WorldWideScience

Sample records for hiv diagnostic test

  1. Causes of false-positive HIV rapid diagnostic test results

    OpenAIRE

    Klarkowski, Derryck; O?Brien, Daniel P.; Shanks, Leslie; Singh, Kasha P.

    2014-01-01

    HIV rapid diagnostic tests have enabled widespread implementation of HIV programs in resource-limited settings. If the tests used in the diagnostic algorithm are susceptible to the same cause for false positivity, a false-positive diagnosis may result in devastating consequences. In resource-limited settings, the lack of routine confirmatory testing, compounded by incorrect interpretation of weak positive test lines and use of tie-breaker algorithms, can leave a false-positive diagnosis undet...

  2. Causes of false-positive HIV rapid diagnostic test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarkowski, Derryck; O'Brien, Daniel P; Shanks, Leslie; Singh, Kasha P

    2014-01-01

    HIV rapid diagnostic tests have enabled widespread implementation of HIV programs in resource-limited settings. If the tests used in the diagnostic algorithm are susceptible to the same cause for false positivity, a false-positive diagnosis may result in devastating consequences. In resource-limited settings, the lack of routine confirmatory testing, compounded by incorrect interpretation of weak positive test lines and use of tie-breaker algorithms, can leave a false-positive diagnosis undetected. We propose that heightened CD5+ and early B-lymphocyte response polyclonal cross-reactivity are a major cause of HIV false positivity in certain settings; thus, test performance may vary significantly in different geographical areas and populations. There is an urgent need for policy makers to recognize that HIV rapid diagnostic tests are screening tests and mandate confirmatory testing before reporting an HIV-positive result. In addition, weak positive results should not be recognized as valid except in the screening of blood donors.

  3. Field accuracy of fourth-generation rapid diagnostic tests for acute HIV-1: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Joseph M; MacPherson, Peter; Adams, Emily R.; Ochodo, Eleanor; Sands, Anita; Taegtmeyer, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fourth-generation HIV-1 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect HIV-1 p24 antigen to screen for acute HIV-1. However, diagnostic accuracy during clinical use may be suboptimal. Methods: Clinical sensitivity and specificity of fourth-generation RDTs for acute HIV-1 were collated from field evaluation studies in adults identified by a systematic literature search. Results: Four studies with 17?381 participants from Australia, Swaziland, the United Kingdom and Malawi were identified. ...

  4. Field accuracy of fourth-generation rapid diagnostic tests for acute HIV-1: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joseph M; Macpherson, Peter; Adams, Emily R; Ochodo, Eleanor; Sands, Anita; Taegtmeyer, Miriam

    2015-11-28

    Fourth-generation HIV-1 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) detect HIV-1 p24 antigen to screen for acute HIV-1. However, diagnostic accuracy during clinical use may be suboptimal. Clinical sensitivity and specificity of fourth-generation RDTs for acute HIV-1 were collated from field evaluation studies in adults identified by a systematic literature search. Four studies with 17 381 participants from Australia, Swaziland, the United Kingdom and Malawi were identified. All reported 0% sensitivity of the HIV-1 p24 component for acute HIV-1 diagnosis; 26 acute infections were missed. Specificity ranged from 98.3 to 99.9%. Fourth-generation RDTs are currently unsuitable for the detection of acute HIV-1.

  5. An alternative strategy to western blot as a confirmatory diagnostic test for HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xia; Wang, Jibao; Gao, Zhiyun; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Huichao; Zhang, Tong; Xiao, Lin; Yao, Jun; Xing, Wenge; Qiu, Maofeng; Jiang, Yan

    2017-03-01

    In China, western blot (WB) is the recommended procedure for the diagnosis of HIV infection. However, this technique is time consuming and labor intensive, and its complexity restricts wide application in resource-limited regions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a dry blood spots (DBS)-urine paired enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test, instead of WB, for HIV antibody detection. Plasma, DBS, and urine samples were collected from 1213 subjects from different populations. Two diagnostic testing strategies were conducted in parallel. The equivalence of the paired ELISA and WB strategies was assessed. A diagnosis of HIV was determined in 250 subjects according to the paired ELISA test, and in 249 according to the WB strategy. The discordant case was judged HIV-positive during follow-up. In total, 18 subjects were diagnosed with possible HIV using the paired ELISA test, among whom, 11 subjects tested negative with WB, and one was confirmed to be HIV-positive during follow-up. For the remaining 945 subjects, both strategies indicated a negative result. The kappa test indicated good conformity (kappa=0.954) between the two diagnostic strategies. The DBS-urine paired ELISA could be applied as an alternative to WB in HIV diagnosis, which would be valuable in resource-limited regions owing to the associated affordability and ease of use. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Performance of a Fourth-Generation HIV Screening Assay and an Alternative HIV Diagnostic Testing Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Wesolowski, Laura G.; Meyer, William A.; Owen, S. Michele; Masciotra, Silvina; Vorwald, Craig; Becker, William J.; Branson, Bernard M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the performance of the GS fourth-generation antigen/antibody assay and compared CDC’s proposed alternative algorithm (repeatedly reactive [RR] fourth-generation immunoassay [IA] followed by an HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation IA and, if needed, nucleic acid testing [NAT]) with the current algorithm (RR third-generation IA followed by HIV-1 Western blot [WB]). Design A convenience sample of the following four specimen sets was acquired: 10,014 from insurance applicants, 493 known WB-positive, 20 known WB-indeterminate specimens, and 230 specimens from 26 HIV-1 seroconverters. Methods Specimens were tested with the GS third- and fourth-generation IAs, the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation IA, NAT, and WB. We applied the two algorithms using these results. Results Among insurance specimens, 13 (0.13%) specimens were IA RR: 2 were HIV-positive (RR by third- and fourth-generation IAs, and WB and Multispot positive); 2 third-generation RR and 9 fourth-generation RR specimens were false-positive. Third- and fourth-generation specificities were 99.98% (95%CI: 99.93%–100%) and 99.91% (95%CI: 99.84%–99.96%) respectively. All HIV-1 WB-positive specimens were RR by third- and fourth-generation IAs. By Multispot, 491 (99.6%) were HIV-1 positive and 2 (0.4%) were HIV-2 positive. Only eight (40%) WB-indeterminate specimens were fourth-generation RR: 6 were Multispot and NAT negative and 2 were Multispot HIV-1 positive but NAT negative. The alternative algorithm correctly classified as positive 102 seroconverter specimens with the third-generation IA and 130 with the fourth-generation IA compared with 56 using the WB with either IA. Conclusions The alternative testing algorithm improved early infection sensitivity and identified HIV-2 infections. Two potential false-positive algorithm results occurred with WB-indeterminate specimens. PMID:23135170

  7. HIV-1 tropism testing in subjects achieving undetectable HIV-1 RNA: diagnostic accuracy, viral evolution and compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pou, Christian; Codoñer, Francisco M; Thielen, Alexander; Bellido, Rocío; Pérez-Álvarez, Susana; Cabrera, Cecilia; Dalmau, Judith; Curriu, Marta; Lie, Yolanda; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Puig, Jordi; Martínez-Picado, Javier; Blanco, Julià; Coakley, Eoin; Däumer, Martin; Clotet, Bonaventura; Paredes, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Technically, HIV-1 tropism can be evaluated in plasma or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). However, only tropism testing of plasma HIV-1 has been validated as a tool to predict virological response to CCR5 antagonists in clinical trials. The preferable tropism testing strategy in subjects with undetectable HIV-1 viremia, in whom plasma tropism testing is not feasible, remains uncertain. We designed a proof-of-concept study including 30 chronically HIV-1-infected individuals who achieved HIV-1 RNA evolution in PBMCs during viremia suppression and only found evolution of R5 viruses in one subject. No de novo CXCR4-using HIV-1 production was observed over time. Finally, Slatkin-Maddison tests suggested that plasma and cell-associated V3 forms were sometimes compartmentalized. The absence of tropism shifts during viremia suppression suggests that, when available, testing of stored plasma samples is generally safe and informative, provided that HIV-1 suppression is maintained. Tropism testing in PBMCs may not necessarily produce equivalent biological results to plasma, because the structure of viral populations and the diagnostic performance of tropism assays may sometimes vary between compartments. Thereby, proviral DNA tropism testing should be specifically validated in clinical trials before it can be applied to routine clinical decision-making.

  8. Field evaluation of a dual rapid diagnostic test for HIV infection and syphilis in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Claire C; Leon, Segundo R; Huang, Emily; Brown, Brandon J; Ramos, Lourdes B; Vargas, Silver K; Flores, Juan A; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-05-01

    Screening for HIV and syphilis in key populations is recommended by the WHO to reduce the morbidity, mortality and transmission associated with undiagnosed and untreated infections. Rapid point-of-care tests that can detect multiple infections with a single fingerprick whole blood specimen using a single device are gaining popularity. We evaluated the field performance of a rapid dual HIV and syphilis test in people at high risk of HIV and syphilis infections. Participants included men who have sex with men and transgender women recruited in Lima, Peru. Reference standard testing for detection of HIV and syphilis infections, conducted using blood samples from venipuncture, included Treponema pallidum particle agglutination and fourth-generation HIV enzyme immunoassay for which positive results had a confirmation HIV Western blot test. For the evaluation test, SD BIOLINE HIV/Syphilis Duo test (Standard Diagnostics, Korea), a fingerprick blood specimen was used. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and the exact binomial method was used to determine 95% CIs. A total of 415 participants were recruited for the study. The dual test sensitivity for detection of T. pallidum infection was 89.2% (95% CI 83.5% to 93.5%) and specificity 98.8% (95% CI 96.5% to 99.8%). For detection of HIV infection, the sensitivity of the dual test was 99.1% (95% CI 94.8% to 100%) and specificity 99.4% (95% CI 97.7% to 99.9%). This high performing dual test should be considered for the use in clinical settings to increase uptake of simultaneous testing of HIV and syphilis and accelerate time to treatment for those who need it. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Self-reported HIV-positive status but subsequent HIV-negative test result using rapid diagnostic testing algorithms among seven sub-Saharan African military populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Harbertson

    Full Text Available HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs combined in an algorithm are the current standard for HIV diagnosis in many sub-Saharan African countries, and extensive laboratory testing has confirmed HIV RDTs have excellent sensitivity and specificity. However, false-positive RDT algorithm results have been reported due to a variety of factors, such as suboptimal quality assurance procedures and inaccurate interpretation of results. We conducted HIV serosurveys in seven sub-Saharan African military populations and recorded the frequency of personnel self-reporting HIV positivity, but subsequently testing HIV-negative during the serosurvey. The frequency of individuals who reported they were HIV-positive but subsequently tested HIV-negative using RDT algorithms ranged from 3.3 to 91.1%, suggesting significant rates of prior false-positive HIV RDT algorithm results, which should be confirmed using biological testing across time in future studies. Simple measures could substantially reduce false-positive results, such as greater adherence to quality assurance guidelines and prevalence-specific HIV testing algorithms as described in the World Health Organization's HIV testing guidelines. Other measures to improve RDT algorithm specificity include classifying individuals with weakly positive test lines as HIV indeterminate and retesting. While expansion of HIV testing in resource-limited countries is critical to identifying HIV-infected individuals for appropriate care and treatment, careful attention to potential causes of false HIV-positive results are needed to prevent the significant medical, psychological, and fiscal costs resulting from individuals receiving a false-positive HIV diagnosis.

  10. Self-reported HIV-positive status but subsequent HIV-negative test result using rapid diagnostic testing algorithms among seven sub-Saharan African military populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbertson, Judith; Hale, Braden R; Tran, Bonnie R; Thomas, Anne G; Grillo, Michael P; Jacobs, Marni B; McAnany, Jennifer; Shaffer, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) combined in an algorithm are the current standard for HIV diagnosis in many sub-Saharan African countries, and extensive laboratory testing has confirmed HIV RDTs have excellent sensitivity and specificity. However, false-positive RDT algorithm results have been reported due to a variety of factors, such as suboptimal quality assurance procedures and inaccurate interpretation of results. We conducted HIV serosurveys in seven sub-Saharan African military populations and recorded the frequency of personnel self-reporting HIV positivity, but subsequently testing HIV-negative during the serosurvey. The frequency of individuals who reported they were HIV-positive but subsequently tested HIV-negative using RDT algorithms ranged from 3.3 to 91.1%, suggesting significant rates of prior false-positive HIV RDT algorithm results, which should be confirmed using biological testing across time in future studies. Simple measures could substantially reduce false-positive results, such as greater adherence to quality assurance guidelines and prevalence-specific HIV testing algorithms as described in the World Health Organization's HIV testing guidelines. Other measures to improve RDT algorithm specificity include classifying individuals with weakly positive test lines as HIV indeterminate and retesting. While expansion of HIV testing in resource-limited countries is critical to identifying HIV-infected individuals for appropriate care and treatment, careful attention to potential causes of false HIV-positive results are needed to prevent the significant medical, psychological, and fiscal costs resulting from individuals receiving a false-positive HIV diagnosis.

  11. OPPORTUNITIES OF VARIOUS IMMUNOLOGICAL TESTS IN DIAGNOSTICS OF TUBERCULOSIS IN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Starshinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-infection of tuberculosis and HIV-infection continues to be the current crucial issue not only due to the persistent growth of HIV-infection but also due difficulties in diagnostics of tuberculosis. Often X-ray changes in the lungs are atypical, clinical signs are manifested only in case of the severe and disseminated disease. At present the IGRA-tests are widely used worldwide while in Russia TRA tests are used. The trial provided the data on the use and comparative efficiency of the above immunological tests against Mantoux test with 2 TU when examining 239 persons from 2014 to 2015. The comparativeness of diagnostic sensitivity of all immunological tests had been proved. The specificity of IGRA-tests and TRA tests is twice higher compared to Mantoux test with 2 TU. Also it was proved that when diagnosing tuberculosis in HIV patients the skin tests (Mantoux test with 2 TU and TRA test had low diagnostic informativeness compared to IGRA tests, among which ELISPOT was the most sensitive.

  12. Rapid Diagnostic Testing of Hospitalized Malawian Children Reveals Opportunities for Improved HIV Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaline, Theresa F; Hochman, Sarah E; Seydel, Karl B; Liomba, Alice; Saidi, Alex; Matebule, Grace; Mowrey, Wenzhu B; O'Hare, Bernadette; Milner, Danny A; Kim, Kami

    2017-12-01

    Recent World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all HIV-infected people; previously CD4+ T lymphocyte quantification (CD4 count) or clinical staging determined eligibility for children ≥ 5 years old in low- and middle-income countries. We examined positive predictive value (PPV) of a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) algorithm and ART eligibility for hospitalized children with newly diagnosed HIV infection. We enrolled 363 hospitalized Malawian children age 2 months to 16 years with two serial positive HIV RDT from 2013 to 2015. Children aged ≤ 18 months whose nucleic acid testing was negative or unavailable were later excluded from the analysis (N = 16). If RNA PCR was undetectable, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and western blot (WB) were performed. Those with negative or discordant EIA and WB were considered HIV negative and excluded from further analysis (N = 6). ART eligibility was assessed using age, CD4 count, and clinical HIV stage. Among 150 patients with HIV RNA PCR results, 15 had undetectable HIV RNA. Of those, EIA and WB were positive in nine patients and negative or discordant in six patients. PPV of serial RDT was 90% versus RNA PCR alone and 96% versus combined RNA PCR, EIA, and WB. Of all patients aged ≥ 5 years, 8.9% were ineligible for ART under previous WHO guidelines. Improved HIV testing algorithms are needed for accurate diagnosis of HIV infection in children as prevalence of pediatric HIV declines. Universal treatment will significantly increase the numbers of older children who qualify for ART.

  13. Performance of a fourth-generation HIV screening assay and an alternative HIV diagnostic testing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Wesolowski, Laura G; Meyer, William A; Owen, S Michele; Masciotra, Silvina; Vorwald, Craig; Becker, William J; Branson, Bernard M

    2013-03-13

    We evaluated the performance of the GS fourth-generation antigen/antibody assay and compared Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) proposed alternative algorithm [repeatedly reactive fourth-generation immunoassay followed by an HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation immunoassay and, if needed, nucleic acid test (NAT)] with the current algorithm (repeatedly reactive third-generation immunoassay followed by HIV-1 western blot). A convenience sample of the following four specimen sets was acquired: 10 014 from insurance applicants, 493 known western blot-positive, 20 known western blot-indeterminate specimens, and 230 specimens from 26 HIV-1 seroconverters. Specimens were tested with the GS third-generation and fourth-generation immunoassays, the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation immunoassay, NAT, and western blot. We applied the two algorithms using these results. Among insurance specimens, 13 (0.13%) specimens were immunoassay repeatedly reactive: two were HIV-positive (repeatedly reactive by third-generation and fourth-generation immunoassays, and western blot and Multispot positive); two third-generation repeatedly reactive and nine fourth-generation repeatedly reactive specimens were false-positive. Third-generation and fourth-generation specificities were 99.98% [95% confidence interval (CI) 99.93-100%] and 99.91% (95% CI 99.84-99.96%), respectively.All HIV-1 western blot-positive specimens were repeatedly reactive by third-generation and fourth-generation immunoassays. By Multispot, 491 (99.6%) were HIV-1-positive and two (0.4%) were HIV-2-positive.Only eight (40%) western blot-indeterminate specimens were fourth-generation repeatedly reactive: six were Multispot and NAT-negative and two were Multispot HIV-1-positive but NAT-negative.The alternative algorithm correctly classified as positive 102 seroconverter specimens with the third-generation immunoassay and 130 with the fourth-generation immunoassay compared with 56 using the western blot with

  14. The evaluation of a rapid in situ HIV confirmation test in a programme with a high failure rate of the WHO HIV two-test diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarkowski, Derryck B; Wazome, Joseph M; Lokuge, Kamalini M; Shanks, Leslie; Mills, Clair F; O'Brien, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    Concerns about false-positive HIV results led to a review of testing procedures used in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) HIV programme in Bukavu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. In addition to the WHO HIV rapid diagnostic test algorithm (RDT) (two positive RDTs alone for HIV diagnosis) used in voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) sites we evaluated in situ a practical field-based confirmation test against western blot WB. In addition, we aimed to determine the false-positive rate of the WHO two-test algorithm compared with our adapted protocol including confirmation testing, and whether weakly reactive compared with strongly reactive rapid test results were more likely to be false positives. 2864 clients presenting to MSF VCT centres in Bukavu during January to May 2006 were tested using Determine HIV-1/2 and UniGold HIV rapid tests in parallel by nurse counsellors. Plasma samples on 229 clients confirmed as double RDT positive by laboratory retesting were further tested using both WB and the Orgenics Immunocomb Combfirm HIV confirmation test (OIC-HIV). Of these, 24 samples were negative or indeterminate by WB representing a false-positive rate of the WHO two-test algorithm of 10.5% (95%CI 6.6-15.2). 17 of the 229 samples were weakly positive on rapid testing and all were negative or indeterminate by WB. The false-positive rate fell to 3.3% (95%CI 1.3-6.7) when only strong-positive rapid test results were considered. Agreement between OIC-HIV and WB was 99.1% (95%CI 96.9-99.9%) with no false OIC-HIV positives if stringent criteria for positive OIC-HIV diagnoses were used. The WHO HIV two-test diagnostic algorithm produced an unacceptably high level of false-positive diagnoses in our setting, especially if results were weakly positive. The most probable causes of the false-positive results were serological cross-reactivity or non-specific immune reactivity. Our findings show that the OIC-HIV confirmation test is practical and effective in field contexts

  15. The evaluation of a rapid in situ HIV confirmation test in a programme with a high failure rate of the WHO HIV two-test diagnostic algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derryck B Klarkowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Concerns about false-positive HIV results led to a review of testing procedures used in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF HIV programme in Bukavu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. In addition to the WHO HIV rapid diagnostic test algorithm (RDT (two positive RDTs alone for HIV diagnosis used in voluntary counselling and testing (VCT sites we evaluated in situ a practical field-based confirmation test against western blot WB. In addition, we aimed to determine the false-positive rate of the WHO two-test algorithm compared with our adapted protocol including confirmation testing, and whether weakly reactive compared with strongly reactive rapid test results were more likely to be false positives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 2864 clients presenting to MSF VCT centres in Bukavu during January to May 2006 were tested using Determine HIV-1/2 and UniGold HIV rapid tests in parallel by nurse counsellors. Plasma samples on 229 clients confirmed as double RDT positive by laboratory retesting were further tested using both WB and the Orgenics Immunocomb Combfirm HIV confirmation test (OIC-HIV. Of these, 24 samples were negative or indeterminate by WB representing a false-positive rate of the WHO two-test algorithm of 10.5% (95%CI 6.6-15.2. 17 of the 229 samples were weakly positive on rapid testing and all were negative or indeterminate by WB. The false-positive rate fell to 3.3% (95%CI 1.3-6.7 when only strong-positive rapid test results were considered. Agreement between OIC-HIV and WB was 99.1% (95%CI 96.9-99.9% with no false OIC-HIV positives if stringent criteria for positive OIC-HIV diagnoses were used. CONCLUSIONS: The WHO HIV two-test diagnostic algorithm produced an unacceptably high level of false-positive diagnoses in our setting, especially if results were weakly positive. The most probable causes of the false-positive results were serological cross-reactivity or non-specific immune reactivity. Our findings show that the OIC-HIV

  16. HIV misdiagnosis in sub-Saharan Africa: performance of diagnostic algorithms at six testing sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosack, Cara S; Shanks, Leslie; Beelaert, Greet; Benson, Tumwesigye; Savane, Aboubacar; Ng'ang'a, Anne; Andre, Bita; Zahinda, Jean-Paul Bn; Fransen, Katrien; Page, Anne-Laure

    2017-07-03

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of HIV testing algorithms at six programmes in five sub-Saharan African countries. In this prospective multisite diagnostic evaluation study (Conakry, Guinea; Kitgum, Uganda; Arua, Uganda; Homa Bay, Kenya; Doula, Cameroun and Baraka, Democratic Republic of Congo), samples from clients (greater than equal to five years of age) testing for HIV were collected and compared to a state-of-the-art algorithm from the AIDS reference laboratory at the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Belgium. The reference algorithm consisted of an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay, a line-immunoassay, a single antigen-enzyme immunoassay and a DNA polymerase chain reaction test. Between August 2011 and January 2015, over 14,000 clients were tested for HIV at 6 HIV counselling and testing sites. Of those, 2786 (median age: 30; 38.1% males) were included in the study. Sensitivity of the testing algorithms ranged from 89.5% in Arua to 100% in Douala and Conakry, while specificity ranged from 98.3% in Doula to 100% in Conakry. Overall, 24 (0.9%) clients, and as many as 8 per site (1.7%), were misdiagnosed, with 16 false-positive and 8 false-negative results. Six false-negative specimens were retested with the on-site algorithm on the same sample and were found to be positive. Conversely, 13 false-positive specimens were retested: 8 remained false-positive with the on-site algorithm. The performance of algorithms at several sites failed to meet expectations and thresholds set by the World Health Organization, with unacceptably high rates of false results. Alongside the careful selection of rapid diagnostic tests and the validation of algorithms, strictly observing correct procedures can reduce the risk of false results. In the meantime, to identify false-positive diagnoses at initial testing, patients should be retested upon initiating antiretroviral therapy.

  17. HIV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... All Collapse All Should I get tested for HIV? CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of ...

  18. Diagnostic accuracy and acceptability of rapid HIV oral testing among adults attending an urban public health facility in Kampala, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanita Nangendo

    Full Text Available The prevalence of HIV in Uganda is 7.3%, and yet nearly 40% of people living with HIV are unaware of their status. The current HIV testing policy which is strictly blood-based poses several challenges including: a need for high level laboratory skills, stringent waste disposal needs, and painful sample collection. It is envisaged that introduction of a rapid, painless HIV oral fluid test as a potential alternative is likely to increase the number of people testing. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy and acceptability of rapid HIV oral testing among adults attending Kisenyi Health Centre IV in Kampala.We conducted a cross-sectional study among 440 adults recruited consecutively at Kisenyi Health Centre IV from January to March 2016. The diagnostic accuracy of the HIV oral test was assessed by comparing to the national HIV serial testing algorithm. We also assessed for acceptability among patients and health care workers (HCWs by triangulating responses from a structured questionnaire, three focus group discussions and seven key informant interviews. Acceptability was defined as willingness to take the test at the time of the study and intention for future use of the test if it was availed. The prevalence of HIV infection among study participants was 14.8%. The HIV oral fluid test was highly accurate with sensitivity of 100% (95% CI; 94.5-100.0, specificity of 100% (95% CI; 99.0-100.0, positive predictive value (PPV of 100% (95% CI; 94.5-100.0 and negative predictive value (NPV of 100% (95% CI; 99.0-100.0. Acceptability of HIV oral testing was also high at 87.0% (95% CI; 83.6-89.9. Participants preferred HIV oral testing because it was: pain free (91%, n = 399 and did not require blood draw (82%, n = 360.The HIV oral fluid test has high diagnostic accuracy and acceptability. HIV oral testing is a suitable addition to the national HIV testing strategies with the potential of increasing access to HIV testing services in

  19. HIV/AIDS Contamination Risk, Savings and the Welfare Effects of Diagnostic Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, J.; Meijdam, A.C.; Verbon, H.A.A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper models the effect of a HIV/AIDS epidemic on saving behavior and studies the welfare effects of testing for HIV. The model specifies a utility function that includes both regular consumption, and medical expenditures. Medical expenditures generate more utility if individuals are HIV

  20. Comparative effectiveness of single and dual rapid diagnostic tests for syphilis and HIV in antenatal care services in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Duarte, Hernando Guillermo; Newman, Lori; Laverty, Maura; Habib, Ndema Abu; González-Gordon, Lina María; Ángel-Müller, Edith; Abella, Catleya; Barros, Esther Cristina; Rincón, Carlos; Caicedo, Sidia; Gómez, Bertha; Pérez, Freddy

    2016-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a dual rapid test compared to a single rapid test for syphilis and HIV screening. A cluster-randomized open-label clinical trial was performed in 12 public antenatal care (ANC) centers in the cities of Bogotá and Cali, Colombia. Pregnant women who were over 14 years of age at their first antenatal visit and who had not been previously tested for HIV and syphilis during the current pregnancy were included. Pregnant women were randomized to single HIV and single syphilis rapid diagnostic tests (Arm A) or to dual HIV and syphilis rapid diagnostic tests (Arm B). The four main outcomes measured were: (1) acceptability of the test, (2) uptake in testing, (3) treatment on the same day (that is, timely treatment), and (4) treatment at any time for positive rapid test cases. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were calculated to adjust for the clustering effect and the period. A total of 1 048 patients were analyzed in Arm A, and 1 166 in Arm B. Acceptability of the rapid tests was 99.8% in Arm A and 99.6% in Arm B. The prevalence of positive rapid tests was 2.21% for syphilis and 0.36% for HIV. Timely treatment was provided to 20 of 29 patients (69%) in Arm A and 16 of 20 patients (80%) in Arm B (relative risk (RR), 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI): (1.00 -1.20). Treatment at any time was given to 24 of 29 patients (83%) in Arm A and to 20 of 20 (100%) in Arm B (RR, 1.11; 95% CI: 1.01-1.22). There were no differences in patient acceptability, testing and timely treatment between dual rapid tests and single rapid tests for HIV and syphilis screening in the ANC centers. Same-day treatment depends also on the interpretation of and confidence in the results by the health providers.

  1. Determination of HIV status of infants born to HIV-infected mothers: A review of the diagnostic methods with special focus on the applicability of p24 antigen testing in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Maria J; Theilgaard, Zahra Persson; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2012-01-01

    children infected with HIV contract the infection in utero, during delivery, or via breast milk. This review outlines the current diagnostic methods to determine the HIV status of infants born to HIV-infected mothers. The HIV DNA and RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests are highly accurate...

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of the rapid urine lipoarabinomannan test for pulmonary tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults in Ghana-findings from the DETECT HIV-TB study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Kenu, Ernest; Lartey, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rapid diagnostic tests are urgently needed to mitigate HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) mortality. We evaluated diagnostic accuracy of the rapid urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) test for pulmonary TB and assessed the effect of a two-sample strategy. METHODS: HIV-infected adults eligible....... Sensitivity of the LAM test was positively associated with hospitalisation (67 %), Modified Early Warning Score > 4 (57 %) and subsequent death (71 %). LAM test specificity was 95 % increasing to 98 % for the composite reference standard. A two-sample LAM test strategy did not improve test performance. Using.......008). CONCLUSIONS: LAM test sensitivity was highest in patients with poor prognosis and subsequent death and did not increase with a two-sample strategy. A rigorous sputum microscopy strategy had superior sensitivity, but the simplicity of the LAM test holds operational possibilities as a TB screening method among...

  3. Viral hepatitis and rapid diagnostic test based screening for HBsAg in HIV-infected patients in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzeck, Fabian C; Ngwale, Ramadhani; Msongole, Bernadeta; Hamisi, Marian; Abdul, Omary; Henning, Lars; Letang, Emilio; Mwaigomole, Geoffrey; Battegay, Manuel; Hatz, Christoph; Tanner, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is highly prevalent in people living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa. Screening for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) before initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is recommended. However, it is not part of diagnostic routines in HIV programs in many resource-limited countries although patients could benefit from optimized antiretroviral therapy covering both infections. Screening could be facilitated by rapid diagnostic tests for HBsAg. Operating experience with these point of care devices in HIV-positive patients in Sub-Saharan Africa is largely lacking. We determined the prevalence of HBV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as well as the diagnostic accuracy of the rapid test device Determine HBsAg in an HIV cohort in rural Tanzania. Prospectively collected blood samples from adult, HIV-1 positive and antiretroviral treatment-naïve patients in the Kilombero and Ulanga antiretroviral cohort (KIULARCO) in rural Tanzania were analyzed at the point of care with Determine HBsAg, a reference HBsAg EIA and an anti-HCV EIA. Samples of 272 patients were included. Median age was 38 years (interquartile range [IQR] 32-47), 169/272 (63%) subjects were females and median CD4+ count was 250 cells/µL (IQR 97-439). HBsAg was detected in 25/272 (9.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.2-13.0%) subjects. Of these, 7/25 (28%) were positive for HBeAg. Sensitivity of Determine HBsAg was rated at 96% (95% CI 82.8-99.6%) and specificity at 100% (95% CI, 98.9-100%). Antibodies to HCV (anti-HCV) were found in 10/272 (3.7%, 95% CI 2.0-6.4%) of patients. This study reports a high prevalence of HBV in HIV-positive patients in a rural Tanzanian setting. The rapid diagnostic test Determine HBsAg is an accurate assay for screening for HBsAg in HIV-1 infected patients at the point of care and may further help to guide cART in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. Viral hepatitis and rapid diagnostic test based screening for HBsAg in HIV-infected patients in rural Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian C Franzeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV is highly prevalent in people living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa. Screening for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg before initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART is recommended. However, it is not part of diagnostic routines in HIV programs in many resource-limited countries although patients could benefit from optimized antiretroviral therapy covering both infections. Screening could be facilitated by rapid diagnostic tests for HBsAg. Operating experience with these point of care devices in HIV-positive patients in Sub-Saharan Africa is largely lacking. We determined the prevalence of HBV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection as well as the diagnostic accuracy of the rapid test device Determine HBsAg in an HIV cohort in rural Tanzania. METHODS: Prospectively collected blood samples from adult, HIV-1 positive and antiretroviral treatment-naïve patients in the Kilombero and Ulanga antiretroviral cohort (KIULARCO in rural Tanzania were analyzed at the point of care with Determine HBsAg, a reference HBsAg EIA and an anti-HCV EIA. RESULTS: Samples of 272 patients were included. Median age was 38 years (interquartile range [IQR] 32-47, 169/272 (63% subjects were females and median CD4+ count was 250 cells/µL (IQR 97-439. HBsAg was detected in 25/272 (9.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.2-13.0% subjects. Of these, 7/25 (28% were positive for HBeAg. Sensitivity of Determine HBsAg was rated at 96% (95% CI 82.8-99.6% and specificity at 100% (95% CI, 98.9-100%. Antibodies to HCV (anti-HCV were found in 10/272 (3.7%, 95% CI 2.0-6.4% of patients. CONCLUSION: This study reports a high prevalence of HBV in HIV-positive patients in a rural Tanzanian setting. The rapid diagnostic test Determine HBsAg is an accurate assay for screening for HBsAg in HIV-1 infected patients at the point of care and may further help to guide cART in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  5. Highlights from the 2016 HIV diagnostics conference: The new landscape of HIV testing in laboratories, public health programs and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Laura G; Parker, Monica M; Delaney, Kevin P; Owen, S Michele

    2017-06-01

    The 2016 HIV Diagnostics Conference, held in Atlanta, Georgia, was attended by public health officials, laboratorians, HIV testing program managers, surveillance coordinators and industry representatives. The conference addressed test performance data, the implementation of new testing algorithms, quality assurance, and the application of new tests in a variety of settings. With regard to the recommended Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Association of Public Health Laboratories HIV laboratory testing algorithm, the conference featured performance data, implementation challenges such as a lack of test options for the second and third steps, as well as data needs for new tests that may be used as part of the algorithm. There are delays when nucleic acid testing is needed with the algorithm. Novel tests such as point of care nucleic acid tests are needed on the U.S. market to readily identify acute infection. Multiplex tests are being developed which allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens. CDC staff highlighted new guidance for testing in non-clinical settings. Innovative approaches to linking testing and care in some settings have led to identification of early infections, improved receipt of test results and expedited initiation of therapy. Work continues to optimize testing so that infections are accurately identified as early as possible and time to treatment is minimized to improve health outcomes and prevent transmission. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Self-Reported HIV-Positive Status But Subsequent HIV-Negative Test Result Using Rapid Diagnostic Testing Algorithms Among Seven Sub-Saharan African Military Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    in many sub-Saharan African countries, and extensive laboratory testing has con- firmed HIV RDTs have excellent sensitivity and specificity. However... interpretation of results. We conducted HIV serosur- veys in seven sub-Saharan African military populations and recorded the frequency of per- sonnel...positive results, such as greater adherence to quality assurance guidelines and prevalence-specific HIV testing algorithms as described in the World

  7. Performance of rapid diagnostic tests for detection of Hepatitis B and C markers in HIV infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Jakeline Ribeiro; Colares, Jeová Keny Baima; Flores, Geane Lopes; Cortes, Vanessa Faria; Miguel, Juliana Custódio; Portilho, Moyra Machado; Marques, Vanessa Alves; Potsch, Denise Vigo; Brandão-Mello, Carlos Eduardo; Amendola-Pires, Marcia; Pilotto, José Henrique; Lima, Danielle Malta; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2017-10-01

    There is little information describing the influence of HIV infection upon the performance of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for hepatitis B and C virus diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the performance of RDTs for HBsAg and anti-HCV detection among HIV-infected individuals. A total of 362 HIV infected individuals were recruited from clinics between January 2013 to November 2014 in the southeast and northeast of Brazil. HBsAg and anti-HCV were detected using commercial EIAs and four RDTs: HBV (Vikia HBsAg® and Wama Imuno-Rapido HBV®) and HCV (Bioeasy Teste Rápido HCV® and Wama Imuno-Rapido HCV®). Reactive HBsAg and anti-HCV serum samples were tested for HBV DNA and HCV RNA. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa statistic were determined. Using EIA, HBsAg and anti-HCV were detected in 14 (3.9%) and 37 (10.2%) serum samples respectively. Using serum only, HBsAg RDTs demonstrated sensitivities and specificities above 92.0% and Kappa values above 89.0%. Anti-HCV RDTs demonstrated sensitivity and specificities above 82.0% and Kappa higher than 89.0%. Using whole blood samples, Vikia HBsAg® and Wama Imuno-Rapido HCV® showed sensitivity and specificity above 99.0% with Kappa of 66.4% and 100%, respectively. HIV viral load was higher among discordant results for anti-HCV RDT. RDTs demonstrated good performance in HIV infected individuals showing the usefulness of assays in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. What Is Diagnostic Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Diagnostic testing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... help you make the decision. What Is Diagnostic Testing? Diagnostic genetic testing can usually work out if ...

  9. Access and Quality of HIV-Related Point-of-Care Diagnostic Testing in Global Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonjungo, Peter N; Boeras, Debrah I; Zeh, Clement; Alexander, Heather; Parekh, Bharat S; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-02-01

    Access to point-of-care testing (POCT) improves patient care, especially in resource-limited settings where laboratory infrastructure is poor and the bulk of the population lives in rural settings. However, because of challenges in rolling out the technology and weak quality assurance measures, the promise of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related POCT in resource-limited settings has not been fully exploited to improve patient care and impact public health. Because of these challenges, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), in partnership with other organizations, recently launched the Diagnostics Access Initiative. Expanding HIV programs, including the "test and treat" strategies and the newly established UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets, will require increased access to reliable and accurate POCT results. In this review, we examine various components that could improve access and uptake of quality-assured POC tests to ensure coverage and public health impact. These components include evaluation, policy, regulation, and innovative approaches to strengthen the quality of POCT. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may be present in rare strains of HIV. The test may not detect a drug-resistant strain of ... Less Common Questions Related Content On This Site Tests: HIV Viral Load ; CD4 Count ; HIV Antibody and HIV ...

  11. The diagnostic performance evaluation of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo rapid test in southern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimelis, Techalew; Tadesse, Endale

    2015-04-23

    To determine the diagnostic performance of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo rapid test. A hospital-based cross-sectional study. This evaluation was conducted at one of the largest hospitals in southern Ethiopia. Serum samples obtained from clients attending the antiretroviral therapy and voluntary counselling and testing centres were used. Sera were originally collected for the purpose of investigating syphilis epidemiology. The performance of the test to detect HIV was evaluated using 400 sera (200 HIV positives and 200 HIV negatives). Also, its performance to detect syphilis was evaluated using 85 syphilis positive and 100 syphilis negative serum samples. Individuals HIV screening was carried out according to the national rapid diagnostic testing (RDT) algorithm: Shenghai Kehua Bioengineering (KHB) test kit as a screening test, followed by the HIV1/2 STAT-PAK assay if positive. Where the result of the STAT-PAK is discordant with KHB, Unigold HIV is used as a tiebreaker to determine the result. We also used ELISA to resolve discordant HIV results. Syphilis serostatus was determined using the Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA). The respective sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo test were 100, 99.5, 99.5 and 100% for HIV and 97.6, 96, 95.4 and 98% for syphilis testing, respectively. In reference to TPHA, the test kit reported 4 false positives and 2 false negative results for syphilis. The κ values were 0.99 for HIV testing and 0.94 for syphilis testing. The excellent performance of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo test to detect HIV as well as syphilis facilitates the integration of syphilis testing and treatment to the already established HIV prevention programme, ultimately contributing to the dual HIV and syphilis elimination goal. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... antiretroviral drugs. With genotypic resistance testing, the genetic code of the HIV a person has been infected ...

  13. [Acceptability of HIV testing provided to infants in pediatric services in Cote d'Ivoire, meanings for pediatric diagnostic coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oga, Maxime; Brou, Hermann; Dago-Akribi, Hortense; Coffie, Patrick; Amani-Bossé, Clarisse; Ekouévi, Didier; Yapo, Vincent; Menan, Hervé; Ndondoki, Camille; Timité-Konan, M; Leroy, Valériane

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing in children had rarely been a central concern for researchers. When pediatric tracking retained the attention, it was more to inform on the diagnosis tools' performances rather than the fact the pediatric test can be accepted or refused. This article highlights the parents' reasons which explain why pediatric HIV test is accepted or refused. To study among parents, the explanatory factors of the acceptability of pediatric HIV testing among infant less than six months. Semi-structured interview with repeated passages in the parents of infants less than six months attending in health care facilities for the pediatric weighing/vaccination and consultations. We highlight that the parents' acceptance of the pediatric HIV screening is based on three elements. Firstly, the health care workers by his speech (which indicates its own knowledge and perceptions on the infection) directed towards mothers' influences their acceptance or not of the HIV test. Secondly, the mother who by her knowledge and perceptions on HIV, whose particular status, give an impression of her own wellbeing for her and her child influences any acceptance of the pediatric HIV test. Thirdly, the marital environment of the mother, particularly characterized by the ease of communication within the couple, to speak about the HIV test and its realization for the parents or the mother only are many factors which influence the effective realization of the pediatric HIV testing. The preventive principle of HIV transmission and the desire to realize the test in the newborn are not enough alone to lead to its effective realization, according to certain mothers confronted with the father's refusal. On the other hand, the other mothers refusing the realization of the pediatric test told to be opposed to it; of course, even if their partner would accept it. The mothers are the principal facing the pediatric HIV question and fear the reprimands and stigma. The father, the partner could be an obstacle

  14. Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Pamphlets - Spanish FAQ164, September 2016 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...

  15. Evaluation of a PfHRP-2 based rapid diagnostic test versus microscopy method among HIV-positive and unknown serology patients in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Arianna; Giorgetti, Pier Francesco; Pietra, Virginio; Melzani, Alessia; Seni, Wetien; Castelli, Francesco; Simpore, Jaques

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the performance of a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT; Malaria Quick Test(®); Cypress Diagnostic) compared with the standard thick-smear microscopy method using blood samples from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and individuals of unknown HIV status collected in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Our results show that 42.1% of 114 HIV-infected patients were concordantly RDT- and thick smear-positive, and 55.3% were concordantly negative. Sensitivity and specificity of the RDT test were 100.0% and 95.4%, respectively, with 5.9% false-positive results and a total agreement of 97.4%; 127 patients with unknown HIV serology were analyzed; of them, 40.9% were RDT- and thick smear-positive, and 46.4% concordantly negative. Sensitivity and specificity were 100.0% and 78.6%, respectively, with 23.5% false-positive results and a total agreement of 87.4%. Malaria Quick Test(®) is rapid and effective for the diagnosis of malaria and has a high sensitivity, confirming its use in general and HIV patients in particular. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  17. Variation in specificity of HIV rapid diagnostic tests over place and time: an analysis of discordancy data using a Bayesian approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derryck Klarkowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent trends to earlier access to anti-retroviral treatment underline the importance of accurate HIV diagnosis. The WHO HIV testing strategy recommends the use of two or three rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs combined in an algorithm and assume a population is serologically stable over time. Yet RDTs are prone to cross reactivity which can lead to false positive or discordant results. This paper uses discordancy data from Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF programmes to test the hypothesis that the specificity of RDTs change over place and time. METHODS: Data was drawn from all MSF test centres in 2007-8 using a parallel testing algorithm. A Bayesian approach was used to derive estimates of disease prevalence, and of test sensitivity and specificity using the software WinBUGS. A comparison of models with different levels of complexity was performed to assess the evidence for changes in test characteristics by location and over time. RESULTS: 106, 035 individuals were included from 51 centres in 10 countries using 7 different RDTs. Discordancy patterns were found to vary by location and time. Model fit statistics confirmed this, with improved fit to the data when test specificity and sensitivity were allowed to vary by centre and over time. Two examples show evidence of variation in specificity between different testing locations within a single country. Finally, within a single test centre, variation in specificity was seen over time with one test becoming more specific and the other less specific. CONCLUSION: This analysis demonstrates the variable specificity of multiple HIV RDTs over geographic location and time. This variability suggests that cross reactivity is occurring and indicates a higher than previously appreciated risk of false positive HIV results using the current WHO testing guidelines. Given the significant consequences of false HIV diagnosis, we suggest that current testing and evaluation strategies be reviewed.

  18. Evaluating diagnostic tests

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Appraising the predictive abilities of diagnostic tests can be surprisingly difficult. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction to the principles underlying the objective evaluation of diagnostic tests. Starting from basic concepts about probability,. Bayes' theorem will be introduced and an explanation given as to.

  19. HIV Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 126 HIV Resistance Testing WHAT IS RESISTANCE? HOW DOES RESISTANCE DEVELOP? ... one or more ARVs. This is called transmitted resistance. The more that HIV multiplies, the more mutations ...

  20. Impact of helminth diagnostic test performance on estimation of risk factors and outcomes in HIV-positive adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Arndt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditional methods using microscopy for the detection of helminth infections have limited sensitivity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays enhance detection of helminths, particularly low burden infections. However, differences in test performance may modify the ability to detect associations between helminth infection, risk factors, and sequelae. We compared these associations using microscopy and PCR. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was nested within a randomized clinical trial conducted at 3 sites in Kenya. We performed microscopy and real-time multiplex PCR for the stool detection and quantification of Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Schistosoma species. We utilized regression to evaluate associations between potential risk factors or outcomes and infection as detected by either method. RESULTS: Of 153 HIV-positive adults surveyed, 55(36.0% and 20(13.1% were positive for one or more helminth species by PCR and microscopy, respectively (p<0.001. PCR-detected infections were associated with farming (Prevalence Ratio 1.57, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.40, communal water source (PR 3.80, 95% CI: 1.01, 14.27, and no primary education (PR 1.54, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.33, whereas microscopy-detected infections were not associated with any risk factors under investigation. Microscopy-detected infections were associated with significantly lower hematocrit and hemoglobin (means of -3.56% and -0.77 g/dl and a 48% higher risk of anemia (PR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.17, 1.88 compared to uninfected. Such associations were absent for PCR-detected infections unless infection intensity was considered, Infections diagnosed with either method were associated with increased risk of eosinophilia (PCR PR 2.42, 95% CI: 1.02, 5.76; microscopy PR 2.92, 95% CI: 1.29, 6.60. CONCLUSION: Newer diagnostic methods, including PCR, improve the detection of helminth infections. This heightened sensitivity may improve the

  1. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF TUBERCULOSIS AND MYCOBACTERIOSIS IN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Panteleev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the differences in clinical and laboratory manifestations of tuberculosis and mycobacteriosis in HIV patients. It was found out that mycobacteriosis developed mostly in the socially well patients at the advanced stages of HIV infection. In case of mycobacteriosis, lesions were mostly located in the abdomen with limited inflammation in the chest, while in case of tuberculosis pulmonary lesions dominated. A negative result of sputum PCR assays for tuberculosis mycobacteria with a positive result of the test for AFB is an important sign for differential diagnostics. The obtained results allow performing differential diagnostics of these diseases in those HIV infected.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy, incremental yield and prognostic value of Determine TB-LAM for routine diagnostic testing for tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients requiring acute hospital admission in South Africa: a prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Stephen D; Kerkhoff, Andrew D; Burton, Rosie; Schutz, Charlotte; Boulle, Andrew; Vogt, Monica; Gupta-Wright, Ankur; Nicol, Mark P; Meintjes, Graeme

    2017-03-21

    We previously reported that one-third of HIV-positive adults requiring medical admission to a South African district hospital had laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) and that almost two-thirds of cases could be rapidly diagnosed using Xpert MTB/RIF-testing of concentrated urine samples obtained on the first day of admission. Implementation of urine-based, routine, point-of-care TB screening is an attractive intervention that might be facilitated by use of a simple, low-cost diagnostic tool, such as the Determine TB-LAM lateral-flow rapid test for HIV-associated TB. Sputum, urine and blood samples were systematically obtained from unselected HIV-positive adults within 24 hours of admission to a South African township hospital. Additional clinical samples were obtained during hospitalization as clinically indicated. TB was defined by the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in any sample using Xpert MTB/RIF or liquid culture. The diagnostic yield, accuracy and prognostic value of urine-lipoarabinomannan (LAM) testing were determined, but urine-LAM results did not inform treatment decisions. Consecutive HIV-positive adult acute medical admissions not already receiving TB treatment (n = 427) were enrolled regardless of clinical presentation or symptoms. TB was diagnosed in 139 patients (TB prevalence 32.6%; median CD4 count 80 cells/μL). In the first 24 hours of admission, sputum (spot and/or induced) samples were obtained from 37.0% of patients and urine samples from 99.5% of patients (P LAM and 52.5% (n = 73/139) for sputum-Xpert/urine-LAM combined (P LAM was unrelated to respiratory symptoms, and LAM assay specificity (using a grade-2 cut-off) was 98.9% (274/277; 95% confidence interval [CI] 96.9-99.8). Among TB cases, positive urine-LAM status was strongly associated with mortality at 90 days (adjusted hazard ratio 4.20; 95% CI 1.50-11.75). Routine testing for TB in newly admitted HIV-positive adults using Determine TB-LAM to test urine

  3. Oral Cytology for HIV: A New Diagnostic Tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagad, Vaibhav Mahesh; Shenoy, Nandita; Ramapuram, John; Lewis, Amitha; Srikant, N; Sarin, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    To asses morphological and morphometrical alterations of oral squamous epithelial cells in HIV infected individuals, and determine its diagnostic significance for HIV infection. Informed Consent was obtained from all study subjects. 40 adult HIV infected patients (experimental group) and 40 adult non-infected volunteers (control group) participated. Age, occupation, and relevant medical history were recorded. The following laboratory tests reports were recorded: complete blood cell counts, blood glucose levels, serum iron and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Oral smears were collected from normal appearing tongue and buccal mucosa of the individuals by exfoliative cytology. The cells were morphologically analysed and the nuclear area (NA), the cytoplasmic area (CA) and the nucleus-to-cytoplasm area ratio (NA/CA) were calculated. Cell yield, cell cohesion, presence/absence of inflammatory cells and candida were observed. The cytological smears of HIV patients showed abundant cell yield and the epithelial cells were found to be in close cohesive clusters and both findings were found to be statistically significant. Nuclear cytoplasmic ratio was seen to be increased in 93.8% of HIV positive patientsand Mild to moderate pleomorphism was observed in 17.9% of HIV positive patients. HIV positive patients had a diminished inflammatory response and this was found to be statistically significant. Statistically significant deviations from normal oral epithelium were found in the study conducted. With further research, oral exfoliative cytology may form a new, painless, inexpensive diagnostic method for HIV infections. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Comparative performance of the Geenius™ HIV-1/HIV-2 supplemental test in Florida's public health testing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordan, Sally; Bennett, Berry; Lee, Meghan; Crowe, Susanne

    2017-06-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published updated guidelines in 2014 for the laboratory diagnosis of HIV in the United States, which recommend use of a supplemental immunoassay (IA) that differentiates HIV-1 from HIV-2 after a repeatedly reactive HIV-1/2 antigen/antibody "Combo" screening test. In October 2014, Bio-Rad Laboratories introduced the FDA-cleared Geenius HIV-1/HIV-2 Supplemental assay and in July 2016, it replaced the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation rapid test as the second test in the HIV diagnostic algorithm. To compare performance of the new FDA-cleared Bio-Rad Geenius HIV-1/HIV-2 Supplemental assay and the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation assay for use as the primary supplemental test in the 2014 CDC/APHL HIV Diagnostic Algorithm. Two sets of specimens were used to assess the performance of Geenius; 340 select retrospective specimens, obtained through routine clinical submissions from individuals seeking HIV serostatus determinations and 10 known HIV-2 antibody reactive specimens provided by Bio-Rad Laboratories. Panels were created and characterized solely by in-house laboratory results. The panels consisted of: algorithm-defined "established HIV-1 infections" (n=250), "acute HIV-1 infections" (n=20), "early HIV-1 infections" (n=10) and "false positive Combo specimens" (n=60). CONCLUSIONS: The Geenius assay provides significant advantages over Multispot as an appropriate replacement for the primary supplemental test in the HIV Diagnostic Algorithm. In this retrospective study, Geenius was highly concordant with Multispot, reclassified some acute and early algorithm-defined HIV-1 positive specimens and demonstrated a potential decrease in the number HIV-1 RNA nucleic acid amplification tests needed to complete the diagnostic algorithm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. HIV testing in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sullivan, Ann K; Sperle, Ida; Raben, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An evaluation of the 2010 ECDC guidance on HIV testing, conducted in October 2015-January 2016, assessed its impact, added value, relevance and usability and the need for updated guidance. METHODS: Data sources were two surveys: one for the primary target audience (health policymakers...... with other international guidance. Primary target audience respondents in 11 of 23 countries reported that they had used the guidance in development, monitoring and/or evaluation of their national HIV testing policy, guidelines, programme and/or strategy, and 29 of 51 of the broader target audience...... respondents reported having used the guidance in their work. Both the primary and broader target audience considered it important or very important to have an EU/EEA-level HIV testing guidance (23/28 and 46/51, respectively). CONCLUSION: The guidance has been widely used to develop policies, guidelines...

  6. Determinants of HIV testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawleshwarkar, Shailendra; Harrison, Christopher; Britt, Helena; Mindel, Adrian

    2011-08-01

    To determine the characteristics of general practitioners (GPs) who test and patients who are tested for HIV in Australia. A secondary analysis of data from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health programme; a cross-sectional, national survey of GP activity. We identified GP, patient and encounter characteristics that were associated with HIV testing between April 2000 and March 2010. We looked at testing rates for patients with different characteristics, whether they had attended for screening and GP 'risk factor' identification. Multiple logistic regression was used to measure the independent effect of each GP, patient and encounter characteristic on testing for HIV. Data were available for 984,200 encounters from 9842 GPs. 1796 (18.2%) of GPs performed at least one HIV test. On logistic regression, independent predictors of HIV testing included the management of a 'risk factor' (OR 19.4, 95% CI 17.4 to 21.6), screening (OR 10.6, 95% CI 9.4 to 12.1), younger GP age, practice in a metropolitan area (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.6), patient age, gender (male > female OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.7 to 3.3), being new to that practice (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.8 to 2.3) and being Indigenous (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.4). The most significant independent predictors of testing were identification of a risk factor and attendance for screening. Unless barriers to testing are addressed it is unlikely that altering guidelines alone will improve testing rates and reduce transmission.

  7. Bedside paediatric HIV testing in Malawi: Impact on testing rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Provider initiated testing and counselling (PITC) is recommended for all inpatients in Malawi if they have not been tested in the previous 3 months. However testing rates remain low among children. We audited the effect of implementing a bedside diagnostic HIV testing service to determine if it would improve ...

  8. Get Tested for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Basics: What Is HIV? What is HIV? HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. This is the virus that causes AIDS. There is no cure yet for HIV/AIDS, but there are treatments that can help ...

  9. Evaluation of four rapid tests for diagnosis and differentiation of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections in Guinea-Conakry, West Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Chaillet, Pascale; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Zachariah, Rony; Duclos, Nanfack; Moctar, Diallo; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien

    2010-01-01

    With both HIV-1 and HV-2 prevalent in Guinea-Conakry, accurate diagnosis and differentiation is crucial for treatment purposes. Thus, four rapid HIV tests were evaluated for their HIV-1 and HIV-2 diagnostic and discriminative capacity for use in Guinea-Conakry. These included SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics Inc.), Genie II HIV1/HIV2 (Bio-Rad), First Response HIV Card Test 1-2.0 (PMC Medical) and Immunoflow HIV1-HIV2 (Core Diagnostics). Results were compared with gold standard tes...

  10. Clinical performance of the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test to correctly differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection in screening algorithms using third and fourth generation assays and to identify cross reactivity with the HIV-1 Western Blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric M; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Coombs, Robert W

    2013-12-01

    An accurate and rapid serologic method to differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection is required since the confirmatory HIV-1 Western Blot (WB) may demonstrate cross-reactivity with HIV-2 antibodies. To evaluate the performance of the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid assay as a supplemental test to correctly identify HIV-2 infection and identify HIV-1 WB cross-reactivity with HIV-2 in clinical samples tested at an academic medical center. Between August 2008 and July 2012, clinical samples were screened for HIV using either 3rd- or 4th-generation HIV-1/2 antibody or combination antibody and HIV-1 p24 antigen assays, respectively. All repeatedly reactive samples were reflexed for Multispot rapid testing. Multispot HIV-2 and HIV-1 and HIV-2-reactive samples were further tested using an HIV-2 immunoblot assay and HIV-1 or HIV-2 RNA assays when possible. The HIV-1 WB was performed routinely for additional confirmation and to assess for HIV-2 antibody cross-reactivity. Of 46,061 samples screened, 890 (89.6%) of 993 repeatedly reactive samples were also Multispot-reactive: 882 for HIV-1; three for only HIV-2; and five for both HIV-1 and HIV-2. All three HIV-2-only Multispot-positives along with a single dually reactive HIV-1/2 Multispot-positive were also HIV-2 immunoblot-positive; the latter was HIV-1 RNA negative and HIV-2 RNA positive. The Multispot rapid test performed well as a supplemental test for HIV-1/2 diagnostic testing. Four new HIV-2 infections (0.45%) were identified from among 890 Multispot-reactive tests. The use of HIV-1 WB alone to confirm HIV-1/2 screening assays may underestimate the true prevalence of HIV-2 infection in the United States. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. HIV Testing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-11-28

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the December 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. In the U.S., about 15 percent of people who have HIV don't know they have it. Learn about the importance of testing, early diagnosis, and treatment.  Created: 11/28/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/28/2017.

  12. Response to "Rapid tests for HIV type discrimination in West Africa may perform differently"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tchounga, Boris K; Ekouevi, Didier K; Eholie, Serge P

    2015-01-01

    ... test used for the initial discrimination of HIV-positive patients. Our team previously conducted in 2004 a field evaluation of rapid HIV serologic tests in Cote d'Ivoire and highlighted the lower accuracy of Genie II for differentiating between HIV-1, HIV-2 and dually reactive patients [4]. In our most recent study, the initial HIV diagnostic te...

  13. Get Tested for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS from other websites National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day Blog topics HIV and AIDS Breaking Down ... t Miss a Beat National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms ...

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of the rapid urine lipoarabinomannan test for pulmonary tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults in Ghana-findings from the DETECT HIV-TB study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Kenu, Ernest; Lartey, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    and Gene Xpert MTB/RIF results and for a composite reference standard including clinical follow-up data. Performance of sputum smear microscopy was included for comparison. RESULTS: Of 469 patients investigated for TB, the LAM test correctly identified 24/55 (44 %) of microbiologically confirmed TB cases...

  15. Evaluation of supplemental testing with the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test and APTIMA HIV-1 RNA Qualitative Assay to resolve specimens with indeterminate or negative HIV-1 Western blots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, Laurie; Ethridge, Steven F; Oraka, Emeka; Owen, S Michele; Wesolowski, Laura G; Wroblewski, Kelly; Landgraf, Kenneth M; Parker, Monica M; Brinson, Myra; Branson, Bernard M

    2013-12-01

    The use of Western blot (WB) as a supplemental test after reactive sensitive initial assays can lead to inconclusive or misclassified HIV test results, delaying diagnosis. To determine the proportion of specimens reactive by immunoassay (IA) but indeterminate or negative by WB that could be resolved by alternative supplemental tests recommended under a new HIV diagnostic testing algorithm. Remnant HIV diagnostic specimens that were reactive on 3rd generation HIV-1/2 IA and either negative or indeterminate by HIV-1 WB from 11 health departments were tested with the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test (Multispot) and the Gen-Probe APTIMA HIV-1 RNA Qualitative Assay (APTIMA). According to the new testing algorithm, 512 (89.8%) specimens were HIV-negative, 55 (9.6%) were HIV-1 positive (including 19 [3.3%] that were acute HIV-1 and 9 [1.6%] that were positive for HIV-1 by Multispot but APTIMA-negative), 2 (0.4%) were HIV-2 positive, and 1 (0.2%) was HIV-positive, type undifferentiated. 47 (21.4%) of the 220 WB-indeterminate and 8 (2.3%) of the 350 WB-negative specimens were HIV-1 positive. Applying the new HIV diagnostic algorithm retrospectively to WB-negative and indeterminate specimens, the HIV infection status could be established for nearly all of the specimens. IA-reactive HIV-infected persons with WB-negative results had been previously misclassified as uninfected, and HIV diagnosis was delayed for those with WB-indeterminate specimens. These findings underscore the limitations of the WB to confirm HIV infection after reactive results from contemporary 3rd or 4th generation IAs that can detect HIV antibodies several weeks sooner than the WB. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Anemia: Evaluation and Diagnostic Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Michael J; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Anemia is among the most common medical problems and clinical and laboratory evaluation need to be approached logically. The complete blood count with red cell indices offers clues to diagnosis. Many anemias have characteristic red cell morphology. The reticulocyte count serves as a useful screen for hemolysis or blood loss. Testing for specific causes of the anemia is performed. Occasionally, examination of the bone marrow is required for diagnosis. Molecular testing is increasingly being use to aid the diagnostic process. This article reviews diagnostic tests for anemia and suggests a rational approach to determining the etiology of a patient's anemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cochrane diagnostic test accuracy reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, Mariska M. G.; Deeks, Jonathan J.; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Macaskill, Petra

    2013-01-01

    In 1996, shortly after the founding of The Cochrane Collaboration, leading figures in test evaluation research established a Methods Group to focus on the relatively new and rapidly evolving methods for the systematic review of studies of diagnostic tests. Seven years later, the Collaboration

  18. Pooled nucleic acid testing increases the diagnostic yield of acute HIV infections in a high-risk population compared to 3rd and 4th generation HIV enzyme immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajden, Mel; Cook, Darrel; Mak, Annie; Chu, Ken; Chahil, Navdeep; Steinberg, Malcolm; Rekart, Michael; Gilbert, Mark

    2014-09-01

    We compared a 3rd generation (gen) and two 4th gen HIV enzyme immunoassays (EIA) to pooled nucleic acid testing (PNAT) for the identification of pre- and early seroconversion acute HIV infection (AHI). 9550 specimens from males >18 year from clinics attended by men who have sex with men were tested by Siemens ADVIA Centaur(®) HIV 1/O/2 (3rd gen) and HIV Combo (4th gen), as well as by Abbott ARCHITECT(®) HIV Ag/Ab Combo (4th gen). Third gen non-reactive specimens were also tested by Roche COBAS(®) Ampliprep/COBAS® TaqMan HIV-1 Test v.2 in pools of 24 samples. Sensitivity and specificity of the three EIAs for AHI detection were compared. 7348 persons contributed 9435 specimens and had no evidence of HIV infection, 79 (94 specimens) had established HIV infection, 6 (9 specimens) had pre-seroconversion AHI and 9 (12 specimens) had early seroconversion AHI. Pre-seroconversion AHI cases were not detected by 3rd gen EIA, whereas 2/6 (33.3%) were detected by Siemens 4th gen, 4/6 (66.7%) by Abbott 4th gen and 6/6 (100%) by PNAT. All three EIAs and PNAT detected all individuals with early seroconversion AHI. Overall sensitivity/specificity for the EIAs relative to WB or NAT resolved infection status was 93.6%/99.9% for Siemens 3rd gen, 95.7%/99.7% for Siemens 4th gen and 97.9%/99.2% for Abbott 4th gen. While both 4th gen EIAs demonstrated improved sensitivity for AHI compared to 3rd gen EIA, PNAT identified more AHI cases than either 4th gen assay. PNAT is likely to remain a useful strategy to identify AHI in high-risk populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Proposed national HIV testing policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, S; Thakur, B B

    1993-11-01

    The National AIDS Control Organization of India is preparing a draft policy document on a national HIV testing policy. This paper presents some of the pertinent issues proposed for incorporation into that policy. Any testing procedure undertaken in the country must be in accordance with and part of the comprehensive control program on HIV. Testing upon an individual may be done to identify an individual infected with HIV for the diagnosis of clinically suspected AIDS, voluntary testing at the behest of the client, and for non-health purposes. For example, testing is also permitted to monitor the trend of HIV infection in a population or subgroup to guide eventual intervention; to test blood, organs, or tissue destined for donation; and for research on HIV infection. Such testing must be supported by social support and the means for intervention even if the testing is refused and ultimately not performed. All mandatory linked testing should be discouraged when it tends to identify an individual. Transfusion safety should be ensured throughout the country, with a single ESR test sufficing to avoid the risk of false negative results. The establishment of voluntary testing centers will be encouraged; the testing protocol using three ESR or three ESR with WB is considered scientific for identifying an infected individual; and surveillance is to be designed by the state epidemiologists/state program officers and carried out by the staff of the selected health institutions with samples tested in any HIV testing facility suitably situated and easily approachable by the staff of the surveillance site. Testing procedures for research must follow the highest international standards for scientific protocol. Test kits must be evaluated before they are manufactured indigenously. Finally, the existing HIV testing network will have to be restructured to carry out objective-wise testing, with internal and external quality assurance of the program rigorously implemented on a regular

  20. Immunochromatographic diagnostic test analysis using Google Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve; Caire, Romain; Cortazar, Bingen; Turan, Mehmet; Wong, Andrew; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-03-25

    We demonstrate a Google Glass-based rapid diagnostic test (RDT) reader platform capable of qualitative and quantitative measurements of various lateral flow immunochromatographic assays and similar biomedical diagnostics tests. Using a custom-written Glass application and without any external hardware attachments, one or more RDTs labeled with Quick Response (QR) code identifiers are simultaneously imaged using the built-in camera of the Google Glass that is based on a hands-free and voice-controlled interface and digitally transmitted to a server for digital processing. The acquired JPEG images are automatically processed to locate all the RDTs and, for each RDT, to produce a quantitative diagnostic result, which is returned to the Google Glass (i.e., the user) and also stored on a central server along with the RDT image, QR code, and other related information (e.g., demographic data). The same server also provides a dynamic spatiotemporal map and real-time statistics for uploaded RDT results accessible through Internet browsers. We tested this Google Glass-based diagnostic platform using qualitative (i.e., yes/no) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and quantitative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests. For the quantitative RDTs, we measured activated tests at various concentrations ranging from 0 to 200 ng/mL for free and total PSA. This wearable RDT reader platform running on Google Glass combines a hands-free sensing and image capture interface with powerful servers running our custom image processing codes, and it can be quite useful for real-time spatiotemporal tracking of various diseases and personal medical conditions, providing a valuable tool for epidemiology and mobile health.

  1. Testing the independence of two diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Wu, D; Zelen, M

    2001-12-01

    Consider two diagnostic procedures having binary outcomes. If one of the tests results in a positive finding, a more definitive diagnostic procedure will be administered to establish the presence or absence of a disease. The use of both tests will improve the overall screening sensitivity when the two tests are independent, compared with employing two tests that are positively correlated. We estimate the correlation coefficient of the two tests and derive statistical methods for testing the independence of the two diagnostic procedures conditional on disease status. The statistical tests are used to investigate the independence of mammography and clinical breast exams aimed at establishing the benefit of early detection of breast cancer. The data used in the analysis are obtained from periodic screening examinations of three randomized clinical trials of breast cancer screening. Analysis of each of these trials confirms the independence of the clinical breast and mammography examinations. Based on these three large clinical trials, we conclude that a clinical breast exam considerably increases the overall sensitivity relative to screening with mammography alone and should be routinely included in early breast cancer detection programs.

  2. A European multicientre study on the comparison of HIV-1 viral loads between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and Roche COBAS® TAQMAN® HIV-1 test, Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Hofmann, Jörg; Izopet, Jacques; Kühn, Sebastian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Mancon, Alessandro; Marcos, Mª Angeles; Mileto, Davide; Sauné, Karine; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Viral load monitoring is essential for patients under treatment for HIV. Beckman Coulter has developed the VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the novel, automated DxN VERIS Molecular Diagnostics System. ¥ OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the clinical performance of the new quantitative VERIS HIV-1 Assay at multiple EU laboratories. Method comparison with the VERIS HIV-1 Assay was performed with 415 specimens at 5 sites tested with COBAS ® AmpliPrep/COBAS ® TaqMan ® HIV-1 Test, v2.0, 169 specimens at 3 sites tested with RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and 202 specimens from 2 sites tested with VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Patient monitoring sample results from 4 sites were also compared. Bland-Altman analysis showed the average bias between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay to be 0.28, 0.39, and 0.61 log 10 cp/mL, respectively. Bias at low end levels below 1000cp/mL showed predicted bias to be HIV-1 Assay versus COBAS HIV-1 Test and RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and HIV-1 Assay. Analysis on 174 specimens tested with the 0.175mL volume VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test showed average bias of 0.39 log 10 cp/mL. Patient monitoring results using VERIS HIV-1 Assay demonstrated similar viral load trends over time to all comparators. The VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the DxN VERIS System demonstrated comparable clinical performance to COBAS ® HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. DIAGNOSTIC CHARACTERISTICS OF HYPERSENSITIVE IMMUNOENZYME ASSAY KIT TO HIV-INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yu. Trohimchuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus remains relevant and can be solved by introduction the highly sensitive 4th generation ELISA test kits in the laboratory practice. The advantage of this analysis is simultaneous determination of serum antigen p24 HIV-1 and HIV-specific total antibody (IgG, IgM, IgA, that can detect the infection in the early stages of development. In Private Joint Stock Company «Scientific and Production Company Diaproph-Med» a modified version of the test kit of the 4th generation DIA-HIV-Ag/Ab hypersensitivity was developed, which uses a mixture of synthetic analogs of viral antigens in the immune-enzyme conjugates at two stages of reaction. Significant amplification of specific signal is achieved by introducing a streptavidin which is conjugated to horseradish peroxidase polymeric form. The analytical sensitivity of the test kit to identify the 1st International Standard WHO HIV p24 (NIBSC was 0.78 IU/ml. The ability to test kit to detect early HIV infection has been examined for 9 seroconversion panels of sera (7 production ZeptoMetrix Corp. and 2 – SeraCare Life Sciences, USA and is comparable to its peers, the leading manufacturers of test kits. The diagnostic characteristics of the test kit tested on standard panels, including dilution of serum of HIV- infected people, and not diluted sera with antibodies to HIV-1 (1 869 samples and HIV-2 ( 41 sample. In these studies, the test kit detected HIV in a large ratio OD/cut off compared to similar commercial test kits for the 4th generation. The diagnostic specificity of the test kit DIA-HIV-Ag/Ab according to the results obtained in the study of blood donors from various transfusion services in Ukraine (93 788 researches was 99.95%.

  4. Ethnic Comparisons in HIV Testing Attitudes, HIV Testing, and Predictors of HIV Testing Among Black and White College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Melanie P; Javier, Sarah J; Abrams, Jasmine A; McGann, Amanda Wattenmaker; Belgrave, Faye Z

    2017-08-01

    This study's primary aim was to examine ethnic differences in predictors of HIV testing among Black and White college students. We also examined ethnic differences in sexual risk behaviors and attitudes toward the importance of HIV testing. An analytic sample of 126 Black and 617 White undergraduatestudents aged 18-24 were analyzed for a subset of responses on the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II) (2012) pertaining to HIV testing, attitudes about the importance of HIV testing, and sexual risk behaviors. Predictors of HIV testing behavior were analyzed using logistic regression. t tests and chi-square tests were performed to access differences in HIV test history, testing attitudes, and sexual risk behaviors. Black students had more positive attitudes toward testing and were more likely to have been tested for HIV compared to White students. A greater number of sexual partners and more positive HIV testing attitudes were significant predictors of HIV testing among White students, whereas relationship status predicted testing among Black students. Older age and history of ever having sex were significant predictors of HIV testing for both groups. There were no significant differences between groups in number of sexual partners or self-reports in history of sexual experience (oral, vaginal, or anal). Factors that influence HIV testing may differ across racial/ethnic groups. Findings support the need to consider racial/ethnic differences in predictors of HIV testing during the development and tailoring of HIV testing prevention initiatives targeting college students.

  5. Increasing HIV testing among male partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Balestre, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Miric, Marija; Darak, Shrinivas; Butsashvili, Maia; Perez-Then, Eddy; Eboko, Fred; Plazy, Melanie; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; du Lou, Annabel Desgrees; Dabis, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Couple-oriented posttest HIV counselling (COC) provides pregnant women with tools and strategies to invite her partner to HIV counselling and testing. We conducted a randomized trial of the efficacy of COC on partner HIV testing in low/medium HIV prevalence settings (Cameroon, Dominican

  6. Rapid HIV testing for developing countries: the challenge of false-negative tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogev, Ram

    2012-06-01

    It is a common practice in resource-constrained countries to accept two positive rapid HIV antibody test results as diagnostic for HIV infection. Because these tests are inexpensive and results are obtained quickly, they are recommended by the WHO to "scale-up" HIV testing to increase the number of people tested. The negative predictive value of rapid HIV tests is so high that negative results are considered conclusive despite the fact that false-negative results can occur in several situations. While the specificity and sensitivity of rapid HIV tests in resource-rich countries is acceptable, there are only limited data about their performance in resource-constrained countries. The challenges of rapid HIV testing in these situations will be discussed.

  7. Auditing HIV Testing Rates across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raben, D; Mocroft, A; Rayment, M

    2015-01-01

    European guidelines recommend the routine offer of an HIV test in patients with a number of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS conditions believed to share an association with HIV; so called indicator conditions (IC). Adherence with this guidance across Europe is not known. We audited HIV testing behaviour...... candidiasis. Observed HIV-positive rates were applied by region and IC to estimate the number of HIV diagnoses potentially missed. Outcomes examined were: HIV test rate (% of total patients with IC), HIV test accepted (% of tests performed/% of tests offered) and new HIV diagnosis rate (%). There were 49...... audits from 23 centres, representing 7037 patients. The median test rate across audits was 72% (IQR 32-97), lowest in Northern Europe (median 44%, IQR 22-68%) and highest in Eastern Europe (median 99%, IQR 86-100). Uptake of testing was close to 100% in all regions. The median HIV+ rate was 0.9% (IQR 0...

  8. Accounting for False Positive HIV Tests: Is Visceral Leishmaniasis Responsible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Shanks

    Full Text Available Co-infection with HIV and visceral leishmaniasis is an important consideration in treatment of either disease in endemic areas. Diagnosis of HIV in resource-limited settings relies on rapid diagnostic tests used together in an algorithm. A limitation of the HIV diagnostic algorithm is that it is vulnerable to falsely positive reactions due to cross reactivity. It has been postulated that visceral leishmaniasis (VL infection can increase this risk of false positive HIV results. This cross sectional study compared the risk of false positive HIV results in VL patients with non-VL individuals.Participants were recruited from 2 sites in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian algorithm of a tiebreaker using 3 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs was used to test for HIV. The gold standard test was the Western Blot, with indeterminate results resolved by PCR testing. Every RDT screen positive individual was included for testing with the gold standard along with 10% of all negatives. The final analysis included 89 VL and 405 non-VL patients. HIV prevalence was found to be 12.8% (47/ 367 in the VL group compared to 7.9% (200/2526 in the non-VL group. The RDT algorithm in the VL group yielded 47 positives, 4 false positives, and 38 negatives. The same algorithm for those without VL had 200 positives, 14 false positives, and 191 negatives. Specificity and positive predictive value for the group with VL was less than the non-VL group; however, the difference was not found to be significant (p = 0.52 and p = 0.76, respectively.The test algorithm yielded a high number of HIV false positive results. However, we were unable to demonstrate a significant difference between groups with and without VL disease. This suggests that the presence of endemic visceral leishmaniasis alone cannot account for the high number of false positive HIV results in our study.

  9. Accounting for False Positive HIV Tests: Is Visceral Leishmaniasis Responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Leslie; Ritmeijer, Koert; Piriou, Erwan; Siddiqui, M Ruby; Kliescikova, Jarmila; Pearce, Neil; Ariti, Cono; Muluneh, Libsework; Masiga, Johnson; Abebe, Almaz

    2015-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV and visceral leishmaniasis is an important consideration in treatment of either disease in endemic areas. Diagnosis of HIV in resource-limited settings relies on rapid diagnostic tests used together in an algorithm. A limitation of the HIV diagnostic algorithm is that it is vulnerable to falsely positive reactions due to cross reactivity. It has been postulated that visceral leishmaniasis (VL) infection can increase this risk of false positive HIV results. This cross sectional study compared the risk of false positive HIV results in VL patients with non-VL individuals. Participants were recruited from 2 sites in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian algorithm of a tiebreaker using 3 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) was used to test for HIV. The gold standard test was the Western Blot, with indeterminate results resolved by PCR testing. Every RDT screen positive individual was included for testing with the gold standard along with 10% of all negatives. The final analysis included 89 VL and 405 non-VL patients. HIV prevalence was found to be 12.8% (47/ 367) in the VL group compared to 7.9% (200/2526) in the non-VL group. The RDT algorithm in the VL group yielded 47 positives, 4 false positives, and 38 negatives. The same algorithm for those without VL had 200 positives, 14 false positives, and 191 negatives. Specificity and positive predictive value for the group with VL was less than the non-VL group; however, the difference was not found to be significant (p = 0.52 and p = 0.76, respectively). The test algorithm yielded a high number of HIV false positive results. However, we were unable to demonstrate a significant difference between groups with and without VL disease. This suggests that the presence of endemic visceral leishmaniasis alone cannot account for the high number of false positive HIV results in our study.

  10. [Rapid diagnostic test for malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houzé, S

    2017-02-01

    The rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) whose main interest lies in their implementation without special equipment by unskilled personnel have grown significantly over the past fifteen years to diagnose malaria. They rely on the detection of specific Plasmodium proteins, PfHRP2, pLDH and aldolase. If the detection of PfHRP2 has very good sensitivity for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the detection of pLDH or aldolase is less efficient for other species, leaving its place to the reference microscopic diagnosis. RDT could not generally be used to monitor therapeutic efficacy because they can remain positive after clinical and parasitological cure. Furthermore, the development of the use of these tests has highlighted the need for quality assurance programs to monitor their production as their use.

  11. Evaluation of a Rapid Point of Care Test for Detecting Acute and Established HIV Infection, and Examining the Role of Study Quality on Diagnostic Accuracy: A Bayesian Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Smallwood

    Full Text Available Fourth generation (Ag/Ab combination point of care HIV tests like the FDA-approved Determine HIV1/2 Ag/Ab Combo test offer the promise of timely detection of acute HIV infection, relevant in the context of HIV control. However, a synthesis of their performance has not yet been done. In this meta-analysis we not only assessed device performance but also evaluated the role of study quality on diagnostic accuracy.Two independent reviewers searched seven databases, including conferences and bibliographies, and independently extracted data from 17 studies. Study quality was assessed with QUADAS-2. Data on sensitivity and specificity (overall, antigen, and antibody were pooled using a Bayesian hierarchical random effects meta-analysis model. Subgroups were analyzed by blood samples (serum/plasma vs. whole blood and study designs (case-control vs. cross-sectional.The overall specificity of the Determine Combo test was 99.1%, 95% credible interval (CrI [97.3-99.8]. The overall pooled sensitivity for the device was at 88.5%, 95% [80.1-93.4]. When the components of the test were analyzed separately, the pooled specificities were 99.7%, 95% CrI [96.8-100] and 99.6%, 95% CrI [99.0-99.8], for the antigen and antibody components, respectively. Pooled sensitivity of the antibody component was 97.3%, 95% CrI [60.7-99.9], and pooled sensitivity for the antigen component was found to be 12.3%, 95% (CrI [1.1-44.2]. No significant differences were found between subgroups by blood sample or study design. However, it was noted that many studies restricted their study sample to p24 antigen or RNA positive specimens, which may have led to underestimation of overall test performance. Detection bias, selection (spectrum bias, incorporation bias, and verification bias impaired study quality.Although the specificity of all test components was high, antigenic sensitivity will merit from an improvement. Besides the accuracy of the device itself, study quality, also impacts

  12. HIV testing in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tri, D L

    1988-11-01

    Because the incidence of AIDS continues to grow, affecting a greater number of the working population, the disease is also rapidly becoming a major issue for employers. AIDS has implications for employer decisions in the areas of hiring, termination, training, promotions, benefits, collective bargaining, health and safety in the workplace. This article examines the advantages and disadvantages of HIV screening in the workplace. Technical issues regarding the validity of current HIV tests being used are outlined. Precedent-setting court decisions are reviewed, and the resulting legal and ethical implications and dilemmas of employers and health care providers are examined.

  13. Transmission route and reasons for HIV testing among recently diagnosed HIV patients in HIV-TR cohort, 2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basak Dokuzoguz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Routes of transmission and reasons for HIV testing are important epidemiologic data to analyze the epidemic and to tailor the response to AIDS. The aim of this study was to analyze reasons for testing and transmission ways of HIV among recently diagnosed HIV patients registered in the multicenter HIV-TR cohort in Turkey. Methods: Transmission ways and reasons for testing of all patients diagnosed in 2011 and 2012 were recorded on a web-based data collection system and were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The study included 693 patients (561 male, 132 female from 24 sites. Reason for HIV testing was available in 640 patients (92%. The most common reason for HIV testing was diagnostic workout for other conditions or illness followed by patient-initiated testing. The reasons for testing were listed in Table 1. The most common routes of HIV transmission were heterosexual intercourse (62.7% and sex among men who have sex with men (MSM (22.6%. At the time of HIV diagnosis, the mean CD4 lymphocyte cell count was 355/mm3 (3–1433/mm3. Primary HIV infection was determined in 42/693 (6% patients and 9/693 (% 1, 2 cases were considered “probable primary HIV infection.” The majority of the cases presented to a clinic for follow-up right after the diagnosis. On the other hand 32/616 (5.2% patients delayed their presentation for more than 3 months. The longest delay was 11 months. Conclusions: The results of the database suggest that targeted testing is lacking in the country. The shift toward homosexual transmission during the last 2 years emphasizes the need for targeted interventions. Patients present relatively late and HIV infection could only be diagnosed when immunosuppression related findings appeared. Patient-initiated testing,an indicator of awareness, was very low suggesting a need to scale-up awareness raising interventions.

  14. Secondary syphilis in HIV infection - a diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panvelker V

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary syphilis in HIV infection is being reported. The patient presented with skin rash only. VDRL was found to be negative and HIV testing was positive. He was treated for secondary syphilis with clinical response. Blood VDRL test was subsequently reported as reactive.

  15. Increasing HIV Testing in Inpatient Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway, Martha; Mangurian, Christina; Carraher, Noah; Momenzadeh, Amanda; Leary, Mark; Lee, Emily K; Dilley, James W

    2017-10-23

    People with serious mental illness (SMI) are at elevated risk of HIV infection, but do not receive HIV tests regularly. Inpatient psychiatric admissions provide opportunities for HIV testing. This study retrospectively examined the impact of three sequential interventions designed to increase HIV testing on an acute inpatient psychiatry service: (1) advocacy by an administrative champion, (2) an on-site HIV counselor, and (3) a clinician championing HIV testing. Demographic and HIV testing data were extracted from hospital data systems for 11,360 admissions of HIV-negative patients to an inpatient psychiatry service between 2006 and 2012. Relationships among interventions, length of stay, patient demographics, and receipt of an HIV test were examined using general estimating equation methods. In the year prior to the intervention, 7.2% of psychiatric inpatients received HIV tests. After 1 year of administrative advocacy, 11.2% received tests. Following the HIV counseling intervention, 25.1% of patients were tested. After the counseling intervention ended, continued administrative and clinical advocacy was associated with further increases in testing. In the final year studied, 30.3% of patients received HIV tests. Patients with shorter inpatient stays and those of Black or Asian race/ethnicity were less likely to be tested. Further, 1.6% of HIV tests were positive. Three interventions of varying intensity were associated with a 5-fold increase in HIV testing on an acute inpatient psychiatry service. Nonetheless, 70% of inpatients were not tested. Continued efforts are needed to increase HIV testing in inpatient psychiatric settings. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. HIV and Hepatitis Testing: Global Progress, Challenges, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Philippa; Johnson, Cheryl; Figueroa, Carmen; Baggaley, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and viral hepatitis due to HBV and HCV infection are major causes of chronic disease worldwide, and share some common routes of transmission, epidemiology, initial barriers faced in treatment access, and in strategies for a global public health response. Testing and diagnosis of HIV, HBV, and HCV infection is the gateway for access to both care and treatment and prevention services, and crucial for an effective HIV and hepatitis epidemic response. In this review article, we first summarize the common goals and guiding principles in a public health approach to HIV and hepatitis testing. We summarize the impressive global progress in HIV testing scale-up and evolution of approaches, with expansion of provider-initiated testing and counseling in clinical settings (particularly antenatal and tuberculosis clinics), the introduction of more community based testing services, and use of rapid diagnostic tests enabling provision of same-day test results. However, 46% of all people living with HIV are still unaware of their serostatus, and many continue to be diagnosed and start antiretroviral therapy late. As testing and treatment scale-up accelerates for an "treat all" approach, other challenges to address include how to better focus testing and reach those yet undiagnosed and most at risk, especially key populations, men, adolescents, and children. We summarize future directions in HIV testing to speed scale-up and close gaps that are addressed in the WHO 2015 consolidated HIV testing guidelines. In contrast to HIV, action in hepatitis testing and treatment has been fragmented and limited to a few countries, and there remains a large burden of undiagnosed cases globally. We summarize key challenges in the hepatitis testing response, including lack of simple, reliable, and low-cost diagnostic tests, laboratory capacity, and testing facilities; inadequate data to guide country specific hepatitis testing approaches and who to screen; stigmatization and social

  17. [THE MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES OF DIAGNOSTIC OF GINGIVITIS AND PERIODONTITIS IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Iagodina, E V; Trefilova, Yu A; Ippolitov, E V

    2016-01-01

    The examination was carried out in the Moscow clinical infectious hospital No 2 concerning 102 patients with verified diagnosis "AIDS-infection" and seropositive according results of detection of anti-HIV-antibodies in blood serum. The study was organized to analyze rate ofcolonization of gums with virulent anaerobic bacteria in HIV-infected (polymerase chain reaction) and antibodies to HIV in gingival fluid (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). It is established that in HIV-infected patients, in scrape from gingival sulcus dominate anaerobic bacteria P. gigngivalis and A. ctinomycetemcomitans and in case of periodontitis--P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. The received data permits recommending the test-system "Multident-5" for polymerase chain reaction diagnostic. The reagents kit "Calypte®HIV-1/2"--for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay gingival fluid. The results of polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have no impact of concomitant stomatological (periodontitis, gingivitis) and somatic pathology.

  18. Evaluation of the automated 'Enzymen-Test Anti HIV-1 + 2' and 'Enzymen-Test Anti HIV-1/2 selective' for the combined detection and differentiation of anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Hess, G; Koberstein, R; Doerr, H W

    1993-10-01

    A new, modular automated ELISA (test 1) for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibody detection and differentiation (Enzymun-Test Anti HIV-1 + 2; anti HIV 1/2 selective, Boehringer Mannheim) was compared with 3 alternative enzyme immunoassays (Abbott recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation EIA, Abbott (test 2); Enzygnost HIV 1 + 2, Behringwerke (test 3); and Wellcozyme HIV recombinant, Murex (test 4)) and Western blot (New LAV I Blot and New LAV II Blot; Diagnostics Pasteur). 380 serum samples from HIV-1 and HIV-2 seropositive patients at different stages of disease, high risk individuals, patients with conditions unrelated to AIDS and from healthy blood donors were used in this evaluation along with 6 seroconversion panels, 6 serum dilution series and 'tricky' sera (repeatedly positive results in ELISA, but negative or undeterminate in Western blot; n = 67). Using the Western blot as reference assay, the overall sensitivity of the four ELISAs was 100%. Test 4 showed the highest sensitivity for antibody detection in seroconversion and dilution series. A high specificity was achieved with test 1 (100%) and test 2 (99.4%). A relatively high rate of false positive results were obtained with test 2 (n = 12) and test 3 (n = 10) by testing 'tricky' sera or samples obtained from healthy blood donors. In comparison to Western blot, a clear differentiation between HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibody serum samples was achieved with the Enzymun-Test. The results of the present study show that the Enzymun-Test provides reliable selective HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibody detection at a cost which is significantly lower than the costs of Western blot tests. Furthermore, the evaluation of test 1 suggests, that it is a highly specific assay for HIV antibody detection.

  19. Finger-stick whole blood HIV-1/-2 home-use tests are more sensitive than oral fluid-based in-home HIV tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Jaspard

    Full Text Available Several countries have recently recommended the expansion of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV antibody testing, including self-testing with rapid tests using oral fluid (OF. Several tests have been proposed for at-home use, but their diagnostic accuracy has not been fully evaluated.To evaluate the performance of 5 rapid diagnostic tests for the detection of anti-HIV-1/2 antibodies, with 4 testing OF and 1 testing whole blood.Prospective multi-center study in France. HIV-infected adults and HIV-uninfected controls were systematically screened with 5 at-home HIV tests using either OF or finger-stick blood (FSB specimens. Four OF tests (OraQuick Advance Rapid HIV-1/2, Chembio DPP HIV 1/2 Assay, test A, and test B and one FSB test (Chembio Sure Check HIV1/2 Assay were performed by trained health workers and compared with laboratory tests.In total, 179 HIV-infected patients (M/F sex ratio: 1.3 and 60 controls were included. Among the HIV-infected patients, 67.6% had an undetectable HIV viral load in their plasma due to antiretroviral therapy. Overall, the sensitivities of the OF tests were 87.2%, 88.3%, 58.9%, and 28% (for OraQuick, DPP, test A, and test B, respectively compared with 100% for the FSB test Sure Check (p50 copies/mL, reaching 94.8%, 96.5%, 90%, and 53.1% (for OraQuick, DPP, test A, and test B, respectively. The specificities of the four OF tests were 98.3%, 100%, 100%, and 87.5%, respectively, compared with 100% for the FSB test.An evaluation of candidates for HIV self-testing revealed unexpected differences in performance of the rapid tests: the FSB test showed a far greater reliability than OF tests.

  20. Increasing HIV testing among male partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Balestre, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Miric, Marija; Darak, Shrinivas; Butsashvili, Maia; Perez-Then, Eddy; Eboko, Fred; Plazy, Melanie; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; Desgrées du Loû, Annabel; Dabis, François

    2013-04-24

    Couple-oriented posttest HIV counselling (COC) provides pregnant women with tools and strategies to invite her partner to HIV counselling and testing. We conducted a randomized trial of the efficacy of COC on partner HIV testing in low/medium HIV prevalence settings (Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Georgia, India). Pregnant women were randomized to receive standard posttest HIV counselling or COC and followed until 6 months postpartum. Partner HIV testing events were notified by site laboratories, self-reported by women or both combined. Impact of COC on partner HIV testing was measured in intention-to-treat analysis. Socio-behavioural factors associated with partner HIV testing were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Among 1943 pregnant women enrolled, partner HIV testing rates (combined indicator) were 24.7% among women from COC group versus 14.3% in standard posttest HIV counselling group in Cameroon [odds ratio (OR) = 2.0 95% CI (1.2-3.1)], 23.1 versus 20.3% in Dominican Republic [OR = 1.2 (0.8-1.8)], 26.8 versus 1.2% in Georgia [OR = 29.6 (9.1-95.6)] and 35.4 versus 26.6% in India [OR = 1.5 (1.0-2.2)]. Women having received COC did not report more conjugal violence or union break-ups than in the standard posttest HIV counselling group. The main factors associated with partner HIV testing were a history of HIV testing among men in Cameroon, Dominican Republic and Georgia and the existence of couple communication around HIV testing in Georgia and India. A simple prenatal intervention taking into account the couple relationship increases the uptake of HIV testing among men in different socio-cultural settings. COC could contribute to the efforts towards eliminating mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

  1. [Recent progress in HIV screening tests and nucleic acid tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Mitsunobu; Kato, Shingo

    2010-03-01

    HIV testing plays a crucial role in detecting and monitoring HIV infection. Diagnosis of HIV infection is basically made by sequential two tests: a screening test with an enzyme immunoassay(EIA) and a confirmatory test with Western blot. The most recent EIAs, used in commercial laboratories, identify HIV infection earlier because they detect both HIV-1 antibody and antigen. Rapid tests represent another advance for HIV screening. They are widely used in voluntary counselling and testing at public health centers and private clinics. An assay for detection of HIV-1 RNA was approved as a confirmatory test of reactive screening tests to diagnose early infection. These new testing technologies offer more accurate, reliable, and convenient diagnosis of HIV infection.

  2. [Development of a rapid test kit for antibody to HIV by nano immunomagnetic lateral flow method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fa-qing; Lee, Tony; Wang, Chao-nan; Sun, Shu-ye; Li, Shan-shan; Tian, Hui

    2010-06-01

    To develop a rapid test kit for antibody to HIV by nano immunomagnetic lateral flow method. A rapid test kit was developed by conjugation of the HIV antigen gp41 and gp36 to 200nm super paramagnetic particles by carbodiimide (EDC) and coating of the HIV antigen gp41 and gp36 to nitrocellulose membrane. Then the kit was evaluated with serials of experiments. The kit was qualified with examination of national reference panel of anti-HIV antibody for colloidal gold diagnostic kit. The sensitivity was 100% by tested with 20 HIV antibody positive sera, the specificity was 98.5% by tested with 600 HIV antibody negative sera, respectively. The stability of the kit was over 12 month by storage at room temperature. A diagnostic kit for antibody to HIV was developed with the advantages of convenience, rapid test, good stability and point of care.

  3. Evaluation of the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test as an alternative to Western blot for confirmation of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Ana María; Baughan, Eleonore; Hodinka, Richard L

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, a new HIV diagnostic algorithm has been proposed that uses an HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation immunoassay instead of Western blot or immunofluoresence for confirmatory testing. To evaluate the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test (Multispot) as an alternative to Western blot analysis for confirmation of HIV infection. A series of 205 serum and plasma specimens positive for HIV-1 or HIV-2 were used to compare the performance of Multispot to a standard HIV-1 Western blot. Positive samples included 63 specimens from patients>18 months of age, 33 proficiency survey specimens, and 109 specimens from nine commercial seroconversion and performance panels. In addition, 63 specimens from 51 HIV-exposed, uninfected children≤18 months of age in various stages of seroreversion and 192 HIV-negative samples were tested. Specimens were initially screened using a 4th generation HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay. Multispot readily discriminated between individuals with HIV-1 or HIV-2 infection and those who were uninfected. Of the 205 samples repeatedly reactive by the 4th generation screening assay, infection status was correctly confirmed by Multispot in 83.9% (172/205) compared to 68.8% (141/205) for Western blot. Multispot detected HIV-1 earlier in 27.6% of low-titer antibody specimens called indeterminate by Western blot, and effectively reduced the number of indeterminate results in seroreverting HIV-1 exposed, uninfected infants and for HIV-2 infections misinterpreted as indeterminate or positive by HIV-1 Western blot. Multispot offers speed and simplicity over Western blot and has an excellent performance for differentiation and confirmation of antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diagnostic imaging techniques and chemical and metabolic analyses to detect, manage, and treat neurological disease. Some ... performed in a doctor’s office or at a clinic. Fluoroscopy is a type of x-ray that ...

  5. Thoracic sinuses in HIV a diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai V

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A male aged 57 years with multiple discharging sinuses on both sides of chest, multiple ulcers on the back, painful ankylosis of right shoulder since 2 months. Chest examination showed reduced expansion and decreased breath sounds on right side. Large boggy swelling on right hemithorax with multiple discharging sinuses was seen. VDRL was reactive in high dilutions and he was also ELISA - HIV positive. X-ray of chest showed few opacities in right lung field. A provisional diagnosis of Gumma - Syphilis/Tuberculous was considered. Sensorineural deafness was also present.

  6. Thoracic sinuses in HIV a diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai V

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A male aged 57 years with multiple discharging sinuses on both sides of chest, multiple ulcers on the back, painful ankylosis of right shoulder since 2 months. Chest examination showed reduced expansion and decreased breath sounds on right side. Large boggy swelling on right hemithorax with multiple discharging sinuses was seen. VDRL was reactive in high dilutions and he was also ELISA - HIV positive. X-ray of chest showed few opacities in right lung field. A provisional diagnosis of Gumma - Syphilis/Tuberculous was considered. Sensorineural deafness was also present.

  7. DEPIVIH 2: Use of three HIV testing methods in French primary care settings - ELISA laboratory screening versus two rapid point-of-care HIV tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadima, D; Gauthier, R; Prévoteau du Clary, F; Bouée, S; Conort, G; Livrozet, J-M; Taulera, O; Wajsbrot, A; Majerholc, C; Peter, J-M; Aubert, J-P

    2017-12-18

    The primary endpoint was to evaluate the use of HIV testing methods by French primary care providers: Elisa laboratory screening, instant result HIV diagnostic test and rapid result HIV diagnostic test. The secondary endpoints were the population screening rate of unknown HIV status consulting during the study period, reasons for screening and for choosing the specific screening method, the investigators' satisfaction with the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and problems encountered. National prospective interventional study with French family physicians (FP) from December 2013 to December 2014. FPs enrolled all consenting adults consulting for an HIV screening test during a 6-month period: the choice was an Elisa laboratory test or one of the two RDTs. During the study period, 43 FPs included 981 patients. HIV screening was performed for the first time for 31.6% of patients; 767 (78.2%) Elisa laboratory test prescriptions and 214 (21.8%) RDTs were performed, leading to a screening rate of 1.3%. For 120 (15.7%) of the Elisa laboratory tests, the result was not reported and six RDTs were not valid. Nine patients were diagnosed as HIV-infected (0.9%): five with Elisa laboratory test and four with RDT. Almost 90% of FPs were willing to keep on using RDTs in their daily practice. In general practice, RDTs may be an important additional tool to traditional HIV screening. They could account for one in five tests prescribed in this context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. How to appraise a diagnostic test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N.

    2011-01-01

    Urologists frequently encounter problems in making a clinical diagnosis whose resolution requires the use of diagnostic tests. With an ever increasing choice of investigations being available, the urologist often has to decide which diagnostic test(s) will best resolve the patient's diagnostic problem. In this article, we aim to help the urologist understand how to critically appraise studies on diagnostic tests and make a rational choice. This article presents the guiding principles in scientifically assessing studies on diagnostic tests by proposing a clinical scenario. The authors describe a standardized protocol to assess the validity of the test and its relevance to the clinical problem that can help the urologist in decision making. The three important issues to be considered when evaluating the validity of the study are to identify how the study population was chosen, how the test was performed and whether there is a comparison to the gold standard test so as to confirm or refute the diagnosis. Then, the urologist would need to know the probability of the test in providing the correct diagnosis in an individual patient in order to decide about its utility in solving the diagnostic dilemma. By performing the steps described in this article, the urologist would be able to critically appraise diagnostic studies and draw meaningful conclusions about the investigations in terms of validity, results and its applicability to the patient's problem. This would provide a scientific basis for using diagnostic tests for improving patient care. PMID:22279321

  9. How to appraise a diagnostic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N

    2011-10-01

    Urologists frequently encounter problems in making a clinical diagnosis whose resolution requires the use of diagnostic tests. With an ever increasing choice of investigations being available, the urologist often has to decide which diagnostic test(s) will best resolve the patient's diagnostic problem. In this article, we aim to help the urologist understand how to critically appraise studies on diagnostic tests and make a rational choice. This article presents the guiding principles in scientifically assessing studies on diagnostic tests by proposing a clinical scenario. The authors describe a standardized protocol to assess the validity of the test and its relevance to the clinical problem that can help the urologist in decision making. The three important issues to be considered when evaluating the validity of the study are to identify how the study population was chosen, how the test was performed and whether there is a comparison to the gold standard test so as to confirm or refute the diagnosis. Then, the urologist would need to know the probability of the test in providing the correct diagnosis in an individual patient in order to decide about its utility in solving the diagnostic dilemma. By performing the steps described in this article, the urologist would be able to critically appraise diagnostic studies and draw meaningful conclusions about the investigations in terms of validity, results and its applicability to the patient's problem. This would provide a scientific basis for using diagnostic tests for improving patient care.

  10. Diagnostic testing for Giardia infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyworth, Martin F

    2014-03-01

    The traditional method for diagnosing Giardia infections involves microscopic examination of faecal specimens for Giardia cysts. This method is subjective and relies on observer experience. From the 1980s onwards, objective techniques have been developed for diagnosing Giardia infections, and are superseding diagnostic techniques reliant on microscopy. Detection of Giardia antigen(s) by immunoassay is the basis of commercially available diagnostic kits. Various nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAATs) can demonstrate DNA of Giardia intestinalis, and have the potential to become standard approaches for diagnosing Giardia infections. Of such techniques, methods involving either fluorescent microspheres (Luminex) or isothermal amplification of DNA (loop-mediated isothermal amplification; LAMP) are especially promising.

  11. Evaluation of current rapid HIV test algorithms in Rakai, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiwango, Ronald M; Musoke, Richard; Lubyayi, Lawrence; Ssekubugu, Robert; Kalibbala, Sarah; Ssekweyama, Viola; Mirembe, Viola; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Reynolds, Steven J; Serwadda, David; Gray, Ronald H; Kigozi, Godfrey

    2013-09-01

    Rapid HIV tests are a crucial component of HIV diagnosis in resource limited settings. In Uganda, the Ministry of Health allows both serial and parallel HIV rapid testing using Determine, Stat-Pak and Uni-Gold. In serial testing, a non-reactive result on Determine ends testing. The performance of serial and parallel algorithms with Determine and Stat-Pak test kits was assessed. A cross-sectional diagnostic test accuracy evaluation using three rapid HIV test kits as per the recommended parallel test algorithm was followed by EIA-WB testing with estimates of the performance of serial testing algorithm. In 2520 participants tested by parallel rapid algorithms, 0.6% had weakly reactive result. Parallel testing had 99.7% sensitivity and 99.8% specificity. If Stat-Pak was used as the first screening test for a serial algorithm, the sensitivity was 99.6% and specificity was 99.7%. However, if Determine was used as the screening test, sensitivity was 97.3% and specificity was 99.9%. Serial testing with Stat-Pak as the initial screening test performed as well as parallel testing, but Determine was a less sensitive screen. Serial testing could be cost saving. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Performance of an alternative HIV diagnostic algorithm using the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay and potential utility of sample-to-cutoff ratio to discriminate primary from established infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric M; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Swenson, Paul; Stekler, Joanne D; Coombs, Robert W

    2013-12-01

    The ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay has a wide dynamic range for determining the sample-to-cutoff ratio (S/CO) values compared to other diagnostic HIV antibody assays. Determine the performance of an HIV testing algorithm that uses the ARCHITECT combo assay in the clinical setting and explore the utility of the signal-to-cutoff (S/CO) ratio to predict acute HIV-1 infection status. A retrospective analysis of clinical samples from a hospital and referral population screened for HIV-1 infection between May 2011 and March 2013. Repeatedly reactive samples were tested using the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test and depending on that result, confirmatory orthogonal testing used the Western blot (WB) for HIV-1, Immunoblot for HIV-2 and nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for HIV RNA. A total of 21,317 test results were evaluated of which 509 were ARCHITECT repeatedly reactive; of these, 422 were Multispot-reactive only for HIV-1 (413 WB-positive; 9 indeterminate), 4 were Multispot-reactive for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 (one HIV-2 immunoblot-positive with 17 HIV-2 RNA copies/mL) and 83 were Multispot-non-reactive of which 15 were HIV-1 RNA positive and represented acute HIV-1 infection. There was an association among the ARCHITECT S/CO (median; IQR) values for antibody-negative (0.14; 0.11-0.16), acute infection (33; 2.1-76) and established HIV-1 infection (794; 494-1,029) (Kruskal-Wallis, pARCHITECT combo assay with Multispot confirmation and reserved use of HIV-1 WB, HIV-2 Immunoblot and HIV NAAT for Multispot dual HIV-1/2 infection, and NAAT alone for Multispot-negative specimens, had a suitable test performance for detecting acute and established HIV infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Performance of an alternative HIV diagnostic algorithm using the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay and potential utility of sample-to-cutoff ratio to discriminate primary from established infection☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric M.; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Swenson, Paul; Stekler, Joanne D.; Coombs, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay has a wide dynamic range for determining the sample-to-cutoff ratio (S/CO) values compared to other diagnostic HIV antibody assays. Objectives Determine the performance of an HIV testing algorithm that uses the ARCHITECT combo assay in the clinical setting and explore the utility of the signal-to-cutoff (S/CO) ratio to predict acute HIV-1 infection status. Study design A retrospective analysis of clinical samples from a hospital and referral population screened for HIV-1 infection between May 2011 and March 2013. Repeatedly reactive samples were tested using the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test and depending on that result, confirmatory orthogonal testing used the Western blot (WB) for HIV-1, Immunoblot for HIV-2 and nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for HIV RNA. Results A total of 21,317 test results were evaluated of which 509 were ARCHITECT repeatedly reactive; of these, 422 were Multispot-reactive only for HIV-1 (413 WB-positive; 9 indeterminate), 4 were Multispot-reactive for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 (one HIV-2 immunoblot-positive with 17 HIV-2 RNA copies/mL) and 83 were Multispot-non-reactive of which 15 were HIV-1 RNA positive and represented acute HIV-1 infection. There was an association among the ARCHITECT S/CO (median; IQR) values for antibody-negative (0.14; 0.11–0.16), acute infection (33; 2.1–76) and established HIV-1 infection (794; 494–1,029) (Kruskal–Wallis, p ARCHITECT combo assay with Multispot confirmation and reserved use of HIV-1 WB, HIV-2 Immunoblot and HIV NAAT for Multispot dual HIV-1/2 infection, and NAAT alone for Multispot-negative specimens, had a suitable test performance for detecting acute and established HIV infection. PMID:24029686

  14. Real-time, universal screening for acute HIV infection in a routine HIV counseling and testing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Christopher D; McPherson, J Todd; Leone, Peter A; Smurzynski, Marlene; Owen-O'Dowd, Judy; Peace-Brewer, Amy L; Harris, Juanita; Hicks, Charles B; Eron, Joseph J; Fiscus, Susan A

    2002-07-10

    Acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection cannot be diagnosed by routine antibody tests and is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice. However, HIV nucleic acid-based testing is widely used to screen for antibody-negative acute infection among low-risk blood donors. To assess the feasibility of screening in high-volume laboratories for acute and long-term HIV infection in a routine HIV testing population, in which HIV infection prevalence is low, using specimen pooling and HIV RNA reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests. Clinical diagnostic performance evaluation at a state-funded public health virology and serology laboratory. A total of 8505 consecutive individuals presenting for routine HIV counseling and testing during a total of 20 business days to simulate a month of testing in August and December 2001 at 110 publicly funded testing sites in North Carolina. Prevalence of acute and long-term HIV infection. Serum specimens negative by HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) were screened in pools by an ultrasensitive HIV RNA RT-PCR test. Results for individual HIV RNA-positive specimens were reclassified as true or false according to results of confirmatory testing. Of the 8505 individuals screened, 8194 had not previously tested HIV positive and had sufficient serum to complete the testing protocol. Of those, 39 had long-term HIV infection (prevalence, 47.6 per 10,000 at-risk persons [95% confidence interval, 33.8-65.0 per 10,000]). Of the 8155 at-risk individuals whose antibody tests were negative, 5 were HIV RNA positive. Four of those had true-positive acute infection (prevalence, 4.9 per 10,000 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-12.5 per 10,000]). All 4 were women; 2 developed symptoms consistent with an acute retroviral syndrome in the week after testing. Screening all specimens required 147 HIV RNA tests. Overall specificity of the strategy was 0.9999. These findings suggest the widespread diagnosis of acute HIV infections in a routine

  15. Expansion of HIV laboratory diagnostic services in Chennai, India 2001-2006: is the growth commensurate with the need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Srikrishnan

    Full Text Available To describe the changes in HIV services provided and the patient population utilizing voluntary counseling and testing (VCT services at private testing laboratories in Chennai, India in 2001 and 2006.In 2001, a cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted to assess the services provided and client population of 1,031 private laboratories. A subset of labs (9% that had been surveyed in 2001 were also studied in 2006.In 2001, significantly more high volume labs (>10 HIV tests per month offered HIV diagnostic tests than low volume labs (<10 HIV test per month (p<0.001. More high volume labs (20.0% provided pre-test counseling as part of HIV testing than low volume labs (11.1% (p = 0.003. Between 2001 and 2006, the number of labs that provided HIV diagnostic tests significantly increased, including ELISA (87.8% vs. 40.0%, Western Blot (84.4% vs. 13.3%, and Tridot (98.9% vs. 72.2% (p<0.001. Also the number of labs that reported greater than 10 women seeking HIV testing per month significantly increased from 14.5% to 79.0% (p = 0.006. More labs provided pre-test counseling in 2006 (34.4% than in 2001 (21.1% (p = 0.046.Though HIV diagnostic testing services have increasingly become available, counseling services have not expanded commensurately. Further outreach and education is necessary to expand comprehensive HIV VCT services in both urban and rural India.

  16. Leveraging rapid community-based hiv testing campaigns for non-communicable diseases in rural uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Chamie; Dalsone Kwarisiima; Clark, Tamara D; Jane Kabami; Vivek Jain; Elvin Geng; Petersen, Maya L; Harsha Thirumurthy; Moses R Kamya; Havlir, Diane V.; Charlebois, Edwin D.

    2012-01-01

    Background The high burden of undiagnosed HIV in sub-Saharan Africa limits treatment and prevention efforts. Community-based HIV testing campaigns can address this challenge and provide an untapped opportunity to identify non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We tested the feasibility and diagnostic yield of integrating NCD and communicable diseases into a rapid HIV testing and referral campaign for all residents of a rural Ugandan parish. Methods A five-day, multi-disease campaign, offering diag...

  17. Number and timing of antenatal HIV testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen Thi Thuy, Hanh; Gammeltoft, Tine; Rasch, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: HIV testing for pregnant women is an important component for the success of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). A lack of antenatal HIV testing results in loss of benefits for HIV-infected mothers and their children. However, the provision of unnecessary...... repeat tests at a very late stage of pregnancy will reduce the beneficial effects of PMTCT and impose unnecessary costs for the individual woman as well as the health system. This study aims to assess the number and timing of antenatal HIV testing in a low-income setting where PMTCT programmes have been...... scaled up to reach first level health facilities. METHODS: A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted among 1108 recently delivered mothers through face-to-face interviews following a structured questionnaire that focused on socio-economic characteristics, experiences of antenatal care and HIV...

  18. HIV Testing in Urban Transgender Individuals: A Descriptive Study

    OpenAIRE

    Juarez-Cuellar, Adrian; Chang, Yu-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract HIV testing is considered the initial component of HIV eradication strategies. This study aimed to describe HIV testing in urban, transgender individuals in western New York. The study uses HIV testing intake data from a sample of self-identified transgender males and females volunteering for an HIV test at a community-based healthcare organization. Transgender individuals with some characteristics were found to have more HIV tests including female gender, black, HIV status (positive...

  19. Paediatric diagnostic audiology testing in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Selvarani

    2016-03-01

    With the increased emphasis on the importance of early identification of paediatric hearing loss within developing countries such as South Africa and Nigeria there has been a recognition of the ethical obligation to ensure access to timely diagnostic and intervention services for children identified with hearing loss; regardless of their geographic or socioeconomic status. There are limited studies on diagnosis of paediatric hearing loss in a developing world context. The objective of this study was to determine processes used for diagnosis of paediatric hearing loss in South Africa, across the private and public healthcare sectors, and to profile the age of testing for each component of the diagnostic test battery. Diagnostic audiology testing data of 230 children enrolled in an early intervention programme was analysed to profile the reporting of diagnostic audiology testing as well as diagnostic audiology procedures employed. Results were analysed according to province as well as healthcare sector to compare diagnostic services across regions as well as healthcare sectors. The differences in audiology practice and tests employed with paediatric clients across the regions of Gauteng, Kwazulu Natal and Western Cape indicates that services across regions and across the public and private sector are not equitable. Each region is equally unlikely to complete a full, comprehensive diagnostic evaluation on paediatric clients. The age of testing highlights the increased age of diagnosis of hearing loss. Paediatric diagnostic audiology is a section of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention services that requires attention in terms of the appropriateness of procedures as well as equity of services. Further studies on diagnostic practice and resources in South Africa will provide information on factors that are preventing adherence to international best practice guidelines for paediatric diagnostic audiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. HIV/STI Testing, Abortion and Contraception

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    address barriers like youth friendly services have yet to conclusively demonstrate impact on protective behaviours like condom or contraceptive use. ..... contraception and HIV/STI testing (p<0.000). Differences in barriers by SRH service across gender, community, school status and age group. HIV/STI testing. As shown in ...

  1. Evaluating diagnostic tests: review | Coetzee | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthesiologists are increasingly more involved in perioperative patient care wherein interpretation of special investigations is crucial to making therapeutic and prognostic decisions. Furthermore, anaesthetic journal publications increasingly rely on diagnostic tests, without paying sufficient attention to the methodology ...

  2. Performance of an Early Infant Diagnostic Test, AmpliSens DNA-HIV-FRT, Using Dried Blood Spots Collected from Children Born to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Mothers in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joy; Tarasova, Tetyana; Shanmugam, Vedapuri; Azarskova, Marianna; Nguyen, Shon; Hurlston, Mackenzie; Sabatier, Jennifer; Zhang, Guoqing; Osmanov, Saladin; Ellenberger, Dennis; Yang, Chunfu; Vitek, Charles; Liulchuk, Maria; Nizova, Natalya

    2015-12-01

    An accurate accessible test for early infant diagnosis (EID) is crucial for identifying HIV-infected infants and linking them to treatment. To improve EID services in Ukraine, dried blood spot (DBS) samples obtained from 237 HIV-exposed children (≤18 months of age) in six regions in Ukraine in 2012 to 2013 were tested with the AmpliSens DNA-HIV-FRT assay, the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan (CAP/CTM) HIV-1 Qual test, and the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Qualitative assay. In comparison with the paired whole-blood results generated from AmpliSens testing at the oblast HIV reference laboratories in Ukraine, the sensitivity was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95 to 1.00) for the AmpliSens and Roche CAP/CTM Qual assays and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.90 to 0.98) for the Abbott Qualitative assay. The specificity was 1.00 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1.00) for the AmpliSens and Abbott Qualitative assays and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.00) for the Roche CAP/CTM Qual assay. McNemar analysis indicated that the proportions of positive results for the tests were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Cohen's kappa (0.97 to 0.99) indicated almost perfect agreement among the three tests. These results indicated that the AmpliSens DBS and whole-blood tests performed equally well and were comparable to the two commercially available EID tests. More importantly, the performance characteristics of the AmpliSens DBS test meets the World Health Organization EID test requirements; implementing AmpliSens DBS testing might improve EID services in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Optimizing diagnostic tests for persulphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss-Skiftesvik, Majken H; Winther, Lotte; Mosbech, Holger Fausbøll

    2016-01-01

    validated method of performing SIC with persulphate powder is time consuming with a duration of up to 4 days. The value of skin prick tests (SPTs) and histamine release tests (HRTs) with persulphates is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish a novel rapid SIC with persulphate powder to test...... for both rhinitis and asthma simultaneously in 1 day. In addition, we assessed the suitability of SPTs and HRTs for detecting persulphate-induced respiratory diseases. METHODS: The study population included 19 hairdressers with a history of work-related rhinitis and/or asthma symptoms, 12 symptomatic...... controls (10 with concurrent allergic asthma and rhinitis and two with non-allergic asthma), and 40 healthy controls. A previous severe asthmatic reaction and/or anaphylactic reaction to persulphates was considered an exclusion criterion for hairdressers. The 19 hairdressers and 12 symptomatic controls had...

  4. Diagnostic patch test concentration for Kathon CG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, H I

    1985-10-01

    Patch test studies, 21-day cumulative irritancy assays and Draize repeat insult patch tests with Kathon CG, were used to ascertain an appropriate diagnostic patch test concentration. A dilution of 100 ppm a.i. (aq. or pet.) appears to have low irritancy potential. Further observations are required to verify if this concentration is high enough to detect most cases of sensitization.

  5. Diagnostic Tests in Human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Nouri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Brucellosis represents a zoonotic bacterial disease, caused by a gram negative bacterium called Brucella. Between the diverses pecies of this bacteria, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis and B. canis consist the main causes of the disease in humans.More than half a million new cases of Brucellosis are reported annually. Consequently, brucellosis is a remarkable threat for the health of society. Because of the multiple nonspecific clinical signs of this infection, such as fever (60% of cases, night sweating, insomnia and anorexia, which are similar to other diseases, the detection of brucellosis is time-consuming and needs more scrutiny. Evidence Acquisition: Blood culture is considered the gold standard for the detection of brucellosis and the sensitivity of this test in the acute form is high. However, for the chronic type of disease, it is remarkably low, in addition, in some cases, it needs long reaction times. Nevertheless, today, some kinds of tests like automatic culturing system and serological methods, such as Rose Bengal (RB test, serum agglutination test (SAT, 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME and coombs, which are operated based on agglutination, are useful for the problems mentioned earlier. Conclusion: Although serological methods are common for the diagnosis of brucellosis, false results are observable for several methods, such as the SAT method. Tests like the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, for the screening of specific traits, although confirmed, have their advantages and defects. The lateral flow assay (LFA shows promising evidence to be effective in the diagnosis of brucellosis. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR is more prevalent than other common tests, according to sensitivity and fast answering potency in case of molecular diagnosis. Also, PCR is proper for patients' follow-up during the period of treatment and crimination of relapse by this method is easier compared to others.

  6. Assessment of the validity of rapid diagnostic test kits available in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were collected for serology tests using five (5) different rapid diagnostic test kits from different manufacturers, HIV status determination and evaluation of the haematological parameters we carried out. As a result, there were significant differences in the results obtained between AFB tests and serological ...

  7. TB Testing for People Living with HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-23

    Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, explains why it is important for people living with HIV to be tested for TB.  Created: 7/23/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 7/23/2012.

  8. HIV testing during the neonatal period

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-24

    Apr 24, 2015 ... in non-breastfed infants, HIV DNA and RNA PCR sensitivity at 1 month of age for perinatally infected infants was 89%8. • in formula-fed infants who received 6 weeks of postpartum zidovudine (AZT), with or with- out other antiretrovirals, 32% of intrapartum-infected infants tested HIV DNA PCR negative.

  9. HIV Testing in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health issues… CHIP Marketplaces Waivers menu KFF.org Facebook Twitter Email Twitter Facebook Email HIV/AIDS Search Graphics & Interactives Polls Home ... in the United States Published: Jun 23, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Print Key Facts HIV testing ...

  10. [Detecting the markers of HIV infection with the new enzyme immunoassay diagnostic kit "DS-EIA-HIV-AB-AG-SPECTRUM" at the laboratories of AIDS prevention and control centers in the Volga Federal District].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, N I; Peksheva, O Iu

    2009-03-01

    A possibility of simultaneously detecting specific antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2 by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) at lower concentrations than those by immunoblotting (IB), and well as an additional possibility of earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, by identifying the HIV-1 antigen p24 lay the foundation of the "DS-EIA-HIV-AB-AG-SPECTRUM" test system made by OOO "Research-and-Production Association "Diagnosticheskiye Sistemy" (Diagnostic Systems). These peculiarities were compared with those of IB at a number of laboratories of AIDS prevention and control centers in the Volga Federal District, by using native serum/plasma samples and a specially designed control panel. The analysis of the conducted studies to identify HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies and HIV-1 antigen p24 in 65 plasma/serum samples in the "DS-EIA-HIV-AB-AG-SPECTRUM" and "LIA-HIV-1/2" (OOO "Niarmedik plus") test systems while confirming the positive result indicated agreement in 57 (87.7%) cases. The diagnostic possibilities of the "DS-EIA-HIV-AB-AG-SPECTRUM" test system versus the "New Lav-Blot I" one to make a laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection were studied. Irrefragable answers as to the availability of HIV-1 markers in the study serum samples on the enciphered panel were provided by IB in 73.3% of cases and EIA in 92%.

  11. HIV testing in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemcke, Asja; Kjøller, Mette; Ekholm, Ola

    2007-01-01

    between HIV testing and background variables, such as gender, age, marital status, educational level, and sexual orientation. RESULTS: Overall 28.5% of the Danish population aged over 16 years have "ever been tested for HIV". More females (29.4%) than males (27.6%) were tested; 12.6% might not be aware......AIMS: To describe the accumulated prevalence of HIV testing in the Danish population until and including the year 2000. METHODS: The study was based on nationally representative data from the Danish Health Interview Survey 2000. Multiple logistic regression analysis investigated the association...... of their blood being HIV tested when donating blood. More males (17.1%) than females (13.8%) had donated blood after 1985. Although males 30-39 years old were the most tested, males 50-59 years old had the highest odds of having donated blood after 1985. Concerning education, the less education one had, the less...

  12. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices about HIV Testing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    The major objective of this study was to determine knowledge, attitudes and practices about HIV testing services and the ... Keywords: Malawi, Adolescents, HIV testing and counselling ..... suicide after being found HIV positive were also.

  13. Diagnostic performance of line-immunoassay based algorithms for incident HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schüpbach Jörg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serologic testing algorithms for recent HIV seroconversion (STARHS provide important information for HIV surveillance. We have previously demonstrated that a patient's antibody reaction pattern in a confirmatory line immunoassay (INNO-LIA™ HIV I/II Score provides information on the duration of infection, which is unaffected by clinical, immunological and viral variables. In this report we have set out to determine the diagnostic performance of Inno-Lia algorithms for identifying incident infections in patients with known duration of infection and evaluated the algorithms in annual cohorts of HIV notifications. Methods Diagnostic sensitivity was determined in 527 treatment-naive patients infected for up to 12 months. Specificity was determined in 740 patients infected for longer than 12 months. Plasma was tested by Inno-Lia and classified as either incident ( Results The 10 best algorithms had a mean raw sensitivity of 59.4% and a mean specificity of 95.1%. Adjustment for overrepresentation of patients in the first quarter year of infection further reduced the sensitivity. In the preferred model, the mean adjusted sensitivity was 37.4%. Application of the 10 best algorithms to four annual cohorts of HIV-1 notifications totalling 2'595 patients yielded a mean IIR of 0.35 in 2005/6 (baseline and of 0.45, 0.42 and 0.35 in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. The increase between baseline and 2008 and the ensuing decreases were highly significant. Other adjustment models yielded different absolute IIR, although the relative changes between the cohorts were identical for all models. Conclusions The method can be used for comparing IIR in annual cohorts of HIV notifications. The use of several different algorithms in combination, each with its own sensitivity and specificity to detect incident infection, is advisable as this reduces the impact of individual imperfections stemming primarily from relatively low sensitivities and

  14. Criteria for standardising counselling for HIV testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Luzi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we outline basic health counselling skills, specifically, those for performing pre-test and post-test counselling for HIV infection. The ultimate goal is to propose that counselling be performed in facilities that carry out screening for anti-HIV antibodies, following standardised (and thus replicable criteria, with consistent focus on the quality of the relationship between the healthcare professional and the individual undergoing testing and on the individual's specific needs.

  15. Indeterminate and discrepant rapid HIV test results in couples' HIV testing and counselling centres in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Many HIV voluntary testing and counselling centres in Africa use rapid antibody tests, in parallel or in sequence, to establish same-day HIV status. The interpretation of indeterminate or discrepant results between different rapid tests on one sample poses a challenge. We investigated the use of an algorithm using three serial rapid HIV tests in cohabiting couples to resolve unclear serostatuses. Methods Heterosexual couples visited the Rwanda Zambia HIV Research Group testing centres in Kigali, Rwanda, and Lusaka, Zambia, to assess HIV infection status. Individuals with unclear HIV rapid antibody test results (indeterminate) or discrepant results were asked to return for repeat testing to resolve HIV status. If either partner of a couple tested positive or indeterminate with the screening test, both partners were tested with a confirmatory test. Individuals with indeterminate or discrepant results were further tested with a tie-breaker and monthly retesting. HIV-RNA viral load was determined when HIV status was not resolved by follow-up rapid testing. Individuals were classified based on two of three initial tests as "Positive", "Negative" or "Other". Follow-up testing and/or HIV-RNA viral load testing determined them as "Infected", "Uninfected" or "Unresolved". Results Of 45,820 individuals tested as couples, 2.3% (4.1% of couples) had at least one discrepant or indeterminate rapid result. A total of 65% of those individuals had follow-up testing and of those individuals initially classified as "Negative" by three initial rapid tests, less than 1% were resolved as "Infected". In contrast, of those individuals with at least one discrepant or indeterminate result who were initially classified as "Positive", only 46% were resolved as "Infected", while the remainder was resolved as "Uninfected" (46%) or "Unresolved" (8%). A positive HIV serostatus of one of the partners was a strong predictor of infection in the other partner as 48% of individuals who

  16. [The capacities of current test systems to verify early HIV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, E N; Sharipova, I N; Denisova, N M; Susekina, M E; Puzyrev, V F; Sarkisian, K A; Vorob'eva, M S; Burkov, A N; Ulanova, T I

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to comparatively evaluate the performance characteristics of the test systems designed to verify the positive results of screening survey for HIV infection, such as the solid-phase immunoassay DS-EIA-HIV-AB/AG-SPECTR (Diagnosticheskiye Sistemy (Diagnostic Systems) Research-and-Production Association, Nizhni Novgorod) and tests based on immune blotting (IB). The investigation examined 15 seroconversion panels produced by ZeptoMetrix (USA) and BBI (USA). The use of the DS-EIA-HIV-AB/AG-SPECTR test system determined 88 of the 167 seroconversion panels as HIV positive. The IB-based tests revealed only 45 of the 167 samples as positive. Consequently, the application of the DS-EIA-HIV-AB/AG-SPECTR test system is more effective than the IB-based tests in early HIV infection.

  17. A retrospective evaluation of proficiency testing, and rapid HIV test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Proficiency testing (PT) has been implemented as a form of External Quality Assurance (EQA) by the National HIV Reference Laboratory in Kenya since 2007 in order to monitor and improve on the quality of HIV testing and counselling HTC services. Objective: To compare concordance between National HIV ...

  18. HIV Testing Rates and Testing Locations, by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Michele A.; Chen Lynn; Brown Adama; Pomeroy, Elizabeth C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the HIV testing rates among white Americans, African Americans, and Hispanic Americans and to identify the frequency of use of HIV testing locations according to a variety of sociodemographic variables. Data for this study came from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Participants in…

  19. Implementation of Couples' Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Implementation of Couples' Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing Services in Durban, South Africa, for HIV Prevention and Intervention. Heterosexual couples represent the largest HIV risk group in sub-Saharan Africa. Couples' Voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing (CVCT) is an effective HIV prevention strategy because ...

  20. False-positive HIV DNA PCR testing of infants: implications in a changing epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; Forsyth, Brian; Kruger, Mariana

    2012-02-23

    To examine false-positive HIV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test results in children, and the potential implications for the paediatric HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. A review was done of records over a 6-year period of children less than 18 months old at an HIV treatment site in South Africa, to evaluate those with an initial 'false'-positive HIV DNA PCR result, but later proven to be HIV-uninfected with HIV DNA PCR and/or quantitative HIV RNA PCR tests. We calculated the influence of changing HIV transmission rates on predictive values (PV) of HIV DNA PCR tests in a hypothetical population of all HIV-exposed infants over a 1-year period. (Positive PV: proportion of individuals with a positive test with disease; negative PV: proportion of individuals with negative test and no disease). Of 718 children, 40 with an initial positive HIV DNA PCR test were subsequently proven to be HIV-uninfected, resulting in a positive PV of 94.4%. Most (75%) uninfected children had PMTCT interventions and were asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (77.5%). Calculations using a test specificity of 99.4%, as reported previously, show a decrease in positive PV using a single-test strategy from 98.6% at 30% HIV transmission rate, to 94.8% at 10% transmission, to 62.5% at 1% transmission. Reduction in test specificity further decreases positive PV at low transmission rates. Decreasing mother-to-child HIV transmission rates reduce the positive predictive value of a single HIV DNA PCR test result, necessitating adaptations to diagnostic algorithms to avoid misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment, especially with early initiation of antiretroviral therapy in asymptomatic infants.

  1. Barriers and facilitators associated with HIV testing uptake in South African health facilities offering HIV Counselling and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neo Mohlabane

    2016-10-01

    Objective: An HCT survey was carried out to ascertain barriers and facilitators for HIV testing in South Africa. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 67 HCT-offering health facilities in 8 South African provinces was undertaken. Individuals (n = 489 who had not tested for HIV on the day of the site visit were interviewed on awareness of HCT services, HIV testing history and barriers to HIV testing. Frequencies were run to describe the sample characteristics, barriers and facilitators to HIV testing. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was usedt o identify the association between never tested for HIV with socio-demographics, awareness of HCT services and type of HCT facilities. Results: In all 18.1% participants never had an HIV test. Major barriers to HCT uptake comprise being scared of finding out one's HIV test result or what people may say, shyness or embarrassment, avoidance of divulging personal information to health workers and fear of death. In multivariate analysis the age group 55 years and older, and not being recommended to have an HIV test were associated with never had an HIV test. Potential facilitators for HIV testing include community or household HIV testing, providing incentives for those who test for HIV, mandatory HIV testing and disclosure of HIV status by those who test HIV positive. Conclusion: The benefits of HCT which include the reduction of HIV transmission, the availability of HIV care and treatment needs to be emphasized to enhance HCT uptake.

  2. Quickness of HIV and Tuberculosis Diagnostic Procedures in Prison of Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Seyed Alinaghi, Seyed; Farhoudi, Behnam; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohammadi Firouzeh, Mona; Mohraz, Minoo; Tashakoriyan, Mehrzad

    2016-01-01

    Quickness of diagnosis and getting results in prisons is lower than other settings. The present study aimed to assess the quickness of HIV and Tuberculosis diagnostic process in the Great Tehran Prison. The present study evaluated the quickness of HIV diagnostic testing (ELISA, Western Blot and CD4 count) in the Great Tehran Prison over the period of October 2013 to May 2014. Also, all suspected tuberculosis (TB) patients in the prison were examined for the occurrence of active TB through collecting 35 chest X-rays and 215 sputum specimens for acid-fast bacillus (AFB) testing at the health center laboratory. The average interval between when test requests were made by a physician and when HIV ELIZA/ Western Blot was obtained was relatively long time. On average, the interval between a physician`s requests for CD4 count to assess the results was eight days. The average time interval between test requests by a physician to deliver sputum samples to the laboratory was four days. However, the average time interval between a physician`s requests for sputum samples to assess the results was 16 days. Due to the significance of positive and negative results for making decision on diagnosis, initiation and follow up of treatment procedure, the time intervals should become shorter.

  3. Potential for false positive HIV test results with the serial rapid HIV testing algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baveewo Steven

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid HIV tests provide same-day results and are widely used in HIV testing programs in areas with limited personnel and laboratory infrastructure. The Uganda Ministry of Health currently recommends the serial rapid testing algorithm with Determine, STAT-PAK, and Uni-Gold for diagnosis of HIV infection. Using this algorithm, individuals who test positive on Determine, negative to STAT-PAK and positive to Uni-Gold are reported as HIV positive. We conducted further testing on this subgroup of samples using qualitative DNA PCR to assess the potential for false positive tests in this situation. Results Of the 3388 individuals who were tested, 984 were HIV positive on two consecutive tests, and 29 were considered positive by a tiebreaker (positive on Determine, negative on STAT-PAK, and positive on Uni-Gold. However, when the 29 samples were further tested using qualitative DNA PCR, 14 (48.2% were HIV negative. Conclusion Although this study was not primarily designed to assess the validity of rapid HIV tests and thus only a subset of the samples were retested, the findings show a potential for false positive HIV results in the subset of individuals who test positive when a tiebreaker test is used in serial testing. These findings highlight a need for confirmatory testing for this category of individuals.

  4. Potential for false positive HIV test results with the serial rapid HIV testing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baveewo, Steven; Kamya, Moses R; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Fatch, Robin; Bangsberg, David R; Coates, Thomas; Hahn, Judith A; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2012-03-19

    Rapid HIV tests provide same-day results and are widely used in HIV testing programs in areas with limited personnel and laboratory infrastructure. The Uganda Ministry of Health currently recommends the serial rapid testing algorithm with Determine, STAT-PAK, and Uni-Gold for diagnosis of HIV infection. Using this algorithm, individuals who test positive on Determine, negative to STAT-PAK and positive to Uni-Gold are reported as HIV positive. We conducted further testing on this subgroup of samples using qualitative DNA PCR to assess the potential for false positive tests in this situation. Of the 3388 individuals who were tested, 984 were HIV positive on two consecutive tests, and 29 were considered positive by a tiebreaker (positive on Determine, negative on STAT-PAK, and positive on Uni-Gold). However, when the 29 samples were further tested using qualitative DNA PCR, 14 (48.2%) were HIV negative. Although this study was not primarily designed to assess the validity of rapid HIV tests and thus only a subset of the samples were retested, the findings show a potential for false positive HIV results in the subset of individuals who test positive when a tiebreaker test is used in serial testing. These findings highlight a need for confirmatory testing for this category of individuals.

  5. Diagnostic tests based on human basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Erdmann, Stephan; Knol, Edward F

    2006-01-01

    for diagnostic purposes, each allergen should be pre-evaluated separately in order to determine a suitable stimulation range. Additionally, anti-IgE or anti-FcepsilonRIalpha antibodies should serve as positive controls, bearing in mind that 10-20% of basophil donors are not responsive to IgE-mediated stimulation....... Diagnostic studies using CD63 or CD203c in hymenoptera, food and drug allergy are critically discussed. Basophil-based tests are indicated for allergy testing in selected cases but should only be performed by experienced laboratories....

  6. Systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeflang, Mariska M G; Deeks, Jonathan J; Gatsonis, Constantine

    2008-01-01

    More and more systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy studies are being published, but they can be methodologically challenging. In this paper, the authors present some of the recent developments in the methodology for conducting systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy studies....... Restrictive electronic search filters are discouraged, as is the use of summary quality scores. Methods for meta-analysis should take into account the paired nature of the estimates and their dependence on threshold. Authors of these reviews are advised to use the hierarchical summary receiver...

  7. Discordant HIV Test Results: Implications on Perinatal and Haemotransfusion Screening for HIV Infection, Cape Coast, Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Tetteh, Ato Kwamena; Agyarko, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Screening results of 488 pregnant women aged 15–44 years whose blood samples had been tested on-site, using First Response® HIV 1/2, and confirmed with INNO-LIA™ HIV I/II Score were used. Of this total, 178 were reactive (HIV I, 154; HIV II, 2; and HIV I and HIV II, 22). Of the 154 HIV I-reactive samples, 104 were confirmed to be HIV I-positive and 2 were confirmed to be HIV II-positive, while 48 were confirmed to be negative [false positive rate = 17.44% (13.56–21.32)]. The two HIV II sample...

  8. Integrated rapid-diagnostic-test reader platform on a cellphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudanyali, Onur; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Sikora, Uzair; Padmanabhan, Swati; Navruz, Isa; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-08-07

    We demonstrate a cellphone-based rapid-diagnostic-test (RDT) reader platform that can work with various lateral flow immuno-chromatographic assays and similar tests to sense the presence of a target analyte in a sample. This compact and cost-effective digital RDT reader, weighing only ~65 g, mechanically attaches to the existing camera unit of a cellphone, where various types of RDTs can be inserted to be imaged in reflection or transmission modes under light-emitting diode (LED)-based illumination. Captured raw images of these tests are then digitally processed (within less than 0.2 s per image) through a smart application running on the cellphone for validation of the RDT, as well as for automated reading of its diagnostic result. The same smart application then transmits the resulting data, together with the RDT images and other related information (e.g., demographic data), to a central server, which presents the diagnostic results on a world map through geo-tagging. This dynamic spatio-temporal map of various RDT results can then be viewed and shared using internet browsers or through the same cellphone application. We tested this platform using malaria, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV RDTs by installing it on both Android-based smartphones and an iPhone. Providing real-time spatio-temporal statistics for the prevalence of various infectious diseases, this smart RDT reader platform running on cellphones might assist healthcare professionals and policymakers to track emerging epidemics worldwide and help epidemic preparedness.

  9. Methodology of diagnostic tests in hepatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    sensitivity and specificity and can be combined with the condition's pre-test prevalence to estimate the posttest probability of the condition. The ROC curve is obtained by calculating the sensitivity and specificity of a quantitative test at every possible cut-off point between 'normal' and 'abnormal......The performance of diagnostic tests can be assessed by a number of methods. These include sensitivity, specificity,positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. This paper describes the methods and explains which information...... they provide. Sensitivity and specificity provides measures of the diagnostic accuracy of a test in diagnosing the condition. The positive and negative predictive values estimate the probability of the condition from the test-outcome and the condition's prevalence. The likelihood ratios bring together...

  10. Determination of Sites Involved, HIV Co–Infection & Utility of Diagnostic Modalities in EPTB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganathan, Aruna; R, Srinivasan; G, Thilagavathy; D, Satishkumar; C, Sidduraj; James, Bonny

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis remains a major global public health problem and an on-going epidemic. Though the chief objectives of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) in detecting and curing the infectious pulmonary cases is well taken, there has been a steady rise in the number of Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis (EPTB) cases as documented in several studies. EPTB which usually constitutes around 15%-20% of the total TB cases is now being increasingly reported due to a combination of better diagnostic facilities, and the HIV pandemic. Though several studies have shown increasing prevalence of EPTB, only few studies are available, especially in the Indian scenario, that study the pattern and risk factors. Hence, this retrospective observational study was undertaken to determine the sites of the involvement, HIV co-infection and usefulness of various diagnostic modalities in EPTB affecting patients attending a medical college DOTS clinic. Material and Methods: One hundred ten EPTB patients referred to the DOTS clinics of the TB & Chest department from the period Dec 2010– Mar 2012 were included in the study. The diagnosis of EPTB was established by combined clinical, microbiological, histopathological &/or imaging modalities. Their medical records were assessed to determine the age distribution, gender and anatomical sites of involvement. The presence of co-morbid conditions like smoking history, alcoholism, diabetic and HIV status were noted. BCG status and Mantoux test readings were recorded. The different diagnostic tests used in confirming EPTB at different sites were recorded. Chest x-ray was analysed for all patients to assess coexisting pulmonary involvement. All patients were followed to assess the outcome of treatment. Results: The mean age of patients was 34.4. The male to female ratio was 58:52 showing a slight male predominance. The most common site of involvement was lymph node followed by pleural effusion and abdominal TB. The

  11. Determination of Sites Involved, HIV Co-Infection & Utility of Diagnostic Modalities in EPTB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganathan, Aruna; R, Srinivasan; G, Thilagavathy; D, Satishkumar; C, Sidduraj; James, Bonny

    2013-08-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global public health problem and an on-going epidemic. Though the chief objectives of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) in detecting and curing the infectious pulmonary cases is well taken, there has been a steady rise in the number of Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis (EPTB) cases as documented in several studies. EPTB which usually constitutes around 15%-20% of the total TB cases is now being increasingly reported due to a combination of better diagnostic facilities, and the HIV pandemic. Though several studies have shown increasing prevalence of EPTB, only few studies are available, especially in the Indian scenario, that study the pattern and risk factors. Hence, this retrospective observational study was undertaken to determine the sites of the involvement, HIV co-infection and usefulness of various diagnostic modalities in EPTB affecting patients attending a medical college DOTS clinic. One hundred ten EPTB patients referred to the DOTS clinics of the TB & Chest department from the period Dec 2010- Mar 2012 were included in the study. The diagnosis of EPTB was established by combined clinical, microbiological, histopathological &/or imaging modalities. Their medical records were assessed to determine the age distribution, gender and anatomical sites of involvement. The presence of co-morbid conditions like smoking history, alcoholism, diabetic and HIV status were noted. BCG status and Mantoux test readings were recorded. The different diagnostic tests used in confirming EPTB at different sites were recorded. Chest x-ray was analysed for all patients to assess coexisting pulmonary involvement. All patients were followed to assess the outcome of treatment. The mean age of patients was 34.4. The male to female ratio was 58:52 showing a slight male predominance. The most common site of involvement was lymph node followed by pleural effusion and abdominal TB. The prevalence of lymph node TB was noted to be higher

  12. Ethical implications of HIV self-testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Jonathan; Hooper, Carwyn

    2015-10-01

    In April 2015, the first legally approved HIV self-testing kit went on sale in the UK-except Northern Ireland where they remain illegal. These tests allow individuals to test their HIV status and read the result in the privacy of their own home, much like a home pregnancy test. This paper explores the ethical implications of HIV self-testing. We conclude that there are no strong ethical objections to self-testing being made widely available in the UK. Pretest counselling for an HIV test is not an ethical necessity, and self-testing has the potential to increase early diagnosis of HIV infection and thus improve prognosis and reduce ongoing transmission. Self-testing kits might also empower people and promote autonomy by allowing people to dictate the terms on which they test their HIV status. We accept that there are some potential areas of concern. These include the possibility of user error with the tests, and the concern that individuals may not present to health services following a reactive result. False negatives have the potential to cause harm if the 'window period' is not understood, and false positives might produce psychological distress. There is, however, little evidence to suggest that self-testing kits will cause widespread harm, and we argue that the only way to properly evaluate whether they do cause significant harm is to carefully evaluate their use, now that they are available on the market. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Case Report: HIV test misdiagnosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    never HIV positive. Discussion. With resources from the Global Fund, the Malawi government has been able to start more than 350000 patients on HAART since 2001. More than 250,000 patients remain in care. (ART unit quarterly reports). The Malawi ART programme relies on a public health approach for initiation of ART.

  14. HIV testing in women: missed opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffus, Wayne A; Davis, Harley T; Byrd, Michael D; Heidari, Khosrow; Stephens, Terri G; Gibson, James J

    2012-02-01

    To investigate opportunities for early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing of women. A retrospective cohort study design linked case reports from HIV surveillance to several statewide health-care databases. Medical encounters occurring before the first positive HIV test (missed opportunities) were categorized by diagnosis/procedure codes to distinguish visits that were likely to have prompted an HIV test. Women were categorized as late testers (AIDS diagnosis 12 months of HIV diagnosis), of reproductive age (13-44 years old), and not of reproductive age (>44 years old). Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to estimate risk and its statistical significance. Of 3303 HIV-infected women diagnosed during the study period, 2408 (73%) had missed opportunity visits. Late testers (39%) were more likely to be black than white (aOR 1.48, 95% CI 1.12-1.95), be older (>44 years old; aOR 7.85, 95% CI 4.49-13.7), and have >10 missed opportunity visits (aOR 2.17, 95% CI 1.62-2.91). Fifty-four percent of women >44 years old were also late testers. Women >44 years old had lower median initial CD4 counts (p44 years old and Papanicolau smear was ranked fourth for late testers. Feasibility and acceptability of routine HIV testing in nontraditional health-care settings, such as mammography and Papanicolau screenings, should be explored to identify late testers and older (not of reproductive age) HIV-infected women.

  15. Indeterminate HIV western blot test result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Deborah L; Duffus, Wayne A

    2008-12-01

    An IWB is a test result that creates uncertainty. Explaining this result to patients can cause provider discomfort but the more the provider practices, the comfort level increases. HIV diagnosis is no longer considered a death sentence. It has become a manageable disease when patients enter care early. That is why it is important to encourage screening for all. The earlier a patient is linked to care the better the health outcome and this prevents ongoing HIV transmission.

  16. Specificity of two HIV screening tests detecting simultaneously HIV-1 p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 and -2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaich, Annette; Buser, Andreas; Stöckle, Marcel; Gehringer, Christian; Hirsch, Hans H; Battegay, Manuel; Klimkait, Thomas; Frei, Reno

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed at assessing the specificity of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT in comparison to the ARCHITECT® HIV Ag/Ab Combo. With both of these assays, 3997 unselected sera from patients of a tertiary health care centre in Basel, Switzerland, were screened for HIV. Reactive sera were reanalysed on the VIDAS® HIV Duo Ultra to identify false-reactive specimens prior to confirmation by quantitative PCR and line immunoassay. The Elecsys® compared to the ARCHITECT® shows a similar specificity (99.7% versus 99.8%) but a slightly lower positive predictive value (71.8% versus 80%). Samples tested with a cut-off index (COI) between 0.91 and 4.85 (cut-off false-reactive. There was no false-reactive result with the VIDAS®. Of the false-reactive samples, 66.7% could be related to patient-specific underlying conditions. The HIV two-tiered diagnostic algorithm proposed in this work improved the positive predictive values of the Elecsys® or ARCHITECT® to 100% when the results of the VIDAS® were included. Values just above the cut-off are highly suspicious to be false-reactive and high COI or S/CO ratios are associated with true positivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. HIV self-testing could "revolutionize testing in South Africa, but it has got to be done properly": perceptions of key stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makusha, Tawanda; Knight, Lucia; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Tulloch, Olivia; Davids, Adlai; Lim, Jeanette; Peck, Roger; van Rooyen, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    South Africa bears the world's largest burden of HIV with over 6.4 million people living with the virus. The South African government's response to HIV has yielded remarkable results in recent years; over 13 million South Africans tested in a 2012 campaign and over 2 million people are on antiretroviral treatment. However, with an HIV & AIDS and STI National Strategic Plan aiming to get 80 percent of the population to know their HIV status by 2016, activists and public health policy makers argue that non-invasive HIV self-testing should be incorporated into the country HIV Counseling and Testing [HCT] portfolios. In-depth qualitative interviews (N = 12) with key stakeholders were conducted from June to July 2013 in South Africa. These included two government officials, four non-governmental stakeholders, two donors, three academic researchers, and one international stakeholder. All stakeholders were involved in HIV prevention and treatment and influenced HCT policy and research in South Africa and beyond. The interviews explored: interest in HIV self-testing; potential distribution channels for HIV self-tests to target groups; perception of requirements for diagnostic technologies that would be most amenable to HIV self-testing and opinions on barriers and opportunities for HIV-linkage to care after receiving positive test results. While there is currently no HIV self-testing policy in South Africa, and several barriers exist, participants in the study expressed enthusiasm and willingness for scale-up and urgent need for further research, planning, establishment of HIV Self-testing policy and programming to complement existing facility-based and community-based HIV testing systems. Introduction of HIV self-testing could have far-reaching positive effects on holistic HIV testing uptake, giving people autonomy to decide which approach they want to use for HIV testing, early diagnosis, treatment and care for HIV particularly among hard-to reach groups, including men.

  18. HIV self-testing could "revolutionize testing in South Africa, but it has got to be done properly": perceptions of key stakeholders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawanda Makusha

    Full Text Available South Africa bears the world's largest burden of HIV with over 6.4 million people living with the virus. The South African government's response to HIV has yielded remarkable results in recent years; over 13 million South Africans tested in a 2012 campaign and over 2 million people are on antiretroviral treatment. However, with an HIV & AIDS and STI National Strategic Plan aiming to get 80 percent of the population to know their HIV status by 2016, activists and public health policy makers argue that non-invasive HIV self-testing should be incorporated into the country HIV Counseling and Testing [HCT] portfolios. In-depth qualitative interviews (N = 12 with key stakeholders were conducted from June to July 2013 in South Africa. These included two government officials, four non-governmental stakeholders, two donors, three academic researchers, and one international stakeholder. All stakeholders were involved in HIV prevention and treatment and influenced HCT policy and research in South Africa and beyond. The interviews explored: interest in HIV self-testing; potential distribution channels for HIV self-tests to target groups; perception of requirements for diagnostic technologies that would be most amenable to HIV self-testing and opinions on barriers and opportunities for HIV-linkage to care after receiving positive test results. While there is currently no HIV self-testing policy in South Africa, and several barriers exist, participants in the study expressed enthusiasm and willingness for scale-up and urgent need for further research, planning, establishment of HIV Self-testing policy and programming to complement existing facility-based and community-based HIV testing systems. Introduction of HIV self-testing could have far-reaching positive effects on holistic HIV testing uptake, giving people autonomy to decide which approach they want to use for HIV testing, early diagnosis, treatment and care for HIV particularly among hard-to reach

  19. Does provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling lead to higher HIV testing rate and HIV case finding in Rwandan clinics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; van Santen, Daniëla; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Lammers, Judith; Mugisha, Veronicah; Bagiruwigize, Emmanuel; de Naeyer, Ludwig; Asiimwe, Anita; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) is promoted as a means to increase HIV case finding. We assessed the effectiveness of PITC to increase HIV testing rate and HIV case finding among outpatients in Rwandan health facilities (HF). PITC was introduced in six HFs in 2009-2010. HIV

  20. Sensitivity of HIV rapid tests compared with fourth-generation enzyme immunoassays or HIV RNA tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Sheng; Chow, Eric P F; Fairley, Christopher K; Chen, Marcus Y; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Read, Tim R H

    2016-07-31

    Determine the sensitivity of HIV rapid tests compared with fourth-generation enzyme immunoassays (EIA) or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) in clinical settings. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane reviews and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched until 14 July 2015 for studies of adults comparing point-of-care HIV rapid tests to fourth-generation HIV EIA antibody/p24 antigen or HIV NAAT. From 953 titles, 18 studies were included, involving 110 122 HIV rapid test results. Compared with EIA, the estimated sensitivity (random effects) of HIV rapid tests was 94.5% [95% confidence interval (CI): 87.4-97.7]. Compared with NAAT, the sensitivity of HIV rapid tests was 93.7% (95% CI: 88.7-96.5). The sensitivity of HIV rapid tests in high-income countries was 85.7% (95% CI: 81.9-88.9) and in low-income countries was 97.7% (95% CI: 95.2-98.9) compared with either EIA or NAAT (P HIV rapid tests were less sensitive in high-income countries compared with low-income countries, missing about one in seven infections, possibly because of the larger proportion of acute infections in targeted populations. This suggests that in high-income countries, HIV rapid tests should be used in combination with fourth-generation EIA or NAAT tests, except in special circumstances. Prospective Registration of Systematic Reviews registration number CRD42015020154.Supplementary video link: http://links.lww.com/QAD/A924.

  1. HIV Testing Within At-Risk Populations in the United States and the Reasons for Seeking or Avoiding HIV Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kellerman, Scott E; Lehman, Stan J; Lansky, Amy; Stevens, Mark R; Hecht, Frederick M; Bindman, Andrew B; Wortley, Pascale M

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:We determined proportions of high-risk persons tested for HIV, the reasons for testing and not testing, and attitudes and perceptions regarding HIV testing, information that is critical for planning prevention programs...

  2. Performance of a Rapid and Simple HIV Testing Algorithm in a Multicenter Phase III Microbicide Clinical Trial▿

    OpenAIRE

    Crucitti, Tania; Taylor, Doug; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien; Van Damme, Lut

    2011-01-01

    A multitest sequential algorithm based on rapid and simple (R/S) assays was applied for the diagnosis of HIV infection among participants in a phase 3 microbicide effectiveness trial. HIV testing was performed on finger-prick blood samples obtained from patients after their enrollment in the trial. The specimens were tested in a serial procedure using three different rapid tests (Determine HIV-1/2 [Abbott], SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 [Standard Diagnostics], and Uni-Gold HIV [Trinity Biotech]). In...

  3. Statistical analysis of microbiological diagnostic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C P Baveja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available No study in medical science is complete without application of the statistical principles. Incorrect application of statistical tests causes incorrect interpretation of the study results obtained through hard work. Yet statistics remains one of the most neglected and loathed areas, probably due to the lack of understanding of the basic principles. In microbiology, rapid progress is being made in the field of diagnostic test, and a huge number of studies being conducted are related to the evaluation of these tests. Therefore, a good knowledge of statistical principles will aid a microbiologist to plan, conduct and interpret the result. The initial part of this review discusses the study designs, types of variables, principles of sampling, calculation of sample size, types of errors and power of the study. Subsequently, description of the performance characteristics of a diagnostic test, receiver operator characteristic curve and tests of significance are explained. Lack of a perfect gold standard test against which our test is being compared can hamper the study results; thus, it becomes essential to apply the remedial measures described here. Rapid computerisation has made statistical calculations much simpler, obviating the need for the routine researcher to rote learn the derivations and apply the complex formulae. Thus, greater focus has been laid on developing an understanding of principles. Finally, it should be kept in mind that a diagnostic test may show exemplary statistical results, yet it may not be useful in the routine laboratory or in the field; thus, its operational characteristics are as important as the statistical results.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of confrontation visual field tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, N M; Chew, S S L; Eady, E K; Gamble, G D; Danesh-Meyer, H V

    2010-04-13

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of confrontation visual field testing and to compare the accuracy of confrontation tests both individually and in combination. Patients were prospectively recruited from ophthalmology clinics over a 6-month period. All patients underwent SITA-standard 24-2 Humphrey visual field analysis. Two examiners, masked to the automated perimetry results and the results of the other examiner, assessed patients using 7 common confrontation visual field tests. The order of testing was randomized to reduce any learning effect. For each individual test and combination of tests, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated. A total of 301 eyes from 163 patients were included in the study. The average mean deviation was -5.91 +/- 7.72 (SD) dB. Most confrontation tests were insensitive to the identification of field loss. The sensitivity and specificity varied depending on the type, density, and cause of the visual field defect. Kinetic testing with a red target provided the highest sensitivity (74.4%) and specificity (93.0%) of any individual test and when combined with static finger wiggle testing achieved a sensitivity of 78.3% while retaining a specificity of 90.1%. Confrontation visual field tests are insensitive at detecting visual field loss when performed individually and are therefore a poor screening test. Combining confrontation tests is a simple and practical method of improving the sensitivity of confrontation testing.

  5. [Evaluation of an immunochromatographic fourth generation test for the rapid diagnosis of acute HIV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahata, Takuya; Nagashima, Mami; Sadamasu, Kenji; Kojima, Yoko; Mori, Haruyo

    2013-07-01

    The early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is important to provide effective antiviral treatment and to prevent transmission of HIV. One of the key issues to achieve this goal is to shorten the so-called "diagnostic window period" when the humoral immune response toward the virus is not fully developed during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. In 2008, the Espline HIV Ag/Ab test kit (E4G, Fujirebio Inc. Japan) was marketed in Japan belonging to the fourth generation of HIV test kits characterized by its ability to detect both viral antigens (Ag) and anti-HIV-1/2 antibodies (Ab). E4G is the first and only fourth generation immunochromatographic HIV test kit approved in Japan at present. To evaluate its performance to diagnose acute HIV infection (AHI), E4G was compared with fourth generation Ag/Ab ELISA test kits, a third generation PA test kit, WB and real-time PCR for the testing of 25 AHI clinical specimens. E4G detected HIV infection in 18/25 specimens (sensitivity : 72.0%), of which the viral Ag was detected in only 2 specimens (8.0%) bearing a viral load > 10 million copies/mL. No spesimens were simultaneously reactive to both Ag and Ab against HIV. The third generation PA achieved a positive score of 17/ 25 specimens (68.0%), which was almost the same as the E4G figure. In contrast the fourth generation Ag/ Ab ELISA scored all the 25 AHI specimens positive (sensitivity : 100%). Overall, although having the merit of offering a rapid diagnostic test for HIV infection, E4G does not provide a sensitivity in AHI diagnosis superior to test kits currently available.

  6. HIV testing during the Canadian immigration medical examination: a national survey of designated medical practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jennifer M; Li, Alan; Owino, Maureen; English, Ken; Mascarenhas, Lyndon; Tan, Darrell H S

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing is mandatory for individuals wishing to immigrate to Canada. Since the Designated Medical Practitioners (DMPs) who perform these tests may have varying experience in HIV and time constraints in their clinical practices, there may be variability in the quality of pre- and posttest counseling provided. We surveyed DMPs regarding HIV testing, counseling, and immigration inadmissibility. A 16-item survey was mailed to all DMPs across Canada (N = 203). The survey inquired about DMP characteristics, knowledge of HIV, attitudes and practices regarding inadmissibility and counseling, and interest in continuing medical education. There were a total of 83 respondents (41%). Participants frequently rated their knowledge of HIV diagnostics, cultural competency, and HIV/AIDS service organizations as "fair" (40%, 43%, and 44%, respectively). About 25%, 46%, and 11% of the respondents agreed/strongly agreed with the statements "HIV infected individuals pose a danger to public health and safety," "HIV-positive immigrants cause excessive demand on the healthcare system," and "HIV seropositivity is a reasonable ground for denial into Canada," respectively. Language was cited as a barrier to counseling, which focused on transmission risks (46% discussed this as "always" or "often") more than coping and social support (37%). There was a high level of interest (47%) in continuing medical education in this area. There are areas for improvement regarding DMPs' knowledge, attitudes, and practices about HIV infection, counseling, and immigration criteria. Continuing medical education and support for DMPs to facilitate practice changes could benefit newcomers who test positive through the immigration process.

  7. HIV testing week 2015: lowering barriers for HIV testing among high-risk groups in Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelsman, M; Joore, I K; van Bergen, J E; Hogewoning, A A; Zuure, F R; van Veen, M G

    2017-08-01

    Evaluation of the HIV Testing Week (HTW) 2015 in Amsterdam: the number of (positive) tested persons, characteristics and testing history of the tested population, the differences in attendance per location and the healthcare workers' experiences and opinions concerning the HTW. The HTW took place from 28 November till 4 December 2015. Anonymous HIV rapid testing (INSTI™ HIV1/HIV2 Ab test or Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab test) was offered free of charge at four hospitals, 12 general practitioner (GP) clinics, a sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic, a laboratory, sites of a community-based organisation, and at outreach locations. Home-based testing (OraQuick® In-Home HIV Test) was offered online. The focus was to motivate two groups to test: men who have sex with men (MSM) and non-Western migrants. Questionnaires regarding participant's characteristics and HIV testing history were collected. Also healthcare workers were asked to complete a questionnaire evaluating the HTW. In total, 1231 participants were tested. With three positive HIV tests, the detection rate was 0.3% (95%CI 0.26-0.37). Of all participants, 24.7% (304/1231) were MSM. Respectively, 22.3% (275/1231) and 15.7% (193/1231) were first- and second-generation migrants from a non-Western country. Altogether, 56.7% (698/1231) of participants belonged to one of the targeted risk groups. For 32.7% (402/1231) of participants, it was the first time they received testing, and 35.1% (432/1231) were tested more than 1 year ago. Among MSM 13.2% were tested for the first time, among first- and second-generation non-Western migrants this percentage was significantly higher at 27.2% and 33.5% respectively (p tested participants per location varied widely, especially between GP clinics (range 3-63). Healthcare workers were positive about the HTW: about half (46.2%) stated they would more readily offer an HIV test following their experience with the HTW. This was the first time the Amsterdam HTW was organised

  8. Discordant HIV Test Results: Implications on Perinatal and Haemotransfusion Screening for HIV Infection, Cape Coast, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Ato Kwamena; Agyarko, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Screening results of 488 pregnant women aged 15-44 years whose blood samples had been tested on-site, using First Response® HIV 1/2, and confirmed with INNO-LIA™ HIV I/II Score were used. Of this total, 178 were reactive (HIV I, 154; HIV II, 2; and HIV I and HIV II, 22). Of the 154 HIV I-reactive samples, 104 were confirmed to be HIV I-positive and 2 were confirmed to be HIV II-positive, while 48 were confirmed to be negative [false positive rate = 17.44% (13.56-21.32)]. The two HIV II samples submitted were confirmed to be negative with the confirmatory test. For the 22 HIV I and HIV II samples, 7 were confirmed to be HIV I-positive and 1 was confirmed to be HIV I- and HIV II-positive, while 14 were confirmed to be negative. Of the 310 nonreactive samples, 6 were confirmed to be HIV I-positive and 1 was confirmed to be HIV II-positive [false negative rate = 5.79% (1.63-8.38)], while 303 were negative. False negative outcomes will remain unconfirmed, with no management options for the client. False negative rate of 5.79% requires attention, as its resultant implications on control of HIV/AIDS could be dire.

  9. Discordant HIV Test Results: Implications on Perinatal and Haemotransfusion Screening for HIV Infection, Cape Coast, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ato Kwamena Tetteh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening results of 488 pregnant women aged 15–44 years whose blood samples had been tested on-site, using First Response® HIV 1/2, and confirmed with INNO-LIA™ HIV I/II Score were used. Of this total, 178 were reactive (HIV I, 154; HIV II, 2; and HIV I and HIV II, 22. Of the 154 HIV I-reactive samples, 104 were confirmed to be HIV I-positive and 2 were confirmed to be HIV II-positive, while 48 were confirmed to be negative [false positive rate = 17.44% (13.56–21.32]. The two HIV II samples submitted were confirmed to be negative with the confirmatory test. For the 22 HIV I and HIV II samples, 7 were confirmed to be HIV I-positive and 1 was confirmed to be HIV I- and HIV II-positive, while 14 were confirmed to be negative. Of the 310 nonreactive samples, 6 were confirmed to be HIV I-positive and 1 was confirmed to be HIV II-positive [false negative rate = 5.79% (1.63–8.38], while 303 were negative. False negative outcomes will remain unconfirmed, with no management options for the client. False negative rate of 5.79% requires attention, as its resultant implications on control of HIV/AIDS could be dire.

  10. Acute HIV Discovered During Routine HIV Screening With HIV Antigen-Antibody Combination Tests in 9 US Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas A E; Giordano, Thomas P; Pasalar, Siavash; Jacobson, Kathleen R; Glick, Nancy R; Sha, Beverly E; Mammen, Priya E; Hunt, Bijou R; Todorovic, Tamara; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Adomolga, Vincent; Feaster, Daniel J; Branson, Bernard M

    2018-01-05

    Newer combination HIV antigen-antibody tests allow detection of HIV sooner after infection than previous antibody-only immunoassays because, in addition to HIV-1 and -2 antibodies, they detect the HIV-1 p24 antigen, which appears before antibodies develop. We determine the yield of screening with HIV antigen-antibody tests and clinical presentations for new diagnoses of acute and established HIV infection across US emergency departments (EDs). This was a retrospective study of 9 EDs in 6 cities with HIV screening programs that integrated laboratory-based antigen-antibody tests between November 1, 2012, and December 31, 2015. Unique patients with newly diagnosed HIV infection were identified and classified as having either acute HIV infection or established HIV infection. Acute HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result, a negative HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay, or Western blot result, but detectable HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA); established HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result and a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay or Western blot result. The primary outcomes were the number of new HIV diagnoses and proportion of patients with laboratory-defined acute HIV infection. Secondary outcomes compared reason for visit and the clinical presentation of acute HIV infection. In total, 214,524 patients were screened for HIV and 839 (0.4%) received a new diagnosis, of which 122 (14.5%) were acute HIV infection and 717 (85.5%) were established HIV infection. Compared with patients with established HIV infection, those with acute HIV infection were younger, had higher RNA and CD4 counts, and were more likely to have viral syndrome (41.8% versus 6.5%) or fever (14.3% versus 3.4%) as their reason for visit. Most patients with acute HIV infection displayed symptoms attributable to acute infection (median symptom count 5 [interquartile range 3 to 6]), with fever often

  11. Acceptance of counseling, voluntary HIV testing and use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The overall acceptance of pre-test counseling in labour among women with unknown sero-status was 71.7% while acceptance of counseling and voluntary HIV testing was 56.6%. Among those who accepted pre-test counseling in labour, 78.9% accepted HIV testing and 8.6% of these were found to be HIV infected.

  12. ACCEPTABILITY OF ROUTINE OFFER OF HIV TESTING (OPT-OUT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-01

    Mar 1, 2011 ... SUMMARY. Background: With the introduction of the opt out HIV testing policy in Ghana, the HIV test is offered rou- tinely to all pregnant women unless they decline test- ing. Objective: To assess acceptability of the routine offer of HIV testing antenatal clinic (ANC) clients in the Wa municipality, Ghana.

  13. HIV testing and informed consent - ethical considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    against his will, even where the patient suffers as a consequence; and the need for informed consent for an HIV test performed for the patient's own sake is simply one instance of that general duty to respect the patient's autonomy. The general duty to gain ir-lformed consent for a medical procedure is subject to exceptions, ...

  14. HIV Risk Behavior and Access to Services: What Predicts HIV Testing among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV…

  15. Awareness of Repeat Antenatal HIV Testing in Mothers Six Weeks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PMTCT) recommend that all pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers must have HIV tests every 3 months. However, less than 10% of pregnant women in Lusaka District get retested. Repeat HIV testing identifies women who seroconvert ...

  16. Contamination with HIV antibody may be responsible for false positive results in specimens tested on automated platforms running HIV 4th generation assays in a region of high HIV prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Diana Ruth; Korsman, Stephen N; Hsiao, Nei-Yuan; Morobadi, Molefi Daniel; Vawda, Sabeehah; Goedhals, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    In South Africa where the prevalence of HIV infection is very high, 4th generation HIV antibody/p24 antigen combo immunoassays are the tests of choice for laboratory based screening. Testing is usually performed in clinical pathology laboratories on automated analysers. To investigate the cause of false positive results on 4th generation HIV testing platforms in public sector laboratories, the performance of two automated platforms was compared in a clinical pathology setting, firstly on routine diagnostic specimens and secondly on known sero-negative samples. Firstly, 1181 routine diagnostic specimens were sequentially tested on Siemens and Roche automated 4th generation platforms. HIV viral load, western blot and follow up testing were used to determine the true status of inconclusive specimens. Subsequently, known HIV seronegative samples from a single donor were repeatedly tested on both platforms and an analyser was tested for surface contamination with HIV positive serum to identify how suspected specimen contamination could be occurring. Serial testing of diagnostic specimens yielded 163 weakly positive or discordant results. Only 3 of 163 were conclusively shown to indicate true HIV infection. Specimen contamination with HIV antibody was suspected, based on the following evidence: the proportion of positive specimens increased on repeated passage through the analysers; viral loads were low or undetectable and western blots negative or indeterminate on problem specimens; screen negative, 2nd test positive specimens tested positive when reanalysed on the screening assay; follow up specimens (where available) were negative. Similarly, an increasing number of known negative specimens became (repeatedly) sero-positive on serial passage through one of the analysers. Internal and external analyser surfaces were contaminated with HIV serum, evidence that sample splashes occur during testing. Due to the extreme sensitivity of these assays, contamination with minute

  17. Standardised opt-out testing for HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Danna

    2011-12-01

    This article offers a literature review of the benefits of, and problems associated with, a standardised opt-out screening programme for HIV, and the attitudes of healthcare professionals and patients to its potential introduction in emergency departments. There is a lack of research on the subject in the UK and so the article relies on work undertaken in the US and on opt-out testing in antenatal services in the UK. It reviews the potential benefits of such a programme, in particular the opportunities it offers to improve public health and reduced the stigma associated with HIV, and discusses the issue of consent.

  18. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Lee F; Elbireer, Ali; Jackson, J Brooks; Amukele, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda. Test types (identity) and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI). AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015. Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954) of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests), moderate (33 tests), and minimal (55 tests) availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83-$3.46). One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1.83-$3.46.

  19. A New Diagnostic Test for Endometrial Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralp, Onur; Sheridan, Susan M.; Harter, Josephine; Hinshaw, James Louis; Seo, Songwon; Hartenbach, Ellen M.; Lindheim, Steven; Stewar, Sarah; Kushner, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective During saline-infused sonohysterography (SIS), the distension fluid is typically discarded. If cytology analysis could identify those patients with endometrial cancer, many women would be spared from further procedures. Methods Thirty consecutive patients with clinical stage I or II endometrial adenocarcinoma were prospectively recruited preoperatively. Saline-infused sonohysterography was performed by instilling 5 mL of saline, withdrawing and sending for analysis. Saline was reinfused until complete SIS images were obtained and sent separately for cytology. Results Of the 30 women enrolled, SIS was technically successful in 29. Demographics included mean age (60.5 ± 6.99 years), body mass index (35.55 ± 8.18 kg/m2), endometrioid histology (76%), and grade (grade 1, 67%). Prestudy diagnostic method included biopsy (70%), dilatation and curettage (17%), and hysteroscopy (10%). Adequate cytology specimens were obtained in 66% of the 5mL flushes and 72% of the complete SIS collections. Of adequate specimens, the sensitivities to detect endometrial cancer for the 5-mL, complete, and combined fluid samples were 26% (95% confidence interval, 9%–51%), 36% (17%–59%), and 42% (22%–63%). Sensitivity based on the whole study sample (N = 30) was 33% (17%–53%). Statistical significance was not found in the association between a positive test and age, body mass index, grade, diagnostic method, or volume instilled or aspirated. Conclusions Most patients with early endometrial cancer can undergo SIS procedures with adequate cytology specimens obtained from distention media. However, the sensitivity is low, and refinements are necessary before utilizing as a diagnostic test. In cases with positive results, the patient may be able to avoid other costly and painful procedures. PMID:23881100

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of premanipulative vertebrobasilar insufficiency tests: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutting, N.; Verhagen, A.P.; Vijverman, V.; Keesenberg, M.D.; Dixon, G.; Scholten-Peeters, G.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review of diagnostic accuracy studies. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the premanipulative vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) tests. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The aim of premanipulative vertebrobasilar testing is to evaluate the adequacy of blood

  1. Factors that influence the acceptance of HIV testing by pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highest educational level and occupation of the pregnant women significantly influenced their having and HIV test (P<0.001). All the women with tertiary education have had an HIV test while 66.7% and 7.1% of those with primary and secondary education respectively had not taken an HIV test for the first time. Also house ...

  2. Knowledge and Preference of HIV Testing Types Among Antenatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context Knowledge of different HIV testing modules is necessary to make an informed consent. The basic conditions of confidentiality, voluntary and counseling (pre-and-post) should apply in all HIV testing. Objective To assess the knowledge and preference of HIV counseling and testing types among antenatal women at ...

  3. HIV counselling and testing utilisation and attitudes of male inmates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results indicate that a poor health system (OR=0.34, 95%CI:0.23 - 0.50) was inversely associated with HIV testing acceptance in prison, while age, educational level, population group, marital status, length of incarceration and access to HIV testing in prison were not associated with HIV testing acceptance in prison. Half of ...

  4. Quality and Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies in TB, HIV and Malaria: Evaluation Using QUADAS and STARD Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Patricia Scolari; Pant Pai, Nitika; Schiller, Ian; Dendukuri, Nandini; Ramsay, Andrew; Pai, Madhukar

    2009-01-01

    Background Poor methodological quality and reporting are known concerns with diagnostic accuracy studies. In 2003, the QUADAS tool and the STARD standards were published for evaluating the quality and improving the reporting of diagnostic studies, respectively. However, it is unclear whether these tools have been applied to diagnostic studies of infectious diseases. We performed a systematic review on the methodological and reporting quality of diagnostic studies in TB, malaria and HIV. Methods We identified diagnostic accuracy studies of commercial tests for TB, malaria and HIV through a systematic search of the literature using PubMed and EMBASE (2004–2006). Original studies that reported sensitivity and specificity data were included. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics and diagnostic accuracy, and used QUADAS and STARD to evaluate the quality of methods and reporting, respectively. Findings Ninety (38%) of 238 articles met inclusion criteria. All studies had design deficiencies. Study quality indicators that were met in less than 25% of the studies included adequate description of withdrawals (6%) and reference test execution (10%), absence of index test review bias (19%) and reference test review bias (24%), and report of uninterpretable results (22%). In terms of quality of reporting, 9 STARD indicators were reported in less than 25% of the studies: methods for calculation and estimates of reproducibility (0%), adverse effects of the diagnostic tests (1%), estimates of diagnostic accuracy between subgroups (10%), distribution of severity of disease/other diagnoses (11%), number of eligible patients who did not participate in the study (14%), blinding of the test readers (16%), and description of the team executing the test and management of indeterminate/outlier results (both 17%). The use of STARD was not explicitly mentioned in any study. Only 22% of 46 journals that published the studies included in this review required

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of GeneXpert MTB/RIF in musculoskeletal tuberculosis: High sensitivity in tissue samples of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Held

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. GeneXpert MTB/RIF is useful for the diagnosis of pulmonary TB in adults, but there is limited evidence on its usefulness in extrapulmonary TB. Objectives. To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of GeneXpert MTB/RIF in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients with suspected musculoskeletal TB. Methods. A prospective study of patients with suspected musculoskeletal (bone and joint TB was undertaken. The diagnostic accuracy of GeneXpert MTB/RIF was compared with the reference standards of culture and histopathology. Results. A total of 206 biopsies from 201 patients (23% HIV-infected were evaluated. The sensitivity and specificity of GeneXpert MTB/RIF was 92.3% (84/91 and 99.1% (114/115, respectively. GeneXpert MTB/RIF detected 8.8% more cases than culture (84/91 (92.3% v. 76/91 (83.5%, respectively; p=0.069. GeneXpert MTB/RIF also detected all 4 multidrug-resistant TB cases and an additional 2 rifampicin-resistant cases in culture-negative samples. The sensitivity of GeneXpert MTB/RIF in HIV-infected patients was 96.9% (31/32 v. 89.6% (43/48 in HIV-uninfected patients (p=0.225. Conclusion. GeneXpert MTB/RIF is an accurate test for the detection of TB in tissue samples of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients with suspected musculoskeletal TB. A positive GeneXpert MTB/RIF result should be regarded as microbiological confirmation of TB.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of GeneXpert MTB/RIF in musculoskeletal tuberculosis: High sensitivity in tissue samples of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, M; Laubscher, M; Workman, L; Zar, H J; Dunn, R

    2017-09-22

    GeneXpert MTB/RIF is useful for the diagnosis of pulmonary TB in adults, but there is limited evidence on its usefulness in extrapulmonary TB. To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of GeneXpert MTB/RIF in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients with suspected musculoskeletal TB. A prospective study of patients with suspected musculoskeletal (bone and joint) TB was undertaken. The diagnostic accuracy of GeneXpert MTB/RIF was compared with the reference standards of culture and histopathology. A total of 206 biopsies from 201 patients (23% HIV-infected) were evaluated. The sensitivity and specificity of GeneXpert MTB/RIF was 92.3% (84/91) and 99.1% (114/115), respectively. GeneXpert MTB/RIF detected 8.8% more cases than culture (84/91 (92.3%) v. 76/91 (83.5%), respectively; p=0.069). GeneXpert MTB/RIF also detected all 4 multidrug-resistant TB cases and an additional 2 rifampicin-resistant cases in culture-negative samples. The sensitivity of GeneXpert MTB/RIF in HIV-infected patients was 96.9% (31/32) v. 89.6% (43/48) in HIV-uninfected patients (p=0.225). GeneXpert MTB/RIF is an accurate test for the detection of TB in tissue samples of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients with suspected musculoskeletal TB. A positive GeneXpert MTB/RIF result should be regarded as microbiological confirmation of TB.

  7. Lower mortality and earlier start of combination antiretroviral therapy in patients tested repeatedly for HIV than in those with a positive first test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, Luuk; van Sighem, Ard; Bezemer, Daniela; Smit, Colette; Wit, Ferdinand; de Wolf, Frank; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection will probably beneficially impact onward transmission and life expectancy. We compared mortality rates and CD4 cell counts at start of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in patients with different frequencies of diagnostic testing for HIV.

  8. Lower mortality and earlier start of combination antiretroviral therapy in patients tested repeatedly for HIV than in those with a positive first test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, Luuk; van Sighem, Ard; Bezemer, Daniela; Smit, Colette; Wit, Ferdinand; de Wolf, Frank; Prins, J. M.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; Boer, K.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Godfried, M. H.; Reiss, P.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Lange, J. M. A.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; van der Valk, M.; Schreij, G.; Lowe, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Pronk, M. J. H.; Bravenboer, B.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Schurink, C. A. M.; van der Feltz, M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; Slobbe, L.; Hartwig, N. G.; Driessen, G. J. A.; Branger, J.; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; Arend, S. M.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; de Boer, M. G. J.; Jolink, H.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; van Twillert, G.; Kortmann, W.; Vriesendorp, R.; Leyten, E. M. S.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Juttmann, J. R.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K. D.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Smit, P. M.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van Assen, S.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Koopmans, P. P.; de Groot, R.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; van der Flier, M.; Brouwer, A. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; van der Hilst, J. C. H.; Barth, R. E.; Danner, S. A.; van Agtmael, M. A.; de Vocht, J.; Perenboom, R. M.; Claessen, F. A. P.; bij de Vaate, E. A.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; van den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Polée, M. B.; Winkel, C.; Muskiet, F.; Voigt, R.

    2011-01-01

    Early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection will probably beneficially impact onward transmission and life expectancy. We compared mortality rates and CD4 cell counts at start of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in patients with different frequencies of diagnostic testing for HIV. Patients infected

  9. Diagnostic performance of interferon-gamma releasing assay in HIV-infected patients in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active tuberculosis infection represents a very common and significant threat to HIV-infected patients. But measures to accurately detect it are limited. OBJECTIVE: To compare and analyze the diagnostic efficacy of T-SPOT.TB alone and in combination with TST in HIV-infected patients in China. METHOD: TST (tuberculin skin test and T-SPOT.TB were performed on 131 HIV-infected patients admitted in Beijing You'an Hospital and Beijing Ditan Hospital between Oct, 2010 and Jul, 2012, who were initially diagnosed as suspected ATB (active TB. The patients were further categorized into ATB and Not ATB based on clinical and cultural evidences. The performance of TST and T-SPOT.TB were analyzed and compared. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of T-SPOT.TB were 41.3% and 94.6%, respectively, both higher than TST (12.9% and 91.8%. By combining T-SPOT.TB and TST, the sensitivity did not increase, but specificity was elevated to 100%. TST, T-SPOT.TB and their combinations all performed better in patients with extra-pulmonary diseases than with pulmonary disorders. False-positive T-SPOT.TB results were found to be associated with history of prior TB. In addition, concomitant bacterial infections and low CD4 counts were associated with increased ATB risk. CONCLUSIONS: T-SPOT.TB is superior in screening ATB in HIV-infected patients in China over traditional TST. Additional TST would help to confirm a positive T-SPOT.TB result. Both tests work better for patients with extra-pulmonary conditions.

  10. Urine antibody tests: new insights into the dynamics of HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urnovitz, H B; Sturge, J C; Gottfried, T D; Murphy, W H

    1999-09-01

    Noninvasive methodologies provide alternatives to diagnostic blood tests and have high patient acceptance, increased safety, and reduced costs. Such tests may supplement or replace blood diagnostic assays currently in use. Using a licensed urine-based test for antibody to HIV-1, we performed 25 991 HIV-1 urine antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) screening tests [confirmable by HIV-1 Western blot (WB)] on paired urine and blood specimens obtained from high- and low-risk HIV-1 subjects collected at six sites representative of the US population. Using HIV-1 urine EIA tests confirmed by urine Western blot, a compartmentalized immune response (urine positive/serum negative) occurred in 0.24% of a cohort of 11 896 subjects. In the same cohort, specimens that were urine negative/serum positive occurred in 0.17% of subjects. In a second study of 25 991 subjects that included 859 high-risk individuals, the false-positive urine EIA frequency (urine WB negative or indeterminate) was 1.3%. This false-positive frequency in the high-risk cohort was attributed, in part, to an IgA antibody response. We tabulated urine and serum indeterminate reactivities and examined their possible causes. Data are presented showing that antibodies from a seroindeterminate HIV-1vau group O subject were reactive in urine EIA and urine WB tests. An analysis of the HIV-1vau strain group O env nucleotide sequence disclosed a high frequency of homology with human chromosome 7q31, a fragile site implicated in many human malignancies. These results demonstrate the utility of urine for alternative HIV-1 antibody testing and provide new insights into the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and into potential application of this approach in investigation of other microbial pathogens and toxic compounds.

  11. Modern diagnostic capabilities for vasospastic angina diagnostics (intracoronary provocative testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Обединский

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This review is devoted to a topical problem of modern cardiology – techniques of diagnosing vasospastic angina. The results of retrospective and prospective studies on the efficacy and safety of vasospastic angina diagnostics are reviewed. The literature on the prevalence, progression and treatment of this pathology is discussed.Received 13 January 2017. Accepted 6 February 2017.Financing: The study did not have sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  12. Modern diagnostic capabilities for vasospastic angina diagnostics (intracoronary provocative testing)

    OpenAIRE

    А. А. Обединский; С. В. Бугуров; О. В. Крестьянинов; И. А. Нарышкин; Д. Д. Зубарев; И. О. Гражданкин; Р. У. Ибрагимов; В. И. Байструков; Р. А. Найденов; Е. И. Кретов

    2017-01-01

    This review is devoted to a topical problem of modern cardiology – techniques of diagnosing vasospastic angina. The results of retrospective and prospective studies on the efficacy and safety of vasospastic angina diagnostics are reviewed. The literature on the prevalence, progression and treatment of this pathology is discussed.Received 13 January 2017. Accepted 6 February 2017.Financing: The study did not have sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  13. [Specificity of a new test for detection of antibodies to HIV-1/-2 in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadé, C; Wüst, T

    1996-06-01

    The aim of the continuous development of anti-HIV-ELISA tests is the improvement of their specificity and sensitivity. With this study the precision and the specificity of the Cobas Core Anti-HIV-1/HIV-2 DAGS, a 3rd-generation anti-HIV assay, were evaluated. 1,557 frozen and 1,654 fresh sera from blood donors were tested with the Cobas Core Anti-HIV-1/HIV-2 DAGS (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Basel, Switzerland) and the Abbott Recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd Generation EIA (Abbott GmbH Diagnostika, Wiesbaden, Germany), which was used as a reference assay. Positive sera were tested with a Westernblot. 34 sera, previously not negative in the Abbott test, were retested with the two anti-HIV assays and with a Westernblot. The intra- and inter-assay precision was evaluated with the positive and negative controls of the test kits and with control sera. The intra- and inter-assay precision of the Roche test was very good. The specificity of the Roche test is 99.91%. Out of 3,211 tested sera those of three blood donors were false positive in the Roche test and one sample false positive in the Abbott test. The precision and specificity of the new anti-HIV test fulfil the demands of transfusion medicine.

  14. RHIC electron lens test bench diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassner, D.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Miller, T.; Pikin, A.; Thieberger, P.

    2011-05-16

    An Electron Lens (E-Lens) system will be installed in RHIC to increase luminosity by counteracting the head-on beam-beam interaction. The proton beam collisions at the RHIC experimental locations will introduce a tune spread due to a difference of tune shifts between small and large amplitude particles. A low energy electron beam will be used to improve luminosity and lifetime of the colliding beams by reducing the betatron tune shift and spread. In preparation for the Electron Lens installation next year, a test bench facility will be used to gain experience with many sub-systems. This paper will discuss the diagnostics related to measuring the electron beam parameters.

  15. Testing Hammer and Stanton's Reengineering Success Diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Murphy

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Business Process Reengineering (BPR is no longer referenced in academic literature with the regularity that it was in the heady days of the mid-nineties but it is still in use in Australian organisations. We are also changing processes radically as new software is implemented or new electronic markets are embraced and the lessons of reengineering can be applied to these process changes. This study makes three main contributions by: (1 investigating the organisational context prior to the embarkation on projects of major change in Australia, (2 testing the validity of a diagnostic proposed by Hammer and Stanton (1995 to be used when assessing the ability of organisations to succeed at reengineering, and (3 examining the impact of the organisational environment prior to change on the outcome of reengineering projects.

  16. Evaluation of nine HIV rapid test kits to develop a national HIV testing algorithm in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orji Bassey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-cold chain-dependent HIV rapid testing has been adopted in many resource-constrained nations as a strategy for reaching out to populations. HIV rapid test kits (RTKs have the advantage of ease of use, low operational cost and short turnaround times. Before 2005, different RTKs had been used in Nigeria without formal evaluation. Between 2005 and 2007, a study was conducted to formally evaluate a number of RTKs and construct HIV testing algorithms. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess and select HIV RTKs and develop national testing algorithms. Method: Nine RTKs were evaluated using 528 well-characterised plasma samples. These comprised 198 HIV-positive specimens (37.5% and 330 HIV-negative specimens (62.5%, collected nationally. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated with 95% confidence intervals for all nine RTKs singly and for serial and parallel combinations of six RTKs; and relative costs were estimated. Results: Six of the nine RTKs met the selection criteria, including minimum sensitivity and specificity (both ≥ 99.0% requirements. There were no significant differences in sensitivities or specificities of RTKs in the serial and parallel algorithms, but the cost of RTKs in parallel algorithms was twice that in serial algorithms. Consequently, three serial algorithms, comprising four test kits (BundiTM, DetermineTM, Stat-Pak® and Uni-GoldTM with 100.0% sensitivity and 99.1% – 100.0% specificity, were recommended and adopted as national interim testing algorithms in 2007. Conclusion: This evaluation provides the first evidence for reliable combinations of RTKs for HIV testing in Nigeria. However, these RTKs need further evaluation in the field (Phase II to re-validate their performance.

  17. The influence of stigma on voluntary HIV testing among pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal and external stigmas are often lumped together while addressing issues of stigma and HIV-testing, not considering that one of them may actually affect the disposition HIV-testing than the other. This study, therefore, investigated the effect of HIV/AIDS-related internal and external stigma on the disposition of pregnant ...

  18. Low HIV testing rates among tuberculosis patients in Kampala, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sendagire, Ibrahim; Schreuder, Imke; Mubiru, Mesach; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Cobelens, Frank; Konde-Lule, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    HIV testing among tuberculosis patients is critical in improving morbidity and mortality as those found to be HIV positive will be offered a continuum of care including ART if indicated. We conducted a cross-sectional study in three Kampala City primary care clinics: to assess the level of HIV test

  19. A Comprehensive Sex Education Approach for HIV Testing and Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpin, Hilde

    2006-01-01

    Despite huge prevention efforts the number of HIV infections worldwide continues to increase dramatically. Among other strategies, the HIV test offers an important chance for targeted prevention, provided quality counselling is offered. Several studies have revealed that HIV testing is often performed in less than optimal conditions and is often…

  20. Determinants In HIV Counselling And Testing In Couples In North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT) has been shown to be an acceptable and effective tool in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Couple HIV Counselling and Testing (CHCT) however, is a relatively new concept whose acceptance and efficacy is yet to be determined. Objective: To describe factors that ...

  1. Validity of oral mucosal transudate specimens for HIV testing using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The overall sensitivity of OMT specimens for HIV testing in children using ELISA was low. Stratifying the analysis by sector showed that OMT samples are good specimens for HIV testing. It is important to note that factors such as the low HIV prevalence in our study population, quality of the OMT, diet and oral hygiene could ...

  2. HIV Testing Patterns among Urban YMSM of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Noelle R.; Rajan, Sonali; Gwadz, Marya V.; Aregbesola, Temi

    2014-01-01

    The heightened level of risk for HIV infection among Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) is driven by multilevel influences. Using cross-sectional data, we examined HIV testing patterns among urban YMSM of color in a high-HIV seroprevalence area (ages 16 to 21 years). Self-reported frequency of testing was high, with 42% of…

  3. Womens experiences of HIV testing and counselling in the labour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. HIV counseling and testing during labour can be emotional, but is important because it allows mothers and babies to receive PMTCT prophylaxis if previous identification of HIV infection has not occurred. The study explores how HIV testing and counseling during early labour affects women. Methodology.

  4. Diagnostic Testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content Turn off Animations Turn on Animations Our Sponsors Log in | Register Menu Log in | ... Body HIV/AIDS Physical examination,, and thorough medical history, plus one or more of the following blood ...

  5. Evaluation of simple rapid HIV assays and development of national rapid HIV test algorithms in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbwana Judica

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suitable algorithms based on a combination of two or more simple rapid HIV assays have been shown to have a diagnostic accuracy comparable to double enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA or double ELISA with Western Blot strategies. The aims of this study were to evaluate the performance of five simple rapid HIV assays using whole blood samples from HIV-infected patients, pregnant women, voluntary counseling and testing attendees and blood donors, and to formulate an alternative confirmatory strategy based on rapid HIV testing algorithms suitable for use in Tanzania. Methods Five rapid HIV assays: Determine™ HIV-1/2 (Inverness Medical, SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics Inc., First Response HIV Card 1–2.0 (PMC Medical India Pvt Ltd, HIV1/2 Stat-Pak Dipstick (Chembio Diagnostic System, Inc and Uni-Gold™ HIV-1/2 (Trinity Biotech were evaluated between June and September 2006 using 1433 whole blood samples from hospital patients, pregnant women, voluntary counseling and testing attendees and blood donors. All samples that were reactive on all or any of the five rapid assays and 10% of non-reactive samples were tested on a confirmatory Inno-Lia HIV I/II immunoblot assay (Immunogenetics. Results Three hundred and ninety samples were confirmed HIV-1 antibody positive, while 1043 were HIV negative. The sensitivity at initial testing of Determine, SD Bioline and Uni-Gold™ was 100% (95% CI; 99.1–100 while First Response and Stat-Pak had sensitivity of 99.5% (95% CI; 98.2–99.9 and 97.7% (95% CI; 95.7–98.9, respectively, which increased to 100% (95% CI; 99.1–100 on repeat testing. The initial specificity of the Uni-Gold™ assay was 100% (95% CI; 99.6–100 while specificities were 99.6% (95% CI; 99–99.9, 99.4% (95% CI; 98.8–99.7, 99.6% (95% CI; 99–99.9 and 99.8% (95% CI; 99.3–99.9 for Determine, SD Bioline, First Response and Stat-Pak assays, respectively. There was no any sample which was

  6. Lack of HIV testing and dissatisfaction with HIV testing and counselling among men having sex with men in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyitray, Alan G; Bagyinszky, Ferenc; Ross, Michael W; Schmidt, Axel J

    2017-11-22

    Using data from a large internet-based survey of European men having sex with men (MSM), we assessed factors associated with HIV testing and reasons for dissatisfaction with HIV testing and counselling among Hungarian MSM. A total of 2052 Hungarian MSM provided evaluable data for the European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS) in 2010. χ2 tests and Poisson regression with a robust variance estimator were used to assess factors associated with HIV testing and dissatisfaction with HIV testing and counselling. A total of 42.1% of MSM reported never being testing for HIV. Over one-half of men (54.1%) who reported condomless anal intercourse (CAI) in the prior 12 months with a person of unknown or sero-discordant HIV status reported no lifetime HIV testing. The factor most strongly associated with dissatisfaction with HIV testing and counselling was test site with increased dissatisfaction with inpatient hospital settings vs. community-based organizations. Both lack of HIV testing and dissatisfaction with testing were independently associated with MSM who reported that no one, or only a few people, knew they were attracted to men. Lack of HIV testing was strongly associated with CAI. MSM reported that community-based organizations better supported confidentiality and were more respectful during HIV testing.

  7. Use of rapid HIV assays as supplemental tests in specimens with repeatedly reactive screening immunoassay results not confirmed by HIV-1 Western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Laura G; Delaney, Kevin P; Meyer, William A; Blatt, Amy J; Bennett, Berry; Chavez, Pollyanna; Granade, Timothy C; Owen, Michele

    2013-09-01

    An alternate HIV testing algorithm has been proposed which includes a fourth-generation immunoassay followed by an HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation supplemental test for reactive specimens and a nucleic acid test (NAT) for specimens with discordant results. To evaluate the performance of five rapid tests (Alere Clearview, Bio-Rad Multispot, OraSure OraQuick, MedMira Reveal, and Trinity Biotech Unigold) as the supplemental antibody assay in the algorithm. A total of 3273 serum and plasma specimens that were third-generation immunoassay repeatedly reactive and Western blot (WB) negative or indeterminate were tested with rapid tests and NAT. Specimens were classified by NAT: (1) HIV-1 infected (NAT-reactive; n=184, 5.6%), (2) HIV-status unknown (NAT nonreactive; n=3078, 94.2%) or by Multispot, (3) HIV-2 positive (n=5), and (4) HIV-1 and HIV-2 positive (n=6). Excluding HIV-2 positive specimens, we calculated the proportion of reactive rapid tests among specimens with reactive and nonreactive NAT. The proportion of infected specimens with reactive rapid test results and negative or indeterminate WB ranged from 30.4% (56) to 47.8% (88) depending on the rapid test. From 1% to 2% of NAT-negative specimens had reactive rapid test results. In these diagnostically challenging specimens, all rapid tests identified infections that were missed by the Western blot, but only Multispot could differentiate HIV-1 from HIV-2. Regardless of which rapid test is used as a supplemental test in the alternative algorithm, false-positive algorithm results (i.e., reactive screening and rapid test in uninfected person) may occur, which will need to be resolved during the baseline medical evaluation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Brazilian Program For HIV Point-Of-Care Test Evaluation: A Decade’s Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando da Costa Ferreira Jr.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The point-of-care tests (POCTs for HIV diagnosis have been widely used in Brazil in order to expand and to allow HIV diagnosis outside health units including remote areas, such as the Amazon region. In order to guarantee the quality of HIV diagnostics based on rapid tests, the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH implemented the HIV POCT Evaluation Program. This study compiles the Brazilian experience acquired over the last 13 years conducting the HIV POCT Evaluation Program.   Methods and Findings The selection of tests was based on the interest of manufacturers to qualify for the MoH tenders. Each round was performed with fresh whole blood and oral fluid samples, always including HIV positive and negative ones. In addition to the POCT, every sample was submitted to a reference testing protocol, based on an immunoassay followed by Western blot. The POCTs were evaluated for clinical sensitivity, clinical specificity, assay operational characteristics, detection of HIV-2 antibodies, sensitivity to subtypes panels; and sensitivity to seroconversion panels. Since its implementation in 2003, the POCT evaluation protocol has undergone some modifications aiming to improve and simplify the evaluation process, to know: (i  for HIV-positive samples, perform EIA and Western blot only if the POCT is non-reactive; (ii reduction from 800 to 600 HIV negative samples; (iii increase from one to three subtype panels (including HIV-2 samples; and (iv inclusion of seroconversion panel. We evaluated six tests, four of which met the sensitivity criteria of 99.5%: BD Chek™ HIV Multi-test (whole blood, HIV 1/2 Colloidal Gold (whole blood, OraQuick ADVANCE® Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test (whole blood and oral fluid and TR DPP HIV-1/2 (whole blood, plasma and oral fluid. Regarding other evaluated criteria, all assays met the requirements.   Conclusions The successful Brazilian policy on POCT use for HIV infection diagnosis includes the evaluation of the POCT itself in

  9. Diagnostic value of specific IgM antibodies in primary HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. M.; Parry, J. V.; de Wolf, F.; Mortimer, P. P.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    Sequential serum samples from 55 homosexual men with primary HIV infection were tested for IgM anti-HIV. An early IgM response was found in 27 out of 55 (49%). In five cases IgM anti-HIV was detected 1-3 1/4 months prior to IgG anti-HIV seroconversion, as detected by a commercially available ELISA,

  10. HIV testing and linkage to services for youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Kurth

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV testing is the portal to serostatus knowledge that can empower linkage to care for HIV treatment and HIV prevention. However, young people's access to HIV testing is uneven worldwide. The objective of this paper is to review the context and concerns faced by youth around HIV testing in low- as well as high-income country settings. Discussion: HIV testing is a critical entry point for primary and secondary prevention as well as care and treatment for young people including key populations of vulnerable youth. We provide a framework for thinking about the role of testing in the continuum of prevention and care for young people. Brief case study examples from Kenya and the US illustrate some of the common barriers and issues involved for young people. Conclusions: Young people worldwide need more routine access to HIV testing services that effectively address the developmental, socio-political and other issues faced by young women and men.

  11. Determination of HIV status in African adults with discordant HIV rapid tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Donohue, Kelsey; Cummings, Vanessa; Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Breaud, Autumn; Fiamma, Agnès; Donnell, Deborah; Kulich, Michal; Mbwambo, Jessie K. K.; Richter, Linda; Gray, Glenda; Sweat, Michael; Coates, Thomas J.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings, HIV infection is often diagnosed using two rapid tests. If the results are discordant, a third tie-breaker test is often used to determine HIV status. This study characterized samples with discordant rapid tests and compared different testing strategies for determining HIV status in these cases. Methods Samples were previously collected from 173 African adults in a population-based survey who had discordant rapid test results. Samples were classified as HIV positive or HIV negative using a rigorous testing algorithm that included two fourth-generation tests, a discriminatory test, and two HIV RNA tests. Tie-breaker tests were evaluated, including: rapid tests (one performed in-country), a third-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA), and two fourth-generation tests. Selected samples were further characterized using additional assays. Results Twenty-nine (16.8%) samples were classified as HIV positive; 24 (82.8%) of those samples had undetectable HIV RNA. Antiretroviral drugs were detected in one sample. Sensitivity was 8.3%–43% for the rapid tests; 24.1% for the third-generation EIA; 95.8% and 96.6% for the fourth-generation tests. Specificity was lower for the fourth-generation tests than the other tests. Accuracy ranged from 79.5–91.3%. Conclusions In this population-based survey, most HIV-infected adults with discordant rapid tests were virally suppressed without antiretroviral drugs. Use of individual assays as tie-breaker tests was not a reliable method for determining HIV status in these individuals. More extensive testing algorithms that use a fourth-generation screening test with a discriminatory test and HIV RNA test are preferable for determining HIV status in these cases. PMID:25835607

  12. Evaluation of HIV testing recommendations in specialty guidelines for the management of HIV indicator conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lord, E; Stockdale, A J; Malek, R

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: European guidelines recommend HIV testing for individuals presenting with indicator conditions (ICs) including AIDS-defining conditions (ADCs). The extent to which non-HIV specialty guidelines recommend HIV testing in ICs and ADCs is unknown. Our aim was to pilot a methodology in the UK...... to review specialty guidelines and ascertain if HIV was discussed and testing recommended. METHODS: UK and European HIV testing guidelines were reviewed to produce a list of 25 ADCs and 49 ICs. UK guidelines for these conditions were identified from searches of the websites of specialist societies...... (48%) and 36 of 49 (73%) ICs. In total, 78 guidelines were reviewed (range 0-13 per condition). HIV testing was recommended in six of 17 ADC guidelines (35%) and 24 of 61 IC guidelines (39%). At least one guideline recommended HIV testing for six of 25 ADCs (24%) and 16 of 49 ICs (33...

  13. Missed opportunities for HIV control: Gaps in HIV testing for partners of people living with HIV in Lima, Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L Vasquez

    Full Text Available Based on the hypothesis that HIV programs struggle to deliver health services that harmonize necessities of treatment and prevention, we described the outcomes of routinely provided HIV testing to partners of people living with HIV (PLWH through a secondary analysis of routine data collected at a public hospital in Lima, Peru.Among PLWH enrolled in the study center's HIV program between 2005 and 2014, we identified index cases (IC: PLWH who reported a unique partner not previously enrolled. We grouped partners according to their HIV status as reported by IC and collected data on HIV testing, clinical characteristics and admissions. The main outcome was the frequency of HIV testing among partners with reported unknown/seronegative HIV status.Out of 1586 PLWH who reported a unique partner at enrollment, 171 had a previously enrolled partner, leaving 1415 (89% IC. HIV status of the partner was reported as unknown in 571 (40%, seronegative in 325 (23% and seropositive in 519 (37%. Out of 896 partners in the unknown/seronegative group, 72 (8% had HIV testing, 42/72 (58% tested within three months of IC enrollment. Among the 49/72 (68% who tested positive for HIV, 33 (67% were enrolled in the HIV program. The proportion in WHO clinical stage IV was lower in enrolled partners compared to IC (37% vs 9%, p = 0.04. Non-tested partners (824 were likely reachable by the hospital, as 297/824 (36% of their IC were admitted in the study center at least once, 51/243 (21% female IC had received pregnancy care at the study center, and 401/692 (64% of IC on antiretroviral therapy had achieved viral suppression, implying frequent visits to the hospital for pill pick-up.In this setting, HIV testing of partners of PLWH was suboptimal, illustrating missed opportunities for HIV control. Integration of HIV strategies in primarily clinical-oriented services is a challenging need.

  14. False positive HIV test in low prevalence region: Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram, Nadeem; Ahmad, Sajid

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV in Pakistan is less than 0.1%, but is feared to be spreading among the general population rapidly. Screening tests for HIV is based on antibody detection. There seems to be little knowledge regarding the interpretation of HIV results among the population. Most often the patients are being issued a positive HIV report based on single screening test when in fact it should be confirmed before issuing a positive HIV result. There is a lot of stigma associated with the disease in Pakistan, on the other hand the test is done mostly without counselling services hence causing physical and mental trauma to the patients.

  15. Leveraging rapid community-based HIV testing campaigns for non-communicable diseases in rural Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Chamie

    Full Text Available The high burden of undiagnosed HIV in sub-Saharan Africa limits treatment and prevention efforts. Community-based HIV testing campaigns can address this challenge and provide an untapped opportunity to identify non-communicable diseases (NCDs. We tested the feasibility and diagnostic yield of integrating NCD and communicable diseases into a rapid HIV testing and referral campaign for all residents of a rural Ugandan parish.A five-day, multi-disease campaign, offering diagnostic, preventive, treatment and referral services, was performed in May 2011. Services included point-of-care screening for HIV, malaria, TB, hypertension and diabetes. Finger-prick diagnostics eliminated the need for phlebotomy. HIV-infected adults met clinic staff and peer counselors on-site; those with CD4 ≤ 100/µL underwent intensive counseling and rapid referral for antiretroviral therapy (ART. Community participation, case-finding yield, and linkage to care three months post-campaign were analyzed.Of 6,300 residents, 2,323/3,150 (74% adults and 2,020/3,150 (69% children participated. An estimated 95% and 52% of adult female and male residents participated respectively. Adult HIV prevalence was 7.8%, with 46% of HIV-infected adults newly diagnosed. Thirty-nine percent of new HIV diagnoses linked to care. In a pilot subgroup with CD4 ≤ 100, 83% linked and started ART within 10 days. Malaria was identified in 10% of children, and hypertension and diabetes in 28% and 3.5% of adults screened, respectively. Sixty-five percent of hypertensives and 23% of diabetics were new diagnoses, of which 43% and 61% linked to care, respectively. Screening identified suspected TB in 87% of HIV-infected and 19% of HIV-uninfected adults; 52% percent of HIV-uninfected TB suspects linked to care.In an integrated campaign engaging 74% of adult residents, we identified a high burden of undiagnosed HIV, hypertension and diabetes. Improving male attendance and optimizing linkage to care

  16. Determinants and prevalence of late HIV testing in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizosa, Claudia M; Blumberg, Elaine J; Hovell, Melbourne F; Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Garcia-Gonzalez, Gregorio; Lozada, Remedios; Kelley, Norma J; Hofstetter, C Richard; Sipan, Carol L

    2010-05-01

    Timely diagnosis of HIV is essential to improve survival rates and reduce transmission of the virus. Insufficient progress has been made in effecting earlier HIV diagnoses. The Mexican border city of Tijuana has one of the highest AIDS incidence and mortality rates in all of Mexico. This study examined the prevalence and potential correlates of late HIV testing in Tijuana, Mexico. Late testers were defined as participants who had at least one of: (1) an AIDS-defining illness within 1 year of first positive HIV test; (2) a date of AIDS diagnosis within 1 year of first positive HIV test; or (3) an initial CD4 cell count below 200 cells per microliter within 1 year of first positive HIV test. Medical charts of 670 HIV-positive patients from two HIV/AIDS public clinics in Tijuana were reviewed and abstracted; 362 of these patients were interviewed using a cross-sectional survey. Using multivariate logistic regression, we explored potential correlates of late HIV testing based on the Behavioral Ecological Model. From 342 participants for whom late testing could be determined, the prevalence of late testing was 43.2%. Multivariate logistic regression results (n = 275) revealed five significant correlates of late testing: "I preferred not to know I had HIV" (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.78, 1.46-5.31); clinic (AOR = 1.90, 1.06-3.41); exposure to peers engaging in high-risk sexual behavior (AOR = 1.14, 1.02-1.27); stigma regarding HIV-infected individuals (AOR = 0.65, 0.47-0.92); and stigma regarding HIV testing (AOR = 0.66, 0.45-0.97). These findings may inform the design of interventions to increase timely HIV testing and help reduce HIV transmission in the community at large.

  17. University leadership for innovation in global health and HIV/AIDS diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamountain, K M; Stewart, K A; Krauss, A; Kelso, D; Diermeier, D

    2010-01-01

    Medical products used in the developed world often fail to adequately serve resource-limited settings where electricity, transportation and health care workers are not readily available. We suggest that the problem is not only a lack of coordinated financial resources to purchase existing medical products, but also a lack of products that are specifically designed for resource-limited settings. While donor organisations with a focus on global health are increasingly willing to bear the additional financial risk for the research and development of such high-impact medical products, corporations are still reluctant to take their best scientists and engineers away from more commercially attractive projects. Universities, on the other hand, given their teaching and research missions, are well positioned to engage in such high-risk development projects. A group of biomedical, engineering, business and social science researchers at Northwestern University (NU) propose a creative model to address significant social and health needs. The team's initial product focus is a rapid test for diagnosing infants with HIV. The NU model aligns the incentives and expertise of industry, donors and academia to innovate medical products, such as the infant HIV diagnostic test, for resource-limited settings.

  18. Factors affecting willingness to HIV Counseling and Testing among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is ample scientific evidence that a person with an untreated sexually transmitted infection (STI), particularly those inducing ulcers or discharge, is at an increased risk of passing on or acquiring HIV during sexual intercourse. HIV counseling and testing (HIV CT) for STI cases is thus an important tool in the ...

  19. The influence of stigma on voluntary HIV testing among pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study, therefore, investigated the effect of HIV/AIDS-related internal and external stigma on the disposition of pregnant women in the Limpopo Province of South Africa to go for voluntary HIV-testing. Four hundred and fifty ... Furthermore, HIV/AIDS-related internal stigma came out to be a significant factor. The more ...

  20. HIV-Selectest enzyme immunoassay and rapid test: ability to detect seroconversion following HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Surender; Norris, Philip J; Busch, Michael P; Haynes, Barton F; Park, Susan; Sasono, Pretty; Mlisana, Koleka; Salim, Abdool Karim; Hecht, Frederick M; Mulenga, Joseph; Chomba, Elwyn; Hunter, Eric; Allen, Susan; Nemo, George; Rodriguez-Chavez, Isaac R; Margolick, Joseph B; Golding, Hana

    2010-01-01

    HIV-Selectest is a serodiagnostic enzyme immunoassay (EIA), containing p6 and gp41 peptides, designed to differentiate between vaccine-induced antibodies and true infections. A rapid test version of the HIV-Selectest was developed. Both assays detected HIV antibodies in men and women within 2 to 4 weeks of infection, with sensitivity similar to third-generation EIAs.

  1. Quantifying the added value of a diagnostic test or marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moons, Karel G M; de Groot, Joris A H; Linnet, Kristian; Reitsma, Johannes B; Bossuyt, Patrick M M

    2012-10-01

    In practice, the diagnostic workup usually starts with a patient with particular symptoms or signs, who is suspected of having a particular target disease. In a sequence of steps, an array of diagnostic information is commonly documented. The diagnostic information conveyed by different results from patient history, physical examination, and subsequent testing is to varying extents overlapping and thus mutually dependent. This implies that the diagnostic potential of a test or biomarker is conditional on the information obtained from previous tests. A key question about the accuracy of a diagnostic test/biomarker is whether that test improves the diagnostic workup beyond already available diagnostic test results. This second report in a series of 4 gives an overview of several methods to quantify the added value of a new diagnostic test or biomarker, including the area under the ROC curve, net reclassification improvement, integrated discrimination improvement, predictiveness curve, and decision curve analysis. Each of these methods is illustrated with the use of empirical data. We reiterate that reporting on the relative increase in discrimination and disease classification is relevant to obtain insight into the incremental value of a diagnostic test or biomarker. We also recommend the use of decision-analytic measures to express the accuracy of an entire diagnostic workup in an informative way. © 2012 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  2. Enhancing HIV status disclosure and partners' testing through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Tanzania HIV Testing and Counselling (HTC) is being implemented through voluntary counselling and testing (VCT), provider initiated counselling and testing (PITC) and work place counselling and testing (HTC). Within these programmes, HIV status disclosure is emphasized. However, among persons who ...

  3. Evaluation of HIV testing recommendations in specialty guidelines for the management of HIV indicator conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, E; Stockdale, A J; Malek, R; Rae, C; Sperle, I; Raben, D; Freedman, A; Churchill, D; Lundgren, J; Sullivan, A K

    2017-04-01

    European guidelines recommend HIV testing for individuals presenting with indicator conditions (ICs) including AIDS-defining conditions (ADCs). The extent to which non-HIV specialty guidelines recommend HIV testing in ICs and ADCs is unknown. Our aim was to pilot a methodology in the UK to review specialty guidelines and ascertain if HIV was discussed and testing recommended. UK and European HIV testing guidelines were reviewed to produce a list of 25 ADCs and 49 ICs. UK guidelines for these conditions were identified from searches of the websites of specialist societies, the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) website, the NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries (CKS) website, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidance Network (SIGN) website and the British Medical Journal Best Practice database and from Google searches. We identified guidelines for 12 of 25 ADCs (48%) and 36 of 49 (73%) ICs. In total, 78 guidelines were reviewed (range 0-13 per condition). HIV testing was recommended in six of 17 ADC guidelines (35%) and 24 of 61 IC guidelines (39%). At least one guideline recommended HIV testing for six of 25 ADCs (24%) and 16 of 49 ICs (33%). There was no association between recommendation to test and publication year (P = 0.62). The majority of guidelines for ICs do not recommend testing. Clinicians managing ICs may be unaware of recommendations produced by HIV societies or the prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection among these patients. We are piloting methods to engage with guideline development groups to ensure that patients diagnosed with ICs/ADCs are tested for HIV. We then plan to apply our methodology in other European settings as part of the Optimising Testing and Linkage to Care for HIV across Europe (OptTEST) project. © 2016 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  4. Rapid HIV testing and obstetrical characteristics of women with unknown HIV serostatus at time of labor and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dola, Chi; Tran, Thuc; Duong, Can; Federico, Chris; DeNicola, Nathaniel; Maupin, Robert

    2010-12-01

    To describe the obstetrical characteristics of women without prenatal care and/or undocumented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serostatus who presented for delivery and to assess the usefulness of rapid HIV screening in these women. The study design was a retrospective analysis. Demographics, labor, delivery characteristics, and pregnancy outcomes of women without prenatal care and/or unknown HIV serostatus were reviewed. Three hundred fifty parturients met the inclusion criteria: 15.2% presented at complete cervical dilation, 48.6% with cervical dilation of at least 5 cm, and 43.1% with ruptured membranes. Twenty-two percent of parturients delivered within 1 hour of admission, 47.6% delivered within 4 hours of admission, and 5.5% delivered prior to arrival to the hospital. With the lengthy admission process and procurement of zidovudine from the pharmacy requiring at least 1 hour at best, 27.5% would not have the benefit of intrapartum zidovudine treatment. Single Use Diagnostic System HIV-1 rapid test was reactive and confirmed in 7 women (2.5%). Rapid HIV screening is a useful tool for guiding immediate obstetrical management and coordinated care for the neonate. In some circumstances, the full benefit of rapid HIV detection will not be realized due to advanced labor, ruptured members, or delivery prior to arrival.

  5. Uptake of HIV testing during antenatal care in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Anne Sebert; Bergquist, Eleanor P; Fu, Qiang; Shacham, Enbal; Foggia, Janine; Sierra, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    In order to interrupt vertical transmission of HIV, the WHO recommends universal HIV testing during antenatal care (ANC), a policy that has been adopted by the Ministry of Health in Honduras. We examined HIV counseling and testing practices during ANC in the Honduras Demographic and Health Survey to understand compliance with this established standard of care. Among currently married women with a child aged five years or younger who attended ANC, only 66% recalled being offered HIV testing during ANC, yet 95% of those got tested. Older, less literate women who lived in a rural area, a small household, or had an older husband were significantly less likely to recall being offered HIV testing. These findings highlight necessary revisions to ANC protocols to ensure that all women in Honduras get HIV testing to interrupt mother-to-child transmission.

  6. Diagnostic Testing and the Disadvantaged Student: A Field in Disarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphus, Stephen H.

    Some basic maxims of the field of diagnostic/prescriptive testing for academically deficient college students are as follows: the end purpose of diagnostic testing must be, not to screen out prospective students, but to match the available resources of the campus to the strengths and weaknesses of the student; testing is the essential tool in…

  7. Evaluation of an alternative supplemental testing strategy for HIV diagnosis by retrospective analysis of clinical HIV testing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styer, Linda M; Sullivan, Timothy J; Parker, Monica M

    2011-12-01

    Because newer screening assays are more sensitive than traditional confirmatory assays, a new HIV testing algorithm was proposed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) in 2010 to replace the current enzyme immunoassay (EIA)-Western blot (WB) algorithm that was established in 1989. The new algorithm includes a sensitive screening EIA and a HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation immunoassay (Multispot) for confirmation. Concordant reactive specimens are reported as HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 positive; those with discordant results receive nucleic acid testing (NAT). Our laboratory uses all components of both the current and proposed algorithms and conducted a retrospective analysis of test results to compare algorithm performance. All available test results from 38,257 specimens were analyzed, of which 36,598 were EIA non-reactive. Of 1659 EIA-reactive specimens, 1578 were defined by our laboratory as HIV-1 positive, 5 as HIV-2 positive, 69 as negative and 7 as unknown. These results were used to evaluate both algorithms. Under the proposed algorithm, all 1578 HIV-1-positive specimens would be reported as 'HIV-1 positive', whereas the current algorithm only confirmed 98% (1546/1578). The proposed algorithm produced fewer inconclusive results (9 vs 48); consequently, fewer follow-up specimens would be needed. The current algorithm produced one false-positive result whereas the proposed algorithm produced four. Two of these four false-positive results could be eliminated by requiring NAT for specimens with discordant HIV-1 results on the Multispot. Although both algorithms identified all HIV-2-positive specimens, the current algorithm required an additional 112 tests. The CDC/APHL HIV testing algorithm, proposed in 2010, outperformed the current algorithm because it was more sensitive for detecting HIV-1 infection, provided a greater number of definitive HIV results, and detected HIV-2 more efficiently. Copyright

  8. The role of rapid diagnostic tests in managing adults with pneumonia in low-resource settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Aston

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In well-resourced settings the systematic use of rapid diagnostics tests (e.g. pneumococcal urinary antigen test that define the causal pathogen to direct therapy has not resulted in significantly improved outcomes in adults with pneumonia. The management of pneumonia in many low-resource settings is complicated by a substantial burden of tuberculosis and HIV-associated opportunistic infections, in addition to the usual spectrum of pathogens seen in well-resourced settings. Clinical features alone do not reliably distinguish between these different aetiologies and physicians often have to treat empirically. Given the limitations in diagnostic laboratory capability present in most low-resource settings, rapid and point-of-care diagnostic tests could become valuable tools to guide treatment decisions. Pneumococcal and Legionella urinary antigen tests are specific and moderately sensitive, but their utility in low-resource settings is uncertain. The Xpert MTB/RIF (Cepheid, USA platform and rapid assays for urinary lipoarabinomannan can substantially speed up tuberculosis diagnosis; the current challenge is to translate this into earlier treatment and hopefully improve patient outcome. In HIV-infected patients, 1-3-β-D-glucan is a serum marker of Pneumocystis jirovecii infection with excellent sensitivity. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of these rapid diagnostic assays when they are incorporated into treatment algorithms.

  9. Rapid non-invasive tests for diagnostics of infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    A rapid test for an infectious disease that can be used at point-of-care at a physician's office, a pharmacy, or in the field is critical for the prompt and appropriate therapeutic intervention. Ultimately by treating infections early on will decrease transmission of the pathogen. In contrast to metabolic diseases or cancer where multiple biomarkers are required, infectious disease targets (e.g. antigen, antibody, nucleic acid) are simple and specific for the pathogen causing the disease. Our laboratory has focused on three major infectious disease; HIV, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. These diseases are pandemic in much of the world thus putting natives, tourists and military personnel at risk for becoming infected, and upon returning to the U.S., transmitting these diseases to their contacts. Our devices are designed to detect antigens, antibodies or nucleic acids in blood or saliva samples in less than 30 minutes. An overview describing the current status of each of the three diagnostic platforms is presented. These microfluidic point-of-care devices will be relatively inexpensive, disposable, and user friendly.

  10. Escherichia coli–expressed near full length HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein is a highly sensitive and specific diagnostic antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talha Sheikh M

    2012-11-01

    of hydrophobic regions, and its purification in reasonable yields. This underscores the potential for cost saving in antigen production. Evaluation of this antigen in a double antigen sandwich two-step assay showed it to be a highly sensitive and specific HIV-1 diagnostic reagent. The amenability of this assay to the one-step format suggests its potential utility in developing a rapid point-of-care HIV-1 diagnostic test.

  11. The International HIV Dementia Scale: a new rapid screening test for HIV dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacktor, Ned C; Wong, Matthew; Nakasujja, Noeline; Skolasky, Richard L; Selnes, Ola A; Musisi, Seggane; Robertson, Kevin; McArthur, Justin C; Ronald, Allan; Katabira, Elly

    2005-09-02

    HIV dementia is an important neurological complication of advanced HIV infection. The use of a cross-cultural screening test to detect HIV dementia within the international community is critical for diagnosing this condition. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of a new screening test for HIV dementia, the International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) in cohorts from the US and Uganda. Two cross-sectional cohort studies designed to evaluate for the presence of HIV dementia. Sixty-six HIV-positive individuals in the US and 81 HIV-positive individuals in Uganda received the IHDS and full standardized neurological and neuropsychological assessments. The sensitivity and specificity of varying cut-off scores of the IHDS were evaluated in the two cohorts. In the US cohort, the mean IHDS score for HIV-positive individuals without dementia and with dementia were 10.6 and 9.3 respectively (P dementia with the IHDS were 80% and 57% respectively in the US cohort, and 80% and 55% respectively in the Uganda cohort. The IHDS may be a useful screening test to identify individuals at risk for HIV dementia in both the industrialized world and the developing world. Full neuropsychological testing should then be performed to confirm a diagnosis of HIV dementia.

  12. The burden of knowing: balancing benefits and barriers in HIV testing decisions. a qualitative study from Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgensen Marte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Client-initiated HIV counselling and testing has been scaled up in many African countries, in the form of voluntary counselling and testing (VCT. Test rates have remained low, with HIV-related stigma being an important barrier to HIV testing. This study explored HIV testing decisions in one rural and one urban district in Zambia with high HIV prevalence and available antiretroviral treatment. Methods Data were collected through 17 in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions with individuals and 10 in-depth interviews with counsellors. Interpretive description methodology was employed to analyse the data. Results 'To know your status' was found to be a highly charged concept yielding strong barriers against HIV testing. VCT was perceived as a diagnostic device and a gateway to treatment for the severely ill. Known benefits of prevention and early treatment were outweighed by a perceived burden of knowing your HIV status related to stigma and fear. The manner in which the VCT services were organised added to this burden. Conclusions This study draws on social stigma theory to enhance the understanding of the continuity of HIV related stigma in the presence of ART, and argues that the burden of knowing an HIV status and the related reluctance to get HIV tested can be understood both as a form of label-avoidance and as strong expressions of the still powerful embodied memories of suffering and death among non-curable AIDS patients over the last decades. Hope lies in the emerging signs of a reduction in HIV related stigma experienced by those who had been tested for HIV. Further research into innovative HIV testing service designs that do not add to the burden of knowing is needed.

  13. Central implementation strategies outperform local ones in improving HIV testing in Veterans Healthcare Administration facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Hoang, Tuyen; Knapp, Herschel; Burgess, Jane; Fletcher, Michael D; Gifford, Allen L; Asch, Steven M

    2013-10-01

    Pilot data suggest that a multifaceted approach may increase HIV testing rates, but the scalability of this approach and the level of support needed for successful implementation remain unknown. To evaluate the effectiveness of a scaled-up multi-component intervention in increasing the rate of risk-based and routine HIV diagnostic testing in primary care clinics and the impact of differing levels of program support. Three arm, quasi-experimental implementation research study. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities. Persons receiving primary care between June 2009 and September 2011 INTERVENTION: A multimodal program, including a real-time electronic clinical reminder to facilitate HIV testing, provider feedback reports and provider education, was implemented in Central and Local Arm Sites; sites in the Central Arm also received ongoing programmatic support. Control Arm sites had no intervention Frequency of performing HIV testing during the 6 months before and after implementation of a risk-based clinical reminder (phase I) or routine clinical reminder (phase II). The adjusted rate of risk-based testing increased by 0.4 %, 5.6 % and 10.1 % in the Control, Local and Central Arms, respectively (all comparisons, p marketing significantly increased the frequency at which HIV testing is offered and performed in VHA facilities. These findings support a multimodal approach toward achieving the goal of having every American know their HIV status as a matter of routine clinical practice.

  14. Private healthcare sector doctors and HIV testing practices in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing has many logistic and ethical challenges. The UNAIDS/WHO policy statement states that the testing of individuals must be confidential, be accompanied by counselling, and be conducted with informed consent. HIV testing is integral to the management of the ...

  15. evaluation of commercial hiv test kits used in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    As technology evolved, screening, confirmatory and. HIV monitoring assays have greatly improved in terms of quality and speed. Coupled with this development is the unprecedented increase in the number of test kits that are available for determining. HIV status. Test kits that are simple, instrument-free simple/rapid tests ...

  16. Womens experiences of HIV testing and counselling in the labour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tested to update their status. Four women were found HIV-positive while 6 were HIVnegative. The primary theme was that women appreciated and accepted HIV testing and counseling. Testing was accepted as a necessary step to protect the ...

  17. Social problems of indeterminate and false positive HIV test results ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increased availability of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) screening test and more public enlightenment have resulted in more people coming forward to access counseling and testing at the HIV counseling and testing centers in Nigeria. Some of the clients however obtained indeterminate and false positive results ...

  18. Are students being coerced into HIV testing? Ethical considerations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A social marketing strategy, including substantial prizes, was used to promote HIV testing at 17 institutions of higher learning in South Africa. Over 20 000 students with a mean age of 19 years were counselled and tested for HIV. The majority were being tested for the first time. Afterwards they signed a public pledge: 'We, ...

  19. Review of HIV Testing Efforts in Historically Black Churches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latrice Crystal Pichon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to critically assess the state of HIV testing in African American churches. A comprehensive review of peer-reviewed publications on HIV testing in church-based settings was conducted by two independent coders. Twenty-six papers published between 1991 and 2015, representing 24 unique projects, were identified addressing at least one dimension of HIV testing. Thirteen faith-based projects have implemented HIV testing events or had clergy promote the importance of testing and knowing one’s HIV status, but empirical data and rigorous study designs were limited. Only eight papers reported onsite HIV testing in churches. Less than 5% of the studies reported the percentage of congregants who returned for their test results. Finally, no study has examined at baseline or post-intervention behavioral intentions to be screened for HIV. Future research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of HIV testing in churches and to explore the possibilities of the role of the church and leadership structure in the promotion of HIV treatment and care.

  20. Rapid HIV-1 testing during labor: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulterys, Marc; Jamieson, Denise J; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Cohen, Mardge H; Maupin, Robert; Nesheim, Steven; Webber, Mayris P; Van Dyke, Russell; Wiener, Jeffrey; Branson, Bernard M

    2004-07-14

    Timely testing of women in labor with undocumented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status could enable immediate provision of antiretroviral prophylaxis. To determine the feasibility and acceptance of rapid HIV testing among women in labor and to assess rapid HIV assay performance. The Mother-Infant Rapid Intervention At Delivery (MIRIAD) study implemented 24-hour counseling and voluntary rapid HIV testing for women in labor at 16 US hospitals from November 16, 2001, through November 15, 2003. A rapid HIV-1 antibody test for whole blood was used. Acceptance of HIV testing; sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the rapid test; time from blood collection to patient notification of results. There were 91,707 visits to the labor and delivery units in the study, 7381 of which were by eligible women without documentation of HIV testing. Of these, 5744 (78%) women were approached for rapid HIV testing and 4849 (84%) consented. HIV-1 test results were positive for 34 women (prevalence = 7/1000). Sensitivity and specificity of the rapid test were 100% and 99.9%, respectively; positive predictive value was 90% compared with 76% for enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Factors independently associated with higher test acceptance included younger age, being black or Hispanic, gestational age less than 32 weeks, and having had no prenatal care. Lower acceptance was associated with being admitted between 4 pm and midnight, particularly on Friday nights, but this may be explained in part by fewer available personnel. Median time from blood collection to patient notification of result was 66 minutes (interquartile range, 45-120 minutes), compared with 28 hours for EIA (PHIV testing is feasible and delivers accurate and timely test results for women in labor. It provides HIV-positive women prompt access to intrapartum and neonatal antiretroviral prophylaxis, proven to reduce perinatal HIV transmission, and may be particularly applicable to higher-risk populations.

  1. A rapid diagnostic test for schistosomiasis mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Christina Mello-Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an improvement to the Kato-Katz (KK method, making it faster and more efficient for the visualisation of fertile eggs in stool samples. This modified KK method uses sodium acetate formalin as a fixative and reveals the intensity of infection in less than 1 h, reducing the diagnostic time without increasing the cost. This modified method may contribute to future epidemiological studies in both hospitals and the field due to its rapid and precise diagnostic, which allow for immediate treatment.

  2. A review of the impact of cost and quality of HIV kits on HIV testing in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ademu

    Double ELISA was used to test blood samples before a particular specimen was diagnosed as reactive or non-reactive. A time came when immunoconfirmatory test was introduced into HIV antibodies testing for confirmations of the presence of HIV. Objectives: This present retospective study is to review the impact of cost ...

  3. Ethnicity and HIV risk behaviour, testing and knowledge in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tory M; Hembling, John; Bertrand, Jane T

    2015-01-01

    To describe levels of risky sexual behaviour, HIV testing and HIV knowledge among men and women in Guatemala by ethnic group and to identify adjusted associations between ethnicity and these outcomes. Data on 16,205 women aged 15-49 and 6822 men aged 15-59 from the 2008-2009 Encuesta Nacional de Salud Materno Infantil were used to describe ethnic group differences in sexual behaviour, HIV knowledge and testing. We then controlled for age, education, wealth and other socio-demographic factors in a multivariate logistic regression model to examine the effects of ethnicity on outcomes related to age at sexual debut, number of lifetime sex partners, comprehensive HIV knowledge, HIV testing and lifetime sex worker patronage (men only). The data show low levels of risky sexual behaviour and low levels of HIV knowledge among indigenous women and men, compared to other respondents. Controlling for demographic factors, indigenous women were more likely than other women never to have been tested for HIV and to lack comprehensive HIV knowledge. They were less likely to report early sexual debut and three or more lifetime sexual partners. Indigenous men were more likely than other men to lack comprehensive HIV knowledge and demonstrated lower odds of early sexual debut, 10 or more lifetime sexual partners and sex worker patronage. The Mayan indigenous population in Guatemala, while broadly socially vulnerable, does not appear to be at elevated risk for HIV based on this analysis of selected risk factors. Nonetheless, low rates of HIV knowledge and testing may be cause for concern. Programmes working in indigenous communities should focus on HIV education and reducing barriers to testing. Further research into the factors that underlie ethnic self-identity and perceived ethnicity could help clarify the relative significance of these measures for HIV risk and other health outcomes.

  4. New HIV Testing Algorithm: Promising Tool in the Fight Against HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-21

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Phil Peters discusses the new HIV testing algorithm and how this latest technology can improve the diagnosis of acute HIV infection. Early detection of HIV is critical to saving lives, getting patients into treatment, and preventing transmission.  Created: 9/21/2016 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), • Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP).   Date Released: 9/21/2016.

  5. Frequency of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection among Iranian Patients with HIV/AIDS by PPD Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Fattahi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Persons infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are particularly susceptible to tuberculosis, either by latent infection reactivation or by a primary infection with rapid progression to active disease. This study was done to determine the frequency of tuberculosis infection among Iranian patients with HIV/AIDS. A total of 262 HIV/AIDS patients attending all three HIV/AIDS health care centers of Tehran, Iran were enrolled in this study. A detailed history and physical examination were obtained from all HIV patients suspected of having pulmonary M. tuberculosis. A positive PPD skin test was used as a diagnostic parameter for probability of TB infection. Out of 262 HIV/AIDS patients, a total of 63 (24% were shown to have the tuberculosis infection based on a positive PPD skin test. Of the patients with positive PPD skin test, 22 (35% had pulmonary Tuberculosis, 2 (3.2% had extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and 39 (53% had no evidence of M. tuberculosis infection (latent infection. Also 8 (12.7% had history of long term residence in a foreign country, 32 (50.8% were exposed to an index case, and 9 (14.3% had past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, while only 33.3% had clinical manifestations of TB (active disease. There was no resistant case of tuberculosis. Our study showed that near 24% of Iranian patients with HIV/AIDS were infected with M. tuberculosis. This finding denotes the need to improve the diagnostic and preventive measures, and also prompt treatment of this type of infection in the HIV infected individuals.

  6. PIC Reading and Spelling Diagnostic Test Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, N. J.

    This diagnostic skills checklist enables the methods and materials specialists to note the reading and spelling skills the child has mastered, those skills which are weak or not developed, and those skills which are clearly beyond the child's capability of mastering because of insufficiently developed abilities at lower, prerequisite levels. Also…

  7. Use of Diagnostic Testing in a Classification Information Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration Hospital, Bedford, MA.

    The three parts of this study concern the application of diagnostic testing to measure the effectiveness of classification training, the development of a systematic approach to applying the results, and a long-term study of employee retention of classification information. The measurement instrument selected for diagnostic testing of employees of…

  8. Diagnostic Testing at UK Universities: An E-Mail Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Jonathan; Levi, Margaret; Wilson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In July 2009, an e-mail survey was sent to various UK universities to gain information regarding current practices concerning mathematics diagnostic testing, and to provide an update from the review "Diagnostic Testing for Mathematics" published by the LTSN MathsTEAM Project in 2003. A total of 38 university departments were contacted…

  9. Quantifying the Accuracy of a Diagnostic Test or Marker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnet, Kristian; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Moons, Karel G. M.; Reitsma, Johannes B. R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, increasing focus has been directed to the methodology for evaluating (new) tests or biomarkers. A key step in the evaluation of a diagnostic test is the investigation into its accuracy. CONTENT: We reviewed the literature on how to assess the accuracy of diagnostic

  10. The Therapeutic Role of Language in HIV/AIDS Diagnostic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    large extent, pragmatically adequate and therapeutic as it disposes both the HIV positive and negative clients counselled to respond to the perlocutionary effects of the utterances. This pragmatic appraisal becomes imperative given that “a mere knowledge of technical vocabulary, and even the ability to use that knowledge ...

  11. Tailoring HIV testing in a setting of late HIV diagnosis: is the tide turning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Joseph; Lascar, Monica; Phiri, Elias

    2015-10-01

    Routine HIV testing in areas of high HIV prevalence has been shown to be both cost effective and to avert downstream morbidity and mortality from 'late' HIV diagnosis (defined as CD4 cell count<350 cells/ml). In the London borough of Waltham Forest in 2010, late HIV diagnoses were resulting in high morbidity with associated lengthy and costly hospital admissions. A retrospective analysis of all new HIV diagnoses was undertaken within a two-phased quality improvement project 2010-13. Newly diagnosed patients in 2010 were characterized, including immunological state, presence of HIV-related illness and department where they presented. After an intervention to set up an opt-out, walk-in rapid HIV testing service in outpatients, an analysis was conducted of numbers of tests, prevalence and immunological state of newly diagnosed patients in 2013. A total of 91 patients were diagnosed with HIV, January-December 2010, 70% of which were a late diagnosis, including 48% defined as 'very immunosuppressed' (CD4 count<100 cells/ml). Of these, 51 out of 91 patients (56%) had attended hospital services in the 5 years before diagnosis, including 204 outpatient department attendances. After the intervention, rates of late diagnosis in 2013 had reduced to 46%, and rates of those diagnosed 'very immunosuppressed' had reduced from 48% to 8%. HIV testing in outpatients is feasible and acceptable to patients and can be offered alongside routine outpatient care. The rate of positive HIV tests in this group of patients in the authors' setting has been much higher than the HIV positivity rate of larger scale HIV testing interventions in other hospital settings. This approach also provides a model for more integrated care of HIV-positive patients.

  12. HIV testing in developing countries: what is required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemnji, George; Nkengasong, John N; Parekh, Bharat S

    2011-12-01

    HIV diagnostic and follow up testing are usually done in laboratory settings. However, in developing countries there is a need to decentralize testing as the majority of the population lives in rural settings. In developing countries stringent quality assurance (QA) practices, which include appropriate training, development of standard operating procedures, maintenance of operator proficiency, routine use of quality control (QC) specimens, standardized data management, equipment calibration and maintenance, and biohazard safety with proper disinfection/disposal procedures are not routinely followed to ensure reliability of results and a safe work environment. The introduction of point-of-care testing technologies involving the use of non-laboratorians in routine testing has further increased the complexity of QA. Therefore, a careful approach towards improvement of laboratories that encourages best practices, coupled with incentives, and review of government policies in point-of-care testing is needed to improve quality of testing as decentralization takes place. Development of a functional laboratory tiered network that facilitates communication, referral, training and problem solving could further enhance confidence in laboratory testing. There is also a need for special considerations in implementing a step-wise approach towards quality improvement, strengthening of the supply chain management, human capacity development, infrastructure upgrade, and strong public private partnerships to ensure long term sustainability of these efforts.

  13. Assessing factors associated with HIV testing among adolescents in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkandawire, Paul

    2017-07-01

    Despite being at high risk of HIV/AIDS, most young people do not know their HIV status. Using survey data (n = 2428) and applying multilevel models, this paper assesses factors associated with HIV testing among adolescents in Northern Malawi. The results show that among both boys (OR = 0.39) and girls (OR = 0.47), orphan status is associated with low likelihood of HIV testing. Correct knowledge about HIV/AIDS (OR = 2.55) and having secondary education (OR = 3.24) are associated with HIV testing among boys and girls, respectively. At the household level, living in a household whose head has secondary or higher education is positively associated with testing for boys (OR = 2.63), while residing together with biological siblings predicts higher odds of testing (OR = 2.67) for girls. Notably, orphaned girls' disadvantage regarding HIV testing loses significance when residential arrangement is controlled. At the community level, having HIV testing facility (OR = 2.70) or post-test club (OR = 1.40) is positively associated with HIV testing for boys, while girls from areas where religious leaders hold judgmental views about HIV/AIDS are less likely (OR = 0.45) to test. These findings suggest that efforts to scale up HIV testing among youth could benefit greatly from an understanding of how individual and community factors operate to influence adolescents to know their sero-status.

  14. "There's No Place Like Home": Perceptions of Home-Based HIV Testing in Lesotho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantell, J. E.; DiCarlo, A. L.; Remien, R. H.; Zerbe, A.; Morris, D.; Pitt, B.; Nkonyana, J. P.; Abrams, E. J.; El-Sadr, W.

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing has the potential to reduce HIV transmission by identifying and counseling individuals with HIV, reducing risk behaviors, linking persons with HIV to care and earlier treatment, and reducing perinatal transmission. In Lesotho, a high HIV prevalence country in which a large proportion of the population has never tested for HIV,…

  15. Diagnostic validation of selected serological tests for detecting scrub typhus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koraluru, Munegowda; Bairy, Indira; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    .... Though better diagnostic tests are available for rickettsial diseases and scrub typhus elsewhere, the Weil-Felix test is still commonly used in India, mainly because microimmunofluorescence assays (M-IFA...

  16. Towards more accurate HIV testing in sub-Saharan Africa: a multi-site evaluation of HIV RDTs and risk factors for false positives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosack, Cara S; Page, Anne-Laure; Beelaert, Greet; Benson, Tumwesigye; Savane, Aboubacar; Ng'ang'a, Anne; Andre, Bita; Zahinda, Jean-Paul Bn; Shanks, Leslie; Fransen, Katrien

    2017-03-24

    Although individual HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) show good performance in evaluations conducted by WHO, reports from several African countries highlight potentially significant performance issues. Despite widespread use of RDTs for HIV diagnosis in resource-constrained settings, there has been no systematic, head-to-head evaluation of their accuracy with specimens from diverse settings across sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a standardized, centralized evaluation of eight HIV RDTs and two simple confirmatory assays at a WHO collaborating centre for evaluation of HIV diagnostics using specimens from six sites in five sub-Saharan African countries. Specimens were transported to the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM), Antwerp, Belgium for testing. The tests were evaluated by comparing their results to a state-of-the-art reference algorithm to estimate sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. 2785 samples collected from August 2011 to January 2015 were tested at ITM. All RDTs showed very high sensitivity, from 98.8% for First Response HIV Card Test 1-2.0 to 100% for Determine HIV 1/2, Genie Fast, SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 and INSTI HIV-1/HIV-2 Antibody Test kit. Specificity ranged from 90.4% for First Response to 99.7% for HIV 1/2 STAT-PAK with wide variation based on the geographical origin of specimens. Multivariate analysis showed several factors were associated with false-positive results, including gender, provider-initiated testing and the geographical origin of specimens. For simple confirmatory assays, the total sensitivity and specificity was 100% and 98.8% for ImmunoComb II HIV 12 CombFirm (ImmunoComb) and 99.7% and 98.4% for Geenius HIV 1/2 with indeterminate rates of 8.9% and 9.4%. In this first systematic head-to-head evaluation of the most widely used RDTs, individual RDTs performed more poorly than in the WHO evaluations: only one test met the recommended thresholds for RDTs of ≥99% sensitivity and ≥98% specificity. By performing all tests

  17. Healthcare workers’ experiences of HIV testing in Tshwane, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamakwa S. Mataboge

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In an era when antiretroviral (ARV therapy has become part of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV prevention strategy, early testing and introduction to ARVs iscritical for improving public health outcomes in general and, in particular, the lives of people living with HIV. South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV as compared with the rest of the world. Initiated voluntary HIV counselling and testing and provider initiated counselling and testing (PICT are required in order to increase the uptake of HIV testing.Objectives: To explore and describe the experiences of healthcare workers who are themselves in need of HIV testing.Method: A descriptive, exploratory design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with the 26 healthcare workers who were involved in HIV testing in the Tshwane district of South Africa. The participants were sampled purposively from two healthcare settings. A thematic framework was used for data analysis.Results: There was a complication with regard to PICT as healthcare workers felt they could not initiate HIV testing for themselves and or their work colleagues without their confidentiality being compromised. This was complicated further by both the perceived and actual fear of stigmatisation and discrimination. It was difficult for qualified staff to support and encourage the uptake of HIV testing by students nurses as this was seen, albeit incorrectly, as targeting the students in a negative manner.Conclusion: There is a need for accessible HIV testing policies for healthcare workers in order to increase access to HIV testing and prevent the progression of the disease

  18. How Do We Get Partners to Test for HIV?: Predictors of Uptake of Partner HIV Testing Following Individual Outpatient Provider Initiated HIV Testing in Rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiene, Susan M; Gbenro, Olumide; Sileo, Katelyn M; Lule, Haruna; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2017-08-01

    In a sample of outpatients (152 females, 152 males) receiving individual provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) we aimed to identify factors associated with subsequent uptake of partner HIV testing. Purposively sampled outpatients receiving PITC at a Ugandan hospital completed a questionnaire immediately prior to testing for HIV, and then at 3 and 6 months post-test. By 6-month follow-up 96% of participants reported disclosing their HIV test results to their partner and 96.4% reported asking their partner to test. 38.8% of women and 78.9% of men reported that their partner tested and they knew their results. Recent (men AOR 5.84, 95.0% CI 1.90-17.99; women AOR 6.19, 95.0% CI 2.74-13.59) or any previous testing by the partner (women AOR 4.01, 95% CI 1.06-15.10) predicted uptake of partner testing by the 6-month follow-up. Among women, perceiving greater social support from their partner, which perhaps reflects better relationship quality, was predictive of their male partner testing for HIV (AOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.22-4.58). Notably intimate partner violence showed no negative association with partner testing. Our findings demonstrate that women are at a disadvantage compared to men in their ability to influence their partner to test for HIV, and that improving social support in intimate relationships should be a focus of HIV partner testing interventions. However, more research on interventions to improve partner testing is needed, particularly in identifying effective ways to support women in engaging their partners to test.

  19. Factors Associated with Recent HIV Testing among Heterosexuals at High-Risk for HIV Infection in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marya eGwadz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The CDC recommends persons at high-risk for HIV infection in the United States receive annual HIV testing to foster early HIV diagnosis and timely linkage to health care. Heterosexuals make up a significant proportion of incident HIV infections (>25%, but test for HIV less frequently than those in other risk categories. Yet factors that promote or impede annual HIV testing among heterosexuals are poorly understood. The present study examines individual/attitudinal-, social-, and structural-level factors associated with past-year HIV testing among heterosexuals at high-risk for HIV. Methods. Participants were African American/Black and Hispanic heterosexual adults (N=2307 residing in an urban area with both high poverty and HIV prevalence rates. Participants were recruited by respondent-driven sampling (RDS in 2012-2015 and completed a computerized structured assessment battery covering background factors, multi-level putative facilitators of HIV testing, and HIV testing history. Separate logistic regression analysis for males and females identified factors associated with past-year HIV testing.Results. Participants were mostly male (58%, African American/Black (75%, and 39 years old on average (SD = 12.06 years. Lifetime homelessness (54% and incarceration (62% were common. Half reported past-year HIV testing (50% and 37% engaged in regular, annual HIV testing. Facilitators of HIV testing common to both genders included sexually transmitted infection (STI testing or STI diagnosis, peer norms supporting HIV testing, and HIV testing access. Among women, access to general medical care and extreme poverty further predicted HIV testing, while recent drug use reduced the odds of past-year HIV testing. Among men, past-year HIV testing was also associated with lifetime incarceration and substance use treatment.Conclusions. The present study identified gaps in rates of HIV testing among heterosexuals at high-risk for HIV, and both common and

  20. Home-based HIV counselling and testing in Western Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Objective: To describe our experience with the feasibility and acceptance of home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBCT) in two large, rural, administrative divisions of western Kenya. Design: Setting: Results: Conclusion. : Home-based HIV counselling and testing was feasible among this rural population ...

  1. Utilization of HIV Testing and Counseling in Ghana: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Yawson et al. HIV Testing in Ghana. African Journal of Reproductive Health March 2014; 18(1): 145. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. Utilization of HIV Testing and Counseling in Ghana: Implications for Universal Coverage. Alfred E Yawson. 1, 2*. , Phyllis Dako-Gyeke. 3. , Stephen Ayisi Addo. 1. , Bernard T Dornoo. 1.

  2. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices about HIV Testing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During FGDs some students did not test because they feared their parents would think they were sexually promiscuous. This study demonstrates the need for intensive campaigns among adolescent girls and their parents to create awareness about the importance of HIV testing as this is an entry point for all HIV and AIDS ...

  3. Determinants of acceptance of voluntary HIV testing among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Back ground: Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) is one of the best interventions to reduce mother to child transmission of HIV. ... Objective: The objective of this study was to identify factors that determine the acceptance of voluntary HIV testing ... Recently, child mortality has fallen in some countries as a result of.

  4. Sexual Orientation Differences in HIV Testing Motivation among College Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, Daniel N.; Samsa, Gregory P.; McKellar, Mehri S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate sexual orientation differences in college men's motivations for HIV testing. Participants: 665 male college students in the Southeastern United States from 2006 to 2014. Methods: Students completed a survey on HIV risk factors and testing motivations. Logistic regressions were conducted to determine the differences…

  5. Behavioural Precursors and HIV Testing Behaviour among African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, Jennifer D.; Davis, Kevin C.; Rupert, Doug; Fraze, Jami

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether there is an association between knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, reported intentions to get an HIV test, and reported HIV testing behaviour at a later date among a sample of African American women. Design: Secondary analysis of data collected from October 2007 through March 2008 for a randomized controlled experiment…

  6. Barriers to accessibility and utilization of HIV testing and counseling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: While HIV testing and counseling (HTC) services remain to be amongst the effective strategies in slowing HIV transmission, its accessibility and uptake in Tanzania is low. In 2011, 50% of adults have been ever tested and received their results. We conducted this study to assess barriers to accessibility and ...

  7. Objective and Subjective Knowledge and HIV Testing among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Su-I

    2004-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on the knowledge domain specifically related to HIV testing among college students. Students (age 18-24) were recruited from a major university in the southeastern United States to participate in a Web-based survey during spring 2003 (N=440). About 21% of the students reported previous voluntary HIV tests.…

  8. Determinants of HIV Testing Among Tuberculosis Patients on DOTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main aim of the study was to assess determinants of HIV testing among Tuberculosis patients on DOTS in East Wollega zone, Ethiopia. Institution based case control study was conducted from January – March 2011. Cases were tuberculosis patients who have not accepted HIV testing while the controls were those who ...

  9. willingness to accept hiv testing among caretakers with a child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    treatment and care they require. In spite of all efforts put ... more than half the HIV knowledge questions were significantly .... The study finding of high levels of willingness to accept. HIV testing of .... and testing among pregnant women living in North. Uganda AIDS ... patients at university teaching hospital, Lusaka,. Zambia: ...

  10. Behavioral and Psychological Responses to HIV Antibody Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Considers effects of informing individuals of their antibody status as determined by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing. Reviews research examining changes in psychological distress and in behaviors associated with HIV infections among individuals who have undergone antibody testing. Identifies methodological issues in studying…

  11. HIV Testing in Recent College Students: Prevalence and Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Singer, Barbara J.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Arria, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    Prevalence and correlates of HIV testing were examined in a sample of 957 unmarried recent college students in the United States. Participants were asked about HIV testing, past-six-months sexual activities, lifetime treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STI), past-year health service utilization, and DSM-IV criteria for alcohol and other…

  12. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices about HIV Testing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Abstract. The major objective of this study was to determine knowledge, attitudes and practices about HIV testing services and the uptake ... Sixty nine per cent of the girls who did not go for the HIV test was mainly because either they were not sexually active or they ..... was not possible to get parental consent; hence this.

  13. Acceptability of routine HIV counselling and testing among a sample ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Routine HIV counseling and testing (RCT) is a necessary first step in accessing health care for persons who may test HIV-positive. Despite the availability of RCT in many South African settings, uptake has often been low. We sought to determine whether the main components of the Health Belief Model (HBM), namely ...

  14. Comparison of turnaround time and total cost of HIV testing before and after implementation of the 2014 CDC/APHL Laboratory Testing Algorithm for diagnosis of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Derrick J; Yao, Joseph D

    2017-06-01

    Updated recommendations for HIV diagnostic laboratory testing published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories incorporate 4th generation HIV immunoassays, which are capable of identifying HIV infection prior to seroconversion. The purpose of this study was to compare turnaround time and cost between 3rd and 4th generation HIV immunoassay-based testing algorithms for initially reactive results. The clinical microbiology laboratory database at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN was queried for 3rd generation (from November 2012 to May 2014) and 4th generation (from May 2014 to November 2015) HIV immunoassay results. All results from downstream supplemental testing were recorded. Turnaround time (defined as the time of initial sample receipt in the laboratory to the time the final supplemental test in the algorithm was resulted) and cost (based on 2016 Medicare reimbursement rates) were assessed. A total of 76,454 and 78,998 initial tests were performed during the study period using the 3rd generation and 4th generation HIV immunoassays, respectively. There were 516 (0.7%) and 581 (0.7%) total initially reactive results, respectively. Of these, 304 (58.9%) and 457 (78.7%) were positive by supplemental testing. There were 10 (0.01%) cases of acute HIV infection identified with the 4th generation algorithm. The most frequent tests performed to confirm an HIV-positive case using the 3rd generation algorithm, which were reactive initial immunoassay and positive HIV-1 Western blot, took a median time of 1.1 days to complete at a cost of $45.00. In contrast, the most frequent tests performed to confirm an HIV-positive case using the 4th generation algorithm, which included a reactive initial immunoassay and positive HIV-1/-2 antibody differentiation immunoassay for HIV-1, took a median time of 0.4 days and cost $63.25. Overall median turnaround time was 2.2 and 1.5 days, and overall median cost was $63.90 and $72.50 for

  15. Information provided by diagnostic and screening tests: improving probabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, Mark

    2017-11-13

    Uncertainty in clinical encounters is inevitable and despite this uncertainty clinicians must still work with patients to make diagnostic and treatment decisions. Explicit diagnostic reasoning based on probabilities will optimise information in relation to uncertainty. In clinical diagnostic encounters, there is often pre-existing information that reflects the probability any particular patient has a disease. Diagnostic testing provides extra information that refines diagnostic probabilities. However, in general diagnostic tests will be positive in most, but not all cases of disease (sensitivity) and may not be negative in all cases of disease absence (specificity). Bayes rule is an arithmetic method of using diagnostic testing information to refine diagnostic probabilities. In this method, when probabilities are converted to odds, multiplication of the odds of disease before diagnostic testing, by the positive likelihood ratio (LR+), the sensitivity of a test divided by 1 minus the specificity refines the probability of a particular diagnosis. Similar arithmetic applies to the probability of not having a disease, where the negative likelihood ratio is the specificity divided by 1 minus the sensitivity. A useful diagnostic test is one where the LR+ is greater than 5-10. This can be clarified by creating a contingency table for hypothetical groups of patients in relation to true disease prevalence and test performance predicted by sensitivity and specificity. Most screening tests in populations with a low prevalence of disease have a very high ratio of false positive results to true positive results, which can also be illustrated by contingency tables. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Better Tests, Better Care: Improved Diagnostics for Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Angela M.; Gilbert, David N.; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Hanson, Kimberly E.; May, Larissa; Quinn, Thomas C.; Tenover, Fred C.; Alland, David; Blaschke, Anne J.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Hirschhorn, Lisa R.; Joseph, W. Patrick; Karchmer, Tobi; MacIntyre, Ann T.; Reller, L. Barth; Jackson, Audrey F.

    2013-01-01

    In this IDSA policy paper, we review the current diagnostic landscape, including unmet needs and emerging technologies, and assess the challenges to the development and clinical integration of improved tests. To fulfill the promise of emerging diagnostics, IDSA presents recommendations that address a host of identified barriers. Achieving these goals will require the engagement and coordination of a number of stakeholders, including Congress, funding and regulatory bodies, public health agencies, the diagnostics industry, healthcare systems, professional societies, and individual clinicians. PMID:24200831

  17. [Benefit of the rapid test determine HIV1/2 in the clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in Ibn Rochd hospital of Casablanca, Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouladlahsen, A; Bensghir, R; Karkouri, M; Elharti, E; Oumzil, H; Himmich, H; Elfilali, K M; Chakib, A

    2012-08-01

    In Morocco, diagnosis of HIV infection remains late, which seriously compromises the timely management of HIV infection in the era of HAART therapies. Rapid test represents a good opportunity to improve the access to early screening of HIV. The objective of this study is to report the experience of the infectious diseases unit of the Ibn Rochd University hospital center of Casablanca, in the use of the rapid test in clinical screening of HIV. This retrospective study reports data relevant to the use of the rapid test Determine VIH-1/2, Abbott Diagnostics, since its introduction in the infectious diseases unit in April 2006 up to December 2009. The test was performed for patients from the infectious diseases unit and patients hospitalized in different units of the Ibn Rochd University hospital center, after their consent. Test was ordered systematically by clinicians in case of any suspected symptom related to HIV and immunodepression. Positive samples were confirmed by Western Blot test, at the National Reference Laboratory for HIV, within the Institut National d'Hygiène in Rabat. Between 2006 and 2009, 1105 rapid tests were performed, among which 16.3% were positive. All results were provided to patients and none were lost to follow-up. The main reasons for the prescription of an HIV test were tuberculosis (26.3%) and chronic diarrhea (9.9%) for inpatients. For outpatients, the main symptoms were sexually transmissible infections (16.7%) and weight loss (15.7%). Results of the tests allowed us to adapt the treatment in case of suspicion of pneumocystosis (12 cases) and toxoplasmosis (seven cases). The introduction of the rapid test for HIV clinical screening in the hospital facilities improved considerably the access to diagnosis and consequently allowed a timely management of HIV infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Common Diagnostic Test Results Over the Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruvee Eve

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, common test results over the years 2000 – 2016 are analysed. The test questions for new entrants were based on secondary school mathematics. The students took the test in the first lesson of the higher mathematics course. The test results were analysed by years, by tasks and by specialities, and their differences were found. The test results’ dependence on state-exams score was studied and other types of dependence were looked at.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of temporomandibular disorder pain tests: a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, C.M.; Naeije, M.; de Laat, A.; Michelotti, A.; Nilner, M.; Craane, B.; Ekberg, E.; Farella, M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) clinical examination and of the dynamic/static tests for the recognition of TMD pain. Since the diagnosis of TMD pain is especially complicated in persistent orofacial pain

  20. Formaldehyde concentration in diagnostic patch testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trattner, A; Johansen, J D; Menné, T

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to formaldehyde is common from both consumer products and industry. The reliability of the patch test is essential for the diagnosis of formaldehyde allergy as it is difficult to suspect from the patient's history. The recommended formaldehyde patch test concentration has been reduced over...... the last decades from 4-5% to 2% and is currently 1%. The changes have not been based upon formal studies, but driven by an intention to reduce irritancy and false-positive results. The aim of the present study was prospectively to compare the outcome of simultaneous testing with formaldehyde 1% and 2......% in consecutively patch-tested patients, with respect to frequency of positive patch test reactions, strength of patch test reactions to different formaldehyde test concentrations, irritancy and relevance. The study included 3734 consecutively patch tested patients. 121 gave a positive reaction to 1% and/or 2...

  1. HIV/AIDS testing sites and locator services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The HIV Testing Sites & Care Services Locator is a first-of-its-kind, location-based search tool that allows you to search for testing services, housing...

  2. A diagnostic dilemma: drug-induced aseptic meningitis in a 45-year-old HIV-positive man.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowley, D

    2014-03-01

    We describe a case of aseptic meningitis following the administration of moxifloxacin in a 45-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). At presentation he was receiving tuberculosis treatment on a modified regimen following severe hepatotoxicity; this included moxifloxacin, started 8 days previously. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was grossly abnormal. Anti-viral and -bacterial treatments were started. All microbiological tests proved negative and his moxifloxacin was withheld resulting in a complete normalisation of CSF. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a diagnosis of exclusion and presents a serious diagnostic dilemma. The decision to withhold medication cannot be taken lightly.

  3. To err is human, to correct is public health: a systematic review examining poor quality testing and misdiagnosis of HIV status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cheryl C; Fonner, Virginia; Sands, Anita; Ford, Nathan; Obermeyer, Carla Mahklouf; Tsui, Sharon; Wong, Vincent; Baggaley, Rachel

    2017-08-29

    In accordance with global testing and treatment targets, many countries are seeking ways to reach the "90-90-90" goals, starting with diagnosing 90% of all people with HIV. Quality HIV testing services are needed to enable people with HIV to be diagnosed and linked to treatment as early as possible. It is essential that opportunities to reach people with undiagnosed HIV are not missed, diagnoses are correct and HIV-negative individuals are not inadvertently initiated on life-long treatment. We conducted this systematic review to assess the magnitude of misdiagnosis and to describe poor HIV testing practices using rapid diagnostic tests. We systematically searched peer-reviewed articles, abstracts and grey literature published from 1 January 1990 to 19 April 2017. Studies were included if they used at least two rapid diagnostic tests and reported on HIV misdiagnosis, factors related to potential misdiagnosis or described quality issues and errors related to HIV testing. Sixty-four studies were included in this review. A small proportion of false positive (median 3.1%, interquartile range (IQR): 0.4-5.2%) and false negative (median: 0.4%, IQR: 0-3.9%) diagnoses were identified. Suboptimal testing strategies were the most common factor in studies reporting misdiagnoses, particularly false positive diagnoses due to using a "tiebreaker" test to resolve discrepant test results. A substantial proportion of false negative diagnoses were related to retesting among people on antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions HIV testing errors and poor practices, particularly those resulting in false positive or false negative diagnoses, do occur but are preventable. Efforts to accelerate HIV diagnosis and linkage to treatment should be complemented by efforts to improve the quality of HIV testing services and strengthen the quality management systems, particularly the use of validated testing algorithms and strategies, retesting people diagnosed with HIV before initiating treatment and

  4. Rapid point-of-care HIV testing in pregnant women: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Nitika Pant; Tulsky, Jacqueline Peterson; Cohan, Deborah; Colford, John M; Reingold, Arthur L

    2007-02-01

    Rapid, point-of-care human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing has the potential to enhance strategies to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV infection. Rapid tests need minimal laboratory infrastructure and can be performed by health workers with minimal training. In our systematic review and meta-analysis, we aimed to summarize the overall diagnostic accuracy of rapid HIV tests in pregnancy, and outcomes such as acceptability, patient preference, feasibility and impact of rapid testing. We searched four major databases, identified and screened 1377 citations, and included 17 studies that met our eligibility criteria. Analyses of these studies suggested that the overall sensitivity and specificity of blood-based rapid tests was high compared with oral rapid tests. A two-step testing strategy, particularly parallel testing, was found to be superior to single-test strategy in labour and delivery settings. Acceptability of rapid tests and patient preference was variable across studies. Overall, rapid HIV testing was highly accurate compared with conventional tests and offer a clear advantage of enabling the implementation of timely interventions to reduce MTCT of HIV. To improve diagnostic accuracy and to reduce false-positive results, it may be necessary to use two rapid tests during labour and delivery.

  5. Diagnostic Accuracy of Lachman Test in the Evaluation of Anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In most cities and towns in the developing countries there are none or very few centers with sophisticated diagnostic investigative tests. We therefore depend a lot on clinical tests for diagnosis. The Lachman test is a very important test of the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament. In this prospective study, the ...

  6. Visualizing the impact of prevalence on a diagnostic test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehling, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of a diagnostic test is to confirm or rule out disease or to increase or decrease the probability of disease. Only a few tests can separate all patients into those with and without a disease (true positive and true negative test). Usually there will be some false test results (false...

  7. The diagnostic accuracy of serologic and molecular methods for detecting visceral leishmaniasis in HIV infected patients: meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Fernandes Cota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human visceral leishmaniasis (VL, a potentially fatal disease, has emerged as an important opportunistic condition in HIV infected patients. In immunocompromised patients, serological investigation is considered not an accurate diagnostic method for VL diagnosis and molecular techniques seem especially promising. OBJECTIVE: This work is a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the accuracy of serologic and molecular tests for VL diagnosis specifically in HIV-infected patients. METHODS: Two independent reviewers searched PubMed and LILACS databases. The quality of studies was assessed by QUADAS score. Sensitivity and specificity were pooled separately and compared with overall accuracy measures: diagnostic odds ratio (DOR and symmetric summary receiver operating characteristic (sROC. RESULTS: Thirty three studies recruiting 1,489 patients were included. The following tests were evaluated: Immunofluorescence Antibody Test (IFAT, Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, immunoblotting (Blot, direct agglutination test (DAT and polimerase chain reaction (PCR in whole blood and bone marrow. Most studies were carried out in Europe. Serological tests varied widely in performance, but with overall limited sensitivity. IFAT had poor sensitivity ranging from 11% to 82%. DOR (95% confidence interval was higher for DAT 36.01 (9.95-130.29 and Blot 27.51 (9.27-81.66 than for IFAT 7.43 (3.08-1791 and ELISA 3.06 (0.71-13.10. PCR in whole blood had the highest DOR: 400.35 (58.47-2741.42. The accuracy of PCR based on Q-point was 0.95; 95%CI 0.92-0.97, which means good overall performance. CONCLUSION: Based mainly on evidence gained by infection with Leishmania infantum chagasi, serological tests should not be used to rule out a diagnosis of VL among the HIV-infected, but a positive test at even low titers has diagnostic value when combined with the clinical case definition. Considering the available evidence, tests based on DNA

  8. Testing in the HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) campaign, HIV risk behaviours and ART enrolment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoya, D; Mohlabane, N; Maduna, V; van Zyl, J; Sewpaul, R; Naidoo, Y

    2016-07-01

    To examine the association between testing in the 2010 HIV Testing and Counselling (HCT) campaign with HIV risk behaviours and enrolment on ART. Data for this study were collected as part of a nationally representative cross-sectional household survey conducted in 2012 in South Africa. Consenting participants completed a structured questionnaire and provided a dry blood spot specimen which was tested for HIV antibodies and antiretroviral drugs. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the association between HIV testing history and explanatory variables of interest. There was no association between testing in the 2010 HCT campaign and condom use at last sex, number of sexual partnerships or HIV knowledge. Individuals who tested in the HCT campaign were more likely to disclose their status (COR 2.6, 95% CI: 1.71-3.8) and those who tested HIV positive in the campaign were more likely to be receiving ART (COR 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-2.9). Testing in the HCT campaign was associated with having received both pretest and post-test counselling while testing before the campaign was associated with having received HIV results with no counselling (COR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.2-3.8). We highlight the success of the 2010 HCT campaign in improving HIV status disclosure and enrolment on ART as well as shortcomings on HIV risk behaviours and HIV knowledge. These may be related to issues of quality assurance in the counselling process. Our results further highlight possible HCT counselling inconsistencies across sectors requiring stronger public-private partnership in the delivery of HCT in South Africa. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. HIV late presenters in Denmark: need for increased diagnostic awareness among general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian; Laursen, Tinne; Andersen, Berit; Ostergaard, Lars; Laursen, Alex; Larsen, Carsten Schade

    2011-04-01

    The study objective was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics among HIV late presenters in a Danish university hospital. Patients > 15 years of age were enrolled in this retrospective study. Data from the medical patient records were analyzed in accordance with the CD4 count at the time of HIV diagnosis. Among 194 HIV patients (138 men and 56 women), 63 (33%) were diagnosed with a CD4 count below 200 cells/microlitre (late presenters). Heterosexuals constituted a larger proportion of patients in the late presenter group than did homosexual men (MSM) (p = 0.02), whereas a higher proportion of MSM than heterosexuals were diagnosed with HIV during primary infection (p HIV diagnosis. HIV antibody testing had not been performed although complaints consistent with possible underlying immune deficiency had been reported. Twenty per cent of the late presenters had a persistently low CD4 count below 200 cells/microlitre at follow-up despite having received HAART therapy for more than two years. One third of the HIV patients in this study were diagnosed as late presenters, and this group featured a higher proportion of heterosexuals than of MSM. The HIV antibody test should be performed more consistently on solid clinical ground by general practitioners.

  10. Learning Digital Test and Diagnostics via Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz-Dietrich Wuttke

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An environment targeted to e-learning is presented for teaching design and test of electronic systems. The environment consists of a set of Java applets, and of web based access to the hardware equipments, which can be used in the classroom, for learning at home, in laboratory research and training, or for carrying out testing of students during exams. The tools support university courses on digital electronics, computer hardware, testing and design for testability to learn by hands-on exercises how to design digital systems, how to make them testable, how to build self-testing systems, how to generate test patterns, how to analyze the quality of tests, and how to localize faults in hardware. The tasks chosen for hands-on training represent simultaneously research problems, which allow to fostering in students critical thinking, problem solving skills and creativity.

  11. Performance of a Rapid and Simple HIV Testing Algorithm in a Multicenter Phase III Microbicide Clinical Trial▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucitti, Tania; Taylor, Doug; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien; Van Damme, Lut

    2011-01-01

    A multitest sequential algorithm based on rapid and simple (R/S) assays was applied for the diagnosis of HIV infection among participants in a phase 3 microbicide effectiveness trial. HIV testing was performed on finger-prick blood samples obtained from patients after their enrollment in the trial. The specimens were tested in a serial procedure using three different rapid tests (Determine HIV-1/2 [Abbott], SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 [Standard Diagnostics], and Uni-Gold HIV [Trinity Biotech]). In the event of discordant results between the Determine HIV-1/2 and SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 tests, the third assay (Uni-Gold HIV) determined the final outcome. When the final outcome was positive, a second specimen was collected and tested with the same algorithm, only if a positive result was obtained with this sample the participant was informed of her positive serostatus. A total of 5,734 postenrollment specimens obtained from 1,398 women were tested. Forty-six women tested positive according to the testing algorithm performed on the first collected specimen. Confirmatory testing results obtained at the ITM confirmed that 42 women were truly infected. Two of four initial false positives tested negative upon analysis of a second blood specimen. The other two tested false positive twice using specimens collected the same day. A high percentage of specimens reactive with the Determine HIV-1/2 assay was only observed at the study site in Kampala. This result did not appear to be associated with pregnancy or malaria infection. We conclude that HIV testing algorithms, including only R/S assays, are suitable for use in clinical trials, provided that adequate quality assurance procedures are in place. PMID:21752945

  12. Performance of a rapid and simple HIV testing algorithm in a multicenter phase III microbicide clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucitti, Tania; Taylor, Doug; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien; Van Damme, Lut

    2011-09-01

    A multitest sequential algorithm based on rapid and simple (R/S) assays was applied for the diagnosis of HIV infection among participants in a phase 3 microbicide effectiveness trial. HIV testing was performed on finger-prick blood samples obtained from patients after their enrollment in the trial. The specimens were tested in a serial procedure using three different rapid tests (Determine HIV-1/2 [Abbott], SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 [Standard Diagnostics], and Uni-Gold HIV [Trinity Biotech]). In the event of discordant results between the Determine HIV-1/2 and SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 tests, the third assay (Uni-Gold HIV) determined the final outcome. When the final outcome was positive, a second specimen was collected and tested with the same algorithm, only if a positive result was obtained with this sample the participant was informed of her positive serostatus. A total of 5,734 postenrollment specimens obtained from 1,398 women were tested. Forty-six women tested positive according to the testing algorithm performed on the first collected specimen. Confirmatory testing results obtained at the ITM confirmed that 42 women were truly infected. Two of four initial false positives tested negative upon analysis of a second blood specimen. The other two tested false positive twice using specimens collected the same day. A high percentage of specimens reactive with the Determine HIV-1/2 assay was only observed at the study site in Kampala. This result did not appear to be associated with pregnancy or malaria infection. We conclude that HIV testing algorithms, including only R/S assays, are suitable for use in clinical trials, provided that adequate quality assurance procedures are in place.

  13. Misdiagnosis of HIV infection during a South African community-based survey: implications for rapid HIV testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufa, Tendesayi; Kharsany, Ayesha Bm; Cawood, Cherie; Khanyile, David; Lewis, Lara; Grobler, Anneke; Chipeta, Zawadi; Bere, Alfred; Glenshaw, Mary; Puren, Adrian

    2017-08-29

    We describe the overall accuracy and performance of a serial rapid HIV testing algorithm used in community-based HIV testing in the context of a population-based household survey conducted in two sub-districts of uMgungundlovu district, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, against reference fourth-generation HIV-1/2 antibody and p24 antigen combination immunoassays. We discuss implications of the findings on rapid HIV testing programmes. Cross-sectional design: Following enrolment into the survey, questionnaires were administered to eligible and consenting participants in order to obtain demographic and HIV-related data. Peripheral blood samples were collected for HIV-related testing. Participants were offered community-based HIV testing in the home by trained field workers using a serial algorithm with two rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in series. In the laboratory, reference HIV testing was conducted using two fourth-generation immunoassays with all positives in the confirmatory test considered true positives. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and false-positive and false-negative rates were determined. Of 10,236 individuals enrolled in the survey, 3740 were tested in the home (median age 24 years (interquartile range 19-31 years), 42.1% males and HIV positivity on RDT algorithm 8.0%). From those tested, 3729 (99.7%) had a definitive RDT result as well as a laboratory immunoassay result. The overall accuracy of the RDT when compared to the fourth-generation immunoassays was 98.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 98.5-99.2). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 91.1% (95% CI 87.5-93.7), 99.9% (95% CI 99.8-100), 99.3% (95% CI 97.4-99.8) and 99.1% (95% CI 98.8-99.4) respectively. The false-positive and false-negative rates were 0.06% (95% CI 0.01-0.24) and 8.9% (95% CI 6.3-12.53). Compared to true positives, false negatives were more likely to be recently infected on

  14. Misdiagnosis of HIV infection during a South African community-based survey: implications for rapid HIV testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufa, Tendesayi; Kharsany, Ayesha BM; Cawood, Cherie; Khanyile, David; Lewis, Lara; Grobler, Anneke; Chipeta, Zawadi; Bere, Alfred; Glenshaw, Mary; Puren, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: We describe the overall accuracy and performance of a serial rapid HIV testing algorithm used in community-based HIV testing in the context of a population-based household survey conducted in two sub-districts of uMgungundlovu district, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, against reference fourth-generation HIV-1/2 antibody and p24 antigen combination immunoassays. We discuss implications of the findings on rapid HIV testing programmes. Methods: Cross-sectional design: Following enrolment into the survey, questionnaires were administered to eligible and consenting participants in order to obtain demographic and HIV-related data. Peripheral blood samples were collected for HIV-related testing. Participants were offered community-based HIV testing in the home by trained field workers using a serial algorithm with two rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in series. In the laboratory, reference HIV testing was conducted using two fourth-generation immunoassays with all positives in the confirmatory test considered true positives. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and false-positive and false-negative rates were determined. Results: Of 10,236 individuals enrolled in the survey, 3740 were tested in the home (median age 24 years (interquartile range 19–31 years), 42.1% males and HIV positivity on RDT algorithm 8.0%). From those tested, 3729 (99.7%) had a definitive RDT result as well as a laboratory immunoassay result. The overall accuracy of the RDT when compared to the fourth-generation immunoassays was 98.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 98.5–99.2). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 91.1% (95% CI 87.5–93.7), 99.9% (95% CI 99.8–100), 99.3% (95% CI 97.4–99.8) and 99.1% (95% CI 98.8–99.4) respectively. The false-positive and false-negative rates were 0.06% (95% CI 0.01–0.24) and 8.9% (95% CI 6.3–12.53). Compared to true positives

  15. Testing the hypothesis that treatment can eliminate HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okano, Justin T; Robbins, Danielle; Palk, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    . The elimination threshold is one new HIV infection per 1000 individuals. Here, we test the hypothesis that TasP can substantially reduce epidemics and eliminate HIV. We estimate the impact of TasP, between 1996 and 2013, on the Danish HIV epidemic in men who have sex with men (MSM), an epidemic UNAIDS has...... identified as a priority for elimination. METHODS: We use a CD4-staged Bayesian back-calculation approach to estimate incidence, and the hidden epidemic (the number of HIV-infected undiagnosed MSM). To develop the back-calculation model, we use data from an ongoing nationwide population-based study......: the Danish HIV Cohort Study. FINDINGS: Incidence, and the hidden epidemic, decreased substantially after treatment was introduced in 1996. By 2013, incidence was close to the elimination threshold: 1·4 (median, 95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI] 0·4-2·1) new HIV infections per 1000 MSM and there were only...

  16. Implementing a Routine, Voluntary HIV Testing Program in a Massachusetts County Prison

    OpenAIRE

    Liddicoat, Rebecca V.; Zheng, Hui; Internicola, Jeanne; Werner, Barbara G.; Kazianis, Arthur; Golan, Yoav; Rubinstein, Eric P.; Kenneth A Freedberg; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2006-01-01

    Although U.S. prison inmates have higher rates of HIV infection than the general population, most inmates are not routinely tested for HIV infection at prison entry. The study objective was to implement a routine, voluntary HIV testing program in a Massachusetts county prison. During admission, inmates were given group HIV pre-test counseling and were subsequently offered private HIV testing. This intervention was compared to a control period during which HIV testing was provided only upon in...

  17. Concordance in diagnostic testing for respiratory pathogens of Bighorn Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reliable diagnostic tests are essential for disease investigation and management. This is particularly true for diseases of free-ranging wildlife where sampling is logistically difficult precluding retesting. Clinical assays for wildlife diseases frequently vary among laboratories because of lack ...

  18. Tackling HIV through robust diagnostics in the developing world: current status and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Darash; Wu, Grace; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2011-01-21

    Over the last thirty years, the world has seen HIV circulate the globe, affecting 33 million people to date and killing 2 million people a year. The disease has affected developed and developing countries alike, and in the U.S., remains one of the top ten leading causes of death. Many regions of the world are highly impacted by this disease, including sub-Saharan Africa, South and South-East Asia, and Eastern Europe. Fortunately, multilateral, global efforts, along with successful developments in diagnostic tools and anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs) have successfully curbed the spread of HIV over the last ten years. In spite of this fact, access to HIV treatment and preventive healthcare is varying and limited in developing countries. A lack of healthcare infrastructure, financial support, and healthcare workers are some logistical factors that are responsible. HIV stigmatization, discrimination, and inadequate education pose additional social challenges that are hindering countries from advancing in HIV prevention. This review focuses on current technological tools that are used for HIV diagnosis and ongoing research that is aimed at addressing the conditions in low-resource settings. Recent developments in microfluidic applications and mobile health technologies are promising approaches to building a compact, portable, and robust device that can provide information-rich, real-time diagnoses. We also discuss the role that governments, healthcare workers, and even researchers can play in order to increase the acceptance of newly introduced devices and treatments in rural communities.

  19. False negative HIV antibody test in HIV infected children who receive early antiretroviral treatment in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of 2010 World Health Organization guidelines, the number of infants from developing countries who will initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART will increase considerably. In this study we describe the HIV antibody tests of 14 HIV infected children who initiated ART at age less than one year in a rural setting of India. The HIV rapid test was negative in seven and indeterminate in two cases, whereas the HIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA antibody test was negative in three and indeterminate in one case. In one child who had both negative HIV rapid test and ELISA initially, HIV serology turned positive after having a virological failure to ART, suggesting the possibility of utilizing HIV serology for monitoring ART effectiveness in children who experience HIV seroreversion. In conclusion, HIV seroreversion of children with early initiation of ART is common and should be considered for avoiding misdiagnosis of HIV infection. 

  20. Sneller overgaan tot HIV-test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Kees; van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands it is estimated that around 35% of people with HIV have not yet been diagnosed, although many of them belong to well-described risk groups. Furthermore, even though early in their disease course these people often present with symptoms that should trigger suspicion of an HIV

  1. Evolution of HIV counselling and testing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that is conducting a multisite cluster randomised trial of an HIV prevention intervention for HIV-positive patients delivered in the context of ongoing clinical care in ... He also has certificates in Community Health Management, Epidemiology, Health Services ... inpatient, antenatal, sexually transmitted infection, tuberculosis.

  2. Indications for HIV testing in paediatric surgical patients | Masache ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV testing is done in paediatric surgical patients at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, when HIV infection is suspected to be the underlying cause of the clinical presentation or contributing to morbidity. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive analysis of children with surgical conditions under the age of 15 who underwent ...

  3. Low HIV testing rates among tuberculosis patients in Kampala, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Sendagire (Ibrahim); I. Schreuder (Imke); M. Mubiru (Mesach); M.S. van der Loeff (Maarten); F.G.J. Cobelens (Frank); J. Konde-Lule (Joseph)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: HIV testing among tuberculosis patients is critical in improving morbidity and mortality as those found to be HIV positive will be offered a continuum of care including ART if indicated. We conducted a cross-sectional study in three Kampala City primary care clinics: to

  4. Awareness, willingness and use of Voluntary HIV testing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV testing and counseling (HTC) is the entry point to HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support services. HTC can be voluntary or mandatory. This study aimed to determine the awareness, willingness, and use of voluntary HTC (VHTC) services by students of the Niger Delta University, Bayelsa State Nigeria ...

  5. Low HIV testing rates among tuberculosis patients in Kampala, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sendagire, I.; Schreuder, I.; Mubiru, M.; van der Loeff, M.S.; Cobelens, F.; Konde-Lule, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: HIV testing among tuberculosis patients is critical in improving morbidity and mortality as those found to be HIV positive will be offered a continuum of care including ART if indicated. We conducted a cross-sectional study in three Kampala City primary care clinics: to assess the level

  6. HIV Voluntary Counselling and Testing: A Qualitative Assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An intervention workshop was organised by a community-based project with aim to promote HIV Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) and assess the perception of participants about the benefits of VCT and knowing their HIV status. The intervention workshop was conducted on a group of thirty teachers who consented ...

  7. South African HIV self-testing policy and guidance considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Venter

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The gap in HIV testing remains significant and new modalities such as HIV self-testing (HIVST have been recommended to reach key and under-tested populations. In December 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO released the Guidelines on HIV Self-Testing and Partner Notification: A Supplement to the Consolidated Guidelines on HIV Testing Services (HTS and urged member countries to develop HIVST policy and regulatory frameworks. In South Africa, HIVST was included as a supplementary strategy in the National HIV Testing Services Policy in 2016, and recently, guidelines for HIVST were included in the South African National Strategic Plan for HIV, sexually transmitted infections and tuberculosis 2017–2022. This document serves as an additional guidance for the National HIV Testing Services Policy 2016, with specific focus on HIVST. It is intended for policy advocates, clinical and non-clinical HTS providers, health facility managers and healthcare providers in private and public health facilities, non-governmental, community-based and faith-based organisations involved in HTS and outreach, device manufacturers, workplace programmes and institutes of higher education.

  8. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy, feasibility and client preference for rapid oral fluid-based diagnosis of HIV infection in rural India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitika Pant Pai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oral fluid-based rapid tests are promising for improving HIV diagnosis and screening. However, recent reports from the United States of false-positive results with the oral OraQuick ADVANCE HIV1/2 test have raised concerns about their performance in routine practice. We report a field evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy, client preference, and feasibility for the oral fluid-based OraQuick Rapid HIV1/2 test in a rural hospital in India. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional, hospital-based study was conducted in 450 consenting participants with suspected HIV infection in rural India. The objectives were to evaluate performance, client preference and feasibility of the OraQuick Rapid HIV-1/2 tests. Two Oraquick Rapid HIV1/2 tests (oral fluid and finger stick were administered in parallel with confirmatory ELISA/Western Blot (reference standard. Pre- and post-test counseling and face to face interviews were conducted to determine client preference. Of the 450 participants, 146 were deemed to be HIV sero-positive using the reference standard (seropositivity rate of 32% (95% confidence interval [CI] 28%, 37%. The OraQuick test on oral fluid specimens had better performance with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI 98, 100 and a specificity of 100% (95% CI 99, 100, as compared to the OraQuick test on finger stick specimens with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI 98, 100, and a specificity of 99.7% (95% CI 98.4, 99.9. The OraQuick oral fluid-based test was preferred by 87% of the participants for first time testing and 60% of the participants for repeat testing. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In a rural Indian hospital setting, the OraQuick Rapid- HIV1/2 test was found to be highly accurate. The oral fluid-based test performed marginally better than the finger stick test. The oral OraQuick test was highly preferred by participants. In the context of global efforts to scale-up HIV testing, our data suggest that oral fluid-based rapid HIV testing

  9. A review of the impact of cost and quality of HIV kits on HIV testing in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This present retospective study is to review the impact of cost and quality of HIV reagent kits in the two periods A and B on the patients and confidence on the health care provider. Methods: We collated and compared laboratory records for both periods of HIV antibodies testing at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital ...

  10. The impact of HIV/AIDS stigma on HIV counseling and testing in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS Counseling and Testing (HCT) is low in sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease continues to be a serious public health problem. This has in part been attributed to HIV/AIDS related stigma. Objective: To assess the level of HIV/AIDS related ...

  11. Uptake of prenatal HIV testing in Hai Phong Province, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Lan; Christoffersen, Sarah Vigh; Rasch, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study is to describe the uptake of prenatal HIV testing among Vietnamese women. Exit interviews were conducted among 300 women who had delivered at Hai Phong obstetrical hospital. Information about socioeconomic characteristics and HIV testing was obtained through structured...... questionnaire interviews. It was found that 45% of the women were tested for HIV before the end of 34 weeks of gestation, 5% in 35 to 40 weeks of gestation, and 55% at labor. Low educational levels, being a farmer or worker, having a low income, and living close to the hospital were associated with being tested...... at labor. When adjusting for possible confounders, however, living more than 15 km from the hospital was the only factor, which remained significantly associated with HIV testing during labor (odds ratio = 2.15; confidence interval = 1.14-4.04). The results suggest that many Vietnamese women are not tested...

  12. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing using Gingival Crevicular Fluid as a New Technique for Detecting HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Willyandre

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of HIV-1 infection by individuals in window period who are tested negative in conventional HIV-1 detection would pose the community with serious problems. Several diagnostic tools require specific labora-tory equipment, perfect timing of diagnosis, antibody to HIV-1, and invasive technique to get sample for examination, until high amount of time to process the sample as well as accessibility of remote areas. Many attempts have been made to solve those problems to come to a new detection technique. This review aims to give information about the current development technique for detection of HIV infection. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing is currently introduced for detection of HIV-1 infection. This review also cover the possible usage of gingival crevicular fluid as sample specimen that could be taken noninvasively from the individual.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v18i2.63

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of HIV Infection and HIV Testing Among Transgender Women in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Wang, Ying; Jones, Nicolette; Levermore, Kandasi; Neil, Ava; Ellis, Tyrone; Bryan, Nicolette; Harker, Sheldon; Marshall, Annecka; Newman, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    Transgender women are overrepresented in the Caribbean HIV epidemic. The study objective was to examine correlates of HIV infection and HIV testing among transgender women in Jamaica. We implemented a cross-sectional survey with transgender women in Kingston and Ocho Rios, Jamaica. We conducted multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with HIV testing and HIV infection. Among 137 transgender women [mean age 24.0; standard deviation (SD) 5.5], three-quarters (n = 103, 75.7%) had received an HIV test. Of these, one-quarter (n = 26, 25.2%) were HIV positive. In multivariable analyses, HIV testing was associated with: perceived HIV risk [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.42, confidence interval (CI) 1.36-4.28], depression (AOR 1.34, CI 1.01-1.77), forced sex (AOR 3.83, CI 1.42-10.35), physical abuse (AOR 4.11, CI 1.44-11.72), perceived transgender stigma (AOR 1.23, 1.06-1.42), having a healthcare provider (AOR 5.89, CI 1.46-23.77), and lower HIV-related stigma (AOR 0.96, CI 0.92-0.99), incarceration (AOR 0.28, CI 0.10-0.78), and drug use (AOR 0.74, CI 0.58-0.95). HIV infection was associated with the following: homelessness (AOR 5.94, CI 1.27-27.74), perceived HIV risk (AOR 1.67, CI 1.02-2.72), depression (AOR 1.39, CI 1.06-1.82), STI history (AOR 56.79, CI 5.12-630.33), perceived (AOR 1.26, CI 1.06-1.51) and enacted (AOR 1.16, CI 1.04-1.29) transgender stigma, forced sex (AOR 4.14, CI 1.49-11.51), physical abuse (AOR 3.75, CI 1.39-10.12), and lower self-rated health (AOR 0.55, CI 0.30-0.98) and social support (AOR 0.79, CI 0.64-0.97). Transgender women in Jamaica experience high HIV infection rates and suboptimal HIV testing. Combination HIV prevention approaches should address transgender women's social and structural vulnerabilities.

  14. Access to CD4 Testing for Rural HIV Patients: Findings from a Cohort Study in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Vogt

    Full Text Available CD4 cell count measurement remains an important diagnostic tool for HIV care in developing countries. Insufficient laboratory capacity in rural Sub-Saharan Africa is frequently mentioned but data on the impact at an individual patient level are lacking. Urban-rural discrepancies in CD4 testing have not been quantified to date. Such evidence is crucial for public health planning and to justify new yet more expensive diagnostic procedures that could circumvent access constraints in rural areas.To compare CD4 testing among rural and urban HIV patients during the first year of treatment.Records from 2,145 HIV positive adult patients from a Médecins sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders HIV project in Beitbridge, Zimbabwe, during 2011 and 2012 were used for a retrospective cohort analysis. Covariate-adjusted risk ratios were calculated to estimate the effects of area of residence on CD4 testing at treatment initiation, six and 12 months among rural and urban patients.While the proportion of HIV patients returning for medical consultations at six and 12 months decreased at a similar rate in both patient groups, CD4 testing during consultations dropped to 21% and 8% for urban, and 2% and 1% for rural patients at six and 12 months, respectively. Risk ratios for missing CD4 testing were 0.8 (95% CI 0.7-0.9, 9.2 (95% CI 5.5-15.3, and 7.6 (95% 3.7-17.1 comparing rural versus urban patients at treatment initiation, six and 12 months, respectively.CD4 testing was low overall, and particularly poor in rural patients. Difficulties with specimen transportation were probably a major factor underlying this difference and requires new diagnostic approaches. Our findings point to severe health system constraints in providing CD4 testing overall that need to be addressed if effective monitoring of HIV patients is to be achieved, whether by alternative CD4 diagnostics or newly-recommended routine viral load testing.

  15. Tuberculosis in Children: New diagnostic Blood Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Kakkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-gamma-release assays were developed to overcome the pitfalls and logistic difficulties of the tuberculin skin test (TST for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI. These blood tests measure the in vitro production of interferon-gamma by sensitized lymphocytes in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens. Two interferon-gamma-release assays are registered for use in Canada: the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay (Cellestis Inc, Australia and the T.SPOT–TB test (Oxford Immunotec, United Kingdom. Evaluation of these tests has been hampered by the lack of a gold standard for LTBI, and limited paediatric data on their use. It appears that they are more specific than the TST, and may be useful for evaluating TST-positive patients at low risk of true LTBI. Moreover, they may add sensitivity if used in addition to the TST in immunocompromised patients, very young children and close contacts of infectious adults. A summary of these tests, their limitations and their application to clinical paediatric practice are described.

  16. Automation of diagnostic genetic testing: mutation detection by cyclic minisequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagrund, Katariina; Orpana, Arto K

    2014-01-01

    The rising role of nucleic acid testing in clinical decision making is creating a need for efficient and automated diagnostic nucleic acid test platforms. Clinical use of nucleic acid testing sets demands for shorter turnaround times (TATs), lower production costs and robust, reliable methods that can easily adopt new test panels and is able to run rare tests in random access principle. Here we present a novel home-brew laboratory automation platform for diagnostic mutation testing. This platform is based on the cyclic minisequecing (cMS) and two color near-infrared (NIR) detection. Pipetting is automated using Tecan Freedom EVO pipetting robots and all assays are performed in 384-well micro plate format. The automation platform includes a data processing system, controlling all procedures, and automated patient result reporting to the hospital information system. We have found automated cMS a reliable, inexpensive and robust method for nucleic acid testing for a wide variety of diagnostic tests. The platform is currently in clinical use for over 80 mutations or polymorphisms. Additionally to tests performed from blood samples, the system performs also epigenetic test for the methylation of the MGMT gene promoter, and companion diagnostic tests for analysis of KRAS and BRAF gene mutations from formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tumor samples. Automation of genetic test reporting is found reliable and efficient decreasing the work load of academic personnel.

  17. Progeria Research Foundation Diagnostic Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scientific test to definitively diagnose children with Progeria. What is the Gene for HGPS? The gene responsible for HGPS is called LMNA (pronounced Lamin A). Within this gene there is a change in one element of DNA. This type of gene change is ...

  18. Global HIV Prevention, Testing, and Counseling in Military Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Michael P; Sloan, Margo; Wankie, Che; Woodland, Kelly; Reader, Elizabeth; Porter, Bruce; Shaffer, Richard; Macera, Caroline A; Bulterys, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the general population in low- and middle-income countries, military members tend to be male, young, travel more frequently away from their main sexual partners, drink more alcohol and have a consistent source of income. All of these factors may lead to an increased risk of contracting HIV. In response, the Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program advocates for the integration of HIV prevention "building blocks" into military health services to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV among foreign uniformed services. The building blocks include basic HIV education including outreach, condom promotion, enabling HIV policies, HIV testing services, screening for sexually transmitted infections, voluntary medical male circumcision where appropriate, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and other supportive services. The Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Programs supports implementation of these building blocks though partnerships with foreign militaries. This comprehensive prevention package, when closely linked with HIV treatment services, is the cornerstone of creating an HIVfree generation in military and surrounding communities worldwide. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Detection of Early Sero-Conversion HIV Infection Using the INSTITM HIV-1 Antibody Point-of-Care Test

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Darrel; Gilbert, Mark; DiFrancesco, Lillo; Krajden, Mel

    2010-01-01

    We compared the INSTITM HIV-1 Antibody Point-of-Care (POC) Test to laboratory-based tests for detection of early sero-conversion (i.e. acute) HIV infections. Fifty-three (53) individuals with early HIV infection, (i.e. 3rd generation anti-HIV EIA non-reactive or reactive, HIV-1 Western Blot non-reactive or indeterminate and HIV-1 p24 antigen reactive) were tested by INSTITM. The INSTITM test was reactive for 34/49 (sensitivity 69.4%; 95% confidence interval 54.6-81.8%) early-infected individu...

  20. HIV testing of pregnant women: an ethical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Kjell Arne; Pedersen, Kirsten Bjerkreim; Andersson, Anna-Karin

    2011-12-01

    Recent global advances in available technology to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission necessitate a rethinking of contemporary and previous ethical debates on HIV testing as a means to preventing vertical transmission. In this paper, we will provide an ethical analysis of HIV-testing strategies of pregnant women. First, we argue that provider-initiated opt-out HIV testing seems to be the most effective HIV test strategy. The flip-side of an opt-out strategy is that it may end up as involuntary testing in a clinical setting. We analyse this ethical puzzle from a novel perspective, taking into account the moral importance of certain hypothetical preferences of the child, as well as the moral importance of certain actual preferences of the mother. Finally, we balance the conflicting concerns and try to arrive at an ethically sound solution to this dilemma. Our aim is to introduce a novel perspective from which to analyse testing strategies, and to explore the implications and possible benefits of our proposal. The conclusion from our analysis is that policies that recommend provider-initiated opt-out HIV testing of pregnant mothers, with a risk of becoming involuntary testing in a clinical setting, are acceptable. The rationale behind this is that the increased availability of very effective and inexpensive life-saving drugs makes the ethical problems raised by the possible intrusiveness of HIV testing less important than the child's hypothetical preferences to be born healthy. Health care providers, therefore, have a duty to offer both opt-out HIV testing and available PMTCT (preventing mother-to-child transmission) interventions. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Emergent diagnostic testing for pediatric nonfebrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Ashley M; Gill, Vikramjit S; Witting, Michael D; Teshome, Getachew

    2015-09-01

    Guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology recommend laboratory studies or computed tomography (CT) for children who experience a nonfebrile seizure if anything in their history suggests a clinically significant abnormality. To ascertain if any patient or seizure characteristics are associated with a greater likelihood that laboratory studies or CT scan will yield clinically significant results. This retrospective case series reviewed 93 children with nonfebrile seizure, who were evaluated in an urban pediatric emergency department (ED) between July 2007 and June 2011. Laboratory studies were performed in 87% of the study group; 7% of those tests gave clinically significant results. Computed tomographic scans were obtained in 35% of our patients; 9% showed clinically significant findings. Presence of an active seizure in the ED or a first nonfebrile seizure had an 8% and 11% difference, respectively, for clinically significant laboratory abnormality. Children younger than 2 years showed a 7% difference of clinically significant laboratory abnormality. This study did not identify statistically significant predictors of laboratory or CT abnormalities for children with nonfebrile seizure presenting to the ED. Age less than 2years, having an active seizure in the ED, and experiencing a first-time seizure showed a trend toward an increased yield of laboratory testing. In accordance with the American Academy of Neurology guidelines, we conclude that the history of a child's present illness preceding the nonfebrile seizure, not characteristics of the seizure, should be used to determine the need for further testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating operational specifications of point-of-care diagnostic tests: a standardized scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehe, Jonathan D; Sitoe, Nádia E; Tobaiwa, Ocean; Loquiha, Osvaldo; Quevedo, Jorge I; Peter, Trevor F; Jani, Ilesh V

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of HIV antiretroviral therapy into decentralized rural settings will increasingly require simple point-of-care (POC) diagnostic tests that can be used without laboratory infrastructure and technical skills. New POC test devices are becoming available but decisions around which technologies to deploy may be biased without systematic assessment of their suitability for decentralized healthcare settings. To address this, we developed a standardized, quantitative scorecard tool to objectively evaluate the operational characteristics of POC diagnostic devices. The tool scores devices on a scale of 1-5 across 30 weighted characteristics such as ease of use, quality control, electrical requirements, shelf life, portability, cost and service, and provides a cumulative score that ranks products against a set of ideal POC characteristics. The scorecard was tested on 19 devices for POC CD4 T-lymphocyte cell counting, clinical chemistry or hematology testing. Single and multi-parameter devices were assessed in each of test categories. The scores across all devices ranged from 2.78 to 4.40 out of 5. The tool effectively ranked devices within each category (p0.80; ptechnology. It is particularly relevant for countries and testing programs considering the adoption of new POC diagnostic tests.

  3. Utility of diagnostic blood tests in clinical podiatric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, Bennett G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical podiatric medical practice encompasses a wide spectrum of podiatric medical and surgical problems. Technological advances such as imaging have greatly improved diagnostic acumen; however, physical diagnosis and blood testing remain extremely important factors in reinforcing diagnostic hypotheses as a part of differential diagnosis. There are certain blood tests of importance that the podiatric medical practitioner should be familiar with in everyday medical and surgical practice. The purpose of this article is to identify and highlight which blood tests are truly essential and practical in terms of diagnosis. This article encompasses blood tests pertinent to the clinical areas of hematology, hemostasis, electrolytes, endocrine, cardiac, rheumatology, nephrology, and gastroenterology. Careful selection of these tests and proper interpretation of their results will help reinforce diagnostic hypotheses.

  4. Evaluation of an External Quality Assessment Program for HIV Testing in Haiti, 2006–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Frantz Jean; Anselme, Renette; Ndongmo, Clement; Buteau, Josiane; Boncy, Jacques; Dahourou, Georges; Vertefeuille, John; Marston, Barbara; Balajee, S. Arunmozhi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate an external quality assessment (EQA) program for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) rapid diagnostics testing by the Haitian National Public Health Laboratory (French acronym: LNSP). Acceptable performance was defined as any proficiency testing (PT) score more than 80%. Methods The PT database was reviewed and analyzed to assess the testing performance of the participating laboratories and the impact of the program over time. A total of 242 laboratories participated in the EQA program from 2006 through 2011; participation increased from 70 laboratories in 2006 to 159 in 2011. Results In 2006, 49 (70%) laboratories had a PT score of 80% or above; by 2011, 145 (97.5%) laboratories were proficient (P quality of testing and allowed the LNSP to document improvements in the quality of HIV rapid testing over time. PMID:24225755

  5. Does rapid HIV testing result in an early diagnosis and reduce the waiting time for patients to receive medical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Magaly Carvalho Vieira de; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar; Falcão, Ilka Veras; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of rapid HIV testing in Brazil began in 2006 for specific groups, and from 2009 was extended to the Counseling and Testing Centers (CTC) in certain Brazilian capitals. The aim of this study was to compare two groups of individuals: those diagnosed with HIV infection by conventional testing and those diagnosed with rapid testing, with respect to: the waiting time before receiving medical care, the time of the first laboratory tests and the virological, immune and clinical status. This is a cross-sectional study to compare a group with individuals diagnosed by conventional testing (2006-2008) and another with those diagnosed by rapid testing (2010-2011).The median time between blood collection and diagnosis of HIV in the conventional test group was 76 days, while in the rapid test group 94.2% of the subjects received their results on the same day of blood collection (p test group, the median period of time before the first consultation with an infectious disease specialist was 99 days, and for the rapid test group the time was 14 days (p test group (p test group (472) was higher than in the conventional test group (397) (p = 0.01). The introduction of rapid HIV testing as a diagnostic strategy has reduced the waiting times for medical care and laboratory tests and also allowed earlier diagnosis of HIV infection than with the conventional test.

  6. Identifying HIV infection in South African women: How does a fourth generation HIV rapid test perform?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapila Bhowan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV rapid tests (RT play an important role in tackling the HIV pandemic in South Africa. Third generation RT that detect HIV antibodies are currently used to diagnose HIV infection at the point of care. Determine Combo (DC is the first fourth generation RT that detects both p24 antigen (p24Ag and HIV antibodies (Ab, theoretically reducing the window period and increasing detection rates. Early detection of maternal HIV infection is important to mitigate the high risk of vertical transmission associated with acute maternal infection. Objectives: We assessed the performance of the DC RT against third generation RT in antenatal and post-partum women. Methods: Third generation RT Advance Quality and Acon were used in a serial algorithm to diagnose HIV infection in antenatal and post-partum women over six months at a tertiary hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. This data provided the reference against which the DC RT was compared on plasma and whole blood samples. Results: The 1019 participants comprised 345 (34% antenatal and 674 (66% post-partum women. Ninety women (8.8% tested HIV-positive of whom 59 (66% were tested antenatally, and 31 (34% post-partum yielding prevalence rates of 17.1% and 4.6% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the Ab component of DC on plasma antenatally was 100% (93.8% – 100% and 100% (98.6% – 100% respectively and post-partum was 100% (88.9% – 100% and 99.6% (98.8% – 99.9% respectively. One false positive and not a single true positive p24Ag was detected. Of 505 post-partum women who tested HIV-negative 6–12 months prior to enrolment, 12 (2.4% seroconverted. Conclusion: The fourth generation DC offered no advantage over current third generation RT in the diagnosis of HIV infection.

  7. An Adaptive Approach to Locating Mobile HIV Testing Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Gregg S; Crawford, Forrest W; Cleary, Paul D; Kaplan, Edward H; Paltiel, A David

    2017-07-01

    Public health agencies suggest targeting "hotspots" to identify individuals with undetected HIV infection. However, definitions of hotspots vary. Little is known about how best to target mobile HIV testing resources. We conducted a computer-based tournament to compare the yield of 4 algorithms for mobile HIV testing. Over 180 rounds of play, the algorithms selected 1 of 3 hypothetical zones, each with unknown prevalence of undiagnosed HIV, in which to conduct a fixed number of HIV tests. The algorithms were: 1) Thompson Sampling, an adaptive Bayesian search strategy; 2) Explore-then-Exploit, a strategy that initially draws comparable samples from all zones and then devotes all remaining rounds of play to HIV testing in whichever zone produced the highest observed yield; 3) Retrospection, a strategy using only base prevalence information; and; 4) Clairvoyance, a benchmarking strategy that employs perfect information about HIV prevalence in each zone. Over 250 tournament runs, Thompson Sampling outperformed Explore-then-Exploit 66% of the time, identifying 15% more cases. Thompson Sampling's superiority persisted in a variety of circumstances examined in the sensitivity analysis. Case detection rates using Thompson Sampling were, on average, within 90% of the benchmark established by Clairvoyance. Retrospection was consistently the poorest performer. We did not consider either selection bias (i.e., the correlation between infection status and the decision to obtain an HIV test) or the costs of relocation to another zone from one round of play to the next. Adaptive methods like Thompson Sampling for mobile HIV testing are practical and effective, and may have advantages over other commonly used strategies.

  8. Quality assurance of HIV counselling and testing for the prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    child transmission of HIV in Rivers State, Nigeria. ... Similarly, other resources for counselling such as television and video sets, posters and banners were in short supply. Important issues in post-test counselling such as information about ...

  9. Diagnostic test evaluation for Trichinella infections in pigs: a renewed interaction between diagnostic test data and their statistical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dopfer, D.D.V.; Maassen, C.B.M.; Achterberg, R.P.; Giessen, van der J.W.B.; Teunis, P.; Buist, W.G.; Molina, V.; Guarnera, E.; Gonzales, M.; Krivokapich, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Peralta, J.L.; Trabattoni, H.; Larrieu, E.; Engel, B.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of serological tests applied to monitor Trichinella free herds, Bayesian methodology was used to estimate the diagnostic test parameters: sensitivity, specificity and prevalence in the absence of a Gold Standard test. In the absence of Dutch serum samples for positive

  10. Initial Accuracy of HIV Rapid Test Kits Stored in Suboptimal Conditions and Validity of Delayed Reading of Oral Fluid Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choko, Augustine T; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; MacPherson, Peter; Cocker, Derek; Khundi, McEwen; Thindwa, Deus; Sambakunsi, Rodrick S; Kumwenda, Moses K; Chiumya, Kondwani; Malema, Owen; Makombe, Simon D; Webb, Emily L; Corbett, Elizabeth L

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of storing commonly used rapid diagnostic tests above manufacturer-recommended temperature (at 37°C), and the accuracy of delayed reading of oral fluid kits with relevance to HIV self-testing programmes. A quality assurance study of OraQuick (OraSure), Determine HIV 1/2™ (Alere) and Uni-Gold™ (Recombigen®). Consecutive adults (≥18y) attending Ndirande Health Centre in urban Blantyre, Malawi in January to April 2012 underwent HIV testing with two of each of the three rapid diagnostic test kits stored for 28 days at either 18°C (optimally-stored) or at 37°C (pre-incubated). Used OraQuick test kits were stored in a laboratory for delayed day 1 and subsequent monthly re-reading was undertaken for one year. Of 378 individuals who underwent parallel testing, 5 (1.3%) were dropped from the final analysis due to discordant or missing reference standard results (optimally-stored Determine and Uni-Gold). Compared to the diagnostic reference standard, OraQuick had a sensitivity of 97.2% (95% CI: 93.6-99.6). There were 7 false negative results among all test kits stored at 37°C and three false negatives among optimally stored kits. Excellent agreement between pre-incubated tests and optimally-stored tests with Kappa values of 1.00 for Determine and Uni-Gold; and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95; 1.00) for OraQuick were observed. There was high visual stability on re-reading of OraQuick, with only 1/375 pre-incubated and 1/371 optimally-stored OraQuick kits changing from the initial result over 12 months. Erroneous results observed during HIV testing in low income settings are likely to be due to factors other than suboptimal storage conditions. Re-reading returned OraQuick kits may offer a convenient and accurate quality assurance approach, including in HIV self-testing programmes.

  11. Tracking the progress of HIV: the impact of point-of-care tests on antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid SD

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Steven D Reid, Sarah J Fidler, Graham S Cooke Department of Infectious Diseases, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: It is now around 30 years since the discovery of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. More than 70 million people have been infected in that time and around 35 million have died. The majority of those currently living with HIV/AIDS are in low- and middle-income countries, with sub-Saharan Africa bearing a disproportionate burden of the global disease. In high-income countries, the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART has drastically reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV. Patients on ART are now predicted to have near-normal life expectancy and the role of treatment is increasingly recognized in preventing new infections. In low- and middle-income countries, treatment is now more widely available and around half of those who need ART are currently receiving it. Early diagnosis of HIV is essential if ART is to be optimally implemented. Lab-based diagnostics for screening, diagnosis, treatment initiation, and the monitoring of treatment efficacy are critical in managing the disease and reducing the number of new infections each year. The introduction of point-of-care HIV rapid tests has transformed the epidemic, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. For the first time, these point-of-care tests allow for the rapid identification of infected individuals outside the laboratory who can undergo counseling and treatment and, in the case of pregnant women, allow the timely initiation of ART to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. Although survival is markedly improved with ART even in the absence of laboratory monitoring, long-term management of people living with HIV on ART, and their partners, is essential to ensure successful viral suppression. The burden of disease in many resource-poor settings with high HIV prevalence has challenged the ability of local laboratories

  12. Luminex xMAP combined with Western blot improves HIV diagnostic sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weiwei; Li, Yan; Cheng, Shaohui; Yan, Chen; An, Shiping; Dong, Zheng; Yan, Lina; Yuan, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Western blot is used to confirm the initial serodiagnosis of HIV infection by antibody detection. However, a major deficiency of the Western blot relates to a lack of sufficient sensitivity in detecting HIV antibodies. This report describes a simple, sensitive and inexpensive bead-based assay for detection of early HIV infection. A panel of 138 positive specimens including 105 blood donors and 33 MSM with known Western blot results were evaluated using Luminex xMAP at Tianjin Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We demonstrate a superior sensitivity of Luminex xMAP compared with Western blot. Of the 87 confirmed HIV positive blood donors, Western blot only confirmed 65 cases with 74.7% (65/87) sensitivity while Luminex xMAP identified 72 cases with 82.8% (72/87) sensitivity (pWestern blot and Luminex xMAP verified 13 and 19 of 33 MSM specimens, respectively. The sensitivity was 39.4% (13/33) for Western blot and 57.6% (19/33) for Luminex xMAP (pWestern blot improves the diagnostic sensitivity of HIV infection at an early stage, and reduces the chances of missed diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. HIV rapid testing in the framework of an STI prevention project on a cohort of vulnerable Italians and immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccella, Ilaria; Petrelli, Alessio; Vescio, Maria Fenicia; De Carolis, Silvia; Fazioli, Cecilia; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Rezza, Gianni

    2017-08-01

    Uptake of HIV tests is a challenging issue in vulnerable populations including immigrants, normally using standard diagnostic tools. Objectives of this study were to evaluate the acceptability of HIV rapid test; estimate the percentage of newly HIV diagnoses and evaluate knowledge, attitudes and perception (KAP) about HIV/AIDS and other STIs in a specific set of immigrants and vulnerable population in Rome (Italy). All immigrant and Italian people, aged 16-70 years, attending the infectious disease outpatient clinic of the National Institute for Health, Migration and Poverty (INMP) in Rome (Italy), during the period December 2012 to December 2013 were enrolled. HIV rapid testing was provided for free and patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire evaluating KAP about HIV/STIs. All patients with risky sexual behaviours or with a recent diagnosis of STIs were invited to come back after 3-6 months and a post-counselling questionnaire was offered. Out of the total sample, 99.2% (n = 825) accepted the "rapid test" and 10 new HIV diagnoses were found (1.22%; 95% CI 0.58%-2.22%). Three hundred and eighty-five participants (47%) answered the entry questionnaire and 58 (15%) completed the follow-up. Overall, we found high knowledge about HIV/AIDS; however, lower educational level and immigrant status were associated with poor knowledge about HIV, other STIs and prevention methods. Immigrants have lower perception of sexual risk and higher prejudice than Italians. Our study showed high acceptance of rapid test in this specific vulnerable population and this allowed to identify new HIV diagnoses in unaware people. Socioeconomic inequalities observed in the KAP questionnaire suggest the need for actions to support the reduction of cultural differences in knowledge of HIV/AIDS and for policies aimed at improving access to health services and preventions programmes of marginalized populations.

  14. Sexual behaviors and HIV/syphilis testing among transgender individuals in China: implications for expanding HIV testing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, John; Tang, Weiming; Zhang, Ye; Han, Larry; Liu, Fengying; Huang, Shujie; Yang, Bin; Wei, Chongyi; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-05-01

    HIV and syphilis are disproportionately common among transgender individuals globally, yet few studies have investigated transgender HIV/syphilis risk and testing in low- and middle-income nations. We conducted an online survey of men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender individuals to examine sexual behaviors and HIV/syphilis testing in China. We recruited MSM and transgender individuals from 2 major Chinese lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Web platforms. χ Test and logistic regression were used to compare risk behaviors, HIV and syphilis testing history, and prevalence between transgender individuals and other MSM. Among the 1320 participants, 52 (3.9%) self-identified as transgender. Demographics, including education, employment, and marital status, were similar between both groups, whereas transgender individuals were older. Condomless anal intercourse rate was comparable between the groups. Transgender individuals were less likely to report ever testing for HIV (34.6% vs. 62.0%) and syphilis (15.7% vs. 31.2%) with adjusted odds ratios of 0.36 (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.65) and 0.42 (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.91), respectively. We found a trend toward a higher HIV prevalence among transgender individuals (11.1% vs. 5.7%, P = 0.12). Transgender individuals have suboptimal HIV and syphilis testing rates in China. Given the substantial risk behaviors and burden of HIV/STI in the general Chinese MSM population and a lack of knowledge about transgender individuals, enhanced HIV/syphilis testing programs for transgender individuals in China are needed.

  15. Sensitivity and specificity of rapid HIV testing of pregnant women in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhore, A V; Sastry, J; Patke, D; Gupte, N; Bulakh, P M; Lele, S; Karmarkar, A; Bharucha, K E; Shrotri, A; Pisal, H; Suryawanshi, N; Tripathy, S; Risbud, A R; Paranjape, R S; Shankar, A V; Kshirsagar, A; Phadke, M A; Joshi, P L; Brookmeyer, R S; Bollinger, R C

    2003-01-01

    Efforts to prevent HIV transmission from mother to infants in settings like India may benefit from the availability of reliable methods for rapid and simple HIV screening. Data from India on the reliability of rapid HIV test kits are limited and there are no data on the use of rapid HIV tests for screening of pregnant women. Pregnant women attending an antenatal clinic and delivery room in Pune agreed to participate in an evaluation of five rapid HIV tests, including (a) a saliva brush test (Oraquick HIV-1/2, Orasure Technologies Inc.), (b) a rapid plasma test (Oraquick HIV-1/2) and (c) three rapid finger prick tests (Oraquick HIV-1/2; HIV-1/2 Determine, Abbott; NEVA HIV-1/2 Cadila). Results of the rapid tests were compared with three commercial plasma enzyme immunoassay (EIA) tests (Innotest HIV AB EIA, Lab systems/ELISCAN HIV AB EIA, UBI HIV Ab EIA). Between September 2000 and October 1, 2001, 1258 pregnant women were screened for HIV using these rapid tests. Forty-four (3.49%) of the specimens were HIV-antibody-positive by at least two plasma EIA tests. All of the rapid HIV tests demonstrated excellent specificity (96-100%). The sensitivity of the rapid tests ranged from 75-94%. The combined sensitivity and specificity of a two-step algorithm for rapid HIV testing was excellent for a number of combinations of the five rapid finger stick tests. In this relatively low HIV prevalence population of pregnant women in India, the sensitivity of the rapid HIV tests varied, when compared to a dual EIA algorithm. In general, the specificity of all the rapid tests was excellent, with very few false positive HIV tests. Based upon these data, two different rapid HIV tests for screening pregnant women in India would be highly sensitive, with excellent specificity to reliably prevent inappropriate use of antiretroviral therapy for prevention of vertical HIV transmission.

  16. Receiver operating characteristic curve in diagnostic test assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrekar, Jayawant N

    2010-09-01

    The performance of a diagnostic test in the case of a binary predictor can be evaluated using the measures of sensitivity and specificity. However, in many instances, we encounter predictors that are measured on a continuous or ordinal scale. In such cases, it is desirable to assess performance of a diagnostic test over the range of possible cutpoints for the predictor variable. This is achieved by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve that includes all the possible decision thresholds from a diagnostic test result. In this brief report, we discuss the salient features of the ROC curve, as well as discuss and interpret the area under the ROC curve, and its utility in comparing two different tests or predictor variables of interest.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of xpert test in tuberculosis detection: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravdeep Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: World Health Organization (WHO recommends the use of Xpert MTB/RIF assay for rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB and detection of rifampicin resistance. This systematic review was done to know about the diagnostic accuracy and cost-effectiveness of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, PUBMED, Scopus, Science Direct and Google Scholar for relevant studies for studies published between 2010 and December 2014. Studies given in the systematic reviews were accessed separately and used for analysis. Selection of studies, data extraction and assessment of quality of included studies was performed independently by two reviewers. Studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of Xpert MTB/RIF assay among adult or predominantly adult patients (≥14 years, presumed to have pulmonary TB with or without HIV infection were included in the review. Also, studies that had assessed the diagnostic accuracy of Xpert MTB/RIF assay using sputum and other respiratory specimens were included. Results: The included studies had a low risk of any form of bias, showing that findings are of high scientific validity and credibility. Quantitative analysis of 37 included studies shows that Xpert MTB/RIF is an accurate diagnostic test for TB and detection of rifampicin resistance. Conclusion: Xpert MTB/RIF assay is a robust, sensitive and specific test for accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis as compared to conventional tests like culture and microscopic examination.

  18. Telephone communication of HIV testing results for improving knowledge of HIV infection status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor Car, Lorainne; Gentry, Sarah; van-Velthoven, Michelle H M M T; Car, Josip

    2013-01-31

    This is one of three Cochrane reviews that examine the role of the telephone in HIV/AIDS services. Both in developed and developing countries there is a large proportion of people who do not know they are infected with HIV. Knowledge of one's own HIV serostatus is necessary to access HIV support, care and treatment and to prevent acquisition or further transmission of HIV. Using telephones instead of face-to-face or other means of HIV test results delivery could lead to more people receiving their HIV test results. To assess the effectiveness of telephone use for delivery of HIV test results and post-test counselling.To evaluate the effectiveness of delivering HIV test results by telephone, we were interested in whether they can increase the proportion of people who receive their HIV test results and the number of people knowing their HIV status. We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, PubMed Central, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health (CINAHL), WHOs The Global Health Library and Current Controlled Trials from 1980 to June 2011. We also searched grey literature sources such as Dissertation Abstracts International,CAB Direct Global Health, OpenSIGLE, The Healthcare Management Information Consortium, Google Scholar, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, International AIDS Society and AEGIS Education Global Information System, and reference lists of relevant studies for this review. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials (qRCTs), controlled before and after studies (CBAs), and interrupted time series (ITS) studies comparing the effectiveness of telephone HIV test results notification and post-test counselling to face-to-face or other ways of HIV test result delivery in people regardless of their demographic characteristics and in all settings. Two reviewers independently searched, screened, assessed study quality and extracted data. A

  19. SPS Dipole Multipactor Test and TEWave Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F; Edwards, P; Federmann, S; Holz, M; Taborelli, M

    2013-01-01

    Electron cloud accumulation in particle accelerators can be mitigated by coating the vacuum beam pipe with thin films of low secondary electron yield (SEY) material. The SEY of small coated samples are usually measured in the laboratory. To further test the properties of different coating materials, RF-induced multipacting in a coaxial waveguide configuration can be performed. The technique is applied to two main bending dipoles of the SPS, where the RF power is fed through a tungsten wire stretched along the vacuum chamber (6.4 m). A dipole with a bare stainless steel chamber shows a clear power threshold initiating an abrupt rise in reflected power and pressure. The effect is enhanced at RF frequencies corresponding to electron cyclotron resonances for given magnetic fields. Preliminary results show that the dipole with a carbon coated vacuum chamber does not exhibit any pressure rise or reflected RF power up to the maximum available input power. In the case of a large scale coating production this techniqu...

  20. Diagnostic Performance of Visual Screening Tests in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lança, Carla Costa; Carolino, Elisabete

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to determine and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of visual screening tests for detecting vision loss in elderly. This study is defined as study of diagnostic performance. The diagnostic accuracy of 5 visual tests -near convergence point, near accommodation point, stereopsis, contrast sensibility and amsler grid—was evaluated by means of the ROC method (receiver operating characteristics curves), sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+/LR-). Visual acuity was used as the reference standard. A sample of 44 elderly aged 76.7 years (±9.32), who were institutionalized, was collected. The curves of contrast sensitivity and stereopsis are the most accurate (area under the curves were 0.814-p = 0.001, C.I.95%[0.653;0.975]— and 0.713-p = 0.027, C.I.95%[0,540;0,887], respectively). The scores with the best diagnostic validity for the stereopsis test were 0.605 (sensitivity 0.87, specificity 0.54; LR+ 1.89, LR-0.24) and 0.610 (sensitivity 0.81, specificity 0.54; LR+ 1.75, LR-0.36). The scores with higher diagnostic validity for the contrast sensibility test were 0.530 (sensitivity 0.94, specificity 0.69; LR+ 3.04, LR-0.09). The contrast sensitivity and stereopsis test's proved to be clinically useful in detecting vision loss in the elderly.

  1. Nonparametric predictive inference for combining diagnostic tests with parametric copula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Noryanti; Coolen, F. P. A.; Coolen-Maturi, T.

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the accuracy of diagnostic tests is crucial in many application areas including medicine and health care. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve is a popular statistical tool for describing the performance of diagnostic tests. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) is often used as a measure of the overall performance of the diagnostic test. In this paper, we interest in developing strategies for combining test results in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy. We introduce nonparametric predictive inference (NPI) for combining two diagnostic test results with considering dependence structure using parametric copula. NPI is a frequentist statistical framework for inference on a future observation based on past data observations. NPI uses lower and upper probabilities to quantify uncertainty and is based on only a few modelling assumptions. While copula is a well-known statistical concept for modelling dependence of random variables. A copula is a joint distribution function whose marginals are all uniformly distributed and it can be used to model the dependence separately from the marginal distributions. In this research, we estimate the copula density using a parametric method which is maximum likelihood estimator (MLE). We investigate the performance of this proposed method via data sets from the literature and discuss results to show how our method performs for different family of copulas. Finally, we briefly outline related challenges and opportunities for future research.

  2. When is diagnostic testing inappropriate or irrational? Acceptable regret approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozo, Iztok; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    The authors provide a new model within the framework of theories of bounded rationality for the observed physicians' behavior that their ordering of diagnostic tests may not be rational. Contrary to the prevailing thinking, the authors find that physicians do not act irrationally or inappropriately when they order diagnostic tests in usual clinical practice. When acceptable regret (i.e., regret that a decision maker finds tolerable upon making a wrong decision) is taken into account, the authors show that physicians tend to order diagnostic tests at a higher level of pretest probability of disease than predicted by expected utility theory. They also show why physicians tend to overtest when regret about erroneous decisions is extremely small. Finally, they explain variations in the practice of medicine. They demonstrate that in the same clinical situation, different decision makers might have different acceptable regret thresholds for withholding treatment, for ordering a diagnostic test, or for administering treatment. This in turn means that for some decision makers, the most rational strategy is to do nothing, whereas for others, it may be to order a diagnostic test, and still for others, choosing treatment may be the most rational course of action.

  3. University Students' Perspectives on Diagnostic Testing in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Fhloinn, Eabhnat; Bhaird, Ciarán Macan; Nolan, Brien

    2014-01-01

    Many universities issue mathematical diagnostic tests to incoming first-year students, covering a range of the basic concepts with which they should be comfortable from secondary school. As far as many lecturers are concerned, the purpose of this test is to determine the students' mathematical knowledge on entry. It should also provide an early…

  4. Field evaluation of a malaria rapid diagnostic test (ICT Pf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field evaluation of a malaria rapid diagnostic test (ICT Pf) ... province to determine the accuracy of the MRDT currently used in public sector clinics and hospitals. ... The positive predictive value of the test was 98.48 (99% CI 98.41 - 100%), and the negative predictive value was 99.52% (95% CI 96.47 – 100%). Conclusions.

  5. A comparison of rapid diagnostic testing (by plasmodium lactate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) considers early and rapid diagnosis as one of the strategies to control malaria. This study compared the performance of Quantitative Buffy Coat (QBC) test and the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) rapid diagnostic test (RDT) with microscopy as the gold ...

  6. Diagnostic, carrier and prenatal genetic testing for fragile X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the brain and testes. FMRP has been shown to down-regulate the translation of specific target messenger RNAs and plays a vital role in synaptic plasticity.[7]. Diagnostic, carrier and prenatal genetic testing for fragile X syndrome and other FMR-1-related disorders in Johannesburg, South Africa: A 20-year review. F B Essop ...

  7. Psychoacoustic Assessment of Speech Communication Systems. The Diagnostic Discrimination Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether, Craig Blaine

    The present report traces the rationale, development and experimental evaluation of the Diagnostic Discrimination Test (DDT). The DDT is a three-choice test of consonant discriminability of the perceptual/acoustic dimensions of consonant phonemes within specific vowel contexts. The DDT was created and developed in an attempt to provide a…

  8. Quality of HIV laboratory testing in Tanzania: a situation analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Source and level of customer satisfaction of HIV test kits supply was established. Of 12 laboratories, nine used rapid tests for screening and two used rapid tests for diagnosis. In the 12 laboratories, four used double ELISA and five used single ELISA and three did not use ELISA. Confirmatory tests observed were Western ...

  9. Detection of acute HIV infections in an urban HIV counseling and testing population in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priddy, Frances H; Pilcher, Christopher D; Moore, Renee H; Tambe, Pradnya; Park, Mahin N; Fiscus, Susan A; Feinberg, Mark B; del Rio, Carlos

    2007-02-01

    The southeastern United States has an increasing burden of HIV, particularly among blacks, women, and men who have sex with men. To evaluate HIV nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) and antibody-based algorithms in determination of HIV incidence, detection of acute HIV infections, and surveillance of drug-resistant virus transmission in the urban southeastern United States, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data from 2202 adults receiving HIV testing and counseling at 3 sites in Atlanta, GA from October 2002 through January 2004. After standard testing with an HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Western blot confirmation, HIV-positive specimens were tested with 2 standardized assays to detect recent infection. HIV antibody-negative specimens were pooled and screened for HIV using NAAT. Seventy (3.2%) of 2202 subjects were HIV infected. Only 66 were positive on the standard HIV antibody test; 4 were antibody-negative but acutely HIV infected. The overall annual HIV incidence was 1.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.4 to 1.8) based on the Vironostika-LS assay and 1.3% (95% CI: 0.6 to 2.1) based on the BED Incidence Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA). The prevalence of acute HIV infection was 1.8 per 1000 persons (95% CI: 0.7 to 4.6). The sensitivity of the current testing algorithm using an EIA and Western blot test for detectable infections was only 94.3% (95% CI: 86.2 to 97.8). All 3 of the acutely infected subjects genotyped had drug resistance mutations, and 1 had multiclass resistance. Adding NAAT-based screening to standard HIV antibody testing increased case identification by 6% and uncovered the first evidence of multidrug-resistant HIV transmission in Atlanta. Antibody tests alone are insufficient for public health practice in high-risk urban HIV testing settings.

  10. Opt-out HIV testing in prison: informed and voluntary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David L; Golin, Carol E; Grodensky, Catherine A; May, Jeanine; Bowling, J Michael; DeVellis, Robert F; White, Becky L; Wohl, David A

    2015-01-01

    HIV testing in prison settings has been identified as an important mechanism to detect cases among high-risk, underserved populations. Several public health organizations recommend that testing across health-care settings, including prisons, be delivered in an opt-out manner. However, implementation of opt-out testing within prisons may pose challenges in delivering testing that is informed and understood to be voluntary. In a large state prison system with a policy of voluntary opt-out HIV testing, we randomly sampled adult prisoners in each of seven intake prisons within two weeks after their opportunity to be HIV tested. We surveyed prisoners' perception of HIV testing as voluntary or mandatory and used multivariable statistical models to identify factors associated with their perception. We also linked survey responses to lab records to determine if prisoners' test status (tested or not) matched their desired and perceived test status. Thirty-eight percent (359/936) perceived testing as voluntary. The perception that testing was mandatory was positively associated with age less than 25 years (adjusted relative risk [aRR]: 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24, 1.71) and preference that testing be mandatory (aRR: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.41, 2.31) but negatively associated with entry into one of the intake prisons (aRR: 0.41 95% CI: 0.27, 0.63). Eighty-nine percent of prisoners wanted to be tested, 85% were tested according to their wishes, and 82% correctly understood whether or not they were tested. Most prisoners wanted to be HIV tested and were aware that they had been tested, but less than 40% understood testing to be voluntary. Prisoners' understanding of the voluntary nature of testing varied by intake prison and by a few individual-level factors. Testing procedures should ensure that opt-out testing is informed and understood to be voluntary by prisoners and other vulnerable populations.

  11. Supervised oral HIV self-testing is accurate in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, Guillermo; Steele, Sarah J; Govender, Indira; Arellano, Gemma; Mkwamba, Alec; Hadebe, Menzi; van Cutsem, Gilles

    2016-06-01

    To achieve UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets, alternatives to conventional HIV testing models are necessary in South Africa to increase population awareness of their HIV status. One of the alternatives is oral mucosal transudates-based HIV self-testing (OralST). This study describes implementation of counsellor-introduced supervised OralST in a high HIV prevalent rural area. Cross-sectional study conducted in two government-run primary healthcare clinics and three Médecins Sans Frontières-run fixed-testing sites in uMlalazi municipality, KwaZulu-Natal. Lay counsellors sampled and recruited eligible participants, sought informed consent and demonstrated the use of the OraQuick(™) OralST. The participants used the OraQuick(™) in front of the counsellor and underwent a blood-based Determine(™) and a Unigold(™) rapid diagnostic test as gold standard for comparison. Primary outcomes were user error rates, inter-rater agreement, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. A total of 2198 participants used the OraQuick(™) , of which 1005 were recruited at the primary healthcare clinics. Of the total, 1457 (66.3%) were women. Only two participants had to repeat their OraQuick(™) . Inter-rater agreement was 99.8% (Kappa 0.9925). Sensitivity for the OralST was 98.7% (95% CI 96.8-99.6), and specificity was 100% (95% CI 99.8-100). This study demonstrates high inter-rater agreement, and high accuracy of supervised OralST. OralST has the potential to increase uptake of HIV testing and could be offered at clinics and community testing sites in rural South Africa. Further research is necessary on the potential of unsupervised OralST to increase HIV status awareness and linkage to care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Oral Glucose Tolerance Testing identifies HIV+ infected women with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) not captured by standard DM definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seang, Sophie; Lake, Jordan E; Tian, Fang; Anastos, Kathryn; Cohen, Mardge H; Tien, Phyllis C

    2016-02-01

    HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals may have differential risk of diabetes mellitus (DM) compared to the general population, and the optimal diagnostic algorithm for DM in HIV+ persons remains unclear. We aimed to assess the utility of oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) for DM diagnosis in a cohort of women with or at risk for HIV infection. Using American Diabetic Association DM definitions, DM prevalence and incidence were assessed among women enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study. DM was defined by 2-hour OGTT ≥ 200 mg/dL (DM_OGTT) or a clinical definition (DM_C) that included any of the following: (i) anti-diabetic medication use or self-reported DM confirmed by either fasting glucose (FG) ≥126 mg/dL or HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, (ii) FG ≥ 126 mg/dL confirmed by a second FG ≥ 126 mg/dL or HbA1c 6.5%, or (iii) HbA1c 6.5% confirmed by FG ≥ 126 mg/dL cohort. Overall, 390 women (285 HIV+, median age 43 years; 105 HIV-, median age 37 years) were enrolled between 2003-2006. Over half of all women were African American. Using DM_C, DM prevalence rates were 5.6% and 2.8% among HIV+ and HIV- women, respectively. Among HIV+ women, adding DM_OGTT to DM_C increased DM prevalence from 5.6% to 7.4%, a 31% increase in the number of diabetes cases diagnosed (p=0.02). In HIV- women, no additional cases were diagnosed by DM-OGTT. In HIV+ women, OGTT identified DM cases that were not identified by a standardized clinical definition. Further investigation is needed to determine whether OGTT should be considered as an adjunctive tool for DM diagnosis in the setting of HIV infection.

  13. Late HIV Testing in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossas-Milligan, Katherine Y; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F; Mayor, Angel M; Fernández-Santos, Diana M; Dworkin, Mark S

    2015-09-01

    Late HIV testing (LT), defined as receiving an AIDS diagnosis within a year of one's first positive HIV test, is associated with higher HIV transmission, lower HAART effectiveness, and worse outcomes. Latinos represent 36% of LT in the US, yet research concerning LT among HIV cases in Puerto Rico is scarce. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with LT, and a Cochran‒Armitage test was used to determine LT trends in an HIV-infected cohort followed at a clinic in Puerto Rico specialized in the management and treatment of HIV. From 2000 to 2011, 47% of eligible patients were late testers, with lower median CD4 counts (54 vs. 420 cells/mm3) and higher median HIV viral load counts (253,680 vs. 23,700 copies/mL) than non-LT patients. LT prevalence decreased significantly, from 47% in 2000 to 37% in 2011. In a mutually adjusted logistic regression model, males, older age at enrollment and past history of IDU significantly increased LT odds, whereas having a history of amphetamine use decreased LT odds. When the data were stratified by mode of transmission, it became apparent that only the category men who have sex with men (MSM) saw a significant reduction in the proportion of LT, falling from 67% in 2000 to 33% in 2011. These results suggest a gap in early HIV detection in Puerto Rico, a gap that decreased only among MSM. An evaluation of the manner in which current HIV-testing guidelines are implemented on the island is needed.

  14. [Development and assessment of a new test for verification of tests for HIV-infection markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, E N; Sharipova, I N; Kudriavtseva, E N; Lobanova, O A; Puzyrev, V F; Riabinina, S A; Burkov, A N; Obriadina, A P; Ulanova, T I

    2008-03-01

    The OOO "Research-and-Production Association "Diagnostic Systems" has developed a "DC-EIA-HIV-AT/AG-SPECTRUM" screening enzyme immunoassay system designed to detect separately antibodies to certain HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteins, as well as antigen p24. The determination of antibodies of all classes and the marker of early-stage infection antigen p24 with a high (5 pg/ml) sensitivity substantially reduces the number of void results obtained in the use of immunoblots. The developed "DC-EIA-HIV-AT/AG-SPECTRUM" plate system is an effective tool to support positive screening results and may be used at the final stage of laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection.

  15. HIV Testing and awareness of HIV status among people who inject drugs in greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazazi, Alexander R; Vijay, Aishwarya; Crawford, Forrest W; Heimer, Robert; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2018-01-01

    HIV testing services are the gateway into HIV treatment and are critical for monitoring the epidemic. HIV testing is recommended at least annually in high-risk populations, including people who inject drugs (PWID). In Malaysia, the HIV epidemic is concentrated among PWID, but their adherence to testing recommendations and the proportion of HIV-positive PWID who are aware of their status remain unknown. We recruited 460 PWID in Greater Kuala Lumpur using respondent-driven sampling and conducted HIV testing. We examined past testing behaviors, estimating testing frequency, correlates of testing in the past 12 months, and the proportion of those living with HIV who were aware of their status. Results showed that most PWID living with HIV (90.4%, 95% CI: 83.6%-95.9%) were aware of their status. Among those never previously diagnosed with HIV, few had accessed HIV testing in the past 12 months (14.3%, 95% CI: 11.1%-18.0%). Prison (57.0%) and compulsory drug detention centers (36.1%) were the primary locations where PWID reported ever being HIV tested, and the main correlate of recent testing in regression was recent criminal justice involvement. Although awareness of HIV status may be high among PWID living with HIV in Kuala Lumpur, testing occurs primarily in prisons and compulsory drug detention centers, where it is involuntary and linkage to care is limited. A shift in HIV testing policy is needed to align health and human rights objectives, replacing mandatory testing with voluntary testing in settings where individuals can be rapidly linked to HIV care.

  16. HIV Viral Load Testing in Laos

    OpenAIRE

    Paboriboune, Phimpha; Ngin, S.; Kieffer, A.; Phimphachanh, C.; Bouchard, B; Fan, P. Ho; Steenkeste, N.; Viretto, G; Fernandez, M.; Longuet, C.; Babin, F.X.; Nerrienet, E.

    2013-01-01

    The number of people living with HIV/AIDS in the People’s Democratic Republic of Laos (also known as Laos PDR) is estimated at 13,600 and the number of people in need of antiretroviral therapy at 8,000. Today, around 3,200 HIV infected individuals receive treatment in seven centres throughout the country. Until recently, antiretroviral treated patients were followed-up only on the basis of clinical and immunological criteria. In 2009 the Centre d'Infectiologie Christophe Mérieux in Laos PDR (...

  17. [Diagnostic value of alginate test in gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, D S; Masharova, A A; Droxzdov, V N; Firsova, L D; Kozhurina, T S

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of single dose of gaviscon (the alginates test) in detecting gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with heartburn symptoms. 123 patients (male 46, female 77, age 43.6 +/- 15.5 years) with symptoms suggestive of GERD were investigated. Symptom response to the alginates test compared in GERD positive and GERD negative patients according traditional diagnostic criteria of GERD (upper endoscopy, 24-hr pH-monitoring, esophageal manometry, response to treatment with PPIs). Of 91 (78.9%) patients with positive alginates test, 87 were classified as GERD positive and 4 as GERD negative. Of 32 (26%) patients with negative alginates test, 29 were GERD negative and 3 GERD positive. The results providing a sensitivity of alginates test of 96.7% and a specificity of 87.7%. The alginates test is sensitive and specific for diagnosing GERD in patients with typical GERD symptoms.

  18. Mixed Portmanteau Test for Diagnostic Checking of Time Series Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Chand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Model criticism is an important stage of model building and thus goodness of fit tests provides a set of tools for diagnostic checking of the fitted model. Several tests are suggested in literature for diagnostic checking. These tests use autocorrelation or partial autocorrelation in the residuals to criticize the adequacy of fitted model. The main idea underlying these portmanteau tests is to identify if there is any dependence structure which is yet unexplained by the fitted model. In this paper, we suggest mixed portmanteau tests based on autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation functions of the residuals. We derived the asymptotic distribution of the mixture test and studied its size and power using Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Offering prenatal diagnostic tests: European guidelines for clinical practice [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirton, Heather; Goldsmith, Lesley; Jackson, Leigh; Lewis, Celine; Chitty, Lyn

    2014-05-01

    For over four decades, it has been possible to offer prenatal diagnostic testing for fetal abnormalities. Prenatal testing is now available for a wide range of monogenic disorders as well as chromosomal abnormalities and should be provided within the ethical framework of informed consent and autonomous choice. However, there are no published guidelines for health professionals from varied disciplines who offer prenatal diagnosis (PND) in a range of possible settings including departments of maternity, obstetrics and clinical genetics. We used an Expert Group technique to develop a set of guidelines for provision of prenatal diagnostic services. Thirteen European health professionals, all experts in PND, participated in a workshop to develop the guidelines, which were then subjected to a wide consultation process. The objective of PND was defined as providing prenatal diagnostic testing services (for genetic conditions) that enable families to make informed choices consistent with their individual needs and values and which support them in dealing with the outcome of such testing. General principles, logistical considerations, clinical care and counselling topics are all described and are equally applicable to invasive and non-invasive testing. These guidelines provide a framework for ethical clinical care; however, they are flexible enough to enable practitioners to adapt them to their particular setting. Ideally, an individualised approach to each family is required to ensure autonomous choice and informed consent regarding prenatal diagnostic testing within the local ethical and legal framework.

  20. Barriers to access and uptake of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in Hanoi, Vietnam: from HIV testing to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Hao T M; Le, Giang M; Mai, Anh Q; Zablotska-Manos, Iryna; Maher, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    Little is known about the experiences of Vietnamese men who have sex with men in accessing HIV testing and treatment. We aimed to explore barriers to access and uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in Hanoi. During 2015, we conducted qualitative interviews with 35 participants recruited using snowball sampling based on previous research and social networks. Key individual impediments to ART uptake included inadequate preparation for a positive diagnosis and the dual stigmatisation of homosexuality and HIV and its consequences, leading to fear of disclosure of HIV status. Health system barriers included lack of clarity and consistency about how to register for and access ART, failure to protect patient confidentiality and a reticence by providers to discuss sexual identity and same-sex issues. Results suggest fundamental problems in the way HIV testing is currently delivered in Hanoi, including a lack of client-centred counselling, peer support and clear referral pathways. Overcoming these barriers will require educating men who have sex with men about the benefits of routine testing, improving access to quality diagnostic services and building a safe, confidential treatment environment for HIV-positive men to access, receive and remain in care.

  1. The rise of targeted HIV oral rapid testing in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Derek; Stewart, Michael; Smith, Maggie; Price, Tony; Lusk, Jo; Ooi, Catriona; Read, Phillip; Finlayson, Robert

    2015-03-16

    To assess the performance and acceptability of the OraQuick Advance Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test (ORT) in Australia. Cross-sectional study of 1074 men who have sex with men (MSM) and individuals aged 18 years or older at high risk of acquiring HIV infection who attended five public HIV or sexual health services, two general practices and one community clinic in Sydney from 1 January to 31 December 2013. One ORT confirmed by fourth-generation HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA). ORT sensitivity and specificity compared with EIA; acceptabiity of the ORT to participants. 83.5% of participants were MSM, 90.3% were aged under 50 years, and 9% had never been tested for HIV. There were 11 true-positive ORT results, two false-negative (non-reactive) results (both were early infections), and one false-positive (reactive) result (due to reader error). Sensitivity and specificity were 84.6% and 99.8%, respectively (compared with a sensitivity of 99.3% and specificity of 99.8% listed by the manufacturer). Three quarters of participants (74.0%; 730/987) found the ORT less stressful than venous sampling. Those who usually had tests at intervals of greater than 3 months deemed the ORT less stressful than those who had quarterly tests (77.5% v 64.8%; Ptesting. ORT sensitivity is reduced in early HIV infection. The test is highly acceptable and less stressful than venous sampling. Participants are keen to be tested with the ORT in future, would recommend it to peers and would have tests more frequently if the ORT were licensed. TGA approval of this test might slow increasing HIV infection rates among MSM and others by facilitating diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Advantages of the rapid HIV-1 test in occupational accidents with potentially contaminated material among health workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MACHADO Alcyone Artioli

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In occupational accidents involving health professionals handling potentially contaminated material, the decision to start or to continue prophylactic medication against infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV has been based on the ELISA test applied to a blood sample from the source patient. In order to rationalize the prophylactic use of antiretroviral agents, a rapid serologic diagnostic test of HIV infection was tested by the enzymatic immunoabsorption method (SUDS HIV 1+2, MUREX® and compared to conventional ELISA (Abbott HIV-1/ HIV-2 3rd Generation plus EIA®. A total of 592 cases of occupational accidents were recorded at the University Hospital of Ribeirão Preto from July 1998 to April 1999. Of these, 109 were simultaneously evaluated by the rapid test and by ELISA HIV. The rapid test was positive in three cases and was confirmed by ELISA and in one the result was inconclusive and later found to be negative by ELISA. In the 106 accidents in which the rapid test was negative no prophylactic medication was instituted, with an estimated reduction in costs of US$ 2,889.35. In addition to this advantage, the good correlation of the rapid test with ELISA, the shorter duration of stress and the absence of exposure of the health worker to the adverse effects of antiretroviral agents suggest the adoption of this test in Programs of Attention to Accidents with Potentially Contaminated Material.

  3. False positive HIV diagnoses in resource limited settings: operational lessons learned for HIV programmes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shanks, Leslie; Klarkowski, Derryck; O'Brien, Daniel P

    2013-01-01

    Access to HIV diagnosis is life-saving; however the use of rapid diagnostic tests in combination is vulnerable to wrongly diagnosing HIV infection when both screening tests give a false positive result...

  4. False Positive HIV Diagnoses in Resource Limited Settings: Operational Lessons Learned for HIV Programmes: e59906

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leslie Shanks; Derryck Klarkowski

    2013-01-01

      Background Access to HIV diagnosis is life-saving; however the use of rapid diagnostic tests in combination is vulnerable to wrongly diagnosing HIV infection when both screening tests give a false positive result...

  5. Lack of HIV Testing and Awareness of HIV Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men, Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung-Hee; Lui, Hui; Guo, Yaqi; Han, Lei; Mandel, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    In China, men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk for HIV. However, little is known about their HIV testing behavior. From September 2001 to January 2002, we recruited 482 men through social networks and MSM venues. We conducted HIV testing and counseling, and anonymous, standardized face-to-face interviews. Eighty-two percent of…

  6. Incentives for HIV testing at the workplace in the automotive industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comprehensive HIV and AIDS workplace programmes made use of substantial lottery incentives in HIV counselling and testing drives to promote HIV testing at four companies in the automotive industry in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality. The main aim was to use lottery incentives to increase uptake for HIV testing.

  7. Mandatory HIV testing and uptake of ante-natal services in a primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Nigeria\\'s national policy on HIV/AIDS did not allow for mandatory HIV testing. But several health institutions in Nigeria insist on an HIV test before certain services are given. Fears have been expressed that such mandatory HIV testing might lead to poorer uptake of associated services. Aim: To assess the ...

  8. Proactive HIV testing strategies in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joore, I.K.C.W.

    2017-01-01

    After the introduction of therapy, HIV changed from a deadly disease to a chronic treatable infection, with those infected – if treated in time – having almost the same life expectancy as those not infected. Also, other studies have reported that early initiation of therapy greatly reduces the risk

  9. HIV testing and informed consent - ethical considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the case of a cadaver donor, relatives, before granting consent, must be ... Exposures carrying a significant risk - the high-risk exposures, as they are called - are hollow needle-stick injuries, or injuries that are more traumatic still. The ground for this ... and health care workers from exposure to HIV-infective material (blood ...

  10. Should trained lay providers perform HIV testing? A systematic review to inform World Health Organization guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C E; Yeh, P T; Johnson, C; Baggaley, R

    2017-12-01

    New strategies for HIV testing services (HTS) are needed to achieve UN 90-90-90 targets, including diagnosis of 90% of people living with HIV. Task-sharing HTS to trained lay providers may alleviate health worker shortages and better reach target groups. We conducted a systematic review of studies evaluating HTS by lay providers using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Peer-reviewed articles were included if they compared HTS using RDTs performed by trained lay providers to HTS by health professionals, or to no intervention. We also reviewed data on end-users' values and preferences around lay providers preforming HTS. Searching was conducted through 10 online databases, reviewing reference lists, and contacting experts. Screening and data abstraction were conducted in duplicate using systematic methods. Of 6113 unique citations identified, 5 studies were included in the effectiveness review and 6 in the values and preferences review. One US-based randomized trial found patients' uptake of HTS doubled with lay providers (57% vs. 27%, percent difference: 30, 95% confidence interval: 27-32, p Cambodia, Malawi, and South Africa comparing testing quality between lay providers and laboratory staff found little discordance and high sensitivity and specificity (≥98%). Values and preferences studies generally found support for lay providers conducting HTS, particularly in non-hypothetical scenarios. Based on evidence supporting using trained lay providers, a WHO expert panel recommended lay providers be allowed to conduct HTS using HIV RDTs. Uptake of this recommendation could expand HIV testing to more people globally.

  11. Predictors of HIV Testing and Intention to Test Among Hispanic Farmworkers in South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, M. Isabel; Collazo, Jose B.; Bowen, G. Stephen; Varga, Leah M.; Hernandez, Nilda; Perrino, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Context and Purpose: This study examined the predictors of HIV testing and factors associated with intention to accept a free HIV test among 244 Hispanic migrant/seasonal farmworkers in South Florida. Methods: Time and space sampling procedures were used to recruit participants in public venues. Bilingual staff interviewed eligible respondents in…

  12. and hiv testing in sub-saharan africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    threat to confidentiality and the right not to HIV seropositivity: a prospective cohort study know. AIDS 1999; 13:2469-2474. in Burkina Faso: J Acqzn'r Immune Dq/ic. Syndr 2001; 28: 367—372. . Tcmmerman M, Ndinya-Achola I, Ambani .1,. I'iot P. The right not to know HIV-Test re- 19. Keogh P, Allen S, Almcdal C, Temahagili ...

  13. Background review for diagnostic test development for Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrel, Rémi N; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Pas, Suzan; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Koopmans, Marion; Reusken, Chantal

    2016-08-01

    To review the state of knowledge about diagnostic testing for Zika virus infection and identify areas of research needed to address the current gaps in knowledge. We made a non-systematic review of the published literature about Zika virus and supplemented this with information from commercial diagnostic test kits and personal communications with researchers in European preparedness networks. The review covered current knowledge about the geographical spread, pathogen characteristics, life cycle and infection kinetics of the virus. The available molecular and serological tests and biosafety issues are described and discussed in the context of the current outbreak strain. We identified the following areas of research to address current knowledge gaps: (i) an urgent assessment of the laboratory capacity and capability of countries to detect Zika virus; (ii) rapid and extensive field validation of the available molecular and serological tests in areas with and without Zika virus transmission, with a focus on pregnant women; (iii) monitoring the genomic diversity of circulating Zika virus strains; (iv) prospective studies into the virus infection kinetics, focusing on diagnostic sampling (specimen types, combinations and timings); and (v) developing external quality assessments for molecular and serological testing, including differential diagnosis for similar viruses and symptom clusters. The availability of reagents for diagnostic development (virus strains and antigens, quantified viral ribonucleic acid) needs to be facilitated. An international laboratory response is needed, including preparation of protocols for prospective studies to address the most pressing information needs.

  14. The fourth generation AlereTM HIV Combo rapid test improves detection of acute infection in MTN-003 (VOICE) samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livant, Edward; Heaps, Amy; Kelly, Cliff; Maharaj, Rashika; Samsunder, Natasha; Nhlangulela, Lindiwe; Karugaba, Patrick; Panchia, Ravindre; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Chirenje, Zvavahera Mike; Parikh, Urvi M

    2017-09-01

    Early and accurate detection of HIV is crucial when using pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention to avoid PrEP initiation in acutely infected individuals and to minimize the risk of drug resistance in individuals with breakthrough infection. To determine if fourth-generation antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) would have detected HIV infection earlier than the third-generation RDT used in MTN-003 (VOICE). 5029 VOICE participants were evaluated with third-generation Alere Determine™ HIV-1/2, OraQuick ADVANCE® Rapid HIV-1/2, Uni-Gold™ Recombigen® HIV-1/2 and Bio-Rad GS HIV-1/2+O EIA; and fourth-generation Alere Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo, Conformité Européene (CE)-Marked Alere™ HIV Combo and Bio-Rad HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA. Multispot®, GS HIV-1 Western Blot (WB) and Geenius™ (Bio-Rad) were also evaluated. Of 57 antibody-negative pre-seroconversion plasma samples with HIV RNA >20 copies/mL identified, 16 (28%) were reactive by CE-Marked Alere™ HIV Combo (1 Ab; 9 Ag; 6 Ag/Ab reactive) and 4 (7%) by Alere Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo (2 Ab; 2 Ag; 0 Ag/Ab reactive) (p=0.0005). Multispot® confirmed only 1 of 16 acute infections while WB and Geenius™ confirmed none. GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA identified 27 of 57 (47%) pre-seroconversion RNA-positive samples. In VOICE, 28% of infections missed by current third-generation RDT would have been identified with the use of CE-Marked Alere™ HIV Combo. Geenius™, Multispot® and WB were all insensitive (HIV RNA testing will be essential for efficiently identifying seroconverters on PrEP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Respiratory tests in diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayev I. V. Samsonov A.A. Ayvazova R.A. Rapoport S.I. Grechushnikov V.В.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Research Objective: Comparative assessment of informational content of various techniques, respiratory tests for Helicobacteriosis detection. Methods et methods: Research of existence of H.pylori in stomach has been conducted by respiratory tests in 106 patients with various diseases of stomach and duodenum. All researches have been conducted on an outpatient basis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy with mucous biopsy and determination of H.pylori in biopsy materials have been followed by respiratory tests. Respiratory tests 13C UBT and 14C UBT have been carried out. The comparative analysis of respiratory tests for Helicobacteriosis detection has been performed. Results: The conducted researches have showed that, the respiratory tests are favourable for H.pylori diagnostics. They are methodically simple and short-term. Conclusion: Results of comparative researches showed that ammoniac respiratory tests for Helicobacteriosis detection in stomach possess lesser sensitivity than the 13C UBT — respiratory test and may be used for the primary diagnostics which results demand carrying out additional methods of diagnostics. Low specificity of these techniques and inauthentic results do not control the efficiency of eradication of H.pylori and do not present any value in medical examination of the population.

  16. HIV prevalence in voluntary counseling and testing centers compared with national HIV serosurvey data in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryarama, Fulgentius; Bunnell, Rebecca E; Montana, Livia; Hladik, Wolfgang; Opio, Alex; Musinguzi, Joshua; Kirungi, Wilford; Waswa-Bright, Laban; Mermin, Jonathan H

    2008-10-01

    To compare HIV prevalence from routine voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) data with a population-based serosurvey in Uganda and to assess the utility of VCT data as a supplemental data source for HIV surveillance. We analyzed HIV testing data from 75,640 unique VCT clients aged 15-59 years collected from August 2004 to January 2005 at 160 VCT sites. We excluded clients who reported illness as the reason for testing. During the same time period, 18,525 adults aged 15-59 years were tested for HIV in the Uganda HIV/AIDS Sero-Behavioral Survey (UHSBS). We compared UHSBS HIV prevalence with age-standardized VCT prevalence, overall and among stand-alone and facility-based VCT sites. HIV prevalence in urban areas was similar overall [UHSBS: 9.7%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.6 to 10.7; VCT: 10.1%, CI 9.8 to 10.5] and for both men (UHSBS: 6.3%, CI 4.9 to 7.6; VCT: 7.1, CI 6.6 to 7.5) and women (UHSBS: 12.2%, CI 10.6 to 13.7; VCT: 12.9%, CI 12.3 to 13.4). Urban prevalence from UHSBS (9.7%, CI 8.6 to 10.7), VCT stand-alone sites (10.3% CI 9.8 to 10.8), and VCT sites in health facility settings (10.0%, CI 9.5 to 10.4) was similar. However, in rural areas where VCT coverage is much lower than in urban areas (10% versus 31%), HIV prevalence was much higher among rural VCT clients (8.2%, CI 7.9% to 8.4%) than among rural UHSBS participants (5.2%, CI 4.8% to 5.5%). This resulted in overall higher HIV prevalence among all VCT clients (8.8%, CI 8.7 to 9.1) compared with all survey participants (5.9%, CI 5.6 to 6.2). After excluding clients who give illness as a reason for testing, VCT data may be used without further adjustment to monitor the HIV epidemic among urban Ugandans using either VCT data from stand-alone or health facility-based sites. However, monitoring rural and overall HIV prevalence using VCT data may not be appropriate until the uptake of VCT in rural areas is significantly improved or an adjustment factor is applied.

  17. "HIV is still real": Perceptions of HIV testing and HIV prevention among black men who have sex with men in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanín, José; Osubu, Tokes; Walker, Ja'Nina; Powell, Borris; Powell, Donald; Parsons, Jeffrey

    2009-06-01

    Rising HIV infection rates have been recently occurring among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) in the United States. As a result, promoting HIV testing among members of this population is now considered a priority among local and federal health officials. A study was conducted to explore concerns about HIV testing among BMSM in New York City. In early 2006, data were gathered from focus groups with 29 BMSM. Discussions revealed factors affecting HIV testing, including stigma, sexuality, religion, race, and class, emphasizing responsibility, testing concerns, and media influences, among others. Recommendations were submitted to New York City health officials to inform HIV testing and prevention efforts.

  18. 40 CFR 85.2223 - On-board diagnostic test report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false On-board diagnostic test report. 85... Tests § 85.2223 On-board diagnostic test report. (a) Motorists whose vehicles fail the on-board diagnostic test described in § 85.2222 shall be provided with the on-board diagnostic test results, including...

  19. Programmatic evaluation of a combined antigen and antibody test for rapid HIV diagnosis in a community and sexual health clinic screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taegtmeyer, Miriam; MacPherson, Peter; Jones, Kathy; Hopkins, Mark; Moorcroft, Jay; Lalloo, David G; Chawla, Anu

    2011-01-01

    A substantial proportion of HIV-infected individuals in the UK are unaware of their status and late presentations continue, especially in low prevalence areas. Fourth generation antigen/antibody rapid test kits could facilitate earlier diagnosis of HIV in non-clinical settings but lack data on performance under programmatic conditions. We evaluated the performance of Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo Test (Determine Combo), a rapid test with indicators for both HIV antibodies and p24 antigen, in participants recruited from community outreach and hospital-based sexual health clinics. HIV infection was confirmed using laboratory enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA), Line Immuno Assay (LIA) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 953 people underwent HIV testing. HIV antibody (Ab) prevalence was 1.8% (17/953). Four false positive rapid tests were identified: two antibody and two p24 antigen (Ag) reactions. Of participants diagnosed as HIV Ab positive, 2/17 (12%) were recent seroconverters based on clinical history and HIV antibody avidity test results. However, none of these were detected by the p24 antigen component of the rapid test kit. There were no other true positive p24 Ag tests. These data lend support to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that 4th generation rapid HIV tests have little additional benefit over 3rd generation HIV kits for routine screening in low prevalence settings and have high rates of false positives. In order to optimally combine community-based case-finding among hard-to-reach groups with reliable and early diagnosis 3rd generation kits should be primarily used with laboratory testing of individuals thought to be at risk of acute HIV infection. A more reliable point of care diagnostic is required for the accurate detection of acute HIV infection under programmatic conditions.

  20. Programmatic evaluation of a combined antigen and antibody test for rapid HIV diagnosis in a community and sexual health clinic screening programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Taegtmeyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of HIV-infected individuals in the UK are unaware of their status and late presentations continue, especially in low prevalence areas. Fourth generation antigen/antibody rapid test kits could facilitate earlier diagnosis of HIV in non-clinical settings but lack data on performance under programmatic conditions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We evaluated the performance of Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo Test (Determine Combo, a rapid test with indicators for both HIV antibodies and p24 antigen, in participants recruited from community outreach and hospital-based sexual health clinics. HIV infection was confirmed using laboratory enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA, Line Immuno Assay (LIA and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR. In total, 953 people underwent HIV testing. HIV antibody (Ab prevalence was 1.8% (17/953. Four false positive rapid tests were identified: two antibody and two p24 antigen (Ag reactions. Of participants diagnosed as HIV Ab positive, 2/17 (12% were recent seroconverters based on clinical history and HIV antibody avidity test results. However, none of these were detected by the p24 antigen component of the rapid test kit. There were no other true positive p24 Ag tests. CONCLUSION: These data lend support to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that 4th generation rapid HIV tests have little additional benefit over 3rd generation HIV kits for routine screening in low prevalence settings and have high rates of false positives. In order to optimally combine community-based case-finding among hard-to-reach groups with reliable and early diagnosis 3rd generation kits should be primarily used with laboratory testing of individuals thought to be at risk of acute HIV infection. A more reliable point of care diagnostic is required for the accurate detection of acute HIV infection under programmatic conditions.

  1. Tuberculin skin testing in intravenous drug users: differences between HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portu, José J; Aldamiz-Etxebarria, Mikel; Agud, José M; Arévalo, José M; Almaraz, María J; Ayensa, Cándido

    2002-04-01

    The prevalence of tuberculin skin test reactions among intravenous drug abusers and differences in tuberculin skin test positivity between HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative subjects were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 1131 subjects. They were recruited from a therapeutic community, from those who attended the centre for the treatment of drug addiction and from those who visited for any reason an acute tertiary-care hospital in Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country (Spain). All subjects underwent skin testing with purified protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin and testing for HIV antibodies. CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count was determined in HIV-seropositive individuals. Positive PPD tests were recorded in 35% of drug users who were HIV-seropositive and in 65% in those who were HIV-seronegative. In the HIV-infected group, there was a significant association between results of the tuberculin test and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count. When the CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count was > or = 500 cells/mm(3), percentages of positive PPD tests were similar in HIV-seropositives and HIV-seronegatives (47% versus 65%) but when the CD4(+) count was < 500 cells/mm(3), positive PPD tests occurred in only 21% of HIV-seropositives. The PPD test showed a decreased sensitivity for detecting tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected intravenous drug users with CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts fewer than 500 cells/mm(3).

  2. 20 CFR 416.919m - Diagnostic tests or procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 416.919m Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE... for Report Content § 416.919m Diagnostic tests or procedures. We will request the results of any... responsibility for deciding whether to perform the examination rests with the medical source designated to...

  3. The role of neuro-electrophysiological diagnostic tests in clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To summarise and discuss the role of neuro-electrophysiological diagnostic tests in clinical medicine. Data Sources: Published original research and reviews to date. Study Selection: The review was with emphasis on diagnosis of peripheral neuropathic and neuromuscular disorders. Data extraction and ...

  4. Assessment of the Diagnostic Potential of Clinotech TB Screen Test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Clinotech TB Screen test, a 3rd generation multi-antigen rapid chromatographic immunoassay for detection of IgG antibodies in serum against recombinant protein antigens 38kDa, 16kDa and 6kDa, was assessed for its diagnostic potential for diagnosis of active pulmonary TB in routine TB control programme in Abia ...

  5. Classification of chronic orofacial pain using an intravenous diagnostic test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjakkes, G. -H. E.; De Bont, L. G. M.; van Wijhe, M.; Stegenga, B.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of a preliminary intravenous diagnostic test to classify chronic orofacial pain patients into different subgroups. Patients with chronic orofacial pain conditions that could not be unambiguously diagnosed. A retrospective evaluation of series of

  6. Simplifying consent for HIV testing is associated with an increase in HIV testing and case detection in highest risk groups, San Francisco January 2003-June 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola M Zetola

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Populations at highest risk for HIV infection face multiple barriers to HIV testing. To facilitate HIV testing procedures, the San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center eliminated required written patient consent for HIV testing in its medical settings in May 2006. To describe the change in HIV testing rates in different hospital settings and populations after the change in HIV testing policy in the SFDH medical center, we performed an observational study using interrupted time series analysis.Data from all patients aged 18 years and older seen from January 2003 through June 2007 at the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SFDPH medical care system were included in the analysis. The monthly HIV testing rate per 1000 had patient-visits was calculated for the overall population and stratified by hospital setting, age, sex, race/ethnicity, homelessness status, insurance status and primary language.By June 2007, the average monthly rate of HIV tests per 1000 patient-visits increased 4.38 (CI, 2.17-6.60, p<0.001 over the number predicted if the policy change had not occurred (representing a 44% increase. The monthly average number of new positive HIV tests increased from 8.9 (CI, 6.3-11.5 to 14.9 (CI, 10.6-19.2, p<0.001, representing a 67% increase. Although increases in HIV testing were seen in all populations, populations at highest risk for HIV infection, particularly men, the homeless, and the uninsured experienced the highest increases in monthly HIV testing rates after the policy change.The elimination of the requirement for written consent in May 2006 was associated with a significant and sustained increase in HIV testing rates and HIV case detection in the SFDPH medical center. Populations facing the higher barriers to HIV testing had the highest increases in HIV testing rates and case detection in response to the policy change.

  7. Sweat conductivity: an accurate diagnostic test for cystic fibrosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Ana Claudia Veras; Leone, Claudio; Rodrigues, Joaquim Carlos; Adde, Fabíola Villac

    2014-09-01

    Sweat chloride test is the gold standard test for cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosis. Sweat conductivity is widely used although still considered a screening test. This was a prospective, cross-sectional, diagnostic research conducted at the laboratory of the Instituto da Criança of the Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo, Brazil. Sweat chloride (quantitative pilocarpine iontophoresis) and sweat conductivity tests were simultaneously performed in patients referred for a sweat test between March 2007 and October 2008. Conductivity and chloride cut-off values used to rule out or diagnose CF were sweat chloride and conductivity values were 11 and 25 mmol/L in these populations, respectively. Twenty-four patients who had received a diagnosis of CF presented median sweat chloride and conductivity values of 87 and 103 mmol/L, respectively. Conductivity values above 90 mmol/L had 83.3% sensitivity, 99.7% specificity, 90.9% PPV and 99.4% NPV to diagnose CF. The best conductivity cut-off value to exclude CF was sweat conductivity test yielded a high degree of diagnostic accuracy and it showed good agreement with sweat chloride. We suggest that it should play a role as a diagnostic test for CF in the near future. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Aspects of the Italian legislation related to HIV testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania D'Amato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Italy has adhered to international declarations regarding the prevention, care, and treatment of HIV/AIDS and has adopted the fundamental interventions for surveillance and control; access to testing is defined by Law 135 of 5 June 1990. At the time, the Ministry of Health issued decrees to define national epidemiological surveillance systems for new HIV infections. The decree provides indications on the data to be collected, data flow, the modes of data transmission respecting security measures and some recommendations regarding access to HIV testing. It is thus necessary to develop national recommendations on appropriate methods for considering the diverse phases of access to testing in relation to the level of awareness of the minor, the outcome and divulging of the test.

  9. An economic evaluation of mandatory premarital testing for HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, N L; Phillips, K M

    1991-01-01

    This study provides a comprehensive assessment of mandatory premarital testing for HIV. We incorporate new evidence about the assumptions underlying an economic evaluation of premarital testing, use standard methods of program evaluation (cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis), and carefully evaluate how changes in the various assumptions affect the results. The cost-effectiveness results show that, under the most likely conditions, the cost per case of HIV infection prevented by mandatory premarital testing would be between $70,000 and $127,000. In the cost-benefit analysis, the benefit-cost ratio in the most likely scenarios ranges between 3.1 and 28.2.

  10. FAITH - Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 486, Dec (2015), s. 78-87 ISSN 0042-6822 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-15326S; GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : retrovirus * HIV * assembly * assay * inhibitor Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.200, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0042682215003864

  11. A comparison of tuberculosis diagnostic systems in a retrospective cohort of HIV-infected children in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Solange Gonçalves; Lovero, Kathryn L; Pombo March, Maria de Fátima B; Abreu, Thalita G; Ruffino Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio L; Sant'Anna, Clemax C

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of pediatric tuberculosis (TB) presents many challenges, and is further complicated in HIV-infected patients. While many diagnostic systems have been proposed, there is no pediatric TB diagnosis gold standard. The outcomes of four TB diagnostic systems in HIV-infected children were compared in this study. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a TB/HIV reference hospital in Rio de Janeiro. HIV-infected pediatric patients evaluated for TB from 1998 to 2010 were reassessed using four diagnostic systems: Kenneth Jones, 1969; Tidjani, 1986; Ben Marais, 2006; Brazilian Ministry of Health, 2010. Results were compared to standardized diagnoses made by an expert panel of physicians. Of the 121 patients in the study cohort, the expert panel diagnosed 64 as TB and 57 as not TB cases. The Tidjani system showed the highest diagnostic accuracy, with and without the inclusion of microbiological data. The Tidjani and Kenneth Jones systems produced fewer false-positives, and the Ben Marais and Ministry of Health fewer false-negatives. Across systems, there was little agreement between TB diagnoses. In HIV-infected pediatric patients, the Ben Marais and Ministry of Health systems are useful for TB diagnostic screening, whereas the Tidjani and Kenneth Jones systems are best used in a reference center setting. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. TestMeEast: a campaign to increase HIV testing in hospitals and to reduce late diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, R; O'Connell, R; Lascar, M; Ferrand, R; Strachan, S; Matin, N; Bassnet, I; Orkin, C

    2016-01-01

    Late diagnosis occurs in almost half of those diagnosed in the UK (HIV Prevention England, 2013. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from HIV Prevention England: http://www.hivpreventionengland.org.uk/Campaigns-Current/National-HIV-Testing-Week ). Testing occurs mainly in sexual health and antenatal clinics despite recommendations to test more broadly [Ellis, S., & Curtis, H. (2012). HIV diagnoses and missed opportunities. Results of the British HIV association (BHIVA) National Audit 2010. Clinical Medicine, 12(5), 430-434]. We report the findings of an HIV-testing week campaign to offer testing to those who have blood tests as part of routine care within outpatient clinics and emergency departments of six London hospitals. The campaign target was to test 500 patients a day during the 2013 National HIV Testing Week (NHTW). Clinic staff and medical students were trained to offer routine HIV testing. Linkage to care was arranged for those who tested HIV-positive. During NHTW we tested 2402 of the planned 2500 test target. 2402/4317 (55.6% 95% CI 54.1-57.1%) of those who had routine blood tests were tested for HIV. There were eight HIV-positive tests; three were new diagnoses (all linked to care). The campaign hashtag #TestMeEast achieved a total Twitter "reach" of 238, 860 and the campaign had widespread news coverage. Our campaign showed that staff and students could be trained and mobilised to do thousands of routine HIV tests during a campaign.

  13. Determinants of HIV testing among young people aged 18 – 24 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although recent estimates of the HIV/AIDS burden in South Africa show the particular vulnerability of youth to HIV, HIV testing and its determinants are largely understudied in this age group. Objective: To investigate the prevalence and determinants of HIV testing among young people aged 18 to 24 years, ...

  14. Drug-Drug Interactions and Diagnostics for Drug Users With HIV and HIV/HCV Coinfections: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Jag H; Talal, Andrew H; Morse, Gene

    2017-03-01

    Substance use and pharmacologic treatment of co-occurring infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are associated with many adverse consequences including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The National Institute on Drug Abuse sponsored a 2-day conference on DDIs at which clinicians/scientists from government, academia, and the pharmaceutical industry presented the most current research findings to formulate a comprehensive overview of DDIs. Specific topics discussed included drug metabolism; drug interactions between medications used in the treatment of HIV, HCV, and substance use disorders; intrahepatic concentrations and methods of assessment of drugs in liver disease of varying etiologies and degrees of impairment; and minimally invasive sampling techniques for the assessment of intrahepatic drug concentrations, viral replication, and changes in gene expression in response to treatment. Finally, the speakers identified research targets and priorities on DDIs. Areas of emphasis included development of diagnostic assays for drug concentration assessment in different organs, an enhanced understanding of factors responsible for alterations in drug metabolism and excretion, and establishment of clinical trials and work groups to study DDIs. Our long-term objective is to broaden investigation in the field of DDIs in substance users. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  15. Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of Serum Albumin for Tuberculosis in HIV Infected Patients Eligible for Antiretroviral Therapy: Data from an HIV Cohort Study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose and it is the leading cause of death in HIV infected individuals in developing countries. There is an urgent need of low-cost diagnostic markers for resource-limited settings. Methods: The study involved 1571 patients from an HIV cohort study in India with known serum albumin concentrations at the time of becoming eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART. We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of serum albumin to predict tuberculosis within six months of ART eligibility and the prognostic value in patients who experienced tuberculosis. Results: The diagnostic accuracy of serum albumin, measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, to predict tuberculosis was 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.78-0.83. Serum albumin concentrations 90%, even in settings with high tuberculosis prevalence. Hypoalbuminemia was associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients with tuberculosis. Conclusion: Serum albumin can be a useful low-cost diagnostic marker for tuberculosis in HIV infected patients eligible for ART. However, we failed to find thresholds to rule out or rule in tuberculosis. If these results are confirmed by other studies, serum albumin could be used to improve the diagnostic accuracy of intensive case finding algorithms for HIV-related tuberculosis. In patients who experience tuberculosis, hypoalbuminemia is associated with poor prognosis.

  16. Relevance of cutoff on a 4th generation ELISA performance in the false positive rate during HIV diagnostic in a low HIV prevalence setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Lucía; Mateos, María Luisa; Holguín, África

    2017-07-01

    Despite the high specificity of fourth-generation enzyme immunoassays (4th-gen-EIA) for screening during HIV diagnosis, their positive predictive value is low in populations with low HIV prevalence. Thus, screening should be optimized to reduce false positive results. The influence of sample cutoff (S/CO) values by a 4th-gen-EIA with the false positive rate during the routine HIV diagnosis in a low HIV prevalence population was evaluated. A total of 30,201 sera were tested for HIV diagnosis using Abbott Architect® HIV-Ag/Ab-Combo 4th-gen-EIA at a hospital in Spain during 17 months. Architect S/CO values were recorded, comparing the HIV-1 positive results following Architect interpretation (S/CO≥1) with the final HIV-1 diagnosis by confirmatory tests (line immunoassay, LIA and/or nucleic acid test, NAT). ROC curve was also performed. Among the 30,201 HIV performed tests, 256 (0.85%) were positive according to Architect interpretation (S/CO≥1) but only 229 (0.76%) were definitively HIV-1 positive after LIA and/or NAT. Thus, 27 (10.5%) of 256 samples with S/CO≥1 by Architect were false positive diagnose. The false positive rate decreased when the S/CO ratio increased. All 19 samples with S/CO ≤10 were false positives and all 220 with S/CO>50 true HIV-positives. The optimal S/CO cutoff value provided by ROC curves was 32.7. No false negative results were found. We show that very low S/CO values during HIV-1 screening using Architect can result HIV negative after confirmation by LIA and NAT. The false positive rate is reduced when S/CO increases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Improved HIV testing coverage after scale-up of ... - Lusaka

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % (99/100) received post-test counseling and 99.1% (98 of 99) learned their status. In 2003 ... Hospital-based HIV testing is an essential clinical service in high prevalence settings and can serve further as a surveillance system to help track the ...

  18. HIV counselling and testing utilisation and attitudes of male inmates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lelaka C Motshabi MPH , Professor Supa Pengpid MSc DrPH MBA a & Professor Karl Peltzer PhD DrHabil b kpeltzer@hsrc.ac.za

    2011-09-03

    Sep 3, 2011 ... UNAIDS (2002). HIV Voluntary Counselling and Testing. Geneva: UNAIDS. UNAIDS (2004). Voluntary Counselling and Testing and operational guidelines. 2004. Geneva: UNAIDS. Uys, L., Chirwa, M., Kohi, T., Greeff, M., Naidoo, J., Makoae, L., Dlamini, P.,. Durrheim, K., Cuca, Y., & Holzemer, W.L. (2009).

  19. Detection of Early Sero-Conversion HIV Infection Using the INSTI HIV-1 Antibody Point-of-Care Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Darrel; Gilbert, Mark; Difrancesco, Lillo; Krajden, Mel

    2010-12-30

    We compared the INSTI(TM) HIV-1 Antibody Point-of-Care (POC) Test to laboratory-based tests for detection of early sero-conversion (i.e. acute) HIV infections. Fifty-three (53) individuals with early HIV infection, (i.e. 3(rd) generation anti-HIV EIA non-reactive or reactive, HIV-1 Western Blot non-reactive or indeterminate and HIV-1 p24 antigen reactive) were tested by INSTI(TM). The INSTI(TM) test was reactive for 34/49 (sensitivity 69.4%; 95% confidence interval 54.6-81.8%) early-infected individuals whose laboratory-based 3(rd) generation HIV EIA test was reactive. Four (4) were non-reactive by both the laboratory-based EIA and INSTI(TM )tests, but were p24 antigen reactive. The INSTI(TM )POC test performs well compared with other POC tests for the detection of early sero-conversion HIV infection, but it may miss 20% to 30% of those detected by laboratory-based 3(rd) generation anti-HIV tests. Both POC and laboratory-based anti-HIV tests will fail to detect a proportion of infected individuals in the first weeks after infection.

  20. A comparative analysis of costs of single and dual rapid HIV and syphilis diagnostics: results from a randomised controlled trial in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obure, Carol Dayo; Gaitan-Duarte, Hernando; Losada Saenz, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Lina; Angel-Muller, Edith; Laverty, Maura; Perez, Freddy

    2017-11-01

    HIV and congenital syphilis are major public health burdens contributing to substantial perinatal morbidity and mortality globally. Although studies have reported on the costs and cost-effectiveness of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for syphilis screening within antenatal care in a number of resource-constrained settings, empirical evidence on country-specific cost and estimates of single RDTs compared with dual RDTs for HIV and syphilis are limited. A cluster randomised controlled study design was used to compare the incremental costs of two testing algorithms: (1) single RDTs for HIV and syphilis and (2) dual RDTs for HIV and syphilis, in 12 health facilities in Bogota and Cali, Colombia. The costs of single HIV and syphilis RDTs and dual HIV and syphilis RDTs were collected from each of the health facilities. The economic costs per woman tested for HIV and syphilis and costs per woman treated for syphilis defined as the total costs required to test and treat one woman for syphilis were estimated. A total of 2214 women were tested in the study facilities. Cost per pregnant woman tested and cost per woman treated for syphilis were US$10.26 and US$607.99, respectively in the single RDT arm. For the dual RDTs, the cost per pregnant woman tested for HIV and syphilis and cost per woman treated for syphilis were US$15.89 and US$1859.26, respectively. Overall costs per woman tested for HIV and syphilis and cost per woman treated for syphilis were lower in Cali compared with Bogota across both intervention arms. Staff costs accounted for the largest proportion of costs while treatment costs comprised <1% of the preventive programme. Findings show lower average costs for single RDTs compared with dual RDTs with costs sensitive to personnel costs and the scale of output at the health facilities. NCT02454816; results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of tests to detect hepatitis B surface antigen: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Amini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV infection is characterised by the persistence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg. Expanding HBV diagnosis and treatment programmes into low resource settings will require high quality but inexpensive rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs in addition to laboratory-based enzyme immunoassays (EIAs to detect HBsAg. The purpose of this review is to assess the clinical accuracy of available diagnostic tests to detect HBsAg to inform recommendations on testing strategies in 2017 WHO hepatitis testing guidelines. Methods The systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA guidelines using 9 databases. Two reviewers independently extracted data according to a pre-specified plan and evaluated study quality. Meta-analysis was performed. HBsAg diagnostic accuracy of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs was compared to enzyme immunoassay (EIA and nucleic-acid test (NAT reference standards. Subanalyses were performed to determine accuracy among brands, HIV-status and specimen type. Results Of the 40 studies that met the inclusion criteria, 33 compared RDTs and/or EIAs against EIAs and 7 against NATs as reference standards. Thirty studies assessed diagnostic accuracy of 33 brands of RDTs in 23,716 individuals from 23 countries using EIA as the reference standard. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 90.0% (95% CI: 89.1, 90.8 and 99.5% (95% CI: 99.4, 99.5 respectively, but accuracy varied widely among brands. Accuracy did not differ significantly whether serum, plasma, venous or capillary whole blood was used. Pooled sensitivity of RDTs in 5 studies of HIV-positive persons was lower at 72.3% (95% CI: 67.9, 76.4 compared to that in HIV-negative persons, but specificity remained high. Five studies evaluated 8 EIAs against a chemiluminescence immunoassay reference standard with a pooled sensitivity and specificity of 88.9% (95% CI: 87.0, 90.6 and

  2. HIV health literacy, sexual behaviour and self-reports of having tested for HIV among students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Saloshni; Taylor, Myra

    2015-01-01

    The HIV prevalence among young South African adults makes it important to understand their HIV knowledge, sexual behaviour and HIV counselling and testing (HCT) behaviour in this group. This paper presents the demographics, knowledge, sexual behaviour and cues to action as reported by sexually active students' who had HCT. A cross-sectional study conducted in 10 high schools in the eThekwini and Ugu districts, KwaZulu-Natal, surveyed students' HIV knowledge, sexual behaviour and HCT behaviour. Complete information was available from 1 114 (97.9%) students who participated in the survey. Of these, 378 (33.9%) were sexually active and were included in this analysis. Logistic regression models tested for significant associations between the independent and the dependent variables under study, nesting the students within schools and controlling for age, sex, grade and school location (urban/rural).The median age of students was 17 years (range: 14-23 years) with most being male (n=287; 75.9%). The lifetime median number of sexual partners of students was 3 (range: 1-27). Students who used condoms with their regular partners were more likely to have had counselling for HIV (OR :1.79; 95% CI: 1.06-3.01). Those students who were more likely to have been tested for HIV were female (OR: 44.90; 95% CI: 7.77-259.38), those who had always used a condom with their non-regular partner (OR: 2.75; 95% CI: 1.01-7.47), and those who knew a person who had tested for HIV (OR: 15.28; 95% CI: 5.16-45.23). Targeting students, especially males early in adolescence and reinforcing safe sex behaviour messages through their high school years, can encourage HCT among students.

  3. Evaluation of HIV ELISA Diagnostic Kit developed at the Institute of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    almost identical to the results from the other kits. Our kit was nearly identical in terms of sensitivity'and specificity to the other two commercial kits used in this study. Thus our ELISA system, which is much cheaper than the commercial kits currently available in the market, offers a more affordable system for routine HIV tests.

  4. HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) testing and prevention in the cruise industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Eilif

    2011-01-01

    There are no internationally recognized guidelines regarding HIV for employees on cruise ships. The aim of the study was to survey and compare current practices for crews in the cruise industry regarding HIV testing and prevention. Medical representatives from cruise companies were invited to complete a questionnaire on their company's practices regarding HIV-related issues. Fifteen of 18 invited representatives completed the questionnaire on behalf of 24 companies with a total of 155 ships. All 8 companies with a medical department had a written HIV policy, versus 4 of 16 companies that handled medical crew issues through independent medical consultant services. Thirteen companies required pre-sea HIV testing, 12 had a written HIV policy regarding HIV testing and prevention, and 18 had free condoms for the crew. A positive HIV test would result in revocation of the employment offer from 5 companies and in another 6 companies establish HIV as a pre-existing condition. Eight companies required HIV+ seafarers to demonstrate stability at regular intervals as a condition for sailing. Cruise companies have different practices regarding HIV in crew. Large cruise lines with medical departments are more likely to have a written HIV policy than companies using independent medical consultants. About half the companies required pre-sea HIV testing; some to avoid hiring HIV+ seafarers, others to establish HIV as a pre-existing condition or to ensure proper follow-up of their HIV+ seafarers. This report may provide input for company discussions about present or future HIV policies.

  5. Diagnostic Tests for Alzheimer's Disease: Rationale, Methodology, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Mason

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a large increase in the amount of research seeking to define or diagnose Alzheimer's disease before patients develop dementia. If successful, this would principally have clinical benefits both in terms of treatment as well as risk modification. Moreover, a better method for diagnosing predementia disease would assist research which seeks to develop such treatments and risk modification strategies. The evidence-based definition of a diagnostic test's accuracy is fundamental to achieve the above goals and to address this, the Cochrane Collaboration has established a Diagnostic Test Accuracy group dedicated to examining the utility and accuracy of proposed tests in dementia and cognitive impairment. We present here the assumptions and observations underpinning the chosen methodology as well as the initial methodological approach decided upon.

  6. Why Take an HIV Test? Concerns, Benefits, and Strategies to Promote HIV Testing among Low-Income Heterosexual African American Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Scyatta A.; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Harris, Muriel J.; Townsend, Tiffany G.; Miller, Kim S.

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study examined perceptions of HIV testing and strategies to enhance HIV testing among HIV-negative African American heterosexual young adults (ages 18-25 years). Twenty-six focus groups (13 male groups, 13 female groups) were conducted in two low-income communities (urban and rural). All sessions were audio-recorded and transcribed.…

  7. HIV/AIDS knowledge and uptake of HIV counselling and testing among undergraduate private university students in Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppong Asante, Kwaku

    2013-03-28

    HIV Counselling and Testing (VCT) and knowledge about HIV are some key strategies in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS in Ghana. However, HIV knowledge and utilization of VCT services among university students is low. The main objective was to determine the level of HIV/AIDS knowledge and to explore factors associated with the use HIV counselling and testing among private university students in Accra, Ghana. A cross-sectional study was conducted using structured questionnaires among 324 conveniently selected students enrolled at a privately owned tertiary institution in Accra, Ghana. The respondents consisted of 56.2% males and 43.8% females aged 17 - 37 years. The mean HIV/AIDS knowledge score of was 7.70. There was a significant difference in knowledge of HIV/AIDS by gender where female students had more knowledge about HIV/AIDS than males [t (322) = 2.40, p = 0.017]. The ANOVA results showed that there was a significant difference in HIV/AIDS knowledge according to the age groups [F (3, 321) = 6.26, p = 0. 0001] and marital status [F (3, 321) = 4.86, p = 0. 008] of the sample. Over half of the participants had not tested for HIV, although over 95% of them knew where to access counseling and testing services. The study also revealed a significant association between demographic variables, testing for HIV and intention to test in the future. Participants who were never married (single), aged 17 - 20 years and had knowledge of two routes of HIV transmission were more likely to have taken an HIV test. Males were more likely to take an HIV test in the future than females. Majority of the students receive HIV/AIDS information from both print and electronic media, but few of them received such information from parents. The students HIV knowledge was very good, yet HIV testing were low. Health education and HIV intervention programmes must not only provide accurate information, but must be made to help to equip private university students

  8. Aquifer test interpretation using derivative analysis and diagnostic plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Espriú, Antonio; Real-Rangel, Roberto; Cortés-Salazar, Iván; Castro-Herrera, Israel; Luna-Izazaga, Gabriela; Sánchez-León, Emilio

    2017-04-01

    Pumping tests remain a method of choice to deduce fundamental aquifer properties and to assess well condition. In the oil and gas (O&G) industry, well testing has been the core technique in examining reservoir behavior over the last 50 years. The pressure derivative by Bourdet, it is perhaps, the most significant single development in the history of well test analysis. Recently, the so-called diagnostics plots (e.g. drawdown and drawdown derivative in a log-log plot) have been successfully tested in aquifers. However, this procedure is still underutilized by groundwater professionals. This research illustrates the applicability range, advantages and drawbacks (e.g. smoothing procedures) of diagnostic plots using field examples from a wide spectrum of tests (short/long tests, constant/variable flow rates, drawdown/buildup stages, pumping well/observation well) in dissimilar geological conditions. We analyze new and pre-existent aquifer tests in Mexico, USA, Canada, Germany, France and Saudi Arabia. In constant flow rate tests, our results show that derivative analysis is an easy, robust and powerful tool to assess near-borehole damage effects, formation heterogeneity, boundaries, flow regimes, infinite-acting radial stages, i.e., valid Theisian framework, and fracture-driven flow. In step tests, the effectiveness relies on high-frequency drawdown measurements. Moreover, we adapt O&G analytical solutions to cater for the conditions in groundwater systems. In this context, further parameters can be computed analytically from the plots, such as skin factor, head losses, wellbore storage, distance to the boundary, channel-aquifer and/or fracture zone width, among others. Therefore, diagnostic plots should be considered a mandatory tool for pumping tests analysis among hydrogeologists. This project has been supported by DGAPA (UNAM) under the research project PAPIIT IN-112815.

  9. Accuracy and user-acceptability of HIV self-testing using an oral fluid-based HIV rapid test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oon Tek Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The United States FDA approved an over-the-counter HIV self-test, to facilitate increased HIV testing and earlier linkage to care. We assessed the accuracy of self-testing by untrained participants compared to healthcare worker (HCW testing, participants' ability to interpret sample results and user-acceptability of self-tests in Singapore. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study, involving 200 known HIV-positive patients and 794 unknown HIV status at-risk participants was conducted. Participants (all without prior self-test experience performed self-testing guided solely by visual instructions, followed by HCW testing, both using the OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV 1/2 Antibody Test, with both results interpreted by the HCW. To assess ability to interpret results, participants were provided 3 sample results (positive, negative, and invalid to interpret. Of 192 participants who tested positive on HCW testing, self-testing was positive in 186 (96.9%, negative in 5 (2.6%, and invalid in 1 (0.5%. Of 794 participants who tested negative on HCW testing, self-testing was negative in 791 (99.6%, positive in 1 (0.1%, and invalid in 2 (0.3%. Excluding invalid tests, self-testing had sensitivity of 97.4% (95% CI 95.1% to 99.7% and specificity of 99.9% (95% CI: 99.6% to 100%. When interpreting results, 96%, 93.1% and 95.2% correctly read the positive, negative and invalid respectively. There were no significant demographic predictors for false negative self-testing or wrongly interpreting positive or invalid sample results as negative. Eighty-seven percent would purchase the kit over-the-counter; 89% preferred to take HIV tests in private. 72.5% and 74.9% felt the need for pre- and post-test counseling respectively. Only 28% would pay at least USD15 for the test. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Self-testing was associated with high specificity, and a small but significant number of false negatives. Incorrectly identifying model results as

  10. Accuracy and user-acceptability of HIV self-testing using an oral fluid-based HIV rapid test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oon Tek; Chow, Angela L; Lee, Vernon J; Chen, Mark I C; Win, Mar Kyaw; Tan, Hiok Hee; Chua, Arlene; Leo, Yee Sin

    2012-01-01

    The United States FDA approved an over-the-counter HIV self-test, to facilitate increased HIV testing and earlier linkage to care. We assessed the accuracy of self-testing by untrained participants compared to healthcare worker (HCW) testing, participants' ability to interpret sample results and user-acceptability of self-tests in Singapore. A cross-sectional study, involving 200 known HIV-positive patients and 794 unknown HIV status at-risk participants was conducted. Participants (all without prior self-test experience) performed self-testing guided solely by visual instructions, followed by HCW testing, both using the OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV 1/2 Antibody Test, with both results interpreted by the HCW. To assess ability to interpret results, participants were provided 3 sample results (positive, negative, and invalid) to interpret. Of 192 participants who tested positive on HCW testing, self-testing was positive in 186 (96.9%), negative in 5 (2.6%), and invalid in 1 (0.5%). Of 794 participants who tested negative on HCW testing, self-testing was negative in 791 (99.6%), positive in 1 (0.1%), and invalid in 2 (0.3%). Excluding invalid tests, self-testing had sensitivity of 97.4% (95% CI 95.1% to 99.7%) and specificity of 99.9% (95% CI: 99.6% to 100%). When interpreting results, 96%, 93.1% and 95.2% correctly read the positive, negative and invalid respectively. There were no significant demographic predictors for false negative self-testing or wrongly interpreting positive or invalid sample results as negative. Eighty-seven percent would purchase the kit over-the-counter; 89% preferred to take HIV tests in private. 72.5% and 74.9% felt the need for pre- and post-test counseling respectively. Only 28% would pay at least USD15 for the test. Self-testing was associated with high specificity, and a small but significant number of false negatives. Incorrectly identifying model results as invalid was a major reason for incorrect result interpretation. Survey

  11. The Evaluation of Diagnostic Tests for Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max A Chernesky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic tests should receive method- and use-effectiveness evaluations. Method-effectiveness evaluations determine sensitivity, specificity and predictive values for new tests. Use-effectiveness evaluations determine how practical or convenient a new test will be in a specific setting and may not be performed in a formal way in North American laboratories. To perform a clinical method evaluation of diagnostic tests, a good relationship between laboratory and clinical personnel is essential. Studies are usually conducted separately on populations of men and women, and should include sampling from different prevalence groups. Test performance comparisons may be made on a single specimen type or on more than one specimen from the same patient, which allows for the expansion of a reference standard and includes the ability of a particular assay, performed on a specimen type to diagnose an infected individual. The following components of the evaluation should be standardized and carefully followed: specimen identification; collection; transportation; processing; quality control; reading; proficiency testing; confirmatory testing; discordant analysis -- sensitivity, specificity and predictive value calculations; and record keeping. Methods are available to determine whether sample results are true or false positives or negatives. Use-effectiveness evaluations might determine the stability or durability of supplies and equipment; the logistics of shipping, receiving and storing supplies; the clarity and completeness of test instructions; the time and effort required to process and read results; the subjectivity factors in interpretation and reporting; and the costs. These determinations are usually more apparent for commercial assays than for homemade tests.

  12. HIV testing among pregnant women living with HIV in India: are private healthcare providers routinely violating women's human rights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhivanan, Purnima; Krupp, Karl; Kulkarni, Vinay; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; Vaidya, Neha; Shaheen, Reshma; Philpott, Sean; Fisher, Celia

    2014-03-24

    In India, approximately 49,000 women living with HIV become pregnant and deliver each year. While the government of India has made progress increasing the availability of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) services, only about one quarter of pregnant women received an HIV test in 2010, and about one-in-five that were found positive for HIV received interventions to prevent vertical transmission of HIV. Between February 2012 to March 2013, 14 HIV-positive women who had recently delivered a baby were recruited from HIV positive women support groups, Government of India Integrated Counseling and Testing Centers, and nongovernmental organizations in Mysore and Pune, India. In-depth interviews were conducted to examine their general experiences with antenatal healthcare; specific experiences around HIV counseling and testing; and perceptions about their care and follow-up treatment. Data were analyzed thematically using the human rights framework for HIV testing adopted by the United Nations and India's National AIDS Control Organization. While all of the HIV-positive women in the study received HIV and PMTCT services at a government hospital or antiretroviral therapy center, almost all reported attending a private clinic or hospital at some point in their pregnancy. According to the participants, HIV testing often occurred without consent; there was little privacy; breaches of confidentiality were commonplace; and denial of medical treatment occurred routinely. Among women living with HIV in this study, violations of their human rights occurred more commonly in private rather than public healthcare settings. There is an urgent need for capacity building among private healthcare providers to improve standards of practice with regard to informed consent process, HIV testing, patient confidentiality, treatment, and referral of pregnant women living with HIV.

  13. Concordance in diagnostic testing for respiratory pathogens of bighorn sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel P.; Cassirer, E. Frances; Bonds, Michael D.; Brown, Daniel R.; Edwards, William H.; Weiser, Glen C.; Drew, Mark L.; Briggs, Robert E.; Fox, Karen A.; Miller, Michael W.; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Besser, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable diagnostic tests are essential for disease investigation and management. This is particularly true for diseases of free-ranging wildlife where sampling is logistically difficult precluding retesting. Clinical assays for wildlife diseases frequently vary among laboratories because of lack of appropriate standardized commercial kits. Results of diagnostic testing may also be called into question when investigators report different etiologies for disease outbreaks, despite similar clinical and pathologic findings. To evaluate reliability of diagnostic testing for respiratory pathogens of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), we conducted a series of ring tests across 6 laboratories routinely involved in detection of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, Pasteurellaceae, lktA (the Pasteurellaceae gene encoding leukotoxin), and 3 reference laboratories. Consistency of results for replicate samples within laboratories was high (median agreement = 1.0). Agreement between laboratories was high for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of M. ovipneumoniae and culture isolation of Mannheimia spp. and Bibersteinia trehalosi(median agreement = 0.89–0.95, Kappa = 0.65–0.74), and lower for PCR detection of Mannheimiaspp. lktA (median agreement = 0.58, Kappa = 0.12). Most errors on defined status samples were false negatives, suggesting test sensitivity was a greater problem than specificity. However, tests for M. haemolytica and lktA yielded some false positive results. Despite differences in testing protocols, median agreement among laboratories and correct classification of controls for most agents was ≥0.80, meeting or exceeding the standard required by federal proficiency testing programs. This information is valuable for interpreting test results, laboratory quality assessments, and advancing diagnosis of respiratory disease in wild sheep. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Background review for diagnostic test development for Zika virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrel, Rémi N; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Pas, Suzan; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Koopmans, Marion; Reusken, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the state of knowledge about diagnostic testing for Zika virus infection and identify areas of research needed to address the current gaps in knowledge. Methods We made a non-systematic review of the published literature about Zika virus and supplemented this with information from commercial diagnostic test kits and personal communications with researchers in European preparedness networks. The review covered current knowledge about the geographical spread, pathogen characteristics, life cycle and infection kinetics of the virus. The available molecular and serological tests and biosafety issues are described and discussed in the context of the current outbreak strain. Findings We identified the following areas of research to address current knowledge gaps: (i) an urgent assessment of the laboratory capacity and capability of countries to detect Zika virus; (ii) rapid and extensive field validation of the available molecular and serological tests in areas with and without Zika virus transmission, with a focus on pregnant women; (iii) monitoring the genomic diversity of circulating Zika virus strains; (iv) prospective studies into the virus infection kinetics, focusing on diagnostic sampling (specimen types, combinations and timings); and (v) developing external quality assessments for molecular and serological testing, including differential diagnosis for similar viruses and symptom clusters. The availability of reagents for diagnostic development (virus strains and antigens, quantified viral ribonucleic acid) needs to be facilitated. Conclusion An international laboratory response is needed, including preparation of protocols for prospective studies to address the most pressing information needs. PMID:27516635

  15. Decliners of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling: Characteristics of participants who refused HIV testing in a population survey in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascalina Chanda-Kapata

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Strategies to improve HIV testing acceptance are necessary. Qualitative research is recommended to understand the reasons for testing refusals so that remedial interventions can be implemented.

  16. Improving prescribing practices with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burchett, Helen E D; Leurent, Baptiste; Baiden, Frank

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The overuse of antimalarial drugs is widespread. Effective methods to improve prescribing practice remain unclear. We evaluated the impact of 10 interventions that introduced rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs) on the use of tests and adherence to results in different contexts...... packages, supervision, supplies and community sensitisation. OUTCOME MEASURES: Analysis explored variation in: (1) uptake of mRDTs (% febrile patients tested); (2) provider adherence to positive mRDTs (% Plasmodium falciparum positive prescribed/given Artemisinin Combination Treatment); (3) provider...

  17. Evaluation Of Algorithms Of Anti- HIV Antibody Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paranjape R.S

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: Can alternate algorithms be used in place of conventional algorithm for epidemiological studies of HIV infection with less expenses? Objective: To compare the results of HIV sero- prevalence as determined by test algorithms combining three kits with conventional test algorithm. Study design: Cross â€" sectional. Participants: 282 truck drivers. Statistical analysis: Sensitivity and specificity analysis and predictive values. Results: Three different algorithms that do not include Western Blot (WB were compared with the conventional algorithm, in a truck driver population with 5.6% prevalence of HIV â€"I infection. Algorithms with one EIA (Genetic Systems or Biotest and a rapid test (immunocomb or with two EIAs showed 100% positive predictive value in relation to the conventional algorithm. Using an algorithm with EIA as screening test and a rapid test as a confirmatory test was 50 to 70% less expensive than the conventional algorithm per positive scrum sample. These algorithms obviate the interpretation of indeterminate results and also give differential diagnosis of HIV-2 infection. Alternate algorithms are ideally suited for community based control programme in developing countries. Application of these algorithms in population with low prevalence should also be studied in order to evaluate universal applicability.

  18. Challenges in implementing HIV load testing in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Wendy S; Marshall, Theresa M

    2010-04-15

    The South African antiretroviral treatment guidelines recommend the use of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) load testing for patient monitoring and, in particular, to assist in switching to second-line treatment regimens. There are significant challenges to implementing HIV load testing on the scale that is required in South Africa. To put this in context, approximately 560,000 HIV-infected individuals are receiving antiretroviral therapy, and program recommendations include viral load testing twice per year. Currently, a 3-tiered laboratory infrastructure exists with tertiary facilities and, to some extent, secondary laboratories able to implement quantitative HIV nucleic acid testing. Challenges include high sample volumes, transportation logistics from remote sites, costs, phlebotomy in children, a national skills shortage, and sample throughput of technology platforms. Several approaches are thus being explored simultaneously: (1) the feasibility of establishing higher throughput and more automated central laboratories; (2) improvement of current sample collection, transportation, and storage techniques; (3) alternative viral load technologies, including flow-based marker screening approaches to reduce testing volumes, and (4) point-of-care viral load testing strategies for clinics. The development of appropriate solutions for each laboratory tier in South Africa will require close collaboration between researchers in the field and partners in industry.

  19. Rationale and design of FORTH: a randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of HIV self-testing in increasing HIV testing frequency among gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Muhammad S; Prestage, Garrett; Fairley, Christopher K; Smith, Kirsty S; Kaldor, John M; Grulich, Andrew E; McNulty, Anna M; Chen, Marcus; Holt, Martin; Conway, Damian P; Wand, Handan; Keen, Phillip; Batrouney, Colin; Bradley, Jack; Bavinton, Benjamin R; Ryan, Dermot; Russell, Darren; Guy, Rebecca J

    2015-12-10

    Gay and bisexual men (GBM) are a major risk group for HIV acquisition, yet the majority of higher-risk GBM test for HIV less often than recommended (3-6 monthly). HIV self-testing has the potential to increase testing frequency and improve awareness of personal HIV status. HIV self-tests have been approved in some countries, however there are concerns whether self-testing would increase HIV testing frequency enough to compensate for the reduced sensitivity of self-tests in early infection. We describe here a randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of self-testing in increasing HIV testing frequency among higher-risk GBM, and its acceptability. Participants are higher-risk HIV negative GBM (>5 partners or condomless anal intercourse in previous 3 months; n = 350), including 50 GBM who tested for HIV over two years ago or never tested before ('infrequent-testers'). Participants are recruited from sexual health clinics and community-based organisations, and randomised 1:1 to either self-testing or standard-care (routine clinic-based testing) arms. The trial employs a wait-list control design: participants in the standard-care arm switch to self-testing arm in the second year, and gain access to self-test kits. Participants in the self-testing arm receive four oral-fluid self-test kits at enrolment, with additional kits provided on request. Demographics, sexual behaviour and HIV testing preferences are collected at baseline, and the frequency and pattern of HIV and sexually transmissible infection (STI) testing is collected via online 3-monthly questionnaires. The acceptability of self-testing is assessed at 12 months via an online questionnaire and in-depth interviews. A 24-h telephone support is provided, with expedited follow-up of those with reactive self-test results. The primary outcome is HIV testing frequency (mean number of HIV tests per person) over 12 months, and the secondary outcomes are: mean number of STI tests (chlamydia

  20. A rapid ultrasound particle agglutination method for HIV antibody detection: Comparison with conventional rapid HIV tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystryak, Simon; Ossina, Natalya

    2017-11-01

    We present the results of the feasibility and preliminary studies on analytical performance of a rapid test for detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies in human serum or plasma that is an important advance in detecting HIV infection. Current methods for rapid testing of antibodies against HIV are qualitative and exhibit poor sensitivity (limit of detection). In this paper, we describe an ultrasound particle agglutination (UPA) method that leads to a significant increase of the sensitivity of conventional latex agglutination tests for HIV antibody detection in human serum or plasma. The UPA method is based on the use of: 1) a dual mode ultrasound, wherein a first single-frequency mode is used to accelerate the latex agglutination process, and then a second swept-frequency mode of sonication is used to disintegrate non-specifically bound aggregates; and 2) a numerical assessment of results of the agglutination process. The numerical assessment is carried out by optical detection and analysis of moving patterns in the resonator cell during the swept-frequency mode. The single-step UPA method is rapid and more sensitive than the three commercial rapid HIV test kits analyzed in the study: analytical sensitivity of the new UPA method was found to be 510-, 115-, and 80-fold higher than that for Capillus™, Multispot™ and Uni-Gold™ Recombigen HIV antibody rapid test kits, respectively. The newly developed UPA method opens up additional possibilities for detection of a number of clinically significant markers in point-of-care settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Advancing the development of diagnostic tests and biomarkers for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasinskaya, Y; Plikaytis, B; Sizemore, C; Sacks, L

    2011-07-01

    High costs and limited returns on investment have hampered progress in developing new diagnostic tests and treatments for tuberculosis (TB). We need new biomarkers to develop assays that can rapidly, efficiently and reliably detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease, identify drug resistance and expedite drug and vaccine development. This can only be accomplished through cross-disciplinary collaborations to facilitate access to human specimens. The Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, the industry and academia experts came together in a June 2010 workshop to examine the field of TB diagnostic test development and biomarker discovery, identify areas of most urgent need and formulate strategies to address those needs.

  2. Bedside paediatric HIV testing in Malawi: Impact on testing rates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... Centre for Medical Education, Queens University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom. Introduction. HIV prevalence in children under the age of 15 in Malawi in 2015 was estimated to be 84,000.1 Sixty-one percent of children eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) actually received this intervention, compared ...

  3. Structural inequalities drive late HIV diagnosis: The role of black racial concentration, income inequality, socioeconomic deprivation, and HIV testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransome, Yusuf; Kawachi, Ichiro; Braunstein, Sarah; Nash, Denis

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, research is limited on the mechanisms that link socioeconomic and structural factors to HIV diagnosis outcomes. We tested whether neighborhood income inequality, socioeconomic deprivation, and black racial concentration were associated with gender-specific rates of HIV in the advanced stages of AIDS (i.e., late HIV diagnosis). We then examined whether HIV testing prevalence and accessibility mediated any of the associations above. Neighborhoods with highest (relative to lowest) black racial concentration had higher relative risk of late HIV diagnosis among men (RR=1.86; 95%CI=1.15, 3.00) and women (RR=5.37; 95% CI=3.16, 10.43) independent of income inequality and socioeconomic deprivation. HIV testing prevalence and accessibility did not significantly mediate the associations above. Research should focus on mechanisms that link black racial concentration to HIV diagnosis outcomes. PMID:27770671

  4. The indication area of a diagnostic test. Part I-discounting gain and loss in diagnostic certainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, L.J.; Nelemans, P.J.; Geurts, S.M.; Jansen, E.; Boer, P.; Verbeek, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Test performance is conventionally expressed by gain in diagnostic certainty. We propose net diagnostic gain and indication area as more appropriate measures of test performance; then, the loss in certainty due to misclassification and the information of "no test" would be performed are

  5. DIAGNOSTIC TEST FOR GARCH MODELS BASED ON ABSOLUTE RESIDUAL AUTOCORRELATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhat Iqbal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the asymptotic distribution of the absolute residual autocorrelations from generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic (GARCH models is derived. The correct asymptotic standard errors for the absolute residual autocorrelations are also obtained and based on these results, a diagnostic test for checking the adequacy of GARCH-type models are developed. Our results do not depend on the existence of higher moments and is therefore robust under heavy-tailed distributions.

  6. Diagnostic testing: a key component of high-value care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucien J. Cardinal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This is the fourth article of a series on fundamental concepts in biostatistics and research. In this article, the author reviews the fundamental concepts in diagnostic testing, sensitivity, and specificity and how they relate to the concept of high-value care. The topics are discussed in common language, with a minimum of jargon and mathematics, and with clinical examples. Emphasis is given to conceptual understanding. A companion article will follow focusing on predictive value and prior probability.

  7. Diagnostic Tests for Alzheimer's Disease: Rationale, Methodology, and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    S. E. Mason; McShane, R.; Ritchie, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    There has been a large increase in the amount of research seeking to define or diagnose Alzheimer's disease before patients develop dementia. If successful, this would principally have clinical benefits both in terms of treatment as well as risk modification. Moreover, a better method for diagnosing predementia disease would assist research which seeks to develop such treatments and risk modification strategies. The evidence-based definition of a diagnostic test's accuracy is fundamental to a...

  8. Rapid diagnostic tests for typhoid and paratyphoid (enteric) fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijedoru, Lalith; Mallett, Sue; Parry, Christopher M

    2017-01-01

    Background Differentiating both typhoid (Salmonella Typhi) and paratyphoid (Salmonella Paratyphi A) infection from other causes of fever in endemic areas is a diagnostic challenge. Although commercial point-of-care rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for enteric fever are available as alternatives to the current reference standard test of blood or bone marrow culture, or to the widely used Widal Test, their diagnostic accuracy is unclear. If accurate, they could potentially replace blood culture as the World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended main diagnostic test for enteric fever. Objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of commercially available rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and prototypes for detecting Salmonella Typhi or Paratyphi A infection in symptomatic persons living in endemic areas. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index, IndMED, African Index Medicus, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) up to 4 March 2016. We manually searched WHO reports, and papers from international conferences on Salmonella infections. We also contacted test manufacturers to identify studies. Selection criteria We included diagnostic accuracy studies of enteric fever RDTs in patients with fever or with symptoms suggestive of enteric fever living in endemic areas. We classified the reference standard used as either Grade 1 (result from a blood culture and a bone marrow culture) or Grade 2 (result from blood culture and blood polymerase chain reaction, or from blood culture alone). Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted the test result data. We used a modified QUADAS-2 extraction form to assess methodological quality. We performed a meta-analysis when there were sufficient studies for the test and heterogeneity was reasonable. Main results Thirty-seven studies met the inclusion

  9. [Rapid diagnostic tests for the serodiagnosis of human cystic echinococcosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarozzi, F; Mariconti, M; Covini, I; Brunetti, E

    2017-02-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a parasitic zoonosis especially affecting resource-poor populations in livestock raising areas. Imaging, in particular ultrasound (US), is crucial for the diagnosis, staging, and clinical management of abdominal CE in humans. Serology is a valuable complement to imaging, especially when ultrasound features of CE are absent or unclear. In rural endemic areas, where expertise in US is scant, and conventional serology techniques are unavailable due to lack of laboratory equipment, rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) may be very useful. Several reports have described the performance of commercial and experimental RDTs in the diagnosis of CE, including a recent study by our group that compared the diagnostic performances of three commercial RDTs for the diagnosis of hepatic CE. To put RDTs for CE in context, we reviewed the available literature in English on this topic. Overall, RDTs appear to be useful in resourcepoor settings where they may replace conventional serodiagnostic tests. However, like other serodiagnostic tests, RDTs lack standardization and show unsatisfactory sensitivity and specificity. An important issue that needs to be addressed is that studies on the diagnostic performance of RDTs fail to take into account the variables known to influence results such as anatomical location and cyst stage.

  10. A general diagnostic model applied to language testing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Davier, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    Probabilistic models with one or more latent variables are designed to report on a corresponding number of skills or cognitive attributes. Multidimensional skill profiles offer additional information beyond what a single test score can provide, if the reported skills can be identified and distinguished reliably. Many recent approaches to skill profile models are limited to dichotomous data and have made use of computationally intensive estimation methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo, since standard maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques were deemed infeasible. This paper presents a general diagnostic model (GDM) that can be estimated with standard ML techniques and applies to polytomous response variables as well as to skills with two or more proficiency levels. The paper uses one member of a larger class of diagnostic models, a compensatory diagnostic model for dichotomous and partial credit data. Many well-known models, such as univariate and multivariate versions of the Rasch model and the two-parameter logistic item response theory model, the generalized partial credit model, as well as a variety of skill profile models, are special cases of this GDM. In addition to an introduction to this model, the paper presents a parameter recovery study using simulated data and an application to real data from the field test for TOEFL Internet-based testing.

  11. Stage of HIV presentation at initial clinic visit following a community-based HIV testing campaign in rural Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Haskew, John; Turner, Kenrick; Rø, Gunnar; Ho, Andrew; Kimanga, Davies; Sharif, Shahnaaz

    2015-01-01

    Background The Kenyan Ministry of Health and partners implemented a community-based integrated prevention campaign (IPC) in Western Kenya in 2008. The aim of this study was to determine whether the IPC, compared to Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) services, was able to identify HIV positive individuals earlier in the clinical course of HIV infection following testing. Methods A total of 1,752 adults aged over 15 years who tested HIV positive through VCT services or the IPC, and subsequ...

  12. Acceptability of routine offer of HIV testing (opt-out approach) among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: With the introduction of the opt out HIV testing policy in Ghana, the HIV test is offered routinely to all pregnant women unless they decline testing. Objective: To assess acceptability of the routine offer of HIV testing antenatal clinic (ANC) clients in the Wa municipality, Ghana. Design: Cross-sectional study of 270 ...

  13. Measuring Health Literacy Among Adults with HIV Infection in Mozambique: Development and Validation of the HIV Literacy Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tique, José A; Howard, Leigh M; Gaveta, Sandra; Sidat, Mohsin; Rothman, Russell L; Vermund, Sten H; Ciampa, Philip J

    2017-03-01

    The role of health literacy on HIV outcomes has not been evaluated widely in Africa, in part because few appropriate literacy measures exist. We developed a 16-item scale, the HIV Literacy Test (HIV-LT) to assess literacy-related tasks needed to participate in HIV care. Items were scored as correct or incorrect; higher scores indicated higher literacy skill (range 0-100 %). We tested internal reliability (Kuder-Richardson coefficient) of the HIV-LT in a convenience sample of 319 Portuguese-speaking, HIV infected adults on antiretroviral treatment in Maputo, Mozambique. Construct validity was assessed by a hypothetical model developed a priori. The HIV-LT was reliable and valid to measure participants' literacy skills. The mean HIV-LT score was 42 %; literacy skills applicable to HIV care were challenging for many participants. The HIV-LT could be used to assess the relationship of literacy and HIV-related outcomes in diverse settings, and evaluate interventions to improve health communication for those in HIV care.

  14. Clonality Testing in Veterinary Medicine: A Review With Diagnostic Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, S M; Vernau, W; Moore, P F

    2016-07-01

    The accurate distinction of reactive and neoplastic lymphoid proliferations can present challenges. Given the different prognoses and treatment strategies, a correct diagnosis is crucial. Molecular clonality assays assess rearranged lymphocyte antigen receptor gene diversity and can help differentiate reactive from neoplastic lymphoid proliferations. Molecular clonality assays are commonly used to assess atypical, mixed, or mature lymphoid proliferations; small tissue fragments that lack architecture; and fluid samples. In addition, clonality testing can be utilized to track neoplastic clones over time or across anatomic sites. Molecular clonality assays are not stand-alone tests but useful adjuncts that follow clinical, morphologic, and immunophenotypic assessment. Even though clonality testing provides valuable information in a variety of situations, the complexities and pitfalls of this method, as well as its dependency on the experience of the interpreter, are often understated. In addition, a lack of standardized terminology, laboratory practices, and interpretational guidelines hinders the reproducibility of clonality testing across laboratories in veterinary medicine. The objectives of this review are twofold. First, the review is intended to familiarize the diagnostic pathologist or interested clinician with the concepts, potential pitfalls, and limitations of clonality testing. Second, the review strives to provide a basis for future harmonization of clonality testing in veterinary medicine by providing diagnostic guidelines. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. HIV Testing Among Teens Attending Therapeutic Schools: Having a Personal Source of Information About HIV/AIDS Matters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Rebecca R; Houck, Christopher; Sarfati, David; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri; Brown, Larry K

    2015-06-01

    Being informed and using positive coping strategies are associated with engaging in health-promoting behaviors. We assessed whether the type of information source about HIV (personal or impersonal) and coping strategies (optimism, avoidance, or emotion-focused) are associated with HIV testing among adolescents attending therapeutic schools. Participants were 417 adolescents, ages 13-19, who attended one of 20 therapeutic day schools for emotionally/behaviorally disordered youth in two US cities (Providence, RI and Chicago, IL) and completed a baseline assessment for an HIV prevention study. Among adolescents in the study, 29% reported having been tested for HIV. Adolescents were more likely to have been tested if they were older, female, Hispanic, identified as non-heterosexual, came from lower SES households, and had recently had unprotected sex. Additionally, youth who endorsed greater use of optimistic thinking and emotion-focused coping, and who reported having been informed about HIV by more personal sources, were also more likely to have been tested for HIV. In a multivariate analysis, having had recent unprotected sex and having more personal sources of information about HIV/AIDS were independently associated with HIV testing. Study findings suggest that, controlling for sociodemographic background, sexual risk behavior, and coping strategy, HIV testing among adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems may be increased when adolescents learn about HIV/AIDS from personal sources such as their healthcare providers, family, and friends.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of a repeat HIV test in pregnancy in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Smita; Kulkarni, Vinay; Gangakhedkar, Raman; Mahajan, Uma; Sharma, Sushma; Shirole, Devendra; Chandhiok, Nomita

    2015-06-11

    To evaluate cost-effectiveness of second HIV test in pregnancy. Current strategy of single HIV test during pregnancy in India can miss new HIV infections acquired after the first test or those HIV infections that were missed in the first test due to a false-negative HIV test. Between August 2011 and April 2013, 9097 pregnant HIV uninfected women were offered a second HIV test near term (34 weeks or beyond) or within 4 weeks of postpartum period. A decision analysis model was used to evaluate cost-effectiveness of a second HIV test in pregnant women near term. Our key outcome measures include programme cost with addition of second HIV test in pregnant women and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. We detected 4 new HIV infections in the second test. Thus HIV incidence among pregnant women was 0.12 (95% 0.032 to 0.297) per 100 person women years (PWY). Current strategy of a single HIV test is 8.2 times costlier for less QALYs gained as compared to proposed repeat HIV testing of pregnant women who test negative during the first test. Our results warrant consideration at the national level for including a second HIV test of all pregnant women in the national programme. However prior to allocation of resources for a second HIV test in pregnancy, appropriate strategies will have to be planned for improving compliance for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and reducing loss-to-follow-up of those women detected with HIV. CTRI/2013/12/004183. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Rethinking HIV exceptionalism: the ethics of opt-out HIV testing in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Opt-out testing for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incorporates testing as a routine part of health care for all patients unless they refuse. The ethics of this approach to testing in sub-Saharan Africa is a source of controversy. Opt-out HIV testing is expected to improve survival by increasing case detection and thus linking more HIV-infected people to earlier treatment, provided there is effective patient follow-up and programme sustainability. At the population level, these benefits will likely outweigh the potential negative consequences of individuals experiencing HIV-related stigma. These justifications appeal to consequentialist moral theories that the acceptability of an action depends upon its outcomes. On the other hand, liberal moral theories state that the autonomy of individuals should always be protected unless restricting autonomy is necessary to protect the welfare of others. Opt-out consent may restrict autonomy and it is unclear whether it would benefit people other than those being tested. Yet, the doctrine of libertarian paternalism proposes that it is justifiable and desirable to use unobtrusive mechanisms to help individuals make choices to maximize their own welfare. Central to this idea are the premises featured by supporters of opt-out consent that individuals will not always make the best choices for their own welfare but they may be influenced to do so in ways that will not compromise their freedom of choice. Also important is the premise that all policies inevitably exert some such influence: opt-in consent encourages test refusal just as opt-out consent encourages acceptance. Based on these premises, opt-out testing may be an effective and ethically acceptable policy response to Africa’s HIV epidemic. PMID:20865076

  18. HIV testing among patients infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae: STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Heather; Asbel, Lenore; Bernstein, Kyle; Mattson, Melanie; Pathela, Preeti; Mohamed, Mukhtar; Samuel, Michael C; Schwebke, Jane; Stenger, Mark; Tabidze, Irina; Zenilman, Jonathan; Dowell, Deborah; Weinstock, Hillard

    2013-03-01

    We used data from the STD Surveillance Network to estimate HIV testing among patients being tested or treated for gonorrhea. Of 1,845 gonorrhea-infected patients identified through nationally notifiable disease data, only 51% were tested for HIV when they were tested or treated for gonorrhea. Among the 10 geographic sites in this analysis, the percentage of patients tested for HIV ranged from 22-63% for men and 20-79% for women. Nearly 33% of the un-tested patients had never been previously HIV-tested. STD clinic patients were more likely to be HIV-tested than those in other practice settings.

  19. HIV test counselling at a tertiary hospital | Louw | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A questionnaire was distributed to 64 of the 78 interns working at a teaching hospital in Cape Town in August 1992 to examine their attitudes and practice in respect of HIV test counselling. The questionnaire was completed by 61 interns. Thirteen per cent of those who responded counselled all patients, 49% counselled ...

  20. Barriers and facilitators associated with HIV testing uptake in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major barriers to HCT uptake comprise being scared of finding out one's HIV test result or what people may say, shyness or embarrassment, avoidance of divulging personal information to health workers and fear of death. In multivariate analysis the age group 55 years and older, and not being recommended to have an HIV ...

  1. Legal and ethical implications of opt-out HIV testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssens, Catherine

    2007-12-15

    New guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that opt-out screening for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) without written patient consent be part of routine clinical care and imply that state HIV-associated laws in conflict with this approach should be amended. However, HIV testing and treatment issues are governed by a range of federal and state laws, common law principles, constitutional provisions, and various codes of ethics. Patient testing protocols should satisfy the legal definition of informed consent, to reduce risk of liability for providers (i.e., health care professionals and facilities). Rigid application of the new guidelines may trigger legal claims, especially if there is no link to care for persons with a positive test result, no proof of informed consent, or inadequate counseling. Ensuring confidentiality, better test training for providers, and provider collaboration with HIV service organizations can reduce the risk of patient claims, but state and federal laws, codes of ethics, and concerns about provider liability should temper reflexive wholesale adoption of guidelines that recommend opt-out screening.

  2. HIV counseling and testing uptake among adults in Amhara region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A secondary data analysis was carried out on Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey 2005 and 2011 records. In the study 6564 (age 15-49 years) study subjects were included. Spatial data of Amhara region was integrated and analyzed with data mining techniques. HIV testing uptake coverage was much lower (2%) in ...

  3. Willingness to accept HIV testing among caretakers with a child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the willingness to accept HIV testing among caretakers who bring a child to the University Teaching Hospital Paediatric department. Design: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that was conducted over a period of two months from September 2009 to October 2009 in the Paediatrics ...

  4. Determinants of HIV Testing Among Sexually Active Young People ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study used data from the 2013 Zambia Demographic Health Survey (ZDHS) based on a nationally representative sample carried out by Central Statistical Office of Zambia. This paper analyzed a special module designed to collect information on the extent of the uptake of HIV testing by sexually active young people in ...

  5. hiv testing and arv prophylaxis for newborns without their mothers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-06-19

    Jun 19, 2008 ... HIV TESTING AND ARV PROPHYLAXIS FOR. NEWBORNS WITHOUT THEIR MOTHERS'. CONSENT. AN ETHICAL AND RIGHTS-BASED APPROACH. A woman's constitutional rights to privacy, reproductive choice and bodily autonomy are all too often violated and require adequate legal protection. Also ...

  6. Attitude towards mandatory pre-marital HIV testing among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the attitude of unmarried youths towards Mandatory Premarital HIV Testing (MPHT) in Ibadan Northwest Local Government Area. A three-stage sampling technique was used to select 571unmarried youths from households. A validated questionnaire was used for the collection of the data. Descriptive ...

  7. Attitude Towards Mandatory Pre-Marital HIV Testing Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    This study assessed the attitude of unmarried youths towards Mandatory Premarital HIV Testing (MPHT) in Ibadan. Northwest Local Government Area. A three-stage sampling technique was used to select 571unmarried youths from households. A validated questionnaire was used for the collection of the data. Descriptive ...

  8. Determinants of acceptance of voluntary HIV testing among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-09-10

    Objective: The objective of this study was to identify factors that determine the acceptance of voluntary HIV testing among pregnant women attending antenatal care at Dil Chora Hospital in Dire Dawa. Method: The study employed unmatched case control study which was conducted from August 20 to September 10, 2006.

  9. Barriers to HIV testing among adolescents in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Morales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most teenagers and young people do not consistently use condoms during sex, exposing themselves to HIV. Early diagnosis of the virus increases the survival rate and reduces new infections. Attitude towards HIV testing (HT and the main barriers to testing remain unknown. The main objective of the study was to explore the attitude towards HT and identify the main barriers of those who had never undergone HT before. This study involved 992 adolescents (16-20 years, who were recruited from 4 autonomous regions of Spain. The mean age was 16.84 (SD=.92 and 54.6% were women. The attitude towards HT was very favorable, especially in women. 79.2% of sexually active participants did not consistently use condoms during sex; however only 1% (n=11 reported having undergone HT. The main perceived barriers were related to not having received the offer to get tested (49%, low risk perception (32.6% and trust between sexual partners (29.1%. Facilitating access of the HIV screening test to adolescents with high sexual risk is crucial to the success of early detection campaigns, and curb the spread of the HIV.

  10. Quality of HIV laboratory testing in Tanzania: a situation analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    December 2004 to February 2005 in 12 laboratories which were conveniently selected to represent all the zones of Tanzania. The questionnaires comprised of questions on laboratory particulars, internal and external quality control for HIV testing and quality control of reagents. Source and level of customer satisfaction of ...

  11. Mantoux skin test reactivity among household contacts of hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To compare the prevalence of Tuberculosis (TB) infection as demonstrated by a positive Mantoux skin test (MST) among household contacts of sputum smear positive (SSP) HIV infected and un-infected TB patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study of household contacts of patients with TB (index cases) attending ...

  12. Utilization of HIV Testing and Counseling in Ghana: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV testing and counselling (HTC) is a gateway to all systems of AIDS-related care. This study examined national programme data to highlight gaps in HTC service utilization, regional differences and differential use of various HTC programs in Ghana in the period, 2007-2010. Analysis showed HTC increased rapidly across ...

  13. Effects of mortality salience and perceived vulnerability on HIV testing intentions and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Kristin W; Miller, Carol T

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that death thoughts that occur in response to health threats affect subsequent health behaviour. The present study examined the effects of mortality salience on HIV testing. After reading an article that was intended to make them perceive that they had high or low vulnerability to HIV, participants wrote about death or an aversive control topic. Participants then indicated their intentions to get tested for HIV and were given the opportunity to take an HIV test at the end of the study. Results showed that mortality salience increased testing behaviour among participants who were made to feel vulnerable to HIV, but decreased testing behaviour among participants who were not made to feel vulnerable to HIV infection. This research suggests that HIV prevention programmes must carefully consider how the association many people make between HIV and death may interact with people's perceptions of their vulnerability to HIV infection to affect their willingness to engage in preventative behaviours.

  14. Perceptions of door-to-door HIV counselling and testing in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to-door HIV testing, including convenience, confidentiality, capacity to increase the number of people tested, and opportunities to increase knowledge of HIV transmission, prevention and care through provision of correct information to ...

  15. Evaluation of the Bio-Rad Geenius HIV-1/2 test as a confirmatory assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, Isabel; Eykmans, Joelle; Delforge, Marie-Luce

    2014-08-01

    We have evaluated the recently Conformité Européenne (CE)-marked Bio-Rad Geenius human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)1/2 as a rapid and simple alternative to western blot for confirmation of HIV screening results. A total of 160 serum samples were tested: 44 HIV-1 reactive samples by a fourth-generation Murex HIV Ag/Ab and/or Vidas HIV Duo Ultra, five HIV-2 reactive samples, 15 HIV-1 non-B subtype samples and 11 confirmed HIV-1 early seroconversion samples, 72 nonreactive samples, eight indeterminate samples by MP HIV BLOT 2.2 confirmed negative after follow-up and five low-reactive samples by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) negative by MP HIV BLOT 2.2. The samples were tested according to the manufacturer's guidelines. The overall sensitivity for Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 assay was 92%. Five out of 11 early seroconversion samples were tested positive, four negative and two indeterminate. All HIV-1 non-B subtype samples were tested positive. Two out of the five HIV-2 reactive samples were tested positive HIV-2, two positive HIV-2 with HIV-1 cross-reaction and one HIV positive untypable. After excluding early seroconversion samples, the sensitivity of Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 assay reached 100%. Overall specificity was 96%. All HIV negative serums by fourth-generation EIA were tested negative. All five low-reactive samples by EIA, negative by HIV BLOT 2.2 were tested negative by Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2. Two out of the eight indeterminate samples by MP HIV BLOT 2.2 that were confirmed negative after follow-up were tested indeterminate and one invalid, the other five were negative. After excluding these last 13 samples, the specificity of Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 assay reached 100%. In comparison with MP HIV BLOT 2.2, the Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 assay was markedly time saving, allowed full traceability, automatic reading and interpretation. The Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 confirmatory system represents a reliable alternative to other confirmatory assays in HIV testing algorithms and

  16. Developing and Standardization of a Diagnostic Reading Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Sima-Shirazi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper is a report on the development, structure and content of a diagnostic dyslexia reading test. The target population of this test is persian children who have problems in learning reading and may be considered as dyslexic. This diagnostic test is the first reading test developed for the native speakers of persian. Materials & Methods: The theoretical framework of the test is based on two well- established reading tests for the English speaking children, namely Durrell Analysis of Reading and Neale Analysis of Reading Ability. The linguistic content of the subtests is selected from the vocabulary and texts of the textbook used in the primary schools. Both the vocabulary and the sentences of the parrallel passeges were controlled for frequency, phonemic/graphemic regularity, syllable structure, morphology, syntax and semantics. They were also controlled for value judgement by two linguistics and three first grader teachers.The first version of the test is normed on 605 boy and girl first graders from different educational sectors and schools selected randomly.The method used in this research is cross- sectional, descriptive- analytic and the data analysis is based on pearson, and mann-whitney u. Results: Reliability of the test is calculated based on parrallel forms (~ 90% and validity is based on content validity.This test has a supplementary section including spelling, graphem/ phoneme correspondness, nonword reading, irregular word reading, and copy subtests. Conclusion: Considering highreliability and precise validation of the test it can be used to diagnose the dyslexia and related linguistic impairments.

  17. False-negative post-18-month confirmatory HIV tests in HIV DNA PCR-positive children: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Prats, Anthony J; Draper, Heather R; Sanders, Jill E; Agrawal, Anurag K; Mohapi, Edith Q; Schutze, Gordon E

    2012-09-24

    The WHO guidelines for children less than 18 months old diagnosed with HIV based on presumptive clinical diagnosis or one virologic test recommend confirmatory HIV antibody testing after 18 months of age. This study describes post-18-month HIV test results following this WHO-recommended confirmatory testing strategy. Case series and retrospective review of routine program data. Children enrolled at the Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence, a pediatric and family HIV clinic in Maseru, Lesotho from December 2005 through January 2009 with a positive HIV DNA PCR at less than 18 months of age and HIV rapid test results after 18 months of age were included. Post-18-month confirmatory HIV test results are described. Factors associated with non-positive confirmatory rapid tests were determined using binary logistic regression. Of the 109 children meeting inclusion criteria, 22 (20.2%) had negative and 27 (24.8%) discordant confirmatory rapid tests. Forty-six of these 49 were on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Among these 49, 11 of 24 post-18-month HIV DNA PCRs were negative, whereas nine of 10 post-18-month HIV ELISAs were positive; 29 were definitively and 17 probably HIV-infected, two were uninfected, and one had undetermined status. Only age less than 9 months at ART initiation (odds ratio 4.25, P = 0.002) was associated with non-positive rapid tests. False-negative post-18-month confirmatory rapid tests and HIV DNA PCRs in children on ART are common, associated with early ART initiation, and may lead to inappropriate ART discontinuation and discharge from care of truly HIV-infected children.

  18. HIV Testing and Awareness of Partner's HIV Status Among Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men in Main Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chongyi; Yan, Hongjing; Raymond, H Fisher; Shi, Ling-En; Li, Jianjun; Yang, Haitao; McFarland, Willi

    2016-04-01

    Many men who have sex with men (MSM) do not use condoms with their main partners, especially if both parties are of the same HIV status. However, significant proportions of MSM have never tested or recently tested and are unaware of their main partners' HIV status. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 524 MSM in Jiangsu, China in 2013-2014. Time-location sampling and online convenience sampling were used to recruit participants. We compared awareness of HIV status and recent HIV testing between participants who had main partners versus those who did not, and identified factors associated with recent HIV testing among men in main partnerships. Participants in main partnerships were significantly more likely to report recent HIV testing and being HIV-negative instead of HIV-unknown compared to participants in casual partnerships only. Overall, 74.5 % of participants were aware of their main partners' HIV status. Among participants in main partnerships, those who had 2-5 male anal sex partners in the past 6 months and those who reported that their partners were HIV-negative had 2.36 (95 % CI 1.12, 4.97) and 4.20 (95 % CI 2.03, 8.70) fold greater odds of being tested in the past year compared to those who had main partners only and those whose partners were HIV-positive/unknown, respectively. Chinese MSM in main partnerships might be practicing serosorting and may be at lower risk for HIV infection due to increased awareness of main partners' HIV status and higher uptake of recent testing.

  19. Assessment of HIV-related stigma in a US faith-based HIV education and testing intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannette Y Berkley-Patton

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The African American church is a highly influential institution with the potential to greatly increase the reach of HIV prevention interventions and address HIV-related stigma in US African American communities. However, there are few studies on HIV-related stigma and African American church populations. This study explored HIV-related stigma among church and community members participating in an HIV education and testing intervention pilot study in African American churches, named Taking It to the Pews. Methods: Four African American churches located in Kansas City, MO and KS, were randomized to either intervention or comparison groups. Churches assigned to the intervention group received religiously tailored HIV education, testing and compassion messages/activities (e.g. sermons, brochures/church bulletins, testimonials via the Taking It to the Pews HIV Tool Kit. Comparison churches received non-religiously tailored HIV information. HIV-related stigma was assessed with 543 church members and with community members served through church outreach services (e.g. food/clothing pantries, social services in the four churches. Participants completed surveys at baseline, 6 months and 12 months to assess their HIV-related stigma beliefs, exposure to intervention components and satisfaction with the study. Results: At baseline, HIV-related stigma beliefs were similar across experimental groups and were quite low. Mean HIV-related stigma scores were not significantly different between experimental groups at 6 months (p=0.92 or at 12 months (p=0.70. However, mean HIV-related stigma scores within both groups showed decreasing trends at six months, which approached significance. Analysis of previously studied HIV-related stigma factors (e.g. age, gender, income, HIV knowledge, religiosity did not yield changes in the null findings. Intervention group participants were highly exposed to several intervention components (sermons, HIV resource

  20. "Inside These Fences Is Our Own Little World": Prison-Based HIV Testing and HIV-Related Stigma Among Incarcerated Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Rosen, David L; Farel, Claire E; White, Becky L; Filene, Eliza J; Wohl, David A

    2016-04-01

    Correctional facilities offer opportunities to provide comprehensive HIV services including education, testing, treatment, and coordination of post- release care. However, these services may be undermined by unaddressed HIV stigma. As part of a prison-based HIV testing study, we interviewed 76 incarcerated men and women from the North Carolina State prison system. The sample was 72% men, median age 31.5 years (range: 19 to 60). Thematic analysis revealed high levels of HIV-related fear and stigma, homophobia, incomplete HIV transmission knowledge, beliefs that HIV is highly contagious within prisons ("HIV miasma"), and the View of HIV testing as protective. Interviewees described social distancing behaviors and coping mechanisms they perceived to be protective, including knowing their HIV status and avoiding contact with others and shared objects. Interviewees endorsed universal testing, public HIV status disclosure, and segregation of HIV-positive inmates. Intensified education and counseling efforts are needed to ameliorate entrenched HIV-transmission fears and stigmatizing beliefs.

  1. The impact of HIV/AIDS stigma on HIV counseling and testing in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Men aged 15-54 and women aged 15-49 were selected for the study because these are the ages most at risk to HIV/AIDS. Data on socio-demographic, sexual and ..... UNGASS Country. Progress Report Uganda, January 2008-. December 2009, March 2010. 12. Sebudde S, Nangendo F. Voluntary counselling and testing ...

  2. "HIV Testing Is so Gay": The Role of Masculine Gender Role Conformity in HIV Testing among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Mike C.; Torrey, Carrie; Michaels, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) account for more than half of all new cases of HIV infection in the United States. Yet, many MSM are unaware of their HIV serostatus. Consistent with research indicating that gender role conformity impacts health behaviors, this study examined how masculine norms may influence HIV testing among MSM in the United…

  3. Spillover effects of HIV testing policies: changes in HIV testing guidelines and HCV testing practices in drug treatment programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemima A. Frimpong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the extent to which state adoption of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC 2006 revisions to adult and adolescent HIV testing guidelines is associated with availability of other important prevention and medical services. We hypothesized that in states where the pretest counseling requirement for HIV testing was dropped from state legislation, substance use disorder treatment programs would have higher availability of HCV testing services than in states that had maintained this requirement. Methods We analyzed a nationally representative sample of 383 opioid treatment programs from the 2005 and 2011 National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey (NDATSS. Data were collected from program directors and clinical supervisors through telephone surveys. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to measure associations between state adoption of CDC recommended guidelines for HIV pretest counseling and availability of HCV testing services. Results The effects of HIV testing legislative changes on HCV testing practices varied by type of opioid treatment program. In states that had removed the requirement for HIV pretest counseling, buprenorphine-only programs were more likely to offer HCV testing to their patients. The positive spillover effect of HIV pretest counseling policies, however, did not extend to methadone programs and did not translate into increased availability of on-site HCV testing in either program type. Conclusions Our findings highlight potential positive spillover effects of HIV testing policies on HCV testing practices. They also suggest that maximizing the benefits of HIV policies may require other initiatives, including resources and programmatic efforts that support systematic integration with other services and effective implementation.

  4. Performance of the Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag Test on Clinical Samples Representing Current Epidemic HIV Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Lemee, Véronique; Leoz, Marie; Etienne, Manuel; De Oliveira, Fabienne; Plantier, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Screening for HIV infection has improved since the first immunoassays. Today, diagnosis of HIV infection can be performed with fourth-generation tests that track both the patient's antibodies and HIV antigen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the new DiaSorin Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag assay compared to another fourth-generation assay, the Abbott Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo kit. This work was performed on a large panel of 900 samples, includ...

  5. Research Protocol - An Evaluation of False Positive HIV Results due to Testing Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Maparo, Tatenda; Mungofa, Stanley; Bara, Hilda T.; Chirisa, Florence

    2014-01-01

    An unacceptably high frequency of false positive HIV test results has been reported in various settings. Given the severity and implications of an HIV+ diagnosis, a false positive result is likely to be psychologically traumatic and may result in inappropriate and potentially harmful treatment. The current HIV testing algorithm being used in Zimbabwe does not include repeat testing for HIV positive results, and it is not currently known whether testing errors are leading to false positive dia...

  6. Evidence-based guidelines for universal counselling and offering of HIV testing in pregnancy in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Samson, L; King, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide Canadian health care workers with evidence-based guidelines for universal counselling about HIV testing and the offering of such testing to all pregnant women. OPTIONS: Universal counselling and offering of HIV testing to all pregnant women versus targeted testing of only pregnant women at high risk for HIV infection. Antiretroviral treatment protocols for HIV-positive mothers and their infants are discussed as the intervention to reduce mother-to-child transmission rate...

  7. HIV testing and counselling for migrant populations living in high-income countries: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez-del Arco, Debora; Monge, Susana; Azcoaga, Amaya; Rio, Isabel; Hernando, Victoria; Gonzalez, Cristina; Alejos, Belen; Caro, Ana Maria; Perez-Cachafeiro, Santiago; Ramirez-Rubio, Oriana; Bolumar, Francisco; Noori, Teymur; Del Amo, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Background: The barriers to HIV testing and counselling that migrants encounter can jeopardize proactive HIV testing that relies on the fact that HIV testing must be linked to care. We analyse available evidence on HIV testing and counselling strategies targeting migrants and ethnic minorities in high-income countries. Methods: Systematic literature review of the five main databases of articles in English from Europe, North America and Australia between 2005 and 2009. Results: Of 1034 abstrac...

  8. The emotional wellbeing of lay HIV counselling and testing counsellors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maretha; Mabota, Princess

    2015-01-01

    The HIV testing, treatment and care programme of the South African public healthcare system depends on HIV counselling and testing (HCT) that is primarily delivered by lay counsellors. Lay counsellors are expected to educate clients about HIV/AIDS, advocate behaviour change, convey test results and support those infected and affected to cope with the emotional and social challenges associated with HIV/AIDS. This research focuses on the emotional wellbeing of lay HCT counsellors because this influences the quality of services they provide. A mixed methods approach was used. The emotional wellbeing, level of burnout, depression and coping style of 50 lay HCT counsellors working at the City of Tshwane clinics were assessed. Additionally, five focus group discussions were conducted. The results showed that HCT counsellors reported average emotional wellbeing, high levels of emotional exhaustion and depression. They had a sense of personal accomplishment and positive coping skills. The results revealed that they may have difficulty dealing with clients' emotional distress without adequate training and supervision. This creates a dilemma for service delivery. In the light of the important role they play in service delivery, the role of the lay HCT counsellor needs to be reconsidered. HCT should develop as a profession with specific training and supervision to develop their emotional competencies to conduct effective counselling sessions.

  9. Watchful Waiting Strategy May Reduce Low-Value Diagnostic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Larissa; Franks, Peter; Jerant, Anthony; Fenton, Joshua

    PCPs need effective communication strategies to address patient requests for low-value testing while sustaining patient-provider partnerships. Watchful waiting - allowing a negotiated period of time to pass before making a firm testing decision - shows promise as a tool for addressing patient requests for low-value testing. Observational analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of a communication intervention designed to boost patient-centeredness and reduce low-value test ordering among 61 resident primary care physicians. Intervention effectiveness was assessed during follow-up encounters of unannounced standardized patients (SPs) who requested low-value tests. We examined associations between five physician counseling behaviors and overall patient-centeredness (Measure of Patient-Centered Communication) and requested test ordering. During 155 SP encounters, residents most commonly used reassurance (96% of encounters), evidence-based recommendations (97%), and watchful waiting (68 %). Resident advice to pursue watchful waiting was associated with 39% lower likelihood of test ordering (adjusted marginal effect of -38.6% [95% CI -43.6 to -33.6]). When all communication behaviors were examined together, only watchful waiting was significantly associated with test ordering (marginal effect of -38% [95% CI -44.3% to -31.7%]). Overall patient-centeredness was not associated with low-value testing. Resident physician counseling to pursue watchful waiting was associated with less ordering of requested low-value diagnostic tests, while overall patient-centeredness was not. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  10. HIV-related stigma, social norms, and HIV testing in Soweto and Vulindlela, South Africa: National Institutes of Mental Health Project Accept (HPTN 043).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sean D; Hlavka, Zdenek; Modiba, Precious; Gray, Glenda; Van Rooyen, Heidi; Richter, Linda; Szekeres, Greg; Coates, Thomas

    2010-12-15

    HIV testing is necessary to curb the increasing epidemic. However, HIV-related stigma and perceptions of low likelihood of societal HIV testing may reduce testing rates. This study aimed to explore this association in South Africa, where HIV rates are extraordinarily high. Data were taken from the Soweto and Vulindlela, South African sites of Project Accept, a multinational HIV prevention trial. Self-reported HIV testing, stigma, and social norms items were used to study the relationship between HIV testing, stigma, and perceptions about societal testing rates. The stigma items were broken into 3 factors: negative attitudes, negative perceptions about people living with HIV, and perceptions of fair treatment for people living with HIV (equity). Results from a univariate logistic regression suggest that history of HIV testing was associated with decreased negative attitudes about people living with HIV/AIDS, increased perceptions that people living with HIV/AIDS experience discrimination, and increased perceptions that people with HIV should be treated equitably. Results from a multivariate logistic regression confirm these effects and suggest that these differences vary according to sex and age. Compared with people who had never tested for HIV, those who had previously tested were more likely to believe that the majority of people have tested for HIV. Data suggest that interventions designed to increase HIV testing in South Africa should address stigma and perceptions of societal testing.

  11. Low HIV-testing rates and awareness of HIV infection among high-risk heterosexual STI clinic attendees in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bij, Akke K.; Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Fennema, Han S. A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Since 1999, HIV testing is routinely offered to all attendees of the sexually transmitted infections (STI) outpatient clinic in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. This study evaluates whether this more active HIV-testing policy increased uptake of HIV testing and awareness of an HIV-positive

  12. High HIV Prevalence, Suboptimal HIV Testing, and Low Knowledge of HIV-Positive Serostatus Among Injection Drug Users in St. Petersburg, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussova, Olga V.; Verevochkin, Sergei V.; Barbour, Russell; Heimer, Robert; Kozlov, Andrei P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to estimate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence and testing patterns among injection drug users (IDUs) in St. Petersburg, Russia. HIV prevalence among 387 IDUs in the sample was 50%. Correlates of HIV-positive serostatus included unemployment, recent unsafe injections, and history/current sexually transmitted infection. Seventy-six percent had been HIV tested, but only 22% of those who did not report HIV-positive serostatus had been tested in the past 12 months and received their test result. Correlates of this measure included recent doctor visit and having been in prison or jail among men. Among the 193 HIV-infected participants, 36% were aware of their HIV-positive serostatus. HIV prevalence is high and continuing to increase in this population. Adequate coverage of HIV testing has not been achieved, resulting in poor knowledge of positive serostatus. Efforts are needed to better understand motivating and deterring factors for HIV testing in this setting. PMID:18843531

  13. Technology diffusion and diagnostic testing for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeck, Florian R; Kaufman, Samuel R; Jacobs, Bruce L; Skolarus, Ted A; Miller, David C; Weizer, Alon Z; Montgomery, Jeffrey S; Wei, John T; Shahinian, Vahakn B; Hollenbeck, Brent K

    2013-11-01

    While the dissemination of robotic prostatectomy and intensity modulated radiotherapy may fuel the increased use of prostatectomy and radiotherapy, these new technologies may also have spillover effects related to diagnostic testing for prostate cancer. Therefore, we examined the association of regional technology penetration with the receipt of prostate specific antigen testing and prostate biopsy. In this retrospective cohort study we included 117,857 men 66 years old or older from the 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries living in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) areas from 2003 to 2007. Regional technology penetration was measured as the number of providers performing robotic prostatectomy or intensity modulated radiotherapy per population in a health care market, ie hospital referral region. We assessed the association of technology penetration with the prostate specific antigen testing rate and prostate biopsy using generalized estimating equations. High technology penetration was associated with an increased rate of prostate specific antigen testing (442 vs 425/1,000 person-years, ptechnology penetration on prostate specific antigen testing and prostate biopsy was much less than the effect of age, race and comorbidity, eg the prostate specific antigen testing rate per 1,000 person-years was 485 vs 373 for men with only 1 vs 3+ comorbid conditions (ptechnology penetration is associated with a slightly higher rate of prostate specific antigen testing and no change in the prostate biopsy rate. Collectively, our findings temper concerns that adopting new technology accelerates diagnostic testing for prostate cancer. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Toward a Reconceptualization of Communication Cues to Action in the Health Belief Model: HIV Test Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Marifran

    1999-01-01

    Examines the persuasive communication of HIV test counselors as cues to action in clients' decisions to practice safer sex. Indicates hypothesized relationships inherent in the Health Belief Model were not supported for the pre-HIV test survey, but the post-HIV test survey reported compliance with safer-sex recommendations. Finds use of certain…

  15. Repeat HIV testing during pregnancy and delivery: missed opportunities in a rural district hospital in Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemelaar, S.; Habets, N.; Makukula, Z.; van Roosmalen, J.; van den Akker, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess coverage of repeat HIV testing among women who delivered in a Zambian hospital. HIV testing of pregnant women and repeat testing every 3 months during pregnancy and breastfeeding is the recommended policy in areas of high HIV prevalence. Methods: A prospective implementation

  16. A clinical audit of provider-initiated HIV counselling and testing in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy reduces transmission of HIV and prolongs life. Expansion of HIV testing is therefore pivotal in overcoming the HIV pandemic. Provider-initiated counselling and testing (PICT) at first clinical contact is one way of increasing the number of individuals tested. Our impression is ...

  17. Rapid enzymatic test for phenotypic HIV protease drug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, D.; Assfalg-Machleidt, Irmgard; Nitschko, H; Helm, K. von der; Koszinowski, U.; Machleidt, Werner

    2003-01-01

    A phenotypic resistance test based on recombinant expression of the active HIV protease in E. coli from patient blood samples was developed. The protease is purified in a rapid onestep procedure as active enzyme and tested for inhibition by five selected synthetic inhibitors (amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, and saquinavir) used presently for chemotherapy of HIVinfected patients. The HPLC system used in a previous approach was replaced by a continuous fluorogenic assay suitable f...

  18. Stage of HIV presentation at initial clinic visit following a community-based HIV testing campaign in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskew, John; Turner, Kenrick; Rø, Gunnar; Ho, Andrew; Kimanga, Davies; Sharif, Shahnaaz

    2015-01-21

    The Kenyan Ministry of Health and partners implemented a community-based integrated prevention campaign (IPC) in Western Kenya in 2008. The aim of this study was to determine whether the IPC, compared to Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) services, was able to identify HIV positive individuals earlier in the clinical course of HIV infection following testing. A total of 1,752 adults aged over 15 years who tested HIV positive through VCT services or the IPC, and subsequently registered at initial clinic visit between September 2008 and September 2010, were considered in the analysis. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed to assess the association of CD4 count and WHO clinical stage of HIV infection at first clinic appointment with age group, gender, marital status and HIV testing source. Male gender and marital status were independently associated with late HIV presentation (WHO clinical stage 3 or 4 or CD4 count ≤ 350 cells/μl) at initial clinic visit. Patients testing HIV positive during the IPC had significantly higher mean CD4 count at initial clinic visit compared to individuals who tested HIV positive via VCT services. Patients testing HIV positive during the IPC had more than two times higher odds of presenting early with CD4 count greater than 350 cells/μl (adjusted OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.28 - 3.61, p = 0.004) and presenting early with WHO clinical stage 1 or 2 of HIV infection (adjusted OR 2.39, 95% CI 1.24 - 4.60, p = 0.01) at initial clinic visit compared to individuals who tested HIV positive via VCT services. The community-based integrated prevention campaign identified HIV positive individuals earlier in the course of HIV infection, compared to Voluntary Counselling and Testing services. Community-based campaigns, such as the IPC, may be able to assist countries to achieve earlier testing and initiation of ART in the course of HIV infection. Improving referral mechanisms and strengthening linkages between HIV testing and treatment

  19. Correlates of HIV testing among African American and Latino church congregants: the role of HIV stigmatizing attitudes and discussions about HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Laura M; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Kanouse, David E; Griffin, Beth Ann; Grifin, Beth Ann; Haas, Ann C; Williams, Malcolm V

    2015-02-01

    Faith-based organizations can be key settings in which to reach African Americans and Latinos for HIV prevention, but little is known regarding factors that predict congregants' HIV testing behaviors. We examined the extent to which sociodemographic factors, HIV-related cues to action (e.g., knowing someone who is HIV-positive), and the social climate surrounding HIV (stigma toward a hypothetical HIV-positive congregant, HIV-related discussions at church about abstinence, condoms, and testing) were associated with willingness to be tested in church and with ever having been tested among 1211 African American and Latino congregants. Multivariate analyses indicated that congregants were more open to church-based testing if they were younger and had discussed condoms at church. They were less open if they expressed stigmatizing attitudes toward a hypothetical congregant. Foreign-born Latinos with low English proficiency were more willing to be tested at church than were African Americans. Congregants were more likely to have ever been tested if they were younger, African American, female, or married; if they knew someone who was HIV-positive; and if they had discussed testing and condoms at church. They were less likely if they had discussed abstinence. Open dialogue around HIV may activate congregants to be more receptive to church-based prevention.

  20. DiagTest3Grp: An R Package for Analyzing Diagnostic Tests with Three Ordinal Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqin Luo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical researchers endeavor to identify potentially useful biomarkers to develop marker-based screening assays for disease diagnosis and prevention. Useful summary measures which properly evaluate the discriminative ability of diagnostic markers are critical for this purpose. Literature and existing software, for example, R packages nicely cover summary measures for diagnostic markers used for the binary case (e.g., healthy vs. diseased. An intermediate population at an early disease stage usually exists between the healthy and the fully diseased population in many disease processes. Supporting utilities for three-group diagnostic tests are highly desired and important for identifying patients at the early disease stage for timely treatments. However, application packages which provide summary measures for three ordinal groups are currently lacking. This paper focuses on two summary measures of diagnostic accuracy—volume under the receiver operating characteristic surface and the extended Youden index, with three diagnostic groups. We provide the R package DiagTest3Grp to estimate, under both parametric and nonparametric assumptions, the two summary measures and the associated variances, as well as the optimal cut-points for disease diagnosis. An omnibus test for multiple markers and a Wald test for two markers, on independent or paired samples, are incorporated to compare diagnostic accuracy across biomarkers. Sample size calculation under the normality assumption can be performed in the R package to design future diagnostic studies. A real world application evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of neuropsychological markers for Alzheimer’s disease is used to guide readers through step-by-step implementation of DiagTest3Grp to demonstrate its utility.

  1. Increased adolescent HIV testing with a hybrid mobile strategy in Uganda and Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadede, Kevin; Ruel, Theodore; Kabami, Jane; Ssemmondo, Emmanuel; Sang, Norton; Kwarisiima, Dalsone; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig R; Liegler, Teri; Clark, Tamara D; Charlebois, Edwin D; Petersen, Maya L; Kamya, Moses R; Havlir, Diane V; Chamie, Gabriel

    2016-09-10

    We sought to increase adolescent HIV testing across rural communities in east Africa and identify predictors of undiagnosed HIV. Hybrid mobile testing. We enumerated 116 326 adolescents (10-24 years) in 32 communities of Uganda and Kenya ( NCT01864603): 98 694 (85%) reported stable (≥6 months of prior year) residence. In each community we performed hybrid testing: 2-week multidisease community health campaign that included HIV testing, followed by home-based testing of community health campaign nonparticipants. We measured adolescent HIV testing coverage and prevalence, and determined predictors of newly diagnosed HIV among HIV-infected adolescents using multivariable logistic regression. A total of 86 421 (88%) stable adolescents tested for HIV; coverage was 86, 90, and 88% in early (10-14), mid (15-17), and late (18-24) adolescents, respectively. Self-reported prior testing was 9, 26, and 55% in early, mid, and late adolescents tested, respectively. HIV prevalence among adolescents tested was 1.6 and 0.6% in Ugandan women and men, and 7.1 and 1.5% in Kenyan women and men, respectively. Prevalence increased in mid-adolescence for women and late adolescence for men. Among HIV-infected adolescents, 58% reported newly diagnosed HIV. In multivariate analysis of HIV-infected adolescents, predictors of newly diagnosed HIV included male sex [odds ratio (OR) = 1.97 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42-2.73)], Ugandan residence [OR = 2.63 (95% CI: 2.08-3.31)], and single status [OR = 1.62 (95% CI: 1.23-2.14) vs. married)]. The SEARCH hybrid strategy tested 88% of stable adolescents for HIV, a substantial increase over the 28% reporting prior testing. The majority (57%) of HIV-infected adolescents were new diagnoses. Mobile HIV testing for adults should be leveraged to reach adolescents for HIV treatment and prevention.

  2. Impact of HIV testing and counseling (HTC) knowledge on HIV prevention practices among traditional birth attendants in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuji, Alice; Pharr, Jennifer R; Nwokoro, Uche; Ike, Anulika; Ali, Christiana; Ejiro, Ogheneaga; Osuyali, John; Obiefune, Michael; Fiscella, Kevin; Ezeanolue, Echezona E

    2015-02-10

    Nigeria is second in the world for the number of people with HIV and has a high rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Over 60% of births in Nigeria occur outside of health care facilities, and because of this, Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) play a significant role in maternal and child health. It is important that TBAs be knowledgeable about HIV prevention. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of HIV testing and counseling (HTC) knowledge on the HIV prevention practices among TBAs in Nigeria. Five hundred TBAs were surveyed. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to assess differences in HIV prevention practices between TBAs with and without HTC knowledge. TBAs with HTC knowledge are significantly more likely to engage in HIV prevention practices than TBAs without HTC. Prevention practices included: wearing gloves during delivery (p HTC training increases HIV prevention practices and can be a key to improve maternal and child health.

  3. 40 CFR 85.2231 - On-board diagnostic test equipment requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false On-board diagnostic test equipment... Warranty Short Tests § 85.2231 On-board diagnostic test equipment requirements. (a) The test system... be capable of checking for the monitors supported by the on-board diagnostic system and the...

  4. 40 CFR 85.2207 - On-board diagnostics test standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false On-board diagnostics test standards... Warranty Short Tests § 85.2207 On-board diagnostics test standards. (a) (b) A vehicle shall fail the on-board diagnostics test if it is a 1996 or newer vehicle and the vehicle connector is missing, has been...

  5. 40 CFR 85.2222 - On-board diagnostic test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false On-board diagnostic test procedures... Warranty Short Tests § 85.2222 On-board diagnostic test procedures. The test sequence for the inspection of on-board diagnostic systems on 1996 and newer light-duty vehicles and light-duty trucks shall consist...

  6. A compliance testing program for diagnostic X-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.E.; Cobb, B.J.; Jacob, C.S

    1999-01-01

    Compliance testing is nominally that part of a quality assurance program dealing with those aspects of X-ray equipment performance that are subject to radiation control legislation. Quality assurance programs for medical X-ray equipment should be an integral part of the quality culture in health care. However while major hospitals and individual medical centers may implement such programs with some diligence, much X-ray equipment can remain unappraised unless there is a comprehensive regulatory inspection program or some form of compulsion on the equipment owner to implement a testing program. Since the late 1950s all X-ray equipment in the State of Western Australia has been inspected by authorized officers acting on behalf of the Radiological Council, the regulatory authority responsible for administration of the State's Radiation Safety Act. However, economic constraints, coupled with increasing X-ray equipment numbers and a geographically large State have significantly affected the inspection rate. Data available from inspections demonstrate that regular compliance and performance checks are essential in order to ensure proper performance and to minimize unnecessary patient and operator dose. To ensure that diagnostic X-ray equipment complies with accepted standards and performance criteria, the regulatory authority introduced a compulsory compliance testing program for all medical, dental and chiropractic diagnostic X-ray equipment effective from 1 January 1997.

  7. The ethical significance of diagnostic test results in psychology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefler, Gaby; Ben Shakhar, Gershon; Bilu, Yoram

    2009-03-01

    "Psychologists base the opinions contained in their recommendations, reports and diagnostic or evaluative statements including forensic testimony on information and techniques sufficient to substantiate their findings". Do expert psychodiagnosticians rely in their professional final reports on the materials and raw data obtained from test materials? How ethical are they in their professional performances? In order to answer this question, expert clinical psychologists were given batteries of psychodiagnostic tests, accompanied by one of two different types of background information, suggesting either a Borderline Personality Disorder, or a Paranoid Personality Disorder. This background information was a full and strongly suggestive story in one experiment, and a mere hypothesis in another. All conditions manifested a confirmation bias: the psychodiagnostic reports were profoundly biased by the background suggestions. The present paper focuses on a content analysis of the reports, and shows that the experts referred very little if at all to the psychodiagnostic materials they received. They were found less professional and as a result- less ethical. The ethical relevance of these findings to the teaching and training of professional psychodiagnosticians is discussed, with an emphasis on the importance of teaching students and interns in clinical psychology to base their diagnostic reports on the test data.

  8. A Diagnostic Accuracy Study of Xpert®MTB/RIF in HIV-Positive Patients with High Clinical Suspicion of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriquiry, Gabriela; Otero, Larissa; González-Lagos, Elsa; Zamudio, Carlos; Sánchez, Eduardo; Nabeta, Pamela; Campos, Miguel; Echevarría, Juan; Seas, Carlos; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients remains complex and demands easy to perform and accurate tests. Xpert®MTB/RIF (MTB/RIF) is a molecular TB diagnostic test which is rapid and convenient; the test requires minimal human resources and reports results within two hours. The majority of performance studies of MTB/RIF have been performed in high HIV burden settings, thus TB diagnostic studies among HIV patients in low HIV prevalence settings such as Peru are still needed. Methodology/Principal Findings From April 2010 to May 2011, HIV-positive patients with high clinical suspicion of TB were enrolled from two tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. Detection of TB by MTB/RIF was compared to a composite reference standard Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) and liquid culture. Detection of rifampicin resistance was compared to the LJ proportion method. We included 131 patients, the median CD4 cell count was 154.5 cells/mm3 and 45 (34.4%) had TB. For TB detection among HIV patients, sensitivity of MTB/RIF was 97.8% (95% CI 88.4–99.6) (44/45); specificity was 97.7% (95% CI 91.9–99.4) (84/86); the positive predictive value was 95.7% (95% CI 85.5–98.8) (44/46); and the negative predictive value, 98.8% (95% CI 93.6–99.8) (84/85). MTB/RIF detected 13/14 smear-negative TB cases, outperforming smear microscopy [97.8% (44/45) vs. 68.9% (31/45); p = 0.0002]. For rifampicin resistance detection, sensitivity of MTB/RIF was 100% (95% CI 61.0–100.0) (6/6); specificity was 91.0% (95% CI 76.4–96.9) (30/33); the positive predictive value was 66.7% (95% CI 35.4–87.9) (6/9); and the negative predictive value was 100% (95% CI 88.7 –100.0) (30/30). Conclusions/Significance In HIV patients in our population with a high clinical suspicion of TB, MTB/RIF performed well for TB diagnosis and outperformed smear microscopy. PMID:22970271

  9. Indeterminate rapid HIV-1 test results among antenatal and postnatal mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Matemo, D; Kinuthia, J.; John, F.; Chung, M.; Farquhar, C; John-Stewart, G.; Kiarie, J.

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of rapid HIV-1 tests may be altered during pregnancy and postpartum. We conducted a study to determine the prevalence and correlates of false-positive Abbott Determine™ and false-negative Uni-Gold™ rapid HIV-1 test results among antenatal and postnatal mothers attending a primary care clinic in Nairobi, Kenya. Mothers were tested for HIV-1 using Abbott Determine™ and non-reactive results were considered HIV-1 antibody negative. Reactive samples by Determine wer...

  10. Uptake of HIV testing and counseling, risk perception and linkage to HIV care among Thai university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thana Khawcharoenporn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV testing and counseling (HTC with linkage to care after known infection are key components for HIV transmission prevention. This study was conducted to assess HTC uptake, HIV risk perception and linkage to care among Thai university students. Methods An outreach HTC program was conducted in a large public university in Thailand from January 2013 to December 2014. The program consisted of brief HIV knowledge assessment, free HTC, HIV risk assessment and education provided by the healthcare personnel. Students were categorized into low, moderate and high-risk groups according to the pre-defined HIV risk characteristics. Results One-thousand-eight-hundred-one students participated in the program, 494 (27 % underwent HTC. Independent characteristics associated with no HTC uptake included female sex (P < 0.001, lower HIV knowledge score (P < 0.001, younger age (P < 0.001 and students from non-health science faculties (P = 0.02. Among the 494 students undergoing HTC, 141 (29 % were categorized into moderate or high-risk group, of whom 45/141 (32 % had false perception of low HIV risk. Being heterosexual was independently associated with false perception of low HIV risk (P = 0.04. The rate of new HIV infection diagnosis was 4/494 (0.8 %. Of these 4 HIV-infected students, 3 (75 % were men who have sex with men and only 2 of the 4 students (50 % showed up for HIV continuity care. Conclusions An outreach HIV prevention program with HTC was feasible and beneficial in detecting HIV risk and infection among the university students. However, interventions to improve HTC uptake, HIV risk perception and linkage to care are needed.

  11. An Evaluation of Introduction of Rapid HIV Testing in a Perinatal Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Sarah; Tulloch, Karen; Maan, Evelyn J; van Schalkwyk, Julianne; Money, Deborah M

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the roll-out of rapid HIV testing as part of an emergency Prevention of Perinatal HIV Transmission Program. Specifically, HIV prevalence in this population, the reason(s) for performing the rapid HIV test, and compliance with recommendations for antiretroviral prophylaxis were assessed. Since November 2011, all women presenting to a tertiary labour and delivery unit with unknown HIV status or with ongoing risk of HIV infection since their last HIV test were offered rapid HIV testing. Through retrospective chart review, demographic data, HIV risk and prior testing history, and antiretroviral prophylaxis, data were collected and descriptive statistics were performed. One hundred fourteen rapid HIV tests were conducted and there were two preliminary reactive rapid results (one true positive, one false positive). None of the infants was HIV infected. Sixty-three percent of women had multiple risk factors for HIV acquisition, most commonly intravenous drug use (54%). Forty-four percent of women were within the 4-week seroconversion window at the time of delivery; 25% of these women and 52% of their infants received prophylactic drug therapy. Rapid HIV testing identified a high-risk cohort and enabled aggressive management of a newly diagnosed HIV-positive pregnancy, successfully preventing perinatal HIV transmission. Risk factors for HIV acquisition were ongoing within the seroconversion window for over half of the women, impacting the utility of the test in eliminating unnecessary antiretroviral prophylaxis in this population because prophylaxis is recommended despite a negative rapid HIV test in these cases. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid HIV testing for individuals on probation/parole: outcomes of an intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; McKenzie, Michelle; Wilson, Monique E; Rich, Josiah D

    2013-07-01

    Many probationers and parolees do not receive HIV testing despite being at increased risk for obtaining and transmitting HIV. A two-group randomized controlled trial was conducted between April, 2011 and May, 2012 at probation/parole offices in Baltimore, Maryland and Providence/Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Male and female probationers/parolees were interviewed (n = 1,263) and then offered HIV testing based on random assignment to one of two conditions: (1) On-site rapid HIV testing conducted at the probation/parole office; or (2) Referral for rapid HIV testing off site at a community HIV testing clinic. Outcomes were: (1) undergoing HIV testing; and (2) receipt of HIV testing results. Participants were significantly more likely to be tested on-site at a probation/parole office versus off-site at a HIV testing clinic (p < 0.001). There was no difference between the two groups in terms of receiving HIV testing results. Findings indicate that probationers/parolees are willing to be tested on-site and, independent of testing location, are equally willing to receive their results. Implications for expanding rapid HIV testing to more criminal justice related locations and populations are discussed.

  13. Comparing Cost-Effectiveness of HIV Testing Strategies: Targeted and Routine Testing in Washington, DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda D Castel

    Full Text Available Routine HIV testing is an essential approach to identifying undiagnosed infections, linking people to care and treatment, and preventing new infections. In Washington, DC, where HIV prevalence is 2.4%, a combination of routine and targeted testing approaches has been implemented since 2006.We sought to evaluate the cost effectiveness of the District of Columbia (DC Department of Health's routine and targeted HIV testing implementation strategies. We collected HIV testing data from 3 types of DC Department of Health-funded testing sites (clinics, hospitals, and community-based organizations; collected testing and labor costs; and calculated effectiveness measures including cost per new diagnosis and cost per averted transmission.Compared to routine testing, targeted testing resulted in higher positivity rates (1.33% vs. 0.44%. Routine testing averted 34.30 transmissions per year compared to targeted testing at 17.78. The cost per new diagnosis was lower for targeted testing ($2,467 vs. $7,753 per new diagnosis as was the cost per transmission averted ($33,160 vs. $104,205. When stratified by testing site, both testing approaches were most cost effective in averting new transmissions when conducted by community based organizations ($25,037 routine; $33,123 targeted compared to hospitals or clinics.While routine testing identified more newly diagnosed infections and averted more infections than targeted testing, targeted testing is more cost effective per diagnosis and per transmission averted overall. Given the high HIV prevalence in DC, the DC Department of Health's implementation strategy should continue to encourage routine testing implementation with emphasis on a combined testing strategy among community-based organizations.

  14. [Diagnostic of congenital syphilis: a comparison between serological tests in mothers and their newborns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsanti, C; Valdetaro, F; de Albuquerque Diniz, E M; Succi, R C

    1999-01-01

    For the purpose of establishing the incidence of maternal and congenital syphilis among pregnant women at delivery and their respective newborns, a study was carried out to determine treponemic and non-treponemic serology in one thousand (1,000) parturient women and their children at Santa Marcelina Hospital - São Paulo, between June 95 and July 96. All blood samples (maternal venous, umbilical cord and newborn venous) were VDRL-tested, treponemic tests (TPHA, ELISA IgG, ELISA IgM) being applied whenever one of the samples from mother or newborn proved positive. Further, an anti-HIV search was run through ELISA among VDRL-positive mothers. Among the 1,000 parturients, 24 (2.4%) were found to be VDRL-reactive; 18 (1.8%) newborn children of these 24 mothers presented positive serology in their umbilical cord blood and 19 (1.9%) in venous blood. No positive newborns were found for negative mothers. From the high occurrence of maternal and congenital syphilis in this group of patients, we propose a VDRL maternal test as a way of selecting gestational and congenital syphilis cases, since this test appeared to be sufficiently capable of such diagnoses. Of the treponemic tests, the ELISA test did not enhance diagnostic sensitivity.

  15. Rapid diagnostic tests for dengue virus infection in febrile Cambodian children: diagnostic accuracy and incorporation into diagnostic algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Carter

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection is prevalent across tropical regions and may cause severe disease. Early diagnosis may improve supportive care. We prospectively assessed the Standard Diagnostics (Korea BIOLINE Dengue Duo DENV rapid diagnostic test (RDT to NS1 antigen and anti-DENV IgM (NS1 and IgM in children in Cambodia, with the aim of improving the diagnosis of DENV infection.We enrolled children admitted to hospital with non-localised febrile illnesses during the 5-month DENV transmission season. Clinical and laboratory variables, and DENV RDT results were recorded at admission. Children had blood culture and serological and molecular tests for common local pathogens, including reference laboratory DENV NS1 antigen and IgM assays. 337 children were admitted with non-localised febrile illness over 5 months. 71 (21% had DENV infection (reference assay positive. Sensitivity was 58%, and specificity 85% for RDT NS1 and IgM combined. Conditional inference framework analysis showed the additional value of platelet and white cell counts for diagnosis of DENV infection. Variables associated with diagnosis of DENV infection were not associated with critical care admission (70 children, 21% or mortality (19 children, 6%. Known causes of mortality were melioidosis (4, other sepsis (5, and malignancy (1. 22 (27% children with a positive DENV RDT had a treatable other infection.The DENV RDT had low sensitivity for the diagnosis of DENV infection. The high co-prevalence of infections in our cohort indicates the need for a broad microbiological assessment of non-localised febrile illness in these children.

  16. Diagnostic performance of rapid diagnostic tests versus blood smears for malaria in US clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, William M; Cartwright, Charles P; Olson, Douglas A; Juni, Billie Anne; Taylor, Charlotte M; Bowers, Susan H; Hanson, Kevan L; Rosenblatt, Jon E; Boulware, David R

    2009-09-15

    Approximately 4 million US travelers to developing countries are ill enough to seek health care, with 1500 malaria cases reported in the United States annually. The diagnosis of malaria is frequently delayed because of the time required to prepare malaria blood films and lack of technical expertise. An easy, reliable rapid diagnostic test (RDT) with high sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV), particularly for Plasmodium falciparum, would be clinically useful. The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of a RDT approved by the US Food and Drug Administration compared with traditional thick and thin blood smears for malaria diagnosis. This prospective study tested 852 consecutive blood samples that underwent thick and thin smears and blinded malaria RDTs at 3 hospital laboratories during 2003-2006. Polymerase chain reaction verified positive test results and discordant results. Malaria was noted in 95 (11%) of the 852 samples. The RDT had superior performance than the standard Giemsa thick blood smear (p = .003). The RDT's sensitivity for all malaria was 97% (92 of 95 samples), compared with 85% (81 of 95) for the blood smear, and the RDT had a superior NPV of 99.6%, compared with 98.2% for the blood smear (p = .001). The P. falciparum performance was excellent, with 100% rapid test sensitivity, compared with only 88% (65 of 74) by blood smear (p = .003). This operational study demonstrates that the US Food and Drug Administration-approved RDT for malaria is superior to a single set of blood smears performed under routine US clinical laboratory conditions. The most valuable clinical role of the RDT is in the rapid diagnosis or the exclusion of P. falciparum malaria, which is particularly useful in outpatient settings when evaluating febrile travelers.

  17. Performance of Dengue Diagnostic Tests in a Single-Specimen Diagnostic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge; Beltran, Manuela; Colón, Candimar; Carrión, Jessica; Vazquez, Jesus; Acosta, Luz Nereida; Medina-Izquierdo, Juan F; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Margolis, Harold S

    2016-09-15

    Anti-dengue virus (DENV) immunoglobulin M (IgM) seroconversion has been the reference standard for dengue diagnosis. However, paired specimens are rarely obtained, and the interval for this testing negates its usefulness in guiding clinical case management. The presence of DENV viremia and appearance of IgM during the febrile phase of dengue provides the framework for dengue laboratory diagnosis by using a single serum specimen. Archived paired serum specimens (n = 1234) from patients with laboratory-confirmed dengue from 2005 through 2011 were used to determine the diagnostic performance of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), for detection of DENV serotypes 1-4, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), for detection of DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen and anti-DENV IgM. During 1-3 days after illness onset, real-time RT-PCR and NS1 antigen testing detected 82%-69% and 90%-84% of cases, respectively, as viremia levels declined, while anti-DENV IgM ELISA detected 5%-41% of cases as antibody appeared. Over the 10-day period of the febrile phase of dengue, the cumulative effect of using these 3 types of tests in a diagnostic algorithm confirmed ≥90% of dengue cases. The use of molecular or NS1 antigen tests to detect DENV and one to detect anti-DENV IgM in a single serum specimen collected during the first 10 days of illness accurately identified ≥90% of dengue primary and secondary cases. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Rapid HIV Testing and Counselling in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conseil et le test rapide du VIH pendant le travail dans un milieu du Nigéria du nord Entre avril et aôut. 2004 toutes les femmes en travail à]UTH ont subi le test pour le VIH et ont reçu du conseil avec l'opportunité de refuser le test. Les femmes séro-positives reçu la monothérapie de névirapine standard shéma prophylaxie.

  19. Offering self-administered oral HIV testing to truck drivers in Kenya to increase testing: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelvin, Elizabeth A; George, Gavin; Mwai, Eva; Nyaga, Eston; Mantell, Joanne E; Romo, Matthew L; Odhiambo, Jacob O; Starbuck, Lila; Govender, Kaymarlin

    2018-01-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial among 305 truck drivers from two North Star Alliance roadside wellness clinics in Kenya to see if offering HIV testing choices would increase HIV testing uptake. Participants were randomized to be offered (1) a provider-administered rapid blood (finger-prick) HIV test (i.e., standard of care [SOC]) or (2) a Choice between SOC or a self-administered oral rapid HIV test with provider supervision in the clinic. Participants in the Choice arm who refused HIV testing in the clinic were offered a test kit for home use with phone-based posttest counseling. We compared HIV test uptake using the Mantel Haenszel odds ratio (OR) adjusting for clinic. Those in the Choice arm had higher odds of HIV test uptake than those in the SOC arm (OR = 1.5), but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.189). When adding the option to take an HIV test kit for home use, the Choice arm had significantly greater odds of testing uptake (OR = 2.8, p = 0.002). Of those in the Choice arm who tested, 26.9% selected the SOC test, 64.6% chose supervised self-testing in the clinic, and 8.5% took a test kit for home use. Participants varied in the HIV test they selected when given choices. Importantly, when participants who refused HIV testing in the clinic were offered a test kit for home use, an additional 8.5% tested. Offering truck drivers a variety of HIV testing choices may increase HIV testing uptake in this key population.

  20. Factors associated with refusal of rapid HIV testing in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisculli, Mary L; Reichmann, William M; Losina, Elena; Donnell-Fink, Laurel A; Arbelaez, Christian; Katz, Jeffrey N; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2011-05-01

    HIV screening studies in the emergency department (ED) have demonstrated rates of HIV test refusal ranging from 40-67%. This study aimed to determine the factors associated with refusal to undergo routine rapid HIV testing in an academic ED in Boston. HIV counselors offered routine testing to 1,959 patients; almost one-third of patients (29%) refused. Data from a self-administered survey were used to determine independent correlates of HIV testing refusal. In multivariate analysis, women and patients with annual household incomes of $50,000 or more were more likely to refuse testing, as were those who reported not engaging in HIV risk behaviors, those previously HIV tested and those who did not perceive a need for testing. Enrollment during morning hours was also associated with an increased risk of refusal. Increased educational efforts to convey the rationale and benefits of universal screening may improve testing uptake among these groups.

  1. Noninvasive prenatal screening or advanced diagnostic testing: caveat emptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mark I; Wapner, Ronald J; Berkowitz, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    The past few years have seen extraordinary advances in prenatal genetic practice led by 2 major technological advances; next-generation sequencing of cell-free DNA in the maternal plasma to noninvasively identify fetal chromosome abnormalities, and microarray analysis of chorionic villus sampling and amniotic fluid samples, resulting in increased cytogenetic resolution. Noninvasive prenatal screening of cell-free DNA has demonstrated sensitivity and specificity for trisomy 21 superior to all previous screening approaches with slightly lower performance for other common aneuploidies. These tests have rapidly captured an increasing market share, with substantial reductions in the number of chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis performed suggesting that physicians and patients regard such screening approaches as an equivalent replacement for diagnostic testing. Simultaneously, many clinical programs have noted significant decreases in patient counseling. In 2012 the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded a blinded comparison of karyotype with the emerging technology of array comparative genomic hybridization showing that in patients with a normal karyotype, 2.5% had a clinically relevant microdeletion or duplication identified. In pregnancies with an ultrasound-detected structural anomaly, 6% had an incremental finding, and of those with a normal scan, 1.6% had a copy number variant. For patients of any age with a normal ultrasound and karyotype, the chance of a pathogenic copy number variant is greater than 1%, similar to the age-related risk of aneuploidy in the fetus of a 38 year old. This risk is 4-fold higher than the risk of trisomy 21 in a woman younger than 30 years and 5- to 10-fold higher than the present accepted risk of a diagnostic procedure. Based on this, we contend that every patient, regardless of her age, be educated about these risks and offered the opportunity to have a diagnostic procedure with

  2. HIV testing and counselling for migrant populations living in high-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-del Arco, Debora; Monge, Susana; Azcoaga, Amaya; Rio, Isabel; Hernando, Victoria; Gonzalez, Cristina; Alejos, Belen; Caro, Ana Maria; Perez-Cachafeiro, Santiago; Ramirez-Rubio, Oriana; Bolumar, Francisco; Noori, Teymur; Del Amo, Julia

    2013-12-01

    The barriers to HIV testing and counselling that migrants encounter can jeopardize proactive HIV testing that reli