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Sample records for hitler reputation icon

  1. Images of Marie Curie: How Reputational Entrepreneurs Shape Iconic Identities

    Lisa Alaimo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Marie Curie holds iconic status both within the scientific community and in the wider cultural imagination and collective memory. The first woman to be awarded a Nobel Prize and the only woman to achieve such an honor twice, Curie is widely celebrated as a female pioneer in the sciences and is held up as a model for all, but particularly women, to emulate. She is revered not only as a ground-breaking scientist, but also as a devoted wife and mother who fostered intellectual passion in her own children, one of whom became the second woman to be honored with the Nobel Prize in Science. Echoing Eva Hemmungs Wirten, we argue that the evolution of Curie’s status over time offers an opportunity to use meta-biography to understand the layered nature of her reputation. We draw on Gary Alan Fine’s theory of reputational entrepreneurship to understand her legacy as a product of collective historical memory. Curie’s legacy was not pre-determined by the fact that she was a successful scientist; in fact, she was shunned by the public in France in 1911 after it was revealed that she, a widow, had engaged in an affair with a fellow married scientist. A meta-biographical analysis reveals considerable effort was put into reputation building by her Curie herself, her commercial sponsor, and family members. To ignore the earlier iterations of her reputation is to underestimate the challenges she faced as a woman in male-dominated science and in a society that judged her by a sexual double standard. Meta-biography, in conjunction with theories of intellectual reputation building and collective memory, allows us to unearth the complicated layers of Curie’s story. It also tells us a great deal about the [sexist] society in which Curie and her supporters had to forge her reputation.

  2. Reputation

    Jessica Jarl

    2011-01-01

    Introduction This paper examines intrinsic and financial values of corporate reputation and its roles within the context of strategic management. Two case studies on Johnson & Johnson and Shell are discussed to demonstrate the importance of reputation management in corporate success.

  3. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result.

  4. Hitler's penicillin.

    Wainwright, Milton

    2004-01-01

    During the Second World War, the Germans and their Axis partners could only produce relatively small amounts of penicillin, certainly never enough to meet their military needs; as a result, they had to rely upon the far less effective sulfonamides. One physician who put penicillin to effective use was Hitler's doctor, Theodore Morell. Morell treated the Führer with penicillin on a number of occasions, most notably following the failed assassination attempt in July 1944. Some of this penicillin appears to have been captured from, or inadvertently supplied by, the Allies, raising the intriguing possibility that Allied penicillin saved Hitler's life.

  5. Paying for Hitler's War

    Lund, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Book review of: Jonas Scherner & Eugene N. White (eds.), Paying for Hitler's War: The Consequenses of Nazi Hegemony for Europe (NY: Cambridge University Press, 2016)......Book review of: Jonas Scherner & Eugene N. White (eds.), Paying for Hitler's War: The Consequenses of Nazi Hegemony for Europe (NY: Cambridge University Press, 2016)...

  6. Iconic memory of icon?

    Chow, Dr Siu L.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the present commentary are to show that (1) one important theoretical property of iconic memory is inconsistent with a retinotopic icon, (2) data difficult for the notion of an icon do not necessarily challenge the notion of an iconic store, (3) the iconic store, as a theoretical mechanism, is an ecologically valid one, and (4) the rationale of experimentation is such that the experimental task need not mimic the phenomenon being studied.

  7. Hitler's Death Camps.

    Wieser, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Presents a high school lesson on Hitler's death camps and the widespread policy of brutality and oppression against European Jews. Includes student objectives, instructional procedures, and a chart listing the value of used clothing taken from the Jews. (CFR)

  8. Adolf Hitler's medical care.

    Doyle, D

    2005-02-01

    For the last nine years of his life Adolf Hitler, a lifelong hypochondriac had as his physician Dr Theodor Morell. Hitler's mood swings, Parkinson's disease, gastro-intestinal symptoms, skin problems and steady decline until his suicide in 1945 are documented by reliable observers and historians, and in Morell's diaries. The bizarre and unorthodox medications given to Hitler, often for undisclosed reasons, include topical cocaine, injected amphetamines, glucose, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosteroids. In addition, he was given a preparation made from a gun cleaner, a compound of strychnine and atropine, an extract of seminal vesicles, and numerous vitamins and 'tonics'. It seems possible that some of Hitler's behaviour, illnesses and suffering can be attributed to his medical care. Whether he blindly accepted such unorthodox medications or demanded them is unclear.

  9. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler.

  10. Hitler: a neurohistorical formulation.

    Martindale, C; Hasenfus, N; Hines, D

    1976-01-01

    It is hypothesized that Adolf Hitler suffered from a constitutional left-side weakness that allowed his cerebral hemisphere to exert a strong influence on his thought and behavior. Physical characteristics such as trembling of the left extremities, lack of a left testicle, and tendency to exhibit leftward eye movements are interpreted as supportive of the hypothesis. Right hemisphere dominance is consistent with a number of Hitler's personal traits such as praise of the irrational, automatic speech, auditory hallucinations, hypochondriasis, uncontrolled rages, and spatial and musical interests. Right hemisphere dominated thought may also have formed a basis for his two basic political policies: Lebensraum and anti-Semitism.

  11. Hitlers Store Gennembrud

    Kongsbøg, Andreas Aabye; Vesth, Mille; Grcic, Ema; Kampman, Anders Engelund; Nielsen, Magnus Nørhave

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the political landscape during the Weimar Republic, which led to Adolf Hitler and Nationalsozialistische Deutschhe Arbeiterpartei’s (NSDAP) rise to power. Through a historical examination of the German political system, we found a number of critical obstacles, which most likely led to the fall of the democratic majority. The government was forced to deal with the demands of war reparations, an economic crisis caused by the Great Depression and the rise in far-right populis...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

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  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Phaeodactylum tricornutum Phaeodactylum_tricornutum_L.png Phaeodactylum_tricornutum..._NL.png Phaeodactylum_tricornutum_S.png Phaeodactylum_tricornutum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricornutum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricorn...utum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricorn...utum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricornutum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=213 ...

  14. The Status of Hitler Today

    Ben Novak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A finales del siglo XX, podía afirmarse que Hitler estaba más vivo y con más influencia que en la cumbre de su poder medio siglo antes. ¿Cómo ha alcanzado Hitler esta posición? ¿No está muerto? ¿Cómo puede ser tan prominente más de cincuenta años después de su defunción? Esta cuestión de Hitler en la actualidad posee diversos problemas históricos que están íntimamente conectados con otros morales. En este trabajo, sin embargo, pretendo concentrarme primordialmente en su dimensión histórica. A la luz del sorprendente ascenso de Hitler en la moderna conciencia histórica, esto puede llevarnos a la siguiente pregunta: ¿No hemos otorgado al dictador nazi un poder aún mayor que cuando estaba vivo y comandando sus divisiones de la Wehrmacht en el punto culminante de sus conquistas?___________________ABSTRACT:By the end of the twentieth century, it can be said, Hitler was more alive and prominent than at the height of his power a half-century before. How did Hitler become this way? Isn’t he dead? How can he become so prominent more than half a century after his death? The issue of Hitler today poses several historical problems that are deeply moral problems as well. In this work, however, I intend to concentrate primarily on their historical dimension. In light of Hitler’s astonishing rise in modern historical consciousness, this leads to the inevitable question: Have we not granted to Hitler a far greater power over us than ever he had when he was alive and commanding his Wehrmacht divisions at the farthest extent of his conquests?

  15. Did Adolf Hitler have syphilis?

    Retief, F P; Wessels, A

    2005-10-01

    The evidence that Adolf Hitler might have suffered from incapacitating syphilis is reviewed. Rumors that he acquired syphilis from a prostitute at the age of 20 years, with possible re-infection during World War I, can no longer be verified. Evidence is that he was sexually rather inactive throughout his life. Suggestions that Hitler's cardiac lesion and complaints such as transitory blindness, tremor of his left arm and leg, recurring abdominal pain and a skin lesion of the leg were of syphilitic aetiology cannot be supported. Hitler's progressive mental and physical deterioration after 1942, his growing paranoia, fits of rage, grandiosity and symptoms of possible dementia would fit in neurosyphilis. There are, however, also other explanations for his terminal syndrome, and evidence that repeated clinical examinations did not show the characteristic signs of dementia paralytica or tabes dorsalis, swings the balance of probability away from tertiary syphilis.

  16. Mrs Hitler and her doctor.

    Macleod, Sandy

    2005-12-01

    The doctor who attended the mother of Adolf Hitler in her terminal illness has been blamed as a cause of the Holocaust. The medical details recorded of this professional relationship are presented and discussed. Dr Bloch's medical care of Mrs Hitler was consistent with the prevailing medical practice of the management of fungating breast carcinoma. Indeed, the general practitioner's care and attention of the family appear to have been astute and supportive. There is nothing to suggest that Dr Bloch's medical care was other than competent. Doctors who have the (mis)fortune to professionally attend major figures of history may be unfairly viewed, despite their appropriate and adequate care.

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: honey bee [Taxonomy Icon

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  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: thale cress [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available thale cress Arabidopsis thaliana Arabidopsis_thaliana_L.png Arabidopsis_thaliana_NL.png Arabidopsis_thal...iana_S.png Arabidopsis_thaliana_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thal...iana&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=NL http://...biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: sorghum [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available sorghum Sorghum bicolor Sorghum_bicolor_L.png Sorghum_bicolor_NL.png Sorghum_bicolor_S.png Sorg...hum_bicolor_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=L http://b...iosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorg...hum+bicolor&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: fission yeast [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_L.png Schizosaccharomyce...s_pombe_NL.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_S.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyce...s+pombe&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyce...s+pombe&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=NS

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: potato [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available potato Solanum tuberosum Solanum_tuberosum_L.png Solanum_tuberosum_NL.png Solanum_tuber...osum_S.png Solanum_tuberosum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Lotus corniculatus [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Lotus corniculatus Lotus corniculatus Lotus_corniculatus_L.png Lotus_corniculatus_NL.png Lotus_corn...iculatus_S.png Lotus_corniculatus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corn...iculatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corniculatus&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corniculatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corniculatus&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: barrel medic [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available barrel medic Medicago truncatula Medicago_truncatula_L.png Medicago_truncatula_NL.png Medi...cago_truncatula_S.png Medicago_truncatula_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medi...cago+truncatula&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=NL http://biosci...encedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: fruit fly [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Arthropoda Drosophila_melanogaster_L.png Drosophila_mela...nogaster_NL.png Drosophila_melanogaster_S.png Drosophila_melanogaster_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/...taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophila+melanogaster&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophila+mela...nogaster&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophila+mela...nogaster&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophila+melanogaster&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: Lotus japonicus [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Lotus japonicus Lotus japonicus Lotus_japonicus_L.png Lotus_japonicus_NL.png Lotus_japonicus_S.png Lotus_jap...onicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+japonicus&t=L ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+japonicus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+jap...onicus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+japonicus&t=NS ...

  6. Iconic Memory

    Sakitt, Barbara

    1976-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments showing that in normal subjects (a) iconic storage occurs primarily in the retina in the photoreceptors and (b) under conditions of dark pre- and postexposure fields, the icon is mainly a rod phenomenon. Draws conclusions based on these experiments, discusses previous work done by others, and attempts to reconcile…

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese Ratsnake [Taxonomy Icon

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  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: Oryzias javanicus [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Oryzias javanicus Oryzias javanicus Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Oryzias_javanicus_L.png Oryzias_java...nicus_NL.png Oryzias_javanicus_S.png Oryzias_javanicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javanicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javan...icus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javanicus&t=S ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javanicus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=77 ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Trypanosoma brucei [Taxonomy Icon

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  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Schistosoma japonicum [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum Schistosoma japonicum Platyhelminthes Schistosoma_japonicum_L.png Schistoso...ma_japonicum_NL.png Schistosoma_japonicum_S.png Schistosoma_japonicum_NS.png http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistoso...ma+japonicum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistoso...ma+japonicum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=132 ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Toxoplasma gondii [Taxonomy Icon

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  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Planaria [Taxonomy Icon

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  13. Killing Hitler: A Writer's Journey and Angst.

    Thaler, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Describes the author's experiences in preparing a talk that "evokes the specter" of Adolf Hitler and in writing an historical account of a British plot to kill Hitler. Address the question of why the British allowed him to live that final year of the war. Muses on why scholars write, and the impact of violence and terrorism. (SG)

  14. Hitler og Stalin arm i arm

    Bryld, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Levende fortalt bog om pagten mellem Hitler og Stalin, som udløste krigen og kastede lange skygger over Europas historie.......Levende fortalt bog om pagten mellem Hitler og Stalin, som udløste krigen og kastede lange skygger over Europas historie....

  15. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-01-01

    Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world) and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  16. Adolf Hitler had post-encephalitic Parkinsonism.

    Lieberman, A

    1996-04-01

    Adolf Hitler had Parkinson symptoms in 1934, at age 45 years. He may have had transient symptoms in 1923, at age 34 years. Young-onset parkinsonism, during the 1920s, favored a diagnosis of post-encephalitic rather than idiopathic parkinsonism. Hitler had oculogyric crises, phenomena only associated with post-encephalitic parkinsonism. In addition, he had dystonic facial spasms, palilalia and a sleep disorder, phenomena more likely to be associated with post-encephalitic than idiopathic parkinsonism. In November 1918, at age 29 years, Hitler may have had von Economo's encephalitis, while he was a patient in a hospital, recovering from poison gas. This paper looks at the possible relationship of von Economo's encephalitis to Hitler's asocial behavior; his obsessions and compulsions, his cruelty and rages. The influence of Hitler's parkinsonism on his conduct during World War II is discussed.

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: coelacanth [Taxonomy Icon

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  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: mandrill [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available mandrill Mandrillus sphinx Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Mandrillus_sphinx..._L.png Mandrillus_sphinx_NL.png Mandrillus_sphinx_S.png Mandrillus_sphinx_NS.png http://biosci...encedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus+sphinx&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus+sphinx...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus+sphinx...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus+sphinx&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: sperm whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Cetacea Physeter_macrocephal...us_L.png Physeter_macrocephalus_NL.png Physeter_macrocephalus_S.png Physeter_macrocephal...us_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=L http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Asiatic elephant [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Asiatic elephant Elephas maximus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Elephas_maxim...us_L.png Elephas_maximus_NL.png Elephas_maximus_S.png Elephas_maximus_NS.png http://bioscienced...bc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elephas+maximus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elephas+maxim...us&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elephas+maximus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elephas+maximus&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Arabian camel [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Arabian camel Camelus dromedarius Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Camel...us_dromedarius_L.png Camelus_dromedarius_NL.png Camelus_dromedarius_S.png Camelus_dromedarius_...NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo...nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camel...us+dromedarius&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese serow [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Japanese serow Capricornis crispus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Capricorn...is_crispus_L.png Capricornis_crispus_NL.png Capricornis_crispus_S.png Capricornis_crispus..._NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricorn...is+crispus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Asiatic tapir [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Asiatic tapir Tapirus indicus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Tapirus_indicus_L.png Tapi...rus_indicus_NL.png Tapirus_indicus_S.png Tapirus_indicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+indicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+ind...icus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+indicus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+indicus&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: dog [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available dog Canis lupus familiaris Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Carnivora Canis_lupus..._familiaris_L.png Canis_lupus_familiaris_NL.png Canis_lupus_familiaris_S.png Canis_lupus_familiari...s_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp.../taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: okapi [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available okapi Okapia johnstoni Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Okapi...a_johnstoni_L.png Okapia_johnstoni_NL.png Okapia_johnstoni_S.png Okapia_johnstoni_NS.png http://bioscienc...edbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapi...a+johnstoni&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnston...i&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: Anopheles stephensi [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Anopheles stephensi Anopheles stephensi Arthropoda Anopheles_stephensi_L.png Anopheles_stephen...si_NL.png Anopheles_stephensi_S.png Anopheles_stephensi_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&...t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=S htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=149 ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: fathead minnow [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available fathead minnow Pimephales promelas Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Pimephales_promela...s_L.png Pimephales_promelas_NL.png Pimephales_promelas_S.png Pimephales_promelas_NS.png http://bioscienced...bc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promelas&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promela...s&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promela...s&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promelas&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: giant panda [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Carnivora Ailuropoda_mela...noleuca_L.png Ailuropoda_melanoleuca_NL.png Ailuropoda_melanoleuca_S.png Ailuropoda_mela...noleuca_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=L http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=NL http://biosciencedb...c.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Guinea baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Guinea baboon Papio papio Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Papio_papio_L.png Papio_papi...o_NL.png Papio_papio_S.png Papio_papio_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papi...o&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NL http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: white shark [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available white shark Carcharodon carcharias Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Carcharodon_carcharias_L.png Carcharo...don_carcharias_NL.png Carcharodon_carcharias_S.png Carcharodon_carcharias_NS.png http:/.../biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carcharo...don+carcharias&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carcharo...don+carcharias&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: llama [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available llama Lama glama Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Lama_glama_L.png Lama_glama_NL.png Lama_glama_S.png Lama_glama..._NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glam...a&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=NS ...

  12. [Ophthalmologists in the proximity of Adolf Hitler].

    Rohrbach, J M

    2012-10-01

    Adolf Hitler met or at least knew about 5 ophthalmologists. The chair of ophthalmology in Berlin, Walther Löhlein, personally examined Hitler's eyes at least two times. The chair of ophthalmology in Breslau, Walter Dieter, developed "air raid protection spectacles" with the aid of high representatives of the NS-system and probably Adolf Hitler himself. Heinrich Wilhelm Kranz became rector of the universities of Giessen and Frankfurt/Main. He was known as a very strict advocate of the NS-race hygiene. Werner Zabel made plans for Hitler's diet and tried to interfere with Hitler's medical treatment. Finally, Hellmuth Unger was an influential representative of the medical press and a famous writer. Three of his novels with medical topics were made into a film which Hitler probably saw. Hitler had, so to say, a small "ophthalmological proximity" which, however, did not play a significant role for himself or the NS-state. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Reputation Addiction

    Rosamond, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Reputation Addiction… explores some of the ways in which social networks encourage excessive preoccupation with professional profile and public image. Sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Academia.edu (Rosamond’s main case study) use mechanisms designed to encourage regular return visits based on the popularity of an individual’s content. These platforms are economically invested in the creation of regular flows of traffic to their sites, as the data produced can be sold for a profit. Rosamo...

  14. Adolf Hitler and His Parkinsonism.

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B

    2015-01-01

    Research works have suggested almost incontrovertibly, that Adolf Hitler suffered from Parkinsonism. However, the precise nature of his illness had always been controversial and post-encephalitic and idiopathic varieties were the ones which were most commonly thought as the possible etiology. He displayed features like oculogyric crisis, palilalia, and autonomic symptoms which strongly implicate post-encephalitic etiology in the genesis of his illness. Others on the contrary, observed premorbid personality traits like non-flinching mental rigidity, extreme inflexibility, and awesome pedantry; which are often observed in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Moreover, nonmotor symptoms like disturbed sleep, proneness to temper tantrums, phases of depression, suspiciousness, and lack of trust on colleagues have also been described by various authors. Additionally, he was prescribed methamphetamine by his personal doctor and that might have led to the development of some of the later traits in his personality.

  15. Adolf Hitler and His Parkinsonism

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research works have suggested almost incontrovertibly, that Adolf Hitler suffered from Parkinsonism. However, the precise nature of his illness had always been controversial and post-encephalitic and idiopathic varieties were the ones which were most commonly thought as the possible etiology. He displayed features like oculogyric crisis, palilalia, and autonomic symptoms which strongly implicate post-encephalitic etiology in the genesis of his illness. Others on the contrary, observed premorbid personality traits like non-flinching mental rigidity, extreme inflexibility, and awesome pedantry; which are often observed in idiopathic Parkinson′s disease. Moreover, nonmotor symptoms like disturbed sleep, proneness to temper tantrums, phases of depression, suspiciousness, and lack of trust on colleagues have also been described by various authors. Additionally, he was prescribed methamphetamine by his personal doctor and that might have led to the development of some of the later traits in his personality.

  16. Physicists' Forced Migrations under Hitler

    Beyerchen, Alan

    2011-03-01

    When the Nazis came to power in early 1933 they initiated formal and informal measures that forced Jews and political opponents from public institutions such as universities. Some physicists retired and others went into industry, but most emigrated. International communication and contact made emigration a viable option despite the desperate economic times in the Great Depression. Another wave of emigrations followed the annexation of Austria in 1938. Individual cases as well as general patterns of migration and adaptation to new environments will be examined in this presentation. One important result of the forced migrations was that many of the physicists expelled under Hitler played important roles in strengthening physics elsewhere, often on the Allied side in World War II.

  17. The Battle of Crete: Hitler's Airborne Gamble

    Blank, Maria

    2003-01-01

    As Adolf Hitler conquered most of the European continent in 1939-1941, the small island of Crete in the Mediterranean Sea became vital to future operations in the Mediterranean region for both the Axis and Allied powers...

  18. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  19. Iconics: Icon Evolution in Digitality

    Steven John Thompson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Image manipulation, archiving, and sharing are all critical technological aspects of Western culture and postmodern civilization. Consequently, creation, identification, dissemination, and proliferation of powerful images across media channels today indicate a burgeoning area of information technology. While words alone are capable of conveying adequate information across media channels, the news industry crafts around the dual enterprise of both word and image. Audio-visual supports of these communication devices constituting new media are standard means of rhetorical expressions in acquiring and sharing information in daily life. Overwhelming sensory experiences associated with broadcast media ensure that neither 1 time to study individual factors that render media as iconic, nor 2 interest in interpretation of such dynamics prior to public release. That leads to deeper issues of access, privilege, and motive, yet only through serious scholarly inquiry can we gain understanding of rhetorical roots and expressions of the diverse entities producing media that eventually becomes iconic.

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: moss [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available moss Physcomitrella patens subsp. patens. Physcomitrella_patens_subsp_patens_L.png Physcomitrella_patens..._subsp_patens_NL.png Physcomitrella_patens_subsp_patens_S.png Physcomitrella_patens_subsp_patens..._NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2e+patens%2e&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2e+patens...%2e&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2e+patens%2e&t

  1. Personal reputation

    Foste, Elizabeth; Botero, Isabel C.

    2012-01-01

    the importance of supervisor perceptions for the future of employees in the organization, this study uses principles of language expectancy theory (LET) to explore how message content (benefit organization vs. no benefit) and delivery style (aggressive vs. nonaggressive) in upward communication situations affect......One of the pitfalls of past research in upward influence communication is that messages are often categorized using more than one characteristic. This categorization has made it difficult to understand how different message characteristics affect supervisors’ perceptions about employees. Given...... perceptions of personal reputation and work competence. Participants, acting in the role of supervisors, read one of four scenarios and evaluated a new employee. Results suggest that delivery style and message content independently influence the supervisor’s willingness to grant a request as well as influence...

  2. Hitler og de tyske retslærde

    Lando, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Konsekvenserne af at Hitler drev tysksprogede jurister i landflygtighed for tysk, engelsk og nordisk retsvidenskab.......Konsekvenserne af at Hitler drev tysksprogede jurister i landflygtighed for tysk, engelsk og nordisk retsvidenskab....

  3. Teaching the Hitler Period: History and Morality.

    Mork, Gordon R.

    1980-01-01

    Outlines six approaches used in a university history course which address the problems of teaching the Hitler period. The assumption underlying all the approaches is that Americans are not entirely different from Germans and that they may be faced with similar moral choices. The approaches avoid the didactic moralism often taught about this era.…

  4. Social Media Reputation

    Etter, Michael; Colleoni, Elanor; Ravasi, Davide

    directly to corporate performance and actions. Secondly, prominent reputation measurements couple stakeholders´ believes to reputation drivers through the use of predefined scales and items. We argue that with the rise of social media a company´s reputation has increasingly become autonomous from corporate...... actions, which demands a greater decoupling of stakeholders´ perceptions from corporate signals or actions in corporate reputation research. We develop the concept of social media reputation as the overall evaluation of a company presented in social media and present a new approach of measuring reputation...... based on social media data that accounts for the autonomy of stakeholder´s perception of a firm. We compare and contrast this novel social media reputation measure (SMRM) with traditional reputation measurements and find that SMRM is a valuable measurement to capture the autonomy of the stakeholders...

  5. In pursuit of repute

    Haddon, M.

    1997-01-01

    This article traces the emergence of reputation management at Shell after the abandonment of the planned sinking of the Brent Spar oil storage buoy due to public opinion aroused mainly by the successful Greenpeace campaign. The appointment of a reputation manager at Shell, and evaluation of investment proposals for their impact on Shell's reputation are reported. (UK)

  6. The death of Adolf Hitler--forensic aspects.

    Marchetti, Daniela; Boschi, Ilaria; Polacco, Matteo; Rainio, Juha

    2005-09-01

    The death of Adolf Hitler is one of the unsolved mysteries of the twentieth century. Numerous historians and journalists have attempted to piece together the details, but despite the interest in the forensic literature regarding the identification of the body, there has not been much scientific debate about the alleged cause of death--cyanide poisoning, gunshot injury, or both. The available literature concerning Hitler's cause of death is incomplete because the toxicological analysis has not been performed and because the skull bone fragment with a gunshot wound possibly from Hitler's corpse has not been properly examined. This has given basis for various theories, which are reviewed. We believe that mtDNA analysis of the skull fragments and of Hitler's jaw, now filed in Moscow, and samples from maternal relatives of Hitler are crucial linking the skull fragment with the gunshot wound to Hitler.

  7. Defining popular iconic metaphor.

    Columbus, Peter J; Boerger, Michael A

    2002-04-01

    Popular Iconic Metaphor is added to the cognitive linguistic lexicon of figurative language. Popular Iconic Metaphors employ real or fictional celebrities of popular culture as source domains in figurative discourse. Some borders of Popular Iconic Metaphor are identified, and Elvis Presley is offered as a prototype example of a popular iconic source domain, due to his ubiquity in American popular culture, which affords his figurative usage in ways consistent with decision heuristics in everyday life. Further study of Popular Iconic Metaphors may serve to illuminate how figurative expressions emerge in their localized contexts, structure conduct and experience, and affect mediation of cultural and personal meanings.

  8. Hitler's hysterical blindness: fact or fiction?

    Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Silva, Carlos Eduardo da Rocha E

    2010-10-01

    This article deals with a little known episode that occurred near the end of the Great War in a military reserve hospital located in the small town of Pasewalk, part of the distant region of Pomerania in northern Poland. The story is centered around the transient visual loss of a 29-year-old Austrian messenger of the 16th Bavarian Infantry Regiment. His name: Adolf Hitler.

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese Bush Warbler [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Japanese Bush Warbler Cettia diphone Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Cettia_diphone_L.png Cettia_diphone..._NL.png Cettia_diphone_S.png Cettia_diphone_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=26 ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Old world swallowtail [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Old world swallowtail Papilio machaon Arthropoda Papilio_machaon_L.png Papilio_machaon_NL.png Papilio_machao...n_S.png Papilio_machaon_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machao...n&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=47 ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Ptychodera flava Eschscholtz (Acorn worm) [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Ptychodera flava Eschscholtz (Acorn worm) Ptychodera flava Hemichordata Ptychodera_flava_L.png Ptycho...dera_flava_NL.png Ptychodera_flava_S.png Ptychodera_flava_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+fla...va&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=S htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=161 ...

  12. Youth Reflect on Hitler: A Cross-National Study.

    McRoy, James J.

    1985-01-01

    A content analysis of essays written by students from Great Britain and the United States on the topic "What I have heard about Adolf Hitler" showed that today's youth have only a very superficial knowledge about the events surrounding Hitler and Nazism. (RM)

  13. Fascism and Class Discourse: Hitler's Appeals to the Junkers.

    Fillippeli, Susan E.

    For the generation of Americans who witnessed and perhaps even fought against the Hitler regime, the consequences of his political manipulation had a significant and tangible impact on their lives. For younger generations it is necessary to work to understand how Hitler constructed his appeals to the German people. While a great deal of his…

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: aye-aye [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available aye-aye Daubentonia madagascariensis Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Daubentonia_madaga...scariensis_L.png Daubentonia_madagascariensis_NL.png Daubentonia_madagascariensis_S.png Daubentonia_madagasc...ariensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madagascar...iensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madagascar...iensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madagascariensis&t=S http://bi

  15. The unmourned wound: Reflections on the psychology of Adolf Hitler.

    Ferrell, D R

    1995-09-01

    Fifty years after his death by suicide, Adolf Hitler continues to arouse profound feelings of revulsion and attraction. This paper is an exploration of Hitler's psyche from the perspective of a depth psychology. After examining analyses of Hilter's personality by Richard Rubenstein and Alice Miller, the argument is made that we need C.G. Jung's concept of psychic inflation to understand more fully Hitler's impact upon the world. Hitler is seen as inflated by the compensating energies of the Self in response to his deeply wounded ego, a wound he could not mourn. Consequently, he became identified with the dark and destructive energies of the Self which inflated and then usurped his ego. Hitler's demonic and destructive career resulted from that inflation, which he was not able to neutralize. The paper concludes with reflections on the role of mourning in protecting us from the experience of psychic inflation, especially by the Self in its dark and destructive aspects.

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Diplazium tomitaroanum Masam [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Diplazium tomitaroanum Masam Diplazium tomitaroanum Masam Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Masam_L.png Diplazium_tomit...aroanum_Masam_NL.png Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Masam_S.png Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Masa...m_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=L http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=NL http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: Javan tree shrew [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Javan tree shrew Tupaia javanica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Tupaia_java...nica_L.png Tupaia_javanica_NL.png Tupaia_javanica_S.png Tupaia_javanica_NS.png http://bioscienced...bc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+javanica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+java...nica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+javanica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+javanica&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: African savanna elephant [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available African savanna elephant Loxodonta africana Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Loxodonta_afri...cana_L.png Loxodonta_africana_NL.png Loxodonta_africana_S.png Loxodonta_africana_NS....png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+afric...ana&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: wild Bactrian camel [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available wild Bactrian camel Camelus ferus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Camel...us_ferus_L.png Camelus_ferus_NL.png Camelus_ferus_S.png Camelus_ferus_NS.png http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+ferus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+f...erus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+ferus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+ferus&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Pacific electric ray [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Pacific electric ray Torpedo californica Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Torpedo_californica_L.png Torpedo..._californica_NL.png Torpedo_californica_S.png Torpedo_californica_NS.png http://biosc...iencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo+californica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo...+californica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo...+californica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo+californica&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese tree frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica Chordata/Vertebrata/Amphibia Hyla_japonica_L.png Hyla_jap...onica_NL.png Hyla_japonica_S.png Hyla_japonica_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+jap...onica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+jap

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese giant salamander [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Japanese giant salamander Andrias japonicus Chordata/Vertebrata/Amphibia Andrias_japonicus_L.png Andrias_jap...onicus_NL.png Andrias_japonicus_S.png Andrias_japonicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japonicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+jap...onicus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japonicus...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japonicus&t=NS ...

  3. The odontological identification of Eva Braun Hitler.

    Keiser-Nielsen, S; Strøm, F

    1983-01-01

    On May 7th-9th, 1945, a team of Russian pathologists autopsied several bodies found in and near the Fuehrer Bunker in Berlin; among them, a female body (No. 13) was later identified as that of Eva Braun Hitler (EBH), mainly by means of a gold bridge from the lower right jaw. A postmortem photograph of this bridge also shows a separate gold filling. Data now available on the dental treatment of EBH have permitted the present authors to substantiate that this gold filling also came from the mouth of EBH. Further speculation about the fate of EBH would henceforth seem professionally unfounded.

  4. Self-reputation and perception of reputation

    Cho, Junghun

    -, č. 343 (2007), s. 1-36 ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : self - control * self -reputation * time inconsistency Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge.cuni.cz/pdf/wp/Wp343.pdf

  5. Beyond Iconic Simulation

    Dormans, Joris

    2011-01-01

    Realism remains a prominent topic in game design and industry research; yet, a strong academic case can be made that games are anything, but realistic. This article frames realism in games in semiotic terms as iconic simulation and argues that games can gain expressiveness when they move beyond the current focus on iconic simulation. In parallel…

  6. Smart Icon Cards

    Dunbar, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Icons are frequently used in the music classroom to depict concepts in a developmentally appropriate way for students. SmartBoards provide music educators yet another way to share these manipulatives with students. This article provides a step-by-step tutorial to create Smart Icon Cards using the folk song "Lucy Locket."

  7. Iconic decay in schizophrenia.

    Hahn, Britta; Kappenman, Emily S; Robinson, Benjamin M; Fuller, Rebecca L; Luck, Steven J; Gold, James M

    2011-09-01

    Working memory impairment is considered a core deficit in schizophrenia, but the precise nature of this deficit has not been determined. Multiple lines of evidence implicate deficits at the encoding stage. During encoding, information is held in a precategorical sensory store termed iconic memory, a literal image of the stimulus with high capacity but rapid decay. Pathologically increased iconic decay could reduce the number of items that can be transferred into working memory before the information is lost and could thus contribute to the working memory deficit seen in the illness. The current study used a partial report procedure to test the hypothesis that patients with schizophrenia (n = 37) display faster iconic memory decay than matched healthy control participants (n = 28). Six letters, arranged in a circle, were presented for 50 ms. Following a variable delay of 0-1000 ms, a central arrow cue indicated the item to be reported. In both patients and control subjects, recall accuracy decreased with increasing cue delay, reflecting decay of the iconic representation of the stimulus array. Patients displayed impaired memory performance across all cue delays, consistent with an impairment in working memory, but the rate of iconic memory decay did not differ between patients and controls. This provides clear evidence against faster loss of iconic memory representations in schizophrenia, ruling out iconic decay as an underlying source of the working memory impairment in this population. Thus, iconic decay rate can be added to a growing list of unimpaired cognitive building blocks in schizophrenia.

  8. Reputation and its risks.

    Eccles, Robert G; Newquist, Scott C; Schatz, Roland

    2007-02-01

    Regulators, industry groups, consultants, and individual companies have developed elaborate guidelines over the years for assessing and managing risks in a wide range of areas, from commodity prices to natural disasters. Yet they have all but ignored reputational risk, mostly because they aren't sure how to define or measure it. That's a big problem, say the authors. Because so much market value comes from hard-to-assess intangible assets like brand equity and intellectual capital, organizations are especially vulnerable to anything that damages their reputations. Moreover, companies with strong positive reputations attract better talent and are perceived as providing more value in their products and services, which often allows them to charge a premium. Their customers are more loyal and buy broader ranges of products and services. Since the market believes that such companies will deliver sustained earnings and future growth, they have higher price-earnings multiples and market values and lower costs of capital. Most companies, however, do an inadequate job of managing their reputations in general and the risks to their reputations in particular. They tend to focus their energies on handling the threats to their reputations that have already surfaced. That is not risk management; it is crisis management--a reactive approach aimed at limiting the damage. The authors provide a framework for actively managing reputational risk. They introduce three factors (the reputation-reality gap, changing beliefs and expectations, and weak internal coordination) that affect the level of such risks and then explore several ways to sufficiently quantify and control those factors. The process outlined in this article will help managers do a better job of assessing existing and potential threats to their companies' reputations and deciding whether to accept a particular risk or take actions to avoid or mitigate it.

  9. Reputation in Higher Education

    Martensen, Anne; Grønholdt, Lars

    2005-01-01

    leaders of higher education institutions to set strategic directions and support their decisions in an effort to create even better study programmes with a better reputation. Finally, managerial implications and directions for future research are discussed.Keywords: Reputation, image, corporate identity......The purpose of this paper is to develop a reputation model for higher education programmes, provide empirical evidence for the model and illustrate its application by using Copenhagen Business School (CBS) as the recurrent case. The developed model is a cause-and-effect model linking image...

  10. Reputation in Higher Education

    Plewa, Carolin; Ho, Joanne; Conduit, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    Reputation is critical for institutions wishing to attract and retain students in today's competitive higher education setting. Drawing on the resource based view and configuration theory, this research proposes that Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) need to understand not only the impact...... of independent resources but of resource configurations when seeking to achieve a strong, positive reputation. Utilizing fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA), the paper provides insight into different configurations of resources that HEIs can utilize to build their reputation within their domestic...

  11. Building Web Reputation Systems

    Farmer, Randy

    2010-01-01

    What do Amazon's product reviews, eBay's feedback score system, Slashdot's Karma System, and Xbox Live's Achievements have in common? They're all examples of successful reputation systems that enable consumer websites to manage and present user contributions most effectively. This book shows you how to design and develop reputation systems for your own sites or web applications, written by experts who have designed web communities for Yahoo! and other prominent sites. Building Web Reputation Systems helps you ask the hard questions about these underlying mechanisms, and why they're critical

  12. Online Reputation in Automotive

    Vodák Josef

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the issue of online reputation, namely the social networking profile of businesses. Selected companies in the automotive industry through social profiles communicate with their customers, the public and they trying to improve their name and the name of their products in the public eye. Online reputation analysis was carried out to determine the current situation on the territory of Slovakia. On the basis of the data found, measures were proposed to improve the current state and reputation of automotive companies. Recommendations suggested by the findings can be used on any market to improve the current state and increase the competitiveness of automotive companies.

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: North Pacific right whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available North Pacific right whale Eubalaena japonica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eu...theria/Cetacea Eubalaena_japonica_L.png Eubalaena_japonica_NL.png Eubalaena_japonica_S.png Eubalaena_japonic...a_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=NS ...

  14. Book Review: Adolf Hitler. Legende, mythe, werkelijkheid | Ploeger ...

    Abstract. Book Title: Adolf Hitler. Legende, mythe, werkelijkheid. Book Author: Werner Maser. Uitgeverij De Arbeiderspers, Amsterdam, 1973, pp. 531. Met aantekeninge [pp. 429 - 506] en bibliografie [pp. 507 - 531].

  15. Iconic memory requires attention

    Persuh, Marjan; Genzer, Boris; Melara, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether attention plays a role in iconic memory, employing either a change detection paradigm (Experiment 1) or a partial-report paradigm (Experiment 2). In each experiment, attention was taxed during initial display presentation, focusing the manipulation on consolidation of information into iconic memory, prior to transfer into working memory. Observers were able to maintain high levels of performance (accuracy of change detection or categorization) even when co...

  16. Iconic Decay in Schizophrenia

    Hahn, Britta; Kappenman, Emily S.; Robinson, Benjamin M.; Fuller, Rebecca L.; Luck, Steven J.; Gold, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Working memory impairment is considered a core deficit in schizophrenia, but the precise nature of this deficit has not been determined. Multiple lines of evidence implicate deficits at the encoding stage. During encoding, information is held in a precategorical sensory store termed iconic memory, a literal image of the stimulus with high capacity but rapid decay. Pathologically increased iconic decay could reduce the number of items that can be transferred into working memory before the info...

  17. Social Media Reputation

    Etter, Michael Andreas; Ravasi, Davide; Colleoni, Elanor

    motivational drivers and contextual conditions associated with the formation of narratives in traditional news media and social media influence their content, diffusion, and impact significantly. Our analysis suggests that current theories of media reputation may provide an incomplete representation......Social media enable millions of users to create and disseminate narratives about organizations that increase their public exposure and shape public perceptions. In this paper, we draw on the sociology of news production and research on computer-mediated communication to discuss how different...... of the phenomenon, and highlight theoretically relevant differences and interrelationships between reputational dynamics involving news media and social media....

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 Synechocystis_sp_PCC_6803_L.png Synecho...cystis_sp_PCC_6803_NL.png Synechocystis_sp_PCC_6803_S.png Synechocystis_sp_PCC_6803_NS.png http://bi...osciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Synechocystis+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Synecho...cystis+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Synecho...cystis+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Synechocystis

  19. Iconic memory requires attention.

    Persuh, Marjan; Genzer, Boris; Melara, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether attention plays a role in iconic memory, employing either a change detection paradigm (Experiment 1) or a partial-report paradigm (Experiment 2). In each experiment, attention was taxed during initial display presentation, focusing the manipulation on consolidation of information into iconic memory, prior to transfer into working memory. Observers were able to maintain high levels of performance (accuracy of change detection or categorization) even when concurrently performing an easy visual search task (low load). However, when the concurrent search was made difficult (high load), observers' performance dropped to almost chance levels, while search accuracy held at single-task levels. The effects of attentional load remained the same across paradigms. The results suggest that, without attention, participants consolidate in iconic memory only gross representations of the visual scene, information too impoverished for successful detection of perceptual change or categorization of features.

  20. Iconic memory requires attention

    Marjan ePersuh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments investigated whether attention plays a role in iconic memory, employing either a change-detection paradigm (Experiment 1 or a partial-report paradigm (Experiment 2. In each experiment, attention was taxed during initial display presentation, focusing the manipulation on consolidation of information into iconic memory, prior to transfer into working memory. Observers were able to maintain high levels of performance (accuracy of change detection or categorization even when concurrently performing an easy visual search task (low load. However, when the concurrent search was made difficult (high load, observers’ performance dropped to almost chance levels, while search accuracy held at single-task levels. The effects of attentional load remained the same across paradigms. The results suggest that, without attention, participants consolidate in iconic memory only gross representations of the visual scene, information too impoverished for successful detection of perceptual change or categorization of features.

  1. Appropriability, services and reputation

    Dolfsma, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    The appropriability regime (Teece 1986) that innovating service firms face is generally weaker than what firms in manufacturing sectors face. An important means to appropriate benefits from innovation that service firms can use is their reputation. This conceptual paper offers insights into how a

  2. Size and Reputation

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo; Ringsmose, Jens

    2015-01-01

    American public gratitude than the UK. While London has been accused of losing Basra and Musa Qaleh, Copenhagen has been showered with praise and top-posts in NATO. This article explains why demonstrating how the differences in size and reputation gave rise to different expectations of the special...

  3. Design and Iconic Brands

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The VW Beetle, Apple, Porsche … many iconic brands have reached their status with groundbreaking designs. But what makes these designs so special? And is it really the design factor that accounts for the overall success of a brand? Dr. Walter de Silva shares with us his thoughts on iconic designs, the design process and the role of design in branding. Open your heart and mind to his extensive experience in developing designs for Volkswagen, Audi and other brands of the Volkswagen Group

  4. Classification of iconic images

    Zrianina, Mariia; Kopf, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Iconic images represent an abstract topic and use a presentation that is intuitively understood within a certain cultural context. For example, the abstract topic “global warming” may be represented by a polar bear standing alone on an ice floe. Such images are widely used in media and their automatic classification can help to identify high-level semantic concepts. This paper presents a system for the classification of iconic images. It uses a variation of the Bag of Visual Words approach wi...

  5. Comment: 61 [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available .png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for Life Science licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan イメージを差し替えました(添付は旧イメージ) ttamura 2009/04/21 12:50:03 ...

  6. Comment: 215 [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available 215.png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for Life Science licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan アイコン:電子顕微鏡バージョン bando 2010/02/15 15:30:03 2010/02/15 15:30:03 ...

  7. Hitler's scientists science, war and the devil's pact

    Cornwell, John

    2003-01-01

    In a rich and fascinating history John Cornwell tells the epic story of Germany's scientists from the First World War to the collapse of Hitler's Reich. He shows how Germany became the world's Mecca for inventive genius, taking the lion's share of Nobel awards, before Hitler's regime hijacked science for wars of conquest and genocidal racism. Cornwell gives a dramatic account of the wide ranging Nazi research projects, from rockets to nuclear weapons; the pursuit of advanced technology for irrational ends, concluding with with penetrating relevance for today: the inherent dangers of science without conscience.

  8. The Semantic Analysis of Icon

    m Piravivanak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available "Eikon" (Greek word or "Imago" (Latin word signifies a kind of similarity or "likeness". In Plato’s philosophy, this term implies "likeness" of appearance to pattern or symbol. In semantic analysis of icon, which is correlated with Idea, we can find factors such as "perception", "imagination", "likeness", "imitation" (Mimesis, "imaginary ideas", that is, it is not possible to reduce icon to a material picture because it is supported by cultural (symbolic, perceptual and conceptual sources. The process in which an icon is established indicates a special relation between icon and imaginary ideas that is supported by symbolic sources. Then, it is not possible to regard icon as a material picture because icon is an icon of a symbol which is able to play its role visibly in relation to a symbol.

  9. A Unit on Hitler and Nazism for Advanced Students.

    Williams, Elinor C.

    1993-01-01

    This unit on Hitler, the Third Reich, and its echoes in Germany today is based on original source material, such as "Mein Kampf," as well as more recent reports by those directly affected, such as Sichrovsky's "Schuldig Geboren." Teachers of advanced high school or college classes are introduced to some appropriate materials…

  10. Why Study about F.D.R. and Hitler?

    Gross, Richard E.

    1983-01-01

    Both Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933. This 50th anniversary issue contains articles analyzing the two men, and the different political, social, moral, and artistic directions taken by the United States and Germany in the 1930's. American youth have much to learn from what occurred. (CS)

  11. Did Adolf Hitler have syphilis? | Retief | South African Medical Journal

    The evidence that Adolf Hitler may have suffered from incapacitating syphilis is reviewed. Rumours that he acquired syphilis from a prostitute at the age of 20 years, with possible re-infection during World War I, can no longer be verified. Evidence is that he was sexually rather inactive throughout his life. Suggestions that ...

  12. Comment: 219 [Taxonomy Icon

    Full Text Available Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes Oryzias_latipes_L.png 219.png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for Life Sci...ence licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan アイコン:メダカ HNI-Ⅱ系統バージョン bando 2010/02/15 15:31:07 2010/02/16 09:53:27 ...

  13. The Problem with Hitler. The Man Nobody Knows

    Ben Novak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Conocemos mucho sobre Adolf Hitler. Probablemente tenemos más información –hechos, detalles y horarios- sobre la vida de este hombre que la de cualquier otra figura significativa de la contemporaneidad. Sin embargo, todavía sentimos que desconocemos a este hombre. Su vida es uno de los mayores misterios en la historia de la Humanidad. ¿Por qué Hitler, sobre el que conocemos mayores hechos y detalles que ninguna otra figura en la historia contemporánea (quizás en la historia, permanece siendo un misterio? Hitler frustró a sus oponentes, sorprendió a observadores neutrales, y deleitó a sus seguidores consiguiendo lo “imposible”. Él jamás habría accedido al poder sin haber conseguido estos cinco “improbabilidades” que describiremos a continuación, y lo que es más, consiguiendo el apoyo incondicional de sus seguidores, le dio un aura de excepcionalidad y catapultó a este pequeño y feo hombre al poder. Este artículo tratará sobre esas cinco “improbabilidades” y su influencia en la personalidad de Hitler: sus primeros años (1919-1923; el juicio por el Putsch; la refundación del partido; el terremoto político de 1930 y su ascenso al poder._____________________ABSTRACT:We know so much about Adolf Hitler. We probably have more information—facts, details, and minutiae—about this man’s life than any other major figure of modern times. Nonetheless, we still feel that we do not know the man. His life is one of the greatest mysteries in human history. Why is it that Hitler, about whom more facts and details are known than perhaps any other figure in modern history (perhaps in all history, remains such a mystery?  Hitler frustrated his opponents, amazed neutral observers, and delighted his supporters by pulling off the seemingly “impossible”. He never would have made it into power except by accomplishing these five “impossibilities”; and it was this, more than anything else, that bound his supporters to him

  14. Arbitrary Inequality in Reputation Systems

    Frey, Vincenz; van de Rijt, Arnout

    2016-12-01

    Trust is an essential condition for exchange. Large societies must substitute the trust traditionally provided through kinship and sanctions in small groups to make exchange possible. The rise of internet-supported reputation systems has been celebrated for providing trust at a global scale, enabling the massive volumes of transactions between distant strangers that are characteristic of modern human societies. Here we problematize an overlooked side-effect of reputation systems: Equally trustworthy individuals may realize highly unequal exchange volumes. We report the results of a laboratory experiment that shows emergent differentiation between ex ante equivalent individuals when information on performance in past exchanges is shared. This arbitrary inequality results from cumulative advantage in the reputation-building process: Random initial distinctions grow as parties of good repute are chosen over those lacking a reputation. We conjecture that reputation systems produce artificial concentration in a wide range of markets and leave superior but untried exchange alternatives unexploited.

  15. Estimating reputation polarity on microblog posts

    Peetz, M.-H.; de Rijke, M.; Kaptein, R.

    2016-01-01

    In reputation management, knowing what impact a tweet has on the reputation of a brand or company is crucial. The reputation polarity of a tweet is a measure of how the tweet influences the reputation of a brand or company. We consider the task of automatically determining the reputation polarity of

  16. Estimating Reputation Polarity on Microblog Posts

    Peetz, M.H.; Rijke, M. de; Kaptein, R.

    2016-01-01

    In reputation management, knowing what impact a tweet has on the reputation of a brand or company is crucial. The reputation polarity of a tweet is a measure of how the tweet influences the reputation of a brand or company. We consider the task of automatically determining the reputation polarity of

  17. Reputational Information and Strategic Collaboration

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Bendix, Henrik B.

    1998-01-01

    What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration......What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration...

  18. Measuring instruments of corporate reputation

    Damir Grgić

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is focused on the instruments for the measurement of corporate reputation. Recent research of the elements which influence the success of a company shows a growing interest in intangible values. Corporate reputation itself has been identified as one of the key intangible assets which create the company’s added value. Understanding of the importance of corporate reputation has been determined as a significant component of the company’s competitiveness, that is, of its competitive edge. Reputation is a normal part of our life and an integral part of our society. Our interest in the honesty and integrity of others is firmly established in all cultures and nowadays the focus of this interest is switching increasingly on companies. Corporate reputation can be acquired by means of strong, well-developed strategies, which are crucial for the opinion of stakeholders regarding future stability and competitive sustainability of the company. On the other hand, it should be emphasized that in order to manage it, corporate reputation has to be measured first. However, although the concept of corporate reputation is universally accepted and its significance has been recognized especially in the last two decades, the process of its measurement is still at an early stage and there is no universally accepted instrument for its measurement. Therefore, the author of this paper gives an overview of the instruments used for the measurement of corporate reputation which have gained a foothold through former practical usage.

  19. Constructing, Confirming, and Contesting Icons

    Mortensen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    link between icons and their appropriations. Three sets of appropriations are analyzed of the iconic imagery of Alan Kurdi, the refugee boy drowning in the Mediterranean in 2015. First, the numerous appropriations circulated under the Twitter hashtag #humanitywashedashore. Based on genre analysis...

  20. ASN reputation system model

    Hutchinson, Steve; Erbacher, Robert F.

    2015-05-01

    Network security monitoring is currently challenged by its reliance on human analysts and the inability for tools to generate indications and warnings for previously unknown attacks. We propose a reputation system based on IP address set membership within the Autonomous System Number (ASN) system. Essentially, a metric generated based on the historic behavior, or misbehavior, of nodes within a given ASN can be used to predict future behavior and provide a mechanism to locate network activity requiring inspection. This will provide reinforcement of notifications and warnings and lead to inspection for ASNs known to be problematic even if initial inspection leads to interpretation of the event as innocuous. We developed proof of concept capabilities to generate the IP address to ASN set membership and analyze the impact of the results. These results clearly show that while some ASNs are one-offs with individual or small numbers of misbehaving IP addresses, there are definitive ASNs with a history of long term and wide spread misbehaving IP addresses. These ASNs with long histories are what we are especially interested in and will provide an additional correlation metric for the human analyst and lead to new tools to aid remediation of these IP address blocks.

  1. Consumer networks and firm reputation

    Tyran, Jean-Robert; Huck, Steffen; Lünser, Gabriele K.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the role of consumer networks in markets that suffer from moral hazard. Consumers exchange information with neighbors about past experiences with different sellers. Networks foster incentives for reputation building and enhance trust and efficiency in markets....

  2. Corporate Branding and Corporate Reputation

    Karmark, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through o...... for corporate brands and corporate communication.......Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through...... organizational culture and identity, and how, although characterized by parallel developments, new ideas and models from a “third” wave of corporate branding challenge prevailing assumptions of corporate reputation particularly in terms of the assumptions that reputations emerge from authentic and transparent...

  3. Fundamental Paradigms for Corporate Reputation

    Volkan YUNCU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the divergent theoretical approaches from institutional theory, signaling theory, stakeholder theory, social identity theory, game theory, economics theory, mass communication theory, social cognition theory, impression management theory and to transaction cost theory the term corporate reputation is regarded as a conflux for social sciences. The concept of corporate reputation is an interdisciplinary phenomenon and within the social sciences literature it is defined as a state of awareness, as an assessment or as an asset in which reputation functions as an intangible resource and economic asset. In this comprehensive survey, the notion of corporate reputation is addressed in the framework of three basic and most prominent theories - institutional theory, signalling theory, resource-based view- in order to avoid a theoretical confusion and elusiveness.

  4. System of Enterprise Reputation Management

    Derevianko Olena. H.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article offers a system of enterprise reputation management directed at increase of economic benefits from formation and maintenance of high reputation in the result of maximisation of the volume of the incoming cash flows of the enterprise and also their duration and stability. It proves that reputation management, which allows achievement of economic goals of the enterprise, should be directed at key groups of stakeholders: growth of products sales is ensured by consumers, growth of internal stability – by enterprise personnel, growth of external stability – by society, including authority bodies, growth of business value – by investors, owners and partners. The article describes components of the system of enterprise reputation management, the degree of development of which are determined by three vectors: interaction with stakeholders and level of their feedback: messaging, informing, convincing and attracting; activity of the used instruments of reputation management, regularity and intensity, and also quantitative indicators of their application within the framework of directions of the product PR, corporate PR and IR, internal PR, GR and PR-CSR; level of organisational pre-requisites (functional, system and strategic of the system of reputation management.

  5. The 'icon' of output efficiency

    Bligh, L.N.; Evans, S.G.; Larcos, G.; Gruenewald, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Output efficiency (OE) is a well-validated parameter used in the assessment of hydronephrosis. Current analysis on Microdelta appears to produce few low OE values and occasional inability to produce a result. We sought an OE program which gave a reliable response over the full range of values. The aims of this study were to determine: (1) whether OE results are comparable between two computer systems; (2) a normal range for OE on an ICON; (3) inter-observer reproducibility; and (4) the correlation between the two programs and the residual cortical activity ratio (RCA), an index which assesses tracer washout from the 20 min cortical activity/peak cortical activity. Accordingly, two blinded medical radiation scientists reviewed 41 kidneys (26 native, 15 transplant) and calculated OE for each kidney on the ICON and Microdelta computers The OE on the Microdelta and the ICON had good correspondence (r = 0.6%, SEE = 6.2). The extrapolated normal range for ICON OE was 69-92% (mean 80.9%). The inter-observer reproducibility on the ICON was excellent with a CV of 8.7%. ICON OE and RCA had a strong correlation (r = - 0.77, SEE = 0.09), compared with a weaker correlation for the Microdelta (r = 0.47, SEE = 0.13). Processing on the ICON was almost half that of the Microdelta at 4 min compared with 7 min. We conclude that OE generated by these computer programs has good correlation, an established normal range, excellent interobserver reproducibility, but differing correlation with RCA. The response of the ICON program to low ranges of OE is being investigated further

  6. Hitler and the Holocaust. Senior High School U.S. History, World History, English.

    Aldridge, Ron; Townsend, Kenneth

    This curriculum outline, designed for use in U.S. history, world history, or English courses, presents information about Adolf Hitler and the Holocaust. Part 1 provides a rationale for teaching about this subject, while part 2 presents an outline of historical information from 1887 to 1934 concerning Hitler's life and the rise of the Nazi Party.…

  7. Hitler and Humor: Coming to Terms with the Past Through Parody

    Giuliana Sorce

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in German television programming represent Adolf Hitler and his Nazi regime through comedic entertainment. While these programs do not poke fun at the Holocaust itself, they are utilizing the image of Hitler for parodistic purposes. Similar to existing foreign media depicting Hitler as a foolish ruler with farcical mannerisms, newer programs such as the comedy show Switch Reloaded and the movie Hotel Lux show a clumsy and gullible Hitler. This essay argues that these recent representations of Hitler are contributing to the ongoing cultural conversation of the Holocaust, while also encouraging new ways in how Germans can culturally cope with their recent past. Drawing on parody and cultural trauma research, this essay offers evidence from German national media reviews and newspaper articles.

  8. A Lady 'in Proper Proportions'? Feminism, Lytton Strachey, and Florence Nightingale's Reputation, 1918-39.

    Southern, James

    2017-03-01

    Lytton Strachey's Eminent Victorians has long been regarded as a watershed in attitudes to Victorian culture, widely seen as having instigated a revolutionary backlash against the values and heroes of the Victorian era in England. Its impact, however, on the reputations of his four subjects-Thomas Arnold, General Gordon, Cardinal Manning and Florence Nightingale-has been subjected to surprisingly little scholarly attention. Drawing on the work of gender historians, this article reassesses Strachey's effect on the reputation of Nightingale, using biographies and contemporary reviews of Eminent Victorians. It argues that, far from 'debunking' the famous nurse as is generally assumed, Strachey in many ways enhanced her reputation and rendered her a plausible icon for English feminists of the 1920s and 1930s. © The Author [2016]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Indirect reciprocity with trinary reputations.

    Tanabe, Shoma; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2013-01-21

    Indirect reciprocity is a reputation-based mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations when individuals do not repeatedly meet. The conditions under which cooperation based on indirect reciprocity occurs have been examined in great details. Most previous theoretical analysis assumed for mathematical tractability that an individual possesses a binary reputation value, i.e., good or bad, which depends on their past actions and other factors. However, in real situations, reputations of individuals may be multiple valued. Another puzzling discrepancy between the theory and experiments is the status of the so-called image scoring, in which cooperation and defection are judged to be good and bad, respectively, independent of other factors. Such an assessment rule is found in behavioral experiments, whereas it is known to be unstable in theory. In the present study, we fill both gaps by analyzing a trinary reputation model. By an exhaustive search, we identify all the cooperative and stable equilibria composed of a homogeneous population or a heterogeneous population containing two types of players. Some results derived for the trinary reputation model are direct extensions of those for the binary model. However, we find that the trinary model allows cooperation under image scoring under some mild conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Consumer Networks and Firm Reputation

    Huck, Steffen; Lünser, Gabriele K.; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    Arguing that consumers are the carriers of firms' reputations, we examine the role of consumer networks for trust in markets that suffer from moral hazard. When consumers are embedded in a network, they can exchange information with their neighbours about their private experiences with different ...... sellers. We find that such information exchange fosters firms' incentives for reputation building and, thus, enhances trust and efficiency in markets. This efficiency-enhancing effect is already achieved with a rather low level of network density......Arguing that consumers are the carriers of firms' reputations, we examine the role of consumer networks for trust in markets that suffer from moral hazard. When consumers are embedded in a network, they can exchange information with their neighbours about their private experiences with different...

  11. Hitler na crônica militante de Jorge Amado

    Márcio Henrique Muraca

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Militante comunista até meados da década de 1950, Jorge Amado configura sua obra com sopros panfletários. Escritor prolífero, seus escritos vão além dos romances, sendo o baiano um assíduo colaborador em jornais de seu tempo. Entre 1942 e 1945, Amado escreveu a colona “Hora da Guerra”, no jornal O Imparcial, de Salvador. Umas das figuras mais citadas e tratadas pelo autor é Adolf Hitler, sobretudo como metonímia do mal. A figuração demoníaca do líder alemão está articulada, no plano internacional, ao movimento comunista encabeçado por Moscou e, no plano nacional, ao engajamento esquerdista antifascista que enxerga no período da Guerra a oportunidade de virada democrática no Brasil. Em termos literários, a crônica de Amado estabelece uma dicção modernista da linguagem, enquanto ideologicamente pretende convencer pela emoção, ao associar Hitler a uma tríade: ódio-vingança-repúdio, tudo em oposição a uma identidade nacional baseada na miscigenação.

  12. Rapid iconic erasure without masking.

    Tijus, Charles Albert; Reeves, Adam

    2004-01-01

    We report on the erasure of the iconic memory of an array of 12 black letters flashed on a continuously- present white field. Erasure is accomplished by replacing the 16 ms letter array (frame 1) with a blank white frame for 16 ms (frame 2). The letter array returns in frame 3, with from one to six letters missing. Report of the missing letters is accurate without the blank white frame but is impoverished with it, as if interposing the blank erases the icon. Erasure occurs without any obvious luminance masking, 'mud splashes', pattern masking (backward, forward, or metacontrast), lateral masking, or masking by object substitution. Erasure is greatly decreased if the blank is presented one frame earlier or later. We speculate that erasure is due to a rapid reset of the icon produced by an informational mis-match.

  13. Iconic hyperlinks on e-commerce websites.

    Cheng, Hong-In; Patterson, Patrick E

    2007-01-01

    The proper use of iconic interfaces reduces system complexity and helps users interact with systems more easily. However, due to carelessness, inadequate research, and the web's relatively short history, the icons used on web sites often are ambiguous. Because non-identifiable icons may convey meanings other than those intended, designers must consider whether icons are easily identifiable when creating web sites. In this study, visual icons used on e-business web sites were examined by population stereotypy and categorized into three groups: identifiable, medium, and vague. Representative icons from each group were tested by comparing selection performance in groups of student volunteers, with identifiable and medium icons improving performance. We found that only easily identifiable icons can reduce complexity and increase system usability.

  14. Future trends in reputation management

    C.B.M. van Riel (Cees)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Companies must redefine their portfolio in such a way that people will perceive it as having added value for their personal lives, says RSM's Professor Cees van Riel, an expert in reputation management – and there's good reason for the world's biggest companies to

  15. Reputation: An Important Component of Corporations' Value

    Malikeh Beheshtifar; Azam Korouki

    2013-01-01

    Corporate reputation may also be a critical factor in responding to a crisis. Reputation may be seen to arise as an output of different activities in the professions.Reputation is a set of collectively held beliefs about a company's ability to satisfy the interest of its various stakeholders. Corporate reputation also is: Observers’ collective judgments of a corporation based on assessments of the financial, social, and environmental impacts attributed to the corporation over time. The organi...

  16. Voluntary eyeblinks disrupt iconic memory.

    Thomas, Laura E; Irwin, David E

    2006-04-01

    In the present research, we investigated whether eyeblinks interfere with cognitive processing. In Experiment 1, the participants performed a partial-report iconic memory task in which a letter array was presented for 106 msec, followed 50, 150, or 750 msec later by a tone that cued recall of onerow of the array. At a cue delay of 50 msec between array offset and cue onset, letter report accuracy was lower when the participants blinked following array presentation than under no-blink conditions; the participants made more mislocation errors under blink conditions. This result suggests that blinking interferes with the binding of object identity and object position in iconic memory. Experiment 2 demonstrated that interference due to blinks was not due merely to changes in light intensity. Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated that other motor responses did not interfere with iconic memory. We propose a new phenomenon, cognitive blink suppression, in which blinking inhibits cognitive processing. This phenomenon may be due to neural interference. Blinks reduce activation in area V1, which may interfere with the representation of information in iconic memory.

  17. Iconic Religion in Urban Space

    Meyer, B.; Knott, Kim; Krech, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand current dynamics of religious diversity, a focus on the tangible presence of religion and the co-existence of new and longstanding religious buildings, sites and artifacts in urban spaces is a fruitful starting point. Launching the notion of iconic religion, this introduction

  18. Reputational Spillovers: Evidence from French Architecture

    A. Boutinot (Amélie); S.M. Ansari (Shahzad); M. Belkhouja (Mustapha); V. Mangematin (Vincent)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWhile the notion of reputation has attracted much scholarly interest, few studies have addressed the strategic issue of reputational multiplicity and managing the interactions among different types of reputations. We suggest that an organization can have several stakeholder-specific

  19. reputation Risks through Information Security Incidents

    Vitaly Eduardovich Dorokhov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with accounting reputational risks arising through information security breaches in the management of a business entity. Security breach incidents which results to the loss of reputation are identified. Based on this analysis the definition of reputational risk in information security is given.

  20. Hitler and Bormann identifications compared by postmortem craniofacial and dental characteristics.

    Sognnaes, R F

    1980-06-01

    After Stalin told President Truman at Potsdam, July 17, 1945, that Hitler got away, a secret U.S. mission was designated to establish anthropological skull projections pertinent to a potential recovery of Hitler's remains, i.e., by experimentally eliminating the "flesh." Then, conversely, in 1972, when one of the two skulls unearthed next to the Lehrter Railroad station in West Berlin (where Hitler's physician and Bormann had last been seen alive on May 2, 1945), an attempt was made to put facial flesh back on the skull with a view to reconstruct the original facial physiognomy of Martin Bormann. All things considered, it will be documented that the only convincing forensic evidence of Hitler's and Bormann's deaths proved to be the dental data.

  1. "Allakäigu" Adolf Hitler paistab päris inimese moodi / Andres Laasik

    Laasik, Andres, 1960-2016

    2004-01-01

    Mängufilm, kus peategelaseks on Adolf Hitler - "Allakäik" ("Der Untergang") : stsenarist ja produtsent Bernd Eichinger : režissöör Oliver Hirschbiegel : Saksamaa 2004. Lisa "Pimedad Ööd tahavad Hitlerit"

  2. Baltoscandalistide massiline meeleavaldus : Hitler inglise moodi ja tantsuteater spordikirikus / Marko Mägi

    Mägi, Marko

    2000-01-01

    Meeldejäävaimaid "teatripärleid" Rakvere teatrifestivalilt "Baltoscandal 2000" : ameerika New York Wyoming Dance Theatre Projecti all tegutseva Pat Creminsi tantsuõhtu ja inglase Pit Upponi kehastatud Hitler monotükis "Adolf"

  3. What becomes an icon most?

    Holt, Douglas B

    2003-03-01

    Some brands become icons. Think of Nike, Apple, Harley-Davidson: They're the brands every marketer regards with awe. But they are not built according to the principles of conventional marketing, says Harvard Business School marketing professor Douglas Holt. Iconic brands beat the competition not just by delivering innovative benefits, services, or technologies but by forging a deep connection with the culture. A brand becomes an icon when it offers a compelling myth, a story that can help people resolve tensions in their lives. The deepest source of tension in modern society is the disparity between national ideology and the average citizen's reality. When ideologies shift, myths become even more important, and in America, the most potent myths are depictions of rebels. Mountain Dew has long offered a rebel myth in ads showing exciting, vital men who are far from the ideological model of success. Loyal customers drink the beverage to consume the myth. But Mountain Dew's greatest achievement is that it has retained its iconic power by creating fresh rebel myths to suit the tensions of each era: first the hillbilly, who stood in stark contrast to the organization man of the 1950s and 1960s; then the redneck, who rebelled against the investment bankers and consultants of the 1970s and 1980s; and most recently the slacker, who rejects the values and behaviors that, for the past decade, have marked the successful executive. Holt says marketers can learn from Mountain Dew and other iconic brands if they are willing to move beyond conventional brand management and acquire knowledge and skills they may not have. They must learn to target national contradictions instead of just consumer segments, create myths that make sense of confusing societal changes, and speak with a rebel's voice.

  4. Adolf Hitler's Parkinson's disease and an attempt to analyse his personality structure.

    Gerstenbrand, F; Karamat, E

    1999-03-01

    It has been proved that Adolf Hitler suffered from idiopathic Parkinson's disease. No indication for postencephalitic parkinsonism was found in the clinical symptoms or the case history. Professor Max de Crinis established his diagnosis of Parkinson's disease in Hitler early in 1945 and informed the SS leadership, who decided to initiate treatment with a specially prepared 'antiparkinsonian mixture' to be administered by a physician. However, Hitler never received the mixture, this implies that the SS intended to remove the severely diseased 'Leader'. Two different character traits can be analysed in Hitler's personality: on the one hand the typical premorbid personality of parkinsonian patients with uncorrectable mental rigidity, extreme inflexibility and insupportable pedantry. On the other an antisocial personality disorder with lack of ethical and social values, a deeply rooted tendency to betray others and to deceive himself and uncontrollable emotional reactions. This special combination in Hitler's personality resulted in the uncritical conviction of his mission and an enormous driving for recognition. The neuropsychiatric analysis of Hitler's personality could lead to a better explanation of the pathological traits of one of the most conspicuous historical personalities. Copyright 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  5. Political Reputations and Campaign Promises

    Aragones, Enriqueta; Palfrey, Thomas R.; Postlewaite, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    We analyze conditions under which candidates' reputations may affect voters' beliefs over what policy will be implemented by the winning candidate of an election. We develop a model of repeated elections with complete information in which candidates are purely ideological. We analyze an equilibrium in which voters' strategies involve a credible threat to punish candidates who renege on their campaign promises and in which all campaign promises are believed by voters and honored by candidates....

  6. No iconic memory without attention.

    Mack, Arien; Erol, Muge; Clarke, Jason; Bert, John

    2016-02-01

    The experiments reported extend the findings of our earlier paper, (Mack, Erol, & Clarke, 2015) and allow us to reject Bachmann and Aru's critique of our conclusion (2015) that IM requires attention. They suggested our manipulations, which diverted attention from a letter reporting task in a dual task procedure where the task-cue occurred after the array disappeared, might only have affected access to IM and not the "existence of the phenomenal experience". By further decreasing the probability of reporting letters to only 10% and adding a final trial in which the letter matrix was either completely absent or distorted, we found more than half our subjects were unaware of its absence, or distortion i.e., were inattentionally blind. We take this as powerful evidence against the existence of any phenomenal experience component of iconic memory and consistent with the view that iconic memory demands attention and that conscious perception does as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Study reputational risk in an audit

    M. N. Volkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of international sanctions and the formation of intense competition among companies in the Russian market and the related need to assess their risk of reputation that directly affect the value of the goodwill of the company is very important. The article presents the main reputational risks Russian enterprises, which need to be analyzed in the course of the audit. The definition of "reputational risk", which is a challenge due to the problems associated with certain norms of economic security. Currently in economics there are no deep research on managing reputational risks of commercial structures. Is a list of the main risks for Russian companies, such as fraud, financial problems, bankruptcy, information leaks, lawsuits, violating the legislation and labor disputes, allegations of money laundering, tax evasion. It is concluded that the occurrence of at least one of reputational risks will inevitably lead to the gradual emergence of the rest. As well as a diagram the relationship reputational risks. Under the present scheme, identified reputational risks that arise in the financial problems of the enterprise. It was determined that the most significant reputational risks are tax evasion, violation of the law and labor disputes, allegations of money laundering and lawsuits. These risks are managed should have a strategic character. The strategic nature of the management can be achieved through the implementation of effective marketing communication policy. The risk management policy should be made a compulsory item - audit of the calculation and analysis of reputational risk. Compiled scheme of action needed to reputational risk.

  8. Malala and the politics of global iconicity.

    Olesen, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The article presents a case analysis of Malala Yousafzai's transformation into a global injustice icon after she was shot in 2012 by the Pakistani Taliban for advocating for girls' right to education. The analysis focuses on the political aspects of this process and is divided into three parts. The first looks at factors that facilitated Malala's iconization as she was undergoing medical treatment and was unable to participate in her iconization. The second part starts when Malala enters the global public sphere and begins to actively contribute to the iconization process. The third part identifies de-iconizing resistance to Malala from Pakistani actors who see her iconization as a symbolic colonization in which Malala has become a vehicle of the West. Theoretically, the article is located within cultural sociology, but expands it in a political and global direction. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  9. Global Communication with Icons in Environmental Contexts

    Heimbürger, Anneli

    2016-01-01

    Icons are small signs with fixed meanings. Icons are usually context specific. For example in the context of a hotel, the client can often find icons in hotel room books and safety guides. Scandic Hotel chain, for example, currently provides the manual for its safety system in 14 languages. There are at least two major shortcomings of this system: (1) in emergency or panic situations, it is very difficult to find your own language from the leaflet, and (2) there are no Asian ...

  10. Family involvement and hotel online reputation

    J. Diéguez-Soto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Online reputation is nowadays particularly significant in the context of hotel firms due to the high sensitivity and enormous influence of electronic word-of-mouth activities of customers. Since there is still no clear set of online reputation-generating factors, the aim of this paper is to contribute to this knowledge considering the role of family governance as an antecedent of hotel online reputation. Specifically, our purpose is to explain whether the heterogeneity among family firms regarding their family influence on the business exerts a significant effect on online reputation of hotel firms, investigating how family ownership and family management dimensions interact in terms of influencing online reputation. Our findings, based on a sample of 157 Spanish family hotels, indicate a positive influence of family ownership on a hotel's online reputation, augmented by a positive moderating effect of the family management represented by the presence of a family CEO managing the hotel.

  11. Making Sense of Stakeholder Brand Reputations

    von Wallpach, Sylvia; Koll, Oliver

    Marketing science and practice acknowledge that a brand’s reputation amongst consumers is essential for success. However, brand reputation may also affect other stakeholders’ exchange relationships with a brand. We discuss (1) the relevance of a multi-stakeholder approach to brand management, (2...... may show substantial overlap and divergence at the same time. When relating these stakeholders’ reputations to management-intended brand reputation, we find that some reputation elements have permeated to none, one or both groups, but also that the two stakeholder groups may agree about reputation...... elements which are not intended. We discuss how brand management can and why it should use such results in their brand-building efforts....

  12. Examining corporate reputation judgments with generalizability theory.

    Highhouse, Scott; Broadfoot, Alison; Yugo, Jennifer E; Devendorf, Shelba A

    2009-05-01

    The researchers used generalizability theory to examine whether reputation judgments about corporations function in a manner consistent with contemporary theory in the corporate-reputation literature. University professors (n = 86) of finance, marketing, and human resources management made repeated judgments about the general reputations of highly visible American companies. Minimal variability in the judgments is explained by items, time, persons, and field of specialization. Moreover, experts from the different specializations reveal considerable agreement in how they weigh different aspects of corporate performance in arriving at their global reputation judgments. The results generally support the theory of the reputation construct and suggest that stable estimates of global reputation can be achieved with a small number of items and experts. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Reputation Management: Corporate Image and Communication

    Kitchen, Philip J.; Watson, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Reputation was, is, and always will be of immense importance to organisations, whether commercial, governmental or not-for-profit. To reach their goals, stay competitive and prosper, good reputation paves the organisational path to acceptance and approval by stakeholders. Even organisations operating in difficult ethical environments - perhaps self-created - need to sustain a positive reputation where possible.\\ud \\ud Argenti & Druckenmiller argue that, “organisations increasingly recognize t...

  14. Collective Reputation, Professional Regulation and Franchising

    Robert Evans; Timothy W Guinnane

    2007-01-01

    Collective reputation and its associated free-rider problem have been invoked to justify state licensing of professions and to explain the incidence of franchising. We examine the conditions under which it is possible to create a Pareto-improving collective reputation among groups of heterogeneous producers. If the regulator or franchisor cannot credibly commit to high quality then a common reputation can be created only if the groups are not too different and if marginal cost is declining. H...

  15. IPO survival in a reputational market

    Espenlaub, Susanne; Khurshed, Arif; Mohamed, Abdulkadir

    2012-01-01

    We examine IPO survival in a 'reputational' market, the Alternative Investment Market (AIM), where principle-based regulation pivots on the role of a regulatory agent, the nominated advisor (Nomad) to the IPO company. We find that Nomad reputation has a significant impact on IPO survival. IPOs backed by reputable Nomads 'survive longer (by about two years) than those backed by other Nomads. We also find that survival rates of AIM IPOs are broadly comparable to those of North American IPOs. Wh...

  16. Understanding the Influence of Parkinson Disease on Adolf Hitler's Decision-Making during World War II.

    Gupta, Raghav; Kim, Christopher; Agarwal, Nitin; Lieber, Bryan; Monaco, Edward A

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies and a reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the basal ganglia. Common symptoms of PD include a reduction in control of voluntary movements, rigidity, and tremors. Such symptoms are marked by a severe deterioration in motor function. The causes of PD in many cases are unknown. PD has been found to be prominent in several notable people, including Adolf Hitler, the Chancellor of Germany and Führer of Nazi Germany during World War II. It is believed that Adolf Hitler suffered from idiopathic PD throughout his life. However, the effect of PD on Adolf Hitler's decision making during World War II is largely unknown. Here we examine the potential role of PD in shaping Hitler's personality and influencing his decision-making. We purport that Germany's defeat in World War II was influenced by Hitler's questionable and risky decision-making and his inhumane and callous personality, both of which were likely affected by his condition. Likewise his paranoid disorder marked by intense anti-Semitic beliefs influenced his treatment of Jews and other non-Germanic peoples. We also suggest that the condition played an important role in his eventual political decline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Overview of RepLab 2014: Author Profiling and Reputation Dimensions for Online Reputation Management

    Amigó, E.; Carrillo-de-Albornoz, J.; Chugur, I.; Corujo, A.; Gonzalo, J.; Meij, E.; de Rijke, M.; Spina, D.; Kanoulas, E.; Lupu, M.; Clough, P.; Sanderson, M.; Hall, M.; Hanbury, A.; Toms, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the organisation and results of RepLab 2014, the third competitive evaluation campaign for Online Reputation Management systems. This year the focus lied on two new tasks: reputation dimensions classification and author profiling, which complement the aspects of reputation

  18. Fallingwater: Preserving an American icon

    Lynda S. Waggoner

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater is an icon of 20th century architecture. It is undoubtedly one of the most emblematic, best known and most admired buildings in the world. The complex restoration process, which LOGGIA has the honour of including in this issue, has the added virtue that it throws new light on its design and execution. The restoration covers not only compromised structural and aesthetic aspects related to the concrete surfaces of the building but even the environmental management of the whole site, more and more endangered by the large number of visitors received.

  19. Y. Laberge on Jazz Icons.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available (Various artists, Jazz Icons: Series 4. Reelin' In The Years Productions and Naxos, 2.108003. Box Set (8 DVDs, 2009, 10 hours. B&W. All regions (no DVD zone. 1. Coleman Hawkins- Live in '62 & '64- (w/ Sweets Edison and Jo Jones 2. Art Blakey- Live in '65- (w/ Freddie Hubbard 3.  Erroll Garner - Live in '63 & '64 4.  Jimmy Smith- Live in '69 5.  Woody Herman- Live in '64 6.  Anita O'Day- Live In '63 & '70 7.  Art Farmer- Live In '64- (w/ Jim Hall 8. Bonus performances, including excerpts...

  20. Reengineering the Wikipedia for Reputation

    Korsgaard, Thomas Rune; Jensen, Christian D.

    2008-01-01

    The Wikipedia is a free online encyclopedia collaboratively edited by Internet users with a minimum of administration. Anybody can write an article for the Wikipedia and there is no verification of the author’s expertise on the particular subject. This may lead to problems relating to the quality...... of articles, especially completeness and correctness of information, and inaccuracies in the Wikipedia have been rumoured to cause students to fail courses; innocent people have been associated with the killing of John F. Kennedy, etc. Providing a means to assess the correctness, completeness and impartiality...... of information in the Wikipedia is therefore vitally important for the users to build trust in the Wikipedia and ensure the continued success and growth of the system. Integrating a reputation system into the Wikipedia would help users assess the quality of articles and provide a powerful incentive for authors...

  1. Reputational Sanctions in Private and Public Regulation

    J.G. van Erp (Judith)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis article analyses how reputation functions as a mechanism for social control in private and public regulation. It discusses three cases of private markets where reputation is a powerful and effective mechanism for social control. From the case studies, four characteristics of markets

  2. Measuring Corporate Reputation using Sentiment Analysis

    Colleoni, Elanor; Arvidsson, Adam; Hansen, Lars K.

    and monitor reputation through the analysis of user generated content in real-time. In this paper, we show how social media content can be used to measure the online reputation of a company. Furthermore, we present an open platform that uses a sentiment analysis algorithm on twitter traffic to monitor...

  3. Psychohistory before Hitler: early military analyses of German national psychology.

    Bendersky, J W

    1988-04-01

    As part of a grandiose post-World War I psychological project to predict the behavior of nations, the U.S. Military Intelligence Division (MID) utilized racial and social psychological theories to explain an alleged problematic German national character. Though unsuccessful, this project has major significance in the history of psychohistory. For the newly discovered MID files reveal that ideas, attitudes, and biases many psychohistorians subsequently identified as manifestations of a peculiar German national character had previously been held by American officers and reputable psychologists. What American analysts would, in 1940, view as symptoms of a maladjusted German mind, their predecessors had, in 1920, considered valid scientific concepts.

  4. Iconic Memories Die a Sudden Death.

    Pratte, Michael S

    2018-06-01

    Iconic memory is characterized by its large storage capacity and brief storage duration, whereas visual working memory is characterized by its small storage capacity. The limited information stored in working memory is often modeled as an all-or-none process in which studied information is either successfully stored or lost completely. This view raises a simple question: If almost all viewed information is stored in iconic memory, yet one second later most of it is completely absent from working memory, what happened to it? Here, I characterized how the precision and capacity of iconic memory changed over time and observed a clear dissociation: Iconic memory suffered from a complete loss of visual items, while the precision of items retained in memory was only marginally affected by the passage of time. These results provide new evidence for the discrete-capacity view of working memory and a new characterization of iconic memory decay.

  5. REPUTATIONAL AND OPERATIONAL RISKS IN EUROPEAN BANKS

    Roxana HERGHILIGIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past 20 years operational and reputational risk has become more intriguing due to the public scandals of rogue tranding in banks like Barings Bank, Allied Irish Banks, Enron. The purpose of this study is to find the connections between operational risk and reputational risk. Our research shows that there may be a loss of reputation due to operational loss events. Moreover, every type of operational risk, from internal fraud, external fraud, legal and liability losses, processing errors, information security breaches, inappropriate business practice, physical security breaches conduct to a loss of reputation. The limitations of this paper are represented by the fact that do not have enough data to show the real impact of the reputation risk to the financial results of the European Banks.

  6. Human cooperation based on punishment reputation.

    dos Santos, Miguel; Rankin, Daniel J; Wedekind, Claus

    2013-08-01

    The threat of punishment usually promotes cooperation. However, punishing itself is costly, rare in nonhuman animals, and humans who punish often finish with low payoffs in economic experiments. The evolution of punishment has therefore been unclear. Recent theoretical developments suggest that punishment has evolved in the context of reputation games. We tested this idea in a simple helping game with observers and with punishment and punishment reputation (experimentally controlling for other possible reputational effects). We show that punishers fully compensate their costs as they receive help more often. The more likely defection is punished within a group, the higher the level of within-group cooperation. These beneficial effects perish if the punishment reputation is removed. We conclude that reputation is key to the evolution of punishment. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Organising collective reputation: An Ostromian perspective

    Boldizsár Megyesi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available What do collective reputation and communal pastures have in common? Collective reputation is an important type of collective good produced by many business networks. We argue that it has the structure of a common-pool resource, which points to the relevance of Elinor Ostrom’s theory about the community governance of natural common-pool resources. After adapting the Ostromian framework to the phenomenon of collective reputation, we explore the experience of two groups of winemaking enterprises in Hungary who set up systems of quality assurance in order to protect and improve their joint reputation. We examine if the conditions identified by Ostrom as favourable for the self-governance of commons are also conducive to the governance of collective reputation. Our findings validate our conjecture that research on goal-oriented business networks may use insights from the mature theory of ‘governing the commons’. Potential pathways for further research are outlined.

  8. Wyndham Lewis: From Proudhon to Hitler (and back: the Strange Political Journey of Wyndham Lewis

    Alan MUNTON

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available IThe trajectory of Wyndham Lewis’s politics is not yet well understood. Indeed, there is widespread scepticism as to whether there was a trajectory at all, rather than an intrinsic and intransigent right-wing attitude which varied only in acquiring a particularly reprehensible aspect with the rise of Fascism in the 1930s. For many, the publication of Lewis’s uncritical Hitler in 1931 settles the matter: an already-present tendency climaxes in the delusions that Hitler was “a Man of Peace” (ti...

  9. Thirty days at the shooting house: the strange case of Dr. Edmund Forster and Adolf Hitler

    Lewis, David

    2006-01-01

    Em 1918, em um hospital militar da reserva situado na pequena cidade pomerânia de Pasewalk, o neuropsiquiatra Prof. Edmund Forster tratou de um cabo austríaco chamado Adolf Hitler, que apresentava uma neurose de guerra (cegueira histérica), utilizando-se de técnicas terapêuticas sugestivas. Logo após a ascensão de Hitler ao poder na Alemanha nazista, em 1933, o Prof. Forster reuniu-se com um grupo de escritores alemães exilados em Paris e secretamente passou a eles informações sobre o caso. O...

  10. The hysterical blindness of Adolf Hitler: record of a medical chart

    Köpf, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Em 1918, no hospital militar de Pasewalk, o psiquiatra professor Edmund Forster trata, por meio da hipnose, o cabo Adolf Hitler de uma "neurose de guerra" (cegueira histérica). Em 1933, Hitler assume o poder sobre a Alemanha nazista. Pouco tempo depois, Forster entra em contato com um grupo de escritores que viviam em exílio em Paris e passa sigilosamente a eles os seus conhecimentos sobre o caso. O escritor Ernst Weiss, também médico, usa essas informações de Forster para escrever o seu roma...

  11. Trinta dias na casa de tiros: o estranho caso do Dr. Edmund Forster e Adolf Hitler

    Lewis,David

    2006-01-01

    Em 1918, em um hospital militar da reserva situado na pequena cidade pomerânia de Pasewalk, o neuropsiquiatra Prof. Edmund Forster tratou de um cabo austríaco chamado Adolf Hitler, que apresentava uma neurose de guerra (cegueira histérica), utilizando-se de técnicas terapêuticas sugestivas. Logo após a ascensão de Hitler ao poder na Alemanha nazista, em 1933, o Prof. Forster reuniu-se com um grupo de escritores alemães exilados em Paris e secretamente passou a eles informações sobre o caso. O...

  12. Hitler's hysterical blindness: fact or fiction? A cegueira histérica de Hitler: fato ou ficção?

    Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a little known episode that occurred near the end of the Great War in a military reserve hospital located in the small town of Pasewalk, part of the distant region of Pomerania in northern Poland. The story is centered around the transient visual loss of a 29-year-old Austrian messenger of the 16th Bavarian Infantry Regiment. His name: Adolf Hitler.Este artigo trata de um episódio mal conhecido, ocorrido próximo ao final da Primeira Grande Guerra, em um hospital militar da reserva, situado na pequena cidade de Pasewalk, na distante região da Pomerania ao norte da Polônia. No centro desta história, a perda visual transitória de um cabo austríaco de 29 anos, mensageiro do 16º Regimento Bávaro de Infantaria. Seu nome: Adolf Hitler.

  13. Reputation Management for Scientific Organisations – Framework Development and Exemplification

    Petra Morschheuser; Joern Redler

    2015-01-01

    Reputation management deals with establishing, maintaining and strengthening a positive reputation for an object in order to build trust, commitment and lasting relationships. Positive reputation is considered a major intangible asset of companies as it contributes to their value creation. Reputation and reputation management, therefore, are well-established perspectives in marketing theory. This paper examines reputation in matters of scientific organisations. Drawing on conventional (commer...

  14. When expectation confounds iconic memory.

    Bachmann, Talis; Aru, Jaan

    2016-10-01

    In response to the methodological criticism (Bachmann & Aru, 2015) of the interpretation of their earlier experimental results (Mack, Erol, & Clarke, 2015) Mack, Erol, Clarke, and Bert (2016) presented new results that they interpret again in favor of the stance that an attention-free phenomenal iconic store does not exist. Here we once more question their conclusions. When their subjects were unexpectedly asked to report the letters instead of the post-cued circles in the 101th trial where letters were actually absent, they likely failed to see the empty display area because prior experience with letters in the preceding trials produced expectancy based illusory experience of letter-like objects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The equations icons of knowledge

    Bais, Sander

    2005-01-01

    For thousands of years mankind has tried to understand nature. Exploring the world on all scales with instruments of ever more ingenuity, we have been able to unravel some of the great mysteries that surround us. While collecting an overwhelming multitude of observational facts, we discovered fundamental laws that govern the structure and evolution of physical reality. We know that nature speaks to us in the language of mathematics. In this language most of our basic understanding of the physical world can be expressed in an unambiguous and concise way. The most artificial language turns out to be the most natural of all. The laws of nature correspond to equations. These equations are the icons of knowledge that mark crucial turning points in our thinking about the world we happen to live in. They form the symbolic representation of most of what we know, and as such constitute an important and robust part of our culture.

  16. Trust and Online Reputation Systems

    Kwan, Ming; Ramachandran, Deepak

    Web 2.0 technologies provide organizations with unprecedented opportunities to expand and solidify relationships with their customers, partners, and employees—while empowering firms to define entirely new business models focused on sharing information in online collaborative environments. Yet, in and of themselves, these technologies cannot ensure productive online interactions. Leading enterprises that are experimenting with social networks and online communities are already discovering this fact and along with it, the importance of establishing trust as the foundation for online collaboration and transactions. Just as today's consumers must feel secure to bank, exchange personal information and purchase products and services online; participants in Web 2.0 initiatives will only accept the higher levels of risk and exposure inherent in e-commerce and Web collaboration in an environment of trust. Indeed, only by attending to the need to cultivate online trust with customers, partners and employees will enterprises ever fully exploit the expanded business potential posed by Web 2.0. But developing online trust is no easy feat. While various preliminary attempts have occurred, no definitive model for establishing or measuring it has yet been established. To that end, nGenera has identified three, distinct dimensions of online trust: reputation (quantitative-based); relationship (qualitative-based) and process (system-based). When considered together, they form a valuable model for understanding online trust and a toolbox for cultivating it to support Web 2.0 initiatives.

  17. Der Hitler-Stalin-Pakt aus dänischer Perspektive

    Roslyng-Jensen, Palle

    2011-01-01

    Hitler-Stalinpagten august 1939 set i dansk erindringspolitisk og historiografisk perspektiv. De umiddelbare reaktioner fra danske politikere og embedsmænd antager, at pagten vil lede til et tysk angreb på Polen, men de mener fejlagtigt at pagten vil fjerne konfliktfocus fra Danmark og Skandinavien...

  18. Aristotle's Rhetoric, Hitler's Program, and the Ideological Problem of Praxis, Power, and Professional Discourse.

    Katz, Steven B.

    1993-01-01

    Examines Hitler's use of propaganda to construct praxis and define phronesis in Nazi Germany in terms of the rational but open-ended nature of Aristotle's political-ethical thought. Examines the failure of professional discourse surrounding the siting of a low-level nuclear waste facility to create a persuasive reality and yet ideologically…

  19. [The reputation of Spanish hospitals. Basis for developing a reputation index of hospitals].

    Mira, J J; Lorenzo, S; Navarro, I M; Guilabert, M; Pérez-Jover, V

    2015-01-01

    The reputation of the health centers is associated with: greater user preference in obtaining their services, better clinical outcomes and higher care quality and potential for attracting talented professionals. Reputation was evaluated using indexes and scales. The aim of this study is to analyze the attributes that should be gathered in a reputation index for Spanish hospitals. Study based on qualitative techniques of consensus (nominal group technique + Delphi technique). Four dimensions were identified that form the reputation index: care quality, ethical behavior, credibility/confidence and biomedical innovation and research, which in turn are subdivided into 12 components in total. In building a reputation index consideration must be given to the combination of objective data (e.g. quality and safety outcomes) with other data that are subjective in nature (e.g., patient satisfaction). Future studies should go online to validate the reference standards in building a reputation index for hospitals.

  20. A Logical Framework for Reputation Systems

    Nielsen, Mogens; Krukow, Karl Kristian; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2008-01-01

    Reputation systems are meta systems that record, aggregate and distribute information about principals' behaviour in distributed applications. Similarly, history-based access control systems make decisions based on programs' past security-sensitive actions. While the applications are distinct...

  1. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPANIES’ REPUTATION

    Patrizia GAZZOLA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research paper is to analyze in what way Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is capable of enhancing corporate reputation. In the past companies often thought to business and society as being in opposition, but in these days external pressure for CSR continues to grow and numerous organizations monitor, rank, and report social performance. Sometimes the legal, business and reputation risks are great for companies engaging in practices deemed unacceptable. Socially responsible behaviors can increase a company's value in that they can increase the degree of confidence of the various stakeholders and the level of reputation. The research is based on the theoretical framework that supports a thesis of their positive relationship. In the paper the Italian companies with the best CSR reputations are analyzed.

  2. National Reputation Management and the Competition State

    Angell, Svein Ivar; Mordhorst, Mads

    2015-01-01

    of the two approaches, nation branding and public diplomacy. In the next section, national reputation management efforts in Denmark and Norway are compared according to three variables: how they were launched in response to globalization, the role of consultants, and the countries’ different institutional......The paper deals with the national reputation programmes of Denmark and Norway in the period 2005–2010. The first section demonstrates how national reputation management emerged as a part of the globalization discourse and illustrates its hybrid character. The paper then gives a short overview...... settings. The article concludes with a discussion of how the elements of national reputation management interact in the initiatives of the two countries and how this relates to the general change in the relationship between nation-states on the global scene. The paper concludes that Norway and Denmark...

  3. Privacy, Liveliness and Fairness for Reputation

    Schiffner, Stefan; Clauß, Sebastian; Steinbrecher, Sandra

    In various Internet applications, reputation systems are typical means to collect experiences users make with each other. We present a reputation system that balances the security and privacy requirements of all users involed. Our system provides privacy in the form of information theoretic relationship anonymity w.r.t. users and the reputation provider. Furthermore, it preserves liveliness, i.e., all past ratings can influence the current reputation profile of a user. In addition, mutual ratings are forced to be simultaneous and self rating is prevented, which enforces fairness. What is more, without performing mock interactions - even if all users are colluding - users cannot forge ratings. As far as we know, this is the first protocol proposed that fulfills all these properties simultaneously.

  4. Computer Icons and the Art of Memory.

    McNair, John R.

    1996-01-01

    States that key aspects of "memoria," the ancient Art of Memory, especially its focus on vivid representational images set against distinct backgrounds, can be helpful in creating memorable, universal, and easily retrievable computer icons. (PA)

  5. The Impact of Reputation on Market Value

    Simon Cole

    2012-01-01

    Corporate reputations are one of the best known but least understood company assets. Few investment analysts would argue that they have no value but at the same time would struggle to put figures on how much. This paper dispels the myth that intangible means immeasurable. It provides an objective analysis of the scale of the shareholder value tied up in the reputations of many of the largest US and UK public companies. Moreover, it argues that critical understanding of the sources and drivers...

  6. What makes icons appealing? The role of processing fluency in predicting icon appeal in different task contexts.

    McDougall, S.; Reppa, I.; Kulik, J.; Taylor, A.

    2016-01-01

    Although icons appear on almost all interfaces, there is a paucity of research examining the determinants of icon appeal. The experiments reported here examined the icon characteristics determining appeal and the extent to which processing fluency - the subjective ease with which individuals process information - was used as a heuristic to guide appeal evaluations. Participants searched for, and identified, icons in displays. The initial appeal of icons was held constant while ease of process...

  7. Losing to Win: Reputation Management of Online Sellers

    Mo Xiao; Jiandong Ju; Ying Fan

    2013-01-01

    Reputation is generally considered an asset, especially in e-commerce markets. Any reputation system, however, elicits strategic responses from the sellers. Using panel data on a large random sample of online sellers from China’s largest e-commerce platform, Taobao.com, we study how reputation affects revenue, prices, transaction volume, and survival likelihood as well as how sellers manage their reputation. We find that seller reputation has a substantial positive impact on established sel...

  8. Reputation Management in Children on the Autism Spectrum

    Cage, Eilidh; Bird, Geoffrey; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Being able to manage reputation is an important social skill, but it is unclear whether autistic children can manage reputation. This study investigated whether 33 autistic children matched to 33 typical children could implicitly or explicitly manage reputation. Further, we examined whether cognitive processes-theory of mind, social motivation, inhibitory control and reciprocity-contribute to reputation management. Results showed that neither group implicitly managed reputation, and there was...

  9. Hitler blev mere populær i de første år ved magten

    Østergaard, Uffe

    2018-01-01

    Historisk set. Ønsket om revanche efter Versailles-freden var vigtigt for mange tyskere, men ønsket om arbejde gjorde udslaget. Kommentar i anledning af årsdagen for Hitlers magtovertagelse den 30. januar 1933.......Historisk set. Ønsket om revanche efter Versailles-freden var vigtigt for mange tyskere, men ønsket om arbejde gjorde udslaget. Kommentar i anledning af årsdagen for Hitlers magtovertagelse den 30. januar 1933....

  10. [What do we really know about how lance-corporal Adolf Hitler was treated by german military psychiatry?].

    Theiss-Abendroth, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper inquires the hypothesis that Hitler's rise to power was in part due to a hypnotic therapy he had undergone when being treated for hysterical blindness at an army hospital in the town of Pasewalk in October 1918 - as recent contributions have argued. Edmund Forster, his psychiatrist at that time, is supposed to have suggested to Hitler that he would be ordained as Germany's redeemer in times of defeat, thus causing a profound change in his patient's personality. Following three lines of argument, this paper examines if such an assumption can be made plausible. Firstly, it takes a close look at the main historical source which is the novel THE EYEWITNESS, written in German language by the Czech-Jewish author Ernst Weiss. Then it asks if Forster is likely to have chosen hypnosis as a method of treatment. Finally, it exploits the work of the even lesser known author Alexander Moritz Frey who happened to serve close to Hitler as a medical orderly in WW I, thus trying to validate whether or not Hitler really underwent a change of personality in autumn 1918. Although the eventualities of such a hypnotic treatment or a profound change in Hitler's behaviour in that time cannot be disproved, both seem highly unlikely. S One should altogether abandon the notion of Hitler having suffered a permanent change of personality in 1918, be it due to psychiatric treatment or to psychological trauma itself.

  11. Limits to the usability of iconic memory.

    Rensink, Ronald A

    2014-01-01

    Human vision briefly retains a trace of a stimulus after it disappears. This trace-iconic memory-is often believed to be a surrogate for the original stimulus, a representational structure that can be used as if the original stimulus were still present. To investigate its nature, a flicker-search paradigm was developed that relied upon a full scan (rather than partial report) of its contents. Results show that for visual search it can indeed act as a surrogate, with little cost for alternating between visible and iconic representations. However, the duration over which it can be used depends on the type of task: some tasks can use iconic memory for at least 240 ms, others for only about 190 ms, while others for no more than about 120 ms. The existence of these different limits suggests that iconic memory may have multiple layers, each corresponding to a particular level of the visual hierarchy. In this view, the inability to use a layer of iconic memory may reflect an inability to maintain feedback connections to the corresponding representation.

  12. Limits to the Usability of Iconic Memory

    Ronald A. Rensink

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human vision briefly retains a trace of a stimulus after it disappears. This trace—iconic memory—is often believed to be a surrogate for the original stimulus, a representational structure that can be used as if the original stimulus were still present. To investigate its nature, a flicker-search paradigm was developed that relied upon a full scan (rather than partial report of its contents. Results show that for visual search it can indeed act as a surrogate, with little cost for alternating between visible and iconic representations. However, the duration over which it can be used depends on the type of task: some tasks can use iconic memory for at least 240 ms, others for only about 190 ms, while others for no more than about 120 ms. The existence of these different limits suggests that iconic memory may have multiple layers, each corresponding to a particular level of the visual hierarchy. In this view, the inability to use a layer of iconic memory may reflect an inability to maintain feedback connections to the corresponding representation.

  13. [Parkinson's disease of Adolf Hitler and its influence in the development of World War Second].

    Guerrero, A L

    2003-03-01

    Adolf Hitler very probably suffered from Parkinson's disease. The first symptoms of it began to appear in 1937/1938. It is likely that its appearance, and the fear that it caused regarding his survival, lead Hitler to advance his initial projects of military expansion of the great Germany beginning in 1943. Thus, the Second World War broke out in 1939, perhaps quite before the time in which Germany would be prepared. Chronic treatment carried out with opiates, cocaine, amphetamines, and strychnine may very well be related with a very abnormal judgement of the problems and absence of trust in the advice of his team. With this, he would make military decisions that would end up being ill-fated for his interests and which, after 1942, would lead to a change in the course of the war.

  14. Missing Areas in the Bureaucratic Reputation Framework

    Moshe Maor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on insights from social networks, social cognition and the study of emotions, this conceptual article offers a set of ideas and a series of predictions on how systematic variation in two sets of relationships may bear on agency behavior. The first is the agency-audience relationship which revolves around how and what multiple audiences think about public agencies, how these thoughts impact upon agency behavior, how information regarding this behavior is transformed within multiple audiences and how it influences audience memory and behavior regarding that agency. The second is the relationship between the reputation of an agency head and the reputation of that agency. The article identifies six broad areas that offer the most promising possibilities for future research on bureaucratic reputation, calling on researchers to incorporate insights from the aforementioned literatures, to dimensionalize these sets of relationships and to assess the generalizability of reputation’s effects.

  15. Preschoolers affect others' reputations through prosocial gossip.

    Engelmann, Jan M; Herrmann, Esther; Tomasello, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Providing evaluative information to others about absent third parties helps them to identify cooperators and avoid cheaters. Here, we show that 5-year-olds, but not 3-year-olds, reliably engage in such prosocial gossip. In an experimental setting, 5-year-old children spontaneously offered relevant reputational information to guide a peer towards a cooperative partner. Three-year-old children offered such evaluative information only rarely, although they still showed a willingness to inform in a non-evaluative manner. A follow-up study revealed that one component involved in this age difference is children's developing ability to provide justifications. The current results extend previous work on young children's tendency to manage their own reputation by showing that preschoolers also influence others' reputations via gossip. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  16. A NEW APPROACH FOR MEASURING CORPORATE REPUTATION

    Percy Marquina Feldman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the concept of corporate reputation and reviews some of the major points that exist when it comes to measuring it. It thus suggests a new index for measurement and its advantages and disadvantages are pointed out. The consistency of the seven key variables for the collecting indicator is described by the results of a factor analysis and correlations. Finally, the indicator is put to test by gathering the perception of corporate reputation of 1500 individuals for 69 companies belonging to 15 different industrial sectors, in Peru. The results indicate that the proposed index variables are not necessarily of greatest interest to the study sample in which companies have a better performance. Also greater memorial companies aren’t necessarily those that enjoy a greater corporate reputation. Managerial implications for the organizations in the process of managing and monitoring the dimensions involved of this key asset are also referenced.

  17. Managing Corporate Reputation Through Corporate Branding

    Schultz, Majken; Hatch, Mary Jo; Adams, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This article, which concentrates on symbolic management by explaining the role of corporate branding in managing corporate reputation, using Novo Nordisk as a case study, presents three perspectives on corporate branding: the marketing perspective, the organisational perspective and the co...... is a way to influence corporate reputation. The Novo Nordisk management believes the data indicate that corporate branding influenced reputation more than the other way around. Formal brand management practices may work considerably better when they complement rather than try to control existing forces......-creation perspective. The three perspectives reviewed show the possibility of developing a multidisciplinary conceptualisation of corporate branding. They all offer insights important to managing organisations as corporate brands in a multi-stakeholder context and thus to the likelihood that corporate branding...

  18. Strategic Rationality is not Enough: Hitler and the Concept of Crazy States

    1991-08-08

    as well as such luminaries as Wagner and Nietzsche . Finally, reflecting the mood of the times, were the strong undercurrents of nationalist and...result, contradictions and inconsistencies in the articles of faith were unimportant to him so long as they did not interfere with success, "the sole...Root Chair of Strategy. Colonel Jablonsky has written numerous articles and is the author of The Nazi Party in Dissolution: Hitler and the Verbotzeit

  19. Globalization, Superstars, and the Importance of Reputation

    Gibbs, Michael; Tapia, Mikel; Warzynski, Frederic

    We develop a simple model of the effects of reputation on wine prices. An increasing fraction of consumers who are "naïve" (less well informed about wine quality) results in a stronger sensitivity of wine prices to ratings of quality. We then use data on prices and Robert Parker's ratings of wines......, to show that prices have become more related to Parker ratings over time. In addition, we find that a change in Parker rating has a stronger effect on price, the stronger is the wine's reputation....

  20. The experience of the Hitler Youth - boys in national-socialism

    Dominik Figiel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Losing the First World War, unemployment, the generation gap and the cult of youth led to the party of Adolf Hitler gaining popularity in the Weimar Republic. Using slogans of the restoration of a strong Germany the national socialists organized structures, which formed and educated German Youth. Hitler Youth – brought up according to the rule: “youth leads youth” – was a very fertile environment for the spread of the idea of national-socialism. The specific values – racial supremacy, honour, obedience – handed down by parents were the beginning of the Nazi indoctrination. In the later period such organizations as Bund Deutscher Madel or Hitlerjugend took power over German youth. Education, upbringing, ideological content used by the institutions in Nazi Germany are described in the extensive literature on the subject. However, very important are the experiences of individual members of the Hitler Youth that show the Nazi youth activities from a time perspective. Experiences such as the wisdom of life, and gained knowledge, enable recognition and description of the reality which is discussed. The scope of historical and pedagogical research shows the essential facts constituting the full picture of the life of young people during Nazi era.

  1. Dating of ancient icons from Kiev art collections

    Kovalyukh, N; van der Plicht, J; Possnert, G; Skripkin, [No Value; Chlenova, L; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    Icon painting in the Ukraine is rooted in the Byzantine culture, after the conversion to the Christian religion. During the medieval epoch, Kiev became the artistic center for highly skilled icon painters. The icons were painted on wooden boards, specially made for this purpose. Historic dating of

  2. Clustering recommendations to compute agent reputation

    Bedi, Punam; Kaur, Harmeet

    2005-03-01

    Traditional centralized approaches to security are difficult to apply to multi-agent systems which are used nowadays in e-commerce applications. Developing a notion of trust that is based on the reputation of an agent can provide a softer notion of security that is sufficient for many multi-agent applications. Our paper proposes a mechanism for computing reputation of the trustee agent for use by the trustier agent. The trustier agent computes the reputation based on its own experience as well as the experience the peer agents have with the trustee agents. The trustier agents intentionally interact with the peer agents to get their experience information in the form of recommendations. We have also considered the case of unintentional encounters between the referee agents and the trustee agent, which can be directly between them or indirectly through a set of interacting agents. The clustering is done to filter off the noise in the recommendations in the form of outliers. The trustier agent clusters the recommendations received from referee agents on the basis of the distances between recommendations using the hierarchical agglomerative method. The dendogram hence obtained is cut at the required similarity level which restricts the maximum distance between any two recommendations within a cluster. The cluster with maximum number of elements denotes the views of the majority of recommenders. The center of this cluster represents the reputation of the trustee agent which can be computed using c-means algorithm.

  3. Moroccan University Students' Online Reputation Management

    Mansouri, Zoulal; Mrabet, Youssef

    2013-01-01

    Online reputation management (ORM), a component of e-marketing, has grown so fast over the past few years and has become increasingly significant to internet users. The permanence of the content generated on the net, mainly on social networks, has become a huge issue to consider. Because they live in this digital age, digital natives have a major…

  4. Icon arrays help younger children's proportional reasoning.

    Ruggeri, Azzurra; Vagharchakian, Laurianne; Xu, Fei

    2018-06-01

    We investigated the effects of two context variables, presentation format (icon arrays or numerical frequencies) and time limitation (limited or unlimited time), on the proportional reasoning abilities of children aged 7 and 10 years, as well as adults. Participants had to select, between two sets of tokens, the one that offered the highest likelihood of drawing a gold token, that is, the set of elements with the greater proportion of gold tokens. Results show that participants performed better in the unlimited time condition. Moreover, besides a general developmental improvement in accuracy, our results show that younger children performed better when proportions were presented as icon arrays, whereas older children and adults were similarly accurate in the two presentation format conditions. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? There is a developmental improvement in proportional reasoning accuracy. Icon arrays facilitate reasoning in adults with low numeracy. What does this study add? Participants were more accurate when they were given more time to make the proportional judgement. Younger children's proportional reasoning was more accurate when they were presented with icon arrays. Proportional reasoning abilities correlate with working memory, approximate number system, and subitizing skills. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Effect of Typeface on Iconic Storage Capacity.

    Hoffman, Valerie

    Various aspects of iconic memory have been studied in the past. Two tachistoscopic experiments were conducted to examine how legibility of a stimulus affects a subject's ability to recall brief visual presentation. The studies used letter arrays set in four different typefaces (Helvetica, Cooper Black Outline, Electronic, Old English). In the…

  6. Business process of reputation management of food industry enterprises

    Derevianko Olena. H.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the article is development of the methodical base of reputation management directed at formalisation of theoretical provisions and explanation how to organise reputation management at food industry enterprises. The article shows prospectiveness of use of the Business Process Management concept in reputation management. Using the diagram of the Reputation Management business process environment the article shows its key participants (suppliers and clients of the business process) a...

  7. SOME IMPORTANTS DEFINITIONS AND MESUREMENT METHODS OF CORPORATE REPUTATION

    MIHAELA SANDU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Reputation is one of the most important intangible corporate active. In the literature we can find different definitions and methods of measurement for reputation. In this paper we will emphasize some of them. We will see how increased the importance of reputation in the last years. We will see how important this asset is for the company and how a positive reputation determines the competitive advantage for the company.

  8. Non-governmental organizations internal communication in reputation management

    Vaicekauskaitė, Renata

    2010-01-01

    The object of this study is non-governmental organization’s internal communication and its role in reputation management. The aim of this study is to analyse the context of non-governmental organization reputation management and according to it find out the significance of the internal communication factors in non-governmental organization reputation management. The tasks of the study: to analyse the factors which have settled the need of non-governmental organization reputation management; t...

  9. Distortion of online reputation by excess reciprocity: quantification and estimation of unbiased reputation

    Aste, Tomaso; Livan, Giacomo; Caccioli, Fabio

    The peer-to-peer (P2P) economy relies on establishing trust in distributed networked systems, where the reliability of a user is assessed through digital peer-review processes that aggregate ratings into reputation scores. Here we present evidence of a network effect which biases digital reputations, revealing that P2P networks display exceedingly high levels of reciprocity. In fact, these are so large that they are close to the highest levels structurally compatible with the networks reputation landscape. This indicates that the crowdsourcing process underpinning digital reputation is significantly distorted by the attempt of users to mutually boost reputation, or to retaliate, through the exchange of ratings. We uncover that the least active users are predominantly responsible for such reciprocity-induced bias, and that this fact can be exploited to obtain more reliable reputation estimates. Our findings are robust across different P2P platforms, including both cases where ratings are used to vote on the content produced by users and to vote on user profiles.

  10. The Costs of Reneging: Reputation and Alliance Formation

    Gibler, Douglas M.

    2008-01-01

    Reputations are supposed to matter. Decision makers consistently refer to reputations for resolve, and international relations theories confirm the value of being able to credibly signal intentions during times of crisis. However, empirical support for the effects of reputation has been lacking. Problems of strategic selection have hampered…

  11. Does media reputation affect properties of accounts payable?

    Van den Bogaerd, M.; Aerts, Walter

    We examine economic benefits of a firm's corporate reputation by investigating the association between its media reputation and properties of trade payables in a sample of listed UK firms. Our results document a significant positive association between a firm's overall media reputation and both the

  12. Reputation Management in Children on the Autism Spectrum

    Cage, Eilidh; Bird, Geoffrey; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Being able to manage reputation is an important social skill, but it is unclear whether autistic children can manage reputation. This study investigated whether 33 autistic children matched to 33 typical children could implicitly or explicitly manage reputation. Further, we examined whether cognitive processes--theory of mind, social motivation,…

  13. Reputation Management: The New Face of Corporate Public Relations?

    Hutton, James G.; Goodman, Michael B.; Alexander, Jill B.; Genest, Christina M.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an empirical study of the Fortune 500 companies suggesting that "reputation management" is gaining ground as a driving philosophy behind corporate public relations. Finds some interesting correlations between reputation and specific categories of spending. Concludes that if reputation management is the new face of corporate…

  14. Reputation Effects in Public and Private Interactions

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Iwasa, Yoh; Nowak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in a model of indirect reciprocity where people interact in public and private situations. Public interactions have a high chance to be observed by others and always affect reputation. Private interactions have a lower chance to be observed and only occasionally affect reputation. We explore all second order social norms and study conditions for evolutionary stability of action rules. We observe the competition between “honest” and “hypocritical” strategies. The former cooperate both in public and in private. The later cooperate in public, where many others are watching, but try to get away with defection in private situations. The hypocritical idea is that in private situations it does not pay-off to cooperate, because there is a good chance that nobody will notice it. We find simple and intuitive conditions for the evolution of honest strategies. PMID:26606239

  15. Corporate Reputation and the Discipline of Organizational Communication

    Remke, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    Corporate reputation and organizational communication research share some points of theoretical and conceptual overlap, even if the term “corporate reputation” is rarely used within organizational communication scholarship. These shared interests align around theoretical and empirical questions...... related to the core corporate reputation concept. This chapter attempts to highlight these overlaps and offers suggestions as to how organizational communication research can contribute to the understanding of corporate reputation. Specifically, the chapter focuses on the noteworthy overlap of empirical...... interests within organizational communication and corporate reputation research that relates to organizational identity and identification and leadership. Arguing an organizational communicative framework explicates theoretical aspects of corporate reputation that more traditional management and business...

  16. Corporate Social Responsibility, Reputation, and Moral Communication

    Schultz, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    and critically discusses insights from instrumental perspectives and from political-normative perspectives (legitimacy, business ethics). It alternatively develops a constructivist communication view on CSR, building on the “communication constitutes organizations” perspective and a non-dualist turn. It argues...... that CSR is a symbolically mediated, communicative event, which, based on the underlying dynamics of moral communication, does not simply produce reputation, but also result in dysfunctional effects....

  17. Reputation and Humility in Corporate Management

    Argandoña, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Although virtue ethics has gained a firm presence in the theory and practice of corporate management, humility is not ranked as one the chief virtues in the business world. This is probably due to an incomplete or incorrectly focused view of what it means to be a humble person, why a good manager must be humble and how a modest outlook can contribute to both the firm's and the manager's success and reputation.

  18. The Effect of Richard Wagner's Music and Beliefs on Hitler's Ideology

    Carolyn S. Ticker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Holocaust will always be remembered as one of the most horrific and evil events in all of history. One question that has been so pervasive in regards to this historical event is the question of why. Why exactly did Hitler massacre the Jewish people? Why did he come to the conclusion that the Jews were somehow lesser than him, and that it was okay to kill them? What and who were his influences and how did they help form Hitler’s opinions leading up to the Holocaust? Although more than one situation or person influenced Hitler, I believe that one man in particular really helped contribute to Hitler’s ideas, especially about the Jewish people. This man is the famous musician Richard Wagner. While musicologists admit that Wagner was a musical genius, one aspect of his career that is hard to ignore is his strong antisemitism. In addition to speaking about his hatred for the Jews, he also wrote about it in his music, making it hard to glance over. Hitler had been close to the Wagner family, and had an obsessive, cult-like infatuation with Wagner’s music beginning in his childhood. This infatuation with Wagner’s music and his closeness to his later family helped facilitate and solidify his negative views about the Jewish people. In this paper I will explore the antisemitism that is within Wagner’s music and writing, and then I will discuss how Wagner’s antisemitism helped inform, influence, and shape Hitler’s ideas, indirectly assisting in the propagation of the Holocaust.

  19. THE NOTORIOUS, REPUTED AND FAMOUS TRADEMARKS

    Andreea LIVĂDARIU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The owner of a trademark that has a reputation in Romania or in the European Union may request to court to forbid the infringer from using, without its consent, a sign identical or similar to its trademark, but for products or services different from those which are sold or provided under said trademark. According to Law no. 84/1998, the notorious (well-known trademark is the trademark which does not necessarily have to be registered under the Trademark law protection. The Romanian doctrine sustains that famous trademarks do exist. In this paper, we shall attempt to find (if it really does exist the difference between notorious (well-known, reputed and famous trademarks, the criteria by means of which these trademarks shall be distinguished and the evidence by means of which the notoriety, reputation or fame of a trademark may be argued. We shall also present the legal regime and our analysis will be based on the Trademark law, doctrine and case-law studies.

  20. Business process of reputation management of food industry enterprises

    Derevianko Olena. H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article is development of the methodical base of reputation management directed at formalisation of theoretical provisions and explanation how to organise reputation management at food industry enterprises. The article shows prospectiveness of use of the Business Process Management concept in reputation management. Using the diagram of the Reputation Management business process environment the article shows its key participants (suppliers and clients of the business process and identifies their place in formation of the enterprise reputation. It also shows that the reputation management should be considered a business process of the highest level of management. Construction of the flow structure of the Reputation Management business process allows uncovering the logic of interrelation of inlets and outlets within the framework of the specified main stages of the business process: assessment of the current state of reputation, collection of information about stakeholders, identification of PR strategy goals, planning of necessary resources, realisation of the PR strategy, assessment of efficiency and process monitoring. The article offers the flow, functional and organisational structures of the Reputation Management business process for food industry enterprises. Moreover, justification of functional and organisational structures of the Reputation Management business process gives a possibility to distribute functions of reputation management between specific executors and establish responsibility for each stage of the business process.

  1. Reputation Management for Scientific Organisations – Framework Development and Exemplification

    Petra Morschheuser

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Reputation management deals with establishing, maintaining and strengthening a positive reputation for an object in order to build trust, commitment and lasting relationships. Positive reputation is considered a major intangible asset of companies as it contributes to their value creation. Reputation and reputation management, therefore, are well-established perspectives in marketing theory. This paper examines reputation in matters of scientific organisations. Drawing on conventional (commercial marketing models of reputation management and derived characteristics of scientific organisations, a modified framework is deduced, named the Scientific Organisations Reputation Model (SORM. As this model widely fits the specific requirements of this type of organisation it will be useful for the complex task of marketing scientific organisations. Using the SORM framework, scientific organisations will be able to understand the formation of their own reputation in a more comprehensive way and will be able to improve their reputation-relevant management processes. The framework is exemplified and examined more closely using the case of DHBW, the unique German cooperate state university as the interplay of stakeholder patterns and the integration of multi-level marketing activities are carved out and main effects on reputation are demonstrated.

  2. Monsters and Clowns Incorporated: the Representations of Adolf Hitler in British and American WWII Propaganda Posters

    Vallée, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    Dans les affiches de propagande britanniques et américaines de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, les représentations d’Adolf Hitler font de lui soit un monstre effrayant, sanguinaire et diabolique, soit un clown grotesque, un pantin ridicule et risible, une cible qu’il faut frapper, écraser, ou détruire d’une façon ou d’une autre. S’adressant au sens de l’humour du spectateur, à ses peurs ou à son aversion, les artistes de propagande des deux côtés de l’Atlantique utilisent des leviers émotionnels ...

  3. Reputation Life Cycle of The SM Foundation and Customers’ Support

    Muhammad Alishahdani Ibrahim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Reputation is a key construct in organizational sciences since reputation signals its past behavior and its prospect in the future. The purpose of this paper is to explore the development and influence of both personal and organizational reputation and its impact to customer support. The organiza-tion life cycle theory is applied to the “SM” foundation, one of Indonesian largest Islamic social enterprise which experienced fast growth and decline due to the decline of its leader reputation. The case shows that personal reputation of leader is very important in the start-up and early development phase of the organization but it may threaten the organizational sustainability at a later stage when the leader’s personal reputation is conveyed into the organization reputation.

  4. A cegueira histérica de Adolf Hitler: histórico de um boletim médico

    Köpf,Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Em 1918, no hospital militar de Pasewalk, o psiquiatra professor Edmund Forster trata, por meio da hipnose, o cabo Adolf Hitler de uma "neurose de guerra" (cegueira histérica). Em 1933, Hitler assume o poder sobre a Alemanha nazista. Pouco tempo depois, Forster entra em contato com um grupo de escritores que viviam em exílio em Paris e passa sigilosamente a eles os seus conhecimentos sobre o caso. O escritor Ernst Weiss, também médico, usa essas informações de Forster para escrever o seu roma...

  5. Corporate reputation: a review of literature

    Patricia de Salles Vance

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The term corporate reputation has been mentioned in academic papers for some decades however since the 90's the debate about it has been intensified by authors of different areas of study. Therefore, there is a growing pressure around the definition of a construct and the way to measure an organization's corporate reputation. The purpose of this article is to present a literature review on corporate reputation in three different perspectives. At first, we intended to go through the literature, pointing out the different definitions presented on this theme. The second aspect refers to the identification of terms related to corporate reputation, such as corporate brand, corporate identity and corporate communication. Finally, broadening the possibilities of future empiric works, a review of the different proposals of measuring the corporate reputation of organizations is made.O tema reputação corporativa tem sido objeto de estudos acadêmicos há algumas décadas, porém, somente a partir da década de 90 intensificou-se esse interesse, manifestado por autores de diferentes áreas de estudo. A diversidade de abordagens pressiona o debate sobre a definição de um constructo e sobre a forma mais adequada de mensuração da reputação corporativa de uma organização. O propósito deste artigo é realizar uma revisão da literatura sobre a questão da reputação corporativa em três perspectivas distintas. Pretende-se, em primeiro lugar, percorrer a literatura sobre o assunto, apontando as diferentes definições apresentadas do tema. Em seguida, identificar os termos correlatos à reputação corporativa, como: marca corporativa, identidade corporativa e comunicação corporativa. E, finalmente, a fim de ampliar as possibilidades de trabalhos empíricos futuros, examinar criticamente as diferentes propostas de mensuração da reputação corporativa das organizações.

  6. Affixes, Austronesian and iconicity in Malay

    Geoffrey Benjamin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Explanations are offered for the puzzling differences between the forms and meanings of the Malay affixes and those of the broader Austronesian affixal system from which they derive. Oral-gesture iconicity is involved in the encoding of meanings that have both language-internal and social significance. The various verbal prefixes can be analysed both historically and iconically as different combinations of (1 a labial series (m , b , p indicating ‘source orientation’ with (2 r ‘iterative’ and (3 ( N ‘process marker’. The full range of forms becomes apparent only if a sufficiently wide range of Malay and Malayic speech-varieties, both ancient and modern, are brought to bear on the discussion. The different meanings and functions associated with the various prefixes are motivated by the different semantic concerns engendered by the social and cultural circumstances peculiar to each of the speech-varieties.

  7. Iconic cuisines, marketing and place promotion

    Everett, Sally

    2015-01-01

    This chapter looks at how food and drink narratives are utilised to promote and create place identities. By exploring the concepts of heritage branding and constructed historical narratives, it illustrates how iconic cuisines are being employed to promote place and attract consumers. It argues that the marketing process is more than utilising established aspects of heritage cuisines and historical truths, as it is often about creating narratives to meet the evolving needs of destinations and ...

  8. Generic icons – yes or no?

    Krunoslav Bedi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The information society has become increasingly dependant on programs that are subjected to frequent evolutive, basic and logical changes for a variety of reasons whereas the visual design of the program/program interface mostly remains the same or gets slightly modified. The development of technology has become to such an extent a commonplace that the use of redesigned programs implies icons that are visually acceptable although representing obsolete technologies and that are eventually hard to change due to the habits developed by the program users. The research presents a study into the personal preference as to a particular icon, “Save” for example, and into the perception of the visual identities of today's programs under the circumstance of program icons being not compliant with the technological state-of-the-art. Based on the obtained results, the survey that included students attending web design and media technician courses and ECDL course participants who come in contact with computers and programming tools for the first time should enlighten both teachers and designers of programming interfaces about the way of linking the formal knowledge with a constructivist approach to designing and redesigning programs.

  9. A leverage theory of reputation building with co-branding: Complementarity in reputation building

    Choi, Jay Pil; Jeon, Doh-Shin

    2007-01-01

    We present a leverage theory of reputation building with co-branding. We show that under certain conditions, co-branding that links unknown firms in a new sector with established firms in a mature sector allows the unknown firms to signal a high product quality and establish their own reputation. We compare this situation with a benchmark in which both sectors are new and firms signal their quality only with prices. We investigate how this comparison is affected by the nature of the technolog...

  10. Optimized Reputable Sensing Participants Extraction for Participatory Sensor Networks

    Weiwei Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By collecting data via sensors embedded personal smart devices, sensing participants play a key role in participatory sensor networks. Using information provided by reputable sensing participants ensures the reliability of participatory sensing data. Setting a threshold for the reputation, and those whose reputations are bigger than this value are regarded as reputable. The bigger the threshold value is, the more reliable the extracted reputable sensing participant is. However, if the threshold value is too big, only very limited participatory sensing data can be involved. This may cause unexpected bias in information collection. Existing works did not consider the relationship between the reliability of extracted reputable sensing participants and the ratio of usable participatory sensing data. In this work, we propose a criterion for optimized reputable sensing participant extraction in participatory sensor networks. This is achieved based on the mathematical analysis on the ratio of available participatory sensing data and the reliability of extracted reputable sensing participants. Our suggested threshold value for reputable sensing participant extraction is only related to the power of sensing participant’s reputation distribution. It is easy to be applied in real applications. Simulation results tested on real application data further verified the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  11. From Wilhelm von Humboldt to Hitler-are prominent people more prone to have Parkinson's disease?

    Horowski; Horowski; Calne; Calne

    2000-10-01

    We describe Parkinsonism in prominent people, where Wilhelm von Humboldt and Adolf Hitler provide just two spectacular, opposing examples. In both of them, there is little if any evidence that the disease did influence their life ambitions, methods of achieving them or cognitive function in general. Thus, Hitler's Parkinsonism should remain a 'footnote' to history, and historians should acknowledge that in his last years, his trembling, his curbed posture, his slow walking, mask-like face and low voice did not indicate remorse, fear or depression as a consequence of his crimes, but were mere expressions of his disease which, until the end, had no impact on his intellectual skills and methods. The apparently higher incidence of Parkinsonism in prominent people may be just due to their higher visibility, or a consequence of disease-related personality traits (e.g. ambition, perfectionism, rigidity) which may contribute to becoming, e.g., a prominent authoritarian person. Perhaps even some early behaviour pattern (such as repressed emotions or acting in public-which could even increase the risk of some infection) contributes to a greater vulnerability for developing Parkinsonism. Further studying other prominent cases might lead us to better understanding of risk factors and the expression of early Parkinsonism.

  12. Global Communication with Icons : Hotel Safety as an Environmental Context

    Heimbürger, Anneli; Khanom, Sukanya

    2015-01-01

    Icons are small signs with fixed meanings. Icons are usually context specific. For example in the context of a hotel, the client can often find icons in hotel room books and safety guides. Scandic Hotel chain, for example, currently provides the manual for its safety system in 14 languages. There are at least two major shortcomings of this system: (1) in emergency or panic situations, it is very difficult to find your own language from the leaflet, and (2) there are no Asian ...

  13. Reputation based security model for android applications

    Tesfay, Welderufael Berhane; Booth, Todd; Andersson, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The market for smart phones has been booming in the past few years. There are now over 400,000 applications on the Android market. Over 10 billion Android applications have been downloaded from the Android market. Due to the Android popularity, there are now a large number of malicious vendors targeting the platform. Many honest end users are being successfully hacked on a regular basis. In this work, a cloud based reputation security model has been proposed as a solution which greatly mitiga...

  14. A Framework for Concrete Reputation-Systems

    Krukow, Karl Kristian; Nielsen, Mogens; Sassone, Vladimiro

    2005-01-01

    -based trust-management systems aim to provide any formal security-guarantees. We provide a mathematical framework for a class of simple reputation-based systems. In these systems, decisions about interaction are taken based on policies that are exact requirements on agents' past histories. We present a basic...... declarative language, based on pure-past linear temporal logic, intended for writing simple policies. While the basic language is reasonably expressive, we extend it to encompass more practical policies, including several known from the literature. A naturally occurring problem becomes how to efficiently re...

  15. Football and reputation management: the role of online communication platforms

    Salgado, Paulo Jorge Castro Faria; Ruão, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Football clubs, as any type of organization, have a reputation to be managed. More than a sport, football is a business activity that generates high revenues, attracts considerable investments and extreme media exposure. Therefore, reputation management might be considered a key function, when it comes to shape the perceptions of a club’s constituents. As Fombrun (1996) noted, reputations are partly a reflection of the organization’s identity and also their efforts to develop a favorable imag...

  16. Information and Communication Technology Reputation for XU030 Quote Companies

    Seker, Sadi Evren; Cankir, Bilal; Arslan, Mehmet Lutfi

    2014-01-01

    By the increasing spread of information technology and Internet improvements, most of the large-scale companies are paying special attention to their reputation on many types of the information and communication technology. The increasing developments and penetration of new technologies into daily life, brings out paradigm shift on the perception of reputation and creates new concepts like esocieties, techno-culture and new media. Contemporary companies are trying to control their reputation ...

  17. The relationship between labour social responsibility practices and reputation.

    Odriozola Zamanillo, María Dolores; Martín Hernández, Antonio; Luna Sotorrio, Ladislao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyse whether labour social responsibility (LSR) practices influence on corporate reputation (CR) and on labour reputation (LR). Design/methodology/approach – LSR is defined as all those labour practices made by a company for the benefit of employees voluntarily and not imposed by labour legislation. An index developed by content analysis was created to measure LRS. CR and LR scores were obtained from the Business Monitor of Corporate Reputation (ME...

  18. Corporate Reputation Management: Reaching Out to Financial Stakeholders

    Wang, Yijing

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCorporate reputation is important for firms’ long-term performance and competitive advantages. This dissertation sets out to understand the relationship between corporate reputation and a company’s attractiveness to financial stakeholders from different angles. Specifically, I examine the role of corporate reputation in the context of the agency problem to explain the causal chain through which the uncertainties and risks are mitigated for investors. This dissertation contributes ...

  19. Reputation management: Sending the right signal to the right stakeholder

    N. A. DENTCHEV; A. HEENE

    2003-01-01

    Corporate reputation is the result of a signaling activity (Shapiro, 1983), based on available information about a firms’ actions (Fombrun & Shanley, 1990, p. 234). Reputation is also a yardstick of the firm’s relative standing (Shenkar & Yuchtman-Yaar, 1997), routinely used by both internal and external stakeholders (Logsdon & Wood, 2002) when making firm related decisions. However, reputation is not only formed by the information signals sent by a firm or other information intermediaries (F...

  20. Investigating political brand reputation with qualitative projective techniques

    Spry, L; Pich, C; Armannsdottir, G

    2016-01-01

    Corporate brands can be seen as an amalgamation of three related yet distinct elements namely internal identity, external image and external reputation (Balmer and Greyser 2003; Harris and de Chernatony 2001; Spry 2014). Existing research has tended to focus on internal identity and external image with very few studies devoted to the exploration of external reputation and how the concept relates to external image. A strong, clear consistent reputation has the potential to offer a competitive ...

  1. Einstein before Israel Zionist icon or iconoclast?

    Rosenkranz, Ze’ev

    2011-01-01

    Albert Einstein was initially skeptical and even disdainful of the Zionist movement, yet he affiliated himself with this controversial political ideology and today is widely seen as an outspoken advocate for a modern Jewish homeland in Palestine. What enticed this renowned scientist and humanitarian, who repeatedly condemned nationalism of all forms, to radically change his views? Was he in fact a Zionist? Einstein Before Israel traces Einstein's involvement with Zionism from his initial contacts with the movement at the end of World War I to his emigration from Germany in 1933 in the wake of Hitler's rise to power. Drawing on a wealth of rare archival evidence--much of it never before published--this book offers the most nuanced picture yet of Einstein's complex and sometimes stormy relationship with Jewish nationalism. Ze'ev Rosenkranz sheds new light on Einstein's encounters with prominent Zionist leaders, and reveals exactly what Einstein did and didn't like about Zionist beliefs, objectives, and methods...

  2. Lethal Brands: How VEOs Build Reputations

    Gina Scott Ligon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ISIS has run the most effective social media marketing campaign in history. In fact, violent extremist organizations (VEOs market their ideology and organizations to a global audience in ways that rival even the savviest of conventional organizations. However, applying marketing theory and methodology to study VEOs has not been done to date for the security community. Thus, the goal of the present effort is to use a novel lens used to apply the marketing strategies of conventional, for-profit organizations to examine the impact of VEO reputation and legitimacy on VEO performance. We coded tactics used by VEOs such as ISIS to establish a strong brand reputation, and examined the relationship between branding strategies and markers of performance (e.g., recruitment and fundraising using a sample of 60 historically notable VEOs spanning a variety of ideologies, cultures, and periods of peak performance. The primary contribution of studying such a diverse sample of VEOs is the identification of how branding strategies can predict recruitment of talented personnel, financial sources, and organizational capacity for violence. Two key findings discussed are (1 VEOs market and differentiate themselves via malevolently innovative attacks, and (2 even negatively-toned media coverage is related to their long-term fundraising viability.

  3. Overview Michelin Star Reputation Restaurant in Hospitality Industry

    Agung Gita Subakti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For most chefs and Restaurateur, having his restaurant being awarded one or more stars in the famous Michelin Guide Rouge represents a major achievement, recognition of their work, and also important publicity generating increased notoriety. In this specific industry, experts play a decisive role, and reputation of restaurants and chefs are basically established according to their opinions. The aim of this paper is to overview some of the Restaurants achieving the Michelin Star Reputation and able to sustain it for years. Moreover, how these reputations are made and to understand better the development of gaining such a high reputation.

  4. The Shroud of Turin: Relic or icon?

    Dale, W.S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Shroud of Turin, a linen cloth on which appear the imprints of the front and back of a crucified man, can be historically traced to ca. 1354 A.D. Many believe it to be a true relic of the Passion of Christ. Many others regard it as a fake. This paper suggests a third alternative, that it is an icon dating from the 11th century. If future scientific tests, of which radiocarbon dating will be the most important, support this theory, the Shroud of Turin may well be recognized as one of the masterpieces of Christian art. (orig.)

  5. EMOTION DESIGN OF AN ICONIC (VOLKSWAGEN) CAMPERVAN

    Kagali, Linus

    2014-01-01

    This research looks into the thinking and the process of re-design a piece of automotive icon, the Volkswagen campervan known as T1 or microbus. The campervan re-designed with new visual language, and emotions. The re-designed campervan is intended for the new generation of campers and outdoor seekers, a generation of tech savvy people in a world which is rapidly and gradually changing. The need of understanding the relationship between design and emotions fuelled this design project, bas...

  6. Limits to the Usability of Iconic Memory

    Ronald A. Rensink

    2014-01-01

    Human vision briefly retains a trace of a stimulus after it disappears. This trace—iconic memory—is often believed to be a surrogate for the original stimulus, a representational structure that can be used as if the original stimulus were still present. To investigate its nature, a flicker-search paradigm was developed that relied upon a full scan (rather than partial report) of its contents. Results show that for visual search it can indeed act as a surrogate, with little cost for alterna...

  7. Iconic Gestures as Undervalued Representations during Science Teaching

    Chue, Shien; Lee, Yew-Jin; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Iconic gestures that are ubiquitous in speech are integral to human meaning-making. However, few studies have attempted to map out the role of these gestures in science teaching. This paper provides a review of existing literature in everyday communication and education to articulate potential contributions of iconic gestures for science teaching.…

  8. Young Children Create Iconic Gestures to Inform Others

    Behne, Tanya; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about young children's use of deictic gestures such as pointing. Much less is known about their use of other types of communicative gestures, especially iconic or symbolic gestures. In particular, it is unknown whether children can create iconic gestures on the spot to inform others. Study 1 provided 27-month-olds with the…

  9. Does Iconicity in Pictographs Matter? The Influence of Iconicity and Numeracy on Information Processing, Decision Making, and Liking in an Eye-Tracking Study.

    Kreuzmair, Christina; Siegrist, Michael; Keller, Carmen

    2017-03-01

    Researchers recommend the use of pictographs in medical risk communication to improve people's risk comprehension and decision making. However, it is not yet clear whether the iconicity used in pictographs to convey risk information influences individuals' information processing and comprehension. In an eye-tracking experiment with participants from the general population (N = 188), we examined whether specific types of pictograph icons influence the processing strategy viewers use to extract numerical information. In addition, we examined the effect of iconicity and numeracy on probability estimation, recall, and icon liking. This experiment used a 2 (iconicity: blocks vs. restroom icons) × 2 (scenario: medical vs. nonmedical) between-subject design. Numeracy had a significant effect on information processing strategy, but we found no effect of iconicity or scenario. Results indicated that both icon types enabled high and low numerates to use their default way of processing and extracting the gist of the message from the pictorial risk communication format: high numerates counted icons, whereas low numerates used large-area processing. There was no effect of iconicity in the probability estimation. However, people who saw restroom icons had a higher probability of correctly recalling the exact risk level. Iconicity had no effect on icon liking. Although the effects are small, our findings suggest that person-like restroom icons in pictographs seem to have some advantages for risk communication. Specifically, in nonpersonalized prevention brochures, person-like restroom icons may maintain reader motivation for processing the risk information. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  10. Trinta dias na casa de tiros: o estranho caso do Dr. Edmund Forster e Adolf Hitler Thirty days at the shooting house: the strange case of Dr. Edmund Forster and Adolf Hitler

    David Lewis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Em 1918, em um hospital militar da reserva situado na pequena cidade pomerânia de Pasewalk, o neuropsiquiatra Prof. Edmund Forster tratou de um cabo austríaco chamado Adolf Hitler, que apresentava uma neurose de guerra (cegueira histérica, utilizando-se de técnicas terapêuticas sugestivas. Logo após a ascensão de Hitler ao poder na Alemanha nazista, em 1933, o Prof. Forster reuniu-se com um grupo de escritores alemães exilados em Paris e secretamente passou a eles informações sobre o caso. O escritor Ernst Weiss, também médico, mais tarde utilizou tais informações para escrever seu romance A Testemunha Ocular, que, porém, só seria publicado em 1963. Em circunstâncias estranhas, o Prof. Forster cometeu suicídio após uma campanha difamatória sistemática articulada pelos nazistas em 1933. Weiss também cometeu suicídio em 1940, quando as tropas alemãs invadiram Paris. A Gestapo também assassinou diversas outras pessoas envolvidas no prontuário médico de Hitler.In 1918, in a military reserve hospital located in the small pomeranian town of Pasewalk, the neuropsychiatrist Prof. Edmund Forster treated an Austrian caporal called Adolf Hitler, suffering from a war neurosis (hysterical blindness, by means of suggestive techniques. Soon after the Hitler's ascension to the power in the Nazi Germany, in 1933, Dr. Forster met with a group of exiled writers living in Paris and secretly gave them information about the case. The writer Ernst Weiss, also he a physician, latter used this information in order to produce his novel "The Eye Witness", which would be published only in 1963. In strange circumstances, Prof. Forster committed suicide after successive defamatory statements in 1933. Weiss also committed suicide in 1940, when German troops invaded Paris. The Gestapo murdered several other persons involved in the Hitler's medical chart.

  11. Why There Are Certain Parallels Between Joachim C. Fest’s Hitler-Biography and Michael Wolff’s Trump-Book

    Christian Fuchs

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Joachim C. Fest published one of the most widely read Hitler biographies in 1973. Are there parallels of its analytical approach to Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House”?

  12. Building a Reputation System for Wikipedia

    Jensen, Christian D.

    2011-01-01

    Wikipedia is a web-based encyclopedia, written and edited collaboratively by Internet users. Wikipedia has an extremely open editorial policy that allows anybody to create or modify articles. This has promoted a broad and detailed coverage of subjects, but also introduced problems relating...... to the quality of articles. The Wikipedia Recommender System (WRS) was developed to help users determine the credibility of articles based on feedback from other Wikipedia users. The WRS provides a rating which emphasizes feedback from recommenders that the user has agreed with in the past. This paper presents...... some of the work that has gone into the development of the Wikipedia Recommender System. We first developed a generic architecture for integrating a reputation system into existing legacy systems and based our design of the WRS on this architecture. Both the generic architecture and our design...

  13. Instructor Reputation: An Expectancy Relationship Involving Student Ratings and Achievement.

    Perry, Raymond P.

    1979-01-01

    Instructor expressiveness and lecture content were combined with instructor reputation in a 2 X 2 X 2 factorial design to assess interaction effects. Results indicated that reputation interacted with expressiveness but not content, in which students rated positive, high-expressive instructors more favorably than negative, high-expressive…

  14. News and corporate reputation: Empirical findings from the Netherlands

    Meijer, M.M.; Kleinnijenhuis, J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the influence of business news on corporate reputation. A panel survey was used to measure the reputations of six companies and two professional sectors. Media coverage was analyzed by focusing on the tone of two different types of news. News about the successes of the

  15. Publish or perish: how are research and reputation related?

    Linton, Jonathan; Linton, Jonathan D.; Tierney, Robert; Tierney, Robert; Walsh, Steven Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A study of twenty-seven fields in 350 highly ranked universities examines the relationship between reputation and rank. We find that many metrics associated with research prowess significantly correlate to university reputation. However, the next logical step– looking at the relationship that links

  16. Reputation-Seeking by a Government Agency in Europe

    Bækkeskov, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Reputation-seeking can explain some decisions of U.S. federal agencies. However, it has remained unclear whether it could be used in the European context where agencies have proliferated in national and regional governance in the past few decades. This article shows that reputation-seeking can oc...

  17. Corporate Reputation Management: Reaching Out to Financial Stakeholders

    Y. Wang (Yijing)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCorporate reputation is important for firms’ long-term performance and competitive advantages. This dissertation sets out to understand the relationship between corporate reputation and a company’s attractiveness to financial stakeholders from different angles. Specifically, I examine

  18. Pint-Sized Public Relations: The Development of Reputation Management.

    Silver, Ike M; Shaw, Alex

    2018-04-01

    Until recently, many psychologists were skeptical that young children cared about reputation. New evidence suggests that by age five, children begin to understand the broad importance of reputation and to engage in surprisingly sophisticated impression management. These findings prompt exciting new questions about the development of a fundamental social competency. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Combining User Reputation and Provenance Analysis for Trust Assessment

    Ceolin, D.; Groth, P.T.; Maccatrozzo, V.; Fokkink, W.J.; van Hage, W.R.; Nottamkandath, A.

    2016-01-01

    Trust is a broad concept that in many systems is often reduced to user reputation alone. However, user reputation is just one way to determine trust. The estimation of trust can be tackled from other perspectives as well, including by looking at provenance. Here, we present a complete pipeline for

  20. Corporate Reputation: How it Works for Company’s Performance

    Victor Danciu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing pressures of society, consumers, investors and employees on companies to behave more ethical and socially responsible can be easily noticed every day. Under such circumstances, the businesses find that the corporate reputation is more important than ever. This paper focuses on analysis of the corporate reputation and its effects on company’s performance in the new conditions imposed by the stakeholders. First, the analysis emphasizes the contribution Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR might have on Corporate Reputation (CR by communicating the good causes of CSR. Then, the results the corporate reputation has and also the role of Cause Related Marketing (CRM in enhancing corporate reputation on company’s performance are revealed in a detailed way.

  1. Concern for Group Reputation Increases Prosociality in Young Children.

    Engelmann, Jan M; Herrmann, Esther; Tomasello, Michael

    2018-02-01

    The motivation to build and maintain a positive personal reputation promotes prosocial behavior. But individuals also identify with their groups, and so it is possible that the desire to maintain or enhance group reputation may have similar effects. Here, we show that 5-year-old children actively invest in the reputation of their group by acting more generously when their group's reputation is at stake. Children shared significantly more resources with fictitious other children not only when their individual donations were public rather than private but also when their group's donations (effacing individual donations) were public rather than private. These results provide the first experimental evidence that concern for group reputation can lead to higher levels of prosociality.

  2. A cegueira histérica de Adolf Hitler: histórico de um boletim médico The hysterical blindness of Adolf Hitler: record of a medical chart

    Gerhard Köpf

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Em 1918, no hospital militar de Pasewalk, o psiquiatra professor Edmund Forster trata, por meio da hipnose, o cabo Adolf Hitler de uma "neurose de guerra" (cegueira histérica. Em 1933, Hitler assume o poder sobre a Alemanha nazista. Pouco tempo depois, Forster entra em contato com um grupo de escritores que viviam em exílio em Paris e passa sigilosamente a eles os seus conhecimentos sobre o caso. O escritor Ernst Weiss, também médico, usa essas informações de Forster para escrever o seu romance A Testemunha Ocular (Der Augenzeuge, que é publicado somente em 1963. O professor Forster comete suicídio em 1933, depois de sofrer uma campanha de denúncias difamantes. Weiss também se suicida em 1940, quando as tropas alemãs invadem Paris. Várias outras pessoas relacionadas ao boletim médico sobre Hitler são assassinadas pela Gestapo.In 1918, in a military reserve hospital located in the small Pomeranian town of Pasewalk, the neuropsychiatrist Prof. Edmund Forster treated Adolf Hitler, an Austrian caporal suffering from a war neurosis (hysterical blindness, using suggestive techniques. Soon after the Hitler’s ascension to the power in the Nazi Germany, in 1933, Dr. Forster met with a group of exiled writers living in Paris and secretly gave them the information about the case. The writer Ernst Weiss, that was also a physician, latter used this information in order to produce his roman "The Eye Witness", which would be published only in 1963. In 1933, Prof. Forster committed suicide in strange circunstances after successive defamatory statements against him. Also Weiss committed suicide in 1940, when German troops invaded Paris. The Gestapo also murdered several other persons involved in the Hitler’s medical chart.

  3. Comprehension of iconic gestures by chimpanzees and human children.

    Bohn, Manuel; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Iconic gestures-communicative acts using hand or body movements that resemble their referent-figure prominently in theories of language evolution and development. This study contrasted the abilities of chimpanzees (N=11) and 4-year-old human children (N=24) to comprehend novel iconic gestures. Participants learned to retrieve rewards from apparatuses in two distinct locations, each requiring a different action. In the test, a human adult informed the participant where to go by miming the action needed to obtain the reward. Children used the iconic gestures (more than arbitrary gestures) to locate the reward, whereas chimpanzees did not. Some children also used arbitrary gestures in the same way, but only after they had previously shown comprehension for iconic gestures. Over time, chimpanzees learned to associate iconic gestures with the appropriate location faster than arbitrary gestures, suggesting at least some recognition of the iconicity involved. These results demonstrate the importance of iconicity in referential communication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Iconicity can ground the creation of vocal symbols.

    Perlman, Marcus; Dale, Rick; Lupyan, Gary

    2015-08-01

    Studies of gestural communication systems find that they originate from spontaneously created iconic gestures. Yet, we know little about how people create vocal communication systems, and many have suggested that vocalizations do not afford iconicity beyond trivial instances of onomatopoeia. It is unknown whether people can generate vocal communication systems through a process of iconic creation similar to gestural systems. Here, we examine the creation and development of a rudimentary vocal symbol system in a laboratory setting. Pairs of participants generated novel vocalizations for 18 different meanings in an iterative 'vocal' charades communication game. The communicators quickly converged on stable vocalizations, and naive listeners could correctly infer their meanings in subsequent playback experiments. People's ability to guess the meanings of these novel vocalizations was predicted by how close the vocalization was to an iconic 'meaning template' we derived from the production data. These results strongly suggest that the meaningfulness of these vocalizations derived from iconicity. Our findings illuminate a mechanism by which iconicity can ground the creation of vocal symbols, analogous to the function of iconicity in gestural communication systems.

  5. Visual Iconicity Across Sign Languages: Large-Scale Automated Video Analysis of Iconic Articulators and Locations

    Östling, Robert; Börstell, Carl; Courtaux, Servane

    2018-01-01

    We use automatic processing of 120,000 sign videos in 31 different sign languages to show a cross-linguistic pattern for two types of iconic form–meaning relationships in the visual modality. First, we demonstrate that the degree of inherent plurality of concepts, based on individual ratings by non-signers, strongly correlates with the number of hands used in the sign forms encoding the same concepts across sign languages. Second, we show that certain concepts are iconically articulated around specific parts of the body, as predicted by the associational intuitions by non-signers. The implications of our results are both theoretical and methodological. With regard to theoretical implications, we corroborate previous research by demonstrating and quantifying, using a much larger material than previously available, the iconic nature of languages in the visual modality. As for the methodological implications, we show how automatic methods are, in fact, useful for performing large-scale analysis of sign language data, to a high level of accuracy, as indicated by our manual error analysis.

  6. Effects of Iconicity and Semantic Relatedness on Lexical Access in American Sign Language

    Bosworth, Rain G.; Emmorey, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Iconicity is a property that pervades the lexicon of many sign languages, including American Sign Language (ASL). Iconic signs exhibit a motivated, nonarbitrary mapping between the form of the sign and its meaning. We investigated whether iconicity enhances semantic priming effects for ASL and whether iconic signs are recognized more quickly than…

  7. [An objective of the education of mankind: delegated destructiveness. Mass murder of psychiatric patients in Hitler Germany].

    Scharfetter, C

    1984-01-01

    The extermination of 100,000 inpatients of mental hospitals and 5,000 mentally retarded children in NAZI-Germany under the Hitler régime between 1939 and 1941 is reported. The ideological precursors of these actions are traced. The ethological and anthropological aspects of inner-species destruction in the phylogenesis of mankind are traced. Psychological and social conditions of social destructiveness under "normal" and exceptional conditions are discussed and the consequences for education drawn.

  8. Methods for reliability evaluation of trust and reputation systems

    Janiszewski, Marek B.

    2016-09-01

    Trust and reputation systems are a systematic approach to build security on the basis of observations of node's behaviour. Exchange of node's opinions about other nodes is very useful to indicate nodes which act selfishly or maliciously. The idea behind trust and reputation systems gets significance because of the fact that conventional security measures (based on cryptography) are often not sufficient. Trust and reputation systems can be used in various types of networks such as WSN, MANET, P2P and also in e-commerce applications. Trust and reputation systems give not only benefits but also could be a thread itself. Many attacks aim at trust and reputation systems exist, but such attacks still have not gain enough attention of research teams. Moreover, joint effects of many of known attacks have been determined as a very interesting field of research. Lack of an acknowledged methodology of evaluation of trust and reputation systems is a serious problem. This paper aims at presenting various approaches of evaluation such systems. This work also contains a description of generalization of many trust and reputation systems which can be used to evaluate reliability of such systems in the context of preventing various attacks.

  9. Stochastic Optimal Control for Online Seller under Reputational Mechanisms

    Milan Bradonjić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we propose and analyze a model which addresses the pulsing behavior of sellers in an online auction (store. This pulsing behavior is observed when sellers switch between advertising and processing states. We assert that a seller switches her state in order to maximize her profit, and further that this switch can be identified through the seller’s reputation. We show that for each seller there is an optimal reputation, i.e., the reputation at which the seller should switch her state in order to maximize her total profit. We design a stochastic behavioral model for an online seller, which incorporates the dynamics of resource allocation and reputation. The design of the model is optimized by using a stochastic advertising model from [1] and used effectively in the Stochastic Optimal Control of Advertising [2]. This model of reputation is combined with the effect of online reputation on sales price empirically verified in [3]. We derive the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB differential equation, whose solution relates optimal wealth level to a seller’s reputation. We formulate both a full model, as well as a reduced model with fewer parameters, both of which have the same qualitative description of the optimal seller behavior. Coincidentally, the reduced model has a closed form analytical solution that we construct.

  10. Reputation, a universal currency for human social interactions

    Milinski, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Decision rules of reciprocity include ‘I help those who helped me’ (direct reciprocity) and ‘I help those who have helped others’ (indirect reciprocity), i.e. I help those who have a reputation to care for others. A person's reputation is a score that members of a social group update whenever they see the person interacting or hear at best multiple gossip about the person's social interactions. Reputation is the current standing the person has gained from previous investments or refusal of investments in helping others. Is he a good guy, can I trust him or should I better avoid him as a social partner? A good reputation pays off by attracting help from others, even from strangers or members from another group, if the recipient's reputation is known. Any costly investment in others, i.e. direct help, donations to charity, investment in averting climate change, etc. increases a person's reputation. I shall argue and illustrate with examples that a person's known reputation functions like money that can be used whenever the person needs help. Whenever possible I will present tests of predictions of evolutionary theory, i.e. fitness maximizing strategies, mostly by economic experiments with humans. PMID:26729939

  11. The Iconic Chora: A Space of Kenotic Presence and Void

    Isar, Nicoletta

    2000-01-01

    and a cognitive theory that have proved incapable of explaining the endurance of the Byzantine scheme of the icon and of its oxymoronic (paradoxical) definition, except through an appeal to primitivism. I will attempt to put forward an alternative reading of the iconic space and show how vision itself......  The purpose of this essay is not exhaustive research concerning the iconic space and vision in Byzantium. Rather, the aim is to reshuffle the texts - from theological statements in defense of the image to liturgical, living ritual - to build up a polemical discourse with a tradition...

  12. An iconic programming language for sensor-based robots

    Gertz, Matthew; Stewart, David B.; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we describe an iconic programming language called Onika for sensor-based robotic systems. Onika is both modular and reconfigurable and can be used with any system architecture and real-time operating system. Onika is also a multi-level programming environment wherein tasks are built by connecting a series of icons which, in turn, can be defined in terms of other icons at the lower levels. Expert users are also allowed to use control block form to define servo tasks. The icons in Onika are both shape and color coded, like the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, thus providing a form of error control in the development of high level applications.

  13. Iconic and Immediate Memory in Elementary School Children.

    Ewert, G. D.; Janzen, H. L.

    1978-01-01

    As age and grade increased, recall on all tasks increased; subjects in grades three to six were also seen to have a fully developed Iconic Memory, while only sixth graders had a functionally developed Immediate Memory. (KR)

  14. Business Model Innovation: How Iconic Business Models Emerge

    Mikhalkina, T.; Cabantous, L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite ample research on the topic of business model innovation, little is known about the cognitive processes whereby some innovative business models gain the status of iconic representations of particular types of firms. This study addresses the question: How do iconic business models emerge? In other words: How do innovative business models become prototypical exemplars for new categories of firms? We focus on the case of Airbnb, and analyze how six mainstream business media publications ...

  15. Corporate social responsibility, reputation, and moral communication: A constructivist view

    Schultz, F.; Carroll, C.

    2013-01-01

    Conditions and notions of corporate reputation underwent in the last years a fundamental change. Economic and technological processes of globalization, modernization, and rationalization enforced the institutionalization of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the corporate world. It is often

  16. Legitimacy and Reputation in the Institutional Field of Food Safety

    Merkelsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to examine how the institutional context of food safety affects and is affected by concerns for legitimacy and reputation. The paper employs a neo-institutional approach to analyzing the institutional field of food safety in a case study of a multinational...... food service provider where a tension between conflicting institutional logics implied a reputational challenge. The study shows how food safety as a well-defined operational risk is transformed into a high-priority reputational risk and how actors in the field of food safety are caught in a state...... of mutual distrust, partly as a consequence of an intense politicization of food risk over the past years and partly as a result of their respective concerns for legitimacy. The study points to how the field of food safety is colonized by a reputational logic that is paradoxically reproduced by actors...

  17. A Reputation-Based Identity Management Model for Cloud Computing

    Lifa Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of cloud computing, most research on identity management has concentrated on protecting user data. However, users typically leave a trail when they access cloud services, and the resulting user traceability can potentially lead to the leakage of sensitive user information. Meanwhile, malicious users can do harm to cloud providers through the use of pseudonyms. To solve these problems, we introduce a reputation mechanism and design a reputation-based identity management model for cloud computing. In the model, pseudonyms are generated based on a reputation signature so as to guarantee the untraceability of pseudonyms, and a mechanism that calculates user reputation is proposed, which helps cloud service providers to identify malicious users. Analysis verifies that the model can ensure that users access cloud services anonymously and that cloud providers assess the credibility of users effectively without violating user privacy.

  18. Identifying online user reputation in terms of user preference

    Dai, Lu; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Identifying online user reputation is significant for online social systems. In this paper, taking into account the preference physics of online user collective behaviors, we present an improved group-based rating method for ranking online user reputation based on the user preference (PGR). All the ratings given by each specific user are mapped to the same rating criteria. By grouping users according to their mapped ratings, the online user reputation is calculated based on the corresponding group sizes. Results for MovieLens and Netflix data sets show that the AUC values of the PGR method can reach 0.9842 (0.9493) and 0.9995 (0.9987) for malicious (random) spammers, respectively, outperforming the results generated by the traditional group-based method, which indicates that the online preference plays an important role for measuring user reputation.

  19. Ranking online quality and reputation via the user activity

    Liu, Xiao-Lu; Guo, Qiang; Hou, Lei; Cheng, Can; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2015-10-01

    How to design an accurate algorithm for ranking the object quality and user reputation is of importance for online rating systems. In this paper we present an improved iterative algorithm for online ranking object quality and user reputation in terms of the user degree (IRUA), where the user's reputation is measured by his/her rating vector, the corresponding objects' quality vector and the user degree. The experimental results for the empirical networks show that the AUC values of the IRUA algorithm can reach 0.9065 and 0.8705 in Movielens and Netflix data sets, respectively, which is better than the results generated by the traditional iterative ranking methods. Meanwhile, the results for the synthetic networks indicate that user degree should be considered in real rating systems due to users' rating behaviors. Moreover, we find that enhancing or reducing the influences of the large-degree users could produce more accurate reputation ranking lists.

  20. REPUTATIONAL CAPITAL OF POLITICAL ACTORS AS PUBLIC PROCUREMENT

    A. E. Rudakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The author examines the reputational characteristics of the formation of political actors at the expense of the state budget, the specificity of the mechanism of implementation of government procurement and modern Russian practice.

  1. Can "reputation management" overcome failures in corporate governance?\\ud

    Watson, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Poor corporate governance appears to undo all the efforts of corporate communication activities in promoting and managing reputation. Is it a factor of poor leadership by senior management or a generalised failure of organisational relationships?

  2. Reputational Capital of the Modern Russia: Formation and Realization Problems

    O. E. Grishin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Design and implementation of reputational capital allows you to gain an advantage over other equal participants of the political process: to increase the effectiveness of different types of agreements, strengthen mutually beneficial cooperation with other countries to attract foreign investment, maintain the loyalty of domestic business. Reputation - one of the main factors to predict the behavior of the state in domestic and foreign policy.

  3. Regulatory Sanctions and Reputational Damage in Financial Markets

    Armour, John; Mayer, Colin; Polo, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We study the impact of the announcement of enforcement of financial and securities regulation by the UK’s Financial Services Authority and London Stock Exchange on the market price of penalized firms. Since these agencies do not announce enforcement until a penalty is levied, their actions provide a uniquely clean dataset on which to examine reputational effects. We find that reputational sanctions are very real: their stock price impact is on average ten times larger than the financial penal...

  4. Managing the Reputation of DHS and its Components

    2009-06-01

    and Nicholas Hopkins, “Reputation, Social Identity and the Self,” in Social Identity Theory : Constructive and Critical Advances, ed. Dominic Abrams and...were painted with the same brush as them.”92 Social network theory helps to show how reputation can travel across the links between...management is corporate social responsibility (CSR). This element relates specifically to the “social, philanthropic and community

  5. The Impact Of Viral Marketing On Corporate Brand Reputation

    Lawrence Mpele Lekhanya

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the impact of viral marketing on corporate brand reputation. The study aimed to analyse and evaluate the use of viral marketing and the impact it has on the reputation of corporate branding of South African companies. The study was conducted in four South African provinces. The sample consisted of 75 companies, selected using a stratified sampling method, with respondents completing a five-point Likert scale questionnaire with the assistance of an interviewer. The result...

  6. The effect of customer-base reputation on brand equity

    Shahriyar Azizi; Behnaz Roustaian; Manizghe Gharache; Bahman Hajipour

    2016-01-01

    Among the most important sectors of Iranian economy is banking, an industry which has become more competitive over the recent decade. An objective of banks marketing is to increase brand equity. Since reputation is an important factor in improvement of brand equity, the present research evaluated the impact of bank customer-based reputation on total brand equity. A survey was conducted in Tehran metropolitan area, with the sample size of 246 people. Findings showed the positive impact of bank...

  7. The Road to Language Learning Is Not Entirely Iconic: Iconicity, Neighborhood Density, and Frequency Facilitate Acquisition of Sign Language.

    Caselli, Naomi K; Pyers, Jennie E

    2017-07-01

    Iconic mappings between words and their meanings are far more prevalent than once estimated and seem to support children's acquisition of new words, spoken or signed. We asked whether iconicity's prevalence in sign language overshadows two other factors known to support the acquisition of spoken vocabulary: neighborhood density (the number of lexical items phonologically similar to the target) and lexical frequency. Using mixed-effects logistic regressions, we reanalyzed 58 parental reports of native-signing deaf children's productive acquisition of 332 signs in American Sign Language (ASL; Anderson & Reilly, 2002) and found that iconicity, neighborhood density, and lexical frequency independently facilitated vocabulary acquisition. Despite differences in iconicity and phonological structure between signed and spoken language, signing children, like children learning a spoken language, track statistical information about lexical items and their phonological properties and leverage this information to expand their vocabulary.

  8. Serving the Reich the struggle for the soul of physics under Hitler

    Ball, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Serving the Reich tells the story of physics under Hitler. While some scientists tried to create an Aryan physics that excluded any 'Jewish ideas', many others made compromises and concessions as they continued to work under the Nazi regime. Among them were three world-renowned physicists: Max Planck, pioneer of quantum theory, regarded it as his moral duty to carry on under the regime. Peter Debye, a Dutch physicist, rose to run the Reich's most important research institute before leaving for the United States in 1940. Werner Heisenberg, discovered the Uncertainty Principle, and became the leading figure in Germany's race for the atomic bomb. After the war most scientists in Germany maintained they had been apolitical or even resisted the regime: Debye claimed that he had gone to America to escape Nazi interference in his research; Heisenberg and others argued that they had deliberately delayed production of the atomic bomb. Mixing history, science and biography, Serving the Reich is a gripping exploration o...

  9. Modeling of Task Planning for Multirobot System Using Reputation Mechanism

    Zhiguo Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of task planning for multirobot system is developed from two parts: task decomposition and task allocation. In the part of task decomposition, the conditions and processes of decomposition are elaborated. In the part of task allocation, the collaboration strategy, the framework of reputation mechanism, and three types of reputations are defined in detail, which include robot individual reputation, robot group reputation, and robot direct reputation. A time calibration function and a group calibration function are designed to improve the effectiveness of the proposed method and proved that they have the characteristics of time attenuation, historical experience related, and newly joined robot reward. Tasks attempt to be assigned to the robot with higher overall reputation, which can help to increase the success rate of the mandate implementation, thereby reducing the time of task recovery and redistribution. Player/Stage is used as the simulation platform, and three biped-robots are established as the experimental apparatus. The experimental results of task planning are compared with the other allocation methods. Simulation and experiment results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for multi-robot collaboration system.

  10. Managing the risks of reputational disasters in Japan. Theoretical basis and need for information volunteers

    Itoh, Makoto

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses how and why a disaster caused by a bad reputation (Fu-Hyo) occurs in Japan. We survey several cases of reputational disasters and develop a simple model of the process of how a reputational disaster occurs, lasts, and vanishes. We also show the necessity of third parties or information volunteers to reduce the damage of a reputational disaster. (author)

  11. Managing the risks of reputational disasters in Japan. Theoretical basis and need for information volunteers

    Itoh, Makoto [University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    This paper discusses how and why a disaster caused by a bad reputation (Fu-Hyo) occurs in Japan. We survey several cases of reputational disasters and develop a simple model of the process of how a reputational disaster occurs, lasts, and vanishes. We also show the necessity of third parties or information volunteers to reduce the damage of a reputational disaster. (author)

  12. The periodic table: icon and inspiration.

    Poliakoff, Martyn; Tang, Samantha

    2015-03-13

    To start this discussion meeting on the new chemistry of the elements held on 12 May 2014, Martyn Poliakoff, Foreign Secretary of the Royal Society, was invited to give the opening remarks. As a chemist and a presenter of the popular online video channel 'The periodic table of videos', Martyn communicates his personal and professional interest in the elements to the public, who in turn use these videos both as an educational resource and for entertainment purposes. Ever since Mendeleev's first ideas for the periodic table were published in 1869, the table has continued to grow as new elements have been discovered, and it serves as both icon and inspiration; its form is now so well established that it is recognized the world over as a symbol for science. This paper highlights but a few of the varied forms that the table can take, such as an infographic, which can convey the shortage of certain elements with great impact. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. A Collaborator's Reputation Can Bias Decisions and Anxiety under Uncertainty.

    Qi, Song; Footer, Owen; Camerer, Colin F; Mobbs, Dean

    2018-02-28

    Informational social influence theory posits that under conditions of uncertainty, we are inclined to look to others for advice. This leaves us remarkably vulnerable to being influenced by others' opinions or advice. Rational agents, however, do not blindly seek and act on arbitrary information, but often consider the quality of its source before committing to a course of action. Here, we ask the question of whether a collaborator's reputation can increase their social influence and, in turn, bias perception and anxiety under changing levels of uncertainty. Human male and female participants were asked to provide estimations of dot direction using the random dot motion (RDM) perceptual discrimination task and were paired with transient collaborators of high or low reputation whom provided their own estimations. The RDM varied in degrees of uncertainty and joint performance accuracy was linked to risk of an electric shock. Despite providing identical information, we show that collaborating with a high reputation compared with a low reputation partner, led to significantly more conformity during the RDM task for uncertain perceptual decisions. Consequently, high reputation partners decreased the subjects' anxiety during the anticipatory shock periods. fMRI data showed that parametric changes in conformity resulted in increased activity in the ventromedial PFC, whereas dissent was associated with increased in activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). Furthermore, the dACC and insula, regions involved in anticipatory pain, were significantly more active when collaborating with a low reputation partner. These results suggest that information about reputation can influence both cognitive and affective processes and in turn alter the neural circuits that underlie decision-making and emotion. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Humans look to others for advice when making decisions under uncertainty. Rational agents, however, do not blindly seek information, but often

  14. Wine quality, reputation, denominations: How cooperatives and private wineries compete?

    Schamel Guenter H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze how cooperatives in Northern Italy (Alto Adige and Trentino compete with private wineries regarding product quality and reputation, i.e. if firm organization affects wine quality and winery reputation. Moreover, we examine if cooperatives with deep roots in their local economy specialize in specific regional denomination rules (i.e. DOC, IGT. Compared to private wineries, cooperatives face additional challenges in order to raise wine quality, among them appropriate incentives that induce individual growers to supply high quality grapes (e.g. vineyard management and grape pricing schemes to lower yields. The quality reputation of a winery with consumers depends crucially on its winemaking skills. Wine regions differ with respect to climatic conditions and quality denomination rules. Assuming similar climatic conditions within wine regions as well as winemaking skills between firms, incentive schemes to induce individual growers to supply high quality grapes and quality denomination rules remain crucial determinants of wine quality and winery reputation when comparing different regions and firm organizational forms. The data set analyzed allows differentiating local cooperatives vs. private wineries and denotes retail prices, wine quality evaluations, indicators for winery reputation, and distinct denomination rules. We employ a hedonic pricing model in order to test the following hypothesis: First, wines produced by cooperatives suffer a significant reputation and/or wine quality discount relative to wines from private producers. Second, cooperatives and/or private wineries specialize in specific wine denominations for which they receive a price premium relative the competing organizational form. Our results are mixed. However, we reject the hypothesis that cooperatives suffer a reputation/wine quality discount relative to private producers for the Alto Adige wine region. Moreover, we find that regional cooperatives and private

  15. Transition Icons for Time-Series Visualization and Exploratory Analysis.

    Nickerson, Paul V; Baharloo, Raheleh; Wanigatunga, Amal A; Manini, Todd M; Tighe, Patrick J; Rashidi, Parisa

    2018-03-01

    The modern healthcare landscape has seen the rapid emergence of techniques and devices that temporally monitor and record physiological signals. The prevalence of time-series data within the healthcare field necessitates the development of methods that can analyze the data in order to draw meaningful conclusions. Time-series behavior is notoriously difficult to intuitively understand due to its intrinsic high-dimensionality, which is compounded in the case of analyzing groups of time series collected from different patients. Our framework, which we call transition icons, renders common patterns in a visual format useful for understanding the shared behavior within groups of time series. Transition icons are adept at detecting and displaying subtle differences and similarities, e.g., between measurements taken from patients receiving different treatment strategies or stratified by demographics. We introduce various methods that collectively allow for exploratory analysis of groups of time series, while being free of distribution assumptions and including simple heuristics for parameter determination. Our technique extracts discrete transition patterns from symbolic aggregate approXimation representations, and compiles transition frequencies into a bag of patterns constructed for each group. These transition frequencies are normalized and aligned in icon form to intuitively display the underlying patterns. We demonstrate the transition icon technique for two time-series datasets-postoperative pain scores, and hip-worn accelerometer activity counts. We believe transition icons can be an important tool for researchers approaching time-series data, as they give rich and intuitive information about collective time-series behaviors.

  16. Limited capacity for contour curvature in iconic memory.

    Sakai, Koji

    2006-06-01

    We measured the difference threshold for contour curvature in iconic memory by using the cued discrimination method. The study stimulus consisting of 2 to 6 curved contours was briefly presented in the fovea, followed by two lines as cues. Subjects discriminated the curvature of two cued curves. The cue delays were 0 msec. and 300 msec. in Exps. 1 and 2, respectively, and 50 msec. before the study offset in Exp. 3. Analysis of data from Exps. 1 and 2 showed that the Weber fraction rose monotonically with the increase in set size. Clear set-size effects indicate that iconic memory has a limited capacity. Moreover, clear set-size effect in Exp. 3 indicates that perception itself has a limited capacity. Larger set-size effects in Exp. 1 than in Exp. 3 suggest that iconic memory after perceptual process has limited capacity. These properties of iconic memory at threshold level are contradictory to the traditional view that iconic memory has a high capacity both at suprathreshold and categorical levels.

  17. Multiple gossip statements and their effect on reputation and trustworthiness.

    Sommerfeld, Ralf D; Krambeck, Hans-Jürgen; Milinski, Manfred

    2008-11-07

    Empirical and theoretical evidence from various disciplines indicates that reputation, reputation building and trust are important for human cooperation, social behaviour and economic progress. Recently, it has been shown that reputation gained in games of indirect reciprocity can be transmitted by gossip. But it has also been shown that gossiping has a strong manipulative potential. We propose that this manipulative potential is alleviated by the abundance of gossip. Multiple gossip statements give a better picture of the actual behaviour of a person, and thus inaccurate or fake gossip has little power as long as it is in the minority. In addition, we investigate the supposedly strong connection between reciprocity, reputation and trust. The results of this experimental study (with 11 groups of 12 students each) document that gossip quantity helps to direct cooperation towards cooperators. Moreover, reciprocity, trust and reputations transferred via gossip are positively correlated. This interrelation might have helped to reach the high levels of cooperation that can be observed in humans.

  18. Reputation-based secure sensor localization in wireless sensor networks.

    He, Jingsha; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Xingye; Zhang, Yuqiang; Zhang, Ting; Fu, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    Location information of sensor nodes in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is very important, for it makes information that is collected and reported by the sensor nodes spatially meaningful for applications. Since most current sensor localization schemes rely on location information that is provided by beacon nodes for the regular sensor nodes to locate themselves, the accuracy of localization depends on the accuracy of location information from the beacon nodes. Therefore, the security and reliability of the beacon nodes become critical in the localization of regular sensor nodes. In this paper, we propose a reputation-based security scheme for sensor localization to improve the security and the accuracy of sensor localization in hostile or untrusted environments. In our proposed scheme, the reputation of each beacon node is evaluated based on a reputation evaluation model so that regular sensor nodes can get credible location information from highly reputable beacon nodes to accomplish localization. We also perform a set of simulation experiments to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reputation-based security scheme. And our simulation results show that the proposed security scheme can enhance the security and, hence, improve the accuracy of sensor localization in hostile or untrusted environments.

  19. Personagens femininas na obra "Hitler manda lembranças", de Roberto Drummond: um retrato de Stela

    Walkiria Felix Dias

    2016-01-01

    O artigo em questão discute a obra Hitler manda lembranças, de Roberto Drummond. Um romance ambientado em Belo Horizonte no começo dos anos 80, quando a ditadura agonizava no Brasil. Nesse contexto mistura-se a história de seis personagens que fazem parte de uma lista de 417 futuros desempregados. Além disso, os personagens são assombrados pelo que houve na Europa durante o Holocausto. Nesta época, inúmeros judeus fugiram da Europa rumo aos trópicos buscando asilo político no Brasil. Porém...

  20. Financial Perceptions on Oil Spill Disasters: Isolating Corporate Reputational Risk

    José M. Feria-Domínguez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to isolate the corporate reputational risk faced by US oil and gas companies—as listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE—after recent oil spill disasters. For this purpose, we have conducted a standard short-horizon daily event study analysis aimed at the calibration of the financial perceptions caused by these environmental episodes between 2005 and 2011, and the drop effect on the market value of the firms analyzed. We not only find significant negative impact on the stock prices of the companies analyzed but also significant cumulative negative abnormal returns (CAR around the accidental spillages, especially for the longest event windows. Corporate reputational risk is also identified and even measured by adjusting abnormal returns by a certain loss ratio. A new metric, CAR(Rep, is then proposed to disentangle operational losses and the reputational damage derived from such negative financial perceptions.

  1. Research on Trust Propagation Models in Reputation Management Systems

    Zhiyuan Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Feedback based reputation systems continue to gain popularity in eCommerce and social media systems today and reputation management in large social networks needs to manage cold start and sparseness in terms of feedback. Trust propagation has been widely recognized as an effective mechanism to handle these problems. In this paper we study the characterization of trust propagation models in the context of attack resilience. We characterize trust propagation models along three dimensions: (i uniform propagation and conditional propagation, (ii jump strategies for breaking unwanted cliques, and (iii decay factors for differentiating recent trust history from remote past history. We formally and experimentally show that feedback similarity is a critical measure for countering colluding attacks in reputation systems. Without feedback similarity guided control, trust propagations are vulnerable to different types of colluding attacks.

  2. Propagation of Economic Inequality Through Reciprocity and Reputation.

    Hackel, Leor M; Zaki, Jamil

    2018-04-01

    Reciprocity and reputation are powerful tools for encouraging cooperation on a broad scale. Here, we highlight a potential side effect of these social phenomena: exacerbating economic inequality. In two novel economic games, we manipulated the amount of money with which participants were endowed and then gave them the opportunity to share resources with others. We found that people reciprocated more toward higher-wealth givers, compared with lower-wealth givers, even when those givers were equally generous. Wealthier givers also achieved better reputations than less wealthy ones and therefore received more investments in a social marketplace. These discrepancies were well described by a formal model of reinforcement learning: Individuals who weighted monetary outcomes, rather than generosity, when learning about interlocutors also most strongly helped wealthier individuals. This work demonstrates that reciprocity and reputation-although globally increasing prosociality-can widen wealth gaps and provides a precise account of how inequality grows through social processes.

  3. Domestic dogs comprehend human communication with iconic signs.

    Kaminski, Juliane; Tempelmann, Sebastian; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-11-01

    A key skill in early human development is the ability to comprehend communicative intentions as expressed in both nonlinguistic gestures and language. In the current studies, we confronted domestic dogs (some of whom knew many human 'words') with a task in which they had to infer the intended referent of a human's communicative act via iconic signs--specifically, replicas and photographs. Both trained and untrained dogs successfully used iconic replicas to fetch the desired item, with many doing so from the first trial. Dogs' ability to use photographs in this same situation was less consistent. Because simple matching to sample in experimental contexts typically takes hundreds of trials (and because similarity between iconic sign and target item did not predict success), we propose that dogs' skillful performance in the current task reflects important aspects of the comprehension of human communicative intentions.

  4. Understanding iconic texts from Spanish - literature course in pre - university

    Marialina Ana García Escobio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is presented in this article the development of the skills to understand better, which is one of the essential objectives of the teaching of the mother tongue, that is why to understand the image as iconic sign requires taking its value as a system of meaning, but also to sustain their particular difference in front of the purely denotative structures, especially against the model of all semiotic: the linguistic sign in this process of understandin g is necessary to teach students to decode texts of different codes and place them in more complex communicative situations, that is why the present proposal is new; a way to understand iconic texts, from the teaching of Spanish and Literature in preuniver sity, so that the iconic communication is common for all subjects. It is also assumed the historical and cultural approach from Vigotsky and followers, and the developing didactics presented by Castellanos and others.

  5. Iconic gestures prime related concepts: an ERP study.

    Wu, Ying Croon; Coulson, Seana

    2007-02-01

    To assess priming by iconic gestures, we recorded EEG (at 29 scalp sites) in two experiments while adults watched short, soundless videos of spontaneously produced, cospeech iconic gestures followed by related or unrelated probe words. In Experiment 1, participants classified the relatedness between gestures and words. In Experiment 2, they attended to stimuli, and performed an incidental recognition memory test on words presented during the EEG recording session. Event-related potentials (ERPs) time-locked to the onset of probe words were measured, along with response latencies and word recognition rates. Although word relatedness did not affect reaction times or recognition rates, contextually related probe words elicited less-negative ERPs than did unrelated ones between 300 and 500 msec after stimulus onset (N400) in both experiments. These findings demonstrate sensitivity to semantic relations between iconic gestures and words in brain activity engendered during word comprehension.

  6. Reputation, Princing and the E-Science Grid

    Anandasivam, Arun; Neumann, Dirk

    One of the fundamental aspects for an efficient Grid usage is the optimization of resource allocation among the participants. However, this has not yet materialized. Each user is a self-interested participant trying to maximize his utility whereas the utility is not only determined by the fastest completion time, but on the prices as well. Future revenues are influenced by users' reputation. Reputation mechanisms help to build trust between loosely coupled and geographically distributed participants. Providers need an incentive to reduce selfish cancellation of jobs and privilege own jobs. In this chapter we present first an offline scheduling mechanism with a fixed price. Jobs are collected by a broker and scheduled to machines. The goal of the broker is to balance the load and to maximize the revenue in the network. Consumers can submit their jobs according to their preferences, but taking the incentives of the broker into account. This mechanism does not consider reputation. In a second step a reputation-based pricing mechanism for a simple, but fair pricing of resources is analyzed. In e-Science researchers do not appreciate idiosyncratic pricing strategies and policies. Their interest lies in doing research in an efficient manner. Consequently, in our mechanism the price is tightly coupled to the reputation of a site to guarantee fairness of pricing and facilitate price determination. Furthermore, the price is not the only parameter as completion time plays an important role, when deadlines have to be met. We provide a flexible utility and decision model for every participant and analyze the outcome of our reputation-based pricing system via simulation.

  7. Neural correlates of gender differences in reputation building.

    Francesca Garbarini

    Full Text Available Gender differences in cooperative choices and their neural correlates were investigated in a situation where reputation represented a crucial issue. Males and females were involved in an economic exchange (trust game where economic and reputational payoffs had to be balanced in order to increase personal welfare. At the behavioral level, females showed a stronger reaction to negative reputation judgments that led to higher cooperation than males, measured by back transfers in the game. The neuroanatomical counterpart of this gender difference was found within the reward network (engaged in producing expectations of positive results and reputation-related brain networks, such as the self-control network (engaged in strategically resisting the temptation to defect and the mentalizing network (engaged in thinking about how one is viewed by others, in which the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and the medial (MPFC respectively play a crucial role. Furthermore, both DLPFC and MPFC activity correlated with the amount of back transfer, as well as with the personality dimensions assessed with the Big-Five Questionnaire (BFQ-2. Males, according to their greater DLPFC recruitment and their higher level of the BFQ-2 subscale of Dominance, were more focused on implementing a profit-maximizing strategy, pursuing this target irrespectively of others' judgments. On the contrary, females, according to their greater MPFC activity and their lower level of Dominance, were more focused on the reputation per se and not on the strategic component of reputation building. These findings shed light on the sexual dimorphism related to cooperative behavior and its neural correlates.

  8. Iconic site development and legitimating policies : The changing role of water in Dutch identity discourses

    Terlouw, Kees

    2014-01-01

    This paper focusses on the role of iconic sites in the legitimation of policies. Traditionally the legitimation of administrations is based on national communities. The undermining of these territorial communities, through globalisation and individualisation, make iconic sites more important to

  9. A study on design guidelines for the icons used in nuclear power plants

    Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Dhong Ha

    2004-05-01

    In this project, advantages and disadvantages of icons on electronic displays were analyzed, and design procedures, design evaluation principles, and design guidelines for icons on electronic displays were developed. In addition, as design guidelines for special effects applicable to icons on electronic displays, guidelines for color coding, flashing, and 3-dimensional effects were developed. A questionnaire survey was performed to investigate how NPP operators consider methods representing icons on electronic displays (such as colors, dynamic effects, and 3-dimensional effects) compared to methods representing icons by using outlines in the P and ID drawings. NPP operators' preference of the icons designed in accordance with icon design guidelines to the icons without considering the guidelines was also investigated

  10. Semantic distance as a critical factor in icon design for in-car infotainment systems.

    Silvennoinen, Johanna M; Kujala, Tuomo; Jokinen, Jussi P P

    2017-11-01

    In-car infotainment systems require icons that enable fluent cognitive information processing and safe interaction while driving. An important issue is how to find an optimised set of icons for different functions in terms of semantic distance. In an optimised icon set, every icon needs to be semantically as close as possible to the function it visually represents and semantically as far as possible from the other functions represented concurrently. In three experiments (N = 21 each), semantic distances of 19 icons to four menu functions were studied with preference rankings, verbal protocols, and the primed product comparisons method. The results show that the primed product comparisons method can be efficiently utilised for finding an optimised set of icons for time-critical applications out of a larger set of icons. The findings indicate the benefits of the novel methodological perspective into the icon design for safety-critical contexts in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemists’ knowledge object. Formulation, modification and abandonment of iconic model

    Rómulo Gallego Badillo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of different perspectives in regards to chemistry scientific statute. The category of scientific model was considered to characterize the proposal and development of technological-iconic model. It was necessary to have a look at the time in which the introduction of analogical and symbolic models was indispensable to modify the initial model. It also established the way in which the technological-iconic model can be a didactic foundation to lead secondary students towards Chemistry as one of the natural sciences.

  12. ICON: An artificial intelligence approach to radiologic differential diagnosis

    Swett, H.A.; Miller, P.L.

    1986-01-01

    ICON is a computer system, developed using artificial intelligence techniques, that is designed to help radiologists manage the large body of knowledge needed to perform differential diagnosis in radiology. The system's domain is lung disease in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders. The radiologist proposes a diagnostic hypothesis which he or she thinks explains the known clinical and chest radiographic findings. ICON responds with an English-language prose critique that discusses how and why the proposed diagnosis is or is not supported by the clinical literature and suggests further findings or clinical information that might make the diagnosis more secure

  13. A Complex Estimation Function based on Community Reputation for On-line Transaction Systems

    Yu Yang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A reputation management system is crucial in online transaction systems, in which a reputation function is its central component. We propose a generalized set-theoretic reputation function in this paper, which can be configured to meet various assessment requirements of a wide range of reputation scenarios encountered in online transaction nowadays. We analyze and verify tolerance of this reputation function against various socio-communal reputation attacks. We find the function to be dynamic, customizable and tolerant against different attacks. As such it can serve well in many online transaction systems such as e-commerce websites, online group activities, and P2P systems.

  14. When does inferring reputation probability countervail temptation in cooperative behaviors for the prisoners’ dilemma game?

    Dai, Yu; Lu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    In evolutionary games, the temptation mechanism reduces cooperation percentage while the reputation mechanism promotes it. Inferring reputation theory proposes that agent's imitating neighbors with the highest reputation takes place with a probability. Although reputation promotes cooperation, when and how it enhances cooperation is still a question. This paper investigates the condition where the inferring reputation probability promotes cooperation. Hence, the effects of reputation and temptation on cooperation are explored under the spatial prisoners’ dilemma game, utilizing the methods of simulation and statistical analysis. Results show that temptation reduces cooperation unconditionally while reputation promotes it conditionally, i.e. reputation countervails temptation conditionally. When the inferring reputation probability is less than 0.5, reputation promotes cooperation substantially and thus countervails temptation. However, when the inferring reputation probability is larger than 0.5, its contribution to cooperation is relatively weak and cannot prevent temptation from undermining cooperation. Reputation even decreases cooperation together with temptation when the probability is higher than 0.8. It should be noticed that inferring reputation does not always succeed to countervail temptation and there is a specific interval for it to promote cooperation

  15. Reputations in Markets with Asymmetric Information: A Classroom Game

    Wolf, James R.; Myerscough, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe a classroom game used to teach students about the impact of reputations in markets with asymmetric information. The game is an extension of Holt and Sherman's lemons market game and simulates a market under three information conditions. In the full information setting, all participants know both the quality and the price of…

  16. Reputational Challenges for Business Schools: A Contextual Perspective

    Siebert, Sabina; Martin, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The dominant variance theory approaches to researching business school reputations are based on a positivistic hypothetico-deductive research methodology and do not adequately take into account either the different levels and types of contexts in which business schools operate or the diversity of stakeholder interests. The aim of this…

  17. A Latent-Variable Causal Model of Faculty Reputational Ratings.

    King, Suzanne; Wolfle, Lee M.

    A reanalysis was conducted of Saunier's research (1985) on sources of variation in the National Research Council (NRC) reputational ratings of university faculty. Saunier conducted a stepwise regression analysis using 12 predictor variables. Due to problems with multicollinearity and because of the atheoretical nature of stepwise regression,…

  18. The virtues of gossip: reputational information sharing as prosocial behavior.

    Feinberg, Matthew; Willer, Robb; Stellar, Jennifer; Keltner, Dacher

    2012-05-01

    Reputation systems promote cooperation and deter antisocial behavior in groups. Little is known, however, about how and why people share reputational information. Here, we seek to establish the existence and dynamics of prosocial gossip, the sharing of negative evaluative information about a target in a way that protects others from antisocial or exploitative behavior. We present a model of prosocial gossip and the results of 4 studies testing the model's claims. Results of Studies 1 through 3 demonstrate that (a) individuals who observe an antisocial act experience negative affect and are compelled to share information about the antisocial actor with a potentially vulnerable person, (b) sharing such information reduces negative affect created by observing the antisocial behavior, and (c) individuals possessing more prosocial orientations are the most motivated to engage in such gossip, even at a personal cost, and exhibit the greatest reduction in negative affect as a result. Study 4 demonstrates that prosocial gossip can effectively deter selfishness and promote cooperation. Taken together these results highlight the roles of prosocial motivations and negative affective reactions to injustice in maintaining reputational information sharing in groups. We conclude by discussing implications for reputational theories of the maintenance of cooperation in human groups.

  19. Reputation of multinational companies: Corporate social responsibility and internationalization

    Javier Aguilera-Caracuel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to use stakeholder theory as the theoretical reference framework to study the influence of internationalization (geographic international diversification and social performance on multinational companies’ (MNCs reputation. Design/methodology/approach - The authors confirm the research hypotheses using a sample of 113 US MNCs in the chemical, energy and industrial machinery sectors during the period 2005-2010. Findings - This study contributes to the literature in three ways. First, it incorporates literature on internationalization to study the possible connection between geographic international diversification and social performance in MNCs. Second, it sheds light on the debate between corporate social responsibility (CSR and the reputation of MNCs in a very diverse transnational context in which MNCs must meet the needs of stakeholders at both local and global levels. Third, it incorporates the mediating role of social performance in the relationship between geographic international diversification and the firm’s reputation. Originality/value - Prior studies have hardly analyzed this relationship, which becomes especially relevant for MNCs, since their implementation of advanced CSR practices in the different markets in which they operate will gain them a good reputation, not only in specific local contexts but also globally, benefitting the organization as a whole and enabling it to gain internal consistency (improvement in internal efficiency, transparency and legitimacy.

  20. Corporate reputation : intangible assets, tangible benefits / Katrin Rahu, Evelin Ojamets

    Rahu, Katrin, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Hill & Knowlton'i Eesti ning Läti büroode poolt tipp- ja keskastme juhtide seas 2004. a. sügisel läbiviidud uuringust korporatiivse imago kohta, mis on osa 1997. a. alustatud rahvusvahelisest uuringuprojektist Corporate Reputation Watch. Tabel. Diagrammid

  1. A stage to engage: Social media use and corporate reputation

    Dijkmans, C.; Kerkhof, P.; Beukeboom, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Corporate reputation is a valuable intangible asset for companies, yet is increasingly difficult to manage in an era with hard-to-control online conversations. In this paper, we investigate whether and when a company's online activities to acquire engaged consumers are beneficial for corporate

  2. Social Web Identity Established upon Trust and Reputations

    Rajni Goel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks have become a seamless and critical online communication platform for personal interactions. They are a powerful tool that businesses are using to expand among domestic markets. The increase in participation in online social networking can and has caused damage to individuals and organizations, and the issuance of trust has become a concern on the social web. The factors determining the reputation of persons (customers in the real world may relate to the factors of reputation on the social web, though relative to how trust is established in the physical world, establishing trust on the social web can be fairly difficult. Determining how to trust another individual’s online social profile becomes critical in initiating any interaction on the social web. Rather than focusing on content on the social network page, this research proposes and examines the application of user reputations to determine whether the trust should be issued on the social web. A top-level framework to establish trust in an identity on the Social Network Sites (SNS as a function of the users’ associations, usage patterns and reputation on the social web is presented.

  3. Corporate environmental responsibility – a key determinant of corporate reputation

    Cristina GĂNESCU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to determine the trend of the relationship between corporate environmental responsibility and corporate reputation by focusing on a study of the European automotive sector. The starting point of our research is content analysis of the sustainability or social responsibility reports published in 2010, 2011, and 2012 by 13 businesses operating in the European automotive industry. Content analysis was carried out in order to identify the indicators used to assess corporate environmental responsibility. The methodology aimed to produce an evaluation model for corporate environmental responsibility based on the following variables reported by companies: carbon dioxide emissions, water consumption, energy consumption, and amount of waste. Corporate reputation of sampled organizations was assessed based on content analysis of the 2010, 2011, and 2012 reports of the Reputation Institute. We applied the correlation of panel data and emphasised the fact that high levels of corporate environmental responsibility sustain high levels of corporate reputation. The study highlights the theoretical considerations that support this relationship. As companies become increasingly accountable, the methodology described in our study can be developed in further research by using other variables to measure corporate environmental responsibility.

  4. The Evolution of Reputation-Based Cooperation in Regular Networks

    Tatsuya Sasaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in reputation technologies, it is not clear how reputation systems can affect human cooperation in social networks. Although it is known that two of the major mechanisms in the evolution of cooperation are spatial selection and reputation-based reciprocity, theoretical study of the interplay between both mechanisms remains almost uncharted. Here, we present a new individual-based model for the evolution of reciprocal cooperation between reputation and networks. We comparatively analyze four of the leading moral assessment rules—shunning, image scoring, stern judging, and simple standing—and base the model on the giving game in regular networks for Cooperators, Defectors, and Discriminators. Discriminators rely on a proper moral assessment rule. By using individual-based models, we show that the four assessment rules are differently characterized in terms of how cooperation evolves, depending on the benefit-to-cost ratio, the network-node degree, and the observation and error conditions. Our findings show that the most tolerant rule—simple standing—is the most robust among the four assessment rules in promoting cooperation in regular networks.

  5. Information Security for Business: the Necessity of Reputational Risk Management

    Vitaly Eduardovich Dorokhov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of actual information security problems in commercial segment. The main directions in regulations of the Russian Federation connected with information security assurance are defined. The results indicate the insufficiency of legal regulation in prevention of reputational losses due to information security incidents

  6. Polar bears: the fate of an icon.

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T

    2013-11-01

    Polar bears are one of the most iconic animals on our planet. Worldwide, even people who would never see one are drawn to these charismatic arctic ice hunters. They are the world's largest terrestrial carnivore, and despite being born on land, they spend most of their lives out on the sea ice and are considered a marine mammal. Current global studies estimate there are around 20,000 animals in some 19 discrete circumpolar populations. Aside from pregnant females denning in the winter months to give birth, the white bears do not hibernate. They spend their winters on the sea ice hunting seals, an activity they are spectacularly adapted for. Research on these animals is incredibly difficult because of the inhospitable surroundings they inhabit and how inaccessible they make the bears. For many years, the sum of our understanding of the natural history of polar bears came from tracks, scats, the remains of their kills, abandoned dens, and anecdotal observations of native hunters, explorers, and early biologists. Nonetheless, the last 40 years have seen a much better picture of their biology emerge thanks to, first, dedicated Canadian researchers and, later, truly international efforts of workers from many countries. Veterinarians have contributed to our knowledge of the bears by delivering and monitoring anesthesia, obtaining blood samples, performing necropsies, investigating their reproduction, conducting radiotelemetry studies, and examining their behavior. Recently, new technologies have been developed that revolutionize the study of the lives and natural history of undisturbed polar bears. These advances include better satellite radiotelemetry equipment and the development of remote-controlled miniature devices equipped with high-definition cameras. Such new modalities provide dramatic new insights into the life of polar bears. The remarkable degree of specialized adaptation to life on the sea ice that allowed the bears to be successful is the very reason that

  7. [Julia Rosche. Zwischen den Fronten. Die Rolle Estlands zwischen dem Hitler-Stalin-Pakt und dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs im internationalen Kontext] / Olaf Mertelsmann

    Mertelsmann, Olaf, 1969-

    2014-01-01

    Arvustus: Rosche, Julia. Zwischen den Fronten. Die Rolle Estlands zwischen dem Hitler-Stalin-Pakt und dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs im internationalen Kontext. Diplomica Verlag. Hamburg 2012. Unter demselben Titel mit identischem Text auch: Grin Verlag. München 2013

  8. Showcasing Colombia's Native Icons in Beijing

    ZHANGJINGDE

    2004-01-01

    THE Object/Colombia Exhibition, the biggest ever held in China, went on display at the Beijing Jintai Art Museum in July of 2003. This exhibition structured as a journey across historic Colombia, featuring five uses of objects as icons: furniture, decorations, containers, clothes, and ritual and games relics, all grouped

  9. Expertise Reversal for Iconic Representations in Science Visualizations

    Homer, Bruce D.; Plass, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of prior knowledge and cognitive development on the effectiveness of iconic representations in science visualizations was examined. Middle and high school students (N = 186) were given narrated visualizations of two chemistry topics: Kinetic Molecular Theory (Day 1) and Ideal Gas Laws (Day 2). For half of the visualizations, iconic…

  10. Iconic memory for the gist of natural scenes.

    Clarke, Jason; Mack, Arien

    2014-11-01

    Does iconic memory contain the gist of multiple scenes? Three experiments were conducted. In the first, four scenes from different basic-level categories were briefly presented in one of two conditions: a cue or a no-cue condition. The cue condition was designed to provide an index of the contents of iconic memory of the display. Subjects were more sensitive to scene gist in the cue condition than in the no-cue condition. In the second, the scenes came from the same basic-level category. We found no difference in sensitivity between the two conditions. In the third, six scenes from different basic level categories were presented in the visual periphery. Subjects were more sensitive to scene gist in the cue condition. These results suggest that scene gist is contained in iconic memory even in the visual periphery; however, iconic representations are not sufficiently detailed to distinguish between scenes coming from the same category. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. the spirituality of andrei rublev's icon of the holy trinity

    supposed to read God in the icon's form, colours and figures. How does .... ture of deep blue and dark red in a combination which allows him to create the impression of .... on earth and under the earth, and that every tongue should confess that.

  12. Spectroscopic study of an icon painted on wooden panel

    Stojanović Sofija R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Russian icon painted on wooden panel analyzed in this work is interesting for art historians because there is no precise information in which workshops it was made or who the author was. Similar icons are often found in churches and monasteries in our region. In order to obtain information about materials used for creation of investigated icon two micro-analytical techniques were used: Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Obtained results confirmed presence of following materials: lead-white, vermilion, minium, ultramarine, brown and green earth pigments and silver in combination with yellow organic varnish, which served to an iconographer for gilding. Ground layer was made of calcite. Blue pigment ultramarine was probably used for blue colour as well as for obtaining particulars hues in several parts of the paint layer. This can be important information for further research concerning particular workshop in which the icon was made. Identified materials are typical for Russian iconography of the 19th century. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 177021 i OI 177012

  13. Iconic Meaning in Music: An Event-Related Potential Study

    Luo, Qiuling; Huang, Hong; Mo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on the processing of the emotional meaning of music, little is known about other aspects of listeners’ experience of music. The present study investigated the neural correlates of the iconic meaning of music. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded while a group of 20 music majors and a group of 20 non-music majors performed a lexical decision task in the context of implicit musical iconic meaning priming. ERP analysis revealed a significant N400 effect of congruency in time window 260-510 ms following the onset of the target word only in the group of music majors. Time-course analysis using 50 ms windows indicated significant N400 effects both within the time window 410-460 ms and 460-510 ms for music majors, whereas only a partial N400 effect during time window 410-460 ms was observed for non-music majors. There was also a trend for the N400 effects in the music major group to be stronger than those in the non-major group in the sub-windows of 310-360ms and 410-460ms. Especially in the sub-window of 410-460 ms, the topographical map of the difference waveforms between congruent and incongruent conditions revealed different N400 distribution between groups; the effect was concentrated in bilateral frontal areas for music majors, but in central-parietal areas for non-music majors. These results imply probable neural mechanism differences underlying automatic iconic meaning priming of music. Our findings suggest that processing of the iconic meaning of music can be accomplished automatically and that musical training may facilitate the understanding of the iconic meaning of music. PMID:26161561

  14. Iconic Meaning in Music: An Event-Related Potential Study.

    Cai, Liman; Huang, Ping; Luo, Qiuling; Huang, Hong; Mo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on the processing of the emotional meaning of music, little is known about other aspects of listeners' experience of music. The present study investigated the neural correlates of the iconic meaning of music. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded while a group of 20 music majors and a group of 20 non-music majors performed a lexical decision task in the context of implicit musical iconic meaning priming. ERP analysis revealed a significant N400 effect of congruency in time window 260-510 ms following the onset of the target word only in the group of music majors. Time-course analysis using 50 ms windows indicated significant N400 effects both within the time window 410-460 ms and 460-510 ms for music majors, whereas only a partial N400 effect during time window 410-460 ms was observed for non-music majors. There was also a trend for the N400 effects in the music major group to be stronger than those in the non-major group in the sub-windows of 310-360 ms and 410-460 ms. Especially in the sub-window of 410-460 ms, the topographical map of the difference waveforms between congruent and incongruent conditions revealed different N400 distribution between groups; the effect was concentrated in bilateral frontal areas for music majors, but in central-parietal areas for non-music majors. These results imply probable neural mechanism differences underlying automatic iconic meaning priming of music. Our findings suggest that processing of the iconic meaning of music can be accomplished automatically and that musical training may facilitate the understanding of the iconic meaning of music.

  15. Iconic memory and parietofrontal network: fMRI study using temporal integration.

    Saneyoshi, Ayako; Niimi, Ryosuke; Suetsugu, Tomoko; Kaminaga, Tatsuro; Yokosawa, Kazuhiko

    2011-08-03

    We investigated the neural basis of iconic memory using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The parietofrontal network of selective attention is reportedly relevant to readout from iconic memory. We adopted a temporal integration task that requires iconic memory but not selective attention. The results showed that the task activated the parietofrontal network, confirming that the network is involved in readout from iconic memory. We further tested a condition in which temporal integration was performed by visual short-term memory but not by iconic memory. However, no brain region revealed higher activation for temporal integration by iconic memory than for temporal integration by visual short-term memory. This result suggested that there is no localized brain region specialized for iconic memory per se.

  16. Partial report and other sampling procedures overestimate the duration of iconic memory.

    Appelman, I B

    1980-03-01

    In three experiments, subjects estimated the duration of a brief visual image (iconic memory) either directly by adjusting onset of a click to offset of the visual image, or indirectly with a Sperling partial report (sampling) procedure. The results indicated that partial report and other sampling procedures may reflect other brief phenomena along with iconic memory. First, the partial report procedure yields a greater estimate of the duration of iconic memory than the more direct click method. Second, the partial report estimate of the duration of iconic memory is affected if the subject is required to simultaneously retain a list of distractor items (memory load), while the click method estimate of the duration of iconic memory is not affected by a memory load. Finally, another sampling procedure based on visual cuing yields different estimates of the duration of iconic memory depending on how many items are cued. It was concluded that partial report and other sampling procedures overestimate the duration of iconic memory.

  17. Involvement of the Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Learning Others' Bad Reputations and Indelible Distrust.

    Suzuki, Atsunobu; Ito, Yuichi; Kiyama, Sachiko; Kunimi, Mitsunobu; Ohira, Hideki; Kawaguchi, Jun; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Nakai, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    A bad reputation can persistently affect judgments of an individual even when it turns out to be invalid and ought to be disregarded. Such indelible distrust may reflect that the negative evaluation elicited by a bad reputation transfers to a person. Consequently, the person him/herself may come to activate this negative evaluation irrespective of the accuracy of the reputation. If this theoretical model is correct, an evaluation-related brain region will be activated when witnessing a person whose bad reputation one has learned about, regardless of whether the reputation is deemed valid or not. Here, we tested this neural hypothesis with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants memorized faces paired with either a good or a bad reputation. Next, they viewed the faces alone and inferred whether each person was likely to cooperate, first while retrieving the reputations, and then while trying to disregard them as false. A region of the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), which may be involved in negative evaluation, was activated by faces previously paired with bad reputations, irrespective of whether participants attempted to retrieve or disregard these reputations. Furthermore, participants showing greater activity of the left ventrolateral prefrontal region in response to the faces with bad reputations were more likely to infer that these individuals would not cooperate. Thus, once associated with a bad reputation, a person may elicit evaluation-related brain responses on their own, thereby evoking distrust independently of their reputation.

  18. The effects of having more than one good reputation on distributor investments in the film industry

    Ebbers, J.J.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Reputations of organizations and its individual members are valuable resources that help new organizations to get access to investment capital. Reputations, however, can have different dimensions. In this paper, we argue that an individual’s reputation along a particular dimension will have a

  19. Effects of reputational sanctions on the competitive imitation of design innovations

    Gemser, G.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    This study examines whether and under what conditions reputational sanctions are a strong deterrent to imitative firm behaviour. Results indicate that reputational sanctions can be an effective barrier to imitation, in particular when firms perceive a reputation for innovation to be a factor in

  20. Personagens femininas na obra "Hitler manda lembranças", de Roberto Drummond: um retrato de Stela

    Walkiria Felix Dias

    2016-03-01

    Além disso, os personagens são assombrados pelo que houve na Europa durante o Holocausto. Nesta época, inúmeros judeus fugiram da Europa rumo aos trópicos buscando asilo político no Brasil. Porém, em endereço diferente, continuaram sendo assombrados pelo fantasma de Hitler e pelas memórias angustiantes da Shoah. A obra é ainda importante se levarmos em consideração as figuras femininas - em especial Stela Mayer - já que representam, dentro desta narrativa de Drummond, as minorias mais sacrificadas e sofridas frente à Shoah e também as mais tenazes na luta pela sobrevivência.

  1. Field error reduction experiment on the REPUTE-1 RFP device

    Toyama, H.; Shinohara, S.; Yamagishi, K.

    1989-01-01

    The vacuum chamber of the RFP device REPUTE-1 is a welded structure using 18 sets of 1 mm thick Inconel bellows (inner minor radius 22 cm) and 2.4 mm thick port segments arranged in toroidal geometry as shown in Fig. 1. The vacuum chamber is surrounded by 5 mm thick stainless steel shells. The time constant of the shell is 1 ms for vertical field penetration. The pulse length in REPUTE-1 is so far 3.2 ms (about 3 times longer than shell skin time). The port bypass plates have been attached as shown in Fig. 2 to reduce field errors so that the pulse length becomes longer and the loop voltage becomes lower. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  2. Consequence of reputation in the Sznajd consensus model

    Crokidakis, Nuno; Forgerini, Fabricio L.

    2010-07-01

    In this work we study a modified version of the Sznajd sociophysics model. In particular we introduce reputation, a mechanism that limits the capacity of persuasion of the agents. The reputation is introduced as a score which is time-dependent, and its introduction avoid dictatorship (all spins parallel) for a wide range of parameters. The relaxation time follows a log-normal-like distribution. In addition, we show that the usual phase transition also occurs, as in the standard model, and it depends on the initial concentration of individuals following an opinion, occurring at a initial density of up spins greater than 1/2. The transition point is determined by means of a finite-size scaling analysis.

  3. Consequence of reputation in the Sznajd consensus model

    Crokidakis, Nuno; Forgerini, Fabricio L.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study a modified version of the Sznajd sociophysics model. In particular we introduce reputation, a mechanism that limits the capacity of persuasion of the agents. The reputation is introduced as a score which is time-dependent, and its introduction avoid dictatorship (all spins parallel) for a wide range of parameters. The relaxation time follows a log-normal-like distribution. In addition, we show that the usual phase transition also occurs, as in the standard model, and it depends on the initial concentration of individuals following an opinion, occurring at a initial density of up spins greater than 1/2. The transition point is determined by means of a finite-size scaling analysis.

  4. Consequence of reputation in the Sznajd consensus model

    Crokidakis, Nuno [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litoranea s/n, 24210-340 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, I3N - Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Forgerini, Fabricio L., E-mail: fabricio_forgerini@ufam.edu.b [Departamento de Fisica, I3N - Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); ISB - Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 69460-000 Coari, AM (Brazil)

    2010-07-26

    In this work we study a modified version of the Sznajd sociophysics model. In particular we introduce reputation, a mechanism that limits the capacity of persuasion of the agents. The reputation is introduced as a score which is time-dependent, and its introduction avoid dictatorship (all spins parallel) for a wide range of parameters. The relaxation time follows a log-normal-like distribution. In addition, we show that the usual phase transition also occurs, as in the standard model, and it depends on the initial concentration of individuals following an opinion, occurring at a initial density of up spins greater than 1/2. The transition point is determined by means of a finite-size scaling analysis.

  5. Pricing Strategy in Online Retailing Marketplaces of Homogeneous Goods: Should High Reputation Seller Charge More?

    Liu, Yuewen; Wei, Kwok Kee; Chen, Huaping

    There are two conflicting streams of research findings on pricing strategy: one is high reputation sellers should charge price premium, while the other is high reputation sellers should charge relatively low price. Motivated by this confliction, this study examines pricing strategy in online retailing marketplace of homogeneous goods. We conduct an empirical study using data collected from a dominant online retailing marketplace in China. Our research results indicate that, in online retailing marketplace of homogeneous goods, high reputation sellers should charge relatively low price, because the consumers of high reputation sellers are more price sensitive than the consumers of low reputation sellers.

  6. The Impact of Reputation on Corporate Financial Performance: Median Regression Approach

    Vig Silvija

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, reputation has become an important risk concern for companies around the world. Deloitte Global Survey highlights the reputation risk as the top strategic business risk in 2014. This is also proven by a research conducted by AON Global Risk Management Survey in 2015 and Allianz Risk Barometer Survey in 2016 which finds a loss of reputation as one of the biggest risks for business executives. Furthermore, the importance of reputation is confirmed by the fact that reputation accounts for more than 25 percent of a company’s market value and the total market capitalization of the S&P500 companies.

  7. Authentication in Virtual Organizations: A Reputation Based PKI Interconnection Model

    Wazan, Ahmad Samer; Laborde, Romain; Barrere, Francois; Benzekri, Abdelmalek

    Authentication mechanism constitutes a central part of the virtual organization work. The PKI technology is used to provide the authentication in each organization involved in the virtual organization. Different trust models are proposed to interconnect the different PKIs in order to propagate the trust between them. While the existing trust models contain many drawbacks, we propose a new trust model based on the reputation of PKIs.

  8. Corporate social responsibility, corporate reputation and employee engagement

    Ali, Imran; Ali, Jawaria Fatima

    2011-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been outlined as voluntarily additional legal duties of organization to serve environment and community. This voluntarily actions of corporate help them to develop reputation which can shape favorable attitude of employees towards work. Employee engagement is an attitude of commitment and involvement of employee towards their work and organization. Researchers have proved that engaged employees are more productive, more likely to achieve corporate go...

  9. Financial determinants of corporate reputation: A short-term approach

    Anna Blajer-Gołębiewska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available When observing companies listed on stock exchanges, it can be noticed that the gap between a company’s book value (BV and its market value (MV is often significant. The fact that investors are willing to pay more for companies’ assets is often explained using the concept of corporate reputation – an intangible additional asset of a company, which is worth to paying for.

  10. Corporate environmental responsibility – a key determinant of corporate reputation

    Cristina Ganescu; Laura Dindire

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the trend of the relationship between corporate environmental responsibility and corporate reputation by focusing on a study of the European automotive sector. The starting point of our research is content analysis of the sustainability or social responsibility reports published in 2010, 2011, and 2012 by 13 businesses operating in the European automotive industry. Content analysis was carried out in order to identify the indicators used to assess corporate enviro...

  11. Buyer feedback as a filtering mechanism for reputable sellers

    Laureti, Paolo; Slanina, František; Yu, Yi-Kuo; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2002-12-01

    We propose a continuum model for the description of buyer and seller dynamics in an Internet market. The relevant variables are the research effort of buyers and the sellers’ reputation building process. We show that, if a commercial website gives consumers the possibility to rate credibly sellers they bargained with, vendors are forced to be more honest. This leads to mutual beneficial symbiosis between buyers and sellers; the overall enhanced volume of transactions contributes ultimately to the website, which facilitates the matchmaking service.

  12. Does Reliability Pay? How Reputation Can Affect Transaction Governance Investments

    Alfred G. Warner; Peg Thoms; Janice A. Totleben

    2011-01-01

    The role of trust in economic exchange is ill-defined. Trust between alliance partners is argued to sometimes be an alternative to costly governance mechanisms and can therefore lead to superior performance. On the other hand, relying on anything but investments to secure credible commitment to deterrence is described as myopic. This paper explores a middle ground where, in the context of a reputation network, governance costs can decline without the strict necessity of intentional trust. Usi...

  13. Marketing Mix and the Brand Reputation of Nokia

    Syed Ehtisham Ali

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Pakistan’s mobile phone market is growing very fast. The most selling brand in the market is Nokia. A hypothesis was developed that the reputation of a brand is a source of demand and the competitively superior quality image justifies a premium price. In this survey we assessed the reasons for preference of this brand based on established parameters of marketing mix (the 4 Ps. The objective of this study was to measure the extent of preference of these parameters. For this purpose a questionnaire was developed and administered to 240 respondents.The alternate hypothesis that at least one of the predictor variables would have a linear relationship with the dependent variable brand reputation was accepted. R² is 0.53, which indicates that about 53% of the variation on the dependent variable is explained by the predictor variable, which is significantly moderate. Among all the independent variables the slope for the product quality and promotion (advertising & communication were higher than the rest.Regression coefficients for product quality and promotion (advertising & communication were 0.95 and 0.85 respectively. This means that an increase in one rating (on the scale of five to one of product quality and promotion (advertising & communication would cause brand reputation to increase by 0.95 and 0.85 rating respectively.

  14. Identifying online user reputation of user-object bipartite networks

    Liu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Jian-Guo; Yang, Kai; Guo, Qiang; Han, Jing-Ti

    2017-02-01

    Identifying online user reputation based on the rating information of the user-object bipartite networks is important for understanding online user collective behaviors. Based on the Bayesian analysis, we present a parameter-free algorithm for ranking online user reputation, where the user reputation is calculated based on the probability that their ratings are consistent with the main part of all user opinions. The experimental results show that the AUC values of the presented algorithm could reach 0.8929 and 0.8483 for the MovieLens and Netflix data sets, respectively, which is better than the results generated by the CR and IARR methods. Furthermore, the experimental results for different user groups indicate that the presented algorithm outperforms the iterative ranking methods in both ranking accuracy and computation complexity. Moreover, the results for the synthetic networks show that the computation complexity of the presented algorithm is a linear function of the network size, which suggests that the presented algorithm is very effective and efficient for the large scale dynamic online systems.

  15. Eliminating the Effect of Rating Bias on Reputation Systems

    Leilei Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing rapid development of the e-commercial and interest-base websites makes it more pressing to evaluate objects’ accurate quality before recommendation. The objects’ quality is often calculated based on their historical information, such as selected records or rating scores. Usually high quality products obtain higher average ratings than low quality products regardless of rating biases or errors. However, many empirical cases demonstrate that consumers may be misled by rating scores added by unreliable users or deliberate tampering. In this case, users’ reputation, that is, the ability to rate trustily and precisely, makes a big difference during the evaluation process. Thus, one of the main challenges in designing reputation systems is eliminating the effects of users’ rating bias. To give an objective evaluation of each user’s reputation and uncover an object’s intrinsic quality, we propose an iterative balance (IB method to correct users’ rating biases. Experiments on two datasets show that the IB method is a highly self-consistent and robust algorithm and it can accurately quantify movies’ actual quality and users’ stability of rating. Compared with existing methods, the IB method has higher ability to find the “dark horses,” that is, not so popular yet good movies, in the Academy Awards.

  16. Individual choice and reputation distribution of cooperative behaviors among heterogeneous groups

    Lu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Cooperation macrocosmically refers to the overall cooperation rate, while reputation microcosmically records individual choices. •Therefore, reputation should be preferred in order to investigate how individual choices evolve. •Both the mean and standard deviation of reputation follow clear patterns, and some factors have quadratic effects on them. -- Abstract: Cooperation is vital for our society, but the temptation of cheating on cooperative partners undermines cooperation. The mechanism of reputation is raised to countervail this temptation and therefore promote cooperation. Reputation microcosmically records individual choices, while cooperation macrocosmically refers to the group or averaged cooperation level. Reputation should be preferred in order to investigate how individual choices evolve. In this work, we study the distribution of reputation to figure out how individuals make choices within cooperation and defection. We decompose reputation into its mean and standard deviation and inspect effects of their factors respectively. To achieve this goal, we construct a model where agents of three groups or classes play the prisoners’ dilemma game with neighbors on a square lattice. It indicates in outcomes that the distribution of reputation is distinct from that of cooperation and both the mean and standard deviation of reputation follow clear patterns. Some factors have negative quadratic effects on reputation's mean or standard deviation, and some have merely linear effects

  17. Managing Reputational Risk through Environmental Management and Reporting: An Options Theory Approach

    Juan Pineiro-Chousa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reputation is a complex and multidimensional concept that may be organized in downside and upside reputational risk. In this article, we present a formal modelling for the management capabilities of environmental management and reporting over reputational risk, considering that reputational risk is becoming increasingly important for organizations and it directly depends on the information available about companies’ environmental performances. As long as the effectiveness of communication and disclosure plays a key role in the process, the usefulness of environmental management and reporting as a hedging instrument for reputational risk is addressed through different levels of information transparency. When considering a scenario of voluntary reporting, we show that environmentally concerned companies can reduce the cost of environmental management as a reputational risk strategy, as well as reducing the potential loss of reputational value from reputational threats and increasing the potential profit from reputational opportunities. In the context of mandatory reporting, we highlight the role of assurance companies as bearers of the risk of bad reputations for non-concerned companies. As a result, this novel approach applies theoretical oriented research from options theory to reputational risk management literature, so that it benefits from the option’s well known theory, robustness, and conclusions.

  18. THE STROGANOV OR OLD BELIEVERS’ ICON PAINTING TRADITION IN THE WORKS OF N.S. LESKOV

    Yana Valeryevna Karsakova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available N.S. Leskov is known to have been a collector of icons and a connoisseur of history and techniques of icon painting. In his work as a writer he made use of his visual impression of icons painted in the old believers' tradition. Unlike modern scholars, when acting as an iconographer, Leskov did not classify old believers' icon painting as a separate trend, subsuming it within the “Stroganov school”. In the 19th century, the Stroganov school icons were distinguished by the mark of the Stroganov family name on the icon's reverse side. Such icons were believed to have been painted in the workshops officially set up by the Stroganov family. “An old believers' school icon” would be the one painted by at a workshop owned by old believers for the use in their prayer rooms or churches. Leskov's opinion on the insoluble link between the Stroganov and old believers' school of icon painting well agreed with the works of I.P. Sakharov the writer was quite familiar with, as well as with the ideas old believers themselves expressed concerning the history and traditions of icon painting. Leskov knew these opinions through communication with icon painters who professed the old belief version of Orthodox Christianity.

  19. Visualization of the NASA ICON mission in 3d

    Mendez, R. A., Jr.; Immel, T. J.; Miller, N.

    2016-12-01

    The ICON Explorer mission (http://icon.ssl.berkeley.edu) will provide several data products for the atmosphere and ionosphere after its launch in 2017. This project will support the mission by investigating the capability of these tools for visualization of current and predicted observatory characteristics and data acquisition. Visualization of this mission can be accomplished using tools like Google Earth or CesiumJS, as well assistance from Java or Python. Ideally we will bring this visualization into the homes of people without the need of additional software. The path of launching a standalone website, building this environment, and a full toolkit will be discussed. Eventually, the initial work could lead to the addition of a downloadable visualization packages for mission demonstration or science visualization.

  20. Connecting icons, logos and slogans in graphic trademarks

    Ambrožič, Maja

    2016-01-01

    In the public eye the organization is always considered or fully represented by its corporate identity that includes the size of the organization, annual payments, organizational structure, organizational culture, systems owned by the organization, premises, organizational culture, organizational strategy, mission, vision, number of employees etc. Graphic designer when designing graphic trademark by connecting graphic elements (logo, slogan and icon) must take in to consideration all abovemen...

  1. BAROQUE AND ICONIC ECPHRASIS IN GOGOL'S "TARAS BULBA"

    Anastasiya Viktorovna Kozlova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the tools verbalization European Baroque painting techniques and Old icons in the Gogol's story  "Taras Bulba". Narrative functions of implicit ecphrasis investigated in connection problem relatedness Catholicism and Orthodoxy in the minds of Gogol at the beginning of the 1840s.The purpose of the article analyzes the ways of verbalization and features of non-attributed implicit ecphrasis in the second edition of Gogol's "Taras Bulba" reproducing Caravaggio painting style and Old icons.Method or the methodology of work: Among research material are Gogol's "Taras Bulba" in two editions, the European Baroque paintings and ancient Russian icons. Were applied structural-typological, structural, intertextual, hermeneutical methods.Results: We describe the correlation of ecphrasis in Gogol with referents: the paintings of Caravaggio and Honthorst , and Old Russian iconography . Found that ecphrasis descriptions that appear only in the edition of 1842 are not local segments of the text and form the entire text layers, actively organizing narrative, operating plot and composition. Hidden emplisit ecphrasis is the artistic code, extending the semantic space of the text , the text translation tool of religious and philosophical ideas of the author. Valuable contraposition of baroque and iconic ecphrasis in the story reflects not only the author's reflection on the problem of beauty , inner and outer, but also a reflection of their own style.Application area: The results of our study can be used for lectures on the history of Russian literature of the XIX century, the history of Russian and European culture, cultural studies, specialized courses and electives in the problem of interaction between different kinds of art, as well as material for interdisciplinary humanities research, including in school practice teaching literature and art history.

  2. Soldier-worn augmented reality system for tactical icon visualization

    Roberts, David; Menozzi, Alberico; Clipp, Brian; Russler, Patrick; Cook, James; Karl, Robert; Wenger, Eric; Church, William; Mauger, Jennifer; Volpe, Chris; Argenta, Chris; Wille, Mark; Snarski, Stephen; Sherrill, Todd; Lupo, Jasper; Hobson, Ross; Frahm, Jan-Michael; Heinly, Jared

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the development and demonstration of a soldier-worn augmented reality system testbed that provides intuitive 'heads-up' visualization of tactically-relevant geo-registered icons. Our system combines a robust soldier pose estimation capability with a helmet mounted see-through display to accurately overlay geo-registered iconography (i.e., navigation waypoints, blue forces, aircraft) on the soldier's view of reality. Applied Research Associates (ARA), in partnership with BAE Systems and the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), has developed this testbed system in Phase 2 of the DARPA ULTRA-Vis (Urban Leader Tactical, Response, Awareness, and Visualization) program. The ULTRA-Vis testbed system functions in unprepared outdoor environments and is robust to numerous magnetic disturbances. We achieve accurate and robust pose estimation through fusion of inertial, magnetic, GPS, and computer vision data acquired from helmet kit sensors. Icons are rendered on a high-brightness, 40°×30° field of view see-through display. The system incorporates an information management engine to convert CoT (Cursor-on-Target) external data feeds into mil-standard icons for visualization. The user interface provides intuitive information display to support soldier navigation and situational awareness of mission-critical tactical information.

  3. Kandó-Melocco, Ferenc. 2015. An Anti-Nazi at Hitler's Table: Political Memoirs of a Hungarian Nobleman Who Dared to Oppose Both Hitler and the Communists. (trans. and ed. Esther Kando Odescalchi. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace. 162 pp., Illus.; Odescalchi, Esther Kando. 2016. My Escape: Memoirs of a Hungarian Teenage Freedom Fighter. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace. Illus. 148 pp.

    Ruth G. Biro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kandó-Melocco, Ferenc. 2015. An Anti-Nazi at Hitler's Table: Political Memoirs of a Hungarian Nobleman Who Dared to Oppose Both Hitler and the Communists. (trans. and ed. Esther Kando Odescalchi. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace. 162 pp., Illus.; Odescalchi, Esther Kando. 2016. My Escape: Memoirs of a Hungarian Teenage Freedom Fighter. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace. Illus. 148 pp.

  4. The road to language learning is iconic: evidence from British Sign Language.

    Thompson, Robin L; Vinson, David P; Woll, Bencie; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2012-12-01

    An arbitrary link between linguistic form and meaning is generally considered a universal feature of language. However, iconic (i.e., nonarbitrary) mappings between properties of meaning and features of linguistic form are also widely present across languages, especially signed languages. Although recent research has shown a role for sign iconicity in language processing, research on the role of iconicity in sign-language development has been mixed. In this article, we present clear evidence that iconicity plays a role in sign-language acquisition for both the comprehension and production of signs. Signed languages were taken as a starting point because they tend to encode a higher degree of iconic form-meaning mappings in their lexicons than spoken languages do, but our findings are more broadly applicable: Specifically, we hypothesize that iconicity is fundamental to all languages (signed and spoken) and that it serves to bridge the gap between linguistic form and human experience.

  5. Seeing Iconic Gestures While Encoding Events Facilitates Children's Memory of These Events.

    Aussems, Suzanne; Kita, Sotaro

    2017-11-08

    An experiment with 72 three-year-olds investigated whether encoding events while seeing iconic gestures boosts children's memory representation of these events. The events, shown in videos of actors moving in an unusual manner, were presented with either iconic gestures depicting how the actors performed these actions, interactive gestures, or no gesture. In a recognition memory task, children in the iconic gesture condition remembered actors and actions better than children in the control conditions. Iconic gestures were categorized based on how much of the actors was represented by the hands (feet, legs, or body). Only iconic hand-as-body gestures boosted actor memory. Thus, seeing iconic gestures while encoding events facilitates children's memory of those aspects of events that are schematically highlighted by gesture. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  6. Seeing iconic gestures while encoding events facilitates children's memory of these events

    Aussems, Suzanne; Kita, Sotaro

    2017-01-01

    An experiment with 72 three-year-olds investigated whether encoding events while seeing iconic gestures boosts children's memory representation of these events. The events, shown in videos of actors moving in an unusual manner, were presented with either iconic gestures depicting how the actors performed these actions, interactive gestures, or no gesture. In a recognition memory task, children in the iconic gesture condition remembered actors and actions better than children in the control co...

  7. Telling young children they have a reputation for being smart promotes cheating.

    Zhao, Li; Heyman, Gail D; Chen, Lulu; Lee, Kang

    2018-05-01

    The present research examined the consequences of telling young children they have a reputation for being smart. Of interest was how this would affect their willingness to resist the temptation to cheat for personal gain as assessed by a temptation resistance task, in which children promised not to cheat in the game. Two studies with 3- and 5-year-old children (total N = 323) assessed this possibility. In Study 1, participants were assigned to one of three conditions: a smart reputation condition in which they were told they have a reputation for being smart, an irrelevant reputation control condition, or a no reputation control condition. Children in the smart reputation condition were significantly more likely to cheat than their counterparts in either control condition. Study 2 confirmed that reputational concerns are indeed a fundamental part of our smart reputation effect. These results suggest that children as young as 3 years of age are able to use reputational cues to guide their behavior, and that telling young children they have a positive reputation for being smart can have negative consequences. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Activation Is Commonly Invoked by Reputation of Self and Romantic Partners

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Takahashi, Haruka K.; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Sadato, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    The reputation of others influences partner selection in human cooperative behaviors through verbal reputation representation. Although the way in which humans represent the verbal reputations of others is a pivotal issue for social neuroscience, the neural correlates underlying the representation of verbal reputations of others are unclear. Humans primarily depend on self-evaluation when assessing reputation of self. Likewise, humans might primarily depend on self-evaluation of others when representing their reputation. As interaction promotes the formation of more nuanced, individualized impressions of an interaction partner, humans tend to form self-evaluations of persons with whom they are intimate in their daily life. Thus, we hypothesized that the representation of reputation of others is modulated by intimacy due to one’s own evaluation formation of that person. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment with 11 pairs of romantic partners while they viewed an evaluation of a target person (self, partner [intimate other], or stranger [non-intimate other]), made by other evaluators. When compared with strangers, viewing evaluations of self and partner activated overlapping regions in the medial prefrontal cortex. Verbal reputation of self-specific activation was found in the precuneus, which represents self-related processing. The data suggest that midline structures represent reputation of self. In addition, intimacy-modulated activation in the medial prefrontal cortex suggests that the verbal reputation of intimate others is represented similarly to reputation of self. These results suggest that the reputation representation in the medial prefrontal cortex is engaged by verbal reputation of self and intimate others stemming from both own and other evaluators’ judgments. PMID:24086409

  9. CSR and Company Reputation - Case study of Nike

    Valjakka, Mira

    2013-01-01

    During the 21st century, we have seen an enormous increase in the popularity of CSR, in corporate level as well as in public media. Society’s consciousness on the effects of individual behaviour has risen with increased awareness on environmental and societal issues such as global warming and human rights. Corporate catastrophes, such as BP oil spill in Gulf of Mexico in 20101, which was the biggest oil spill in history of United States, has woken companies to protect their CSR reputation. ...

  10. Managing Reputation in Contract-Based Distributed Systems

    Baldoni, Roberto; Doria, Luca; Lodi, Giorgia; Querzoni, Leonardo

    In industry practice, bilateral agreements are established between providers and consumers of services in order to regulate their business relationships. In particular, Quality of Service (QoS) requirements are specified in those agreements in the form of legally binding contracts named Service Level Agreements (SLA). Meeting SLAs allows providers to be seen in the eyes of their clients, credible, reliable, and trustworthy. This contributes to augment their reputation that can be considered an important and competitive advantage for creating potentially new business opportunities.

  11. In the shade of a forest status, reputation, and ambiguity in an online microcredit market.

    Kuwabara, Ko; Anthony, Denise; Horne, Christine

    2017-05-01

    Scholars have long recognized status and reputation as pervasive forces reproducing comparative advantage in social and economic systems. Yet, due in part to methodological challenges, relatively few studies have examined how status and reputation interact. We use data from an online market for peer-to-peer lending to study independent and joint effects of status and reputation on borrowers' success at obtaining loans. First, we find a positive main effect of status, even when reputational signals are reliable and abundant. Second, we find that status matters the most for borrowers with moderate (rather than high or low) reputations, suggesting a curvilinear effect of status x reputation on loans. These results support the idea that status matters not only under conditions of too little information that creates information asymmetry, as typically assumed, but also under conditions of abundant information and too many choices that creates ambiguity about how to evaluate candidates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sell honestly, never sell your honesty: revenue management and corporate reputation management

    Wang, Xuan Lorna

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the link between corporate reputation and revenue management practice in the hospitality and tourism industries. It seeks answers to two key questions: first, whether or not there is a link between corporate reputation and revenue management, and second, how revenue management practice may affect corporate reputation, and vice versa. More specifically, it examines whether the negative effects of sales-driven RevM practice has had on customers, such as unfair perception, re...

  13. Dynamical Trust and Reputation Computation Model for B2C E-Commerce

    Bo Tian; Kecheng Liu; Yuanzhong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Trust is one of the most important factors that influence the successful application of network service environments, such as e-commerce, wireless sensor networks, and online social networks. Computation models associated with trust and reputation have been paid special attention in both computer societies and service science in recent years. In this paper, a dynamical computation model of reputation for B2C e-commerce is proposed. Firstly, conceptions associated with trust and reputation are...

  14. License - Taxonomy Icon | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Full Text Available List Contact us Taxonomy Icon License License to Use This Database Last updated : 2013/3/21 You may use this database...the license terms regarding the use of this database and the requirements you must follow in using this database.... The license for this database is specified in the Creative Commons Attribut...ion 2.1 Japan . If you use data from this database, please be sure attribute this database as follows: Taxon...ative Commons Attribution 2.1 Japan is found here . With regard to this database,

  15. Polar exponential sensor arrays unify iconic and Hough space representation

    Weiman, Carl F. R.

    1990-01-01

    The log-polar coordinate system, inherent in both polar exponential sensor arrays and log-polar remapped video imagery, is identical to the coordinate system of its corresponding Hough transform parameter space. The resulting unification of iconic and Hough domains simplifies computation for line recognition and eliminates the slope quantization problems inherent in the classical Cartesian Hough transform. The geometric organization of the algorithm is more amenable to massively parallel architectures than that of the Cartesian version. The neural architecture of the human visual cortex meets the geometric requirements to execute 'in-place' log-Hough algorithms of the kind described here.

  16. Data associations and the protection of reputation online in Australia

    Daniel Joyce

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses upon defamation law in Australia and its struggles to adjust to the digital landscape, to illustrate the broader challenges involved in the governance and regulation of data associations. In many instances, online publication will be treated by the courts in a similar fashion to traditional forms of publication. What is more contentious is the question of who, if anyone, should bear the responsibility for digital forms of defamatory publication which result not from an individual author’s activity online but rather from algorithmic associations. This article seeks, in part, to analyse this question, by reference to the Australian case law and associated scholarship regarding search engine liability. Reflecting on the tensions involved here offers us a fresh perspective on defamation law through the conceptual lens of data associations. Here the focus of the article shifts to explore some wider questions posed for defamation law by big data. Defamation law may come to play a significant role in emerging frameworks for algorithmic accountability, but these developments also call into question many of its traditional concepts and assumptions. It may be time to think differently about defamation and to consider its interrelationship with privacy, speech and data protection more fully. As a result, I conclude that the courts and policymakers need to engage more deeply and explicitly with the rationale(s for the protection of reputation and that more thought needs to be given to changing conceptions of reputation in the context of data associations.

  17. A Dynamic Reputation Management System for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Eric Chiejina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nodes in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs are mandated to utilize their limited energy resources in forwarding routing control and data packets for other nodes. Since a MANET lacks a centralized administration and control, a node may decide to act selfishly, either by refusing to respond to route requests from other nodes or deceitfully by responding to some route requests, but dropping the corresponding data packets that are presented for forwarding. A significant increase in the presence of these misbehaving nodes in a MANET can subsequently degrade network performance. In this paper, we propose a dynamic reputation management system for detecting and isolating misbehaving nodes in MANETs. Our model employs a novel direct monitoring technique to evaluate the reputation of a node in the network, which ensures that nodes that expend their energy in transmitting data and routing control packets for others are allowed to carry out their network activities while the misbehaving nodes are detected and isolated from the network. Simulation results show that our model is effective at curbing and mitigating the effects of misbehaving nodes in the network.

  18. Difficult reputations and the social reality of occupational medicine.

    Draper, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    This response to Tee Guidotti's (2008) critique of Elaine Draper's 'The Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism' (2003) argues that a forthright examination of the conflicts of those working in the field of occupational medicine is essential to maintaining the health of the profession and to promoting constructive policies. Research for 'The Company Doctor' reveals how doctors walk a tightrope of professional demands on them. The author describes how corporate employment affects medicine and science and how professionals working in corporations are subject to the decisions of company managers and to economic and legal imperatives stemming from their status as corporate employees. Analyzing company doctors' role in confronting toxics and responding to liability fears in corporations, the author argues that problems of lost credibility, stigmatization, and tarnished reputation that company doctors describe largely stem from the organizational constraints, economic interests, and other aspects of the social context of their work. These social forces exert powerful pressure on the ethical framework and daily work lives of these professionals as well as on the reputation of their field. The author discusses ways in which the conflicting demands from being both a corporate employee and a physician are a social and structural problem beyond individual ethics.

  19. The influence of chief eecutive officer reputation on performance of public firms in atin merica

    Marcia Martins Mendes De Luca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the control mechanisms at the disposal of shareholders is based on the reputation of corporate executives. A good personal reputation tends to discourage opportunistic behaviors and reduce limited rationality costs. In light of agency theory and transaction cost economics theory, the reputation of corporate executives is believed to not only reduce such costs but to benefit the reputation of the firm, potentially improving corporate performance. In this study we investigated the effect of the reputation of the chief executive officer (CEO on corporate performance in 46 Latin American public firms traded on the New York stock market as of 31 December 2013. The findings were submitted to descriptive analysis, testing of differences between means, Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression. Among our findings, i media visibility had a favorable effect on CEO reputation, ii on the average, CEO reputation was better in firms from Brazil than in firms from other Latin American countries, and iii the reputation of the CEO had a significant and positive impact on corporate performance. Our results confirm the importance of choosing a CEO with a good reputation to head the firms of the sample.

  20. Assessment of the regional executive power reputation (on the example of the Smolensk region

    N N Rozanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the development of information society, intangible assets are increasingly becoming a significant competitive advantage. At the regional level, the reputational capital turns into a powerful tool to improve the region’s investment attractiveness. The most important component of the regional reputational capital is such a significant political resource as the reputation of the regional authorities: good reputation can and should be a key intangible asset of regional management system development aiming to strengthen the authorities decisions and actions and the public confidence, and to mobilize citizens for the real interested participation in the regional management. The article presents the results of testing the research phase of the technological cycle of the regional power reputation management, which was conducted to identify its key essential characteristics and ways for evaluation. The author proposes a research model to study the regional authorities’ reputation and defines the logic of its perception study in terms of two main subjects - the authorities and the population. The results of the assessment of the regional authorities reputation on the example of the Smolensk region let the author examine the coherence of the regional authorities reputation estimates by the public and the authorities themselves (civil servants of the regional executive power and identify a significant gap in the assessments of this reputation by the population as compared to the civil servants opinions.

  1. Dynamical Trust and Reputation Computation Model for B2C E-Commerce

    Bo Tian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Trust is one of the most important factors that influence the successful application of network service environments, such as e-commerce, wireless sensor networks, and online social networks. Computation models associated with trust and reputation have been paid special attention in both computer societies and service science in recent years. In this paper, a dynamical computation model of reputation for B2C e-commerce is proposed. Firstly, conceptions associated with trust and reputation are introduced, and the mathematical formula of trust for B2C e-commerce is given. Then a dynamical computation model of reputation is further proposed based on the conception of trust and the relationship between trust and reputation. In the proposed model, classical varying processes of reputation of B2C e-commerce are discussed. Furthermore, the iterative trust and reputation computation models are formulated via a set of difference equations based on the closed-loop feedback mechanism. Finally, a group of numerical simulation experiments are performed to illustrate the proposed model of trust and reputation. Experimental results show that the proposed model is effective in simulating the dynamical processes of trust and reputation for B2C e-commerce.

  2. Chien-Shiung Wu: An Icon of Physicist and Woman Scientist in China

    Zhu, Yuelin

    2014-03-01

    Chien-Shiung Wu, the first female president of APS, is a well-known figure in China, a figure who serves as an inspiration for youths, especially young women, to study science and particularly physics. In this presentation, a historical perspective will be used to show how such an icon was formed. Born in 1912, the year of the Republic Revolution, Wu was in the first generation of physicists in China and her college mentor was a student of Marie Curie. When Wu came to the U.S. for graduate studies in the 1930s, it was a ``golden age'' for nuclear physics, and the invention of the cyclotron by E. O. Lawrence put UC Berkeley at the frontier. Wu was trained there, with Lawrence as her advisor, and later became an expert in Beta-decay. In 1956, Wu conceived and initiated the experiment of Cobalt-60, which, together with other two experiments, eventually proved the asymmetry of parity in weak-interactions, a hypothesis proposed by T. D. Lee and C. N. Yang. The importance of the experiment gained Wu an enormous reputation which spread even to China, when this was a period of hostility in Sino-American relations, and near total isolation due to the Cold-War. Wu was the daughter of a revolutionary, and an activist in college in patriotic student movements, and she combined this background with her scientific career as the way of ``Saving China with Science,'' a common belief reflecting the Zeitgeist of her time. Although she spent most of her life in the U.S., Wu never wavered in her love for or loyalty to her motherland. Her patriotism, as well as her scientific achievement, made Wu a legend in China, being called ``the Chinese Madam Curie.'' Even during the Cultural Revolution, a novel supposedly taking Wu as the original model was very popular in underground circles, widely spread by hand-written-copies. From 1979-1988, the CUSPEA program enrolled hundreds of China's best graduate students into physics departments in American universities. Although Wu herself was not

  3. The Victory of Anti-Hitler States in the Second World War. The Lend-lease Factor

    N P Parkhitko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the economic aspect of military cooperation between the USSR and the western Allies (first of all, with the USA and Great Britain during the period of the WW II. The statistic data of the military equipment, sent to the USSR by the Allies through Lend-Lease is compared to the statistics of the Soviet domestic military production during the Great Patriotic War. Also the material and human losses of the USSR and the Allies are compared. As the result of the comparison the crucial military, political and economical input of the USSR in the Victory of Anti-Hitler states in the Second World War is advocated. The goal is also to eliminate the pseudo-historic attempts of denigrating the role of the Soviet Union in the Second World War and even its struggle in the period of the Great Patriotic War. Such attempts are being intensified in the last decades especially in the western countries and their message, in the opinion of the author, is to downplay the role of our country on the international arena as it tends to be in the political conjuncture of the early XXI century.

  4. Hitler's bible: an analysis of the relationship between American and German eugenics in pre-war Nazi Germany.

    Brown, Susan

    2009-06-01

    Throughout the last century the wellbeing of those with disability has been threatened by the idea of eugenics. The most notable and extreme example of this could be considered to have been carried out during World WarTwo, within Nazi eugenic programmes. These resulted in the sterilisation and killing of hundreds of thousands of disabled people. Through research of a wide range of sources it has been established that much of the inspiration and encouragement for this rapidly progressing movement in Germany initially came from America, most notably from California. American eugenicists expressed interest, and at times jealousy, at the speed of the progression in German eugenics. German Sterilisation laws were drafted following careful study of American experiments and research, while financial support from a number of American individuals encouraged further German research. Correspondence between influential leaders, including Hitler, Grant and Whitney, Verschuer and Popenoe, on both sides also added to the developing relationship. In conclusion, although there are a number of vital differences between the progress of the eugenics programme in America and in pre-war Nazi Germany, and eugenics in America never produced the massive genocide that occurred in Germany, it is clear that the research, encouragement and enthusiasm from America had a profound influence on the rapidly growing Nazi eugenics movement.

  5. Type of iconicity matters in the vocabulary development of signing children

    Ortega, G.; Sümer, B.; Özyürek, A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent research on signed as well as spoken language shows that the iconic features of the target language might play a role in language development. Here, we ask further whether different types of iconic depictions modulate children's preferences for certain types of sign-referent links during

  6. 75 FR 5637 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Architecture as Icon...

    2010-02-03

    ... Determinations: ``Architecture as Icon: Perception and Representation of Architecture in Byzantine Art'' SUMMARY... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Architecture as Icon: Perception and Representation of Architecture in Byzantine Art,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, are of...

  7. What's in a name? The role of graphics, functions, and their interrelationships in icon identification.

    McDougall, Siné; Isherwood, Sarah

    2009-05-01

    Communication using icons is now commonplace. It is therefore important to understand the processes involved in icon comprehension and the stimulus cues that individuals utilize to facilitate identification. In this study, we examined predictors of icon identification as participants gained experience with icons over a series of learning trials. A dynamic pattern of findings emerged in which the primary predictors of identification changed as learning progressed. In early learning trials, semantic distance (the closeness of the relationship between icon and function) was the best predictor of performance, accounting for up to 55% of the variance observed, whereas familiarity with the function was more important in later trials. Other stimulus characteristics, such as our familiarity with the graphic in the icon and its concreteness, were also found to be important for icon design. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed, with particular emphasis on the parallels with picture naming. The icon identification norms from this study may be downloaded from brm.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental.

  8. Cultural Interpretations of the Visual Meaning of Icons and Images Used in North American Web Design

    Knight, Eliot; Gunawardena, Charlotte N.; Aydin, Cengiz Hakan

    2009-01-01

    This study examines cross-cultural interpretations of icons and images drawn from US academic websites. Participants from Morocco, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and the USA responded to an online questionnaire containing 18 icons and images representing online functions and information types common on US academic websites. Participants supplied meanings for…

  9. Effects of eye contact and iconic gestures on message retention in human-robot interaction

    Dijk, van E.T.; Torta, E.; Cuijpers, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of iconic gestures and eye contact on message retention in human-robot interaction were investigated in a series of experiments. A humanoid robot gave short verbal messages to participants, accompanied either by iconic gestures or no gestures while making eye contact with the participant

  10. Searching for Signs, Symbols, and Icons: Effects of Time of Day, Visual Complexity, and Grouping

    McDougall, Sine; Tyrer, Victoria; Folkard, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Searching for icons, symbols, or signs is an integral part of tasks involving computer or radar displays, head-up displays in aircraft, or attending to road traffic signs. Icons therefore need to be designed to optimize search times, taking into account the factors likely to slow down visual search. Three factors likely to adversely affect visual…

  11. The Link between Form and Meaning in British Sign Language: Effects of Iconicity for Phonological Decisions

    Thompson, Robin L.; Vinson, David P.; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    Signed languages exploit the visual/gestural modality to create iconic expression across a wide range of basic conceptual structures in which the phonetic resources of the language are built up into an analogue of a mental image (Taub, 2001). Previously, we demonstrated a processing advantage when iconic properties of signs were made salient in a…

  12. Study protocol: The Intensive Care Outcome Network ('ICON' study

    Barber Vicki S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extended follow-up of survivors of ICU treatment has shown many patients suffer long-term physical and psychological consequences that affect their health-related quality of life. The current lack of rigorous longitudinal studies means that the true prevalence of these physical and psychological problems remains undetermined. Methods/Design The ICON (Intensive Care Outcome Network study is a multi-centre, longitudinal study of survivors of critical illness. Patients will be recruited prior to hospital discharge from 20–30 ICUs in the UK and will be assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months following ICU discharge for health-related quality of life as measured by the Short Form-36 (SF-36 and the EuroQoL (EQ-5D; anxiety and depression as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS; and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms as measured by the PTSD Civilian Checklist (PCL-C. Postal questionnaires will be used. Discussion The ICON study will create a valuable UK database detailing the prevalence of physical and psychological morbidity experienced by patients as they recover from critical illness. Knowledge of the prevalence of physical and psychological morbidity in ICU survivors is important because research to generate models of causality, prognosis and treatment effects is dependent on accurate determination of prevalence. The results will also inform economic modelling of the long-term burden of critical illness. Trial Registration ISRCTN69112866

  13. A glittering icon of Fascist femininity: Trebisonda "Ondina" Valla.

    Gori, G

    2001-01-01

    This essay focuses on the second decade of the Italian Fascist regime through its emblematic symbol, Trebisonda 'Ondina' Valla. Valla gained first place in the 80 metre hurdles at the Berlin Olympics of 1936, and became the first world-class female athlete in Italian history, in spite of the generally backward condition of Italian women. In those years, a paternalistic and conservative society deeply discriminated against female participation in not only sport but also other cultural activities. The Catholic Church, medical expertise, eugenics theories and the fascist regime were all opposed to female competitive sport. The Church demanded female morality, modesty and domesticity while, the medical profession recommend only basic physical exercise for female health and motherhood. While promoting the myth of the New Italy as a modern nation, Fascism wished it to be inhabited by a traditional womanhood. Paradoxically, however, Mussolini supported Valla because she epitomized a dynamic fascism and brought Italian Fascism international visibility. The serendipitous value of Valla was that she encouraged young women to attempt to force open the bars of their political cage, and at the same time forced the fascist ideology to reconsider and reconstruct fascist principles in the interest of international propaganda. Thus while Valla was a political instrument of fascist purpose, she was also an agent of female emancipation. She was a political icon that also became a gender icon. In both roles she became a symbol of congratulation but also of confrontation, contradiction and paradox.

  14. Iconic Gestures for Robot Avatars, Recognition and Integration with Speech

    Bremner, Paul; Leonards, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Co-verbal gestures are an important part of human communication, improving its efficiency and efficacy for information conveyance. One possible means by which such multi-modal communication might be realized remotely is through the use of a tele-operated humanoid robot avatar. Such avatars have been previously shown to enhance social presence and operator salience. We present a motion tracking based tele-operation system for the NAO robot platform that allows direct transmission of speech and gestures produced by the operator. To assess the capabilities of this system for transmitting multi-modal communication, we have conducted a user study that investigated if robot-produced iconic gestures are comprehensible, and are integrated with speech. Robot performed gesture outcomes were compared directly to those for gestures produced by a human actor, using a within participant experimental design. We show that iconic gestures produced by a tele-operated robot are understood by participants when presented alone, almost as well as when produced by a human. More importantly, we show that gestures are integrated with speech when presented as part of a multi-modal communication equally well for human and robot performances. PMID:26925010

  15. NPY2-receptor variation modulates iconic memory processes.

    Arning, Larissa; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Kloster, Eugen; Epplen, Jörg T; Beste, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Sensory memory systems are modality-specific buffers that comprise information about external stimuli, which represent the earliest stage of information processing. While these systems have been the subject of cognitive neuroscience research for decades, little is known about the neurobiological basis of sensory memory. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system and systems influencing glutamatergic neural transmission are important. In the current study we examine if functional promoter variations in neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its receptor gene NPY2R affect iconic memory processes using a partial report paradigm. We found that iconic memory decayed much faster in individuals carrying the rare promoter NPY2R G allele which is associated with increased expression of the Y2 receptor. Possibly this effect is due to altered presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release, known to be modulated by Y2 receptors. Altogether, our results provide evidence that the functionally relevant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the NPY2R promoter gene affect circumscribed processes of early sensory processing, i.e. only the stability of information in sensory memory buffers. This leads us to suggest that especially the stability of information in sensory memory buffers depends on glutamatergic neural transmission and factors modulating glutamatergic turnover. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. Reward associations impact both iconic and visual working memory.

    Infanti, Elisa; Hickey, Clayton; Turatto, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    Reward plays a fundamental role in human behavior. A growing number of studies have shown that stimuli associated with reward become salient and attract attention. The aim of the present study was to extend these results into the investigation of iconic memory and visual working memory. In two experiments we asked participants to perform a visual-search task where different colors of the target stimuli were paired with high or low reward. We then tested whether the pre-established feature-reward association affected performance on a subsequent visual memory task, in which no reward was provided. In this test phase participants viewed arrays of 8 objects, one of which had unique color that could match the color associated with reward during the previous visual-search task. A probe appeared at varying intervals after stimulus offset to identify the to-be-reported item. Our results suggest that reward biases the encoding of visual information such that items characterized by a reward-associated feature interfere with mnemonic representations of other items in the test display. These results extend current knowledge regarding the influence of reward on early cognitive processes, suggesting that feature-reward associations automatically interact with the encoding and storage of visual information, both in iconic memory and visual working memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Iconic Gestures for Robot Avatars, Recognition and Integration with Speech

    Paul Adam Bremner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-verbal gestures are an important part of human communication, improving its efficiency and efficacy for information conveyance. One possible means by which such multi-modal communication might be realised remotely is through the use of a tele-operated humanoid robot avatar. Such avatars have been previously shown to enhance social presence and operator salience. We present a motion tracking based tele-operation system for the NAO robot platform that allows direct transmission of speech and gestures produced by the operator. To assess the capabilities of this system for transmitting multi-modal communication, we have conducted a user study that investigated if robot-produced iconic gestures are comprehensible, and are integrated with speech. Robot performed gesture outcomes were compared directly to those for gestures produced by a human actor, using a within participant experimental design. We show that iconic gestures produced by a tele-operated robot are understood by participants when presented alone, almost as well as when produced by a human. More importantly, we show that gestures are integrated with speech when presented as part of a multi-modal communication equally well for human and robot performances.

  18. Combined dendrochronological and radiocarbon dating of six Russian icons from the 15th-17th centuries

    Dolgikh, A. V.; Matskovsky, V. V.; Voronin, K. V.; Solomina, O. N.

    2017-06-01

    The results of dendrochronological and radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of six medieval icons, originating from northern European Russia and painted on wooden panels made from Scots pine, dated to the 15th to 17th centuries are presented. The panels of each icon were studied using dendrochronology. Five to six AMS dates were obtained for four icons. Although five icons were dendro-dated successfully, one failed to be reliably cross-dated with the existing master tree-ring chronologies and it was dated by radiocarbon wiggle-matching. Dendrochronological dating and wiggle-matching of radiocarbon dates allowed us to determine the narrow chronological intervals of icon creation.

  19. The icon of the Holy Virgin Vatopedini with a portrait of Voevoda Ioan Radul

    Mašnić Mirjana M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author discusses iconography and stylistic characteristic of the icon featuring the Virgin Vatopedini with the Hungarian-Wallachian Voevoda loan Radul. The icon is treasured in the cathedral church of the Holy martyr Demetrios in Bitola. In more recent times, a new layer was painted over the icon, but not so long ago the icon was restored to its original condition. The inscriptions on the icon reveal that the Voevoda was a "new ktetor" of Vatopedi and also testify the painting was completed on November 28, 1502. The representation of the enthroned Virgin with the infant Christ sitting in her lap, flanked by St John Prodromes and the founder, belongs to the iconography of Deesis. Its stylistic features indicate that in most probability it was the work by a Cretan painter from the Ritzos family.

  20. An improved public goods game model with reputation effect on the spatial lattices

    Zhou, Tianwei; Ding, Shuai; Fan, Wenjuan; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The reputation effect is added into the spatial public goods game model. • The individual utility is calculated as a combination of payoff and reputation. • The individual reputation will be adaptively modified as the system evolves. • The larger the reputation factor, the higher the cooperation level. - Abstract: How to model the evolution of cooperation within the population is an important and interdisciplinary issue across the academia. In this paper, we propose an improved public goods game model with reputation effect on spatial lattices to investigate the evolution of cooperation regarding the allocation of public resources. In our model, we modify the individual utility or fitness as a product of the present payoff and reputation-related power function, and strategy update adopts a Fermi-like probability function during the game evolution. Meanwhile, for an interaction between a pair of partners, the reputation of a cooperative agent will be accrued beyond two units, but the defective player will decrease his reputation by one unit. Extensive Monte Carlo numerical simulations indicate the introduction of reputation will foster the formation of cooperative clusters, and greatly enhance the level of public cooperation on the spatial lattices. The larger reputation factor leads to the higher cooperation level since the reputation effect will be enormously embedded into the utility evaluation under this scenario. The current results are vastly beneficial to understand the persistence and emergence of cooperation among many natural, social and synthetic systems, and also provide some useful suggestions to devise the feasible social governance measures and modes for the public resources or affairs.

  1. Age-Related Changes in Preschoolers' Ability to Communicate Using Iconic Gestures in the Absence of Speech

    Vasc, Dermina; Miclea, Mircea

    2018-01-01

    Iconic gestures illustrate complex meanings and clarify and enrich the speech they accompany. Little is known, however, about how children use iconic gestures in the absence of speech. In this study, we used a cross-sectional design to investigate how 3-, 4- and 5-year-old children (N = 51) communicate using pantomime iconic gestures. Children…

  2. Peer effects in unethical behavior: standing or reputation?

    David Pascual-Ezama

    Full Text Available Recent empirical evidence shows that working in an unsupervised, isolated situation under competition, can increase dishonest behavior to achieve prestige. However, could working in a common space, in the presence of colleagues affect cheating? Here, we examine how familiar-peer influence, supervision and social incentives affect worker performance and dishonest behavior. First, we show that working in the presence of peers is an effective mechanism to constrain honest/dishonest behavior compared to an isolated work situation (experiment 1. Second, we demonstrate that the mere suspicion of dishonesty from another peer is not enough to affect individual cheating behavior (experiment 2, suggesting that reputation holds great importance in a worker's self-image acting as a strong social incentives. Third, we show that when the suspicion of dishonesty increases with multiple peers behaving dishonestly, the desire to increase standing is sufficient to nudge individuals' behavior back to cheating at the same levels as isolated situations (experiment 3.

  3. Trust and Reputation Management for Critical Infrastructure Protection

    Caldeira, Filipe; Monteiro, Edmundo; Simões, Paulo

    Today's Critical Infrastructures (CI) depend of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) to deliver their services with the required level of quality and availability. ICT security plays a major role in CI protection and risk prevention for single and also for interconnected CIs were cascading effects might occur because of the interdependencies that exist among different CIs. This paper addresses the problem of ICT security in interconnected CIs. Trust and reputation management using the Policy Based Management paradigm is the proposed solution to be applied at the CI interconnection points for information exchange. The proposed solution is being applied to the Security Mediation Gateway being developed in the European FP7 MICIE project, to allow for information exchange among interconnected CIs.

  4. Models of Trust and Reputation in eCommerce

    Florentina Loredana Dragomir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In eCommerce it is offered to online clients three types of evaluation: the evaluation of the buyer, the evaluation of the seller or the evaluation of both of them. For most of the cases, the partners of transaction can evaluate each other. In general, evaluations show how satisfied or unsatisfied is a buyer or a seller about the online transaction or his partner after the ending of the process. A small number of models offers a solution for developing an initial set of advisors which can be used for determination of levels of reputation and there are a few models that take into consideration as many social criteria as possible for determination of trust.

  5. The Rhetoric and Reality of Research Reputation: "Fur Coat and No Knickers"

    O'Loughlin, Deirdre; MacPhail, Ann; Msetfi, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation systems including global university rankings have been recently introduced as mechanisms for assessing overall academic quality, appraising research reputation and as a basis for funding and policy decisions. This study explores the concept of research reputation in terms of how it is defined, constituted and assessed. Eight…

  6. Reputation-Based Investment Helps to Optimize Group Behaviors in Spatial Lattice Networks.

    Ding, Hong; Cao, Lin; Ren, Yizhi; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Shi, Benyun

    2016-01-01

    Encouraging cooperation among selfish individuals is crucial in many real-world systems, where individuals' collective behaviors can be analyzed using evolutionary public goods game. Along this line, extensive studies have shown that reputation is an effective mechanism to investigate the evolution of cooperation. In most existing studies, participating individuals in a public goods game are assumed to contribute unconditionally into the public pool, or they can choose partners based on a common reputation standard (e.g., preferences or characters). However, to assign one reputation standard for all individuals is impractical in many real-world deployment. In this paper, we introduce a reputation tolerance mechanism that allows an individual to select its potential partners and decide whether or not to contribute an investment to the public pool based on its tolerance to other individuals' reputation. Specifically, an individual takes part in a public goods game only if the number of participants with higher reputation exceeds the value of its tolerance. Moreover, in this paper, an individual's reputation can increase or decrease in a bounded interval based on its historical behaviors. We explore the principle that how the reputation tolerance and conditional investment mechanisms can affect the evolution of cooperation in spatial lattice networks. Our simulation results demonstrate that a larger tolerance value can achieve an environment that promote the cooperation of participants.

  7. Selection of kin for spouse: Importance of socioeconomic status, reputation and beauty

    Omran Bakoush

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: The frequency of kin marriages in studied population did not change significantly in the last generation. Knowledge of biological harm of inbreeding has only a small inhibitory effect on choice of kin for spouse. Family reputation was far more important in selection of spouse than family wealth, social status and beauty of spouse, but reputation was uncorrelated with choice of kin for spouse.

  8. Building Corporate Reputation through Sustainable Entrepreneurship: The Mediating Effect of Ethical Behavior

    Mª del Mar Ramos-González

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates how a management approach based on sustainable entrepreneurship can positively affect corporate reputation. The analysis showed that this effect is enhanced by the mediating effect of good governance based on ethical behavior. The empirical study was conducted using data for 104 large Spanish firms defined as sustainable by the Corporate Reputation Business Monitor (MERCO ranking.

  9. Reputational Assault: A Critical and Historical Analysis of Gender and the Law of Defamation.

    Borden, Diane L.

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to gender/legal scholarship and theory by examining how the U.S. judicial system treats men and women differently in terms of reputational harm. Places both court cases and legislative enactments in the context of the development of women's history. Shows that women's reputations are generally discussed in terms of virtue, while men's…

  10. Overview of RepLab 2012: Evaluating Online Reputation Management Systems

    Amigó, E.; Corujo, A.; Gonzalo, J.; Meij, E.; de Rijke, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the goals, organization and results of the first RepLab competitive evaluation campaign for Online Reputation Management Systems (RepLab 2012). RepLab focused on the reputation of companies, and asked participant systems to annotate different types of information on tweets

  11. Interpretation and Implementation of Reputation/Brand Management by UK University Leaders

    Chapleo, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Reputation and brand management are topical issues in UK higher education but previous research has often focused on marketing practitioners within higher education (HE) institutions rather than the senior strategic leaders. This paper, however, examines university chief executives' understanding, attitudes, and interpretation of reputation and…

  12. Nascent ventures competing for start-up capital: matching reputations and investors

    Ebbers, J.J.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Although nascent ventures have not yet developed a performance-based reputation, the individual reputations of their founders, based on the performance of their earlier ventures, can function as important signals to investors. Selection system theory distinguishes between different types of

  13. Does the Perceived Neighborhood Reputation Contribute to Neighborhood Differences in Social Trust and Residential Wellbeing?

    Kullberg, Agneta; Timpka, Toomas; Svensson, Tommy; Karlsson, Nadine; Lindqvist, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The authors used a mixed methods approach to examine if the reputation of a housing area has bearing on residential wellbeing and social trust in three pairs of socioeconomically contrasting neighborhoods in a Swedish urban municipality. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between area reputation and…

  14. An Analysis of Academic Reputation as Perceived by Consumers of Higher Education.

    Conard, Michael J.; Conard, Maureen A.

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses of college-bound high school seniors (n=198) found most respondents viewed successful postgraduate careers as very important to the perception of an institution's academic reputation. Three factors described student perception of academic reputation: academic concerns, campus ethos, and practical value. Also, three factors were…

  15. Disentangling the effects of reputation and network position on the evolution of alliance networks

    Ebbers, J.J.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study uses the panel data social network analysis program SIENA to estimate the effect of actor reputation derived from past performance on alliance formation, while controlling for other constant actor attributes and network position. The authors distinguish between individual reputation based

  16. The Effects of Faulty or Potentially Harmful Products on Brand Reputation and Social Responsibility of Business

    Claudiu-Cătălin Munteanu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Building a strong brand requires a good management of brand reputation over time. Social responsibility of business is a key factor in evoking a positive brand reputation. Both the product itself and brand related actions and communications define brand reputation in the eyes of consumers, thus influencing perceived corporate social responsibility. As a consequence, it can be easily hindered or endangered by many product related issues such as faulty products or potentially harmful products. The purpose of this article is to provide an insight on the link between brand reputation and social responsibility in order to help organizations provide better services and protection for consumers. We examined how brand reputation is influenced by the negative bias generated by brand related communications regarding potentially harmful products. This study also analyzes how under normal consumption circumstances, consumers' experiences related to faulty products can influence brand reputation. To investigate this, we propose a model based on perceptual brand constructs and possible outcomes of brand reputation. In both circumstances, negative spillover effects are highlighted using structural equation modeling. The findings reveal that both faulty products and potentially harmful products have a negative bias on brand reputation, but affected perceptual brand constructs are different.

  17. Image and Reputation of Higher Education Institutions in Students' Retention Decisions.

    Nguyen, Nha; LeBlanc, Gaston

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed business students about the role of institutional image and reputation in the formation of customer loyalty. Found that the degree of loyalty tends to be higher when perceptions of both institutional reputation and image are favorable, and that interaction between the two also influences loyalty. (EV)

  18. Reputation Enhancement and School Delinquency: A Prospective Study Using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey [NELS:88

    Smith-Adcock, Sondra; Lee, Sang Min; Kerpelman, Jennifer; Majuta, Aaron; Young, Choi Bo

    2013-01-01

    High school delinquency, adolescent behaviors ranging from repeated school misconduct to being arrested, is a critical concern in the United States. Though widely believed that reputation is related to adolescent behavior, few studies have addressed the relationship between adolescent reputation and delinquency. Using the National Educational…

  19. Exposure to superfluous information reduces cooperation and increases antisocial punishment in reputation-based interactions

    Miguel edos Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human cooperation is often based on reputation gained from previous interactions with third parties. Such reputation can be built on generous or punitive actions, and both, one’s own reputation and the reputation of others have been shown to influence decision making in experimental games that control for confounding variables. Here we test how reputation-based cooperation and punishment react to disruption of the cognitive processing in different kinds of helping games with observers. Saying a few superfluous words before each interaction was used to possibly interfere with working memory. In a first set of experiments, where reputation could only be based on generosity, the disruption reduced the frequency of cooperation and lowered mean final payoffs. In a second set of experiments where reputation could only be based on punishment, the disruption increased the frequency of antisocial punishment (i.e. of punishing those who helped and reduced the frequency of punishing defectors. Our findings suggest that working memory can easily be constraining in reputation-based interactions within experimental games, even if these games are based on a few simple rules with a visual display that provides all the information the subjects need to play the strategies predicted from current theory. Our findings also highlight a weakness of experimental games, namely that they can be very sensitive to environmental variation and that quantitative conclusions about antisocial punishment or other behavioral strategies can easily be misleading.

  20. Scepticism and corporate social responsibility communications: the influence of fit and reputation

    Elving, W.J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Consumers tend to be sceptical about companies' corporate social responsibility (CSR) communications. We tested the influence of fit and reputation on consumer scepticism when confronted with a cause-related marketing (CRM) advertisement. In a 2 (fit vs. no fit) by 3 (bad reputation, unknown

  1. Higher Education: Reputational Effects, Distorted Signaling and Propitious Selection

    Elena V. Savitskaya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the authors attempt to underpin the hypothesis that under certain conditions a propitious selection may take place on the higher education market. It is a phenomenon when brand universities automatically reproduce their positive reputation without improving the quality of teaching due to influx of talented entrants. The authors apply econometric modelling and regression analysis based on survey of first-year students from Moscow to demonstrate that graduates with high USE marks really prefer to choose among brand universities; moreover, they appreciate a possibility to obtain a prestigious diploma even more than that of acquiring a particular profession. However, entrants do not possess full information about the quality of teaching in a particular university. The analysis presented in the paper shows that university rankings do not contribute to overcoming of this information asymmetry, since they transmit distorted signals caused by the methodology of ranking. The rankings, first of all, accentuate academic activity of teachers rather than educational process and interaction with students. For this reason, higher schools often adopt such a strategy to meet the ranking criteria as much as possible; they also tend to improve namely these indicators disregarding the other to become a leader. As a result, brand universities may surpass ordinary universities not due to rendering educational services of higher quality but due to selection of best entrants and peer-effects. These factors allow them to have excellent graduates, thus maintain positive reputation in employers’ opinion and simultaneously raise the brand value by advancing in a ranking.

  2. The Sznajd model with limited persuasion: competition between high-reputation and hesitant agents

    Crokidakis, Nuno; De Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro

    2011-01-01

    In this work we study a modified version of the two-dimensional Sznajd sociophysics model. In particular, we consider the effects of agents' reputations in the persuasion rules. In other words, a high-reputation group with a common opinion may convince its neighbors with probability p, which induces an increase of the group's reputation. On the other hand, there is always a probability q = 1 − p of the neighbors keeping their opinions, which induces a decrease of the group's reputation. These rules describe a competition between groups with high-reputation and hesitant agents, which makes the full-consensus states (with all spins pointing in one direction) more difficult to reach. As consequences, the usual phase transition does not occur for p c ∼ 0.69 and the system presents realistic democracy-like situations, where the majority of spins are aligned in a certain direction, for a wide range of parameters

  3. The Sznajd model with limited persuasion: competition between high-reputation and hesitant agents

    Crokidakis, Nuno; Murilo Castro de Oliveira, Paulo

    2011-11-01

    In this work we study a modified version of the two-dimensional Sznajd sociophysics model. In particular, we consider the effects of agents' reputations in the persuasion rules. In other words, a high-reputation group with a common opinion may convince its neighbors with probability p, which induces an increase of the group's reputation. On the other hand, there is always a probability q = 1 - p of the neighbors keeping their opinions, which induces a decrease of the group's reputation. These rules describe a competition between groups with high-reputation and hesitant agents, which makes the full-consensus states (with all spins pointing in one direction) more difficult to reach. As consequences, the usual phase transition does not occur for p < pc ~ 0.69 and the system presents realistic democracy-like situations, where the majority of spins are aligned in a certain direction, for a wide range of parameters.

  4. Multi-level reputation signals in service industries in Latin America

    William Newburry

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study uses signaling theory to investigate industry -firm- and individual-level determinants of individual-level corporate reputation assessments in the context of Latin America. In a hierarchical linear model, we test our theory using 76,419 individual evaluations of 80 companies in five Latin American countries collected by the Reputation Institute in conjunction with the Foro de Reputación Corporativa. Results show that across our Latin American sample, reputations of firms in the telecom and energy industries are significantly lower than those of manufacturing firms. Additionally, we find consistent evidence across marginalized groups (e.g., women, lower social class, education and income that they assess telecom industry reputations relatively higher than their less marginalized counterparts do. Results are mixed with regards to marginalized group assessments of firms from other service industries. Additionally, counter to expectations, we do not find evidence that firm size or financial performance impact reputation assessments.

  5. Iconicity in the development of picture skills: typical development and implications for individuals with severe intellectual disabilities.

    Stephenson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The iconicity of graphic symbols and the iconicity hypothesis are theoretical concepts that have had an impact on the use of augmentative and alternative communication strategies for people with severe intellectual disabilities. This article reviews some of the recent literature on the impact of iconicity on symbol recognition and use by typically developing children and relates those findings to people with severe disability. It seems that although iconicity may have some impact on symbol learning, there are other variables that are likely to be much more important. It is likely that iconicity is not helpful to those learning graphic symbols who have little or no comprehension of spoken language.

  6. Choosing colors for map display icons using models of visual search.

    Shive, Joshua; Francis, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    We show how to choose colors for icons on maps to minimize search time using predictions of a model of visual search. The model analyzes digital images of a search target (an icon on a map) and a search display (the map containing the icon) and predicts search time as a function of target-distractor color distinctiveness and target eccentricity. We parameterized the model using data from a visual search task and performed a series of optimization tasks to test the model's ability to choose colors for icons to minimize search time across icons. Map display designs made by this procedure were tested experimentally. In a follow-up experiment, we examined the model's flexibility to assign colors in novel search situations. The model fits human performance, performs well on the optimization tasks, and can choose colors for icons on maps with novel stimuli to minimize search time without requiring additional model parameter fitting. Models of visual search can suggest color choices that produce search time reductions for display icons. Designers should consider constructing visual search models as a low-cost method of evaluating color assignments.

  7. Towards iconic language for patient records, drug monographs, guidelines and medical search engines.

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Duclos, Catherine; Hamek, Saliha; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Kerdelhué, Gaetan; Darmoni, Stefan; Favre, Madeleine; Falcoff, Hector; Simon, Christian; Pereira, Suzanne; Serrot, Elisabeth; Mitouard, Thierry; Hardouin, Etienne; Kergosien, Yannick; Venot, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Practicing physicians have limited time for consulting medical knowledge and records. We have previously shown that using icons instead of text to present drug monographs may allow contraindications and adverse effects to be identified more rapidly and more accurately. These findings were based on the use of an iconic language designed for drug knowledge, providing icons for many medical concepts, including diseases, antecedents, drug classes and tests. In this paper, we describe a new project aimed at extending this iconic language, and exploring the possible applications of these icons in medicine. Based on evaluators' comments, focus groups of physicians and opinions of academic, industrial and associative partners, we propose iconic applications related to patient records, for example summarizing patient conditions, searching for specific clinical documents and helping to code structured data. Other applications involve the presentation of clinical practice guidelines and improving the interface of medical search engines. These new applications could use the same iconic language that was designed for drug knowledge, with a few additional items that respect the logic of the language.

  8. The Pricing Effects of Heritage at an Iconic Hotel

    Bradford T. Hudson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Historic hotels are a recognized product type in the lodging industry and may be found in significant numbers throughout the globe. The purpose of this article is to validate the notion that heritage can be an important element of the consumer value proposition for older hotels, by demonstrating that an iconic hotel with a distinct historical identity is able to attain a price premium over newer hotels with comparable operating characteristics. This exploratory study is based on qualitative field research conducted by the author, and quantitative analysis of pricing data that was collected by a regional hotel industry association over a five year period. The author concludes that heritage does indeed have a positive effect on the ability to attain a price premium at historic hotels, especially for leisure travelers.

  9. GREEN TOWERS AND ICONIC DESIGN: Cases from Three Continents

    Kheir M Al-Kodmany

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, massive urbanization, increasingly denser cities and environmental consciousness are pushing architects to build “green” skyscraper. This paper examines the emergence of a notable type of skyscrapers which depart from purely image-driven structures, and emphasizes functionality and energy efficiency. It argues that breathtaking green design and practical clean technology are merged to give birth to green architectural aesthetics. Upon reviewing over 30 towers from various parts of the world, the paper identifies salient green design strategies that provide new iconicity including: structural efficiencies, renewable energy, façade technology, greeneries, and bioclimatic design. Findings suggest that a dynamic synergy among innovative green design strategies, new architectural languages and exciting aesthetics has constituted a trend that is more likely to prevail in the 21st Century.

  10. Euristica del senso. Iconic turn e semiotica dell'immagine

    Angela Mengoni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Taking cue from the epistolary exchange between Gottfried Boehm and Tom Mitchell, the article explores the relationship between the so-called Bildkritik and the visual semiotics. Rather than focusing on the explicit quotation of semiotic concepts or authors, the paper proposes to examine the heuristic approach to the image that characterizes both the analytical dimension of the Bildkritik and the semiotics of the image developed by the French generative semiotics.Taking into account the immanent approach of both traditions and some key-operators (such as ‘iconic difference’ and ‘sémiotique plastique’, the acknowledgement of an active sense-generating capability of the ‘visual’ will emerge as a common feature.

  11. Intellectual capital and relational capital: The role of sustainability in developing corporate reputation Intellectual capital and relational capital: The role of sustainability in developing corporate reputation Intellectual capital and relational capital: The role of sustainability in developing corporate reputation

    Ignacio Rodríguez del Bosque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intellectual capital offers a potential source of sustainable competitive advantage and is believed to be the source from which economic growth may sprout. However, not many papers analyze the effect of sustainability in the elements involving intellectual capital. This paper seeks to highlight the key role played by corporate sustainability on corporate reputation as one of the key components of relational capital based on the knowledge-based theory.Design/methodology/approach: Authors develop a structural equation model to test the hypothesis. The study was tested using data collected from a sample of 400 Spanish consumers.Findings: The structural equation model shows that sustainability plays a vital role as antecedent of corporate reputation and relational capital. Findings suggest that economic, social and environmental domains of sustainability have a positive direct effect on corporate reputation. Additionally, this study shows that economic sustainability is considered to be the most important dimension to enhance corporate reputation.Research limitations/implications: The complicated economic environment currently experienced worldwide may affect the perceptions of Spanish consumers and their ratings. The crosscutting nature of this research inhibits an understanding of the variations in the perceptions of the customers surveyed over time, suggesting that this research could be expanded by a longitudinal study. Finally, the current study has been conducted with consumers of hotel companies in Spain and it is not clear in how far the findings can be generalized to other industries, stakeholders or countries.Practical implications: This research allows managers to identify the activities in which companies can devote resources to in order to increase firm´s reputation. By knowing these specific economic, social and environmental activities, companies can understand, analyze and make decisions in a better way about its sector and

  12. ORGANIZATION ETHICS REPUTATION AND CUSTOMER LOYALTY: Perception of Muslim Customer Sharia Banking

    Sunaryo SUNARYO

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the Indonesian population is Muslim, in which the share of Sharia Banking is only three (3 percent of the total banking market share in the country. This indicates a low participation, possibly leading to a negative perception on ethic reputation and low awareness among the Muslim communities in using sharia banking products and services. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the influence of sharia banking organization ethics reputation on Muslims customer loyalty and to analyze the role of satisfaction as a mediating effect on sharia banking organization ethics reputation on Muslims customer loyalty for the sharia banking products and services. Survey with 315 respondents in the city of Malang, Indonesia was conducted to gather information to further understand the situation, to answer the questions raised and to meet the study objectives. Purposive sampling was used to select the relevant respondents. The Structural Equation Model (SEM is used to analyze the direct and indirect relationship between sharia banking organization ethic reputation, satisfaction and Muslims customer loyalty. The findings of this study showed that all independent variables significantly influenced the dependent variable, both directly and indirectly. Satisfaction as mediating factor has a high positive support to the relationship between organization ethic reputation Muslims customer loyalty. Hence, satisfaction plays an important role to support the perception of ethic reputation of the sharia banking organization in influencing Muslim customer loyalty. In addition, the study also suggests that ethic reputation of an organization also helps in maintaining customer loyalty.

  13. Social norm complexity and past reputations in the evolution of cooperation.

    Santos, Fernando P; Santos, Francisco C; Pacheco, Jorge M

    2018-03-07

    Indirect reciprocity is the most elaborate and cognitively demanding of all known cooperation mechanisms, and is the most specifically human because it involves reputation and status. By helping someone, individuals may increase their reputation, which may change the predisposition of others to help them in future. The revision of an individual's reputation depends on the social norms that establish what characterizes a good or bad action and thus provide a basis for morality. Norms based on indirect reciprocity are often sufficiently complex that an individual's ability to follow subjective rules becomes important, even in models that disregard the past reputations of individuals, and reduce reputations to either 'good' or 'bad' and actions to binary decisions. Here we include past reputations in such a model and identify the key pattern in the associated norms that promotes cooperation. Of the norms that comply with this pattern, the one that leads to maximal cooperation (greater than 90 per cent) with minimum complexity does not discriminate on the basis of past reputation; the relative performance of this norm is particularly evident when we consider a 'complexity cost' in the decision process. This combination of high cooperation and low complexity suggests that simple moral principles can elicit cooperation even in complex environments.

  14. Knowledge of identity and reputation: Do people have knowledge of others' perceptions?

    Solomon, Brittany C; Vazire, Simine

    2016-09-01

    It may be important to know when our impressions of someone differ from how that person sees him/herself and how others see that same person. We investigated whether people are aware of how their friends see themselves (knowledge of identity) and are seen by others (knowledge of reputation). Previous research indicates that, for physical attractiveness, romantic partners do have such knowledge of others' perceptions, but it is unknown whether people in platonic relationships also detect such discrepancies between their own perceptions and others'. We examined this phenomenon for a new set of characteristics: the Big Five personality traits. Our primary research questions pertained to identity accuracy and reputation accuracy (i.e., knowledge of a target's self-views and how others view the target, respectively) and identity insight and reputation insight (i.e., identity accuracy and reputation accuracy that cannot be accounted for by a potential artifact: perceivers assuming that others share their own views of targets). However, after a series of preliminary tests, we did not examine reputation insight, as several necessary conditions were not met, indicating that any effects would likely be spurious. We did find that perceivers can accurately infer a target's identity and reputation on global personality traits (identity and reputation accuracy), and that perceivers can sometimes accurately distinguish between their own perceptions of targets and targets' self-views, but not others' views of targets (i.e., identity, but not reputation, insight). Finally, we explored boundary conditions for knowledge of others' perceptions and whether knowledge of identity is correlated with knowledge of reputation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Looking at Darwin: portraits and the making of an icon.

    Browne, Janet

    2009-09-01

    With increased attention on the visual in the history of science, there is renewed interest in the role of portraiture and other forms of personal imagery in constructing scientific reputation and the circulation of scientific ideas. This essay indicates some directions in which researchers could push forward by studying the dissemination of pictures and portraits of Charles Darwin. Selected portraits are discussed, with particular attention paid to their circulation. The mode of production and original intent of these portraits is briefly addressed, but the thrust of the argument is to highlight subsequent shifts in usage. While self-fashioning is an important part of the story, it is useful also to dwell on the rise and diversification of printed media in conjunction with escalating interest in Darwin as a celebrity figure. Historicizing the variety of opportunities that people have had of "looking"at Darwin adds considerably to our understanding of scientific fame.

  16. Price reactions when consumers are concerned about pro-social reputation

    Kahsay, Goytom Abraha; Andersen, Laura Mørch; Hansen, Lars Gårn

    In this paper, we propose a reputation-signalling model of demand for consumer goods containing pro-social characteristics such as a ‘fair trade’ or ‘organic’ certification. We show that reputation signalling can reverse price reactions resembling the crowding-out of pre-existing motives for pro-......-social behavior seen in situations of volunteering and charitable giving. Finally, using a unique combination of questionnaire and purchase panel data, we present evidence of such reputation-driven reversal of price reactions in the Danish market for organic milk....

  17. The Impact of Corporate Reputation and Information Sharing on Value Creation for Organizational Customers

    Žabkar Vesna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of corporate communication to build, protect and maintain corporate reputation has been advocated in numerous publications in recent years. The main goal of this paper is to provide an understanding of the impact of corporate reputation and information sharing on value creation. Both reputation and information sharing represent signals that customers observe in the process of value creation, which is seen as the end focus for corporate marketing. The paper draws on signaling theory and corporate marketing literature from the European and American schools of thought.

  18. Reputational concerns, not altruism, motivate restraint when gambling with other people's money

    Kodi B. Arfer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available People may behave prosocially not only because they value the welfare of others, but also to protect their own reputation. We examined the separate roles of altruism and reputational concerns in moral-hazard gambling tasks, which allowed subjects to gamble with a partner's money. In Study 1, subjects who were told that their partner would see their choices were more prosocial. In Study 2, subjects were more prosocial to a single partner when their choices were transparent than when their choices were attributed to a third party. We conclude that reputational concerns are a key restraint on selfish exploitation under moral hazard.

  19. Reputation and Reward: Two Sides of the Same Bitcoin

    Delgado-Segura, Sergi; Tanas, Cristian; Herrera-Joancomartí, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    In Mobile Crowd Sensing (MCS), the power of the crowd, jointly with the sensing capabilities of the smartphones they wear, provides a new paradigm for data sensing. Scenarios involving user behavior or those that rely on user mobility are examples where standard sensor networks may not be suitable, and MCS provides an interesting solution. However, including human participation in sensing tasks presents numerous and unique research challenges. In this paper, we analyze three of the most important: user participation, data sensing quality and user anonymity. We tackle the three as a whole, since all of them are strongly correlated. As a result, we present PaySense, a general framework that incentivizes user participation and provides a mechanism to validate the quality of collected data based on the users’ reputation. All such features are performed in a privacy-preserving way by using the Bitcoin cryptocurrency. Rather than a theoretical one, our framework has been implemented, and it is ready to be deployed and complement any existing MCS system. PMID:27240373

  20. Reputation and Reward: Two Sides of the Same Bitcoin.

    Delgado-Segura, Sergi; Tanas, Cristian; Herrera-Joancomartí, Jordi

    2016-05-27

    In Mobile Crowd Sensing (MCS), the power of the crowd, jointly with the sensing capabilities of the smartphones they wear, provides a new paradigm for data sensing. Scenarios involving user behavior or those that rely on user mobility are examples where standard sensor networks may not be suitable, and MCS provides an interesting solution. However, including human participation in sensing tasks presents numerous and unique research challenges. In this paper, we analyze three of the most important: user participation, data sensing quality and user anonymity. We tackle the three as a whole, since all of them are strongly correlated. As a result, we present PaySense, a general framework that incentivizes user participation and provides a mechanism to validate the quality of collected data based on the users' reputation. All such features are performed in a privacy-preserving way by using the Bitcoin cryptocurrency. Rather than a theoretical one, our framework has been implemented, and it is ready to be deployed and complement any existing MCS system.

  1. Reputation and Reward: Two Sides of the Same Bitcoin

    Sergi Delgado-Segura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In Mobile Crowd Sensing (MCS, the power of the crowd, jointly with the sensing capabilities of the smartphones they wear, provides a new paradigm for data sensing. Scenarios involving user behavior or those that rely on user mobility are examples where standard sensor networks may not be suitable, and MCS provides an interesting solution. However, including human participation in sensing tasks presents numerous and unique research challenges. In this paper, we analyze three of the most important: user participation, data sensing quality and user anonymity. We tackle the three as a whole, since all of them are strongly correlated. As a result, we present PaySense, a general framework that incentivizes user participation and provides a mechanism to validate the quality of collected data based on the users’ reputation. All such features are performed in a privacy-preserving way by using the Bitcoin cryptocurrency. Rather than a theoretical one, our framework has been implemented, and it is ready to be deployed and complement any existing MCS system.

  2. Prototyping and testing of a fully autonomous road construction beacon, the iCone.

    2010-04-01

    A revolutionary portable traffic monitoring device is developed, extensively prototyped and thoroughly tested throughout the State of New York as well as several other states. The resulting device, trademarked as the iCone, simplifies the process o...

  3. Message formulation, organization, and navigation schemes for icon-based communication aids.

    Patel, Rupal

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with severe speech and motor impairments rely on assistive communication devices to convey their needs and desires in social, educational, and vocational situations. Users with limited motor control or literacy often choose to use icon-based devices that afford increased speed of message formulation at the cost of fully generative language formulation on letter-based devices. A major challenge with large vocabulary icon-based systems is rate of communication. Message formulation, vocabulary organization, and navigation schemes can be used to mitigate the trade-off between vocabulary size and communication rate. This paper summarizes our research efforts to leverage semantic frame theory, situational context, and rapid serial visual presentation to improve message formulation speed and completeness in our iconCHAT and RSVP iconCHAT systems. Usability data and persisting challenges are discussed.

  4. Icon Painters of the Nizhniy Novgorod Volga Region of the XVII Century

    Veronicka N. Belyaeva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The author considers specificity and basic difficulties of biographies of the icon painters of the Nizhniy Novgorod Volga region of the XVII-th century restore. The data on the masters are cites.

  5. Readout from iconic memory and selective spatial attention involve similar neural processes.

    Ruff, Christian C; Kristjánsson, Arni; Driver, Jon

    2007-10-01

    Iconic memory and spatial attention are often considered separately, but they may have functional similarities. Here we provide functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence for some common underlying neural effects. Subjects judged three visual stimuli in one hemifield of a bilateral array comprising six stimuli. The relevant hemifield for partial report was indicated by an auditory cue, administered either before the visual array (precue, spatial attention) or shortly after the array (postcue, iconic memory). Pre- and postcues led to similar activity modulations in lateral occipital cortex contralateral to the cued side. This finding indicates that readout from iconic memory can have some neural effects similar to those of spatial attention. We also found common bilateral activation of a fronto-parietal network for postcue and precue trials. These neuroimaging data suggest that some common neural mechanisms underlie selective spatial attention and readout from iconic memory. Some differences were also found; compared with precues, postcues led to higher activity in the right middle frontal gyrus.

  6. Iconic-Memory Processing of Unfamiliar Stimuli by Retarded and Nonretarded Individuals.

    Hornstein, Henry A.; Mosley, James L.

    1979-01-01

    The iconic-memory processing of unfamiliar stimuli by 11 mentally retarded males (mean age 22 years) was undertaken employing a visually cued partial-report procedure and a visual masking procedure. (Author/CL)

  7. ICON, a current model preamplifier in CMOS technology for use with high rate particle detectors

    Anghinolfi, F.; Aspell, P.; Campbell, M.; Heijne, E.H.M.; Jarron, P.; Meddeler, G.; Santiard, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The ICON current mode preamplifier is intended for use in experiments at high rate hadron colliders. The transient response and noise performance have been analyzed. One chip has been made using an ICON circuit with resistive feedback to produce a preamplifier with a peaking time of below 10 ns. This fast preamplifier has a gain of 870 mV/pC and a power dissipation of around 1 mW. Another chip was made which uses the ICON circuit as the front-end to a dual port analog memory. The noise measured is between 2,400 e - and 3,000 e - . An important characteristic of ICON is that it can tolerate a detector leakage current of 10 μA at the DC coupled input. Therefore, it is very suitable for silicon detector systems under severe radiation conditions

  8. Combining Semantic and Lexical Methods for Mapping MedDRA to VCM Icons.

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Tsopra, Rosy

    2018-01-01

    VCM (Visualization of Concept in Medicine) is an iconic language that represents medical concepts, such as disorders, by icons. VCM has a formal semantics described by an ontology. The icons can be used in medical software for providing a visual summary or enriching texts. However, the use of VCM icons in user interfaces requires to map standard medical terminologies to VCM. Here, we present a method combining semantic and lexical approaches for mapping MedDRA to VCM. The method takes advantage of the hierarchical relations in MedDRA. It also analyzes the groups of lemmas in the term's labels, and relies on a manual mapping of these groups to the concepts in the VCM ontology. We evaluate the method on 50 terms. Finally, we discuss the method and suggest perspectives.

  9. The Effect of Iconic and Beat Gestures on Memory Recall in Greek's First and Second Language

    Eleni Ioanna Levantinou

    2016-01-01

    Gestures play a major role in comprehension and memory recall due to the fact that aid the efficient channel of the meaning and support listeners’ comprehension and memory. In the present study, the assistance of two kinds of gestures (iconic and beat gestures) is tested in regards to memory and recall. The hypothesis investigated here is whether or not iconic and beat gestures provide assistance in memory and recall in Greek and in Greek speakers’ second language. Two gr...

  10. An icon-based synoptic visualization of fully polarimetric radar data

    Woodhouse, I.H.; Turner, Dean

    2012-01-01

    The visualization of fully polarimetric radar data is hindered by traditional remote sensing methodologies for displaying data due to the large number of parameters per pixel in such data, and the non-scalar nature of variables such as phase difference. In this paper, a new method is described that uses icons instead of image pixels to represent the image data so that polarimetric properties and geographic context can be visualized together. The icons are parameterized using the alpha-entropy...

  11. Fast decay of iconic memory in observers with mild cognitive impairments

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Neuse, James; Madigan, Stephen; Dosher, Barbara Anne

    2005-01-01

    In a previous clinical report, unusually fast decay of iconic memory was obtained from a subject who later developed Alzheimer's disease. By using the partial-report paradigm, iconic memory (a form of visual sensory memory) in a group of observers with mild cognitive impairments (MCI) was characterized and compared with that of young college-age adults and older controls. Relatively long stimulus exposures were used for all three groups to ensure that older observers could perceive the stimul...

  12. An icon that everyone wants to click on : an empirical study on the relationship between consumer perceptions and mobile game icon successfulness

    Jylhä, Henrietta

    2017-01-01

    Mobile games market has been touted as the fastest growing gaming sector in the world. Every day thousands of new mobile games are published to join millions of others on app stores. The competition for top grossing mobile games is fierce, and the way a game is represented greatly contributes to its commercial success. When browsing for mobile games, consumers search for an icon they want to click on. However, most mobile games fail to engage consumers who browse past hundreds of icons on app...

  13. Sport Concussion Management Using Facebook: A Feasibility Study of an Innovative Adjunct "iCon".

    Ahmed, Osman Hassan; Schneiders, Anthony G; McCrory, Paul R; Sullivan, S John

    2017-04-01

      Sport concussion is currently the focus of much international attention. Innovative methods to assist athletic trainers in facilitating management after this injury need to be investigated.   To investigate the feasibility of using a Facebook concussion-management program termed iCon (interactive concussion management) to facilitate the safe return to play (RTP) of young persons after sport concussion.   Observational study.   Facebook group containing interactive elements, with moderation and support from trained health care professionals.   Eleven participants (n = 9 men, n = 2 women; range, 18 to 28 years old) completed the study.   The study was conducted over a 3-month period, with participant questionnaires administered preintervention and postintervention. The primary focus was on the qualitative experiences of the participants and the effect of iCon on their RTP. Usage data were also collected.   At the completion of the study, all participants (100%) stated that they would recommend an intervention such as iCon to others. Their supporting quotes all indicated that iCon has the potential to improve the management of concussion among this cohort. Most participants (n = 9, 82%) stated they were better informed with regard to their RTP due to participating in iCon.   This interactive adjunct to traditional concussion management was appreciated among this participant group, which indicates the feasibility of a future, larger study of iCon. Athletic trainers should consider the role that multimedia technologies may play in assisting with the management of sport concussion.

  14. Iconic memory is not a case of attention-free awareness.

    Mack, Arien; Erol, Muge; Clarke, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Whether or not awareness entails attention is a much debated question. Since iconic memory has been generally assumed to be attention-free, it has been considered an important piece of evidence that it does not (Koch & Tsuchiya, 2007). Therefore the question of the role of attention in iconic memory matters. Recent evidence (Persuh, Genzer, & Melara, 2012), suggests that iconic memory does depend on attention. Because of the centrality of iconic memory to this debate, we looked again at the role of attention in iconic memory using a standard whole versus partial report task of letters in a 3×2 matrix. We manipulated attention to the array by coupling it with a second task that was either easy or hard and by manipulating the probability of which task was to be performed on any given trial. When attention was maximally diverted from the matrix, participants were able to report less than a single item, confirming the prior results and supporting the conclusion that iconic memory entails attention. It is not an instance of attention-free awareness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bishnuprasad Rabha as Cultural Icon of Assam: The Process of Meaning Making

    Parismita Hazarika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The term ‘cultural icon’ is generally used to refer to individuals or images, objects, visual sign, monuments, space etc. In semiotics the term ‘icon’ is used to refer to a sign that bears close resemblance to the object that it stands for. Icons are particularly influential signifiers because they are immediately identifiable and carry complex cultural codes in a compact image. In this paper the understanding of ‘cultural icon’ is not limited to semiotics. Following Keyan Tomaselli and David Scott in Cultural Icons (2009, we believe that cultural icons are purposive constructions. An attempt has been made in this paper to analyze the association of ‘desirable’ meanings to a cultural icon (while dropping ‘undesirable’ ones; thus, it is imperative that we look at the changing socio-political contexts behind such purposive constructions. With this in mind, we look at the iconic figure of Bishnuprasad Rabha who has been one of the most revered figures in the cultural history of Assam and has been appropriated as a cultural icon in different discourses of the national life of Assam that has emerged in recent times.

  16. Iconicity as a general property of language: evidence from spoken and signed languages

    Pamela Perniss

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Current views about language are dominated by the idea of arbitrary connections between linguistic form and meaning. However, if we look beyond the more familiar Indo-European languages and also include both spoken and signed language modalities, we find that motivated, iconic form-meaning mappings are, in fact, pervasive in language. In this paper, we review the different types of iconic mappings that characterize languages in both modalities, including the predominantly visually iconic mappings in signed languages. Having shown that iconic mapping are present across languages, we then proceed to review evidence showing that language users (signers and speakers exploit iconicity in language processing and language acquisition. While not discounting the presence and importance of arbitrariness in language, we put forward the idea that iconicity need also be recognized as a general property of language, which may serve the function of reducing the gap between linguistic form and conceptual representation to allow the language system to hook up to motor and perceptual experience.

  17. Read-out of emotional information from iconic memory: the longevity of threatening stimuli.

    Kuhbandner, Christof; Spitzer, Bernhard; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2011-05-01

    Previous research has shown that emotional stimuli are more likely than neutral stimuli to be selected by attention, indicating that the processing of emotional information is prioritized. In this study, we examined whether the emotional significance of stimuli influences visual processing already at the level of transient storage of incoming information in iconic memory, before attentional selection takes place. We used a typical iconic memory task in which the delay of a poststimulus cue, indicating which of several visual stimuli has to be reported, was varied. Performance decreased rapidly with increasing cue delay, reflecting the fast decay of information stored in iconic memory. However, although neutral stimulus information and emotional stimulus information were initially equally likely to enter iconic memory, the subsequent decay of the initially stored information was slowed for threatening stimuli, a result indicating that fear-relevant information has prolonged availability for read-out from iconic memory. This finding provides the first evidence that emotional significance already facilitates stimulus processing at the stage of iconic memory.

  18. Accruals quality, underwriter reputation, and corporate bond underpricing: Evidence from China

    Si Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between accruals quality and the underpricing of corporate bonds in China and how underwriter reputation affects this relationship. We find that (1 accruals quality is negatively associated with the magnitude of bond underpricing and (2 the impact of low accruals quality on underpricing is partially offset by hiring reputable underwriters. A path analysis shows that approximately 11% of the effect of accruals quality on underpricing is attributable to the indirect path through reputable underwriters, suggesting that accruals quality is more effective than reputable underwriters in lowering bond underpricing. These findings are significant for initial bond offerings, but not for secondary bond offerings. We also find that low accruals quality is associated with more restrictive non-price contract terms such as greater collateral requirements and stricter covenants.

  19. Reputation formation and the evolution of cooperation in anonymous online markets

    Diekmann, Andreas; Jann, Ben; Przepiorka, Wojtek|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413317617; Wehrli, Stefan

    Theoretical propositions stressing the importance of trust, reciprocity, and reputation for cooperation in social exchange relations are deeply rooted in classical sociological thought. Today's online markets provide a unique opportunity to test these theories using unobtrusive data. Our study

  20. Formative Reputation: From Being an Organizational Asset to Becoming a Process in The Making

    Baka, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    content websites has influenced organizational reputation-making practices in the travel sector. The findings are based upon a corpus of data including: a field study at the offices of the largest travel user-generated website, TripAdvisor and an adaptation of virtual ethnography called ‘netnography......In the last decade, we have witnessed an explosion of emergent web technologies and platforms that have drawn the attention of the academic community, as well as of professionals in many sectors. This paper explores the concept of reputation-making with the aim of explaining how the rise of user-generated......’. In so doing, key insights are generated to inform organizational reputation-making. The paper concludes with the assertion that if we aim to understand the phenomenon of reputation-making, we have to develop a more nuanced and sophisticated way to conceptualize its formativeness. It is suggested...

  1. Reputation,Accounting Information and Debt Contracts in Chinese Family Firms

    Hao Li

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides evidence to show that in the presence of imperfect formal institutions there is both a substitutional and a complementary relationship between accounting information and reputation, an informal institution. Empirical results using a sample of family firms listed in the Chinese A-share stock market from 2004 to 2007 show that in China, where the legal environment is far from perfect, the complementary relationship between reputation and accounting information is more pronounced than is the substitutional relationship. Thus, the aggregate effect is that a better reputation improves the usefulness of accounting information in debt contracts. Besides the aggregate effect, this paper also provides evidence of the substitutional and complementary relationships between reputation and accounting separately.

  2. The Impact of Interactive Corporate Social Responsibility Communication on Corporate Reputation

    D. Eberle (David); G.A.J.M. Berens (Guido); T. Li (Ting)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Companies increasingly communicate about corporate social responsibility (CSR) through interactive online media. We examine whether using such media is beneficial to a company's reputation. We conducted an online experiment to examine the impacts of interactivity in

  3. The Reputation Driven Interplay of Relationships between Clients and Auditors in an Auditor Selection Process

    Kacanski, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the reputation-based interplay between auditor selection and interlocking directorships from a multilevel network perspective. The aim of this article is to explore how and under what conditions reputation influences patterns of social selection processes in an assurance...... to the literature on auditor selection. A total of 774 annual reports were collected from 145 - 165 Danish public listed companies, and the relational data of companies was assembled, as comprised of the members of supervisory boards and partners who signed audit reports during the five-year period from 2010...... to 2014. In this study, mechanisms for auditor selection were controlled by mechanisms for interlocking directorships in order to obtain a broader picture of the conditions under which board members have tendencies to select reputable auditors. The findings suggest that reputation has a significant impact...

  4. Digital presence and reputation in social media: comparative in the fashion industry

    Joan Francesc FONDEVILA GASCÓN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Online management reputation begins to be assumed as a priority for companies that find social media and Internet influence the image that their audience have. H&M and Zara, as the main buyers of retail business, are not an exception. Their mentions in social media and e-commerce sales show a high level influence. This investigation analyses from an introductorily quantitative and qualitative perspective the presence and online reputation of this companies and their strategy to manage that reputation. It is noted that the two analyzed companies generated a high number of interactions and social media mentions, mostly positive or neutral, but we don’t detect real dialogue and, therefore, interactivity is improvable. This circumstance can lead to lack of engagement towards the brand and deficit in the control over negative comments, synonyms of potential reputational crisis.

  5. The effect of corporate brand reputation on brand attachment and brand loyalty: automobile sector

    Loureiro, S. M. C.; Sarmento, E. M.; Le Bellego, G.

    2017-01-01

    The current study aims to analyze the effect of corporate brand reputation on brand attachment and brand loyalty considering the automotive sector and the brands Tesla, Toyota, and Volvo. A sample of 327 participants, members of car brand communities, collaborate in a survey. Overall findings reveal that the perception of corporate brand reputation is more effective on enhancing brand loyalty than brand attachment. However, the effect could depend on the car brand strategy. We may also claim ...

  6. Exploring the Feasibility of Reputation Models for Improving P2P Routing under Churn

    Sànchez-Artigas, Marc; García-López, Pedro; Herrera, Blas

    Reputation mechanisms help peer-to-peer (P2P) networks to detect and avoid unreliable or uncooperative peers. Recently, it has been discussed that routing protocols can be improved by conditioning routing decisions to the past behavior of forwarding peers. However, churn — the continuous process of node arrival and departure — may severely hinder the applicability of rating mechanisms. In particular, short lifetimes mean that reputations are often generated from a small number of transactions.

  7. Revisiting Organizational Credibility and Organizational Reputation – A Situational Crisis Communication Approach

    Jamal Jamilah; Abu Bakar Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Organizational credibility, the extent of which an organization as the source of messages is perceived as trustworthy and reliable, is one important aspect to determine organization’s survival. The perceived credibility of the messages will either strengthen or worsen an organization reputation. The primary objective of this paper is to revisit the concept of organizational credibility and its interaction with organizational outcomes such as organizational reputation. Based on the situational...

  8. Measuring leader reputation within the South African business context : a study in two financial industry organisations

    2015-01-01

    M.A. (Strategic Communication) In today’s increasingly competitive business environments, one of the greatest challenges that continue to face organisations extends beyond financial performance, market share, and attracting and retaining employees and customers, to now include the reputation of the individual that heads up or leads the organisation – in most instances the Chief Executive Officer (CEO). The leader’s reputation has become increasingly important for a number of reasons, one o...

  9. Managing Reputation Risk and Situational Crisis in Higher Institutions of Learning

    Effiong, Andem Ita

    2014-01-01

    Extant literature on crisis and corporate reputation management has presented the Situational Crisis Communication Theory (SCCT) model as a valid and reliable framework for managing crisis and predicting stakeholders’perceptions of organizations’ reputation in times of crisis. In order to verifythe applicability of the model in higher institutions of learning in adeveloping country context, a study was conducted in September, 2011 in twopublic universities in Nigeria. The findings of the stud...

  10. Own-Group Face Recognition Bias: The Effects of Location and Reputation

    Yan, Linlin; Wang, Zhe; Huang, Jianling; Sun, Yu-Hao P.; Judges, Rebecca A.; Xiao, Naiqi G.; Lee, Kang

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we examined whether social categorization based on university affiliation can induce an advantage in recognizing faces. Moreover, we investigated how the reputation or location of the university affected face recognition performance using an old/new paradigm. We assigned five different university labels to the faces: participants’ own university and four other universities. Among the four other university labels, we manipulated the academic reputation and geographical lo...

  11. Corporate reputation and CSR reporting to stakeholders: Gaps in the literature and future lines of research

    Pérez Ruiz, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a literature review of the underdeveloped stream of research that analyses corporate reputation as an outcome of corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting. Design/methodology/approach - The author systematically reviews the theoretical and empirical literature on the CSR reporting-reputation relationship, identify several gaps in the body of knowledge and provide new lines of study to develop this relevant stream of researc...

  12. Reputational Penalties and the Merits of Class-Action Securities Litigation

    Helland, Eric

    2006-01-01

    If private securities class actions alleging fraudulent behavior by officers or directors of a company are meritorious, directors and officers should pay a reputational penalty when they sit on a board of a company whose officers and directors are accused of fraud. I find little evidence of a negative effect associated with allegations of fraud. Using various definitions of board positions as a proxy for the reputation of directors who are accused of fraud, I find that the net number of board...

  13. Use of psychophysiological measurements in communication research: teachings from two studies of corporate reputation

    Salla-Maaria LAAKSONEN; Mikko SALMINEN; Alessio FALCO; Pekka AULA; Niklas RAVAJA

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the possibilities psychophysiological study of emotions can offer to communication research, main focus being on studies of organizational reputation. We briefly discuss the study of emotion in communication sciences and then describe the experimental protocol for studying reputation and emotions with the psychophysiological methods and offer some empirical results from our first experiments. The results obtained from studies reviewed in this paper show that reputati...

  14. An investigation on the socio-cognitive foundations of reputation robustness

    Mariconda, Simone; Lurati, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have consistently found that a positive reputation can lead to many benefits for organizations (e.g., Cable & Turban, 2003; Deephouse, 2000; Rindova et al., 2005; Roberts & Dowling, 2002), thereby constituting a fundamental resource for competitive advantage (Barney, 1991). As a result, academics have advocated for a better understanding of what makes reputations stable to the effects of negative events and/or information (e.g., Carter & Ruefli, 2006; Flanagan & O’Shaughnessy, 20...

  15. All Data is Credit Data: Reputation, Regulation and Character in the Entrepreneurial Imaginary

    Rosamond, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This essay examines new means of measuring creditworthiness, reputation and character online and briefly considers the implications for contemporary art. New technologies for determining creditworthiness abound; for instance, companies in the so-called fintech (financial technology) industry, provide new methods for granting credit to the underbanked, using big data analytics and psychometric testing. Similarly, Rachel Botsman and others envision a future in which reputation becomes a kind of...

  16. The posthumous condition of gossip: Death and its reputational benediction

    Mihai Stelian Rusu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gossiping is ubiquitous in social life. In every imaginable corner of society, people from all walks of life are gossiping their living acquaintances. But what happens when the “third party,” i.e., the subject of gossip, is absent par excellence, not only temporarily and spatially, but definitively? Do people continue to gossip their dead acquaintances? What is the fate of gossip after its target dies? These are the questions this paper sets out to address. In doing so, it develops a non-reductionist sequential model of death as a social process in which biological death is only the starting point of the bio-social phenomenon of dying. Building on some classic anthropological theories and concepts taken from Arnold van Gennep and Victor Turner, the paper examines the post-mortem status of gossip in terms of the unfolding sequence of the funeral ritual in a particular Romanian cultural context. It argues that during the liminal phase covering the deathwatch and the burial, a transient “gossipless communitas” emerges around the dead one governed by the taboo against gossiping. If the dead is afterward spared from post-mortem gossip, this is due mainly to the impracticality of gossip. The paper ends by arguing that death, despite the emotional distress caused to the surviving family, brings about a reputational bless for the deceased. It does so since, under the normative jurisdiction of the saying “De mortuis nihil nisi bonum” (Of the dead, nothing unless good, the memory of the deceased is being posthumously dignified.

  17. Focus: The elusive icon: Einstein, 1905-2005 - Introduction

    Galison, Peter

    2004-12-01

    As Einstein's portrait comes increasingly to resemble an icon, we lose more than detail - his writings and actions lose all reference. This is as true for his physics as it is for his philosophy and his politics; the best of recent work aims to remove Einstein's interventions from the abstract sphere of Delphic pronouncements and to insert them in the stream of real events, real arguments. Politically, this means attending to McCarthyism, Paul Robeson, the Arab-Israeli conflict. Philosophically, it means tying his concerns, for example, to late nineteenth-century neo-Kantian debates and to his own struggles inside science. And where physics is concerned, it means attending both in the narrow to his reponses to others' work and his reactions to this own sometimes misfired early work on, for example, general relativity and to the wider context of technological developments. Einstein remains and will remain a magnet for historians, philosophers, and scientists; the essays assembled here represent a strong sampling - but only a sampling - of a fascinating new generation of work on this perennial figure.

  18. How iconic gestures enhance communication: an ERP study.

    Wu, Ying Choon; Coulson, Seana

    2007-06-01

    EEG was recorded as adults watched short segments of spontaneous discourse in which the speaker's gestures and utterances contained complementary information. Videos were followed by one of four types of picture probes: cross-modal related probes were congruent with both speech and gestures; speech-only related probes were congruent with information in the speech, but not the gesture; and two sorts of unrelated probes were created by pairing each related probe with a different discourse prime. Event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by picture probes were measured within the time windows of the N300 (250-350 ms post-stimulus) and N400 (350-550 ms post-stimulus). Cross-modal related probes elicited smaller N300 and N400 than speech-only related ones, indicating that pictures were easier to interpret when they corresponded with gestures. N300 and N400 effects were not due to differences in the visual complexity of each probe type, since the same cross-modal and speech-only picture probes elicited N300 and N400 with similar amplitudes when they appeared as unrelated items. These findings extend previous research on gesture comprehension by revealing how iconic co-speech gestures modulate conceptualization, enabling listeners to better represent visuo-spatial aspects of the speaker's meaning.

  19. Making Sense of Shakespeare: a Cultural Icon for Contemporary Audiences

    Michael Olsson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The works of William Shakespeare are more popular in the 21st century than ever before, Why are theatre and audiences around the globe still drawn to his work? How do they make sense of these texts in ways that resonate with their cosmopolitan, contemporary audiences? This article uses the findings of a study interviewing 35 theatre professionals in Canada, Finland and the United Kingdom to explore these issues. Theoretically and methodologically, it is a bricollage, drawing on a range of approaches including Foucault’s discourse analysis, Hobsbawm’s invented traditions and Dervin’s Sense-Making to understand participants sense-making as an affective, embodied social practice. It argues that attempting to understand the significance of a major cultural icon such as Shakespeare in contemporary cosmopolitan civil society needs to recognise the many meanings, roles and significances that surround him and that this complexity makes it unlikely that any one theoretical lens will prove adequate on its own. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ccs.v5i3.3640

  20. Revisiting Organizational Credibility and Organizational Reputation – A Situational Crisis Communication Approach

    Jamal Jamilah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Organizational credibility, the extent of which an organization as the source of messages is perceived as trustworthy and reliable, is one important aspect to determine organization’s survival. The perceived credibility of the messages will either strengthen or worsen an organization reputation. The primary objective of this paper is to revisit the concept of organizational credibility and its interaction with organizational outcomes such as organizational reputation. Based on the situational crisis communication theory (SCCT, this paper focuses on the impact of organizational credibility on organizational reputation following a crisis. Even though the SCCT has been widely used in crisis communication research, the theory still has its own limitations in explaining factors that could potentially affect the reputation of an organization. This study proposes a model by integrating organizational credibility in the SCCT theoretical framework. Derived from the theoretical framework, three propositions are advanced to determine the relationships between organizational credibility with crisis responsibility and perceived organizational reputation. This paper contributes to further establishing the SCCT and posits key attributes in the organizational reputation processes..

  1. Board composition and firm reputation: The role of business experts, support specialists and community influentials

    Emma García-Meca

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyze the influence of board resource diversity on firm reputation. We classify board members as business experts, support specialists, political directors and other community influentials, in an effort to address whether business, technical expertise or political ties in the boardroom affect stakeholders’ opinion and, therefore, firm reputation.This study confirms that not all outside directors are equally effective in improving firm reputation, and that certain kinds of outside directors, especially business experts, help increase it. However, the findings note an inverted U-shaped non-linear relationship with these directors, which means that the effect of business experts on reputation is positive up to a point, after which the relationship becomes negative. The findings also evidence that, contrary to popular beliefs, directors with previous experience as politicians are not negatively viewed by stakeholders. Moreover, this type of community influential directors has positive effects on firm reputation in regulated firms as well as in those of the public work sector. JEL classification: G30, Keywords: Reputation, Board, Expertise, Corporate governance, Directors

  2. Reputation for technological innovation: Does it actually cohere with innovative activity?

    Patrick J. Höflinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Firms strategically promote, foster and pursue a reputation for technological innovation. Yet, present research did not examine whether such perception actually coheres with innovative activity itself. Previous studies in this field often relied solely on tangible products/product introductions, hence we apply multiple proxies based on a firm's intangible innovative performance to examine the influences on reputation for technological innovation. Using patent, financial and consumer data our Poisson regression analyzes 65 international firms which have been nominated by 231 consumers. We apply time-series and likewise cross-sectional data for our interdisciplinary analysis. Our findings demonstrate that innovative performance (citation intensity is linked to reputation for technological innovation. Counter-intuitively, our results provide evidence that marketing intensity negatively influences a reputation for technological innovation. From the results, we conclude that innovative performance may be associated with a reputation for technological innovation. Actual technological advancement attracts attention from consumers that cannot be purchased with greater marketing investments. This implies that consumers appreciate the costly and uncertain R&D efforts and value those firms that constantly offer innovation. As a theoretical implication, the consideration of intangible inputs for reputation research is an important contribution for a holistic understanding. The results represent essential strategic information for innovation and marketing functions, where both divisions need to align their activities and investments.

  3. Cooperation Survives and Cheating Pays in a Dynamic Network Structure with Unreliable Reputation

    Antonioni, Alberto; Sánchez, Angel; Tomassini, Marco

    2016-06-01

    In a networked society like ours, reputation is an indispensable tool to guide decisions about social or economic interactions with individuals otherwise unknown. Usually, information about prospective counterparts is incomplete, often being limited to an average success rate. Uncertainty on reputation is further increased by fraud, which is increasingly becoming a cause of concern. To address these issues, we have designed an experiment based on the Prisoner’s Dilemma as a model for social interactions. Participants could spend money to have their observable cooperativeness increased. We find that the aggregate cooperation level is practically unchanged, i.e., global behavior does not seem to be affected by unreliable reputations. However, at the individual level we find two distinct types of behavior, one of reliable subjects and one of cheaters, where the latter artificially fake their reputation in almost every interaction. Cheaters end up being better off than honest individuals, who not only keep their true reputation but are also more cooperative. In practice, this results in honest subjects paying the costs of fraud as cheaters earn the same as in a truthful environment. These findings point to the importance of ensuring the truthfulness of reputation for a more equitable and fair society.

  4. Twitter Activity Associated With U.S. News and World Report Reputation Scores for Urology Departments.

    Ciprut, Shannon; Curnyn, Caitlin; Davuluri, Meena; Sternberg, Kevan; Loeb, Stacy

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the association between US urology department Twitter presence and U.S. News and World Report (USNWR) reputation scores, to examine the content, informational value, and intended audience of these platforms, and to identify objectives for Twitter use. We identified Twitter accounts for urology departments scored in the 2016-2017 USNWR. Correlation coefficients were calculated between Twitter metrics (number of followers, following, tweets, and Klout influence scores) with USNWR reputation scores. We also performed a detailed content analysis of urology department tweets during a 6-month period to characterize the content. Finally, we distributed a survey to the urology department accounts via Twitter, inquiring who administers the content, and their objectives for Twitter use. Among 42 scored urology departments with Twitter accounts, the median number of followers, following, and tweets were 337, 193, and 115, respectively. All of these Twitter metrics had a statistically significant positive correlation with reputation scores (P twitter use among urology departments was visibility and reputation, and urologists are considered the most important target audience. There is statistically significant correlation between Twitter activity and USNWR reputation scores for urology departments. Our results suggest that Twitter provides a novel mechanism for urology departments to communicate about academic and educational topics, and social media engagement can enhance reputation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of management style on employee views of corporate reputation. Application to audit firms

    Isabel Olmedo-Cifuentes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current economic context where the behaviour of firms is carefully examined by the markets, the corporate reputation which is generated by organisations among their stakeholders may facilitate their success. Since employees are actively involved in its shaping and influence the overall perception of the firm's corporate reputation, the aim of this research is to improve the management of the employee views of reputation in order to increase its global evaluation. To do this, we analyse whether the existence of a characteristic management style influences the employee views of reputation, studying the effect of control variables such as employee age, gender, level of education or job position. Using a sample of 148 employees of Spanish accounting audit firms, we develop a specific tool for measuring the reputation from the employee perspective of service SMEs, as well as confirming that a strong participative management style promotes a better perception of reputation by employees than a competitive style. Hence, this study reflects that men prefer a competitive management style. Also, a high level of education along with job position has a positive impact on the preference of a participative style with the job position being the main moderating variable of the proposed model.

  6. Stochasticity in economic losses increases the value of reputation in indirect reciprocity.

    dos Santos, Miguel; Placì, Sarah; Wedekind, Claus

    2015-12-14

    Recent theory predicts harsh and stochastic conditions to generally promote the evolution of cooperation. Here, we test experimentally whether stochasticity in economic losses also affects the value of reputation in indirect reciprocity, a type of cooperation that is very typical for humans. We used a repeated helping game with observers. One subject (the "Unlucky") lost some money, another one (the "Passer-by") could reduce this loss by accepting a cost to herself, thereby building up a reputation that could be used by others in later interactions. The losses were either stable or stochastic, but the average loss over time and the average efficiency gains of helping were kept constant in both treatments. We found that players with a reputation of being generous were generally more likely to receive help by others, such that investing into a good reputation generated long-term benefits that compensated for the immediate costs of helping. Helping frequencies were similar in both treatments, but players with a reputation to be selfish lost more resources under stochastic conditions. Hence, returns on investment were steeper when losses varied than when they did not. We conclude that this type of stochasticity increases the value of reputation in indirect reciprocity.

  7. Global analyses of evolutionary dynamics and exhaustive search for social norms that maintain cooperation by reputation.

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Iwasa, Yoh

    2007-02-07

    Reputation formation is a key to understanding indirect reciprocity. In particular, the way to assign reputation to each individual, namely a norm that describes who is good and who is bad, greatly affects the possibility of sustained cooperation in the population. Previously, we have exhaustively studied reputation dynamics that are able to maintain a high level of cooperation at the ESS. However, this analysis examined the stability of monomorphic population and did not investigate polymorphic population where several strategies coexist. Here, we study the evolutionary dynamics of multiple behavioral strategies by replicator dynamics. We exhaustively study all 16 possible norms under which the reputation of a player in the next round is determined by the action of the self and the reputation of the opponent. For each norm, we explore evolutionary dynamics of three strategies: unconditional cooperators, unconditional defectors, and conditional cooperators. We find that only three norms, simple-standing, Kandori, and shunning, can make conditional cooperation evolutionarily stable, hence, realize sustained cooperation. The other 13 norms, including scoring, ultimately lead to the invasion by defectors. Also, we study the model in which private reputation errors exist to a small extent. In this case, we find the stable coexistence of unconditional and conditional cooperators under the three norms.

  8. Harnessing the power of reputation: strengths and limits for promoting cooperative behaviors.

    Barclay, Pat

    2012-12-20

    Evolutionary approaches have done much to identify the pressures that select for cooperative sentiment. This helps us understand when and why cooperation will arise, and applied research shows how these pressures can be harnessed to promote various types of cooperation. In particular, recent evidence shows how opportunities to acquire a good reputation can promote cooperation in laboratory and applied settings. Cooperation can be promoted by tapping into forces like indirect reciprocity, costly signaling, and competitive altruism. When individuals help others, they receive reputational benefits (or avoid reputational costs), and this gives people an incentive to help. Such findings can be applied to promote many kinds of helping and cooperation, including charitable donations, tax compliance, sustainable and pro-environmental behaviors, risky heroism, and more. Despite the potential advantages of using reputation to promote positive behaviors, there are several risks and limits. Under some circumstances, opportunities for reputation will be ineffective or promote harmful behaviors. By better understanding the dynamics of reputation and the circumstances under which cooperation can evolve, we can better design social systems to increase the rate of cooperation and reduce conflict.

  9. Equilibrium measurements on the REPUTE-1 RFP plasma

    Ji, H.; Toyama, H.; Shinohara, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Yamagishi, K.; Shimazu, Y.; Ejiri, A.; Shimoji, K.; Miyamoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    Global plasma equilibrium measurements by external magnetic probes are widely introduced on the toroidal plasmas, i.e. tokamaks or RFPs, because of their simplicity and convenience. The measurement principle is based on Shafranov's toroidal equilibrium theory, which gives simple relations between the global equilibrium quantity and the external fields. These relations are valid in the either case of existence or absence of ideal shell just out the plasma column, however, not valid in the case of the thin (or resistive) shell, whose skin time τ s has the same order of the current rise time τ r . A method introduced by Swain et al. is effective in this case, in which the plasma current I p is replaced by 6 filament currents. However, by this method it is dificult to include the effect of iron core and computation requires a lot (beyond 14) of the measurement of the fields or flux loop. In this paper we introduce a simple method which is based on fitting measured fields to the vacuum approximate solution of Grad-Shafranov equation. The computation requires only a few measurements (≥6) of the fields. REPUTE-1 device is characterized by a thin shell of 5 mm thickness whose skin time τ s for the penetration of the vertical field is 1 ms compared with τ r of 0.5 ms. The optimum discharges whose duration τ d are about 3 times of τ s have been obtained. In spite of various efforts including vertical-ohmic coils series connection experiments, toroidal ripple reduction experiments and port bypass plate installation experiments, until now τ d is still limited by 3.2 ms. We should think that the equilibrium of plasma is lost due to an unfavorable vertical field. In this paper we present the measurements of the time evolution of the plasma position from the flat-top phase to the termination phase, at that time the plasma begins to lose its equilibrium. The liner has a major radius R L of 82 cm and a minor radius a L of 22 cm. (author) 6 refs., 4 figs

  10. Creativity, alcohol and drug abuse: the pop icon Jim Morrison.

    Holm-Hadulla, Rainer M; Bertolino, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse is frequent among performers and pop musicians. Many of them hope that alcohol and drugs will enhance their creativity. Scientific studies are scarce and conclusions limited for methodological reasons. Furthermore, extraordinary creativity can hardly be grasped by empirical-statistical methods. Thus, ideographic studies are necessary to learn from extraordinarily creative persons about the relationship of creativity with alcohol and drugs. The pop icon Jim Morrison can serve as an exemplary case to investigate the interrelation between alcohol and drug abuse and creativity. Morrison's self-assessments in his works and letters as well as the descriptions by others are analyzed under the perspective of creativity research. In the lyrics of Jim Morrison and in biographical descriptions, we can see how Jim Morrison tried to cope with traumatic events, depressive moods and uncontrolled impulses through creative activities. His talent, skill and motivation to write creatively were independent from taking alcohol and drugs. He used alcohol and drugs to transgress restrictive social norms, to broaden his perceptions and to reinforce his struggle for self-actualization. In short, his motivation to create something new and authentic was reinforced by alcohol and drugs. More important was the influence of a supportive group that enabled Morrison's talents to flourish. However, soon the frequent use of high doses of alcohol and drugs weakened his capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is an exemplary case showing that heavy drinking and the abuse of LSD, mescaline and amphetamines damages the capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is typical of creative personalities like Amy Winehouse, Janis Joplin, Brian Jones and Jimmy Hendrix who burn their creativity in early adulthood through alcohol and drugs. We suppose that the sacrificial ritual of their decay offers some benefits for the excited spectators. One of these is the

  11. Inferring reputation promotes the evolution of cooperation in spatial social dilemma games.

    Zhen Wang

    Full Text Available In realistic world individuals with high reputation are more likely to influence the collective behaviors. Due to the cost and error of information dissemination, however, it is unreasonable to assign each individual with a complete cognitive power, which means that not everyone can accurately realize others' reputation situation. Here we introduce the mechanism of inferring reputation into the selection of potential strategy sources to explore the evolution of cooperation. Before the game each player is assigned with a randomly distributed parameter p denoting his ability to infer the reputation of others. The parameter p of each individual is kept constant during the game. The value of p indicates that the neighbor possessing highest reputation is chosen with the probability p and randomly choosing an opponent is left with the probability 1-p. We find that this novel mechanism can be seen as an universally applicable promoter of cooperation, which works on various interaction networks and in different types of evolutionary game. Of particular interest is the fact that, in the early stages of evolutionary process, cooperators with high reputation who are easily regarded as the potential strategy donors can quickly lead to the formation of extremely robust clusters of cooperators that are impervious to defector attacks. These clusters eventually help cooperators reach their undisputed dominance, which transcends what can be warranted by the spatial reciprocity alone. Moreover, we provide complete phase diagrams to depict the impact of uncertainty in strategy adoptions and conclude that the effective interaction topology structure may be altered under such a mechanism. When the estimation of reputation is extended, we also show that the moderate value of evaluation factor enables cooperation to thrive best. We thus present a viable method of understanding the ubiquitous cooperative behaviors in nature and hope that it will inspire further studies

  12. A Strategic Approach to Reputation Management and its Reflections on Sustainable Competitiveness.

    Pinar Altiok

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the issues brought about by the current Information Age, such as rapid development of technology, easy and fast access to information, increases in international relations and global market perception, companies were compelled to seek for sustainable competitive advantage, and in this sense, the concept of "corporate reputation", which is powered by unique and original values of a corporation and which cannot be "imitated", has started to draw attention. In our day when markets are gradually reaching the point of saturation and consumers are getting the chance to evaluate more and more options, the efforts to create a convincing difference in minds have become prominent, and subsequently, reputation management has become an important field which a company needs to effectively manage. Corporate reputation management and the communication types the company will adopt in this sense have gained importance in all areas related to strategic management elements, from market positioning of products to shaping of intellectual perception maps. Corporate reputation management, wherein integrated marketing communication and public relation activities extremely important roles, needs to be strategically managed. Management of the concept of corporate reputation, which is a product of tangible and intangible corporate components, have transformed into a strategic requirement and become an field of its own as "corporate reputation management" within modern business administration. The fact that corporate reputation management, which has a relation with almost all activity fields of a company, is in contact with elements such as corporate social responsibility, management based on ethical principles, performance assessment studies in human resources management and the of phenomenon of governance, the recent agenda, which all affect the field of sustainable competition, indicates that this concept should be evaluated in terms of business management

  13. A Strategic Approach to Reputation Management and its Reflections on Sustainable Competitiveness.

    Pinar Altinok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the issues brought about by the current Information Age, such as rapid development of technology, easy and fast access to information, increases in international relations and global market perception, companies were compelled to seek for sustainable competitive advantage, and in this sense, the concept of "corporate reputation", which is powered by unique and original values of a corporation and which cannot be "imitated", has started to draw attention. In our day when markets are gradually reaching the point of saturation and consumers are getting the chance to evaluate more and more options, the efforts to create a convincing difference in minds have become prominent, and subsequently, reputation management has become an important field which a company needs to effectively manage. Corporate reputation management and the communication types the company will adopt in this sense have gained importance in all areas related to strategic management elements, from market positioning of products to shaping of intellectual perception maps. Corporate reputation management, wherein integrated marketing communication and public relation activities extremely important roles, needs to be strategically managed. Management of the concept of corporate reputation, which is a product of tangible and intangible corporate components, have transformed into a strategic requirement and become an field of its own as "corporate reputation management" within modern business administration.  The fact that corporate reputation management, which has a relation with almost all activity fields of a company, is in contact with elements such as corporate social responsibility, management based on ethical principles, performance assessment studies in human resources management and the of phenomenon of governance, the recent agenda, which all affect the field of sustainable competition, indicates that this concept should be evaluated in terms of business management

  14. Managing Reputation Risk and Situational Crisis in Higher Institutions of Learning

    Andem Ita Effiong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Extant literature on crisis and corporate reputation management has presented the Situational Crisis Communication Theory (SCCT model as a valid and reliable framework for managing crisis and predicting stakeholders’perceptions of organizations’ reputation in times of crisis. In order to verifythe applicability of the model in higher institutions of learning in adeveloping country context, a study was conducted in September, 2011 in twopublic universities in Nigeria. The findings of the study revealed thatalthough the institutions did not fully implement the core tenets of SCCT, thestrategies adopted in each of the two crisis situations were similar to some ofthe recommendations of the SCCT in different ways. While one institutionfocused on a strategy similar to what the SCCT model describes as “rebuildcrisis response strategy” with informing and adjusting tactics, the secondinstitution utilized a victimization or “Victimage” strategy with strongattribution of blames; and frequent reminder of the stakeholders of the extentof losses that the institution would incur from the crisis. The outcome wasthat the institution with high emphasis on rebuilding and informationadjustment strategy recorded very little damage to its reputation capital, duringand after the crises. Conversely, the second institution which believed invictimization and high attribution recorded significant losses in reputation assets,which included withdrawal of key stakeholders and loss of recognition ofprograms by some professional agencies. The implication for crisis managers in thetwo institutions includes the need to always approach situational crises in aholistic manner. Such holistic approach would involve a refocus, critical analysis,planning and implementation of crisis response strategies based on the relevantsituations, events, and the people concerned. The research was designed as acase study with focus group discussions as the data collection method

  15. Representations of God in Icons. Immanence and Transcendence in Christian Art

    Isbasoiu Iulian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human desire to be in a more natural relationship with God, his Creator, caused the former to find different means of communication. In addition to the liturgical expression, materialized in prayer, another way of interaction is represented by the icon. The icon and through the icon, Heaven and earth, God and the members of the triumphant Church and the ones of the militant Church meet and communicate. The iconographic representation of God, symbols, events and holy Persons, gave rise to much controversy in history, which triggered a major conflict in the life of the Church, culminating in the eighth century iconoclastic dispute. The Seventh Ecumenical Council solved this dispute and placed the icon in its natural spiritual position. In the present study we will analyze and contrast how people have understood the freedom of representing the image of God the Father in icons, an issue which caused disputes and reactions due to exaggerations in artistic expression and misunderstandings linked to the limits of such representation. This evolution is considered historically in the Christian world, East and West, which shows either an exaggerated tolerance of representation or an extreme conservatism leading to the prohibition of painting an anthropomorphic image of the Father. We will also study the recommendations of in the textbooks of Christian erminia and we will present examples of Romanian iconographic art.

  16. Comparison of European ICU patients in 2012 (ICON) versus 2002 (SOAP)

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Kotfis, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    Occurrence in Acutely ill Patients (SOAP) study, an observational study conducted in European intensive care units in 2002, and the Intensive Care Over Nations (ICON) audit, a survey of intensive care unit patients conducted in 2012. RESULTS: We compared the 3147 patients from the SOAP study with the 4852...... patients from the ICON audit admitted to intensive care units in the same countries as those in the SOAP study. The ICON patients were older (62.5 ± 17.0 vs. 60.6 ± 17.4 years) and had higher severity scores than the SOAP patients. The proportion of patients with sepsis at any time during the intensive...... care unit stay was slightly higher in the ICON study (31.9 vs. 29.6%, p = 0.03). In multilevel analysis, the adjusted odds of ICU mortality were significantly lower for ICON patients than for SOAP patients, particularly in patients with sepsis [OR 0.45 (0.35-0.59), p

  17. Effects of pyrethroid insecticide ICON (lambda cyhalothrin) on reproductive competence of male rats.

    Ratnasooriya, W D; Ratnayake, S S K; Jayatunga, Y N A

    2002-03-01

    To assess the effect of ICON (trade name of lambda-cyhalothrin) on sexual competence and fertility of male rats. Male rats were gavaged daily for 7 consecutive days with different doses of ICON (63 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg) or vehicle (distilled water). Their sexual behaviour and fertility were evaluated at different time points during treatment and post-treatment using receptive females. Treatment had no effect on fertility, but sexual competence was seriously impaired: libido (assessed in terms of pre-coital sexual behaviour, and numbers of mounting, intromission and ejaculation), sexual arousability/motivation (in terms of latencies for mounting, intromission and ejaculation), sexual vigour (judged by frequencies of mounting and intromission or copulatory efficiency). In addition, ICON suppressed intromission ratio, indicating erectile dysfunction. These effects on sexual function had a rapid onset and was reversible. ICON-induced sexual dysfunction was mediated by multiple mechanisms, mainly toxicity, stress, sedation and possibly via GABA and dopaminergic systems. Exposure to ICON may cause sexual dysfunction in male rats.

  18. Comparing Iconic Memory in Children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Ahmadi, Nastaran; Goodarzi, Mohammad Ali; Hadianfard, Habib; Mohamadi, Norolah; Farid, Daryush; Kholasehzadeh, Golrasteh; Sakhvidi, Mohammad Nadi; Hemyari, Camellia

    2013-08-01

    Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) do not process most information due to inattention and loss of the opportunity to save and retrieve information. Therefore, these children experience memory impairment. Although visual memory has been previously studied in children with ADHD, iconic memory in these children has been less evaluated. We aimed to study the possibility of iconic memory impairment in children with ADHD, and compare the results with that of children without ADHD. The experimental group of this study were 6-9 year-old children who referred to the Imam Hosein Clinic and were diagnosed as having ADHD by a psychiatrist during 2011-2012 (n = 30).The subjects were interviewed clinically by a psychologist; and in order to diagnose ADHD, their parents and teachers were asked to complete the child symptom inventory-4 (CSI-4). The comparison group were 6-9 year-old children without ADHD who studied in 1st and 2nd educational district of Yazd (n = 30). Subjects' iconic memory was assessed using an iconic memory task. Repeated measure ANOVA was used for data analysis. Based on the iconic memory test, the mean score of ADHD children was significantly lower than that of children without ADHD (P memory is weaker in children with ADHD, and they have weaker performance than normal children in both visual and auditory symbols at presentation durations of 50 and 100 ms. The performance of ADHD children improves as the stimulation time increases.

  19. An Empirical Investigation of Consumer Price Perception and Reputation Dimensions’ Effects on Attitude Toward Private Label Brands

    Chen, Haidong; Sadeque, Saalem

    2007-01-01

    The study empirically investigated the effects of consumer price perception dimension and reputation dimension on attitude toward private label brands among young Swedish consumers. Consumer price perception dimension includes value consciousness, price consciousness, and price-quality association factors. Reputation dimension includes retailer’s reputation, existence of word-of-mouth (WOM), positive WOM, and negative WOM. Previous studies have found that factors under the consumer price perc...

  20. A New Feedback-Analysis based Reputation Algorithm for E-Commerce Communities

    Hasnae Rahimi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dealing with the ever-growing content generated by users in the e-commerce applications, Trust Reputation Systems (TRS are widely used online to provide the trust reputation of each product using the customers’ ratings. However, there is also a good number of online customer reviews and feedback that must be used by the TRS. As a result, we propose in this work a new architecture for TRS in e-commerce application which includes feedback’ mining in order to calculate reputation scores. This architecture is based on an intelligent layer that proposes to each user (i.e. “feedback provider” who has already given his recommendation, a collection of prefabricated feedback to like or dislike. Then the proposed reputation algorithm calculates the trust degree of the user, the feedback’s trustworthiness and generates the global reputation score of the product according to his ‘likes’ and ‘dislikes’. In this work, we present also a state of the art of text mining tools and algorithms that can be used to generate the prefabricated feedback and to classify them into different categories.