RanBP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Ocwieja

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide siRNA screens have identified host cell factors important for efficient HIV infection, among which are nuclear pore proteins such as RanBP2/Nup358 and the karyopherin Transportin-3/TNPO3. Analysis of the roles of these proteins in the HIV replication cycle suggested that correct trafficking through the pore may facilitate the subsequent integration step. Here we present data for coupling between these steps by demonstrating that depletion of Transportin-3 or RanBP2 altered the terminal step in early HIV replication, the selection of chromosomal sites for integration. We found that depletion of Transportin-3 and RanBP2 altered integration targeting for HIV. These knockdowns reduced HIV integration frequency in gene-dense regions and near gene-associated features, a pattern that differed from that reported for depletion of the HIV integrase binding cofactor Psip1/Ledgf/p75. MLV integration was not affected by the Transportin-3 knockdown. Using siRNA knockdowns and integration targeting analysis, we also implicated several additional nuclear proteins in proper target site selection. To map viral determinants of integration targeting, we analyzed a chimeric HIV derivative containing MLV gag, and found that the gag replacement phenocopied the Transportin-3 and RanBP2 knockdowns. Thus, our data support a model in which Gag-dependent engagement of the proper transport and nuclear pore machinery mediate trafficking of HIV complexes to sites of integration.

  7. A new ensemble coevolution system for detecting HIV-1 protein coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangdi; Theys, Kristof; Verheyen, Jens; Pineda-Peña, Andrea-Clemencia; Khouri, Ricardo; Piampongsant, Supinya; Eusébio, Mónica; Ramon, Jan; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke

    2015-01-07

    A key challenge in the field of HIV-1 protein evolution is the identification of coevolving amino acids at the molecular level. In the past decades, many sequence-based methods have been designed to detect position-specific coevolution within and between different proteins. However, an ensemble coevolution system that integrates different methods to improve the detection of HIV-1 protein coevolution has not been developed. We integrated 27 sequence-based prediction methods published between 2004 and 2013 into an ensemble coevolution system. This system allowed combinations of different sequence-based methods for coevolution predictions. Using HIV-1 protein structures and experimental data, we evaluated the performance of individual and combined sequence-based methods in the prediction of HIV-1 intra- and inter-protein coevolution. We showed that sequence-based methods clustered according to their methodology, and a combination of four methods outperformed any of the 27 individual methods. This four-method combination estimated that HIV-1 intra-protein coevolving positions were mainly located in functional domains and physically contacted with each other in the protein tertiary structures. In the analysis of HIV-1 inter-protein coevolving positions between Gag and protease, protease drug resistance positions near the active site mostly coevolved with Gag cleavage positions (V128, S373-T375, A431, F448-P453) and Gag C-terminal positions (S489-Q500) under selective pressure of protease inhibitors. This study presents a new ensemble coevolution system which detects position-specific coevolution using combinations of 27 different sequence-based methods. Our findings highlight key coevolving residues within HIV-1 structural proteins and between Gag and protease, shedding light on HIV-1 intra- and inter-protein coevolution.

  8. Anti-HERV-K (HML-2) capsid antibody responses in HIV elite controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mulder, Miguel; SenGupta, Devi; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sacha, Jonah B; Nixon, Douglas F; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre

    2017-08-22

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) comprise approximately 8% of the human genome and while the majority are transcriptionally silent, the most recently integrated HERV, HERV-K (HML-2), remains active. During HIV infection, HERV-K (HML-2) specific mRNA transcripts and viral proteins can be detected. In this study, we aimed to understand the antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag in the context of HIV-1 infection. We developed an ELISA assay using either recombinant protein or 164 redundant "15mer" HERV-K (HML-2) Gag peptides to test sera for antibody reactivity. We identified a total of eight potential HERV-K (HML-2) Gag immunogenic domains: two on the matrix (peptides 16 and 31), one on p15 (peptide 85), three on the capsid (peptides 81, 97 and 117), one on the nucleocapsid (peptide 137) and one on the QP1 protein (peptide 157). Four epitopes (peptides 16, 31, 85 and 137) were highly immunogenic. No significant differences in antibody responses were found between HIV infected participants (n = 40) and uninfected donors (n = 40) for 6 out of the 8 epitopes tested. The antibody response against nucleocapsid (peptide 137) was significantly lower (p K (HML-2) capsid recombinant peptide in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme immunospot (Elispot) assays. We found that the HERV-K (HML-2) Gag antibody and T cell response by Elispot were significantly correlated. HIV elite controllers had a strong cellular and antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag directed mainly against the Capsid region. Collectively, these data suggest that anti-HERV-K (HML-2) antibodies targeting capsid could have an immunoprotective effect in HIV infection.

  9. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NAT, on testing... test results, HIV-1 p24 antigen test results, and anti-HCV test results that were provided in the FDA... (Anti-HCV),'' August 5, 1993; ``Recommendations for Donor Screening with a Licensed Test for HIV-1...

  10. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L.; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation.

  11. Field accuracy of fourth-generation rapid diagnostic tests for acute HIV-1: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Joseph M; MacPherson, Peter; Adams, Emily R.; Ochodo, Eleanor; Sands, Anita; Taegtmeyer, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fourth-generation HIV-1 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect HIV-1 p24 antigen to screen for acute HIV-1. However, diagnostic accuracy during clinical use may be suboptimal. Methods: Clinical sensitivity and specificity of fourth-generation RDTs for acute HIV-1 were collated from field evaluation studies in adults identified by a systematic literature search. Results: Four studies with 17?381 participants from Australia, Swaziland, the United Kingdom and Malawi were identified. ...

  12. Identification of a BRCA2-Specific Modifier Locus at 6p24 Related to Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijai, Joseph; Klein, Robert J.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dunning, Alison M.; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Healey, Sue; Dicks, Ed; Soucy, Penny; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Wang, Xianshu; Eldridge, Ronald C.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Garber, Judith; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Goldgar, David E.; D'Andrea, Emma; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Arason, Adalgeir; Rennert, Gad; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Adlard, Julian; Tischkowitz, Marc; Porteous, Mary E.; Damiola, Francesca; Golmard, Lisa; Barjhoux, Laure; Longy, Michel; Belotti, Muriel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Genuardi, Maurizio; Arnold, Norbert; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Domchek, Susan M.; Pfeiler, Georg; Friedman, Eitan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Shah, Sohela; Lazaro, Conxi; Mai, Phuong L.; Benitez, Javier; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Fasching, Peter A.; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Bojesen, Stig E.; Milne, Roger L.; Brenner, Hermann; Lochmann, Magdalena; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Dörk, Thilo; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Radice, Paolo; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Winqvist, Robert; Devillee, Peter; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schoof, Nils; Hooning, Maartje J.; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Jakubowska, Anna; Orr, Nick; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Hall, Per; Couch, Fergus J.; Simard, Jacques; Altshuler, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer susceptibility alleles in these BRCA2 mutation carriers and for several regions (including FGFR2, MAP3K1, CDKN2A/B, and PTHLH) identified SNPs that have stronger evidence of association than those previously published. We also identified a novel susceptibility allele at 6p24 that was inversely associated with risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (rs9348512; per allele HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.80–0.90, P = 3.9×10−8). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk either in the general population or in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The locus lies within a region containing TFAP2A, which encodes a transcriptional activation protein that interacts with several tumor suppressor genes. This report identifies the first breast cancer risk locus specific to a BRCA2 mutation background. This comprehensive update of novel and previously reported breast cancer susceptibility loci contributes to the establishment of a panel of SNPs that modify breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This panel may have clinical utility for women with BRCA2 mutations weighing options for medical

  13. Identification of a BRCA2-specific modifier locus at 6p24 related to breast cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M Gaudet

    Full Text Available Common genetic variants contribute to the observed variation in breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers; those known to date have all been found through population-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS. To comprehensively identify breast cancer risk modifying loci for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we conducted a deep replication of an ongoing GWAS discovery study. Using the ranked P-values of the breast cancer associations with the imputed genotype of 1.4 M SNPs, 19,029 SNPs were selected and designed for inclusion on a custom Illumina array that included a total of 211,155 SNPs as part of a multi-consortial project. DNA samples from 3,881 breast cancer affected and 4,330 unaffected BRCA2 mutation carriers from 47 studies belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 were genotyped and available for analysis. We replicated previously reported breast cancer susceptibility alleles in these BRCA2 mutation carriers and for several regions (including FGFR2, MAP3K1, CDKN2A/B, and PTHLH identified SNPs that have stronger evidence of association than those previously published. We also identified a novel susceptibility allele at 6p24 that was inversely associated with risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers (rs9348512; per allele HR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.80-0.90, P = 3.9 × 10(-8. This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk either in the general population or in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The locus lies within a region containing TFAP2A, which encodes a transcriptional activation protein that interacts with several tumor suppressor genes. This report identifies the first breast cancer risk locus specific to a BRCA2 mutation background. This comprehensive update of novel and previously reported breast cancer susceptibility loci contributes to the establishment of a panel of SNPs that modify breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers. This panel may have clinical utility for women with BRCA2 mutations weighing options for

  14. Preparation of quadri-subtype influenza virus-like particles using bovine immunodeficiency virus gag protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Hidajat, Rachmat; Hamilton, Garrett; Horn, Noah; Nickols, Brian; Prather, Raphael O. [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD (United States); Tumpey, Terrence M. [Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road N.E., Atlanta, GA (United States); Pushko, Peter, E-mail: ppushko@medigen-usa.com [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Influenza VLPs comprised of hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), and matrix (M1) proteins have been previously used for immunological and virological studies. Here we demonstrated that influenza VLPs can be made in Sf9 cells by using the bovine immunodeficiency virus gag (Bgag) protein in place of M1. We showed that Bgag can be used to prepare VLPs for several influenza subtypes including H1N1 and H10N8. Furthermore, by using Bgag, we prepared quadri-subtype VLPs, which co-expressed within the VLP the four HA subtypes derived from avian-origin H5N1, H7N9, H9N2 and H10N8 viruses. VLPs showed hemagglutination and neuraminidase activities and reacted with specific antisera. The content and co-localization of each HA subtype within the quadri-subtype VLP were evaluated. Electron microscopy showed that Bgag-based VLPs resembled influenza virions with the diameter of 150–200 nm. This is the first report of quadri-subtype design for influenza VLP and the use of Bgag for influenza VLP preparation. - Highlights: • BIV gag protein was configured as influenza VLP core component. • Recombinant influenza VLPs were prepared in Sf9 cells using baculovirus expression system. • Single- and quadri-subtype VLPs were prepared by using BIV gag as a VLP core. • Co-localization of H5, H7, H9, and H10 HA was confirmed within quadri-subtype VLP. • Content of HA subtypes within quadri-subtype VLP was determined. • Potential advantages of quadri-subtype VLPs as influenza vaccine are discussed.

  15. Heterogeneity of HIV-1 replication in ectocervical and vaginal tissue ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Park, Seo Young; Marks, Kenneth; Lawlor, Sidney; Russo, Julie; Macio, Ingrid; Chappell, Catherine; Bunge, Katherine

    2017-10-06

    In clinical trials evaluating HIV-1 prevention products, ex vivo exposure of mucosal tissue to HIV-1 is performed to inform drug levels needed to suppress viral infection. Understanding assay and participant variables that influence HIV-1 replication will help with assay implementation. Demographic and behavioral data were obtained from 61 healthy women aged 21-45. Paired cervical (CT) and vaginal (VT) tissue biopsies were collected and treated with HIV-1BaL or HIV-1JR-CSF, washed, and cultured. On days 3, 7, and/or 11, culture supernatant was collected and viral replication was monitored by p24 ELISA. Tissue was extracted at study end and HIV-1 relative RNA copies were determined by PCR. Cumulative p24 and RNA were log-transformed and analyzed using a linear mixed model, t-test, and an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). HIV replication was similar between CT and VT for each virus, but HIV-1BaL had 1.5 log10 and 0.9 log10 higher levels of p24 than HIV-1JR-CSF in CT and VT, respectively (p<.001), which correlated with HIV-1 relative RNA copies. Cumulative p24 and RNA copies in both tissues demonstrated low intra-person correlation for both viruses (ICC≤0.513 HIV-1BaL; ICC≤0.419 HIV-1JR-CSF). Enrollment into previous clinical studies in which genital biopsies were collected modestly decreased the HIV-1BaL cumulative p24 for CT, but not for VT. To improve the ex vivo challenge assay, viruses should be evaluated for replication in mucosal tissue prior to study implementation, baseline mucosal tissue is not needed if a placebo/no treatment group is included within the clinical trial, and previous biopsy sites should be avoided.

  16. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, NE (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, NE (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. - Highlights: • CypB has been identified in several proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection. • CypB expression is upregulated in activated and infected T-cells. • Over-expression of CypB enhances HIV nuclear import and infection. • The N-terminus of CypB is necessary for these effects.

  17. Structure and Immunogenicity of Alternative Forms of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Gag Protein Expressed Using Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Cecil, Chad; West, Ande; Collier, Martha; Jurgens, Christy; Madden, Victoria; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert; Moore, Dominic T.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Davis, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) were engineered to express different forms of SIV Gag to compare expression in vitro, formation of intra- and extracellular structures and induction of humoral and cellular immunity in mice. The three forms examined were full-length myristylated SIV Gag (Gagmyr+), full-length Gag lacking the myristylation signal (Gagmyr-), or a truncated form of Gagmyr- comprising only the matrix and capsid domains (MA/CA). Comparison of VRP-infect...

  18. Heparin (GAG-hed inhibits LCR activity of Human Papillomavirus type 18 by decreasing AP1 binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Bayghen Esther

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High risk HPVs are causative agents of anogenital cancers. Viral E6 and E7 genes are continuously expressed and are largely responsible for the oncogenic activity of these viruses. Transcription of the E6 and E7 genes is controlled by the viral Long Control Region (LCR, plus several cellular transcription factors including AP1 and the viral protein E2. Within the LCR, the binding and activity of the transcription factor AP1 represents a key regulatory event in maintaining E6/E7 gene expression and uncontrolled cell proliferation. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, such as heparin, can inhibit tumour growth; they have also shown antiviral effects and inhibition of AP1 transcriptional activity. The purpose of this study was to test the heparinoid GAG-hed, as a possible antiviral and antitumoral agent in an HPV18 positive HeLa cell line. Methods Using in vivo and in vitro approaches we tested GAG-hed effects on HeLa tumour cell growth, cell proliferation and on the expression of HPV18 E6/E7 oncogenes. GAG-hed effects on AP1 binding to HPV18-LCR-DNA were tested by EMSA. Results We were able to record the antitumoral effect of GAG-hed in vivo by using as a model tumours induced by injection of HeLa cells into athymic female mice. The antiviral effect of GAG-hed resulted in the inhibition of LCR activity and, consequently, the inhibition of E6 and E7 transcription. A specific diminishing of cell proliferation rates was observed in HeLa but not in HPV-free colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Treated HeLa cells did not undergo apoptosis but the percentage of cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle was increased. We also detected that GAG-hed prevents the binding of the transcription factor AP1 to the LCR. Conclusion Direct interaction of GAG-hed with the components of the AP1 complex and subsequent interference with its ability to correctly bind specific sites within the viral LCR may contribute to the inhibition of E6/E7 transcription and cell

  19. Crystal structure of an HIV assembly and maturation switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Jonathan M.; Zadrozny, Kaneil K.; Chrustowicz, Jakub; Purdy, Michael D.; Yeager, Mark; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-07-14

    Virus assembly and maturation proceed through the programmed operation of molecular switches, which trigger both local and global structural rearrangements to produce infectious particles. HIV-1 contains an assembly and maturation switch that spans the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the capsid (CA) region and the first spacer peptide (SP1) of the precursor structural protein, Gag. The crystal structure of the CTD-SP1 Gag fragment is a goblet-shaped hexamer in which the cup comprises the CTD and an ensuing type II β-turn, and the stem comprises a 6-helix bundle. The β-turn is critical for immature virus assembly and the 6-helix bundle regulates proteolysis during maturation. This bipartite character explains why the SP1 spacer is a critical element of HIV-1 Gag but is not a universal property of retroviruses. Our results also indicate that HIV-1 maturation inhibitors suppress unfolding of the CA-SP1 junction and thereby delay access of the viral protease to its substrate.

  20. Seventeen-year-old mother-to-child HIV type 1 transmission identified by phylogeny and signature patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, T.L.; Petersen, A.B.; Jorgensen, L.B.

    2008-01-01

    A case, in which the clinical suspicion of perinatal HIV transmission of a newly diagnosed 17-year-old woman was supported by the phylogenetic analyses of pol sequences obtained for routine resistance testing and further substantiated by analyses of gag and env, is described Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...

  1. HIV Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ...

  2. HIV-1 production is specifically associated with human NMT1 long form in human NMT isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamune, Nobutoki; Gota, Kayoko; Misumi, Shogo; Tanaka, Kenzo; Okinaka, Shigetaka; Shoji, Shozo

    2008-02-01

    The N-myristoylation of the N-terminal of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Pr55(gag) by human N-myristoyltransferase (hNMT) is a prerequisite modification for HIV-1 production. hNMT consists of multiple isozymes encoded by hNMT1 and hNMT2. The hNMT1 isozyme consists of long, medium, and short forms. Here, we investigated which isozyme is crucial for HIV-1 production. Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells transfected with infectious HIV-1 vectors were used as models of HIV-1-infected cells in this study. The significant reduction in HIV-1 production and the failure of the specific localization of Pr55(gag) in a detergent-resistant membrane fraction were dependent on the knockdown of the different forms of the hNMT1 isozyme but not of the hNMT2 isozyme. Additionally, the coexpression of an inactive mutant hNMT1 isozyme, namely the hNMT1 long form (hNMT1(L)), but not that of other hNMT mutants resulted in a significant reduction in HIV-1 production. These results strongly suggest that HIV-1 production is specifically associated with hNMT1, particularly hNMT1(L), but not with hNMT2 in vivo, contributing to the understanding of a step in HIV-1 replication.

  3. Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Broadly-Reactive HLA Class II Restricted Epitopes Eliciting HIV-Specific CD4+T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggert, M.; Norström, M.; Lundegaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Background: CD4+ T cells orchestrate immune protection by ‘‘helping’’ other cells of our immune system to clear viral infections. It is well known that the preferential infection and depletion of CD4+ T cells contributes to hampered systemic T cell help following HIV infection. However......, the functional and immunodominant discrepancies of CD4+ T cell responses targeting promiscuous MHC II restricted HIV epitopes remains poorly defined. Thus, utilization of interdisciplinary approaches might aid revealing broadly- reactive peptides eliciting CD4 + T cell responses. Methods: We utilized the novel...... epitopes improved the polyfunctionality compared with overlapping HIV Gag (p55) peptides. Conclusion: Using an unbiased approach where we have predicted peptides with same prerequisites, we demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 + T cell immunodominance is heavily skewed, targeting particularly Gag and Nef....

  4. Identifying HIV infection in South African women: How does a fourth generation HIV rapid test perform?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapila Bhowan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV rapid tests (RT play an important role in tackling the HIV pandemic in South Africa. Third generation RT that detect HIV antibodies are currently used to diagnose HIV infection at the point of care. Determine Combo (DC is the first fourth generation RT that detects both p24 antigen (p24Ag and HIV antibodies (Ab, theoretically reducing the window period and increasing detection rates. Early detection of maternal HIV infection is important to mitigate the high risk of vertical transmission associated with acute maternal infection. Objectives: We assessed the performance of the DC RT against third generation RT in antenatal and post-partum women. Methods: Third generation RT Advance Quality and Acon were used in a serial algorithm to diagnose HIV infection in antenatal and post-partum women over six months at a tertiary hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. This data provided the reference against which the DC RT was compared on plasma and whole blood samples. Results: The 1019 participants comprised 345 (34% antenatal and 674 (66% post-partum women. Ninety women (8.8% tested HIV-positive of whom 59 (66% were tested antenatally, and 31 (34% post-partum yielding prevalence rates of 17.1% and 4.6% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the Ab component of DC on plasma antenatally was 100% (93.8% – 100% and 100% (98.6% – 100% respectively and post-partum was 100% (88.9% – 100% and 99.6% (98.8% – 99.9% respectively. One false positive and not a single true positive p24Ag was detected. Of 505 post-partum women who tested HIV-negative 6–12 months prior to enrolment, 12 (2.4% seroconverted. Conclusion: The fourth generation DC offered no advantage over current third generation RT in the diagnosis of HIV infection.

  5. Monitoring processed, mature Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 particles immediately following treatment with a protease inhibitor-containing treatment regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuritzkes Daniel R

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protease inhibitors (PIs block HIV-1 maturation into an infectious virus particle by inhibiting the protease processing of gag and gag-pol precursor proteins. We have used a simple anti-HIV-1 p24 Western blot to monitor the processing of p55gag precursor into the mature p24 capsid immediately following the first dosage of a PI-containing treatment regimen. Evidence of PI activity was observed in plasma virus as early as 72 hours post treatment-initiation and was predictive of plasma viral RNA decrease at 4 weeks.

  6. HIV-1 protease-substrate coevolution in nelfinavir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, Madhavi; Ozen, Ayşegül; Kurt-Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. The virus accumulates mutations within the protease (PR) that render the PIs less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also coevolve with mutations at PR cleavage sites contributing to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution of the p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations by determining crystal structures of wild-type and NFV-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with p1-p6 substrate peptide variants with L449F and/or S451N. Alterations of residue 30's interaction with the substrate are compensated by the coevolving L449F and S451N cleavage site mutations. This interdependency in the PR-p1-p6 interactions enhances intermolecular contacts and reinforces the overall fit of the substrate within the substrate envelope, likely enabling coevolution to sustain substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of PR resistance mutations. Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. Mutations in HIV-1 protease selected under the pressure of protease inhibitors render the inhibitors less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also mutate and coevolve with protease, contributing to maintenance of viral fitness and to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution at the Gag p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations. Our structural analysis reveals the interdependency of protease-substrate interactions and how coevolution may restore substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of protease drug resistance mutations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Quantitative live-cell imaging of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgärtel, Viola; Müller, Barbara; Lamb, Don C

    2012-05-01

    Advances in fluorescence methodologies make it possible to investigate biological systems in unprecedented detail. Over the last few years, quantitative live-cell imaging has increasingly been used to study the dynamic interactions of viruses with cells and is expected to become even more indispensable in the future. Here, we describe different fluorescence labeling strategies that have been used to label HIV-1 for live cell imaging and the fluorescence based methods used to visualize individual aspects of virus-cell interactions. This review presents an overview of experimental methods and recent experiments that have employed quantitative microscopy in order to elucidate the dynamics of late stages in the HIV-1 replication cycle. This includes cytosolic interactions of the main structural protein, Gag, with itself and the viral RNA genome, the recruitment of Gag and RNA to the plasma membrane, virion assembly at the membrane and the recruitment of cellular proteins involved in HIV-1 release to the nascent budding site.

  8. Using Elecsys® HIV Combi PT assay to identify acute and early HIV infection in a teaching hospital of southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Siyuan; Li, Dongdong; An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Tao, Chuanmin

    2016-03-01

    This study is the first attempt to evaluate the use of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay in identifying acute and early HIV infection in southwest China. We also analyzed the extent of cutoff ratios overlap between false-positive and true-positive results to aid the identification of HIV infection, using samples from the West China Hospital in Chengdu, Sichuan Province from April 2012 to December 2013. Reactive results from a screening test were retested and all repeatedly reactive samples - if available - were confirmed with Western blot, HIV-1 p24 antigen, or HIV-1 RNA. Of 241,840 samples screened, the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay identified 54 patients with acute and early HIV infection; 99.8% cases with cutoff index ratios ≥50 were proved to be true-positive HIV infection and 95.6% cases with cutoff index ratios HIV combi PT assay can identify acute and early HIV infection, including those who might have been missed by third-generation HIV screening assays and Western blot. However, cutoff index ratios HIV-1 nucleic acid test may be unaffordable, detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen can be an alternative strategy to diagnose HIV infection in individuals with a negative or indeterminate Western blot. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Field accuracy of fourth-generation rapid diagnostic tests for acute HIV-1: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joseph M; Macpherson, Peter; Adams, Emily R; Ochodo, Eleanor; Sands, Anita; Taegtmeyer, Miriam

    2015-11-28

    Fourth-generation HIV-1 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect HIV-1 p24 antigen to screen for acute HIV-1. However, diagnostic accuracy during clinical use may be suboptimal. Clinical sensitivity and specificity of fourth-generation RDTs for acute HIV-1 were collated from field evaluation studies in adults identified by a systematic literature search. Four studies with 17 381 participants from Australia, Swaziland, the United Kingdom and Malawi were identified. All reported 0% sensitivity of the HIV-1 p24 component for acute HIV-1 diagnosis; 26 acute infections were missed. Specificity ranged from 98.3 to 99.9%. Fourth-generation RDTs are currently unsuitable for the detection of acute HIV-1.

  10. Novel HIV IL-4R antagonist vaccine strategy can induce both high avidity CD8 T and B cell immunity with greater protective efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ronald J; Worley, Matthew; Trivedi, Shubhanshi; Ranasinghe, Charani

    2014-09-29

    We have established that the efficacy of a heterologous poxvirus vectored HIV vaccine, fowlpox virus (FPV)-HIV gag/pol prime followed by attenuated vaccinia virus (VV)-HIV gag/pol booster immunisation, is strongly influenced by the cytokine milieu at the priming vaccination site, with endogenous IL-13 detrimental to the quality of the HIV specific CD8+ T cell response induced. We have now developed a novel HIV vaccine that co-expresses a C-terminal deletion mutant of the mouse IL-4, deleted for the essential tyrosine (Y119) required for signalling. In our vaccine system, the mutant IL-4C118 can bind to IL-4 type I and II receptors with high affinity, and transiently prevent the signalling of both IL-4 and IL-13 at the vaccination site. When this IL-4C118 adjuvanted vaccine was used in an intranasal rFPV/intramuscular rVV prime-boost immunisation strategy, greatly enhanced mucosal/systemic HIV specific CD8+ T cells with higher functional avidity, expressing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 and greater protective efficacy were detected. Surprisingly, the IL-4C118 adjuvanted vaccines also induced robust long-lived HIV gag-specific serum antibody responses, specifically IgG1 and IgG2a. The p55-gag IgG2a responses induced were of a higher magnitude relative to the IL-13Rα2 adjuvant vaccine. More interestingly, our recently tested IL-13Rα2 adjuvanted vaccine which only inhibited IL-13 activity, even though induced excellent high avidity HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, had a detrimental impact on the induction of gag-specific IgG2a antibody immunity. Our observations suggest that (i) IL-4 cell-signalling in the absence of IL-13 retarded gag-specific antibody isotype class switching, or (ii) IL-13Rα2 signalling was involved in inducing good gag-specific B cell immunity. Thus, we believe our novel IL-4R antagonist adjuvant strategy offers great promise not only for HIV-1 vaccines, but also against a range of chronic infections where sustained high quality mucosal and systemic T and B

  11. The spread of HIV in Pakistan: bridging of the epidemic between populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanani, Muhammad R; Somani, Mehreen; Rehmani, Sadiq S; Veras, Nazle M C; Salemi, Marco; Ali, Syed H

    2011-01-01

    In the last two decades, 'concentrated epidemics' of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have established in several high risk groups in Pakistan, including Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) and among men who have sex with men (MSM). To explore the transmission patterns of HIV infection in these major high-risk groups of Pakistan, 76 HIV samples were analyzed from MSM, their female spouses and children, along with 26 samples from a previously studied cohort of IDUs. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV gag gene sequences obtained from these samples indicated a substantial degree of intermixing between the IDU and MSM populations, suggesting a bridging of HIV infection from IDUs, via MSM, to the MSM spouses and children. HIV epidemic in Pakistan is now spreading to the female spouses and offspring of bisexual MSM. HIV control and awareness programs must be refocused to include IDUs, MSM, as well as bisexual MSM, and their spouses and children.

  12. A validated model of GAG deposition, cell distribution, and growth of tissue engineered cartilage cultured in a rotating bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, N I; Obradovic, B; Versteeg, H K; Lemon, G; Williams, D J

    2010-03-01

    In this work a new phenomenological model of growth of cartilage tissue cultured in a rotating bioreactor is developed. It represents an advancement of a previously derived model of deposition of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in engineered cartilage by (i) introduction of physiological mechanisms of proteoglycan accumulation in the extracellular matrix (ECM) as well as by correlating (ii) local cell densities and (iii) tissue growth to the ECM composition. In particular, previously established predictions and correlations of local oxygen concentrations and GAG synthesis rates are extended to distinguish cell secreted proteoglycan monomers free to diffuse in cell surroundings and outside from the engineered construct, from large aggrecan molecules, which are constrained within the ECM and practically immovable. The model includes kinetics of aggregation, that is, transformation of mobile GAG species into immobile aggregates as well as maintenance of the normal ECM composition after the physiological GAG concentration is reached by incorporation of a product inhibition term. The model also includes mechanisms of the temporal evolution of cell density distributions and tissue growth under in vitro conditions. After a short initial proliferation phase the total cell number in the construct remains constant, but the local cell distribution is leveled out by GAG accumulation and repulsion due to negative molecular charges. Furthermore, strong repulsive forces result in expansion of the local tissue elements observed macroscopically as tissue growth (i.e., construct enlargement). The model is validated by comparison with experimental data of (i) GAG distribution and leakage, (ii) spatial-temporal distributions of cells, and (iii) tissue growth reported in previous works. Validation of the model predictive capability--against a selection of measured data that were not used to construct the model--suggests that the model successfully describes the interplay of several

  13. Recombinant vaccinia DIs expressing simian immunodeficiency virus gag and pol in mammalian cells induces efficient cellular immunity as a safe immunodeficiency virus vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Tomotaka; Someya, Kenji; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    A highly attenuated vaccinia virus substrain of Dairen-I (DIs) shows promise as a candidate vector for eliciting positive immunity against immune deficiency virus. DIs was randomly obtained by serial 1-day egg passages of a chorioarantoic membrane-adapted Dairen strain (DIE), resulting in substantial genomic deletion, including various genes regulating the virus-host-range. To investigate the impact of that deletion and of the subsequent insertion of a foreign gene into that region of DIs on the ability of the DIs recombinant to induce antigen-specific immunity, we generated a recombinant vaccinia DIs expressing fulllength gag and pol genes of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (rDIsSIV gag/pol) and studied the biological and immunological characteristics of the recombinant natural mutant. The rDIsSIV gag/pol developed a tiny plaque on the chick embryo fibroblast (CEF). Viral particles of rDIsSIV gag/pol as well as SIV Gag-like particles were electromicroscopically detected in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, the recombinant DIs strain grows well in CEF cells but not in mammalian cells. While rDIsSIV gag/pol produces SIV proteins in mammalian HeLa and CV-1 cells, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA) expressing SIV gag and pol genes (MVA/SIV239 gag/pol) clearly replicates in HeLa and CV-1 cell lines under synchronized growth conditions and produces the SIV protein in all cell lines. Moreover, intradermal administration of rDIsSIV gag/pol or of MVA/SIV239 gag/pol elicited similar levels of IFN-gamma spot-forming cells specific for SIV Gag. If the non-productive infection characteristically induced by recombinant DIs is sufficient to trigger immune induction, as we believe it is, then a human immunodeficiency virus vaccine employing the DIs recombinant would have the twin advantages of being both effective and safe.

  14. Effect of HIV-1 envelope cytoplasmic tail on adenovirus primed virus encoded virus-like particle immunizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anne Marie C; Ragonnaud, Emeline; Seaton, Kelly E.

    2016-01-01

    The low number of envelope (Env) spikes presented on native HIV-1 particles is a major impediment for HIV-1 prophylactic vaccine development. We designed virus-like particle encoding adenoviral vectors utilizing SIVmac239 Gag as an anchor for full length and truncated HIV-1 M consensus Env...... were found between the different priming regimens as both induced high titered tier 1 neutralizing antibodies, but no tier 2 antibodies, possibly reflecting the similar presentation of trimer specific antibody epitopes. The described vaccine regimens provide insight into the effects of the HIV-1 Env...

  15. HIV subtype is not associated with dementia among individuals with moderate and advanced immunosuppression in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacktor, Ned; Nakasujja, Noeline; Redd, Andrew D; Manucci, Jordyn; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Wendel, Sarah K; Porcella, Stephen F; Martens, Craig; Bruno, Daniel; Skolasky, Richard L; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Robertson, Kevin; Musisi, Seggane; Katabira, Elly; Quinn, Thomas C

    2014-06-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are a common neurological manifestation of HIV infection. A previous study suggested that HIV dementia may be more common among patients with subtype D virus than among those with subtype A virus among HIV+ individuals with advanced immunosuppression. We conducted a study to evaluate the frequency of HIV dementia, and the association of HIV dementia with HIV subtype and compartmentalization among HIV+ individuals with moderate and advanced immunosuppression (CD4 lymphocyte count >150 cells/μL and Uganda. HIV+ individuals received neurological, neuropsychological testing, and functional assessments, and gag and gp41 regions were subtyped. Subjects were considered infected with a specific subtype if both regions analyzed were from the same subtype. 41% of the HIV+ individuals had HIV dementia (mean CD4 lymphocyte count = 233 cells/μL). 67 individuals had subtype A, 25 individuals had subtype D, 24 individuals were classified as A/D recombinants, and one individual had subtype C. There was no difference in the frequency of HIV dementia when stratified by HIV subtype A and D and no association with compartmentalization between the cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood. These results suggest that HIV dementia is common in HIV+ individuals in Uganda. There was no association between HIV subtype and dementia among HIV+ individuals with moderate and advanced immunosuppression. Future studies should be performed to confirm these results.

  16. Symptomatic primary HIV infection in a 49-year-old man who has sex with men: beware of the window phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, H. E.; Damen, M.; de Vries, H. J. C.

    2009-01-01

    A 49-year-old man with a history of receptive unprotected anal intercourse with multiple anonymous men presented with a symptomatic primary HIV infection. Upon his initial visit the rapid HIV antibody screening test was negative but a p24 antigen test suggested a highly infectious phase in the HIV

  17. Symptomatic primary HIV infection in a 49-year-old man who has sex with men: Beware of the window phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, H.E.; Damen, M.; de Vries, H.J.C.

    2009-01-01

    A 49-year-old man with a history of receptive unprotected anal intercourse with multiple anonymous men presented with a symptomatic primary HIV infection. Upon his initial visit the rapid HIV antibody screening test was negative but a p24 antigen test suggested a highly infectious phase in the HIV

  18. HIV-1 adenoviral vector vaccines expressing multi-trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL enhance T cell mediated anti-viral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Termini, James M; Gupta, Sachin; Raffa, Francesca N; Fuller, Katherine A; Rivas, Yaelis; Philip, Sakhi; Kornbluth, Richard S; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF) are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5) vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization) for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag) adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag) which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from vaccinia-Gag

  19. The ESCRT-associated protein Alix recruits the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-1 to facilitate HIV-1 release through the LYPXnL L domain motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sette, Paola; Jadwin, Joshua A; Dussupt, Vincent; Bello, Nana F; Bouamr, Fadila

    2010-08-01

    The p6 region of HIV-1 Gag contains two late (L) domains, PTAP and LYPX(n)L, that bind Tsg101 and Alix, respectively. Interactions with these two cellular proteins recruit members of the host's fission machinery (ESCRT) to facilitate HIV-1 release. Other retroviruses gain access to the host ESCRT components by utilizing a PPXY-type L domain that interacts with cellular Nedd4-like ubiquitin ligases. Despite the absence of a PPXY motif in HIV-1 Gag, interaction with the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 was recently shown to stimulate HIV-1 release. We show here that another Nedd4-like ubiquitin ligase, Nedd4-1, corrected release defects resulting from the disruption of PTAP (PTAP(-)), suggesting that HIV-1 Gag also recruits Nedd4-1 to facilitate virus release. Notably, Nedd4-1 remediation of HIV-1 PTAP(-) budding defects is independent of cellular Tsg101, implying that Nedd4-1's function in HIV-1 release does not involve ESCRT-I components and is therefore distinct from that of Nedd4-2. Consistent with this finding, deletion of the p6 region decreased Nedd4-1-Gag interaction, and disruption of the LYPX(n)L motif eliminated Nedd4-1-mediated restoration of HIV-1 PTAP(-). This result indicated that both Nedd4-1 interaction with Gag and function in virus release occur through the Alix-binding LYPX(n)L motif. Mutations of basic residues located in the NC domain of Gag that are critical for Alix's facilitation of HIV-1 release, also disrupted release mediated by Nedd4-1, further confirming a Nedd4-1-Alix functional interdependence. In fact we found that Nedd4-1 binds Alix in both immunoprecipitation and yeast-two-hybrid assays. In addition, Nedd4-1 requires its catalytic activity to promote virus release. Remarkably, RNAi knockdown of cellular Nedd4-1 eliminated Alix ubiquitination in the cell and impeded its ability to function in HIV-1 release. Together our data support a model in which Alix recruits Nedd4-1 to facilitate HIV-1 release mediated through the LYPX(n)L/Alix budding

  20. The ESCRT-Associated Protein Alix Recruits the Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4-1 To Facilitate HIV-1 Release through the LYPXnL L Domain Motif▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sette, Paola; Jadwin, Joshua A.; Dussupt, Vincent; Bello, Nana F.; Bouamr, Fadila

    2010-01-01

    The p6 region of HIV-1 Gag contains two late (L) domains, PTAP and LYPXnL, that bind Tsg101 and Alix, respectively. Interactions with these two cellular proteins recruit members of the host's fission machinery (ESCRT) to facilitate HIV-1 release. Other retroviruses gain access to the host ESCRT components by utilizing a PPXY-type L domain that interacts with cellular Nedd4-like ubiquitin ligases. Despite the absence of a PPXY motif in HIV-1 Gag, interaction with the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 was recently shown to stimulate HIV-1 release. We show here that another Nedd4-like ubiquitin ligase, Nedd4-1, corrected release defects resulting from the disruption of PTAP (PTAP−), suggesting that HIV-1 Gag also recruits Nedd4-1 to facilitate virus release. Notably, Nedd4-1 remediation of HIV-1 PTAP− budding defects is independent of cellular Tsg101, implying that Nedd4-1's function in HIV-1 release does not involve ESCRT-I components and is therefore distinct from that of Nedd4-2. Consistent with this finding, deletion of the p6 region decreased Nedd4-1-Gag interaction, and disruption of the LYPXnL motif eliminated Nedd4-1-mediated restoration of HIV-1 PTAP−. This result indicated that both Nedd4-1 interaction with Gag and function in virus release occur through the Alix-binding LYPXnL motif. Mutations of basic residues located in the NC domain of Gag that are critical for Alix's facilitation of HIV-1 release, also disrupted release mediated by Nedd4-1, further confirming a Nedd4-1-Alix functional interdependence. In fact we found that Nedd4-1 binds Alix in both immunoprecipitation and yeast-two-hybrid assays. In addition, Nedd4-1 requires its catalytic activity to promote virus release. Remarkably, RNAi knockdown of cellular Nedd4-1 eliminated Alix ubiquitination in the cell and impeded its ability to function in HIV-1 release. Together our data support a model in which Alix recruits Nedd4-1 to facilitate HIV-1 release mediated through the LYPXnL/Alix budding pathway

  1. Relief of preintegration inhibition and characterization of additional blocks for HIV replication in primary mouse T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-xin Zhang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of a small animal model to study HIV replication and pathogenesis has been hampered by the failure of the virus to replicate in non-primate cells. Most studies aimed at achieving replication in murine cells have been limited to fibroblast cell lines, but generating an appropriate model requires overcoming blocks to viral replication in primary T cells. We have studied HIV-1 replication in CD4(+ T cells from human CD4/CCR5/Cyclin T1 transgenic mice. Expression of hCD4 and hCCR5 in mouse CD4(+ T cells enabled efficient entry of R5 strain HIV-1. In mouse T cells, HIV-1 underwent reverse transcription and nuclear import as efficiently as in human T cells. In contrast, chromosomal integration of HIV-1 proviral DNA was inefficient in activated mouse T cells. This process was greatly enhanced by providing a secondary T cell receptor (TCR signal after HIV-1 infection, especially between 12 to 24 h post infection. This effect was specific for primary mouse T cells. The pathways involved in HIV replication appear to be PKCtheta-, CARMA1-, and WASp-independent. Treatment with Cyclosporin A (CsA further relieved the pre-integration block. However, transcription of HIV-1 RNA was still reduced in mouse CD4(+ T cells despite expression of the hCyclin T1 transgene. Additional post-transcriptional defects were observed at the levels of Gag expression, Gag processing, Gag release and virus infectivity. Together, these post-integration defects resulted in a dramatically reduced yield of infectious virus (300-500 fold after a single cycle of HIV-1 replication. This study implies the existence of host factors, in addition to those already identified, that are critical for HIV-1 replication in mouse cells. This study also highlights the differences between primary T cells and cell lines regarding pre-integration steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle.

  2. Detection of Early Sero-Conversion HIV Infection Using the INSTI HIV-1 Antibody Point-of-Care Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Darrel; Gilbert, Mark; Difrancesco, Lillo; Krajden, Mel

    2010-12-30

    We compared the INSTI(TM) HIV-1 Antibody Point-of-Care (POC) Test to laboratory-based tests for detection of early sero-conversion (i.e. acute) HIV infections. Fifty-three (53) individuals with early HIV infection, (i.e. 3(rd) generation anti-HIV EIA non-reactive or reactive, HIV-1 Western Blot non-reactive or indeterminate and HIV-1 p24 antigen reactive) were tested by INSTI(TM). The INSTI(TM) test was reactive for 34/49 (sensitivity 69.4%; 95% confidence interval 54.6-81.8%) early-infected individuals whose laboratory-based 3(rd) generation HIV EIA test was reactive. Four (4) were non-reactive by both the laboratory-based EIA and INSTI(TM )tests, but were p24 antigen reactive. The INSTI(TM )POC test performs well compared with other POC tests for the detection of early sero-conversion HIV infection, but it may miss 20% to 30% of those detected by laboratory-based 3(rd) generation anti-HIV tests. Both POC and laboratory-based anti-HIV tests will fail to detect a proportion of infected individuals in the first weeks after infection.

  3. Generation of HIV-1 derivatives that productively infect macaque monkey lymphoid cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kamada, Kazuya; IGARASHI, Tatsuhiko; Martin, Malcolm A.; KHAMSRI, BOONRUANG; Hatcho, Kazuki; Yamashita, Tomoki; Fujita, Mikako; Uchiyama, Tsuneo; Adachi, Akio

    2006-01-01

    The narrow host range of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is caused in part by innate cellular factors such as apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G) and TRIM5α, which restrict virus replication in monkey cells. Variant HIV-1 molecular clones containing both a 21-nucleotide simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag CA element, corresponding to the HIV-1 cyclophilin A-binding site, and the entire SIV vif gene were constructed. Long-term passage i...

  4. Potent functional antibody responses elicited by HIV-I DNA priming and boosting with heterologous HIV-1 recombinant MVA in healthy Tanzanian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agricola Joachim

    Full Text Available Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA virus boosting (HIVIS03. The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK cells from PBMC (p=0.006, indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development.Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080.

  5. HLA-B57/B*5801 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 elite controllers select for rare gag variants associated with reduced viral replication capacity and strong cytotoxic T-lymphocyte [corrected] recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiyuki; Brockman, Mark A; Schneidewind, Arne; Lobritz, Michael; Pereyra, Florencia; Rathod, Almas; Block, Brian L; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brumme, Chanson J; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa C; Li, Bin; Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Frahm, Nicole; Brander, Christian; Toth, Ildiko; Arts, Eric J; Allen, Todd M; Walker, Bruce D

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) elite controllers (EC) maintain viremia below the limit of commercial assay detection (B57 and the closely related allele B*5801 are particularly associated with enhanced control and recognize the same Gag(240-249) TW10 epitope. The typical escape mutation (T242N) within this epitope diminishes viral replication capacity in chronically infected persons; however, little is known about TW10 epitope sequences in residual replicating viruses in B57/B*5801 EC and the extent to which mutations within this epitope may influence steady-state viremia. Here we analyzed TW10 in a total of 50 B57/B*5801-positive subjects (23 EC and 27 viremic subjects). Autologous plasma viral sequences from both EC and viremic subjects frequently harbored the typical cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL)-selected mutation T242N (15/23 sequences [65.2%] versus 23/27 sequences [85.1%], respectively; P = 0.18). However, other unique mutants were identified in HIV controllers, both within and flanking TW10, that were associated with an even greater reduction in viral replication capacity in vitro. In addition, strong CTL responses to many of these unique TW10 variants were detected by gamma interferon-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assay. These data suggest a dual mechanism for durable control of HIV replication, consisting of viral fitness loss resulting from CTL escape mutations together with strong CD8 T-cell immune responses to the arising variant epitopes.

  6. Induction of feline immunodeficiency virus specific antibodies in cats with an attenuated Salmonella strain expressing the Gag protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Tijhaar (Edwin); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); J.A. Karlas (Jos); M.C. Burger; F.R. Mooi (Frits); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSalmonella typhimurium aroA strains (SL3261), expressing high levels of the Gag protein of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) fused with maltose binding protein (SL3261-MFG), were constructed using an invertible promoter system that allows the stable expression of heterologous antigens

  7. A new system for parallel drug screening against multiple-resistant HIV mutants based on lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN vectors and multi-colour analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokofjeva Maria M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite progress in the development of combined antiretroviral therapies (cART, HIV infection remains a significant challenge for human health. Current problems of cART include multi-drug-resistant virus variants, long-term toxicity and enormous treatment costs. Therefore, the identification of novel effective drugs is urgently needed. Methods We developed a straightforward screening approach for simultaneously evaluating the sensitivity of multiple HIV gag-pol mutants to antiviral drugs in one assay. Our technique is based on multi-colour lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN LeGO vector technology. Results We demonstrated the successful use of this approach for screening compounds against up to four HIV gag-pol variants (wild-type and three mutants simultaneously. Importantly, the technique was adapted to Biosafety Level 1 conditions by utilising ecotropic pseudotypes. This allowed upscaling to a large-scale screening protocol exploited by pharmaceutical companies in a successful proof-of-concept experiment. Conclusions The technology developed here facilitates fast screening for anti-HIV activity of individual agents from large compound libraries. Although drugs targeting gag-pol variants were used here, our approach permits screening compounds that target several different, key cellular and viral functions of the HIV life-cycle. The modular principle of the method also allows the easy exchange of various mutations in HIV sequences. In conclusion, the methodology presented here provides a valuable new approach for the identification of novel anti-HIV drugs.

  8. Systematic TOR1A non-c.907_909delGAG variant analysis in isolated dystonia and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Michael; Jochim, Angela; Boesch, Sylvia; Weber, Sandrina; Meindl, Tobias; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Mueller, Joerg; Messner, Michael; Ceballos-Baumann, Andres; Poewe, Werner; Haslinger, Bernhard; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2016-10-01

    An increasing number of rare, functionally relevant non-c.907_909delGAG (non-ΔGAG) variants in TOR1A have been recognized, associated with phenotypic expressions different from classic DYT1 childhood-onset generalized dystonia. Only recently, DYT1 genotype-phenotype correlations have been proposed, awaiting further elucidation in independent cohorts. We screened the entire coding sequence and the 5'-UTR region of TOR1A for rare non-ΔGAG sequence variants in a large series of 940 individuals with various forms of isolated dystonia as well as in 376 ancestry-matched controls. The frequency of rare, predicted deleterious non-ΔGAG TOR1A variants was assessed in the European sample of the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) dataset. In the case cohort, we identified a rare 5'-UTR variant (c.-39G > T), a rare splice-region variant (c.445-8T > C), as well as one novel (p.Ile231Asn) and two rare (p.Ala163Val, p.Thr321Met) missense variants, each in a single patient with adult-onset focal/segmental isolated dystonia. Of these variants, only p.Thr321Met qualified as possibly disease-related according to variant interpretation criteria. One novel, predicted deleterious missense substitution (p.Asn208Ser) was detected in the control cohort. Among European ExAC individuals, the carrier rate of rare, predicted deleterious non-ΔGAG variants was 0.4%. Our study does not allow the establishment of genotype-specific clinical correlations for DYT1. Further large-scale genetic screening accompanied by comprehensive segregation and functional studies is required to conclusively define the contribution of TOR1A whole-gene variation to the pathogenesis of isolated dystonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of gag reflex on dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorders and prosthetic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarslan, Z Z; Yıldırım Biçer, A Z

    2013-12-01

    To assess the influence of gag reflex severity, assessed according to the short form of the patient part of Gagging Problem Assessment Questionnaire (GPA-pa SF), on the dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and presence of prosthetic restorations among patients requiring prosthodontic treatment in Turkey. A total of 505 patients (305 women; mean age: 46·35 years, SD: 28·2 years) undergoing dental examination were administered a questionnaire containing questions regarding their age, gender, education level, dental attendance, TMD symptoms (limitation in jaw opening, muscle pain, pain/sounds in the temporomandibular jaw), the Turkish version of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the GPA-pa SF. Subsequently, any prosthetic restoration was recorded by a dentist. Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance (anova) and the chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Differences were found between GPA-pa SF scores 0, 1 and 2 for education level (P = 0·001), MDAS scores (P = 0·003), self-reported TMD (P = 0·000) and prosthesis wear (P = 0·000), but not for attendance patterns (P = 0·826). Patients with gag reflex had lower education levels, higher levels of dental anxiety, more self-reported TMD symptoms and fewer fixed or removable prosthetic restorations than patients without gag reflex. Gag reflex has impacts on dental anxiety, self-reported TMD and prosthetic restorations, but not on dental attendance patterns, according to the results of the GPA-pa SF. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. HLA-A*7401-mediated control of HIV viremia is independent of its linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B*5703

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Philippa C; Adland, Emily; Listgarten, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The potential contribution of HLA-A alleles to viremic control in chronic HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection has been relatively understudied compared with HLA-B. In these studies, we show that HLA-A*7401 is associated with favorable viremic control in extended southern African cohorts of >2100 C......-clade-infected subjects. We present evidence that HLA-A*7401 operates an effect that is independent of HLA-B*5703, with which it is in linkage disequilibrium in some populations, to mediate lowered viremia. We describe a novel statistical approach to detecting additive effects between class I alleles in control of HIV-1...... disease, highlighting improved viremic control in subjects with HLA-A*7401 combined with HLA-B*57. In common with HLA-B alleles that are associated with effective control of viremia, HLA-A*7401 presents highly targeted epitopes in several proteins, including Gag, Pol, Rev, and Nef, of which the Gag...

  11. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S; Rennert, Paul D; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C; Freed, Eric O; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-09-02

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors.

  12. Chronic HIV-1 infection frequently fails to protect against superinfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Piantadosi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Reports of HIV-1 superinfection (re-infection have demonstrated that the immune response generated against one strain of HIV-1 does not always protect against other strains. However, studies to determine the incidence of HIV-1 superinfection have yielded conflicting results. Furthermore, few studies have attempted to identify superinfection cases occurring more than a year after initial infection, a time when HIV-1-specific immune responses would be most likely to have developed. We screened a cohort of high-risk Kenyan women for HIV-1 superinfection by comparing partial gag and envelope sequences over a 5-y period beginning at primary infection. Among 36 individuals, we detected seven cases of superinfection, including cases in which both viruses belonged to the same HIV-1 subtype, subtype A. In five of these cases, the superinfecting strain was detected in only one of the two genome regions examined, suggesting that recombination frequently occurs following HIV-1 superinfection. In addition, we found that superinfection occurred throughout the course of the first infection: during acute infection in two cases, between 1-2 y after infection in three cases, and as late as 5 y after infection in two cases. Our results indicate that superinfection commonly occurs after the immune response against the initial infection has had time to develop and mature. Implications from HIV-1 superinfection cases, in which natural re-exposure leads to re-infection, will need to be considered in developing strategies for eliciting protective immunity to HIV-1.

  13. HIV Transmission in a State Prison System, 1988–2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafa, Krishna; McElroy, Peter; Fitzpatrick, Lisa; Borkowf, Craig B.; MacGowan, Robin; Margolis, Andrew; Robbins, Ken; Youngpairoj, Ae Saekhou; Stratford, Dale; Greenberg, Alan; Taussig, Jennifer; Shouse, R. Luke; LaMarre, Madeleine; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Heneine, Walid; Sullivan, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction HIV prevalence among state prison inmates in the United States is more than five times higher than among nonincarcerated persons, but HIV transmission within U.S. prisons is sparsely documented. We investigated 88 HIV seroconversions reported from 1988–2005 among male Georgia prison inmates. Methods We analyzed medical and administrative data to describe seroconverters' HIV testing histories and performed a case-crossover analysis of their risks before and after HIV diagnosis. We sequenced the gag, env, and pol genes of seroconverters' HIV strains to identify genetically-related HIV transmission clusters and antiretroviral resistance. We combined risk, genetic, and administrative data to describe prison HIV transmission networks. Results Forty-one (47%) seroconverters were diagnosed with HIV from July 2003–June 2005 when voluntary annual testing was offered. Seroconverters were less likely to report sex (OR [odds ratio] = 0.02, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 0–0.10) and tattooing (OR = 0.03, 95% CI: prison after their HIV diagnosis than before. Of 67 seroconverters' specimens tested, 33 (49%) fell into one of 10 genetically-related clusters; of these, 25 (76%) reported sex in prison before their HIV diagnosis. The HIV strains of 8 (61%) of 13 antiretroviral-naïve and 21 (40%) of 52 antiretroviral-treated seroconverters were antiretroviral-resistant. Discussion Half of all HIV seroconversions were identified when routine voluntary testing was offered, and seroconverters reduced their risks following their diagnosis. Most genetically-related seroconverters reported sex in prison, suggesting HIV transmission through sexual networks. Resistance testing before initiating antiretroviral therapy is important for newly-diagnosed inmates. PMID:19412547

  14. HIV transmission in a state prison system, 1988-2005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Jafa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: HIV prevalence among state prison inmates in the United States is more than five times higher than among nonincarcerated persons, but HIV transmission within U.S. prisons is sparsely documented. We investigated 88 HIV seroconversions reported from 1988-2005 among male Georgia prison inmates. METHODS: We analyzed medical and administrative data to describe seroconverters' HIV testing histories and performed a case-crossover analysis of their risks before and after HIV diagnosis. We sequenced the gag, env, and pol genes of seroconverters' HIV strains to identify genetically-related HIV transmission clusters and antiretroviral resistance. We combined risk, genetic, and administrative data to describe prison HIV transmission networks. RESULTS: Forty-one (47% seroconverters were diagnosed with HIV from July 2003-June 2005 when voluntary annual testing was offered. Seroconverters were less likely to report sex (OR [odds ratio] = 0.02, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 0-0.10 and tattooing (OR = 0.03, 95% CI: <0.01-0.20 in prison after their HIV diagnosis than before. Of 67 seroconverters' specimens tested, 33 (49% fell into one of 10 genetically-related clusters; of these, 25 (76% reported sex in prison before their HIV diagnosis. The HIV strains of 8 (61% of 13 antiretroviral-naïve and 21 (40% of 52 antiretroviral-treated seroconverters were antiretroviral-resistant. DISCUSSION: Half of all HIV seroconversions were identified when routine voluntary testing was offered, and seroconverters reduced their risks following their diagnosis. Most genetically-related seroconverters reported sex in prison, suggesting HIV transmission through sexual networks. Resistance testing before initiating antiretroviral therapy is important for newly-diagnosed inmates.

  15. HIV transmission in a state prison system, 1988-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafa, Krishna; McElroy, Peter; Fitzpatrick, Lisa; Borkowf, Craig B; Macgowan, Robin; Margolis, Andrew; Robbins, Ken; Youngpairoj, Ae Saekhou; Stratford, Dale; Greenberg, Alan; Taussig, Jennifer; Shouse, R Luke; Lamarre, Madeleine; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Heneine, Walid; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2009-01-01

    HIV prevalence among state prison inmates in the United States is more than five times higher than among nonincarcerated persons, but HIV transmission within U.S. prisons is sparsely documented. We investigated 88 HIV seroconversions reported from 1988-2005 among male Georgia prison inmates. We analyzed medical and administrative data to describe seroconverters' HIV testing histories and performed a case-crossover analysis of their risks before and after HIV diagnosis. We sequenced the gag, env, and pol genes of seroconverters' HIV strains to identify genetically-related HIV transmission clusters and antiretroviral resistance. We combined risk, genetic, and administrative data to describe prison HIV transmission networks. Forty-one (47%) seroconverters were diagnosed with HIV from July 2003-June 2005 when voluntary annual testing was offered. Seroconverters were less likely to report sex (OR [odds ratio] = 0.02, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 0-0.10) and tattooing (OR = 0.03, 95% CI: prison after their HIV diagnosis than before. Of 67 seroconverters' specimens tested, 33 (49%) fell into one of 10 genetically-related clusters; of these, 25 (76%) reported sex in prison before their HIV diagnosis. The HIV strains of 8 (61%) of 13 antiretroviral-naïve and 21 (40%) of 52 antiretroviral-treated seroconverters were antiretroviral-resistant. Half of all HIV seroconversions were identified when routine voluntary testing was offered, and seroconverters reduced their risks following their diagnosis. Most genetically-related seroconverters reported sex in prison, suggesting HIV transmission through sexual networks. Resistance testing before initiating antiretroviral therapy is important for newly-diagnosed inmates.

  16. Evaluation of dried blood spot protocols with the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA and Geenius™ HIV 1/2 Supplemental Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Davis, Geoff; Li, LiXia; Shriver, M Kathleen; Mei, Joanne; Styer, Linda M; Parker, Monica M; Smith, Amanda; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Ethridge, Steve; Wesolowski, Laura; Owen, S Michele; Masciotra, Silvina

    2017-06-01

    FDA-approved antigen/antibody combo and HIV-1/2 differentiation supplemental tests do not have claims for dried blood spot (DBS) use. We compared two DBS-modified protocols, the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab (BRC) EIA and Geenius™ HIV-1/2 (Geenius) Supplemental Assay, to plasma protocols and evaluated them in the CDC/APHL HIV diagnostic algorithm. BRC-DBS p24 analytical sensitivity was calculated from serial dilutions of p24. DBS specimens included 11 HIV-1 seroconverters, 151 HIV-1-positive individuals, including 20 on antiretroviral therapy, 31 HIV-2-positive and one HIV-1/HIV-2-positive individuals. BRC-reactive specimens were tested with Geenius using the same DBS eluate. Matched plasma specimens were tested with BRC, an IgG/IgM immunoassay and Geenius. DBS and plasma results were compared using the McNemar's test. A DBS-algorithm applied to 348 DBS from high-risk individuals who participated in surveillance was compared to HIV status based on local testing algorithms. BRC-DBS detects p24 at a concentration 18 times higher than in plasma. In seroconverters, BRC-DBS detected more infections than the IgG/IgM immunoassay in plasma (p=0.0133), but fewer infections than BRC-plasma (p=0.0133). In addition, the BRC/Geenius-plasma algorithm identified more HIV-1 infections than the BRC/Geenius-DBS algorithm (p=0.0455). The DBS protocols correctly identified HIV status for established HIV-1 infections, including those on therapy, HIV-2 infections, and surveillance specimens. The DBS protocols exhibited promising performance and allowed rapid supplemental testing. Although the DBS algorithm missed some early infections, it showed similar results when applied to specimens from a high-risk population. Implementation of a DBS algorithm would benefit testing programs without capacity for venipuncture. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Development of a Novel Screening Strategy Designed to Discover a New Class of HIV Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nancy; Lee, Sook-Kyung; Donover, P Scott; Reichman, Mel; Schiffer, Celia A; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Swanstrom, Ronald; Janzen, William P

    2014-06-01

    Current antiretroviral treatments target multiple pathways important for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) multiplication, including viral entry, synthesis and integration of the DNA provirus, and the processing of viral polyprotein precursors. However, HIV is becoming increasingly resistant to these "combination therapies." Recent findings show that inhibition of HIV Gag protein cleavage into its two structural proteins, matrix (MA) and capsid (CA), has a devastating effect on viral production, revealing a potential new target class for HIV treatment. Unlike the widely used HIV protease inhibitors, this new class of inhibitor would target the substrate, not the protease enzyme itself. This approach offers a distinct advantage in that inhibitors of MA/CA would only need to affect a subset of the Gag molecules to disable viral replication. To discover MA/CA-specific inhibitors, we constructed a modified MA/CA fusion peptide (MA/CAΔ) that contains the HIV protease (PR) cleavage site as well as a tetracysteine motif for fluorescent labeling. The HIV PR cleavage of MA/CAΔ can then be monitored via fluorescence polarization (FP). We have adapted this FP assay for high-throughput screening and validated it according to industry standards using a 384-well plate format. We have currently tested 24,000 compounds in this assay and here detail the screening methodology and the results of this screening campaign. © 2013 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  18. Does antiretroviral treatment change HIV-1 codon usage patterns in its genes: a preliminary bioinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Navaneethan; Osman, Nathan; Ohnona, Frédéric; Xu, Hong-Tao; Brenner, Bluma; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2017-01-07

    Codon usage bias has been described for various organisms and is thought to contribute to the regulation of numerous biological processes including viral infections. HIV-1 codon usage has been previously shown to be different from that of other viruses and man. It is evident that the antiretroviral drugs used to restrict HIV-1 replication also select for resistance variants. We wanted to test whether codon frequencies in HIV-1 sequences from treatment-experienced patients differ from those of treatment-naive individuals due to drug pressure affecting codon usage bias. We developed a JavaScript to determine the codon frequencies of aligned nucleotide sequences. Irrespective of subtypes, using HIV-1 pol sequences from 532 treatment-naive and 52 treatment-experienced individuals, we found that pol sequences from treatment-experienced patients had significantly increased AGA (arginine; p = 0.0002***) and GGU (glycine; p = 0.0001***), and decreased AGG (arginine; p = 0.0001***) codon frequencies. The same pattern was not observed when subtypes B and C sequences were analyzed separately. Additionally, irrespective of subtypes, using HIV-1 gag sequences from 524 treatment-naive and 54 treatment-experienced individuals, gag sequences from treatment-experienced patients had significantly increased CUA (leucine; p HIV-1 genome, we show that antiretroviral therapy changed certain HIV-1 codon frequencies in a subtype specific way.

  19. Differential effect of CLK SR Kinases on HIV-1 gene expression: potential novel targets for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobson Wendy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA processing plays a critical role in the replication of HIV-1, regulated in part through the action of host SR proteins. To explore the impact of modulating SR protein activity on virus replication, the effect of increasing or inhibiting the activity of the Cdc2-like kinase (CLK family of SR protein kinases on HIV-1 expression and RNA processing was examined. Results Despite their high homology, increasing individual CLK expression had distinct effects on HIV-1, CLK1 enhancing Gag production while CLK2 inhibited the virus. Parallel studies on the anti-HIV-1 activity of CLK inhibitors revealed a similar discrepant effect on HIV-1 expression. TG003, an inhibitor of CLK1, 2 and 4, had no effect on viral Gag synthesis while chlorhexidine, a CLK2, 3 and 4 inhibitor, blocked virus production. Chlorhexidine treatment altered viral RNA processing, decreasing levels of unspliced and single spliced viral RNAs, and reduced Rev accumulation. Subsequent experiments in the context of HIV-1 replication in PBMCs confirmed the capacity of chlorhexidine to suppress virus replication. Conclusions Together, these findings establish that HIV-1 RNA processing can be targeted to suppress virus replication as demonstrated by manipulating individual CLK function and identified chlorhexidine as a lead compound in the development of novel anti-viral therapies.

  20. Induction of novel CD8+ T-cell responses during chronic untreated HIV-1 infection by immunization with subdominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloverpris, Henrik; Karlsson, Ingrid; Bonde, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the potential to induce additional cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) immunity during chronic HIV-1 infection. DESIGN:: We selected infrequently targeted or subdominant but conserved HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes in Gag, Pol, Env, Vpu and Vif. These relatively immune silent epi...... lead to stronger and more durable cellular responses to selected epitopes with the potential to control viral replication and prevent disease in HIV-1-infected individuals....

  1. HIV-1 vaccines based on replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia protected Chinese rhesus macaques from simian HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Li, Yue; Luo, Zhenwu; Yang, Guibo; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Sun, Maosheng; Dai, Jiejie; Li, Qihan; Qin, Chuan; Shao, Yiming

    2015-03-27

    To assess the efficacy of HIV vaccines constructed from replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia virus (rTV) alone or combined with DNA in protecting Chinese rhesus macaques from homologous Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV)-CN97001 challenge. The nef, gag, pol, and gp140 genes from strain CRF07_BC HIV-1 CN54 were selected to construct an HIV vaccine using the rTV or rTV/DNA vaccine. After vaccination, the vaccine and control groups were intravenously challenged with SHIV-CN97001 (32 MID50). HIV-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, gp70 V1V2 binding antibodies, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses were measured prospectively after vaccination with an ELISA, a virus infectivity assay in TZM-bl cells, and ELISPOT assays, respectively. Viral RNA was quantified after challenge with real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and protection efficacy was determined with an analysis of CD8 lymphocyte depletion in vivo. Both rTV and DNA/rTV vaccine groups developed strong cellular and humoral responses against HIV-1 CN54 antigens, including Gag and Env, and also developed significant and persistent anti-Env antibodies and neutralizing antibodies after immunization. Both the rTV and DNA/rTV groups were significantly protected against SHIV-CN97001 or displayed lower viremia than the controls. After CD8 lymphocyte depletion, no viremia was detectable in the vaccinated monkeys, but rebounded rapidly in the control animals. Protection against infection correlated with vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies specific for homologous HIV-1 viruses. An rTV-based HIV-1 vaccine, with or without a DNA primer, provided protection from SHIV challenge in a macaque model. Replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia is a promising vector and should enable advances in HIV-1 vaccine development.

  2. BioAfrica's HIV-1 Proteomics Resource: Combining protein data with bioinformatics tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Michelle

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most Internet online resources for investigating HIV biology contain either bioinformatics tools, protein information or sequence data. The objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive online proteomics resource that integrates bioinformatics with the latest information on HIV-1 protein structure, gene expression, post-transcriptional/post-translational modification, functional activity, and protein-macromolecule interactions. The BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteomics Resource http://bioafrica.mrc.ac.za/proteomics/index.html is a website that contains detailed information about the HIV-1 proteome and protease cleavage sites, as well as data-mining tools that can be used to manipulate and query protein sequence data, a BLAST tool for initiating structural analyses of HIV-1 proteins, and a proteomics tools directory. The Proteome section contains extensive data on each of 19 HIV-1 proteins, including their functional properties, a sample analysis of HIV-1HXB2, structural models and links to other online resources. The HIV-1 Protease Cleavage Sites section provides information on the position, subtype variation and genetic evolution of Gag, Gag-Pol and Nef cleavage sites. The HIV-1 Protein Data-mining Tool includes a set of 27 group M (subtypes A through K reference sequences that can be used to assess the influence of genetic variation on immunological and functional domains of the protein. The BLAST Structure Tool identifies proteins with similar, experimentally determined topologies, and the Tools Directory provides a categorized list of websites and relevant software programs. This combined database and software repository is designed to facilitate the capture, retrieval and analysis of HIV-1 protein data, and to convert it into clinically useful information relating to the pathogenesis, transmission and therapeutic response of different HIV-1 variants. The HIV-1 Proteomics Resource is readily accessible through the BioAfrica website at

  3. Expansion and productive HIV-1 infection of Foxp3 positive CD4 T cells at pleural sites of HIV/TB co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Christina S; Baseke, Joy; Kafuluma, John Lusiba; Nserko, Mary; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Toossi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T-cells expressing Foxp3 are expanded systemically during active tuberculosis (TB) regardless of HIV-1 co-infection. Foxp3+ CD4 T cells are targets of HIV-1 infection. However, expansion of HIV-1 infected Foxp3+ CD4 T cells at sites of HIV/TB co-infection, and whether they contribute to promotion of HIV-1 viral activity is not known. Pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMC) from HIV/TB co-infected patients with pleural TB were characterized by immune-staining and FACS analysis for surface markers CD4, CD127, CCR5, CXCR4, HLA-DR and intracellular expression of Foxp3, HIVp24, IFN-γ and Bcl-2. Whole PFMC and bead separated CD4+CD25+CD127- T cells were assessed for HIV-1 LTR strong stop (SS) DNA by real-time PCR, which represents viral DNA post cell entry and initiation of reverse transcription. High numbers of HIV-1 p24 positive Foxp3+ and Foxp3+CD127- CD4 T cells were identified in PFMC from HIV/TB co-infected subjects. CD4+Foxp3+CD127- T cells displayed high expression of the cellular activation marker, HLA-DR. Further, expression of the HIV-1 co-receptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, were higher on CD4+Foxp3+T cells compared to CD4+Foxp3- T cells. Purified CD4+CD25+CD127- T cells isolated from PFMC of HIV/TB co-infected patients, were over 90% CD4+Foxp3+T cells, and exhibited higher HIV-1 SS DNA as compared to whole PFMC, and as compared to CD4+CD25+CD127- T cells from an HIV-infected subject with pleural mesothelioma. HIV-1 p24+ Foxp3+ CD4+T cells from HIV/TB patients higher in Bcl-2 expression as compared to both HIV-1 p24+ Foxp3- CD4 T cells, and Foxp3+ CD4+T cells without HIV-p24 expression. Foxp3+ CD4 T cells in PFMC from HIV/TB co-infected subjects are predisposed to productive HIV-1 infection and have survival advantage as compared to Foxp3 negative CD4 T cells.

  4. Towards targeted screening for acute HIV infections in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Malcolm; Cook, Darrel A; Gilbert, Mark; Krajden, Mel; Haag, Devon; Tsang, Peggy; Wong, Elsie; Brooks, James I; Merks, Harriet; Rekart, Michael L

    2011-08-09

    Our objective was to describe the characteristics of acute and established HIV infections diagnosed in the Canadian province of British Columbia. Province-wide HIV testing and surveillance data were analyzed to inform recommendations for targeted use of screening algorithms to detect acute HIV infections. Acute HIV infection was defined as a confirmed reactive HIV p24 antigen test (or HIV nucleic acid test), a non-reactive or reactive HIV EIA screening test and a non-reactive or indeterminate Western Blot. Characteristics of unique individuals were identified from the British Columbia HIV/AIDS Surveillance System. Primary drug resistance and HIV subtypes were identified by analyzing HIV pol sequences from residual sera from newly infected individuals. From February 2006 to October 2008, 61 individuals met the acute HIV infection case definition, representing 6.2% of the 987 newly diagnosed HIV infections during the analysis period. Acute HIV infection cases were more likely to be men who have sex with men (crude OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.01-2.89], to have had a documented previous negative HIV test result (crude OR 2.89; 95% CI 1.52-5.51), and to have reported a reason for testing due to suspected seroconversion symptoms (crude OR 5.16; 95% CI 2.88-9.23). HIV subtypes and rates of transmitted drug resistance across all classes of drugs were similar in persons with both acute and established HIV infections. Targeted screening to detect acute HIV infection is a logical public health response to the HIV epidemic. Our findings suggest that acute HIV infection screening strategies, in our setting, are helpful for early diagnosis in men who have sex with men, in persons with seroconversion symptoms and in previously negative repeat testers.

  5. Performance comparison of the 4th generation Bio-Rad Laboratories GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA on the EVOLIS™ automated system versus Abbott ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo, Ortho Anti-HIV 1+2 EIA on Vitros ECi and Siemens HIV-1/O/2 enhanced on Advia Centaur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Elizabeth O; Stewart, Greg; Bajzik, Olivier; Ferret, Mathieu; Bentsen, Christopher; Shriver, M Kathleen

    2013-12-01

    A multisite study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the Bio-Rad 4th generation GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA versus Abbott 4th generation ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo. The performance of two 3rd generation EIAs, Ortho Diagnostics Anti-HIV 1+2 EIA and Siemens HIV 1/O/2 was also evaluated. Study objective was comparison of analytical HIV-1 p24 antigen detection, sensitivity in HIV-1 seroconversion panels, specificity in blood donors and two HIV false reactive panels. Analytical sensitivity was evaluated with International HIV-1 p24 antigen standards, the AFFSAPS (pg/mL) and WHO 90/636 (IU/mL) standards; sensitivity in acute infection was compared on 55 seroconversion samples, and specificity was evaluated on 1000 negative blood donors and two false reactive panels. GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab demonstrated better analytical HIV antigen sensitivity compared to ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo: 0.41 IU/mL versus 1.2 IU/mL (WHO) and 12.7 pg/mL versus 20.1 pg/mL (AFSSAPS); GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA also demonstrated slightly better specificity compared to ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo (100% versus 99.7%). The 4th generation HIV Combo tests detected seroconversion 7-11 days earlier than the 3rd generation HIV antibody only EIAs. Both 4th generation immunoassays demonstrated excellent performance in sensitivity, with the reduction of the serological window period (7-11 days earlier detection than the 3rd generation HIV tests). However, GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab demonstrated improved HIV antigen analytical sensitivity and slightly better specificity when compared to ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay, with higher positive predictive values (PPV) for low prevalence populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Symptomatic HIV infection in infancy - clinical and laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    polymerase chain reaction (PCR). viral culture. p24 antigen) the presence of infection can usually be reliably .... used, except where the expected cell values were less than. 5. (Fisher's exact test was used in these cases.) .... Overall, the clinical presentations of the patients who were. HIV seropositive was similar to those who ...

  7. EDITORIAL DIAGNOSIS OF PAEDIATRIC HIV/AIDS The human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other groups are currently assessing some less expensive laboratory approaches such as a boosted p24 antigen assay. Accurately diagnosing early, asymptomatic HIV infection in children remains of utmost importance and is impossible to do clinically. Diagnosing ...

  8. HIV Diagnosis and Treatment through Advanced Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfiqar, Hafiza Fizzah; Javed, Aneeqa; Sumbal; Afroze, Bakht; Ali, Qurban; Akbar, Khadija; Nadeem, Tariq; Rana, Muhammad Adeel; Nazar, Zaheer Ahmad; Nasir, Idrees Ahmad; Husnain, Tayyab

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the chief contributor to global burden of disease. In 2010, HIV was the fifth leading cause of disability-adjusted life years in people of all ages and leading cause for people aged 30-44 years. It is classified as a member of the family Retroviridae and genus Lentivirus based on the biological, morphological, and genetic properties. It infects different cells of the immune system, such as CD4+ T cells (T-helper cells), dendritic cells, and macrophages. HIV has two subtypes: HIV-1 and HIV-2. Among these strains, HIV-1 is the most virulent and pathogenic. Advanced diagnostic methods are exploring new ways of treatment and contributing in the reduction of HIV cases. The diagnostic techniques like PCR, rapid test, EIA, p24 antigen, and western blot have markedly upgraded the diagnosis of HIV. Antiretroviral therapy and vaccines are promising candidates in providing therapeutic and preventive regimes, respectively. Invention of CRISPR/Cas9 is a breakthrough in the field of HIV disease management.

  9. HIV Diagnosis and Treatment through Advanced Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiza Fizzah Zulfiqar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the chief contributor to global burden of disease. In 2010, HIV was the fifth leading cause of disability-adjusted life years in people of all ages and leading cause for people aged 30–44 years. It is classified as a member of the family Retroviridae and genus Lentivirus based on the biological, morphological, and genetic properties. It infects different cells of the immune system, such as CD4+ T cells (T-helper cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages. HIV has two subtypes: HIV-1 and HIV-2. Among these strains, HIV-1 is the most virulent and pathogenic. Advanced diagnostic methods are exploring new ways of treatment and contributing in the reduction of HIV cases. The diagnostic techniques like PCR, rapid test, EIA, p24 antigen, and western blot have markedly upgraded the diagnosis of HIV. Antiretroviral therapy and vaccines are promising candidates in providing therapeutic and preventive regimes, respectively. Invention of CRISPR/Cas9 is a breakthrough in the field of HIV disease management.

  10. HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Collapse All Is abstinence the only 100% effective HIV prevention option? Yes. Abstinence means not having oral, ...

  11. HIV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... All Collapse All Should I get tested for HIV? CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of ...

  12. Bulk culture levels of specific cytotoxic T-cell activity against HIV-1 proteins are not associated with risk of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aladdin, H; Ullum, H; Lepri, A Cozzi

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to control and influence the outcome of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is not fully understood. The association between HIV-CTL activity and disease progression was evaluated prospectively in 36 HIV-1-infected individuals with a median...... follow-up of 3.0 years. HIV-CTL activity was measured in a 4 h Cr* release assay using autologous target cells expressing HIV-1 BRU isolate gene products (gp-120, gag, pol, nef) and a bulk culture of autologous effector cells. The CD4 count was measured at enrolment and plasma HIV RNA was measured...... retrospectively. The present study failed to support the hypothesis that HIV-CTL activity, as measured using the present method, is important in reducing the risk of death in HIV-infected individuals. However, using other approaches and methods could possibly yield other conclusions, and further prospective...

  13. The HIV-1 Rev/RRE system is required for HIV-1 5' UTR cis elements to augment encapsidation of heterologous RNA into HIV-1 viral particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Hong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA encapsidation is governed by a number of viral encoded components, most notably the Gag protein and gRNA cis elements in the canonical packaging signal (ψ. Also implicated in encapsidation are cis determinants in the R, U5, and PBS (primer binding site from the 5' untranslated region (UTR. Although conventionally associated with nuclear export of HIV-1 RNA, there is a burgeoning role for the Rev/RRE in the encapsidation process. Pleiotropic effects exhibited by these cis and trans viral components may confound the ability to examine their independent, and combined, impact on encapsidation of RNA into HIV-1 viral particles in their innate viral context. We systematically reconstructed the HIV-1 packaging system in the context of a heterologous murine leukemia virus (MLV vector RNA to elucidate a mechanism in which the Rev/RRE system is central to achieving efficient and specific encapsidation into HIV-1 viral particles. Results We show for the first time that the Rev/RRE system can augment RNA encapsidation independent of all cis elements from the 5' UTR (R, U5, PBS, and ψ. Incorporation of all the 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance RNA encapsidation in the absence of the Rev/RRE system. In fact, we demonstrate that the Rev/RRE system is required for specific and efficient encapsidation commonly associated with the canonical packaging signal. The mechanism of Rev/RRE-mediated encapsidation is not a general phenomenon, since the combination of the Rev/RRE system and 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance encapsidation into MLV-derived viral particles. Lastly, we show that heterologous MLV RNAs conform to transduction properties commonly associated with HIV-1 viral particles, including in vivo transduction of non-dividing cells (i.e. mouse neurons; however, the cDNA forms are episomes predominantly in the 1-LTR circle form. Conclusions Premised on encapsidation of a heterologous RNA into

  14. [Screening of HIV in blood banks. Evaluation of fourth generation kits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canna, Fernando; Treviño, Elena; Domínguez, Claudia; Gastaldello, Rene; Barbas, Gabriela; Cudola, Analia; Irizar, Marta; Bepre, Hector; Gallego, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Use of detection tests for p24 HIV antigen (p24Ag) in blood banks in Argentina is recommended by the Argentinean Society of Hemotherapy and Immunohematology. In the blood bank of the National University of Cordoba (Argentina), the recent implementation of the p24Ag screening test has considerably increased the cost of the battery of screening tests and its use in all blood donations has not produced the benefits expected. A 4th generation EIA was evaluated for the screening of HIV in comparison with the currently used assays in the blood bank of National University of Cordoba (3rd generation EIA + p24Ag assay). For this comparison, 11 serum samples from subjects with early HIV infection (early seroconversion period) were tested, as well as 27 serum samples from asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects and other 39 from non-HIV infected subjects. The 3rd generation EIA and the 4th generation EIA showed the same sensitivity value (100%) but the specificity of the 3rd generation EIA was higher (97.5%) comparing with 4th generation (95.1%). Besides, the p24Ag test failed to detect 2 samples from subjects with early HIV infection. These results indicate a good performance of both 3rd and 4th generation assays for screening of HIV. However, due to the lowest cost of 4th generation EIA kit, it could replace the currently used assays for HIV screening in regional blood banks. This screening assay will lead to gain in effectiveness and reduced costs until the detection of HIV RNA can be implemented in blood banks.

  15. Autocrine production of beta-chemokines protects CMV-Specific CD4 T cells from HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Casazza

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Induction of a functional subset of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells that is resistant to HIV infection could enhance immune protection and decrease the rate of HIV disease progression. CMV-specific CD4+ T cells, which are less frequently infected than HIV-specific CD4+ T cells, are a model for such an effect. To determine the mechanism of this protection, we compared the functional response of HIV gag-specific and CMV pp65-specific CD4+ T cells in individuals co-infected with CMV and HIV. We found that CMV-specific CD4+ T cells rapidly up-regulated production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta mRNA, resulting in a rapid increase in production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta after cognate antigen stimulation. Production of beta-chemokines was associated with maturational phenotype and was rarely seen in HIV-specific CD4+ T cells. To test whether production of beta-chemokines by CD4+ T cells lowers their susceptibility to HIV infection, we measured cell-associated Gag DNA to assess the in vivo infection history of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells. We found that CMV-specific CD4+ T cells which produced MIP-1beta contained 10 times less Gag DNA than did those which failed to produce MIP-1beta. These data suggest that CD4+ T cells which produce MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta bind these chemokines in an autocrine fashion which decreases the risk of in vivo HIV infection.

  16. Validation of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay for screening and reliable early detection of HIV-1 infection in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chuan Min; Cho, Yunjung; Ng, Kee Peng; Han, Xiaoxu; Oh, Eun-Jee; Zainah, Saat; Rozainanee, Mohd Zain; Wang, Lan Lan

    2013-09-01

    The Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay was developed to allow earlier detection of HIV infection with increased sensitivity and specificity. To validate the assay for screening and reliable early detection of HIV-1 infection in Asia. Samples tested reflected those routinely screened in Asia and comprised: HIV-1 antigen lysate (25 samples) and antibody (20 samples) dilutions; seven HIV-1 seroconversion panels (46 samples); 39 patient samples from early infection; 183 known-positive sera; HIV-1 p24 antigen sensitivity panel (seven samples); >500 routine clinical samples per center. The Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay was compared with fourth- (ADVIA Centaur® HIV combo, ARCHITECT® HIV combo, Elecsys® HIV combi) and third-generation (VIRONOSTIKA® HIV Uni-Form II Plus O, Zhuhai Livzon Anti-HIV EIA, Serodia® Particle Agglutination) assays commonly used in the region. Overall, the Elecsys® HIV combi PT showed superior or similar sensitivity to the comparators for detecting all subtypes. The assay correctly identified all positive samples, including those taken soon after infection, and detected seroconversion at a similar or shorter time interval than the comparators. The analytical sensitivity of Elecsys® HIV combi PT for HIV-1 p24 antigen was 0.90 IU/mL, which was lower than reported previously. The assay showed good specificity (99.86%) that was superior or equivalent to the other fourth-generation assays tested. These robust data demonstrate the good subtype inclusivity of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay and its suitability for screening and reliable early detection of HIV infection in Asia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Viral linkage in HIV-1 seroconverters and their partners in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary S Campbell

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of viruses in HIV-1 transmission pairs will help identify biological determinants of infectiousness and evaluate candidate interventions to reduce transmission. Although HIV-1 sequencing is frequently used to substantiate linkage between newly HIV-1 infected individuals and their sexual partners in epidemiologic and forensic studies, viral sequencing is seldom applied in HIV-1 prevention trials. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00194519 was a prospective randomized placebo-controlled trial that enrolled serodiscordant heterosexual couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression in reducing HIV-1 transmission; as part of the study analysis, HIV-1 sequences were examined for genetic linkage between seroconverters and their enrolled partners.We obtained partial consensus HIV-1 env and gag sequences from blood plasma for 151 transmission pairs and performed deep sequencing of env in some cases. We analyzed sequences with phylogenetic techniques and developed a Bayesian algorithm to evaluate the probability of linkage. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between enrolled partners' sequences and a Bayesian posterior probability of ≥ 50%. Adjudicators classified each seroconversion, finding 108 (71.5% linked, 40 (26.5% unlinked, and 3 (2.0% indeterminate transmissions, with linkage determined by consensus env sequencing in 91 (84%. Male seroconverters had a higher frequency of unlinked transmissions than female seroconverters. The likelihood of transmission from the enrolled partner was related to time on study, with increasing numbers of unlinked transmissions occurring after longer observation periods. Finally, baseline viral load was found to be significantly higher among linked transmitters.In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner

  18. HIV-1 diversity, drug-resistant mutations, and viral evolution among high-risk individuals in phase II HIV vaccine trial sites in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Qi

    Full Text Available HIV-1 prevalence in Guangxi, China, has been growing since 1996, when the first case was reported. Over half of HIV-1 positive patients in Guangxi Province were injecting drug users (IDUs, possibly because of the province's location near drug-trafficking routes. Since a phase II HIV vaccine trial is ongoing there, a current characterization of the subtypes of HIV-1 among IDUs in Guangxi would provide critical information for future HIV vaccine trials, as well as further control and prevention of HIV-1 transmission. Thus, we conducted a molecular epidemiological investigation of HIV-1 samples from 2008-2010 among IDUs in multiple cities in Guangxi Province. Our results, based on the gag/pol fragment, indicated a very high proportion (78.47% of HIV-1 CRF08_BC recombinants, some CRF01_AE (15.38% recombinants, and a low proportion of CRF07_BC (6.15% recombinants among the IDUs. The high proportion of CRF08 HIV-1 strains among recent IDUs matches the vaccine candidate constructs. However, future vaccine development should also incorporate CRF01-targeted vaccine candidates. Distinct Env sequence evolution patterns were observed for CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE, indicating that different local selection pressures have been exerted on these two HIV-1 subtypes. Unique drug-resistant mutations were also detected, and our data indicate that HIV treatment programs should consider pre-existing drug-resistant mutations.

  19. Genetic structure of the endogenous proviruses and expression of the gag gene in Brown Leghorn chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, A V; Korec, E; Chernov, M V; Tikhonenko, A T; Obukh, I B; Hlozánek, I

    1986-01-01

    Seven loci of endogenous proviruses were detected in the genome of Brown Leghorn chickens. Sets of endogenous proviruses in DNA of the chicken embryos examined were identified by blot hybridization with 32P-labelled DNA of RSV and EcoRI restriction endonuclease digestion. Comparison of the results showed that only one locus (A) of endogeneous provirus was associated with a gs+ phenotype as determined by the immunoperoxidase reaction and antibodies against gag gene products of RSV. Restriction endonuclease analysis with HindIII, BamHI and SacI revealed that proviruses A and F in Brown Leghorn chickens correspond to loci ev-3 and ev-6, respectively, in White Leghorn chickens. Other loci (B, C, D, E, and X) were designated ev-22, ev-23, ev-24, ev-25, ev-26, respectively. None of these loci expressed infectious virions. The structure of most of the endogenous proviruses examined is considerably different from the genome of the endogenous chicken virus RAV-O. The difference in structure may be one possible cause of the absence of endogenous provirus expression.

  20. The generation of biomolecular patterns in highly porous collagen-GAG scaffolds using direct photolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Teresa A; Caliari, Steven R; Williford, Paul D; Harley, Brendan A; Bailey, Ryan C

    2011-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex organization of structural proteins found within tissues and organs. Heterogeneous tissues with spatially and temporally modulated properties play an important role in organism physiology. Here we present a benzophenone (BP) based direct, photolithographic approach to spatially pattern solution phase biomolecules within collagen-GAG (CG) scaffolds and demonstrate creation of a wide range of patterns composed of multiple biomolecular species in a manner independent from scaffold fabrication steps. We demonstrate the ability to immobilize biomolecules at surface densities of up to 1000 ligands per square micron on the scaffold strut surface and to depths limited by the penetration depth of the excitation source into the scaffold structure. Importantly, while BP photopatterning does further crosslink the CG scaffold, evidenced by increased mechanical properties and collagen crystallinity, it does not affect scaffold microstructural or compositional properties or negatively influence cell adhesion, viability, or proliferation. We show that covalently photoimmobilized fibronectin within a CG scaffold significantly increases the speed of MC3T3-E1 cell attachment relative to the bare CG scaffold or non-specifically adsorbed fibronectin, suggesting that this approach can be used to improve scaffold bioactivity. Our findings, on the whole, establish the use of direct, BP photolithography as a methodology for covalently incorporating activity-improving biochemical cues within 3D collagen biomaterial scaffolds with spatial control over biomolecular deposition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preclinical development of the green tea catechin, epigallocatechin gallate, as an HIV-1 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Christina L; Siwak, Edward B; Shearer, William T

    2009-02-01

    Previously, we presented evidence that at physiologic concentrations the green tea catechin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), inhibited attachment of HIV-1 glycoprotein 120 to the CD4 molecule on T cells, but the downstream effects of EGCG on HIV-1 infectivity were not determined. To evaluate the inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by EGCG and begin preclinical development of EGCG as a possible therapy. PBMCs, CD4(+) T cells, and macrophages were isolated from blood of HIV-1-uninfected donors. HIV-1 infectivity was assessed by an HIV-1 p24 ELISA. Cell survival was assessed by cell viability by Trypan blue exclusion assay, cell growth by thymidine incorporation, and apoptosis by flow-cytometric analysis of annexin-V binding. Epigallocatechin gallate inhibited HIV-1 infectivity on human CD4(+) T cells and macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. At a physiologic concentration of 6 mumol/L, EGCG significantly inhibited HIV-1 p24 antigen production across a broad spectrum of both HIV-1 clinical isolates and laboratory-adapted subtypes (B [P < .001], C, D, and G [P < .01]). The specificity of the EGCG-induced inhibition was substantiated by the failure of EGCG derivatives lacking galloyl and/or pyrogallol side groups to alter HIV-1 p24 levels. EGCG-induced inhibition of HV-1 infectivity was not a result of cytotoxicity, cell growth inhibition, or apoptosis. We conclude that by preventing the attachment of HIV-1-glycoprotein 120 to the CD4 molecule, EGCG inhibits HIV-1 infectivity. Because this inhibition can be achieved at physiologic concentrations, the natural anti-HIV agent EGCG is a candidate as an alternative therapy in HIV-1 therapy.

  2. The Life-Cycle of the HIV-1 Gag–RNA Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Mailler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replication is a highly regulated process requiring the recruitment of viral and cellular components to the plasma membrane for assembly into infectious particles. This review highlights the recent process of understanding the selection of the genomic RNA (gRNA by the viral Pr55Gag precursor polyprotein, and the processes leading to its incorporation into viral particles.

  3. Assessment of HIV-1 entry inhibitors by MLV/HIV-1 pseudotyped vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaler Sonja

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murine leukemia virus (MLV vector particles can be pseudotyped with a truncated variant of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope protein (Env and selectively target gene transfer to human cells expressing both CD4 and an appropriate co-receptor. Vector transduction mimics the HIV-1 entry process and is therefore a safe tool to study HIV-1 entry. Results Using FLY cells, which express the MLV gag and pol genes, we generated stable producer cell lines that express the HIV-1 envelope gene and a retroviral vector genome encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP. The BH10 or 89.6 P HIV-1 Env was expressed from a bicistronic vector which allowed the rapid selection of stable cell lines. A codon-usage-optimized synthetic env gene permitted high, Rev-independent Env expression. Vectors generated by these producer cells displayed different sensitivity to entry inhibitors. Conclusion These data illustrate that MLV/HIV-1 vectors are a valuable screening system for entry inhibitors or neutralizing antisera generated by vaccines.

  4. Damaging the Integrated HIV Proviral DNA with TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy L Strong

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrates its proviral DNA genome into the host genome, presenting barriers for virus eradication. Several new gene-editing technologies have emerged that could potentially be used to damage integrated proviral DNA. In this study, we use transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the transactivation response element (TAR of the HIV-1 proviral DNA. We demonstrated that TALENs cleave a DNA template with the HIV-1 proviral target site in vitro. A GFP reporter, under control of HIV-1 TAR, was efficiently inactivated by mutations introduced by transfection of TALEN plasmids. When infected cells containing the full-length integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA were transfected with TALENs, the TAR region accumulated indels. When one of these mutants was tested, the mutated HIV-1 proviral DNA was incapable of producing detectable Gag expression. TALEN variants engineered for degenerate recognition of select nucleotide positions also cleaved proviral DNA in vitro and the full-length integrated proviral DNA genome in living cells. These results suggest a possible design strategy for the therapeutic considerations of incomplete target sequence conservation and acquired resistance mutations. We have established a new strategy for damaging integrated HIV proviral DNA that may have future potential for HIV-1 proviral DNA eradication.

  5. From Shelf to Shelf: Assessing Historical and Contemporary Genetic Differentiation and Connectivity across the Gulf of Mexico in Gag, Mycteroperca microlepis: e0120676

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nathaniel K Jue; Thierry Brulé; Felicia C Coleman; Christopher C Koenig

    2015-01-01

    ... of the epinephelid fish, Gag, Mycteroperca microlepis, an important fishery species, are genetically connected across the Gulf of Mexico and if so, whether that connectivity is attributable to either contemporary...

  6. Alcohol and cannabinoids differentially affect HIV infection and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela eAgudelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC. However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%, THC (5 and 10 uM, or JWH-015 (5 and 10 uM for 4-7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV+EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV+JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV+THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection.

  7. eEF2 and Ras-GAP SH3 domain-binding protein (G3BP1) modulate stress granule assembly during HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Melnychuk, Luca; Vyboh, Kishanda; Ajamian, Lara; Gallouzi, Imed Eddine; Bernard, Nicole; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SG) are translationally silent sites of RNA triage induced by environmental stresses including viral infection. Here we show that HIV-1 Gag blocks SG assembly irrespective of eIF2α-phosphorylation and even when SG assembly is forced by overexpression of Ras-GAP SH3 domain-binding protein (G3BP1) or TIAR. The overexposed loops in the N-terminal Capsid domain of Gag and host eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) are found to be critical for the SG blockade via interaction. Moreover, Cyclophilin A (CypA) stabilizes the Gag-eEF2 association. eEF2 depletion not only lifts the SG blockade but also results in impaired virus production and infectivity. Gag also disassembles pre-formed SGs by recruiting G3BP1 thereby displacing eEF2, revealing another unsuspected virus-host interaction involved in this mechanism. Understanding how HIV-1 counters anti-viral stress responses will lay the groundwork for new therapeutic strategies to bolster host cell immune defences against HIV-1 and other pathogens. PMID:25229650

  8. Single-Cell Characterization of Viral Translation-Competent Reservoirs in HIV-Infected Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Amy E; Niessl, Julia; Fromentin, Rémi; Richard, Jonathan; Porichis, Filippos; Charlebois, Roxanne; Massanella, Marta; Brassard, Nathalie; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Delgado, Gloria-Gabrielle; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Walker, Bruce D; Finzi, Andrés; Chomont, Nicolas; Kaufmann, Daniel E

    2016-09-14

    HIV cure efforts are hampered by limited characterization of the cells supporting HIV replication in vivo and inadequate methods for quantifying the latent viral reservoir in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. We combine fluorescent in situ RNA hybridization with detection of HIV protein and flow cytometry, enabling detection of 0.5-1 gag-pol mRNA(+)/Gag protein(+)-infected cells per million. In the peripheral blood of untreated persons, active HIV replication correlated with viremia and occurred in CD4 T cells expressing T follicular helper cell markers and inhibitory co-receptors. In virally suppressed subjects, the approach identified latently infected cells capable of producing HIV mRNA and protein after stimulation with PMA/ionomycin and latency-reversing agents (LRAs). While ingenol-induced reactivation mirrored the effector and central/transitional memory CD4 T cell contribution to the pool of integrated HIV DNA, bryostatin-induced reactivation occurred predominantly in cells expressing effector memory markers. This indicates that CD4 T cell differentiation status differentially affects LRA effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Development and assessment of a new test for verification of tests for HIV-infection markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, E N; Sharipova, I N; Kudriavtseva, E N; Lobanova, O A; Puzyrev, V F; Riabinina, S A; Burkov, A N; Obriadina, A P; Ulanova, T I

    2008-03-01

    The OOO "Research-and-Production Association "Diagnostic Systems" has developed a "DC-EIA-HIV-AT/AG-SPECTRUM" screening enzyme immunoassay system designed to detect separately antibodies to certain HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteins, as well as antigen p24. The determination of antibodies of all classes and the marker of early-stage infection antigen p24 with a high (5 pg/ml) sensitivity substantially reduces the number of void results obtained in the use of immunoblots. The developed "DC-EIA-HIV-AT/AG-SPECTRUM" plate system is an effective tool to support positive screening results and may be used at the final stage of laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection.

  10. Cell type specificity and structural determinants of IRES activity from the 5' leaders of different HIV-1 transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2013-07-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are important regulators of gene expression, but their diverse molecular mechanisms remain partially understood. The HIV-1 gag transcript leader contains an IRES that may be a good model for understanding the function of many other IRESs. We investigated the possibility that this IRES' function is linked to both the structure of the RNA and its cellular environment. We find that in the context of a bicistronic reporter construct, HIV-1 gag IRES' activity is cell type-specific, with higher activity in T-cell culture systems that model the natural target cells for HIV-1 infection. This finding underscores how an IRES may be fine tuned to function in certain cells, perhaps owing to cell type-specific protein factors. Using RNA probing and mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the HIV-1 gag IRES does not use pre-folded RNA structure to drive function, a finding that gives insight into how conformationally dynamic IRESs operate. Furthermore, we find that a common exon drives IRES activity in a diverse set of alternatively spliced transcripts. We propose a mechanism in which a structurally plastic RNA element confers the ability to initiate translation internally, and activity from this common element is modulated by 3' nucleotides added by alternative splicing.

  11. [Evaluation of Abbott Fourth Generation HIV Antigen and Antibody Assays.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee Jung; Yoo, Kyeong Ha; Kim, Han Sung; Cho, Hyoun Chan

    2006-02-01

    In order to reduce the diagnostic window period between the time of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and serological diagnosis, new fourth generation screening assays which detect HIV p24 antigen and specific antibody simultaneously have been developed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of a new fourth generation assay. We compared a new fourth generation assay, Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo, with another fourth generation assay AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo and a third generation assay, AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO for their performance. The assays were evaluated using 3 HIV seroconversion panels, 305 sera of healthy subjects and 100 sera of patients with HBsAg or anti-HCV antibodies. Within-run and total coefficient variations of the three screening assays were analyzed for the evaluation of precision. Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo shortened the window period by 8.7+/-2.1 days relative to AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO and 2.0+/-2.0 days relative to AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo in seroconversion panels. Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo presented the best performance in precision among the three reagents; total CV for positive control was 3.6%, 9.6% and 4.6% for Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo, AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo and AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO, respectively. Specificities of three assays were not different in this study. HIV Ag/Ab combined assays reduced the diagnostic window as compared to the third generation screening assays, enabling an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection. A new fourth generation assay, Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo presents a better performance than AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo, showing improved seroconversion sensitivity and precision.

  12. Immunogenicity of seven new recombinant yellow fever viruses 17D expressing fragments of SIVmac239 Gag, Nef, and Vif in Indian rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio A Martins

    Full Text Available An effective vaccine remains the best solution to stop the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Cellular immune responses have been repeatedly associated with control of viral replication and thus may be an important element of the immune response that must be evoked by an efficacious vaccine. Recombinant viral vectors can induce potent T-cell responses. Although several viral vectors have been developed to deliver HIV genes, only a few have been advanced for clinical trials. The live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine virus 17D (YF17D has many properties that make it an attractive vector for AIDS vaccine regimens. YF17D is well tolerated in humans and vaccination induces robust T-cell responses that persist for years. Additionally, methods to manipulate the YF17D genome have been established, enabling the generation of recombinant (rYF17D vectors carrying genes from unrelated pathogens. Here, we report the generation of seven new rYF17D viruses expressing fragments of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239 Gag, Nef, and Vif. Studies in Indian rhesus macaques demonstrated that these live-attenuated vectors replicated in vivo, but only elicited low levels of SIV-specific cellular responses. Boosting with recombinant Adenovirus type-5 (rAd5 vectors resulted in robust expansion of SIV-specific CD8(+ T-cell responses, particularly those targeting Vif. Priming with rYF17D also increased the frequency of CD4(+ cellular responses in rYF17D/rAd5-immunized macaques compared to animals that received rAd5 only. The effect of the rYF17D prime on the breadth of SIV-specific T-cell responses was limited and we also found evidence that some rYF17D vectors were more effective than others at priming SIV-specific T-cell responses. Together, our data suggest that YF17D - a clinically relevant vaccine vector - can be used to prime AIDS virus-specific T-cell responses in heterologous prime boost regimens. However, it will be important to optimize rYF17D

  13. [Detecting the markers of HIV infection with the new enzyme immunoassay diagnostic kit "DS-EIA-HIV-AB-AG-SPECTRUM" at the laboratories of AIDS prevention and control centers in the Volga Federal District].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, N I; Peksheva, O Iu

    2009-03-01

    A possibility of simultaneously detecting specific antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2 by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) at lower concentrations than those by immunoblotting (IB), and well as an additional possibility of earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, by identifying the HIV-1 antigen p24 lay the foundation of the "DS-EIA-HIV-AB-AG-SPECTRUM" test system made by OOO "Research-and-Production Association "Diagnosticheskiye Sistemy" (Diagnostic Systems). These peculiarities were compared with those of IB at a number of laboratories of AIDS prevention and control centers in the Volga Federal District, by using native serum/plasma samples and a specially designed control panel. The analysis of the conducted studies to identify HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies and HIV-1 antigen p24 in 65 plasma/serum samples in the "DS-EIA-HIV-AB-AG-SPECTRUM" and "LIA-HIV-1/2" (OOO "Niarmedik plus") test systems while confirming the positive result indicated agreement in 57 (87.7%) cases. The diagnostic possibilities of the "DS-EIA-HIV-AB-AG-SPECTRUM" test system versus the "New Lav-Blot I" one to make a laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection were studied. Irrefragable answers as to the availability of HIV-1 markers in the study serum samples on the enciphered panel were provided by IB in 73.3% of cases and EIA in 92%.

  14. HIV subtype D is associated with dementia, compared with subtype A, in immunosuppressed individuals at risk of cognitive impairment in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacktor, Ned; Nakasujja, Noeline; Skolasky, Richard L; Rezapour, Mona; Robertson, Kevin; Musisi, Seggane; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Clifford, David B; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Quinn, Thomas C

    2009-09-01

    In the United States, clade B is the predominant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) subtype, whereas in sub-Saharan Africa, clades A, C, and D are the predominant subtypes. HIV subtype may have an impact on HIV disease progression. The effect of HIV subtype on the risk of dementia has, to our knowledge, not been examined. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between HIV subtype and the severity of HIV-associated cognitive impairment among individuals initiating antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. Sixty antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected individuals with advanced immunosuppression who were at risk of HIV-associated cognitive impairment underwent neurological, neuropsychological, and functional assessments, and gag and gp41 regions were subtyped. Subtype assignments were generated by sequence analysis using a portion of the gag and gp41 regions. Thirty-three HIV-infected individuals were infected with subtype A, 2 with subtype C, 9 with subtype D, and 16 with A/D recombinants. Eight (89%) of 9 HIV-infected individuals with subtype D had dementia, compared with 7 (24%) of 33 HIV-infected individuals with subtype A (P = .004). These results suggest that, in untreated HIV-infected individuals with advanced immunosuppression who are at risk of developing HIV-associated cognitive impairment, HIV dementia may be more common among patients infected with subtype D virus than among those infected with subtype A virus. These findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that HIV subtypes may have a pathogenetic factor with respect to their capacity to cause cognitive impairment. Additional studies are needed to confirm this observation and to define the mechanism by which subtype D leads to an increased risk of neuropathogenesis.

  15. Gag sequence variation in a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission cluster influences viral replication fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Esther F.; van Nuenen, Ad C.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2013-01-01

    Three men from a proven homosexual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission cluster showed large variation in their clinical course of infection. To evaluate the effect of evolution of the same viral variant in these three patients, we analysed sequence variation in the capsid

  16. Association of HIV diversity and virologic outcomes in early antiretroviral treatment: HPTN 052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Philip J; Wilson, Ethan A; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Kumwenda, Newton; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James G; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Melo, Marineide G; Godbole, Sheela V; Pilotto, Jose H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Chen, Ying Q; Cohen, Myron S; Eshleman, Susan H; Fogel, Jessica M

    2017-01-01

    Higher HIV diversity has been associated with virologic outcomes in children on antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the association of HIV diversity with virologic outcomes in adults from the HPTN 052 trial who initiated ART at CD4 cell counts of 350-550 cells/mm3. A high resolution melting (HRM) assay was used to analyze baseline (pre-treatment) HIV diversity in six regions in the HIV genome (two in gag, one in pol, and three in env) from 95 participants who failed ART. We analyzed the association of HIV diversity in each genomic region with baseline (pre-treatment) factors and three clinical outcomes: time to virologic suppression after ART initiation, time to ART failure, and emergence of HIV drug resistance at ART failure. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we did not find any association of baseline HIV diversity with demographic, laboratory, or clinical characteristics. For the 18 analyses performed for clinical outcomes evaluated, there was only one significant association: higher baseline HIV diversity in one of the three HIV env regions was associated with longer time to ART failure (p = 0.008). The HRM diversity assay may be useful in future studies exploring the relationship between HIV diversity and clinical outcomes in individuals with HIV infection.

  17. Wrapping up the bad news – HIV assembly and release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Bo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The late Nobel Laureate Sir Peter Medawar once memorably described viruses as ‘bad news wrapped in protein’. Virus assembly in HIV is a remarkably well coordinated process in which the virus achieves extracellular budding using primarily intracellular budding machinery and also the unusual phenomenon of export from the cell of an RNA. Recruitment of the ESCRT system by HIV is one of the best documented examples of the comprehensive way in which a virus hijacks a normal cellular process. This review is a summary of our current understanding of the budding process of HIV, from genomic RNA capture through budding and on to viral maturation, but centering on the proteins of the ESCRT pathway and highlighting some recent advances in our understanding of the cellular components involved and the complex interplay between the Gag protein and the genomic RNA.

  18. HIV vaccine strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabel, Gary J

    2002-05-06

    Traditional methods of vaccine development have not produced effective vaccines for several prevalent infectious diseases, including AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. These difficult diseases call attention to the importance of new approaches that profit from modern technologies. Successful efforts in the past have typically taken advantage of naturally occurring, protective immune responses, but this avenue is not readily available in certain cases, such as in HIV infection, where the immune system rarely confers protective immunity. However, there are alternative strategies and areas of research that may facilitate the development of highly effective vaccines. These include the identification of immunogens that elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies, determination of the molecular and cellular basis for immune responses to the components of the infectious agent, the identification of relevant forms of viral proteins for antigen presentation, stimulation of relevant T-cell types, and enhancement of antigen-presenting, dendritic cell function. Answering these basic research questions will aid in rational vaccine design. It is also extremely important to optimize techniques for the testing and production of new vaccines including the quantitation of immune responses in animals and in humans, identification of surrogate markers of immune protection, streamlined vaccine production, and rapid evaluation of candidate vaccines for testing in clinical trials. We have put these ideas into practice in two recent studies in which we generated enhanced cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, while retaining robust humoral responses, to wild-type viral proteins by immunizing mice with genetically modified forms of HIV-1 Env, Gag and Pol delivered in the form of plasmid DNA expression vectors.

  19. Composite growth factor supplementation strategies to enhance tenocyte bioactivity in aligned collagen-GAG scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliari, Steven R; Harley, Brendan A C

    2013-05-01

    Biomolecular environments encountered in vivo are complex and dynamic, with combinations of biomolecules presented in both freely diffusible (liquid-phase) and sequestered (bound to the extracellular matrix) states. Strategies for integrating multiple biomolecular signals into a biomimetic scaffold provide a platform to simultaneously control multiple cell activities, such as motility, proliferation, phenotype, and regenerative potential. Here we describe an investigation elucidating the influence of the dose and mode of presentation (soluble, sequestered) of five biomolecules (stromal cell-derived factor 1α [SDF-1α], platelet-derived growth factor BB [PDGF-BB], insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF], and growth/differentiation factor 5 [GDF-5]) on the recruitment, proliferation, collagen synthesis, and genomic stability of equine tenocytes within an anisotropic collagen-GAG scaffold for tendon regeneration applications. Critically, we found that single factors led to a dose-dependent trade-off between driving tenocyte proliferation (PDGF-BB, IGF-1) versus maintenance of a tenocyte phenotype (GDF-5, bFGF). We identified supplementation schemes using factor pairs (IGF-1, GDF-5) to rescue the tenocyte phenotype and gene expression profiles while simultaneously driving proliferation. These results suggest coincident application of multi-biomolecule cocktails has a significant value in regenerative medicine applications where control of cell proliferation and phenotype are required. Finally, we demonstrated an immobilization strategy that allows efficient sequestration of bioactive levels of these factors within the scaffold network. We showed sequestration can lead to a greater sustained bioactivity than soluble supplementation, making this approach particularly amenable to in vivo translation where diffusive loss is a concern and continuous biomolecule supplementation is not feasible.

  20. Low-Dose Growth Hormone for 40 Weeks Induces HIV-1-Specific T-Cell Responses in Patients on Effective Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herasimtschuk, Anna A; Hansen, Birgitte R; Langkilde, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) administered to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-treated human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals has been found to reverse thymic involution, increase total and naïve CD4 T-cell counts, and to reduce the expression of activation...... were used to enumerate HIV-1-specific IFN-γ-producing T cells at baseline and week 40. Individuals who received rhGH demonstrated increased responses to HIV-1 Gag overlapping 20mer and Gag 9mer peptide pools at week 40 compared to baseline, whereas subjects who received placebo showed no functional...... changes. Subjects with the most robust responses in the ELISpot assays had improved thymic function following rhGH administration, as determined using CD4(+) T-cell receptor rearrangement excision circle (TREC) and thymic density data from the original study. T cells from these robust responders were...

  1. HIV-1 Adaptation to Antigen Processing Results in Population-Level Immune Evasion and Affects Subtype Diversification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenzer, Stefan; Crawford, Hayley; Pymm, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    The recent HIV-1 vaccine failures highlight the need to better understand virus-host interactions. One key question is why CD8(+) T cell responses to two HIV-Gag regions are uniquely associated with delayed disease progression only in patients expressing a few rare HLA class I variants when these...... people vaccinated with natural HIV-1 sequence constructs. Our results suggest that artificial sequence modifications at subtype-specific positions in vitro could refocus and reverse the poor immunogenicity of HIV proteins.......The recent HIV-1 vaccine failures highlight the need to better understand virus-host interactions. One key question is why CD8(+) T cell responses to two HIV-Gag regions are uniquely associated with delayed disease progression only in patients expressing a few rare HLA class I variants when...... these regions encode epitopes presented by ~30 more common HLA variants. By combining epitope processing and computational analyses of the two HIV subtypes responsible for ~60% of worldwide infections, we identified a hitherto unrecognized adaptation to the antigen-processing machinery through substitutions...

  2. Monosomy 9p24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31{r_arrow}qter: Case report and review of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmenti, L.A.; Steinberger, J.; Mammel, M.C. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-22

    Partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 (p24{r_arrow}pter) and partial duplication of the long arm of chromosome 5 (q32{r_arrow}qter) were observed in an abnormal boy who died at age 8 weeks of a complex cyanotic cardiac defect. He also had minor anomalies, sagittal craniosynostosis, triphalangeal thumbs, hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum. Two other infants with similar cytogenetic abnormalities were described previously. These patients had severe congenital heart defect, genitourinary anomalies, broad nasal bridge, low hairline, apparently low-set ears, short neck, and triphalangeal thumbs, in common with our patient. We suggest that combined monosomy 9q23,24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31,32{r_arrow}qter may constitute a clinically recognizable syndrome. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. GB Virus Type C Envelope Protein E2 Elicits Antibodies That React with a Cellular Antigen on HIV-1 Particles and Neutralize Diverse HIV-1 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Emma L.; Xiang, Jinhua; McLinden, James H.; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Chang, Qing; Montefiori, David C.; Klinzman, Donna; Stapleton, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing Abs to HIV-1 are well described; however, identification of Ags that elicit these Abs has proven difficult. Persistent infection with GB virus type C (GBV-C) is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-1–infected individuals, and among those without HIV-1 viremia, the presence of Ab to GBV-C glycoprotein E2 is also associated with survival. GBV-C E2 protein inhibits HIV-1 entry, and an antigenic peptide within E2 interferes with gp41-induced membrane perturbations in vitro, suggesting the possibility of structural mimicry between GBV-C E2 protein and HIV-1 particles. Naturally occurring human and experimentally induced GBV-C E2 Abs were examined for their ability to neutralize infectious HIV-1 particles and HIV-1–enveloped pseudovirus particles. All GBV-C E2 Abs neutralized diverse isolates of HIV-1 with the exception of rabbit anti-peptide Abs raised against a synthetic GBV-C E2 peptide. Rabbit anti–GBV-C E2 Abs neutralized HIV-1–pseudotyped retrovirus particles but not HIV-1–pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus particles, and E2 Abs immune-precipitated HIV-1 gag particles containing the vesicular stomatitis virus type G envelope, HIV-1 envelope, GBV-C envelope, or no viral envelope. The Abs did not neutralize or immune-precipitate mumps or yellow fever viruses. Rabbit GBV-C E2 Abs inhibited HIV attachment to cells but did not inhibit entry following attachment. Taken together, these data indicate that the GBV-C E2 protein has a structural motif that elicits Abs that cross-react with a cellular Ag present on retrovirus particles, independent of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. The data provide evidence that a heterologous viral protein can induce HIV-1–neutralizing Abs. PMID:20826757

  4. A SNAP-tagged derivative of HIV-1--a versatile tool to study virus-cell interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manon Eckhardt

    Full Text Available Fluorescently labeled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV derivatives, combined with the use of advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques, allow the direct visualization of dynamic events and individual steps in the viral life cycle. HIV proteins tagged with fluorescent proteins (FPs have been successfully used for live-cell imaging analyses of HIV-cell interactions. However, FPs display limitations with respect to their physicochemical properties, and their maturation kinetics. Furthermore, several independent FP-tagged constructs have to be cloned and characterized in order to obtain spectral variations suitable for multi-color imaging setups. In contrast, the so-called SNAP-tag represents a genetically encoded non-fluorescent tag which mediates specific covalent coupling to fluorescent substrate molecules in a self-labeling reaction. Fusion of the SNAP-tag to the protein of interest allows specific labeling of the fusion protein with a variety of synthetic dyes, thereby offering enhanced flexibility for fluorescence imaging approaches.Here we describe the construction and characterization of the HIV derivative HIV(SNAP, which carries the SNAP-tag as an additional domain within the viral structural polyprotein Gag. Introduction of the tag close to the C-terminus of the matrix domain of Gag did not interfere with particle assembly, release or proteolytic virus maturation. The modified virions were infectious and could be propagated in tissue culture, albeit with reduced replication capacity. Insertion of the SNAP domain within Gag allowed specific staining of the viral polyprotein in the context of virus producing cells using a SNAP reactive dye as well as the visualization of individual virions and viral budding sites by stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy. Thus, HIV(SNAP represents a versatile tool which expands the possibilities for the analysis of HIV-cell interactions using live cell imaging and sub-diffraction fluorescence

  5. HIV Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthier lives. ART also reduces the risk of HIV transmission (the spread of HIV to others). HIV attacks and destroys ... lives. HIV medicines also reduce the risk of HIV transmission (the spread of HIV to others). What are the seven ...

  6. Women and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV: Get the Facts on HIV Testing, Prevention, and Treatment Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... How can you lower your chance of HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  7. Treatment for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Public Home » Treatment » Treatment Decisions and HIV HIV/AIDS Menu Menu HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Home ... here Enter ZIP code here Treatment Decisions and HIV for Veterans and the Public Treatment for HIV: ...

  8. Dynamics of HIV-containing compartments in macrophages reveal sequestration of virions and transient surface connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Gaudin

    Full Text Available During HIV pathogenesis, infected macrophages behave as "viral reservoirs" that accumulate and retain virions within dedicated internal Virus-Containing Compartments (VCCs. The nature of VCCs remains ill characterized and controversial. Using wild-type HIV-1 and a replication-competent HIV-1 carrying GFP internal to the Gag precursor, we analyzed the biogenesis and evolution of VCCs in primary human macrophages. VCCs appear roughly 14 hours after viral protein synthesis is detected, initially contain few motile viral particles, and then mature to fill up with virions that become packed and immobile. The amount of intracellular Gag, the proportion of dense VCCs, and the density of viral particles in their lumen increased with time post-infection. In contrast, the secretion of virions, their infectivity and their transmission to T cells decreased overtime, suggesting that HIV-infected macrophages tend to pack and retain newly formed virions into dense compartments. A minor proportion of VCCs remains connected to the plasma membrane overtime. Surprisingly, live cell imaging combined with correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that such connections can be transient, highlighting their dynamic nature. Together, our results shed light on the late phases of the HIV-1 cycle and reveal some of its macrophage specific features.

  9. APOBEC3G ubiquitination by Nedd4-1 favors its packaging into HIV-1 particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussart, Sylvie; Douaisi, Marc; Courcoul, Marianne; Bessou, Gilles; Vigne, Robert; Decroly, Etienne

    2005-01-21

    APOBEC3G is a cytidine deaminase that limits the replication of many retroviruses. This antiviral host factor is packaged into retrovirus particles, where it targets single-stranded DNA generated during reverse transcription and induces up to 2% of G-to-A mutations, which are lethal for the HIV-1 provirus. Vif protein counteracts this antiviral factor by decreasing its packaging into lentivirus particles. Here, we demonstrate that Nedd4-1, an HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase, interacts with APOBEC3G, through its WW2 and WW3 domains. As a result of this interaction, APOBEC3G undergoes post-translational modification by addition of ubiquitin moieties. Accordingly, we demonstrate that the dominant negative Nedd4-1 C/S form prevents APOBEC3G ubiquitination. Moreover, the packaging of APOBEC3G into Pr55 Gag virus-like particles and into HIV-1 virions is reduced when Nedd4-1 C/S is expressed. During HIV-1 viral production in the presence of APOBEC3G, Nedd4-1 C/S restores partially the infectivity of Deltavif HIV-1. We conclude that the ubiquitination of APOBEC3G by Nedd4-1 favors its targeting to the virus assembly site where APOBEC3G interacts with Gag and is packaged into HIV-1 particles in the absence of Vif.

  10. Potent Inhibitor of Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Strains Identified from the Medicinal Plant Justicia gendarussa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Jie; Rumschlag-Booms, Emily; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Dong-Ying; Liu, Kang-Lun; Li, Wan-Fei; Nguyen, Van H; Cuong, Nguyen M; Soejarto, Djaja D; Fong, Harry H S; Rong, Lijun

    2017-06-23

    Justicia gendarussa, a medicinal plant collected in Vietnam, was identified as a potent anti-HIV-1 active lead from the evaluation of over 4500 plant extracts. Bioassay-guided separation of the extracts of the stems and roots of this plant led to the isolation of an anti-HIV arylnaphthalene lignan (ANL) glycoside, patentiflorin A (1). Evaluation of the compound against both the M- and T-tropic HIV-1 isolates showed it to possess a significantly higher inhibition effect than the clinically used anti-HIV drug AZT. Patentiflorin A and two congeners were synthesized, de novo, as an efficient strategy for resupply as well as for further structural modification of the anti-HIV ANL glycosides in the search for drug leads. Subsequently, it was determined that the presence of a quinovopyranosyloxy group in the structure is likely essential to retain the high degree of anti-HIV activity of this type of compounds. Patentiflorin A was further investigated against the HIV-1 gene expression of the R/U5 and U5/gag transcripts, and the data showed that the compound acts as a potential inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcription. Importantly, the compound displayed potent inhibitory activity against drug-resistant HIV-1 isolates of both the nucleotide analogue (AZT) and non-nucleotide analogue (nevaripine). Thus, the ANL glycosides have the potential to be developed as novel anti-HIV drugs.

  11. HIV misdiagnosis: A root cause analysis leading to improvements in HIV diagnosis and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Raynell; Charlton, Carmen; Beckthold, Brenda; Kadivar, Kiana; Lavoie, Stephanie; Caswell, Debbie; Levett, Paul N; Horsman, Greg B; Kim, John; Gill, M John

    2017-11-01

    Standard diagnostic testing for HIV infection has traditionally relied on a high sensitivity HIV antibody screening test using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) followed by a high specificity antibody confirmatory test such as a Western Blot. Recently several of the screening assays have been enhanced with an ability to identify p24 antigen thereby narrowing the diagnostic window. To explore the implications of enhanced HIV screening methods that may be leading to HIV misdiagnoses. A patient deemed to be an HIV infected 'elite controller' was found to be misdiagnosed when undergoing detailed investigations prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy. A root cause analysis was performed to identify the causative factors of this misdiagnosis. A retrospective review of all "elite controllers" in Alberta, Canada revealed challenges of current HIV testing algorithms. Technical and human factors were identified as being causative in this HIV misdiagnosis including (i) high rates of false reactive results on the Abbott ARCHITECT HIV-1&2 COMBO EIA, (ii) human error in reading the initial Western blot, (iii) HIV algorithmic directives in which confirmatory (Western blot) testing was not performed on a repeatedly reactive screen test. The outcome of this analysis identified opportunities for improvement, including implementation of a newly approved (automated) confirmatory assay and improved communication between the clinician and laboratory. HIV testing remains problematic despite significant advances in HIV test performance and algorithm development, presenting new and unexpected issues. Ensuring a high-quality management system including implementation of the latest HIV technologies and algorithms along with human resources and policies are required to minimize the impact of false positive diagnoses, especially in the era of universal screening and 'test and treat' recommendations. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.