WorldWideScience

Sample records for hitchhiker experiments advancing

  1. Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment

    Distefano, E.; Noll, C.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment (ALFE) is a Hitchhiker experiment flown on board the Shuttle of STS-39 as part of the Space Test Payload-1 (STP-1). The purpose of ALFE is to evaluate new propellant management components and operations under the low gravity flight environment of the Space Shuttle for eventual use in an advanced spacecraft feed system. These components and operations include an electronic pressure regulator, an ultrasonic flowmeter, an ultrasonic point sensor gage, and on-orbit refill of an auxiliary propellant tank. The tests are performed with two transparent tanks with dyed Freon 113, observed by a camera and controlled by ground commands and an on-board computer. Results show that the electronic pressure regulator provides smooth pressure ramp-up, sustained pressure control, and the flexibility to change pressure settings in flight. The ultrasonic flowmeter accurately measures flow and detects gas ingestion. The ultrasonic point sensors function well in space, but not as a gage during sustained low-gravity conditions, as they, like other point gages, are subject to the uncertainties of propellant geometry in a given tank. Propellant transfer operations can be performed with liquid-free ullage equalization at a 20 percent fill level, gas-free liquid transfer from 20-65 percent fill level, minimal slosh, and can be automated.

  2. Hitchhiking to speciation.

    Daven C Presgraves

    Full Text Available The modern evolutionary synthesis codified the idea that species exist as distinct entities because intrinsic reproductive barriers prevent them from merging together. Understanding the origin of species therefore requires understanding the evolution and genetics of reproductive barriers between species. In most cases, speciation is an accident that happens as different populations adapt to different environments and, incidentally, come to differ in ways that render them reproductively incompatible. As with other reproductive barriers, the evolution and genetics of interspecific hybrid sterility and lethality were once also thought to evolve as pleiotripic side effects of adaptation. Recent work on the molecular genetics of speciation has raised an altogether different possibility-the genes that cause hybrid sterility and lethality often come to differ between species not because of adaptation to the external ecological environment but because of internal evolutionary arms races between selfish genetic elements and the genes of the host genome. Arguably one of the best examples supporting a role of ecological adaptation comes from a population of yellow monkey flowers, Mimulus guttatus, in Copperopolis, California, which recently evolved tolerance to soil contaminants from copper mines and simultaneously, as an incidental by-product, hybrid lethality in crosses with some off-mine populations. However, in new work, Wright and colleagues show that hybrid lethality is not a pleiotropic consequence of copper tolerance. Rather, the genetic factor causing hybrid lethality is tightly linked to copper tolerance and spread to fixation in Copperopolis by genetic hitchhiking.

  3. Mentoring Undergraduate Students through the Space Shuttle Hitchhiker GoldHELOX Project

    Moody, J. Ward; Barnes, Jonathan; Roming, Peter; Durfee, Dallin; Campbell, Branton; Turley, Steve; Eastman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the late 1980s a team of four BYU undergraduate students designed a space-based telescope to image the sun in soft x-rays from 171-181 Angstroms to gain information on microflares and their relation to the corona-chromosphere transition region. The telescope used a near-normal incidence multi-layered mirror imaging onto film through a micro-channel plate. The system was capable of 1.0 sec time resolution and 2.5 arcsec spatial resolution. Aided by a NASA grant in 1991, a system was built and successfully tested in 1998 at Marshall Space Flight Center. Originally designed to be deployed from a Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister in the bay of a space shuttle, the good results of this test elevated GoldHelox to greater-priority Hitchhiker status. Even so technical and procedural difficulties delayed a launch until after 2003. Unfortunately after the Columbia re-entry break-up in February 2003, the Hitchhiker program was cancelled and the GoldHelox project ended.Well over 200 undergraduate students worked on GoldHelox. Many of these have since earned advanced degrees in a variety of technical fields. Several have gone on to work in the space industry, becoming NASA scientists and engineers with one becoming a PI on the Swift satellite. The broad range of talent on the team has included students majoring in physics, astronomy, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, manufacturing engineering, design engineering, business and even English majors who have written technical and public relations documents. We report on lessons learned and the pitfalls and successes of this unique mentoring experience.

  4. A hitchhiker's guide to virtual reality

    McMenemy , Karen

    2007-01-01

    A Hitchhiker's Guide to Virtual Reality brings together under one cover all the aspects of graphics, video, audio, and haptics that have to work together to make virtual reality a reality. Like any good guide, it reveals the practical things you need to know, from the viewpoint of authors who have been there. This two-part guide covers the science, technology, and mathematics of virtual reality and then details its practical implementation. The first part looks at how the interface between human senses and technology works to create virtual reality, with a focus on vision, the most important s

  5. Advanced tokamak burning plasma experiment

    Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Ramos, J.; Schultz, J.; Nevins, W.N.

    2001-01-01

    A new reduced size ITER-RC superconducting tokamak concept is proposed with the goals of studying burn physics either in an inductively driven standard tokamak (ST) mode of operation, or in a quasi-steady state advanced tokamak (AT) mode sustained by non-inductive means. This is achieved by reducing the radiation shield thickness protecting the superconducting magnet by 0.34 m relative to ITER and limiting the burn mode of operation to pulse lengths as allowed by the TF coil warming up to the current sharing temperature. High gain (Q≅10) burn physics studies in a reversed shear equilibrium, sustained by RF and NB current drive techniques, may be obtained. (author)

  6. Treatment of advanced breast cancer. An experience

    Magnoni, G; Corcione, S; Api, P

    1984-01-01

    The Authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotherapy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  7. Organizing a community advanced pharmacy practice experience.

    Koenigsfeld, Carrie Foust; Tice, Angela L

    2006-02-15

    Setting up a community advanced pharmacy practice experience can be an overwhelming task for many pharmacy preceptors. This article provides guidance to pharmacist preceptors in developing a complete and effective community advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). When preparing for the APPE, initial discussions with the college or school of pharmacy are key. Benefits, training, and requirements should be addressed. Site preparation, including staff education, will assist in the development process. The preceptor should plan orientation day activities and determine appropriate evaluation and feedback methods. With thorough preparation, the APPE will be rewarding for both the student and the pharmacy site.

  8. Kayenta advanced series compensation operational experience

    1994-01-01

    The world's first three-phase, thyristor-controlled series compensation scheme with continuously variable impedance has been introduced into a transmission system. Energized and dedicated in September 1992, the installation was placed into commercial operation in January 1993 and has provided over one year of operating experience. This paper describes the 230 kV, 330 MVAr (60 Hz) advanced series compensation (ASC) project, located in north-eastern Arizona at Kayenta Substation on the 320 km Glen Canyon-Shiprock transmission line. The paper describes operating experiences, coordination with phase shifting transformer, phase shifter failure, platform power, system disturbances, and future plans.

  9. Tokamak advanced pump limiter experiments and analysis

    Conn, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    Experiments with pump limiter modules on several operating tokamaks establish such limiters as efficient collectors of particles and has demonstrated the importance of ballistic scattering as predicted theoretically. Plasma interaction with recycling neutral gas appears to become important as the plasma density increases and the effective ionization mean free path within the module decreases. In limiters with particle collection but without active internal pumping, the neutral gas pressure is found to vary nonlinearly with the edge plasma density at the highest densities studies. Both experiments and theory indicate that the energy spectrum of gas atoms in the pump ducting is non-thermal, consistent with the results of Monte Carlo neutral atom transport calculations. The distribution of plasma power over the front surface of such modules has been measured and appears to be consistent with the predictions of simple theory. Initial results from the latest experiment on the ISX-B tokamak with an actively pumped limiter module demonstrates that the core plasma density can be controlled with a pump limiter and that the scrape-off layer plasma can partially screen the core plasma from gas injection. The results from module pump limiter experiments and from the theory and design analysis of advanced pump limiters for reactors are used to suggest the major features of a definitive, axisymmetric, toroidal belt pump limiter experiment

  10. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean; Hayes, Steven Lowe; Dempsey, Douglas; Harp, Jason Michael

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  11. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dempsey, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  12. Advanced divertor experiments on DIII-D

    Schaffer, M.J.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Osborne, T.; Petrie, T.W.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Buchenauer, D.; Hill, D.N.; Klepper, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    The poloidal divertor is presently favored for next-step, high-power tokamaks. The DIII-D Advanced Divertor Program (ADP) aims to gain increased control over the divertor plasma and tokamak boundary conditions. This paper reports experiments done in the first phase of the ADP. The DIII-D lower divertor was modified by the addition of a toroidally symmetric, graphite-armoured, water-cooled divertor-biasing ring electrode at the entrance to a gas plenum. (In the past DIII-D operated with an open divertor.) The plenum will eventually contain a He cryogenic loop for active divertor pumping. The separatrix 'strike' position is controlled by the lower poloidal field shaping coils and can be varied smoothly from the ring electrode upper surface to the divertor floor far from the entrance aperture. External power, at up to 550 V and 8 kA separately, has been applied to the electrode to date. (author) 5 refs., 5 figs

  13. Advanced divertor experiments on DIII-D

    Schaffer, M.J.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Osborne, T.; Petrie, T.W.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Buchenauer, D.; Hill, D.N.; Klepper, C.C.

    1991-04-01

    The poloidal divertor is presently favored for next-step, high-power tokamaks. The DIII-D Advanced Divertor Program (ADP) aims to gain increased control over the divertor plasma and tokamak boundary conditions. This paper reports experiments done in the first phase of the ADP. The DIII-D lower divertor was modified by the addition of a toroidally symmetric, graphite-armoured, water-cooled divertor-biasing ring electrode at the entrance to a gas plenum. The plenum will eventually contain a He cryogenic loop for active divertor pumping. The separatrix ''strike'' position is controlled by the lower poloidal field shaping coils and can be varied smoothly from the ring electrode upper surface to the divertor floor far from the entrance aperture. External power, at up to 550 V and 8 kA separately, has been applied to the electrode to date. 5 refs., 5 figs

  14. Advanced domestic digital satellite communications systems experiments

    Iso, A.; Izumisawa, T.; Ishida, N.

    1984-02-01

    The characteristics of advanced digital transmission systems were measured, using newly developed small earth stations and a K-band and C-band communication satellite. Satellite link performance for data, facsimile, video and packet switching information transmission at bit rates ranging from 6.4 kbit/s to 6.3 Mbit/s have been confirmed, using a small K-band earth station and a demand-assignment time division multiple access system. A low-capacity omni-use C-band terminal experiment has verified a telephone channel transmission performance by spread-spectrum multiple access. Single point to multipoint transmission characteristics of the 64 kbit/s data signals from the computer center were tested, using a receive-only 4 GHz earth terminal. Basic satellite link performance was confirmed under clear-sky conditions. Precise satellite orbit and attitude keeping experiments were carried out to obtain precise satellite antenna pointing accuracy for development of K-band earth stations that do not require satellite tracking equipment. Precise station keeping accuracy of 0.02 degrees was obtained.

  15. Diagnostics for advanced laser acceleration experiments

    Misuri, Alessio

    2002-01-01

    The first proposal for plasma based accelerators was suggested by 1979 by Tajima and Dawson. Since then there has been a tremendous progress both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical progress is particularly due to the growing interest in the subject and to the development of more accurate numerical codes for the plasma simulations (especially particle-in-cell codes). The experimental progress follows from the development of multi-terawatt laser systems based on the chirped-pulse amplification technique. These efforts have produced results in several experiments world-wide, with the detection of accelerated electrons of tens of MeV. The peculiarity of these advanced accelerators is their ability to sustain extremely large acceleration gradients. In the conventional radio frequency linear accelerators (RF linacs) the acceleration gradients are limited roughly to 100 MV/m; this is partially due to breakdown which occurs on the walls of the structure. The electrical breakdown is originated by the emission of the electrons from the walls of the cavity. The electrons cause an avalanche breakdown when they reach other metal parts of the RF linacs structure

  16. Diagnostics for advanced laser acceleration experiments

    Misuri, Alessio [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2002-01-01

    The first proposal for plasma based accelerators was suggested by 1979 by Tajima and Dawson. Since then there has been a tremendous progress both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical progress is particularly due to the growing interest in the subject and to the development of more accurate numerical codes for the plasma simulations (especially particle-in-cell codes). The experimental progress follows from the development of multi-terawatt laser systems based on the chirped-pulse amplification technique. These efforts have produced results in several experiments world-wide, with the detection of accelerated electrons of tens of MeV. The peculiarity of these advanced accelerators is their ability to sustain extremely large acceleration gradients. In the conventional radio frequency linear accelerators (RF linacs) the acceleration gradients are limited roughly to 100 MV/m; this is partially due to breakdown which occurs on the walls of the structure. The electrical breakdown is originated by the emission of the electrons from the walls of the cavity. The electrons cause an avalanche breakdown when they reach other metal parts of the RF linacs structure.

  17. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Colloids Experiment is being conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). Work to date will be discussed and future plans and opportunities will be highlighted. The LMM is a microscope facility designed to allow scientists to process, manipulate, and characterize colloidal samples in micro-gravity where the absence of gravitational settling and particle jamming enables scientists to study such things as:a.The role that disordered and ordered-packing of spheres play in the phase diagram and equation of state of hard sphere systems,b.crystal nucleation and growth, growth instabilities, and the glass transition, c.gelation and phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures,d.crystallization of colloidal binary alloys,e.competition between crystallization and phase separation,f.effects of anisotropy and specific interactions on packing, aggregation, frustration and crystallization,g.effects of specific reversible and irreversible interactions mediated in the first case by hybridization of complementary DNA strands attached to separate colloidal particles,h.Lock and key interactions between colloids with dimples and spheres which match the size and shape of the dimples,i.finding the phase diagrams of isotropic and interacting particles,j.new techniques for complex self-assembly including scenarios for self-replication, k.critical Casimir forces,l.biology (real and model systems) in microgravity,m.etc. By adding additional microscopy capabilities to the existing LMM, NASA will increase the tools available for scientists that fly experiments on the ISS enabling scientists to observe directly what is happening at the particle level. Presently, theories are needed to bridge the gap between what is being observed (at a macroscopic level when photographing samples) with what is happening at a particle (or microscopic) level. What is happening at a microscopic level will be directly

  18. Experience related to the safety of advanced LMFBR fuel elements

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1975-07-01

    Experiments and experience relative to the safety of advanced fuel elements for the liquid metal fast breeder reactor are reviewed. The design and operating parameters and some of the unique features of advanced fuel elements are discussed breifly. Transient and steady state overpower operation and loss of sodium bond tests and experience are discussed in detail. Areas where information is lacking are also mentioned

  19. Advanced photoinjector experiment photogun commissioning results

    F. Sannibale

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Photoinjector Experiment (APEX at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is dedicated to the development of a high-brightness high-repetition rate (MHz-class electron injector for x-ray free-electron laser (FEL and other applications where high repetition rates and high brightness are simultaneously required. The injector is based on a new concept rf gun utilizing a normal-conducting (NC cavity resonating in the VHF band at 186 MHz, and operating in continuous wave (cw mode in conjunction with high quantum efficiency photocathodes capable of delivering the required charge at MHz repetition rates with available laser technology. The APEX activities are staged in three phases. In phase 0, the NC cw gun is built and tested to demonstrate the major milestones to validate the gun design and performance. Also, starting in phase 0 and continuing in phase I, different photocathodes are tested at the gun energy and at full repetition rate for validating candidate materials to operate in a high-repetition rate FEL. In phase II, a room-temperature pulsed linac is added for accelerating the beam at several tens of MeV to reduce space charge effects and allow the measurement of the brightness of the beam from the gun when integrated in an injector scheme. The installation of the phase 0 beam line and the commissioning of the VHF gun are completed, phase I components are under fabrication, and initial design and specification of components and layout for phase II are under way. This paper presents the phase 0 commissioning results with emphasis on the experimental milestones that have successfully demonstrated the APEX gun capability of operating at the required performance.

  20. Advanced photoinjector experiment photogun commissioning results

    Sannibale, F.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C. F.; Staples, J.; Wells, R.; Bailey, B.; Baptiste, K.; Corlett, J.; Cork, C.; De Santis, S.; Dimaggio, S.; Doolittle, L.; Doyle, J.; Feng, J.; Garcia Quintas, D.; Huang, G.; Huang, H.; Kramasz, T.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Lellinger, R.; Moroz, V.; Norum, W. E.; Padmore, H.; Pappas, C.; Portmann, G.; Vecchione, T.; Vinco, M.; Zolotorev, M.; Zucca, F.

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Photoinjector Experiment (APEX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is dedicated to the development of a high-brightness high-repetition rate (MHz-class) electron injector for x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) and other applications where high repetition rates and high brightness are simultaneously required. The injector is based on a new concept rf gun utilizing a normal-conducting (NC) cavity resonating in the VHF band at 186 MHz, and operating in continuous wave (cw) mode in conjunction with high quantum efficiency photocathodes capable of delivering the required charge at MHz repetition rates with available laser technology. The APEX activities are staged in three phases. In phase 0, the NC cw gun is built and tested to demonstrate the major milestones to validate the gun design and performance. Also, starting in phase 0 and continuing in phase I, different photocathodes are tested at the gun energy and at full repetition rate for validating candidate materials to operate in a high-repetition rate FEL. In phase II, a room-temperature pulsed linac is added for accelerating the beam at several tens of MeV to reduce space charge effects and allow the measurement of the brightness of the beam from the gun when integrated in an injector scheme. The installation of the phase 0 beam line and the commissioning of the VHF gun are completed, phase I components are under fabrication, and initial design and specification of components and layout for phase II are under way. This paper presents the phase 0 commissioning results with emphasis on the experimental milestones that have successfully demonstrated the APEX gun capability of operating at the required performance.

  1. The effect of facial makeup on the frequency of drivers stopping for hitchhikers.

    Guéguen, Nicolas; Lamy, Lubomir

    2013-08-01

    Judgments of photographs have shown that makeup enhances ratings of women's facial attractiveness. The present study assessed whether makeup affects the stopping behavior of drivers in response to a hitchhiker's signal. Four 20- to 22-year-old female confederates wore facial makeup, or not, while pretending to be hitchhiking. Frequency of stopping was compared in 1,600 male and female drivers. Facial makeup was associated with an increase in the number of male drivers who stopped to offer a ride. Makeup did not affect frequency of stopping by female drivers.

  2. Hitch-hiking: how to approach this money-free, app-less, mode of transport?

    Anciaes, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Transport planners and researchers never paid much attention to hitch-hiking, so why should they start now, in a world of cheap air and coach travel and all types of app-based ridesharing schemes? This presentation gives answers to this question, based on a critical assessment of the individual needs that hitch-hiking fulfil, the costs and risks for all parties, and the way the activity contributes (or could contribute) to the objectives of contemporary public policy of promoting inclusive an...

  3. Advanced Undergraduate Experiments in Thermoanalytical Chemistry.

    Hill, J. O.; Magee, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments using the techniques of thermal analysis and thermometric titrimetry. Defines thermal analysis and several recent branches of the technique. Notes most of the experiments use simple equipment and standard laboratory techniques. (MVL)

  4. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  5. Public economics of hitchhiking species and tourism-based risk to ecosystem services

    Travis W. Warziniack; David Finnoff; Jason F. Shogren

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first to examine the public economics of exportbased externalities arising within the provisioning of ecosystem services, with direct application to policies to prevent the spread of hitchhiking invasive species. We find when risk enters through exports, policy makers face a tradeoff between welfare improvements and reducing risk of invasion....

  6. Exploitation of manipulators: 'hitch-hiking' as a parasite transmission strategy.

    Thomas; Renaud; Poulin

    1998-07-01

    For many parasites with complex life cycles, manipulation of host behaviour is an adaptation to increase the probability of successful transmission. Since manipulation is likely to be costly, other parasites may exploit hosts already manipulated so as to ensure their transmission without investing in manipulation. Such a cheating strategy, called 'hitch-hiking', could be adaptive in a range of situations. We first propose and discuss criteria that should be met by any parasite to be considered a hitch-hiker. Then, to understand the evolution of the hitch-hiking strategy, we use simple mathematical models to analyse the influence of several variables on the potential benefits for a nonmanipulative parasite of actively seeking a ride to the definitive host with a manipulative parasite. The models suggest that the prevalence or abundance of manipulative parasites will be a key determinant of whether hitch-hiking can be an advantageous option for other parasites. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  7. Experiment-Based Teaching in Advanced Control Engineering

    Precup, R.-E.; Preitl, S.; Radac, M.-B.; Petriu, E. M.; Dragos, C.-A.; Tar, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses an experiment-based approach to teaching an advanced control engineering syllabus involving controlled plant analysis and modeling, control structures and algorithms, real-time laboratory experiments, and their assessment. These experiments are structured around the representative case of the longitudinal slip control of an…

  8. Advances in NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    Robey, Harry

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). Experiments are now routinely conducted in a mirrored keyhole geometry, which allows for simultaneous diagnosis of the shock timing at both the hohlraum pole and equator. Further modifications are being made to improve the surrogacy to ignition hohlraums by replacing the standard liquid deuterium (D2) capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. These experiments will remove any possible surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporate the physics of shock release from the ice layer, which is absent in current experiments. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  9. Experience about the treatment of advanced breast cancer

    Api, P; Corcione, S; Magnoni, G

    1985-01-01

    The authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotheraphy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  10. The advanced containment experiments (ACE) Project

    Sehgal, B.R.; Ritzman, R.; Merilo, M.; Rahn, F.; Machiels, A.

    1992-01-01

    The overall structure and content of the ACE Project, which has been obtaining experimental data in four key areas of LWR severe accident technology are described. The key areas consist of filtration systems for vented containment concepts, radioiodine behavior in containment, the interaction of molten core material with structural concrete, and the use of water to terminate the core-concrete interaction process. Experiment procedures used in each phase of the work are summarized and the principal results and conclusions developed to date are discussed

  11. Advanced neutron diagnostics for ITER fusion experiments

    Kaellne, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Johnson, M.G.; Glasser, W.; Henriksson, H.; Ronchi, E.; Sjoestrand, H.; Andersson, E.S.; Thun, J.; Weiszflog, M.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Popovichev, S.; Sousa, J.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) diagnosis of JET plasma performed with the MPR during the DTE1 campaign of 1997 and the recent TTE of 2003. The NES diagnostic capabilities at JET are presently being drastically enhanced by an upgrade of the MPR (MPRu) and a new 2.5-MeV TOF neutron spectrometer (TOFOR). The principles of MPRu and TOFOR are described and illustrated with the diagnostic role they will play in the high performance fusion experiments in the forward program of JET largely aimed at supporting ITER. The importance for the JET NES effort for ITER is discussed. (author)

  12. Advanced silicon sensors for future collider experiments

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00437143; Moll, Michael; Mannelli, Marcello

    In this thesis, we address two key technological challenges: the radiation tolerance assessment and timing performance studies of thin planar diodes to be used as sensing technology in the recently approved CMS forward sampling calorimeter for the HL-LHC operation, the High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL); and, complementary, we carried out a detailed study of a novel kind of position sensitive microstrip sensors for ionising particles which implements the well established charge-division method to determine the particle impinging position along the microstrip electrode direction; this technology could become an interesting low-material budget solution for the new generation of tracking detectors to be operated in the future lepton collider experiments.

  13. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro, E-mail: agatsuma@nikhef.nl [National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beuzekom, Martin van; Schaaf, Laura van der [National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brand, Jo van den [National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-07-11

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser modulation/demodulation method is used to measure mirror displacements and used for the position controls. This plays a significant role because the quality of controls affect the noise level of the GW detector. The phase camera is able to monitor each sideband separately, which has a great benefit for the manipulation of the delicate controls. Also, overcoming mirror aberrations will be an essential part of Advanced Virgo (AdV), which is a GW detector close to Pisa. Especially low-frequency sidebands can be affected greatly by aberrations in one of the interferometer cavities. The phase cameras allow tracking such changes because the state of the sidebands gives information on mirror aberrations. A prototype of the phase camera has been developed and is currently tested. The performance checks are almost completed and the installation of the optics at the AdV site has started. After the installation and commissioning, the phase camera will be combined to a thermal compensation system that consists of CO{sub 2} lasers and compensation plates. In this paper, we focus on the prototype and show some limitations from the scanner performance. - Highlights: • The phase camera is being developed for a gravitational wave detector. • A scanner performance limits the operation speed and layout design of the system. • An operation range was found by measuring the frequency response of the scanner.

  14. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Beuzekom, Martin van; Schaaf, Laura van der; Brand, Jo van den

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser modulation/demodulation method is used to measure mirror displacements and used for the position controls. This plays a significant role because the quality of controls affect the noise level of the GW detector. The phase camera is able to monitor each sideband separately, which has a great benefit for the manipulation of the delicate controls. Also, overcoming mirror aberrations will be an essential part of Advanced Virgo (AdV), which is a GW detector close to Pisa. Especially low-frequency sidebands can be affected greatly by aberrations in one of the interferometer cavities. The phase cameras allow tracking such changes because the state of the sidebands gives information on mirror aberrations. A prototype of the phase camera has been developed and is currently tested. The performance checks are almost completed and the installation of the optics at the AdV site has started. After the installation and commissioning, the phase camera will be combined to a thermal compensation system that consists of CO 2 lasers and compensation plates. In this paper, we focus on the prototype and show some limitations from the scanner performance. - Highlights: • The phase camera is being developed for a gravitational wave detector. • A scanner performance limits the operation speed and layout design of the system. • An operation range was found by measuring the frequency response of the scanner.

  15. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment.

  16. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment

  17. Research for Foreign Advanced Ports for Protection and Development Experience

    Zhang, Lu; Tian, Mingjing; Zhao, Junjie; Shou, Youping; Wang, Ning; Qiao, Jianzhe; Li, Guanglou

    2018-04-01

    Into the twenty-first century, the process globalization of economic and trade is getting faster and faster, As of 2014, China's annual port trading amount topped the world, But in the port of environmental protection sustainable development approach with foreign advanced port environmental management concept has a big gap. Combined with the present situation of modern ports in China. Drawing lessons from foreign advanced environmental protection idea of port, in order to promote the protection of port environment in our country. The experience of protection and development of foreign advanced port environment will be discussed and discussed.

  18. Advanced detection techniques for educational experiments in cosmic ray physics

    Aiola, Salvatore; La-Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we describe several detection techniques that can be employed to study cosmic ray properties and carry out training activities at high school and undergraduate level. Some of the proposed devices and instrumentation are inherited from professional research experiments, while others were especially developed and marketed for educational cosmic ray experiments. The educational impact of experiments in cosmic ray physics in high-school or undergraduate curricula will be exploited through various examples, going from simple experiments carried out with small Geiger counters or scintillation devices to more advanced detection instrumentation which can offer starting points for not trivial research work. (authors)

  19. Advanced Smart Structures Flight Experiments for Precision Spacecraft

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Erwin, R. Scott; Ninneman, R. Rory

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents an overview as well as data from four smart structures flight experiments directed by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Middeck Active Control Experiment $¯Flight II (MACE II) is a space shuttle flight experiment designed to investigate modeling and control issues for achieving high precision pointing and vibration control of future spacecraft. The Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX-I) is an experiment that has demonstrated active vibration suppression using smart composite structures with embedded piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The Satellite Ultraquiet Isolation Technology Experiment (SUITE) is an isolation platform that uses active piezoelectric actuators as well as damped mechanical flexures to achieve hybrid passive/active isolation. The Vibration Isolation, Suppression, and Steering Experiment (VISS) is another isolation platform that uses viscous dampers in conjunction with electromagnetic voice coil actuators to achieve isolation as well as a steering capability for an infra-red telescope.

  20. Advanced gamma ray balloon experiment ground checkout and data analysis

    Blackstone, M.

    1976-01-01

    A software programming package to be used in the ground checkout and handling of data from the advanced gamma ray balloon experiment is described. The Operator's Manual permits someone unfamiliar with the inner workings of the software system (called LEO) to operate on the experimental data as it comes from the Pulse Code Modulation interface, converting it to a form for later analysis, and monitoring the program of an experiment. A Programmer's Manual is included.

  1. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna technology verification experiments

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) is a key to reaching NASA's goal of developing high-risk, advanced communications technology using multiple frequency bands to support the nation's future communication needs. Using the multiple, dynamic hopping spot beams, and advanced on board switching and processing systems, ACTS will open a new era in communications satellite technology. One of the key technologies to be validated as part of the ACTS program is the multibeam antenna with rapidly reconfigurable hopping and fixed spot beam to serve users equipped with small-aperature terminals within the coverage areas. The proposed antenna technology experiments are designed to evaluate in-orbit ACTS multibeam antenna performance (radiation pattern, gain, cross pol levels, etc.).

  2. Hitchhiker's guide to multi-dimensional plant pathology.

    Saunders, Diane G O

    2015-02-01

    Filamentous pathogens pose a substantial threat to global food security. One central question in plant pathology is how pathogens cause infection and manage to evade or suppress plant immunity to promote disease. With many technological advances over the past decade, including DNA sequencing technology, an array of new tools has become embedded within the toolbox of next-generation plant pathologists. By employing a multidisciplinary approach plant pathologists can fully leverage these technical advances to answer key questions in plant pathology, aimed at achieving global food security. This review discusses the impact of: cell biology and genetics on progressing our understanding of infection structure formation on the leaf surface; biochemical and molecular analysis to study how pathogens subdue plant immunity and manipulate plant processes through effectors; genomics and DNA sequencing technologies on all areas of plant pathology; and new forms of collaboration on accelerating exploitation of big data. As we embark on the next phase in plant pathology, the integration of systems biology promises to provide a holistic perspective of plant–pathogen interactions from big data and only once we fully appreciate these complexities can we design truly sustainable solutions to preserve our resources.

  3. Advanced plant design recommendations from Cook Nuclear Plant experience

    Zimmerman, W.L.

    1993-01-01

    A project in the American Electric Power Service Corporation to review operating and maintenance experience at Cook Nuclear Plant to identify recommendations for advanced nuclear plant design is described. Recommendations so gathered in the areas of plant fluid systems, instrument and control, testing and surveillance provisions, plant layout of equipment, provisions to enhance effective maintenance, ventilation systems, radiological protection, and construction, are presented accordingly. An example for a design review checklist for effective plant operations and maintenance is suggested

  4. Advance Care Planning: Experience of Women With Breast Cancer

    2006-07-01

    recorded along with other characteristics. Inclusion criteria for the primary studies required that women with breast cancer be at least 21 years of age; cog ...W81XWH-04-1-0469 TITLE: Advance Care Planning: Experience of Women with Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ardith Z. Doorenbos...with Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0469 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ardith Z. Doorenbos, Ph.D

  5. Allele frequency changes due to hitch-hiking in genomic selection programs

    Liu, Huiming; Sørensen, Anders Christian; Meuwissen, Theo H E

    2014-01-01

    of inbreeding due to changes in allele frequencies and hitch-hiking. This study aimed at understanding the impact of using long-term genomic selection on changes in allele frequencies, genetic variation and the level of inbreeding. Methods Selection was performed in simulated scenarios with a population of 400......-BLUP, Genomic BLUP and Bayesian Lasso. Changes in allele frequencies at QTL, markers and linked neutral loci were investigated for the different selection criteria and different scenarios, along with the loss of favourable alleles and the rate of inbreeding measured by pedigree and runs of homozygosity. Results...

  6. The Ways of Advanced Human Capital: Discussions from Experiences

    Rayén Amanda Rovira Rubio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed to know the significance of academic training experienced by postgraduate students who are pursuing their studies abroad under the context of a Training Program for Advanced Human Capital promoted by the Government of Chile. A feminist epistemology of situated knowledge was used as methodological framework, and narrative productions were used as technique of data collection. With this approach, the experiences of seven graduate students in Spanish universities, mostly of them beneficiaries of scholarships from Chile, were analyzed. The main findings were: the positive assessment of the experience of studying abroad, the divergent testimonies about these experiences, which based on previous educational trajectories and the socioeconomic level of the professional. These aspects influenced the identifications with the concept of Advanced Human Capital for Chile. Also, for some participants, the Advanced Human Capital is seen as an imposed concept which does not coincide with the real opportunities for the professional practice in the country. Therefore, the participants are sceptical about the possibilities of adequate job insertion in the return to Chile.

  7. Nursing care dependence in the experiences of advanced cancer inpatients.

    Piredda, Michela; Bartiromo, Chiara; Capuzzo, Maria Teresa; Matarese, Maria; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Increasing burden of cancer in Europe and socio-demographic trends imply that more cancer patients will face high levels of dependency. Care dependency is often perceived as a distressing experience by cancer patients who are concerned about becoming a burden to others. The experience of care dependence has been scarcely investigated in advanced cancer patients, especially in the hospital setting. This study aimed at describing advanced cancer patients' experiences of care dependence in hospital and of the factors perceived by them as contributing to decrease or increase this dependence. The study used a descriptive phenomenological approach based on Husserl's (1913) life world perspective. Data collection and analysis followed Giorgi's (1997) five basic methodological steps. Data were gathered by semi-structured interviews with thirteen advanced cancer adult inpatients of a teaching hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded and the recordings transcribed word for word. Three themes emerged: 'dependency discovers new meanings of life', 'active coping with dependency' and 'the care cures the dependent person'. The essential meaning of care dependency was the possibility to become aware of being a person as both an object and subject of care. Dependence appears as an experience with strong relational connotations, which enable patients to see differently their life, themselves, the world and others. Dependency is revealed as a natural experience, only partly in accordance with previous studies. Deeper insight into the meaning patients attach to care dependency can enable nurses to better meet the patient's needs, e.g. by improving caring relationships with patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computational experiment approach to advanced secondary mathematics curriculum

    Abramovich, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    This book promotes the experimental mathematics approach in the context of secondary mathematics curriculum by exploring mathematical models depending on parameters that were typically considered advanced in the pre-digital education era. This approach, by drawing on the power of computers to perform numerical computations and graphical constructions, stimulates formal learning of mathematics through making sense of a computational experiment. It allows one (in the spirit of Freudenthal) to bridge serious mathematical content and contemporary teaching practice. In other words, the notion of teaching experiment can be extended to include a true mathematical experiment. When used appropriately, the approach creates conditions for collateral learning (in the spirit of Dewey) to occur including the development of skills important for engineering applications of mathematics. In the context of a mathematics teacher education program, this book addresses a call for the preparation of teachers capable of utilizing mo...

  9. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Moody, J D; Sater, J; Parham, T; Kozioziemski, B; Dylla- Spears, R; Ross, J S; LePape, S; Ralph, J E; Hohenberger, M; Dewald, E L; Berzak Hopkins, L; Kroll, J J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R; Nikroo, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. (paper)

  10. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  11. Advanced test reactor testing experience-past, present and future

    Marshall, Frances M.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner 'lobes' to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of test sponsors - US government, foreign governments, private researchers, and commercial companies needing neutron irradiation services. There are three basic types of test configurations in the ATR. The simplest configuration is the sealed static capsule, which places the capsule in direct contact with the primary coolant. The next level of experiment complexity is an instrumented lead experiment, which allows for active control of experiment conditions during the irradiation. The most complex experiment is the pressurized water loop, in which the test sample can be subjected to the exact environment of a pressurized water reactor. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and future plans

  12. Information on the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) Test Facility

    Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report provides information related to the design of the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) test facility. Information provided in this report have been pulled from the following information sources: Reference 1: R. Nourgaliev and et.al, 'Summary Report on NGSAC (Next-Generation Safety Analysis Code) Development and Testing,' Idaho National Laboratory, 2011. Note that this is report has not been released as an external report. Reference 2: O. Stevens, Characterization of the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) Passive Residual Heat Removal System Heat Exchanger, Master Thesis, June 1996. Reference 3: J. Reyes, Jr., Q. Wu, and J. King, Jr., Scaling Assessment for the Design of the OSU APEX-1000 Test Facility, OSU-APEX-03001 (Rev. 0), May 2003. Reference 4: J. Reyes et al, Final Report of the NRC AP600 Research Conducted at Oregon State University, NUREG/CR-6641, July 1999. Reference 5: K. Welter et al, APEX-1000 Confirmatory Testing to Support AP1000 Design Certification (non-proprietary), NUREG-1826, August 2005.

  13. Experiments with radioactive samples at the Advanced Photon Source

    Veluri, V. R.; Justus, A.; Glagola, B.; Rauchas, A.; Vacca, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a national synchrotron-radiation light source research facility. The 7 GeV electron Storage Ring is currently delivering intense high brilliance x-ray beams to a total of 34 beamlines with over 120 experiment stations to members of the international scientific community to carry out forefront basic and applied research in several scientific disciplines. Researchers come to the APS either as members of Collaborative Access Teams (CATs) or as Independent Investigators (IIs). Collaborative Access Teams comprise large number of investigators from universities, industry, and research laboratories with common research objectives. These teams are responsible for the design, construction, finding, and operation of beamlines. They are the owners of their experimental enclosures (''hutches'') designed and built to meet their specific research needs. Fig. 1 gives a plan view of the location of the Collaborative Access Teams by Sector and Discipline. In the past two years, over 2000 individual experiments were conducted at the APS facility. Of these, about 60 experiments involved the use of radioactive samples, which is less than 3% of the total. However, there is an increase in demand for experiment stations to accommodate the use of radioactive samples in different physical forms embedded in various matrices with activity levels ranging from trace amounts of naturally occurring radionuclides to MBq (mCi) quantities including transuranics. This paper discusses in some detail the steps in the safety review process for experiments involving radioactive samples and how ALARA philosophy is invoked at each step and implemented

  14. The hitchhiker's guide to altruism: gene-culture coevolution, and the internalization of norms.

    Gintis, Herbert

    2003-02-21

    An internal norm is a pattern of behavior enforced in part by internal sanctions, such as shame, guilt and loss of self-esteem, as opposed to purely external sanctions, such as material rewards and punishment. The ability to internalize norms is widespread among humans, although in some so-called "sociopaths", this capacity is diminished or lacking. Suppose there is one genetic locus that controls the capacity to internalize norms. This model shows that if an internal norm is fitness enhancing, then for plausible patterns of socialization, the allele for internalization of norms is evolutionarily stable. This framework can be used to model Herbert Simon's (1990) explanation of altruism, showing that altruistic norms can "hitchhike" on the general tendency of internal norms to be personally fitness-enhancing. A multi-level selection, gene-culture coevolution argument then explains why individually fitness-reducing internal norms are likely to be prosocial as opposed to socially harmful.

  15. Does Volunteering Experience Influence Advance Care Planning in Old Age?

    Shen, Huei-Wern; Khosla, Nidhi

    2016-07-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) increases the likelihood patients will receive end-of-life care that is congruent with their preferences and lowers stress among both patients and caregivers. Previous efforts to increase ACP have mainly focused on information provision in the very late stage of life. This study examines whether a relationship exists between volunteering and ACP, and whether this relationship is associated with social support. The sample comprises 877 individuals who were aged 55+ in 2008, and were deceased before 2010. The sample is derived from seven waves (1998-2010) of data from the Health and Retirement Study. Logistic regression results showed that overall ACP and durable power of attorney for health care (DPAHC) were both higher (OR = 1.61 and 1.71, respectively) for older adults with volunteering experience in the past 10 years than those without such experience. Available social support (relatives and friends living nearby) was not associated with the relationship between volunteering and ACP. Other factors related to ACP included poorer health, death being expected, death due to cancer, older age, and being a racial minority. Involving older people in volunteer work may help to increase ACP. Future research is encouraged to identify reasons for the association between volunteering and ACP.

  16. Advanced Receiver/Converter Experiments for Laser Wireless Power Transmission

    Howell, Joe T.; ONeill, Mark; Fork, Richard

    2004-01-01

    For several years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, UAH and ENTECH have been working on various aspects of space solar power systems. The current activity was just begun in January 2004 to further develop this new photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter technology. During the next few months, an improved prototype will be designed, fabricated, and thoroughly tested under laser illumination. The final paper will describe the new concept, present its advantages over other laser receiver/converter approaches (including planar photovoltaic arrays), and provide the latest experiment results on prototype hardware (including the effects of laser irradiance level and cell temperature). With NASA's new human exploration plans to first return to the Moon, and then to proceed to Mars, the new photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter technology could prove to be extremely useful in providing power to the landing sites and other phases of the missions. For example, to explore the scientifically interesting and likely resource-rich poles of the Moon (which may contain water) or the poles of Mars (which definitely contain water and carbon dioxide), laser power beaming could represent the simplest means of providing power to these regions, which receive little or no sunlight, making solar arrays useless there. In summary, the authors propose a paper on definition and experimental results of a novel photovoltaic concentrator approach for collecting and converting laser radiation to electrical power. The new advanced photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter offers higher performance, lighter weight, and lower cost than competing concepts, and early experimental results are confirming the expected excellent Performance levels. After the small prototypes are successfully demonstrated, a larger array with even better performance is planned for the next phase experiments and demonstrations. Thereafter, a near-term flight experiment of the new technology

  17. Advanced spot quality analysis in two-colour microarray experiments

    Vetter Guillaume

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image analysis of microarrays and, in particular, spot quantification and spot quality control, is one of the most important steps in statistical analysis of microarray data. Recent methods of spot quality control are still in early age of development, often leading to underestimation of true positive microarray features and, consequently, to loss of important biological information. Therefore, improving and standardizing the statistical approaches of spot quality control are essential to facilitate the overall analysis of microarray data and subsequent extraction of biological information. Findings We evaluated the performance of two image analysis packages MAIA and GenePix (GP using two complementary experimental approaches with a focus on the statistical analysis of spot quality factors. First, we developed control microarrays with a priori known fluorescence ratios to verify the accuracy and precision of the ratio estimation of signal intensities. Next, we developed advanced semi-automatic protocols of spot quality evaluation in MAIA and GP and compared their performance with available facilities of spot quantitative filtering in GP. We evaluated these algorithms for standardised spot quality analysis in a whole-genome microarray experiment assessing well-characterised transcriptional modifications induced by the transcription regulator SNAI1. Using a set of RT-PCR or qRT-PCR validated microarray data, we found that the semi-automatic protocol of spot quality control we developed with MAIA allowed recovering approximately 13% more spots and 38% more differentially expressed genes (at FDR = 5% than GP with default spot filtering conditions. Conclusion Careful control of spot quality characteristics with advanced spot quality evaluation can significantly increase the amount of confident and accurate data resulting in more meaningful biological conclusions.

  18. HIGH PERFORMANCE ADVANCED TOKAMAK REGIMES FOR NEXT-STEP EXPERIMENTS

    GREENFIELD, C.M.; MURAKAMI, M.; FERRON, J.R.; WADE, M.R.; LUCE, T.C.; PETTY, C.C.; MENARD, J.E; PETRIE, T.W.; ALLEN, S.L.; BURRELL, K.H.; CASPER, T.A; DeBOO, J.C.; DOYLE, E.J.; GAROFALO, A.M; GORELOV, Y.A; GROEBNER, R.J.; HOBIRK, J.; HYATT, A.W; JAYAKUMAR, R.J; KESSEL, C.E; LA HAYE, R.J; JACKSON, G.L; LOHR, J.; MAKOWSKI, M.A.; PINSKER, R.I.; POLITZER, P.A.; PRATER, R.; STRAIT, E.J.; TAYLOR, T.S; WEST, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in DIII-D seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation in future devices. These regimes require high toroidal beta to maximize fusion output and poloidal beta to maximize the self-driven bootstrap current. Achieving these conditions requires integrated, simultaneous control of the current and pressure profiles, and active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability control. The building blocks for AT operation are in hand. Resistive wall mode stabilization via plasma rotation and active feedback with non-axisymmetric coils allows routine operation above the no-wall beta limit. Neoclassical tearing modes are stabilized by active feedback control of localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). Plasma shaping and profile control provide further improvements. Under these conditions, bootstrap supplies most of the current. Steady-state operation requires replacing the remaining Ohmic current, mostly located near the half-radius, with noninductive external sources. In DIII-D this current is provided by ECCD, and nearly stationary AT discharges have been sustained with little remaining Ohmic current. Fast wave current drive is being developed to control the central magnetic shear. Density control, with divertor cryopumps, of AT discharges with edge localized moding (ELMing) H-mode edges facilitates high current drive efficiency at reactor relevant collisionalities. A sophisticated plasma control system allows integrated control of these elements. Close coupling between modeling and experiment is key to understanding the separate elements, their complex nonlinear interactions, and their integration into self-consistent high performance scenarios. Progress on this development, and its implications for next-step devices, will be illustrated by results of recent experiment and simulation efforts

  19. Planned Experiments on the Princeton Advanced Test Stand

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Davidson, R. C.

    2010-11-01

    The Princeton Advanced Test Stand (PATS) device is an experimental facility based on the STS-100 high voltage test stand transferred from LBNL. It consists of a multicusp RF ion source, a pulsed extraction system capable of forming high-perveance 100keV ion beams, and a large six-foot-long vacuum with convenient access for beam diagnostics. This results in a flexible system for studying high perveance ion beams relevant to NDCX-I/II, including experiments on beam neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources (FEPS) being developed at PPPL. Research on PATS will concern the basic physics of beam-plasma interactions, such as the effects of volume neutralization on beam emittance, as well as optimizing technology of the FEPS. PATS combines the advantage of an ion beam source and a large-volume plasma source in a chamber with ample access for diagnostics, resulting in a robust setup for investigating and improving relevant aspects of neutralized drift. There are also plans for running the ion source with strongly electro-negative gases such as chlorine, making it possible to extract positive or negative ion beams.

  20. Perturbative transport experiments in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Sozzi, C. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Imbeaux, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA, St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Kinsey, J. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (United States); Budny, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, New Jersey (United States); Coffey, I.; Parail, V.; Walden, A. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Garzotti, L. [Istituto Gas Ionizzati, Padova (Italy); Ingesson, C. [FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kissick, M. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Perturbative transport experiments have been performed in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas either in conditions of fully developed Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) or during a phase where an ITB was not observed. Transient peripheral cooling was induced by either Laser Ablation or Shallow Pellet Injection and the ensuing travelling cold pulse was used to probe the plasma transport in the electron and, for the first time, also in the ion channel. Cold pulses travelling through ITBs are observed to erode the ITB outer part, but, if the inner ITB portion survives, it strongly damps the propagating wave. The result is discussed in the context of proposed possible pictures for ITB formation. In the absence of an ITB, the cold pulse shows a fast propagation in the outer plasma half, which is consistent with a region of stiff transport, while in the inner half it slows down but shows the peculiar feature of amplitude growing while propagating. The data are powerful tests for the validation of theoretical transport models. (author)

  1. Babelomics: advanced functional profiling of transcriptomics, proteomics and genomics experiments

    Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Carbonell, José; Minguez, Pablo; Goetz, Stefan; Conesa, Ana; Tárraga, Joaquín; Medina, Ignacio; Alloza, Eva; Montaner, David; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2008-01-01

    We present a new version of Babelomics, a complete suite of web tools for the functional profiling of genome scale experiments, with new and improved methods as well as more types of functional definitions. Babelomics includes different flavours of conventional functional enrichment methods as well as more advanced gene set analysis methods that makes it a unique tool among the similar resources available. In addition to the well-known functional definitions (GO, KEGG), Babelomics includes new ones such as Biocarta pathways or text mining-derived functional terms. Regulatory modules implemented include transcriptional control (Transfac, CisRed) and other levels of regulation such as miRNA-mediated interference. Moreover, Babelomics allows for sub-selection of terms in order to test more focused hypothesis. Also gene annotation correspondence tables can be imported, which allows testing with user-defined functional modules. Finally, a tool for the ‘de novo’ functional annotation of sequences has been included in the system. This allows using yet unannotated organisms in the program. Babelomics has been extensively re-engineered and now it includes the use of web services and Web 2.0 technology features, a new user interface with persistent sessions and a new extended database of gene identifiers. Babelomics is available at http://www.babelomics.org PMID:18515841

  2. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) hardware experiment development for advanced ISDN satellite designs and experiments

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Service Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Hardware Experiment Development for Advanced Satellite Designs describes the development of the ISDN Satellite Terminal Adapter (ISTA) capable of translating ISDN protocol traffic into Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) signals for use by a communications satellite. The ISTA connects the Type 1 Network Termination (NT1) via the U-interface on the line termination side of the CPE to the RS-499 interface for satellite uplink. The same ISTA converts in the opposite direction the RS-499 to U-interface data with a simple switch setting.

  3. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) hardware experiment design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Hardware Experiment Design for Advanced Satellite Designs describes the design of the ISDN Satellite Terminal Adapter (ISTA) capable of translating ISDN protocol traffic into time division multiple access (TDMA) signals for use by a communications satellite. The ISTA connects the Type 1 Network Termination (NT1) via the U-interface on the line termination side of the CPE to the V.35 interface for satellite uplink. The same ISTA converts in the opposite direction the V.35 to U-interface data with a simple switch setting.

  4. Clinical Experience in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Canadian Perspective.

    Donnelly, Glenn

    2003-01-01

    The role of advanced practice (AP) nurses must be clearly articulated and defined and not overshadowed by medical functions. Consensus on their educational preparation and explication of the nature of expertise in advanced practice are needed if AP nurses are to realize the full scope of their practice. (Contains 35 references.) (SK)

  5. Flotation of Mineral and Dyes: A Laboratory Experiment for Separation Method Molecular Hitchhikers

    Rappon, Tim; Sylvestre, Jarrett A.; Rappon, Manit

    2016-01-01

    Flotation as a method of separation is widely researched and is applied in many industries. It has been used to address a wide range of environmental issues including treatment of wastewater, recovery of heavy metals for recycling, extraction of minerals in mining, and so forth. This laboratory attempts to show how such a simple method can be used…

  6. Hitch-hiking from HRAS1 to the WAGR locus with CMGT markers

    Bickmore, W.; Christie, S.; van Heyningen, V.; Hastie, N.D.; Porteous, D.J.

    1988-01-11

    The clinical association of Wilms' tumor with aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities and mental retardation (WAGR syndrome) is characterized cytogenetically by variable length, constitutional deletion of the short arm of chromosome 11, which always includes at least part of band 11p13. HRAS1-selected chromosome mediated gene transfer (CMGT) generated a transformant, E65-6, in which the only human genes retained map either to band 11p13 or, with HRAS1, in the region 11p15.4-pter. Human recombinants isolated from E65-6 were mapped to a panel of five WAGR deletion hybrids and two clinically related translocations. The authors show that E65-6 is enriched -400-fold for 11p15.4-pter markers and -200-fold for 11p13 markers. Hitch-hiking from HRAS1 with CMGT markers has allowed us to define seven discrete intervals which subtend band 11p13. Both associated translocations co-locate within the smallest region of overlap with the WAGR locus, which has been redefined by identifying a new interval closer than FSHB.

  7. Plastics in the North Atlantic garbage patch: A boat-microbe for hitchhikers and plastic degraders.

    Debroas, Didier; Mone, Anne; Ter Halle, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight that impact wildlife. Their fragmentation leads to a continuum of debris sizes (meso to microplastics) entrapped in gyres and colonized by microorganisms. In the present work, the structure of eukaryotes, bacteria and Archaea was studied by a metabarcoding approach, and statistical analysis associated with network building was used to define a core microbiome at the plastic surface. Most of the bacteria significantly associated with the plastic waste originated from non-marine ecosystems, and numerous species can be considered as hitchhikers, whereas others act as keystone species (e.g., Rhodobacterales, Rhizobiales, Streptomycetales and Cyanobacteria) in the biofilm. The chemical analysis provides evidence for a specific colonization of the polymers. Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria significantly dominated mesoplastics consisting of poly(ethylene terephthalate) and polystyrene. Polyethylene was also dominated by these bacterial classes and Actinobacteria. Microplastics were made of polyethylene but differed in their crystallinity, and the majorities were colonized by Betaproteobacteria. Our study indicated that the bacteria inhabiting plastics harboured distinct metabolisms from those present in the surrounding water. For instance, the metabolic pathway involved in xenobiotic degradation was overrepresented on the plastic surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Experiences from introduction of peer-to-peer teaching methods in Advanced Biochemistry E2010

    Brodersen, Ditlev; Etzerodt, Michael; Rasmussen, Jan Trige

    2012-01-01

    During the autumn semester 2010, we experimented with a range of active teaching methods on the course, Advanced Biochemistry, at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics.......During the autumn semester 2010, we experimented with a range of active teaching methods on the course, Advanced Biochemistry, at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics....

  9. Nurse Leaders? Experiences of Implementing Career Advancement Programs for Nurses in Iran

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Career advancement programs are currently implemented in many countries. In Iran, the first career advancement program was Nurses? Career Advancement Pathway. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse leaders? experiences about implementing the Nurses? Career Advancement Pathway program in Iran. Methods: This exploratory qualitative study was conducted in 2013. Sixteen nurse managers were recruited from the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Behesthi, Qazvin,...

  10. Clinical experience with intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Takahashi, Masaharu; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was performed on 20 patients with colorectal cancer. IORT with a single dose of 20 to 40 Gy was delivered to the residual tumor, tumor bed, and/or lymphnode regions. Although most of the patients had advanced lesions, local control was achieved in 67 % of the patients when IORT was combined with tumor resection, and 4 patients survived more than 5 years. There were no serious complications, except for contracture or atrophy of the psoas muscle seen in 2 patients. IORT combined with external beam radiotherapy should be a useful adjuvant therapy to surgery for locally advanced colorectal cancer. (author)

  11. Advances in cyber security technology, operations, and experiences

    Hsu, D Frank

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Cyber Security provides, in a technical yet easy to understand fashion, a real life story of the evolving cyberspace ecosystem from the perspectives of structure, function, and application. It also provides ways and means to secure and sustain this ecosystem by the collective wisdom of professionals and practitioners from government, academia, and industry across national and international boundaries.

  12. Oxidation Phenomena in Advanced High Strength Steels : Modelling and Experiment

    Mao, W.

    2018-01-01

    Galvanized advanced high strength steels (AHSS) will be the most competitive structural material for automotive applications in the next decade. Oxidation of AHSS during the recrystalization annealing process in a continuous galvanizing line to a large extent influences the quality of zinc coating

  13. Advanced tools for smartphone-based experiments: phyphox

    Staacks, Sebastian; Hütz, Simon; Heinke, Heidrun; Stampfer, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    The sensors in modern smartphones are a promising and cost-effective tool for experimentation in physics education, but many experiments face practical problems. Often the phone is inaccessible during the experiment and the data usually needs to be analyzed subsequently on a computer. We address both problems by introducing a new app, called "phyphox", which is specifically designed for utilizing experiments in physics teaching. The app is free and designed to offer the same set of features o...

  14. Nurse Leaders' Experiences of Implementing Career Advancement Programs for Nurses in Iran.

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2015-02-24

    Career advancement programs are currently implemented in many countries. In Iran, the first career advancement program was Nurses' Career Advancement Pathway. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse leaders' experiences about implementing the Nurses' Career Advancement Pathway program in Iran. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted in 2013. Sixteen nurse managers were recruited from the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Behesthi, Qazvin, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Participants were recruited using purposive sampling method. Study data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The conventional content analysis approach was used for data analysis. participants' experiences about implementing the Nurses' Career Advancement Pathway fell into three main categories including: a) the shortcomings of performance evaluation, b) greater emphasis on point accumulation, c) the advancement-latitude mismatch. The Nurses' Career Advancement pathway has several shortcomings regarding both its content and its implementation. Therefore, it is recommended to revise the program.

  15. Hot rocket plume experiment - Survey and conceptual design. [of rhenium-iridium bipropellants

    Millard, Jerry M.; Luan, Taylor W.; Dowdy, Mack W.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a space-borne engine plume experiment study to fly an experiment which will both verify and quantify the reduced contamination from advanced rhenium-iridium earth-storable bipropellant rockets (hot rockets) and provide a correlation between high-fidelity, in-space measurements and theoretical plume and surface contamination models. The experiment conceptual design is based on survey results from plume and contamination technologists throughout the U.S. With respect to shuttle use, cursory investigations validate Hitchhiker availability and adaptability, adequate remote manipulator system (RMS) articulation and dynamic capability, acceptable RMS attachment capability, adequate power and telemetry capability, and adequate flight altitude and attitude/orbital capability.

  16. Advanced Tools for Smartphone-Based Experiments: Phyphox

    Staacks, S.; Hütz, S.; Stampfer, C.; Heinke, H.

    2018-01-01

    The sensors in modern smartphones are a promising and cost-effective tool for experimentation in physics education, but many experiments face practical problems. Often the phone is inaccessible during the experiment and the data usually needs to be analyzed subsequently on a computer. We address both problems by introducing a new app, called…

  17. Lifelong learning and advancement in a company: Experience from Serbia

    Mllutinović Olivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lifelong learning concept is the concept that brings humanism in both everyday and business life of people. It promotes education, learning, cooperation and advancement in people's lives. During last two decades it became obvious that it is important to implement this concept, particularly in the field of economy in order to achieve better economic results. The aim of this paper is to find out if there is an actual implementation of lifelong learning concept in Serbia. Besides that it will also show if there are instances of advancement for employees in the companies that are implementing lifelong learning concept. The paper contains empirical research that was conducted in 15 companies in Serbia, primarily state-owned. This research gathered the opinion of 492 individuals, both female and male, with every type of education possible in Serbia. By analyzing the given results, the authors of this paper will give a proposal for future improved implementation of lifelong learning concept in Serbia.

  18. Development of Inflation Probe Technologies for the Advanced ACT Experiment

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Inflationary Model of the universe has provided a theoretical platform for modern observational experiments in the field of cosmology. A well-defined method of...

  19. Advancing innovation in health care leadership: a collaborative experience.

    Garcia, Victor H; Meek, Kevin L; Wilson, Kimburli A

    2011-01-01

    The changing framework of today's health care system requires leaders to be increasingly innovative in how they approach their daily functions and responsibilities. Sustaining and advancing a level of innovation that already exists can be challenging for health care administrators with the demands of time and resource limitations. Using collaboration to bring new-age teaching and disciplines to front-line leadership, one hospital was able to reinvigorate a culture of innovation through multiple levels and disciplines of the organization. The Innovation Certification Course provided nursing leaders and other managers' an evidence-drive approach, new principles and useful strategies of innovative leadership and graduate program education.

  20. Advancing Small Satellite Electronics Heritage for Microfluidic Biological Experiments

    White, Bruce; Mazmanian, Edward; Tapio, Eric

    2016-01-01

    DLR's Eu:CROPIS (Euglena and Combined Regenerative Organic-Food Production in Space) mission, launching in 2017, will carry multiple biological payloads into a sun-synchronous orbit, including NASA Ames' PowerCell experiment. PowerCell will attempt to characterize the viability of synthetic biology at micro-g, Lunar, and Martian gravity levels. PowerCell experiment requirements demand an electronic system similar to previous microfluidic biology payloads, but with an expanded feature set. As such, the system was based on PharmaSat (Diaz-Aguado et al. 2009), a previous successful biology payload from NASA Ames, and improved upon. Newer, more miniaturized electronics allow for greater capability with a lower part count and smaller size. Two identical PowerCell enclosures will fly. Each enclosure contains two separate and identical experiments with a 48-segment optical density measurement system, grow light system, microfluidic system for nutrient delivery and waste flushing, plus thermal control and environmental sensing/housekeeping including temperature, pressure, humidity, and acceleration. Electronics consist of a single Master PCB that interfaces to the spacecraft bus and regulates power and communication, plus LED, Detector, and Valve Manifold PCBs for each experiment. To facilitate ease of reuse on future missions, experiment electronics were designed to be compatible with a standard 3U small sat form factor and power bus, or to interface with a Master power/comm PCB for use in a larger satellite as in the case of PowerCell's flight on Eu:CROPIS.

  1. Thermal-hydraulic Experiments for Advanced Physical Model Development

    Song, Chulhwa

    2012-04-01

    The improvement of prediction models is needed to enhance the safety analysis capability through experimental database of local phenomena. To improve the two-phase interfacial area transport model, the various experiments were carried out with local two-phase interfacial structure test facilities. 2 Χ 2 and 6 Χ 6 rod bundle test facilities were used for the experiment on the droplet behavior. The experiments on the droplet behavior inside a heated rod bundle geometry. The experiments used GIRLS and JICO and CFD analysis were carried out to comprehend the local condensation of steam jet, turbulent jet induced by condensation and the thermal mixing in a pool. In order to develop a model for key phenomena of newly adapted safety system, experiments for boiling inside a pool and condensation in horizontal channel have been performed. An experimental database of the CHF (Critical Heat Flux) and PDO (Post-dryout) was constructed. The mechanism of the heat transfer enhancement by surface modifications in nano-fluid was investigated in boiling mode and rapid quenching mode. The special measurement techniques were developed. They are Double-sensor optical void probe, Optic Rod, PIV technique and UBIM system

  2. Thermal-hydraulic Experiments for Advanced Physical Model Development

    Song, Chul Hwa; Baek, W. P.; Yoon, B. J.

    2010-04-01

    The improvement of prediction models is needed to enhance the safety analysis capability through the fine measurements of local phenomena. To improve the two-phase interfacial area transport model, the various experiments were carried out used SUBO and DOBO. 2x2 and 6x6 rod bundle test facilities were used for the experiment on the droplet behavior. The experiments on the droplet behavior inside a heated rod bundle were focused on the break-up of droplets induced by a spacer grid in a rod bundle geometry. The experiments used GIRLS and JICO and CFD analysis were carried out to comprehend the local condensation of steam jet, turbulent jet induced by condensation and the thermal mixing in a pool. An experimental database of the CHF (Critical Heat Flux) and PDO (Post-dryout) had been constructed. The mechanism of the heat transfer enhancement by surface modifications in nano-fluid was investigated in boiling mode and rapid quenching mode. The special measurement techniques were developed. They are Double -sensor optical void probe, Optic Rod, PIV technique and UBIM system

  3. Equipping simulators with an advanced thermal hydraulics model EDF's experience

    Soldermann, R.; Poizat, F.; Sekri, A.; Faydide, B.; Dumas, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of an accelerated version of the advanced CATHARe-1 thermal hydraulics code designed for EDF training simulators (CATHARE-SIMU) was successfully completed as early as 1991. Its successful integration as the principal model of the SIPA Post-Accident Simulator meant that its use could be extended to full-scale simulators as part of the renovation of the stock of existing simulators. In order to further extend the field of application to accidents occurring in shutdown states requiring action and to catch up with developments in respect of the CATHARE code, EDF initiated the SCAR Project designed to adapt CATHARE-2 to simulator requirements (acceleration, parallelization of the computation and extension of the simulation range). In other respects, the installation of SIPA on workstations means that the authors can envisage the application of this remarkable training facility to the understanding of thermal hydraulics accident phenomena

  4. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several metallic fuel element designs which have been tested and used as driver fuel in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The most recent advanced designs have all performed acceptably in EBR-H and can provide reliable performance to high burnups. Fuel elements tested have included use of U-l0Zr metallic fuel with either D9, 316 or HT9 stainless steel cladding; the D9 and 316-clad designs have been used as standard driver fuel. Experimental data indicate that fuel performance characteristics are very similar for the various designs tested. Cladding materials can be selected that optimize performance based on reactor design and operational goals

  5. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) network model for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    Pepin, Gerard R.; Hager, E. Paul

    1991-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Network Model for Advanced Satellite Designs and Experiments describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top-down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ISDN modeling abstractions are added to permit the determination and performance for the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

  6. Laser Light Scattering, from an Advanced Technology Development Program to Experiments in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    Meyer, William V.; Tscharnuter, Walther W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, Pierre; Boucher, Francois; Zuh, Jixiang; Tin, Padetha; Rogers, Richard B.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser light scattering hardware are described. These include intelligent single card correlators; active quench/active reset avalanche photodiodes; laser diodes; and fiber optics which were used by or developed for a NASA advanced technology development program. A space shuttle experiment which will employ aspects of these hardware developments is previewed.

  7. Determination of the Performance Parameters of a Spectrophotometer: An Advanced Experiment.

    Cope, Virgil W.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an advanced analytical chemistry laboratory experiment developed for the determination of the performance parameters of a spectrophotometer. Among the parameters are the baseline linearity with wavelength, wavelength accuracy and respectability, stray light, noise level and pen response time. (HM)

  8. Quality of experience advanced concepts, applications and methods

    Raake, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This pioneering book develops definitions and concepts related to Quality of Experience in the context of multimedia- and telecommunications-related applications, systems and services, and applies these to various fields of communication and media technologies. The editors bring together numerous key-protagonists of the new discipline “Quality of Experience” and combine the state-of-the-art knowledge in one single volume. 

  9. Experiences and Trends of Manufacturing Technology of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    2012-08-01

    The 'Atoms for Peace' mission initiated in the mid-1950s paved the way for the development and deployment of nuclear fission reactors as a source of heat energy for electricity generation in nuclear power reactors and as a source of neutrons in non-power reactors for research, materials irradiation, and testing and production of radioisotopes. The fuels for nuclear reactors are manufactured from natural uranium (∼99.3% 238 U + ∼0.7% 235 U) and natural thorium (∼100% 232 Th) resources. Currently, most power and research reactors use 235 U, the only fissile isotope found in nature, as fuel. The fertile isotopes 238 U and 232 Th are transmuted in the reactor to human-made 239 Pu and 233 U fissile isotopes, respectively. Likewise, minor actinides (MA) (Np, Am and Cm) and other plutonium isotopes are also formed by a series of neutron capture reactions with 238 U and 235 U. Long term sustainability of nuclear power will depend to a great extent on the efficient, safe and secure utilization of fissile and fertile materials. Light water reactors (LWRs) account for more than 82% of the operating reactors, followed by pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), which constitute ∼10% of reactors. LWRs will continue to dominate the nuclear power market for several decades, as long as economically viable natural uranium resources are available. Currently, the plutonium obtained from spent nuclear fuel is subjected to mono recycling in LWRs as uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX), containing up to 12% PuO 2 , in a very limited way. The reprocessed uranium (RepU) is also re-enriched and recycled in LWRs in a few countries. Unfortunately, the utilization of natural uranium resources in thermal neutron reactors is 2 and MOX fuel technology has matured during the past five decades. These fuels are now being manufactured, used and reprocessed on an industrial scale. Mixed uranium- plutonium monocarbide (MC), mononitride (MN) and U-Pu-Zr alloys are recognized as advanced fuels

  10. Aerospace Engineering Systems and the Advanced Design Technologies Testbed Experience

    VanDalsem, William R.; Livingston, Mary E.; Melton, John E.; Torres, Francisco J.; Stremel, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    Continuous improvement of aerospace product development processes is a driving requirement across much of the aerospace community. As up to 90% of the cost of an aerospace product is committed during the first 10% of the development cycle, there is a strong emphasis on capturing, creating, and communicating better information (both requirements and performance) early in the product development process. The community has responded by pursuing the development of computer-based systems designed to enhance the decision-making capabilities of product development individuals and teams. Recently, the historical foci on sharing the geometrical representation and on configuration management are being augmented: 1) Physics-based analysis tools for filling the design space database; 2) Distributed computational resources to reduce response time and cost; 3) Web-based technologies to relieve machine-dependence; and 4) Artificial intelligence technologies to accelerate processes and reduce process variability. The Advanced Design Technologies Testbed (ADTT) activity at NASA Ames Research Center was initiated to study the strengths and weaknesses of the technologies supporting each of these trends, as well as the overall impact of the combination of these trends on a product development event. Lessons learned and recommendations for future activities are reported.

  11. Recent Advances In Science Support For Isolated Droplet Combustion Experiments

    Dryer, F. L.; Kazakov, A.; Urban, B. D.; Kroenlein, K.

    2003-01-01

    In a joint program involving Prof. F.A. Williams of the University of California, San Diego and Dr. V. Nayagam of the National Center for Microgravity Research, the combustion characteristics of isolated liquid fuel droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, methanol, methanol-water, ethanol and ethanol-water having initial diameters between about 1 mm and 6 mm continues to be investigated. The objectives of the work are to improve fundamental knowledge of droplet combustion dynamics for pure fuels and fuel-water mixtures through microgravity experiments and theoretical analyses. The Princeton contributions support the engineering design, data analysis, and data interpretation requirements for the study of initially single component, spherically symmetric, isolated droplet combustion studies through experiments and numerical modeling. UCSD contributions are described in a companion communication in this conference. The Princeton effort also addresses the analyses of Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) experiments conducted with the above fuels and collaborative work with others who are investigating droplet combustion in the presence of steady convection. A thorough interpretation of droplet burning behavior for n-heptane and n-decane over a relatively wide range of conditions also involves the influences of sooting on the combustion behavior, and this particular aspect on isolated burning of droplets is under consideration in a collaborative program underway with Drexel University. This collaboration is addressed in another communication at this conference. The one-dimensional, time-dependent, numerical modeling approach that we have continued to evolve for analyzing isolated, quiescent droplet combustion data has been further applied to investigate several facets of isolated droplet burning of simple alcohols, n-heptane, and n-decane. Some of the new results are described below.

  12. Analysis advanced methods of data bases of industrial experience return

    Lannoy, A.; Procaccia, H.

    1994-05-01

    This is a presentation, through different conceptions of data bases on industrial experience return, of the principal methods for treatments and analyses of the collected data, going from the frequency statistic and factorial analysis, to the the Bayesian statistical decision theory, which is a real decision assistance tool for responsibles, conceivers and operators. Examples in various fields are given (OREDA: Offshore REliability DAta bank for marine drilling platforms, CEDB: Component Event Data Bank for european electric power industry, RDF 93: reliability of electronic components of ''France Telecom'', EVT: failure EVenTs data bank in the french nuclear power plants by ''EDF''). (A.B.). refs., figs., tabs

  13. Advancing intercultural competency: Canadian engineering employers' experiences with immigrant engineers

    Friesen, Marcia; Ingram, Sandra

    2013-05-01

    This paper explores Canadian engineering employers' perceptions of and experiences with internationally educated engineers (recent immigrants to Canada) employed in their organisations for varying lengths of time. Qualitative data were collected from employers using focus group methodology. Findings reflected employers' observations of culturally different behaviours and characteristics in their internationally educated employees, employers' reactions to cultural differences ranging from negative attributions to tolerance, and the implementation of largely ad hoc intra-organisational strategies for managing cultural differences in employer-employee relationships. Findings exposed the lack of corporate intercultural competency in the Canadian engineering profession. Equity and gatekeeping implications are discussed.

  14. Advance Power Technology Experiment for the Starshine 3 Satellite

    Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David; Wilt, David; Raffaelle, Ryne; Button, Robert; Smith, Mark; Kerslake, Thomas; Miller, Thomas; Bailey, Sheila (Technical Monitor); Hepp, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Starshine 3 satellite will carry several power technology demonstrations. Since Starshine 3 is primarily a passive experiment and does not need electrical power to successfully complete its mission, the requirement for a highly reliable power system is greatly reduced. This creates an excellent opportunity to test new power technologies. Several government and commercial interests have teamed up to provide Starshine 3 with a small power system using state-of-the-art components. Starshine 3 will also fly novel integrated microelectronic power supplies (IWS) for evaluation.

  15. Volvo drivers' experiences with advanced crash avoidance and related technologies.

    Eichelberger, Angela H; McCartt, Anne T

    2014-01-01

    Crash avoidance technologies can potentially prevent or mitigate many crashes, but their success depends in part on driver acceptance. Owners of 2010-2012 model Volvo vehicles with several technologies were interviewed about their experiences. Interviews were conducted in summer 2012 with 155 owners of vehicles with City Safety as a standard feature; 145 owners with an optional technology package that included adaptive cruise control, distance alert, collision warning with full auto brake (and pedestrian detection on certain models), driver alert control, and lane departure warning; and 172 owners with both City Safety and the technology package. The survey response rates were 21 percent for owners with City Safety, 30 percent for owners with the technology package, and 27 percent for owners with both. Ten percent of owners opted out before the telephone survey began, and 18 percent declined to participate when called. Despite some annoyance, most respondents always leave the systems on, although fewer do so for lane departure warning (59%). For each of the systems, at least 80 percent of respondents with the system would want it on their next vehicle. Many respondents reported safer driving habits with the systems (e.g., following less closely with adaptive cruise control, using turn signals more often with lane departure warning). Fewer respondents reported potentially unsafe behavior, such as allowing the vehicle to brake for them at least some of the time. About one third of respondents experienced autonomous braking when they believed they were at risk of crashing, and about one fifth of respondents thought it had prevented a crash. About one fifth of respondents with the technology package reported that they were confused or misunderstood which safety system had activated in their vehicle. Consistent with the results for early adopters in the previous survey of Volvo and Infiniti owners, the present survey found that driver acceptance of the technologies

  16. Recent advances in the HL-2A tokamak experiments

    Liu, Y.; Ding, X.T.; Yang, Q.W.; Yan, L.W.; Liu, D.Q.; Xuan, W.M.; Chen, L.Y.; Song, X.M.; Cao, Z.; Zhang, J.H.; Mao, W.C.; Zhou, C.P.; Li, X.D.; Wang, S.J.; Yan, J.C.; Bu, M.N.; Chen, Y.H.; Cui, C.H.; Cui, Z.Y.; Deng, Z.C.; Hong, W.Y.; Hu, H.T.; Huang, Y.; Kang, Z.H.; Li, B.; Li, W.; Li, F.Z.; Li, G.S.; Li, H.J.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.G.; Li, Z.J.; Liu, Yi; Liu, Z.T.; Luo, C.W.; Mao, X.H.; Pan, Y.D.; Rao, J.; Shao, K.; Song, X.Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.X.; Wang, Q.M.; Xiao, Z.G.; Xie, Y.F.; Yao, L.H.; Yao, L.Y.; Zheng, Y.J.; Zhong, G.W.; Zhou, Y.; Pan, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiment campaigns were conducted on the HL-2A tokamak in 2003 and 2004 after the first plasma was obtained at the end of 2002. Progresses in many aspects have been made, especially in the divertor discharge and feedback control of plasma configuration. Up to now, the following operation parameters have been achieved: I p = 320 kA, B t = 2.2 T and discharge duration T d = 1580 ms. With the feedback control of plasma current and horizontal position, an excellent repeatability of the discharge has been achieved. The tokamak has been operated at both limiter configuration and single null (SN) divertor configuration. The HL-2A SN divertor configuration is simulated with the MHD equilibrium code SWEQU. When the divertor configuration is formed, the impurity radiation in the main plasma decreases remarkably

  17. LOFT advanced densitometer for nuclear loss-of-coolant experiments

    Johnson, L.O.; Lassahn, G.D.; Wood, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    A ''nuclear hardened'' gamma densitometer, a device which uses radiation attenuation to measure fluid density in the presence of a background radiation field, is described. Data from the nuclear hardened gamma densitometer are acquired by time sampling the coolant fluid piping and fluid attenuated source energy spectrum. The data are used to calculate transient coolant fluid cross sectional average density to analyze transient mass flow and other thermal-hydraulic characteristics during the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) loss-of-coolant experiments. The nuclear hardened gamma densitometer uses a pulse height analysis or energy discrimination, pulse counting technique which makes separation of the gamma radiation source signal from the reactor generated gamma radiation background noise signal possible by processing discrete pulses which retain their pulse amplitude information

  18. Advanced Scale Conditioning Agent (ASCA) Applications: 2012 Experience Update

    Little, Michael-J.; Varrin, Robert-D.; Pellman, Aaron-T.; Kreider, Marc A.

    2012-09-01

    ASCAs are a group of dilute chemical treatments for removing deposited corrosion products from the secondary side of PWR steam generators (SGs). Each ASCA formulation is customized to achieve plant-specific goals that can include: - Partial dissolution and structural modification of the tube scale present on free span surfaces through full bundle treatment, lowering the deposit loading and enhancing SG thermal performance levels through creation of a scale structure marked by increased boiling efficiency, - Softening and partial removal of deposits present in the broached flow holes in the tube support plates, reducing the risks of level oscillations and flow-induced vibration (FIV), - Chemical removal of copper from tube scale and tube sheet deposits, reducing the risk of rapid tube corrosion caused by the oxidized conditions promoted by some copper species, and - Dissolution of hardness species from consolidated top-of-tube sheet (TTS) collars to enhance collar removal through water-jetting and other mechanical cleaning techniques. Regardless of the cleaning objectives for a particular plant, all ASCA processes are designed to minimize corrosion, waste disposal costs, and impact on the outage schedule. To date, about 40 ASCA applications have been carried out in four (4) countries. This paper provides an update of the industry experience gained during these applications, including results demonstrating the ability of ASCA processes to meet the goals outlined above. Experience at multiple units, including several repeat ASCA applications, has demonstrated significant heat-transfer benefits (i.e., steam pressure increases of up to 1-2 bar (15-30 psi)). ASCA applications also regularly achieve significant reductions in TSP blockage (i.e., up to 30% absolute increases in available flow area in broached flow holes) and have been successful in eliminating level oscillations caused by excessive broached-hole blockage. (authors)

  19. A structured architecture for advanced plasma control experiments

    Penaflor, B.G.; Ferron, J.R.; Walker, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    Recent new and improved plasma control regimes have evolved from enhancements to the systems responsible for managing the plasma configuration on the DIII-D tokamak. The collection of hardware and software components designed for this purpose is known at DIII-D as the Plasma Control System or PCS. Several new user requirements have contributed to the rapid growth of the PCS. Experiments involving digital control of the plasma vertical position have resulted in the addition of new high performance processors to operate in real-time. Recent studies in plasma disruptions involving the use of neural network based software have resulted in an increase in the number of input diagnostic signals sampled. Better methods for estimating the plasma shape and position have brought about numerous software changes and the addition of several new code modules. Furthermore, requests for performing multivariable control and feedback on the current profile are continuing to add to the demands being placed on the PCS. To support all of these demands has required a structured yet flexible hardware and software architecture for maintaining existing capabilities and easily adding new ones. This architecture along with a general overview of the DIII-D Plasma Control System is described. In addition, the latest improvements to the PCS are presented

  20. Advances in target design and fabrication for experiments on NIF

    Obrey K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build target platforms for National Ignition Facility (NIF is a key feature in LANL's (Los Alamos National Laboratory Target Fabrication Program. We recently built and manufactured the first LANL targets to be fielded on NIF in March 2011. Experiments on NIF require precision component manufacturing and accurate knowledge of the materials used in the targets. The characterization of foams and aerogels, the Be ignition capsule, and machining unique components are of main material focus. One important characterization metric the physics' have determined is that the knowledge of density gradients in foams is important. We are making strides in not only locating these density gradients in aerogels and foams as a result of how they are manufactured and machined but also quantifying the density within the foam using 3D confocal micro x-ray fluorescence (μXRF imaging and 3D x-ray computed tomography (CT imaging. In addition, collaborative efforts between General Atomics (GA and LANL in the characterization of the NIF Ignition beryllium capsule have shown that the copper in the capsule migrates radially from the capsule center.

  1. Postural and Object-Oriented Experiences Advance Early Reaching, Object Exploration, and Means-End Behavior

    Lobo, Michele A.; Galloway, James C.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of 3 weeks of social (control), postural, or object-oriented experiences on 9- to 21-week-old infants' (N = 42) reaching, exploration, and means-end behaviors were assessed. Coders recorded object contacts, mouthing, fingering, attention, and affect from video. Postural and object-oriented experiences advanced reaching, haptic…

  2. Advanced Life Support Project: Crop Experiments at Kennedy Space Center

    Sager, John C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Yorio, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Crop production systems provide bioregenerative technologies to complement human crew life support requirements on long duration space missions. Kennedy Space Center has lead NASA's research on crop production systems that produce high value fresh foods, provide atmospheric regeneration, and perform water processing. As the emphasis on early missions to Mars has developed, our research focused on modular, scalable systems for transit missions, which can be developed into larger autonomous, bioregenerative systems for subsequent surface missions. Components of these scalable systems will include development of efficient light generating or collecting technologies, low mass plant growth chambers, and capability to operate in the high energy background radiation and reduced atmospheric pressures of space. These systems will be integrated with air, water, and thermal subsystems in an operational system. Extensive crop testing has been done for both staple and salad crops, but limited data is available on specific cultivar selection and breadboard testing to meet nominal Mars mission profiles of a 500-600 day surface mission. The recent research emphasis at Kennedy Space Center has shifted from staple crops, such as wheat, soybean and rice, toward short cycle salad crops such as lettuce, onion, radish, tomato, pepper, and strawberry. This paper will review the results of crop experiments to support the Exploration Initiative and the ongoing development of supporting technologies, and give an overview of capabilities of the newly opened Space Life Science (SLS) Lab at Kennedy Space Center. The 9662 square m (104,000 square ft) SLS Lab was built by the State of Florida and supports all NASA research that had been performed in Hanger-L. In addition to NASA research, the SLS Lab houses the Florida Space Research Institute (FSRI), responsible for co-managing the facility, and the University of Florida (UF) has established the Space Agriculture and Biotechnology Research and

  3. Nurse Leaders’ Experiences of Implementing Career Advancement Programs for Nurses in Iran

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Career advancement programs are currently implemented in many countries. In Iran, the first career advancement program was Nurses’ Career Advancement Pathway. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse leaders’ experiences about implementing the Nurses’ Career Advancement Pathway program in Iran. Methods: This exploratory qualitative study was conducted in 2013. Sixteen nurse managers were recruited from the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Behesthi, Qazvin, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Participants were recruited using purposive sampling method. Study data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The conventional content analysis approach was used for data analysis. Results: participants’ experiences about implementing the Nurses’ Career Advancement Pathway fell into three main categories including: a) the shortcomings of performance evaluation, b) greater emphasis on point accumulation, c) the advancement-latitude mismatch. Conclusion: The Nurses’ Career Advancement pathway has several shortcomings regarding both its content and its implementation. Therefore, it is recommended to revise the program. PMID:26156907

  4. Pain experiences of patients with advanced cancer: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Erol, Ozgul; Unsar, Serap; Yacan, Lale; Pelin, Meryem; Kurt, Seda; Erdogan, Bülent

    2018-04-01

    Uncontrolled pain, especially in patients with advanced cancer, affects quality of life negatively and causes negative physical and psychological conditions. The aim of this study was to explore the pain experiences of patients with advanced cancer and how they manage with pain, and to present a view of pain management approaches of nurses from the perspectives of the patients. This was a qualitative descriptive study of sixteen hospitalized patients with advanced cancer. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with patients. Data were analysed by Colaizzi's phenomenological method. This study found that patients with advanced cancer who had pain experienced anxiety, helplessness, hopelessness and many restrictions in daily life as well as inability to manage with pain. Most of the patients with advanced cancer were not satisfied with their nursing care with regard to pain management. The themes that emerged were pain perception and experiences, effects of pain on daily life, pain management and management strategies and the patients' perspectives about nursing approaches to pain. This study demonstrated the difficulties of patients with advanced cancer who experienced pain in their daily lives, yet lack pain management strategies. Furthermore, nurses' caring approaches to patients with advanced cancer who experienced pain was found inadequate. Oncology nurses should provide educational interventions in order to enhance knowledge and skills about pain assessment and non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies used in pain management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced nursing experience is beneficial for lowering the peritonitis rate in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    Yang, Zhikai; Xu, Rong; Zhuo, Min; Dong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    We explored the relationship between the experience level of nurses and the peritonitis risk in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Our observational cohort study followed 305 incident PD patients until a first episode of peritonitis, death, or censoring. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the work experience in general medicine of their nurses-that is, least experience (biochemistry, and residual renal function were also recorded. Multivariate Cox regression was used to analyze the association of risks for all-cause and gram-positive peritonitis with patient training provided by nurses at different experience levels. Of the 305 patients, 91 were trained at the initiation of PD by nurses with advanced experience, 100 by nurses with moderate experience, and 114 by nurses with the least experience. Demographic and clinical variables did not vary significantly between the groups. During 13 582 patient-months of follow-up, 129 first episodes of peritonitis were observed, with 48 episodes being attributed to gram-positive organisms. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that training by nurses with advanced experience predicted the longest period free of first-episode gram-positive peritonitis. After adjustment for some recognized confounders, the advanced experience group was still associated with the lowest risk for first-episode gram-positive peritonitis. The level of nursing experience was not significantly correlated with all-cause peritonitis risk. The experience in general medicine of nurses might help to lower the risk of gram-positive peritonitis among PD patients. These data are the first to indicate that nursing experience in areas other than PD practice can be vital in the training of PD patients.

  6. Human Factors Engineering (HFE) insights for advanced reactors based upon operating experience

    Higgins, J.; Nasta, K.

    1997-01-01

    The NRC Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (HFE PRM, NUREG-0711) was developed to support a design process review for advanced reactor design certification under 10CFR52. The HFE PRM defines ten fundamental elements of a human factors engineering program. An Operating Experience Review (OER) is one of these elements. The main purpose of an OER is to identify potential safety issues from operating plant experience and ensure that they are addressed in a new design. Broad-based experience reviews have typically been performed in the past by reactor designers. For the HFE PRM the intent is to have a more focussed OER that concentrates on HFE issues or experience that would be relevant to the human-system interface (HSI) design process for new advanced reactors. This document provides a detailed list of HFE-relevant operating experience pertinent to the HSI design process for advanced nuclear power plants. This document is intended to be used by NRC reviewers as part of the HFE PRM review process in determining the completeness of an OER performed by an applicant for advanced reactor design certification. 49 refs

  7. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Gschwendtner, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  8. Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Facility 10CFR830 Safety Basis Related to Facility Experiments

    Tomberlin, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a DOE Category A reactor, was designed to provide an irradiation test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. The ATR Safety Analysis Report, determined by DOE to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, provides versatility in types of experiments that may be conducted. This paper addresses two general types of experiments in the ATR facility and how safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore this type of experiment is addressed with more detail in the safety basis. This allows individual safety analyses for these experiments to be more routine and repetitive. The second type of experiment is less defined and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, individual safety analyses for the second type of experiment tend to be more unique from experiment to experiment. Experiments are also discussed relative to ''major modifications'' and DOE-STD-1027-92. Application of the USQ process to ATR experiments is also discussed

  9. The Effect of Conceptual Advancement in Jazz Music Selections and Jazz Experience on Musicians' Aesthetic Response

    Coggiola, John C.

    2004-01-01

    This study is an investigation of what musicians consider to be their aesthetic experience with jazz music selections that vary in level of conceptual advancement (melodic complexity during improvised solos). Music major participants (N = 128) were assigned to either the jazz musician (n = 64) or nonjazz musician (n = 64) group. Data were gathered…

  10. Career Advancement Experiences of Hispanic Secondary Principals in Suburban School Districts: A Phenomenological Study

    Fernandez, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and experiences of Hispanic secondary school principals who work in suburban school districts regarding their career advancement. Moreover, the objective of this research was to understand these Hispanic principals' motivational drivers and barriers regarding their career choices,…

  11. Trispyrazolylborate Complexes: An Advanced Synthesis Experiment Using Paramagnetic NMR, Variable-Temperature NMR, and EPR Spectroscopies

    Abell, Timothy N.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Tierney, David L.

    2017-01-01

    A structured inquiry experiment for inorganic synthesis has been developed to introduce undergraduate students to advanced spectroscopic techniques including paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance and electron paramagnetic resonance. Students synthesize multiple complexes with unknown first row transition metals and identify the unknown metals by…

  12. Book Review "Advances on remote laboratories and e-learning experiences"

    Jesús A. del Alamo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Book Review "Advances on remote laboratories and e-learning experiences", book editors: Luís Gomes and Javier García-Zubía, University of Deusto, Spain. Reviewed by Jesús A. del Alamo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, M.I.T.

  13. Long-term intended and unintended experiences after Advanced Life Support training

    Rasmussen, M.B.; Dieckmann, Peter; Issenberg, Berry

    2012-01-01

    Highly structured simulation-based training (SBT) on managing emergency situations can have a significant effect on immediate satisfaction and learning. However, there are some indications of problems when applying learned skills to practice. The aim of this study was to identify long-term intended...... and unintended learner reactions, experiences and reflections after attending a simulation based Advanced Life Support (ALS) course....

  14. Documenting Student Engagement Using an Intention/Reflection Exercise during an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    Fierke, Kerry K.; Lepp, Gardner A.

    2015-01-01

    The article shares the outcomes of a practice called Intention/Reflection (I/R) when applied to a group of ten students in a five-week course involving an international advanced pharmacy practice experience. Developed by the authors and founded on a combination of theoretical principles, this practice is unique because of the blend of formative…

  15. Learning to Facilitate Advance Care Planning: The Novice Social Worker's Experience

    Washington, Karla; Bowland, Sharon; Mueggenburg, Kay; Pederson, Margaret; Otten, Sheila; Renn, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Professional leaders have identified clear roles for social workers involved in advance care planning (ACP), a facilitated process whereby individuals identify their preferences for future medical care; yet information about effective teaching practices in this area is scant. This study reports on the experiences of 14 social workers who…

  16. Experience of developments and implementation of advanced fuel cycles of WWER-440 reactors

    Gagarinski, A.A.; Lizorkin, M.P.; Novikov, A.N.; Proselkov, V.N.; Saprykin, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the experience of development and implementation of advanced four- and five-year fuel cycles in the WWER-440 reactors, the results of experimental operation of the new fuel design and the main neutronic characteristics of the core. (Authors)

  17. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  18. The Offering, Scheduling and Maintenance of Elective Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Rex O. Brown

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE provides standards for colleges of pharmacy to assist in the provision of pharmacy education to student pharmacists. An integral part of all college educational programs includes the provision of experiential learning. Experiential learning allows students to gain real-world experience in direct patient care during completion of the curriculum. All college of pharmacy programs provide several Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs, which include a balance between the four required experiences and a number of other required or elective APPEs. Required APPEs include advanced community, advanced institutional, ambulatory care, and general medicine. The elective APPEs include a myriad of opportunities to help provide a balanced education in experiential learning for student pharmacists. These unique opportunities help to expose student pharmacists to different career tracks that they may not have been able to experience otherwise. Not all colleges offer enough elective APPEs to enable the student pharmacist to obtain experiences in a defined area. Such an approach is required to produce skilled pharmacy graduates that are capable to enter practice in various settings. Elective APPEs are scheduled logically and are based upon student career interest and site availability. This article describes the offering, scheduling and maintenance of different elective APPEs offered by The University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy.

  19. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I&C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    Wood, RT

    2004-09-27

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l&C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l&C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States.

  20. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I and C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    Wood, RT

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I and C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l and C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l and C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States

  1. Identity and home: Understanding the experience of people with advanced cancer.

    Maersk, Jesper Larsen; Cutchin, Malcolm P; la Cour, Karen

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the identity of people with advanced cancer is influenced by their experiences of living at home. A total of 28 in-depth interviews were conducted with 22 people with advanced cancer and four spouses. Grounded theory guided the collection and analysis of data. Home tours and associated field notes augmented the interview data. The analysis revealed that support of participants' identity was reflected in their abilities to live and occupy the home during daily activities, and in the ways the home and objects functioned as referents to themselves and their past. Threats to their identity ensued as the home environment became unmanageable during daily activities and as homecare professionals and assistive devices entered the home. By supporting people with advanced cancer in maintaining daily activities in the home and reducing changes in the home caused by homecare it is possible to reduce loss of identity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) simulator development for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The simulation development associated with the network models of both the Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures is documented. The ISIS Network Model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communications satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete event simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters, and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  3. Review of ICRF antenna development and heating experiments up to advanced experiment I, 1989 on the JT-60 tokamak

    Fujii, Tsuneyuki

    1992-03-01

    Two main subjects of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating on JT-60 are described in this paper from development phase of the JT-60 ICRF heating system up to advanced experiment I, 1989. One is antenna design and development for the high power JT-60 ICRF heating system (6 MW for 10 s at a frequency range of 108 - 132 MHz). The other is the experimental investigation of characteristics of second harmonic ICRF heating in a large tokamak. (J.P.N.)

  4. How does uncertainty shape patient experience in advanced illness? A secondary analysis of qualitative data.

    Etkind, Simon Noah; Bristowe, Katherine; Bailey, Katharine; Selman, Lucy Ellen; Murtagh, Fliss Em

    2017-02-01

    Uncertainty is common in advanced illness but is infrequently studied in this context. If poorly addressed, uncertainty can lead to adverse patient outcomes. We aimed to understand patient experiences of uncertainty in advanced illness and develop a typology of patients' responses and preferences to inform practice. Secondary analysis of qualitative interview transcripts. Studies were assessed for inclusion and interviews were sampled using maximum-variation sampling. Analysis used a thematic approach with 10% of coding cross-checked to enhance reliability. Qualitative interviews from six studies including patients with heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal disease, cancer and liver failure. A total of 30 transcripts were analysed. Median age was 75 (range, 43-95), 12 patients were women. The impact of uncertainty was frequently discussed: the main related themes were engagement with illness, information needs, patient priorities and the period of time that patients mainly focused their attention on (temporal focus). A typology of patient responses to uncertainty was developed from these themes. Uncertainty influences patient experience in advanced illness through affecting patients' information needs, preferences and future priorities for care. Our typology aids understanding of how patients with advanced illness respond to uncertainty. Assessment of these three factors may be a useful starting point to guide clinical assessment and shared decision making.

  5. Paramedics experiences and expectations concerning advance directives: a prospective, questionnaire-based, bi-centre study.

    Taghavi, Mahmoud; Simon, Alfred; Kappus, Stefan; Meyer, Nicole; Lassen, Christoph L; Klier, Tobias; Ruppert, David B; Graf, Bernhard M; Hanekop, Gerd G; Wiese, Christoph H R

    2012-10-01

    Advance directives and palliative crisis cards are means by which palliative care patients can exert their autonomy in end-of-life decisions. To examine paramedics' attitudes towards advance directives and end-of-life care. Questionnaire-based investigation using a self-administered survey instrument. Paramedics of two cities (Hamburg and Goettingen, Germany) were included. Participants were questioned as to (1) their attitudes about advance directives, (2) their clinical experiences in connection with end-of-life situations (e.g. resuscitation), (3) their suggestions in regard to advance directives, 'Do not attempt resuscitation' orders and palliative crisis cards. Questionnaires were returned by 728 paramedics (response rate: 81%). The majority of paramedics (71%) had dealt with advance directives and end-of-life decisions in emergency situations. Most participants (84%) found that cardiopulmonary resuscitation in end-of-life patients is not useful and 75% stated that they would withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the case of legal possibility. Participants also mentioned that more extensive discussion of legal aspects concerning advance directives should be included in paramedic training curricula. They suggested that palliative crisis cards should be integrated into end-of-life care. Decision making in prehospital end-of-life care is a challenge for all paramedics. The present investigation demonstrates that a dialogue bridging emergency medical and palliative care issues is necessary. The paramedics indicated that improved guidelines on end-of-life decisions and the termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care patients may be essential. Participants do not feel adequately trained in end-of-life care and the content of advance directives. Other recent studies have also demonstrated that there is a need for training curricula in end-of-life care for paramedics.

  6. Training for my Life: Lived Experiences of Dislocated Workers in an Advanced Manufacturing Training Program

    Marquita R. Walker

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative paper explores the lived experiences of one group of workers dislocated because of globalized trade policies who completed a hybrid Advanced Manufacturing Training Program (AMTP) by taking advantage of Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), a federally-funded program for retraining workers dislocated because of trade policies. The research questions focus on how satisfied these workers are with the services and programs provided by TAA. Focus groups and survey instrument results ...

  7. Support systems for optics in the experiment stations at the Advanced Photon Source

    Barraza, J.; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Support systems have been designed for optics in the experiment stations of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. These systems utilize modular precision positioning slides and stages arranged in 3-point kinematic mount fashion for optimum mechanical stability. Through the use of novel configurations, these systems can achieve large linear motions, six degree-of-freedom motion, and large load capacities without sacrificing valuable experimental station space. This paper will discuss the designs and specifications of the positioning systems developed

  8. Operating experience with Exxon nuclear advanced fuel assembly and fuel cycle designs in PWRs

    Skogen, F.B.; Killgore, M.R.; Holm, J.S.; Brown, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Exxon Nuclear Company (ENC) has achieved a high standard of performance in its supply of fuel reloads for both BWRs and PWRs, while introducing substantial innovations aimed at realization of improved fuel cycle costs. The ENC experience with advanced design features such as the bi-metallic spacer, the dismountable upper tie plate, natural uranium axial blankets, optimized water-to-fuel designs, annular pellets, gadolinia burnable absorbers, and improved fuel management scenarios, is summarized

  9. Developing Structured-Learning Exercises for a Community Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    Thomas, Renee Ahrens

    2006-01-01

    The recent growth in the number of pharmacy schools across the nation has resulted in the need for high-quality community advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) sites. A vital part of a student's education, these APPEs should be structured and formalized to provide an environment conducive to student learning. This paper discusses how to use a calendar, structured-learning activities, and scheduled evaluations to develop students' knowledge, skills, and abilities in a community pharmacy...

  10. Developing structured-learning exercises for a community advanced pharmacy practice experience.

    Thomas, Renee Ahrens

    2006-02-15

    The recent growth in the number of pharmacy schools across the nation has resulted in the need for high-quality community advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) sites. A vital part of a student's education, these APPEs should be structured and formalized to provide an environment conducive to student learning. This paper discusses how to use a calendar, structured-learning activities, and scheduled evaluations to develop students' knowledge, skills, and abilities in a community pharmacy setting.

  11. Combine EPR and two-slit experiments: Interference of advanced waves

    Klyshko, D. N.

    1988-10-01

    A nonclassical interference effect, using two-photon correlations in nonlinear optical interactions, is discussed. The apparent nonlocality could be conveniently interpreted in terms of advanced waves, emitted by one detector toward the other. A new Bell-type experiment is proposed, in which the measured photon's parameter is the wave-vector (instead of the polarisation), so that the observable can take more than two possible values.

  12. An engineered genetic selection for ternary protein complexes inspired by a natural three-component hitchhiker mechanism.

    Lee, Hyeon-Cheol; Portnoff, Alyse D; Rocco, Mark A; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2014-12-22

    The bacterial twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is well known to translocate correctly folded monomeric and dimeric proteins across the tightly sealed cytoplasmic membrane. We identified a naturally occurring heterotrimer, the Escherichia coli aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC, that is co-translocated by the Tat translocase according to a ternary "hitchhiker" mechanism. Specifically, the PaoB and PaoC subunits, each devoid of export signals, are escorted to the periplasm in a piggyback fashion by the Tat signal peptide-containing subunit PaoA. Moreover, export of PaoA was blocked when either PaoB or PaoC was absent, revealing a surprising interdependence for export that is not seen for classical secretory proteins. Inspired by this observation, we created a bacterial three-hybrid selection system that links the formation of ternary protein complexes with antibiotic resistance. As proof-of-concept, a bispecific antibody was employed as an adaptor that physically crosslinked one antigen fused to a Tat export signal with a second antigen fused to TEM-1 β-lactamase (Bla). The resulting non-covalent heterotrimer was exported in a Tat-dependent manner, delivering Bla to the periplasm where it hydrolyzed β-lactam antibiotics. Collectively, these results highlight the remarkable flexibility of the Tat system and its potential for studying and engineering ternary protein interactions in living bacteria.

  13. Reliable reconstruction of HIV-1 whole genome haplotypes reveals clonal interference and genetic hitchhiking among immune escape variants

    2014-01-01

    Background Following transmission, HIV-1 evolves into a diverse population, and next generation sequencing enables us to detect variants occurring at low frequencies. Studying viral evolution at the level of whole genomes was hitherto not possible because next generation sequencing delivers relatively short reads. Results We here provide a proof of principle that whole HIV-1 genomes can be reliably reconstructed from short reads, and use this to study the selection of immune escape mutations at the level of whole genome haplotypes. Using realistically simulated HIV-1 populations, we demonstrate that reconstruction of complete genome haplotypes is feasible with high fidelity. We do not reconstruct all genetically distinct genomes, but each reconstructed haplotype represents one or more of the quasispecies in the HIV-1 population. We then reconstruct 30 whole genome haplotypes from published short sequence reads sampled longitudinally from a single HIV-1 infected patient. We confirm the reliability of the reconstruction by validating our predicted haplotype genes with single genome amplification sequences, and by comparing haplotype frequencies with observed epitope escape frequencies. Conclusions Phylogenetic analysis shows that the HIV-1 population undergoes selection driven evolution, with successive replacement of the viral population by novel dominant strains. We demonstrate that immune escape mutants evolve in a dependent manner with various mutations hitchhiking along with others. As a consequence of this clonal interference, selection coefficients have to be estimated for complete haplotypes and not for individual immune escapes. PMID:24996694

  14. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    Song, C. H.; Baek, W. P.; Chung, M. K.

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of advanced nuclear reactor system for evaluating key thermal-hydraulic phenomena relevant to new safety concepts. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. The Followings are main research topics: - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation-induced Thermal Mixing in a Pool - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Construction of T-H Data Base

  15. q=1 advanced tokamak experiments in JET and comparison with ASDEX Upgrade

    Joffrin, E.; Wolf, R.; Alper, B.

    2002-01-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade advanced tokamak scenario with central q close to 1 has been reproduced on JET. For almost identical q profiles, the comparative analysis does show similar features like the fishbone activity and the current profile evolution. In JET, transport analyses indicates that an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been produced. Gradient length criterions based on the ion temperature gradient turbulence stabilization are used to characterize the ITBs in both devices. The trigger of ITBs is associated with rational surfaces in both devices although the underlying physics for this triggering seems different. This experiment has the prospect to get closer to identity experiments between the two tokamaks. (author)

  16. Patient and Oncology Nurse Preferences for the Treatment Options in Advanced Melanoma: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Liu, Frank Xiaoqing; Witt, Edward A; Ebbinghaus, Scot; DiBonaventura Beyer, Grace; Basurto, Enrique; Joseph, Richard W

    2017-10-25

    Understanding the perceptions of patients and oncology nurses about the relative importance of benefits and risks associated with newer treatments of advanced melanoma can help to inform clinical decision-making. The aims of this study were to quantify and compare the views of patients and oncology nurses regarding the importance of attributes of treatments of advanced melanoma. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was conducted in US-based oncology nurses and patients diagnosed with advanced melanoma. Patients and nurses were enlisted through online panels. In a series of scenarios, respondents had to choose between 2 hypothetical treatments, each with 7 attributes: mode of administration (MoA), dosing schedule (DS), median duration of therapy (DoT), objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs). Hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression models were used to estimate preference weights. A total of 200 patients with advanced melanoma and 150 oncology nurses participated. The relative importance estimates of attributes by patients and nurses, respectively, were as follows: OS, 33% and 28%; AEs, 29% and 26%; ORR, 25% and 27%; PFS, 12% and 15%; DS, 2% and 3%; DoT, 0% and 0%; and MoA, 0% and 0%. Both patients and oncology nurses valued OS, ORR, and AEs as the most important treatment attributes for advanced melanoma, followed by PFS, whereas DS, DoT, and MoA were given less value in their treatment decisions. Oncology nurses and patients have similar views on important treatment considerations for advanced melanoma, which can help build trust in shared decision-making.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  17. Summary of thermocouple performance during advanced gas reactor fuel irradiation experiments in the advanced test reactor and out-of-pile thermocouple testing in support of such experiments

    Palmer, A. J.; Haggard, DC; Herter, J. W.; Swank, W. D.; Knudson, D. L.; Cherry, R. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 4112, Idaho Falls, ID, (United States); Scervini, M. [University of Cambridge, Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, CB3 0FS, Cambridge, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple-based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time-dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time-dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B) and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Type C). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with Type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly, Type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluence. Currently, the use of these nickel-based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past 10 years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700 deg. C - 1200 deg. C. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out-of-pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150 deg. C and 1200 deg. C for 2,000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250 deg. C and 200 hours at 1300 deg. C. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity, crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including a Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly

  18. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  19. Incorporating full-scale experience into advanced limestone wet FGD designs

    Rader, P.C.; Bakke, E.

    1992-01-01

    Utilities choosing flue gas desulfurization as a strategy for compliance with Phase I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments will largely turn to limestone wet scrubbing as the most cost-effective, least-risk option. State-of-the-art single absorber wet scrubbing systems can be designed to achieve: SO 2 removal efficiencies in excess of 95 %, system availabilities in excess of 98%, and byproducts which can be marketed or land filled. As a result of varying fuel characteristics, site considerations, and owner preferences, FGD plants for large central power stations are typically custom-designed. To avoid the risks associated with new, first-of-a-kind technologies, utilities have preferred to purchase FGD systems from suppliers with proven utility experience and reference plants as close as possible to the design envisioned. As the market for FGD systems is regulatory driven, the demand has shifted geographically in response to national environmental policies. Although limestone wet scrubbing has emerged as the overwhelming choice for SO 2 emission control in coal-fired power stations, the technology has evolved and been adapted to suit local and regional technical and economic situations. Global suppliers are able to benefit from experience and technological advances in the world market. With market units in the U.S., Denmark, Italy, Sweden, and Germany active in the design and supply of wet FGD plants, ABB has a unique ability to incorporate knowledge and experience gained throughout the industrialized world to acid rain retrofit projects in the U.S. This paper describes the design of advanced limestone wet scrubbing systems for application to acid rain retrofits. Specifically, the evolution of advanced design concepts from a global experience base is discussed

  20. Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor for small laboratory experiments

    Ogawa, Yuichi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Nagato

    2006-01-01

    Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor materials and small refrigerator are reviewed. Mini-RT/RT-1 is designed and constructed as a plasma examination device. The element technology of low temperature apparatus, the results of performance tests and application examples are explained. The superconductors such as Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 (Bi-2212) for the low temperature phase, Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 (Bi-2223) for the high temperature phase, and YBa 2 Cu 3 O y (YBCO or Y123) are described. Advanced 4K-Giford-Mcmahon (GM) refrigerator on the market put superconductor coil made of low temperature superconductor metals to practical use and extends its application field. Small laboratory is able to experiment on the high temperature superconductor materials. (S.Y.)

  1. Laguna Verde nuclear power plant: an experience to consider in advanced BWR design

    Fuentes Marquez, L.

    2001-01-01

    Laguna Verde is a BWR 5 containment Mark II. Designed by GE, two external re-circulation loops, each of them having two speed re-circulation pump and a flow control valve to define the drive flow and consequently the total core flow an power control by total core flow. Laguna Verde Design and operational experience has shown some insights to be considering in design for advanced BRW reactors in order to improve the potential of nuclear power plants. NSSS and Balance of plant design, codes used to perform nuclear core design, margins derived from engineering judgment, at the time Laguna Verde designed and constructed had conducted to have a plant with an operational license, generating with a very good performance and availability. Nevertheless, some design characteristics and operational experience have shown that potential improvements or areas of opportunity shall be focused in the advanced BWR design. Computer codes used to design the nuclear core have been evolved relatively fast. The computers are faster and powerful than those used during the design process, also instrumentation and control are becoming part of this amazing technical evolution in the industry. The Laguna Verde experience is the subject to share in this paper. (author)

  2. Robotic Materials Handling in Space: Mechanical Design of the Robot Operated Materials Processing System HitchHiker Experiment

    Voellmer, George

    1997-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Robot Operated Materials Processing System (ROMPS) that flew aboard STS-64 in September, 1994. The ROMPS robot transported pallets containing wafers of different materials from their storage racks to a furnace for thermal processing. A system of tapered guides and compliant springs was designed to deal with the potential misalignments. The robot and all the sample pallets were locked down for launch and landing. The design of the passive lockdown system, and the interplay between it and the alignment system are presented.

  3. ETA-II experiments for determining advanced radiographic capabilities of induction linacs

    Weir, J.T.; Caporaso, G.J.; Clark, J.C.; Kirbie, H.C.; Chen, Y.J.; Lund, S.M.; Westenskow, G.A.; Paul, A.C.

    1997-05-01

    LLNL has proposed a multi-pulsed, multi-line of sight radiographic machine based on induction linac technology to be the core of the advanced hydrotest facility (AHF) being considered by the Department of Energy. In order to test the new technologies being developed for AHF we have recommissioned the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA II). We will conduct our initial experiments using kickers and large angle bending optics at the ETA II facility. Our current status and our proposed experimental schedule will be presented

  4. [Challenges and opportunities: contributions of the Advanced Practice Nurse in the chronicity. Learning from experiences].

    Appleby, Christine; Camacho-Bejarano, Rafaela

    2014-01-01

    Undoubtedly, our society is facing new economic, political, demographic, social and cultural challenges that require healthcare services able to meet the growing health needs of the population, especially in dealing with chronic conditions. In this new context, some countries such as the United Kingdom have made a firm commitment to develop new models for chronic patients care based on the introduction of new figures of Advanced Practice Nurses, which includes 4 cornerstones of professional practice: advanced clinical skills, clinical management, teaching and research. The implementation of this new figures implies a redefinition of professional competencies and has its own accreditation system and a specific catalogue of services adapted to the population requirements, in order to provide chronic care support from Primary Care settings. This trajectory allows us analysing the process of design and implementation of these new models and the organizational structure where it is integrated. In Spain, there are already experiences in some regions such as Andalucia and the Basque Country, focused on the creation of new advanced nursing roles. At present, it is necessary to consider suitable strategic proposals for the complete development of these models and to achieve the best results in terms of overall health and quality of life of patients with chronic conditions, improving the quality of services and cost-effectiveness through a greater cohesion and performance of healthcare teams towards the sustainability of healthcare services and patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced Concepts, Technologies and Flight Experiments for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise

    Meredith, Barry D.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has established a tradition of excellence in scientific research and leading-edge system developments, which have contributed to improved scientific understanding of our Earth system. Specifically, LaRC advances knowledge of atmospheric processes to enable proactive climate prediction and, in that role, develops first-of-a-kind atmospheric sensing capabilities that permit a variety of new measurements to be made within a constrained enterprise budget. These advances are enabled by the timely development and infusion of new, state-of-the-art (SOA), active and passive instrument and sensor technologies. In addition, LaRC's center-of-excellence in structures and materials is being applied to the technological challenges of reducing measurement system size, mass, and cost through the development and use of space-durable materials; lightweight, multi-functional structures; and large deployable/inflatable structures. NASA Langley is engaged in advancing these technologies across the full range of readiness levels from concept, to components, to prototypes, to flight experiments, and on to actual science mission infusion. The purpose of this paper is to describe current activities and capabilities, recent achievements, and future plans of the integrated science, engineering, and technology team at Langley Research Center who are working to enable the future of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise.

  6. Training for my Life: Lived Experiences of Dislocated Workers in an Advanced Manufacturing Training Program

    Marquita R. Walker

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative paper explores the lived experiences of one group of workers dislocated because of globalized trade policies who completed a hybrid Advanced Manufacturing Training Program (AMTP by taking advantage of Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA, a federally-funded program for retraining workers dislocated because of trade policies. The research questions focus on how satisfied these workers are with the services and programs provided by TAA. Focus groups and survey instrument results indicate these workers found TAA services and processes cumbersome and time- consuming and actually had the effect of discouraging their education, training, and self- employment. The consequences of their dislocation as it relates to TAA experiences are increased frustration and dissatisfaction with the TAA program. Serious consideration for TAA policy changes should be deemed of utmost importance.

  7. Advanced Biasing Experiments on the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Device

    Thompson, Matthew; Korepanov, Sergey; Garate, Eusebio; Yang, Xiaokang; Gota, Hiroshi; Douglass, Jon; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Uchizono, Nolan; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    The C-2 experiment seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral beam injection on field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. Recently, substantial improvements in plasma performance were achieved through the application of edge biasing with coaxial plasma guns located in the divertors. Edge biasing provides rotation control that reduces instabilities and E × B shear that improves confinement. Typically, the plasma gun arcs are run at ~ 10 MW for the entire shot duration (~ 5 ms), which will become unsustainable as the plasma duration increases. We have conducted several advanced biasing experiments with reduced-average-power plasma gun operating modes and alternative biasing cathodes in an effort to develop an effective biasing scenario applicable to steady state FRC plasmas. Early results show that several techniques can potentially provide effective, long-duration edge biasing.

  8. Fuel plate stability experiments and analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    The planned Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) and several existing reactors use closely spaced arrays of involute shaped fuel-plates which are cooled by water flowing through the channels between the plates. There is concern that at certain coolant flow velocities adjacent plates may deflect and touch, with resulting failure of the plates. Experiments have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine this potential phenomenon. Results of the experiments and comparison with analytical predictions are reported in this paper. The tests were conducted using full scale epoxy plate models of the aluminum/uranium silicide ANS involute shaped fuel plates. Use of epoxy plates and model theory allowed lower flow velocities and pressures to explore the potential failure mechanism. Plate deflections and channel pressures as function of the flow velocity are examined. Comparisons with mathematical models are noted. 12 refs

  9. Fuel plate stability experiments and analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

    1993-05-01

    The planned reactor for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will use closely spaced arrays of involute-shaped fuel plates that will be cooled by water flowing through the channels between the plates. There is concern that at certain coolant flow velocities, adjacent plates may deflect and touch, with resulting failure of the plates. Experiments have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine this potential phenomenon. Results of the experiments and comparison with analytical predictions are reported. The tests were conducted using full-scale epoxy plate models of the aluminum/uranium silicide ANS involute-shaped fuel plates. Use of epoxy plates and model theory allowed lower flow velocities and pressures to explore the potential failure mechanism. Plate deflections and channel pressures as functions of the flow velocity are examined. Comparisons with mathematical models are noted

  10. Advanced approach to the analysis of a series of in-situ nuclear forward scattering experiments

    Vrba, Vlastimil, E-mail: vlastimil.vrba01@upol.cz [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacký University Olomouc, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Procházka, Vít, E-mail: v.prochazka@upol.cz [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacký University Olomouc, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Smrčka, David, E-mail: david.smrcka@upol.cz [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacký University Olomouc, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Miglierini, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.miglierini@stuba.sk [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Department of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-03-01

    This study introduces a sequential fitting procedure as a specific approach to nuclear forward scattering (NFS) data evaluation. Principles and usage of this advanced evaluation method are described in details and its utilization is demonstrated on NFS in-situ investigations of fast processes. Such experiments frequently consist of hundreds of time spectra which need to be evaluated. The introduced procedure allows the analysis of these experiments and significantly decreases the time needed for the data evaluation. The key contributions of the study are the sequential use of the output fitting parameters of a previous data set as the input parameters for the next data set and the model suitability crosscheck option of applying the procedure in ascending and descending directions of the data sets. Described fitting methodology is beneficial for checking of model validity and reliability of obtained results.

  11. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    Song, C. H.; Chung, M. K.; Park, C. K. and others

    2005-04-01

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of reactor primary system for the verification of the reactor safety and to evaluate new safety concepts of new safety design features. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. Followings are main research topics; - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation Load and Thermal Mixing in the IRWST - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Development of Measurement Techniques for Two-Phase Flow - Supercritical Reactor T/H Characteristics Analysis From the above experimental and analytical studies, new safety design features of the advanced power reactors were verified and lots of the safety issues were also resolved

  12. Advanced approach to the analysis of a series of in-situ nuclear forward scattering experiments

    Vrba, Vlastimil; Procházka, Vít; Smrčka, David; Miglierini, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    This study introduces a sequential fitting procedure as a specific approach to nuclear forward scattering (NFS) data evaluation. Principles and usage of this advanced evaluation method are described in details and its utilization is demonstrated on NFS in-situ investigations of fast processes. Such experiments frequently consist of hundreds of time spectra which need to be evaluated. The introduced procedure allows the analysis of these experiments and significantly decreases the time needed for the data evaluation. The key contributions of the study are the sequential use of the output fitting parameters of a previous data set as the input parameters for the next data set and the model suitability crosscheck option of applying the procedure in ascending and descending directions of the data sets. Described fitting methodology is beneficial for checking of model validity and reliability of obtained results.

  13. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    Song, C. H.; Chung, M. K.; Park, C. K. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of reactor primary system for the verification of the reactor safety and to evaluate new safety concepts of new safety design features. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. Followings are main research topics; - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation Load and Thermal Mixing in the IRWST - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Development of Measurement Techniques for Two-Phase Flow - Supercritical Reactor T/H Characteristics Analysis From the above experimental and analytical studies, new safety design features of the advanced power reactors were verified and lots of the safety issues were also resolved.

  14. Fission product monitoring of TRISO coated fuel for the advanced gas reactor-1 experiment

    Scates, Dawn M.; Hartwell, John K.; Walter, John B.; Drigert, Mark W.; Harp, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burnup of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B's) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  15. ADX: a high field, high power density, Advanced Divertor test eXperiment

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; ADX Team

    2014-10-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment (ADX) - a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research program on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. This high field (6.5 tesla, 1.5 MA), high power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) facility would utilize Alcator magnet technology to test innovative divertor concepts for next-step DT fusion devices (FNSF, DEMO) at reactor-level boundary plasma pressures and parallel heat flux densities while producing high performance core plasma conditions. The experimental platform would also test advanced lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) actuators and wave physics at the plasma densities and magnetic field strengths of a DEMO, with the unique ability to deploy launcher structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-field side - a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and wave physics is most favorable for efficient current drive, heating and flow drive. This innovative experiment would perform plasma science and technology R&D necessary to inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of FNSF/DEMO - in a timely manner, on a cost-effective research platform. Supported by DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  16. The perception and experience of gender-based discrimination related to professional advancement among Japanese physicians.

    Yasukawa, Kosuke; Nomura, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies from the US have found that female physicians often experience gender-based discrimination related to professional advancement. In Japan, female physicians are underrepresented in leadership positions but little is known about the prevalence of gender discrimination. We investigated the perception and prevalence of gender-based career obstacles and discrimination among Japanese physicians. The study was based on surveys of alumnae from 13 medical schools and alumni from 3 medical schools. In total, 1,684 female and 808 male physicians completed a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 83% and 58%). More women than men had the perception of gender-based career obstacles for women (77% vs. 55%; p gender discrimination related to professional advancement (21% vs. 3%; p gender discrimination included age (p gender discrimination compared with younger women (OR 5.77, 95% CI: 1.83-18.24 for women above 50, and OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.48-7.28 for women between 40 and 49) and women with PhD were more likely to experience gender discrimination (OR 4.23, 95% CI: 1.81-9.89). Our study demonstrated that a significant proportion of Japanese women experienced gender-based discrimination and perceived gender-based career obstacles compared with male physicians.

  17. Episodes of breathlessness: types and patterns - a qualitative study exploring experiences of patients with advanced diseases.

    Simon, Steffen T; Higginson, Irene J; Benalia, Hamid; Gysels, Marjolein; Murtagh, Fliss Em; Spicer, James; Bausewein, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    Despite the high prevalence and impact of episodic breathlessness, information about characteristics and patterns is scarce. To explore the experience of patients with advanced disease suffering from episodic breathlessness, in order to describe types and patterns. Qualitative design using in-depth interviews with patients suffering from advanced stages of chronic heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer or motor neurone disease. As part of the interviews, patients were asked to draw a graph to illustrate typical patterns of breathlessness episodes. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Framework Analysis. The graphs were grouped according to their patterns. Fifty-one participants (15 chronic heart failure, 14 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 13 lung cancer and 9 motor neurone disease) were included (mean age 68.2 years, 30 of 51 men, mean Karnofsky 63.1, mean breathlessness intensity 3.2 of 10). Five different types of episodic breathlessness were described: triggered with normal level of breathlessness, triggered with predictable response (always related to trigger level, e.g. slight exertion causes severe breathlessness), triggered with unpredictable response (not related to trigger level), non-triggered attack-like (quick onset, often severe) and wave-like (triggered or non-triggered, gradual onset). Four patterns of episodic breathlessness could be identified based on the graphs with differences regarding onset and recovery of episodes. These did not correspond with the types of breathlessness described before. Patients with advanced disease experience clearly distinguishable types and patterns of episodic breathlessness. The understanding of these will help clinicians to tailor specific management strategies for patients who suffer from episodes of breathlessness.

  18. Advancing Explosion Source Theory through Experimentation: Results from Seismic Experiments Since the Moratorium on Nuclear Testing

    Bonner, J. L.; Stump, B. W.

    2011-12-01

    On 23 September 1992, the United States conducted the nuclear explosion DIVIDER at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It would become the last US nuclear test when a moratorium ended testing the following month. Many of the theoretical explosion seismic models used today were developed from observations of hundreds of nuclear tests at NTS and around the world. Since the moratorium, researchers have turned to chemical explosions as a possible surrogate for continued nuclear explosion research. This talk reviews experiments since the moratorium that have used chemical explosions to advance explosion source models. The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment examined single-point, fully contained chemical-nuclear equivalence by detonating over a kiloton of chemical explosive at NTS in close proximity to previous nuclear explosion tests. When compared with data from these nearby nuclear explosions, the regional and near-source seismic data were found to be essentially identical after accounting for different yield scaling factors for chemical and nuclear explosions. The relationship between contained chemical explosions and large production mining shots was studied at the Black Thunder coal mine in Wyoming in 1995. The research led to an improved source model for delay-fired mining explosions and a better understanding of mining explosion detection by the International Monitoring System (IMS). The effect of depth was examined in a 1997 Kazakhstan Depth of Burial experiment. Researchers used local and regional seismic observations to conclude that the dominant mechanism for enhanced regional shear waves was local Rg scattering. Travel-time calibration for the IMS was the focus of the 1999 Dead Sea Experiment where a 10-ton shot was recorded as far away as 5000 km. The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments provided a comparison of fully- and partially-contained chemical shots with mining explosions, thus quantifying the reduction in seismic amplitudes associated with partial

  19. Mechanical Design and Development of TES Bolometer Detector Arrays for the Advanced ACTPol Experiment

    Ward, Jonathan T.; Austermann, Jason; Beall, James A.; Choi, Steve K.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Devlin, Mark J.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio M.; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; hide

    2016-01-01

    The next generation Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) experiment is currently underway and will consist of four Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer arrays, with three operating together, totaling 5800 detectors on the sky. Building on experience gained with the ACTPol detector arrays, AdvACT will utilize various new technologies, including 150 mm detector wafers equipped with multichroic pixels, allowing for a more densely packed focal plane. Each set of detectors includes a feedhorn array of stacked silicon wafers which form a spline pro le leading to each pixel. This is then followed by a waveguide interface plate, detector wafer, back short cavity plate, and backshort cap. Each array is housed in a custom designed structure manufactured from high purity copper and then gold plated. In addition to the detector array assembly, the array package also encloses cryogenic readout electronics. We present the full mechanical design of the AdvACT high frequency (HF) detector array package along with a detailed look at the detector array stack assemblies. This experiment will also make use of extensive hardware and software previously developed for ACT, which will be modi ed to incorporate the new AdvACT instruments. Therefore, we discuss the integration of all AdvACT arrays with pre-existing ACTPol infrastructure.

  20. Web-based multimedia vignettes in advanced community pharmacy practice experiences.

    Flowers, Schwanda K; Vanderbush, Ross E; Hastings, Jan K; West, Donna

    2010-04-12

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Web-based multimedia vignettes on complex drug administration techniques to augment the training of pharmacy students in advanced community pharmacy practice experiences. During the orientation for a community APPE, students were randomly assigned to either a study group or control group After they began their APPE, students in the study group were given an Internet address to access multimedia vignettes which they were required to watch to augment their training and standardize their counseling of patients in the use of inhalers and ear and eye drops. A 12-item questionnaire was administered to students in both groups at the orientation and again on the last day of the APPE to evaluate their knowledge of counseling patients in the use of inhalers and ear and eye drops. The control group did not experience any improvement in their counseling knowledge of the research topics during their month-long experience. Students in the intervention group scored higher on their postintervention test than students in the control group (p < 0.001). Student learning outcomes from experiential training can be improved through the use of Web-based multimedia instructional vignettes.

  1. Next Generation Climate Change Experiments Needed to Advance Knowledge and for Assessment of CMIP6

    Katzenberger, John [Aspen Global Change Inst., Basalt, CO (United States); Arnott, James [Aspen Global Change Inst., Basalt, CO (United States); Wright, Alyson [Aspen Global Change Inst., Basalt, CO (United States)

    2014-10-30

    The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical science workshop entitled, “Next generation climate change experiments needed to advance knowledge and for assessment of CMIP6,” on August 4-9, 2013 in Aspen, CO. Jerry Meehl (NCAR), Richard Moss (PNNL), and Karl Taylor (LLNL) served as co-chairs for the workshop which included the participation of 32 scientists representing most of the major climate modeling centers for a total of 160 participant days. In August 2013, AGCI gathered a high level meeting of representatives from major climate modeling centers around the world to assess achievements and lessons learned from the most recent generation of coordinated modeling experiments known as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project – 5 (CMIP5) as well as to scope out the science questions and coordination structure desired for the next anticipated phase of modeling experiments called CMIP6. The workshop allowed for reflection on the coordination of the CMIP5 process as well as intercomparison of model results, such as were assessed in the most recent IPCC 5th Assessment Report, Working Group 1. For example, this slide from Masahiro Watanabe examines performance on a range of models capturing Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).

  2. Performance experiments with alternative advanced teleoperator control modes for a simulated solar maximum satellite repair

    Das, H.; Zak, H.; Kim, W. S.; Bejczy, A. K.; Schenker, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which were conducted at the JPL Advanced Teleoperator Lab to demonstrate and evaluate the effectiveness of various teleoperator control modes in the performance of a simulated Solar Max Satellite Repair (SMSR) task. THe SMSR was selected as a test because it is very rich in performance capability requirements and it actually has been performed by two EVA astronauts in the Space Shuttle Bay in 1984. The main subtasks are: thermal blanket removal; installation of a hinge attachment for electrical panel opening; opening of electrical panel; removal of electrical connectors; relining of cable bundles; replacement of electrical panel; securing parts and cables; re-mate electrical connectors; closing of electrical panel; and reinstating thermal blanket. The current performance experiments are limited to thermal blanket cutting, electrical panel unbolting and handling electrical bundles and connectors. In one formal experiment even different control modes were applied to the unbolting and reinsertion of electrical panel screws subtasks. The seven control modes are alternative combinations of manual position and rate control with force feedback and remote compliance referenced to force-torque sensor information. Force-torque sensor and end effector position data and task completion times were recorded for analysis and quantification of operator performance.

  3. En bloc urinary bladder resection for locally advanced colorectal cancer: a 17-year experience.

    Li, Jimmy C M; Chong, Charing C N; Ng, Simon S M; Yiu, Raymond Y C; Lee, Janet F Y; Leung, Ka Lau

    2011-09-01

    En bloc bladder resection is often required for treating colorectal cancer with suspected urinary bladder invasion. Our aim was to review our institutional experience in en bloc resection of locally advanced colorectal cancer involving the urinary bladder over a period of 17 years. The hospital records of 72 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer who underwent en bloc urinary bladder resection at our institution between July 1987 and December 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical and oncologic outcomes were evaluated. The mean duration of follow-up was 64.3 months. Genuine tumor invasion into the urinary bladder was confirmed in 34 patients (47%) by histopathology. Forty patients (56%) underwent primary closure of the urinary bladder, while 32 patients (44%) required various kinds of urologic reconstructive procedures. Operative mortality occurred in four patients (6%). The overall postoperative morbidity rate was significantly higher in patients undergoing urologic reconstruction (81% vs. 45%, p = 0.002) when compared to that in patients undergoing primary closure. This was mostly attributable to significantly higher rates of urinary anastomotic leak (21.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.002) and urinary tract infection (50% vs. 18%, p = 0.003) in the urologic reconstruction group. For the 57 patients (79%) who underwent curative resection, the 5-year overall survival rate was 59%, and the local recurrence at 5 years was 15%. Both parameters were not significantly affected by the presence of pathologic bladder invasion or the extent of surgical procedures. En bloc bladder resection for locally advanced colorectal cancer involving the urinary bladder can produce reasonable long-term local control and patient survival.

  4. Study of advanced LWR cores for effective use of plutonium and MOX physics experiments

    Yamamoto, T.; Matsu-Ura, H.; Ueji, M.; Ota, H.; Kanagawa, T.; Sakurada, K.; Maruyama, H.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced technologies of full MOX cores have been studied to obtain higher Pu consumption based on the advanced light water reactors (APWRs and ABWRs). For this aim, basic core designs of high moderation lattice (H/HM ∼5) have been studied with reduced fuel diameters in fuel assemblies for APWRs and those of high moderation lattice (H/HM ∼6) with addition of extra water rods in fuel assemblies for ABWRs. The analysis of equilibrium cores shows that nuclear and thermal hydraulic parameters satisfy the design criteria and the Pu consumption rate increases about 20 %. An experimental program has been carried out to obtain the core parameters of high moderation MOX cores in the EOLE critical facility at the Cadarache Centre as a joint study of NUPEC, CEA and CEA's industrial partners. The experiments include a uranium homogeneous core, two MOX homogeneous cores of different moderation and a PWR assembly mock up core of MOX fuel with high moderation. The program was started from 1996 and will be completed in 2000. (author)

  5. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    Kirichek, O; Adroja, D T; Manuel, P; Bewley, R I; Brown, J; Kouzmenko, G; Wotherspoon, R

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  6. Advancing the experiment to reality: Perspectives on Shanghai pilot carbon emissions trading scheme

    Wu, Libo; Qian, Haoqi; Li, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Shanghai, as the most advanced mega city in China, has launched a pilot carbon emission trading scheme (SH-ETS) that is designed to achieve a compromise between the domestic context in Shanghai, and a need for national policy appeal. This paper gives an overview of the latest progress of the SH-ETS and sheds some light on the features of key design components, such as the threshold for inclusion, sector coverage, cap setting, allowance allocation and the Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) system. Based on a concern that manipulative principles and economic dynamics may lead to uncertainties and ultimately influence the emission reduction effect of the scheme, this paper conducts an evaluation of potential uncertainties, such as those caused by changes in patterns of economic growth, strategic trading activities related to the bankable allowances, carbon leakage risks and insufficient MRV capabilities. To advance the experiment to reality, this paper suggests some changes are made to the pilot, which include adjusting the allowance allocation principles to facilitate change in the domestic energy structure, improving the disclosure of emission data to guarantee information symmetry, gauging the carbon leakage risks to strengthen compliance, and introducing risk management for non-regulated players and derivatives products

  7. A review of advances in pixel detectors for experiments with high rate and radiation

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Wermes, Norbert

    2018-06-01

    The large Hadron collider (LHC) experiments ATLAS and CMS have established hybrid pixel detectors as the instrument of choice for particle tracking and vertexing in high rate and radiation environments, as they operate close to the LHC interaction points. With the high luminosity-LHC upgrade now in sight, for which the tracking detectors will be completely replaced, new generations of pixel detectors are being devised. They have to address enormous challenges in terms of data throughput and radiation levels, ionizing and non-ionizing, that harm the sensing and readout parts of pixel detectors alike. Advances in microelectronics and microprocessing technologies now enable large scale detector designs with unprecedented performance in measurement precision (space and time), radiation hard sensors and readout chips, hybridization techniques, lightweight supports, and fully monolithic approaches to meet these challenges. This paper reviews the world-wide effort on these developments.

  8. Development of Advanced Gaseous Detectors for Muon Tracking and Triggering in Collider Experiments

    Guan, Liang; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhu, Junjie

    High luminosity and high energy collider experiments impose big challenges to conventional gaseous detectors used for muon tracking and triggering. Stringent requirements, in terms of time and spatial resolutions, rate capabilities etc. are expected. In the context of ATLAS muon upgrade project, we present extensive researches and developments of advanced gas detectors for precision muon tracking and triggering in high rate environments. Particularly, this dissertation focuses on the studies of Micro-mesh Gaseous structure (Micromegas), thin gap Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) and small strip Thin Gap multi-wire Chambers (sTGC). In this dissertation, we first present a novel method, based on thermally bonding micro-meshes to anodes, to construct Micromegas detectors. Without employing the traditional photo-lithography process, it is a convenient alternative to build Micromegas. Both experimental and simulation studies of basic performance parameters of thermo-bonded Micromegas will be reported. Development...

  9. Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Urology: experience report in the Federal District.

    Souza, Bruna Marcela Lima de; Salviano, Cristiane Feitosa; Martins, Gisele

    2018-01-01

    To describe the creation and implementation of the extension program Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Urology, developed in the outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in the Federal District. This is an experience report regarding the implementation of an outpatient service aimed at children and adolescents with symptoms of bladder and bowel dysfunction. Because it is an extension program linked to the university, it follows a different model of care, valuing empowerment, informed and shared decision making, which results in a stronger bond between patients, family and the Pediatric Urology nursing team. It has also become a privileged space for the production and use of scientific knowledge, associated with the principles of evidence-based practice. This project shows a different performance of the nurse-specialist-professor-researcher in Pediatric Urology Nursing, and it has become a reference in the Federal District, mainly for undergraduate and graduate nursing students.

  10. Oregon state university's advanced plant experiment (APEX) AP1000 integral facility test program

    Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Woods, B.G.; Young, E.; Abel, K.; Wu, Q.

    2005-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) has recently completed a three year study of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the Westinghouse AP1000 passive safety systems. Eleven Design Basis Accident (DBA) scenarios, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with technical support from Westinghouse Electric, were simulated in OSU's Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX)-1000. The OSU test program was conducted within the purview of the requirements of 10CFR50 Appendix B, NQA-1 and 10 CFR 21 and the test data was used to provide benchmarks for computer codes used in the final design approval of the AP1000. In addition to the DOE certification testing, OSU conducted eleven confirmatory tests for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper presents the test program objectives, a description of the APEX-1000 test facility and an overview of the test matrix that was conducted in support of plant certification. (authors)

  11. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Time-Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics : Theory and Experiment

    Lathouwers, L

    1992-01-01

    From March 30th to April 3rd, 1992, a NATO Advanced Research workshop entitled "Time Dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Experiment" was held at Snowbird, Utah. The organizing committee consisted of J. BROECKHOVE (Antwerp, Belgium), L. CEDERBAUM (Heidelberg, Germany), L. LATHOUWERS (Antwerp, Belgium), N. OHRN (Gainesville, Florida) and J. SIMONS (Salt Lake City, Utah). Fifty-two participants from eleven different countries attended the meeting at which thirty-three talks and one poster session were held. Twenty-eight participants submitted contributions to the proceedings of the meeting, which are reproduced in this volume. The workshop brought together experts in different areas 0 f molecular quantum dynamics, all adhering to the time dependent approach. The aim was to discuss and compare methods and applications. The ~amiliarityo~ the aUdience with the concepts o~ time dependent approaches greatly facilitated topical discussions and probing towards new applications. A broad area of subject matt...

  12. Impact of an Advanced Cardiac Life Support Simulation Laboratory Experience on Pharmacy Student Confidence and Knowledge.

    Maxwell, Whitney D; Mohorn, Phillip L; Haney, Jason S; Phillips, Cynthia M; Lu, Z Kevin; Clark, Kimberly; Corboy, Alex; Ragucci, Kelly R

    2016-10-25

    Objective. To assess the impact of an advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) simulation on pharmacy student confidence and knowledge. Design. Third-year pharmacy students participated in a simulation experience that consisted of team roles training, high-fidelity ACLS simulations, and debriefing. Students completed a pre/postsimulation confidence and knowledge assessment. Assessment. Overall, student knowledge assessment scores and student confidence scores improved significantly. Student confidence and knowledge changes from baseline were not significantly correlated. Conversely, a significant, weak positive correlation between presimulation studying and both presimulation confidence and presimulation knowledge was discovered. Conclusions. Overall, student confidence and knowledge assessment scores in ACLS significantly improved from baseline; however, student confidence and knowledge were not significantly correlated.

  13. Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Urology: experience report in the Federal District

    Bruna Marcela Lima de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the creation and implementation of the extension program Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Urology, developed in the outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in the Federal District. Method: This is an experience report regarding the implementation of an outpatient service aimed at children and adolescents with symptoms of bladder and bowel dysfunction. Results: Because it is an extension program linked to the university, it follows a different model of care, valuing empowerment, informed and shared decision making, which results in a stronger bond between patients, family and the Pediatric Urology nursing team. It has also become a privileged space for the production and use of scientific knowledge, associated with the principles of evidence-based practice. Conclusion: This project shows a different performance of the nurse-specialist-professor-researcher in Pediatric Urology Nursing, and it has become a reference in the Federal District, mainly for undergraduate and graduate nursing students.

  14. Experiences and perspectives of older people regarding advance care planning: A meta-synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Ke, Li-Shan; Huang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Wen-Yu; O'Connor, Margaret; Lee, Susan

    2017-05-01

    Studies have indicated that family members or health professionals may not know or predict their older relatives' or patients' health preferences. Although advance care planning is encouraged for older people to prepare end-of-life care, it is still challenging. To understand the experiences and perspectives of older people regarding advance care planning. A systematic review of qualitative studies and meta-synthesis was conducted. CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched. A total of 50 articles were critically appraised and a thematic synthesis was undertaken. Four themes were identified: life versus death, internal versus external, benefits versus burdens, and controlling versus being controlled. The view of life and death influenced older people's willingness to discuss their future. The characteristics, experiences, health status, family relationship, and available resources also affected their plans of advance care planning. Older people needed to balance the benefits and burdens of advance care planning, and then judge their own ability to make decisions about end-of-life care. Older people's perspectives and experiences of advance care planning were varied and often conflicted; cultural differences amplified variances among older people. Truthful information, available resources, and family support are needed to enable older people to maintain dignity at the end of life. The views of life and death for older people from different cultures should be compared to assist health professionals to understand older people's attitudes toward advance care planning, and thus to develop appropriate strategies to promote advance care planning in different cultures.

  15. Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants feedback of experience

    Prehler Heinz Josef

    2001-01-01

    Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants have to meet increasing demands for safety and availability. Additionally specific requirements arising from nuclear qualification have to be fulfilled. To meet both subjects adequately in the future, Siemens has developed advanced I and C technology consisting of the two complementary I and C systems TELEPERM XP and TELEPERM XS. TELEPERM XP is primarily oriented to automation of the non safety related part of the power plant process. Such applications involve extensive open and closed loop control systems and encompass all tasks required for process control via the man-machine interface. Therefore the TELEPERM XP system consists of the AS 620 automation system, the OM 690 process control and management system, the ES 680 engineering system, the DS 670 diagnostic system and the SIMATIC NET bus system. Three versions of automation systems are available: for standard automation, for fail safe automation of safety related tasks and for turbine automation. TELEPERM XS is designed to meet all the requirements on I and C important to safety in nuclear power plants. Typical applications include reactor protection (RPS) and Engineered Safety Features Actuation System functions (ESFAS). TELEPERM XS has been rapidly accepted by the market and has accumulated an extensive operational experience. The expected advantages, namely, reduced space requirements, consistent documentation, improved ergonomics, reduced testing effort, less repair have been confirmed by the operation. The new possibilities to apply intelligent diagnostic methods have been only applied in few cases. Very good service records from a broad field of safety application prove that it is right to use digital I and C systems for safety tasks. The expected advantages such as reduced space requirements, less repairs and less effort for periodic tests, have been confirmed by practical experience. For the future, use of digital I and C systems for safety

  16. The experiences of pregnant women at an advanced maternal age: an integrative review.

    Aldrighi, Juliane Dias; Wall, Marilene Loewen; Souza, Silvana Regina Rossi Kissula; Cancela, Franciane Zabloski Vieira

    2016-01-01

    To identify in the literature how the experiences of women age 35 or above are described in terms of pregnancy. Integrative review based on MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS, and SciELO databases, with no time period constraint. Eighteen studies that dealt with the experiences of pregnant women at an advanced maternal age were selected and analyzed. The studies evidenced four theme categories: the search for information, which pointed to a deficit of information supplied by health care professionals; perceiving the risks, which pointed to women's concerns about their own health and their children's; the ideal moment for motherhood, with different reasons for postponing it; and adjusting to a new routine, showing a concern regarding changes in daily life. From the results, it was possible to understand that other factors, in addition to those that include risks, are present in the experiences of older pregnant women and point to a need to involve such aspects in nursing care to create comprehensive strategies that are aligned with these women's needs. Identificar na literatura como são descritas as experiências das mulheres com idade igual ou superior a 35 anos na gestação. Revisão integrativa realizada nas bases de dados MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS e SciELO, sem restrição de período. Foram selecionados e analisados 18 estudos que tratavam das experiências das mulheres na gestação em idade avançada. Os estudos evidenciaram quatro categorias temáticas: A busca por informações, que mostrou aspectos como deficit de informações fornecidas pelos profissionais da saúde;Percebendo os riscos, que apontou uma preocupação da mulher com a própria saúde e a do filho;Momento ideal para a maternidade, com diferentes motivos para o adiamento; e Adaptação à nova rotina, com a preocupação em relação às mudanças no cotidiano. A partir dos resultados, foi possível compreender que outros fatores, além dos que incluem os riscos, permeiam as experi

  17. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  18. Comments on advanced, time-resolved imaging techniques for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1992-11-01

    An extensive set of time-resolved imaging experiments has been performed on rf-linac driven free-electron lasers (FELs) over the past few years. These experiments have addressed both micropulse and macropulse timescales on both the charged-particle beam and the wiggler/undulator outputs (spontaneous emission and lasing). A brief review of first measurements on photoinjecter micropulse elongation, submacropulse phase slew in drive lasers, submacropulse wavelength shifts in lasers, etc. is presented. This is followed by discussions of new measurements of 35-MeV electron beam micropulse bunch length (<10 ps) using optical transition radiation, some of the first single bend synchrotron radiation beam profile measurements at gamma <80, and comments on the low-jitter synchroscan streak camera tuner. These techniques will be further developed on the 200-650 MeV linac test stand at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in the next few years. Such techniques should be adaptable to many of the present FEL designs and to some aspects of the next generation of light sources.

  19. Holistic health care: Patients' experiences of health care provided by an Advanced Practice Nurse.

    Eriksson, Irene; Lindblad, Monica; Möller, Ulrika; Gillsjö, Catharina

    2018-02-01

    Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) is a fairly new role in the Swedish health care system. To describe patients' experiences of health care provided by an APN in primary health care. An inductive, descriptive qualitative approach with qualitative open-ended interviews was chosen to obtain descriptions from 10 participants regarding their experiences of health care provided by an APN. The data were collected during the spring 2012, and a qualitative approach was used for analyze. The APNs had knowledge and skills to provide safe and secure individual and holistic health care with high quality, and a respectful and flexible approach. The APNs conveyed trust and safety and provided health care that satisfied the patients' needs of accessibility and appropriateness in level of care. The APNs way of providing health care and promoting health seems beneficial in many ways for the patients. The individual and holistic approach that characterizes the health care provided by the APNs is a key aspect in the prevailing change of health care practice. The transfer of care and the increasing number of older adults, often with a variety of complex health problems, call for development of the new role in this context. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Nursing Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Preceptor and Student Considerations.

    Dornblaser, Emily K; Ratka, Anna; Gleason, Shaun E; Ombengi, David N; Tofade, Toyin; Wigle, Patricia R; Zapantis, Antonia; Ryan, Melody; Connor, Sharon; Jonkman, Lauren J; Ochs, Leslie; Jungnickel, Paul W; Abrons, Jeanine P; Alsharif, Naser Z

    2016-04-25

    The objective of this article is to describe the key areas of consideration for global/international advanced pharmacy practice experience (G/I APPE) preceptors, students and learning objectives. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP), the GPE SIG prepared and presented an initial report on the G/IAPPE initiatives. Round table discussions were conducted at the 2014 AACP Annual Meeting to document GPE SIG member input on key areas in the report. Literature search of PubMed, Google Scholar and EMBASE with keywords was conducted to expand this report. In this paper, considerations related to preceptors and students and learning outcomes are described. Preceptors for G/I APPEs may vary based on the learning outcomes of the experience. Student learning outcomes for G/I APPEs may vary based on the type of experiential site. Recommendations and future directions for development of G/IAPPEs are presented. Development of a successful G/I APPE requires significant planning and consideration of appropriate qualifications for preceptors and students.

  1. Patient Preferences for Pain Management in Advanced Cancer: Results from a Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Meads, David M; O'Dwyer, John L; Hulme, Claire T; Chintakayala, Phani; Vinall-Collier, Karen; Bennett, Michael I

    2017-10-01

    Pain from advanced cancer remains prevalent, severe and often under-treated. The aim of this study was to conduct a discrete choice experiment with patients to understand their preferences for pain management services and inform service development. Focus groups were used to develop the attributes and levels of the discrete choice experiment. The attributes were: waiting time, type of healthcare professional, out-of-pocket costs, side-effect control, quality of communication, quality of information and pain control. Patients completed the discrete choice experiment along with clinical and health-related quality of life questions. Conditional and mixed logit models were used to analyse the data. Patients with cancer pain (n = 221) and within palliative care services completed the survey (45% were female, mean age 64.6 years; age range 21-92 years). The most important aspects of pain management were: good pain control, zero out-of-pocket costs and good side-effect control. Poor or moderate pain control and £30 costs drew the highest negative preferences. Respondents preferred control of side effects and provision of better information and communication, over access to certain healthcare professionals. Those with lower health-related quality of life were less willing to wait for treatment and willing to incur higher costs. The presence of a carer influenced preferences. Outcome attributes were more important than process attributes but the latter were still valued. Thus, supporting self-management, for example by providing better information on pain may be a worthwhile endeavour. However, service provision may need to account for individual characteristics given the heterogeneity in preferences.

  2. Advanced Electron Microscopy and Micro analytical technique development and application for Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles from the AGR-1 Experiment

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lillo, Thomas Martin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wen, Haiming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, Karen Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Madden, James Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Aguiar, Jeffery Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A series of up to seven irradiation experiments are planned for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Quantification Program, with irradiation completed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the first experiment (i.e., AGR-1) in November 2009 for an effective 620 full power days. The objective of the AGR-1 experiment was primarily to provide lessons learned on the multi-capsule test train design and to provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development and post-irradiation safety testing data at high temperatures. This report describes the advanced microscopy and micro-analysis results on selected AGR-1 coated particles.

  3. Sorafenib-Regorafenib Sequential Therapy in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Single-Institute Experience.

    Ueshima, Kazuomi; Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    Previously, no therapeutic agent has been known to improve the overall survival compared with placebo in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), who have progressed after sorafenib. In this patient population, regorafenib was first demonstrated to confer a survival benefit in the RESORCE trial, and subsequently it was approved as a second-line treatment for patients with advanced HCC. An open-label expanded access program (EAP) of regorafenib was implemented for compassionate use. We investigated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib based on our experience of the RESORCE trial and the EAP. Data from 5 patients from the RESORCE trial and 6 from the EAP were analyzed retrospectively. All patients had tolerated prior sorafenib and were progressing during sorafenib treatment. The median progression-free survival was 9.2 months (95% CI 2.3-16.1). One patient achieved a partial response and 7 achieved stable disease. The objective response rate was 9.1%, and the disease control rate was 72.7%. No treatment-associated mortalities were observed. Grade 3 hypophosphatemia was observed in 2 patients, grade 2 anorexia was observed in 5 patients, and grade 3 neutropenia was observed in 2 patients. Grade 2 and grade 3 thrombocytopenia were observed in 2 and 3 patients, respectively. All treatment-related adverse events were improved by reduction or interruption of regorafenib. Five patients showed decreased serum albumin levels. Sorafenib and regorafenib sequential therapy presents a safe and effective treatment option for patients with advanced HCC. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Locally advanced cervix cancer: chemotherapy prior to definitive surgery or radiotherapy. A single institutional experience

    MacLeod, C.; O'Donnell, A.; Tattersall, M.H.N.; Dalrymple, C.; Firth, I.

    2001-01-01

    Primary or neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy has potential advantages for locally advanced cervix cancer. It can down stage a cancer and allow definitive local therapy to be technically possible (surgery), or potentially more effective (radiotherapy). It can also eradicate subclinical systemic metastases. This report reviews a single institution's experience of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy for cervix cancer over a 13-year period. One hundred and six patients were treated with this intent. The patients were analysed for their response to chemotherapy, treatment received, survival, relapse and toxicity. The chemotherapy was feasible and the majority of patients had a complete or partial response (58.5%). Eight patients did not proceed to local treatment. Forty-six patients had definitive surgery and 52 had definitive radiotherapy. The 5-year overall survival was 27% and the majority of patients died with disease. The first site of relapse was usually in the pelvis (46.2%). Late complications that required ongoing medical therapy (n = 6) or surgical intervention (n = 2) were recorded in eight patients (7.5%). On univariate analysis stage (P= 0.04), tumour size (P = 0.01), lymph node status (P=0.003), response to chemotherapy (P = 0.045) and treatment (P = 0.003) were all significant predictors of survival. On multivariate analysis, tumour size (P < 0.0001) and nodal status (P = 0.02) were significant predictors of survival. Despite the impressive responses to chemotherapy of advanced cervix cancer, there is evidence from randomized trials that it does not improve or compromise survival prior to radiotherapy. As its role prior to surgery remains unclear, it should not be used in this setting outside a prospective randomized trial. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  5. Modes of relating to contingency: An exploration of experiences in advanced cancer patients.

    Kruizinga, Renske; Hartog, Iris D; Scherer-Rath, Michael; Schilderman, Hans; Van Laarhoven, Hanneke

    2017-08-01

    Throughout their lives, people are confronted with unexpected life events, which can be difficult to incorporate into their life narratives. Such a confrontation can result in an experience of contingency. Different ways of relating to contingency have been described by Wuchterl: denying, acknowledging, and "encounter with the Other." In the present article, we aim to trace these theoretical distinctions in real-life experiences of patients. We analyzed 45 interviews using the constant comparative method with a directed content analysis approach in the Atlas.ti coding program. The interviews originated from a randomized controlled trial evaluating an assisted reflection on life events and ultimate life goals. Seven spiritual counselors from six hospitals in the Netherlands conducted the interviews from July of 2014 to March of 2016. All 45 patients had advanced cancer. We found four different modes into which relating to contingency can be classified: denying, acknowledging, accepting, and receiving. With denying, patients did not mention any impact of the life event on their lives. In acknowledging, the impact was recognized and a start was made to incorporate the event into their life. In accepting, patients went through a process of reinterpretation of the event. In receiving, patients talked about receiving insights from their illness and living a more conscious life. Our study is the first to investigate the different ways of relating to contingency in clinical practice. The defined modes will improve our understanding of the various ways in which cancer patients relate to their disease, allowing caregivers to better target and shape individual care.

  6. Impact of advanced pharmacy practice experience placement changes in colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Duke, Lori J; Staton, April G; McCullough, Elizabeth S; Jain, Rahul; Miller, Mindi S; Lynn Stevenson, T; Fetterman, James W; Lynn Parham, R; Sheffield, Melody C; Unterwagner, Whitney L; McDuffie, Charles H

    2012-04-10

    To document the annual number of advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) placement changes for students across 5 colleges and schools of pharmacy, identify and compare initiating reasons, and estimate the associated administrative workload. Data collection occurred from finalization of the 2008-2009 APPE assignments throughout the last date of the APPE schedule. Internet-based customized tracking forms were used to categorize the initiating reason for the placement change and the administrative time required per change (0 to 120 minutes). APPE placement changes per institution varied from 14% to 53% of total assignments. Reasons for changes were: administrator initiated (20%), student initiated (23%), and site/preceptor initiated (57%) Total administrative time required per change varied across institutions from 3,130 to 22,750 minutes, while the average time per reassignment was 42.5 minutes. APPE placements are subject to high instability. Significant differences exist between public and private colleges and schools of pharmacy as to the number and type of APPE reassignments made and associated workload estimates.

  7. Beam-Plasma Interaction Experiments on the Princeton Advanced Test Stand

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.

    2011-10-01

    The Princeton Advanced Test Stand (PATS) is a compact experimental facility for studying the fundamental physics of intense beam-plasma interactions relevant to the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment - II (NDCX-II). The PATS facility consists of a 100 keV ion beam source mounted on a six-foot-long vacuum chamber with numerous ports for diagnostic access. A 100 keV Ar+ beam is launched into a volumetric plasma, which is produced by a ferroelectric plasma source (FEPS). Beam diagnostics upstream and downstream of the FEPS allow for detailed studies of the effects that the plasma has on the beam. This setup is designed for studying the dependence of charge and current neutralization and beam emittance growth on the beam and plasma parameters. This work reports initial measurements of beam quality produced by the extraction electrodes that were recently installed on the PATS device. The transverse beam phase space is measured with double-slit emittance scanners, and the experimental results are compared to WARP simulations of the extraction system. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Addressing Adverse Childhood Experiences Through the Affordable Care Act: Promising Advances and Missed Opportunities.

    Srivastav, Aditi; Fairbrother, Gerry; Simpson, Lisa A

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) occur when children are exposed to trauma and/or toxic stress and may have a lifelong effect. Studies have shown that ACEs are linked with poor adult health outcomes and could eventually raise already high health care costs. National policy interest in ACEs has recently increased, as many key players are engaged in community-, state-, and hospital-based efforts to reduce factors that contribute to childhood trauma and/or toxic stress in children. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has provided a promising foundation for advancing the prevention, diagnosis, and management of ACEs and their consequences. Although the ACA's future is unclear and it does not adequately address the needs of the pediatric population, many of the changes it spurred will continue regardless of legislative action (or inaction), and it therefore remains an important component of our health care system and national strategy to reduce ACEs. We review ways in which some of the current health care policy initiatives launched as part of the implementation of the ACA could accelerate progress in addressing ACEs by fully engaging and aligning various health care stakeholders while recognizing limitations in the law that may cause challenges in our attempts to improve child health and well-being. Specifically, we discuss coverage expansion, investments in the health workforce, a family-centered care approach, increased access to care, emphasis on preventive services, new population models, and improved provider payment models. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Building to Make a Difference: Advanced Practice Nurses' Experience of Power.

    Schoales, Catherine A; Bourbonnais, Frances Fothergill; Rashotte, Judy

    2018-02-01

    Power is necessary for nurses to affect change in patient care and to move the nursing profession forward. Despite the evolving body of nursing research on power, there have been no studies that have investigated the nature of advanced practice nurses' (APNs') power. The purpose of this study was to explore the APNs' lived experience of power. Interpretive phenomenology guided the method and analysis. Eight APNs employed in a single Canadian tertiary care teaching health-care organization engaged in in-depth interviews. The overarching theme, building to make a difference, reflected the APNs' perception of power in their practice, which involved a passion to facilitate change in practice to improve patient care. Building to make a difference involved three themes: building on, building with, and building for. The APNs experienced more power-a process they described as power creep-when they used soft power that was shared with others to affect positive change in health care. These findings contribute to our understanding of how power is perceived and manifested in the APN role, thus further enabling organizations to create working conditions to support the APNs' endeavors to empower others.

  10. Data Acquisition System Design for Advanced Core-Cooling Mechanism Experiment

    Zhang, Ziyang; Tian, Fang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Shen

    2011-01-01

    Data Acquisition System (DAS) design for Advanced Core-Cooling Mechanism Experiment(ACME) is studied in the paper. DAS is an important connection between test facility and result analysis. Firstly, it introduces DAS and its design requirement for ACME. Nearly one thousand data resources need record in ACME. They have different types and acquisition frequencies. In order to record these data, a large scale and high speed layered data acquisition system is developed. Secondly, it discusses the DAS design for ACME, including the analog signal adjusting circuits, clock circuit design, sampling frequencies, data storage and transmission by large database system, anti-interference and etc. Analog signal adjusting circuits are necessary to deal with different kinds of input data to gain standard data resources. Some data change slowly and others change in several seconds according to the test performed on ACME. So it is difficult to use uniform sampling frequencies, and a layered data acquisition system is introduced. A large database is built to store data for ACME test, which keeps data safer and makes subsequent data handling more convenient. A database hot backup is also applied to ensure data safety. The software of DAS is built by Labview, which can provide intuitionist result and friendly interface. Another important function of DAS is the ACME safety protection. Finally, the characteristics and improvement of DAS for ACME is analyzed compared to other test facility. Besides friendly user interface, DAS of ACME can also assure higher data precision and sampling frequency

  11. Conceptual design of a Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) shuttle-attached experiment

    Aguilar, Jerry L.

    1990-01-01

    The conceptual design of a shuttle-attached Moving Belt Radiator (MBR) experiment is presented. The MBR is an advanced radiator concept in which a rotating belt is used to radiate thermal energy to space. The experiment is developed with the primary focus being the verification of the dynamic characteristics of a rotating belt with a secondary objective of proving the thermal and sealing aspects in a reduced gravity, vacuum environment. The mechanical design, selection of the belt material and working fluid, a preliminary test plan, and program plan are presented. The strategy used for selecting the basic sizes and materials of the components are discussed. Shuttle and crew member requirements are presented with some options for increasing or decreasing the demands on the STS. An STS carrier and the criteria used in the selection process are presented. The proposed carrier for the Moving Belt Radiator experiment is the Hitchhiker-M. Safety issues are also listed with possible results. This experiment is designed so that a belt can be deployed, run at steady state conditions, run with dynamic perturbations imposed, verify the operation of the interface heat exchanger and seals, and finally be retracted into a stowed position for transport back to earth.

  12. Flame experiments at the advanced light source: new insights into soot formation processes.

    Hansen, Nils; Skeen, Scott A; Michelsen, Hope A; Wilson, Kevin R; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-05-26

    The following experimental protocols and the accompanying video are concerned with the flame experiments that are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(1-4). This video demonstrates how the complex chemical structures of laboratory-based model flames are analyzed using flame-sampling mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron-generated vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. This experimental approach combines isomer-resolving capabilities with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range(5,6). The first part of the video describes experiments involving burner-stabilized, reduced-pressure (20-80 mbar) laminar premixed flames. A small hydrocarbon fuel was used for the selected flame to demonstrate the general experimental approach. It is shown how species' profiles are acquired as a function of distance from the burner surface and how the tunability of the VUV photon energy is used advantageously to identify many combustion intermediates based on their ionization energies. For example, this technique has been used to study gas-phase aspects of the soot-formation processes, and the video shows how the resonance-stabilized radicals, such as C3H3, C3H5, and i-C4H5, are identified as important intermediates(7). The work has been focused on soot formation processes, and, from the chemical point of view, this process is very intriguing because chemical structures containing millions of carbon atoms are assembled from a fuel molecule possessing only a few carbon atoms in just milliseconds. The second part of the video highlights a new experiment, in which an opposed-flow diffusion flame and synchrotron-based aerosol mass spectrometry are used to study the chemical composition of the combustion-generated soot particles(4). The experimental results indicate that the widely accepted H-abstraction-C2H2-addition (HACA) mechanism is not the sole molecular growth process responsible for the formation

  13. Experience in colon sparing surgery in North America: advanced endoscopic approaches for complex colorectal lesions.

    Gorgun, Emre; Benlice, Cigdem; Abbas, Maher A; Steele, Scott

    2018-07-01

    Need for colon sparing interventions for premalignant lesions not amenable to conventional endoscopic excision has stimulated interest in advanced endoscopic approaches. The aim of this study was to report a single institution's experience with these techniques. A retrospective review was conducted of a prospectively collected database of all patients referred between 2011 and 2015 for colorectal resection of benign appearing deemed endoscopically unresectable by conventional endoscopic techniques. Patients were counseled for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) with possible combined endoscopic-laparoscopic surgery (CELS) or alternatively colorectal resection if unable to resect endoscopically or suspicion for cancer. Lesion characteristic, resection rate, complications, and outcomes were evaluated. 110 patients were analyzed [mean age 64 years, female gender 55 (50%), median body mass index 29.4 kg/m 2 ]. Indications for interventions were large polyp median endoscopic size 3 cm (range 1.5-6.5) and/or difficult location [cecum (34.9%), ascending colon (22.7%), transverse colon (14.5%), hepatic flexure (11.8%), descending colon (6.3%), sigmoid colon (3.6%), rectum (3.6%), and splenic flexure (2.6%)]. Lesion morphology was sessile (N = 98, 93%) and pedunculated (N = 12, 7%). Successful endoscopic resection rate was 88.2% (N = 97): ESD in 69 patients and CELS in 28 patients. Complication rate was 11.8% (13/110) [delayed bleeding (N = 4), perforation (N = 3), organ-space surgical site infection (SSI) (N = 2), superficial SSI (N = 1), and postoperative ileus (N = 3)]. Out of 110 patients, 13 patients (11.8%) required colectomy for technical failure (7 patients) or carcinoma (6 patients). During a median follow-up of 16 months (range 6-41 months), 2 patients had adenoma recurrence. Advanced endoscopic surgery appears to be a safe and effective alternative to colectomy for patients with complex premalignant lesions deemed

  14. The Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory: A Student Team Approach to the Fourth-Year Research Thesis Project Experience

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Boyd, Cleo; Barzda, Virginijus; Gradinaru, Claudiu C.; Krull, Ulrich J.; Stefanovic, Sasa; Stewart, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The advanced interdisciplinary research laboratory (AIRLab) represents a novel, effective, and motivational course designed from the interdisciplinary research interests of chemistry, physics, biology, and education development faculty members as an alternative to the independent thesis project experience. Student teams are assembled to work…

  15. Evaluation of advanced driver assistance system with the VEHIL test facility: experiences and future developments at TNO automotive

    Kusters, L.J.J.; Gietelink, O.J.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Lemmen, P.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the working principle, functionality and the experience during the first operational period of the VEHIL laboratory, dedicated to the development and testing of advanced driver assistance systems. The position of VEHIL and its PC based full software variant PRESCAN is illustrated

  16. Synthesis of Di- and Trisubstituted Azulenes Using a Danheiser Annulation as the Key Step: An Advanced Organic Laboratory Experiment

    Thomas, Rebecca M.; Shea, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    This three-week advanced-level organic experiment provides students with an inquiry-based approach focused on learning traditional skills such as primary literature interpretation, reaction design, flash column chromatography, and NMR analysis. Additionally, students address higher-order concepts such as the origin of azulene's blue color,…

  17. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to…

  18. Advanced light source vacuum policy and vacuum guidelines for beamlines and experiment endstations

    Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to: (1) Explain the ALS vacuum policy and specifications for beamlines and experiment endstations. (2) Provide guidelines related to ALS vacuum policy to assist in designing beamlines which are in accordance with ALS vacuum policy. This document supersedes LSBL-116. The Advanced Light Source is a third generation synchrotron radiation source whose beam lifetime depends on the quality of the vacuum in the storage ring and the connecting beamlines. The storage ring and most of the beamlines share a common vacuum and are operated under ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) conditions. All endstations and beamline equipment must be operated so as to avoid contamination of beamline components, and must include proper safeguards to protect the storage ring vacuum from an accidental break in the beamline or endstation vacuum systems. The primary gas load during operation is due to thermal desorption and electron/photon induced desorption of contaminants from the interior of the vacuum vessel and its components. The desorption rates are considerably higher for hydrocarbon contamination, thus considerable emphasis is placed on eliminating these sources of contaminants. All vacuum components in a beamline and endstation must meet the ALS vacuum specifications. The vacuum design of both beamlines and endstations must be approved by the ALS Beamline Review Committee (BRC) before vacuum connections to the storage ring are made. The vacuum design is first checked during the Beamline Design Review (BDR) held before construction of the beamline equipment begins. Any deviation from the ALS vacuum specifications must be approved by the BRC prior to installation of the equipment on the ALS floor. Any modification that is incorporated into a vacuum assembly without the written approval of the BRC is done at the user's risk and may lead to rejection of the whole assembly

  19. Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants feedback of experience

    Prehler, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants have to meet increasing demands for safety and availability. Additionally specific requirements arising from nuclear qualification have to be fulfilled. To meet both subjects adequately in the future, Siemens has developed advanced I and C technology consisting of the two complementary I and C systems TELEPERM XP and TELEPERM XS.(author)

  20. Early experience of proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    Ishikawa, Youjirou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Makita, Chiyoko; Suzuki, Motohisa; Azami, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2013-01-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, 10 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer underwent proton therapy combined with chemotherapy. The initial results of this therapy were 8 complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR), local recurrence was detected 1 patient. Proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy is thought to be an effective treatment for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. (author)

  1. "Something's Gotta Give:" Advanced-Degree Seeking Women's Experiences of Sexism, Role Overload, and Psychological Distress

    West, Lindsey M.

    2014-01-01

    With the rise in advanced-degree seeking women and the minimal research on the dual impact of sexism and role overload, the current study aims to better understand the impact of sexism and role overload on psychological distress in a particular sample of advanced-degree seeking women. Seventy-six female medical student participants (mean age 24.7)…

  2. The implementation of psychiatric advance directives: Experiences from a Dutch crisis card initiative.

    van der Ham, A.J.; Voskes, Y.; van Kempen, N.; Broerse, J.E.W.; Widdershoven, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The crisis card is a specific form of psychiatric advance directive, documenting mental clients' treatment preferences in advance of a potential psychiatric crisis. In this paper, we aim to provide insight into implementation issues surrounding the crisis card. Method: A Dutch crisis-card

  3. Clinical experience of intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer

    Nishino, Takeshi; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kawakami, Yukikiyo; Sakiyama, Shoji; Kondo, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer is an intractable and serious pathosis, which directly aggravates patients' Quality of Life (QOL) and prognosis. We first select the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. From April 2009 to May 2012, we encountered 5 patients who developed secondary pneumothorax during treatment for advanced lung cancer. Their average age was 60.8 years old, and 4 of them had squamous cell carcinoma, 1 had adenocarcinoma, and all had unresectable advanced lung cancer. In 4 of them, the point of air leakage could be detected by pleurography, and leakage could be stopped by the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue. All of them could receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy after treatment for secondary pneumothorax. The intrapleural administration of fibrin glue may be an effective and valid treatment for intractable secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. (author)

  4. Review and updates of the risk assessment for advanced test reactor operations for operating events and experience

    Atkinson, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Annual or biannual reviews of the operating history of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been conducted for the purpose of reviewing and updating the ATR probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for operating events and operating experience since the first compilation of plant- specific experience data for the ATR PSA which included data for operation from initial power operation in 1969 through 1988. This technical paper briefly discusses the means and some results of these periodic reviews of operating experience and their influence on the ATR PSA

  5. Living with an unfixable heart: a qualitative study exploring the experience of living with advanced heart failure.

    Ryan, Marie

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurses working with patients with advanced heart failure need knowledge that will help us to help patients cope with their situations of chronic illness. However, our knowledge bank is deficient due to the scarcity of inquiry that takes the affected person\\'s point of view as its central focus. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe patients\\' experiences of living with advanced heart failure. METHODS: The study sample (N=9) consisted of male (N=6) and female (N=3) patients with advanced (NYHA classes III-IV) heart failure. The design was qualitative and open unstructured interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim during 2006. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged: Living in the Shadow of Fear; Running on Empty; Living a Restricted life; and Battling the System. The experience of living with advanced heart failure was described as a fearful and tired sort of living characterised by escalating impotence and dependence. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that there may be an illogical but enduring ethos of \\'cure\\' pervading health care worker\\'s attitudes to advanced heart failure care. This mindset might be working to hinder the application of additional or alternative therapies, which might better palliate the physical and psychosocial distress of patients.

  6. Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) network model for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Full Service Integrated Services Digital Network (FSIS) network model for advanced satellite designs describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ACTS and the Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) perform ISDN protocol analyses and switching decisions in the terrestrial domain, whereas FSIS makes all its analyses and decisions on-board the ISDN satellite.

  7. Development, Evaluation and Use of a Student Experience Survey in Undergraduate Science Laboratories: The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory Student Laboratory Learning Experience Survey

    Barrie, Simon C.; Bucat, Robert B.; Buntine, Mark A.; Burke da Silva, Karen; Crisp, Geoffrey T.; George, Adrian V.; Jamie, Ian M.; Kable, Scott H.; Lim, Kieran F.; Pyke, Simon M.; Read, Justin R.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Yeung, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Student experience surveys have become increasingly popular to probe various aspects of processes and outcomes in higher education, such as measuring student perceptions of the learning environment and identifying aspects that could be improved. This paper reports on a particular survey for evaluating individual experiments that has been developed over some 15 years as part of a large national Australian study pertaining to the area of undergraduate laboratories-Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory. This paper reports on the development of the survey instrument and the evaluation of the survey using student responses to experiments from different institutions in Australia, New Zealand and the USA. A total of 3153 student responses have been analysed using factor analysis. Three factors, motivation, assessment and resources, have been identified as contributing to improved student attitudes to laboratory activities. A central focus of the survey is to provide feedback to practitioners to iteratively improve experiments. Implications for practitioners and researchers are also discussed.

  8. Recent experience with multidisciplinary analysis and optimization in advanced aircraft design

    Dollyhigh, Samuel M.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1990-01-01

    The task of modern aircraft design has always been complicated due to the number of intertwined technical factors from the various engineering disciplines. Furthermore, this complexity has been rapidly increasing by the development of such technologies as aeroelasticity tailored materials and structures, active control systems, integrated propulsion/airframe controls, thrust vectoring, and so on. Successful designs that achieve maximum advantage from these new technologies require a thorough understanding of the physical phenomena and the interactions among these phenomena. A study commissioned by the Aeronautical Sciences and Evaluation Board of the National Research Council has gone so far as to identify technology integration as a new discipline from which many future aeronautical advancements will arise. Regardless of whether one considers integration as a new discipline or not, it is clear to all engineers involved in aircraft design and analysis that better methods are required. In the past, designers conducted parametric studies in which a relatively small number of principal characteristics were varied to determine the effect on design requirements which were themselves often diverse and contradictory. Once a design was chosen, it then passed through the various engineers' disciplines whose principal task was to make the chosen design workable. Working in a limited design space, the discipline expert sometimes improved the concept, but more often than not, the result was in the form of a penalty to make the original concept workable. If an insurmountable problem was encountered, the process began over. Most design systems that attempt to account for disciplinary interactions have large empirical elements and reliance on past experience is a poor guide in obtaining maximum utilizations of new technologies. Further compounding the difficulty of design is that as the aeronautical sciences have matured, the discipline specialist's area of research has generally

  9. Locally advanced prostatic cancer: experience with combined pelvic external beam irradiation and interstitial thermobrachytherapy

    Hancock, Steven L; Kapp, Daniel S; Goffinet, Don R; Prionas, Stavros; Cox, Richard S; Bagshaw, Malcolm A

    1995-07-01

    90 did not correlate significantly with either the rate of de cline in PSA or PSA trend. Side effects included penile dysesthesia or anesthesia in 5 patients, subsequent transurethral resections for prostatic necrosis, bladder ulceration, or stricture in 3 patients, lymphedema in 2 patients, and minor urinary incontinence in 5 patients. Most patients reported erectile impotence after treatment. Conclusions: Adequate hyperthermia remains difficult to achieve within the prostate gland. The limited experience in this series does not support a thermal dose-response. Although only 4 patients have experienced recurrence within the prostate gland, the frequency of distant recurrence among these patients with locally advanced disease obscures evaluation of this endpoint. This treatment regimen approaches local tissue tolerance and its results suggests that there will be limited overall gains from dose-escalation strategies for advanced prostatic cancer.

  10. Comparison of patients' expectations and experiences at traditional pharmacies and pharmacies offering enhanced advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    Kassam, Rosemin; Collins, John B; Berkowitz, Jonathan

    2010-06-15

    To compare patients' expectations and experiences at pharmacies offering traditional APPE learning opportunities with those offering enhanced APPEs that incorporate pharmaceutical care activities. A survey of anchored measures of patient satisfaction was conducted in 2 groups of APPE- affiliated community pharmacies: those participating in an enhanced APPE model versus those participating in the traditional model. The enhanced intervention included preceptor training, a comprehensive student orientation, and an extended experience at a single pharmacy rather than the traditional 2 x 4-week experience at different pharmacies. While patient expectations were similar in both traditional and enhanced APPE pharmacies, patients in enhanced pharmacies reported significantly higher in-store satisfaction and fewer service gaps. Additionally, satisfaction was significantly higher for patients who had received any form of consultation, from either pharmacist or students, than those reporting no consultations. Including provision of pharmaceutical care services as part of APPEs resulted in direct and measurable improvements in patient satisfaction.

  11. COMMIX analysis of four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in a thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR

    Yarlagadda, B.S.

    1989-04-01

    The three-dimensional thermal hydraulics computer code COMMIX-1AR was used to analyze four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in the thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR. An objective of these analyses was the validation of COMMIX-1AR for buoyancy affected flows. The COMMIX calculated temperature histories of some thermocouples in the model were compared with the corresponding measured data. The conclusions of this work are presented. 3 refs., 5 figs

  12. Relating to the Experience of Contingency in Patients With Advanced Cancer: An Interview Study in U.S. Patients.

    Kruizinga, Renske; Jafari, Najmeh; Scherer-Rath, Michael; Schilderman, Hans; Bires, Jennifer; Puchalski, Christina; van Laarhoven, Hanneke

    2018-03-01

    Being diagnosed with incurable cancer can be a life-changing experience, evoking different spiritual questions and needs. Confronting a serious life-threatening event occurs not only often unexpected but also can disrupt a person's self-image and ideals of their personhood. This confrontation makes it difficult for people to integrate it into their personal life story-otherwise referred to as an experience of contingency. Different modes of relating to the contingent life event of having cancer have been studied in a Dutch patient population. Here we present an interview study in an U.S. population with advanced cancer patients. We included eight American patients with advanced cancer from the George Washington University Cancer Center. All patients were interviewed twice discussing their life events and life goals using a semistructured interview model. All interviews were transcribed and analyzed focusing on how patients described the way they related to the experience of having advanced cancer. The constant comparative method with a directed content analysis approach was used to code the themes in the interviews. The analyses show that the four modes of relating to contingency that we found in the Dutch study population can also be found in an American advanced cancer patient population. Differences were found in the extended way American patients described the fourth mode of "receiving." This study ensures a broader and deeper understanding of relating to the experience of contingency in having incurable cancer, which is crucial in developing accurate spiritual care in the palliative phase of patients. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Upgrade of MHD data acquisition system from ISX-B [Impurity Study Experiment] to ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility

    Bell, J.D.; Pare, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The data acquisition system assembled to study magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being revised for use on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The new hardware and software architectures are based on ISX-B experience and will feature different modes of operation for storing various subsets of available data, a user interface that requires less routine activity than the earlier system, and continued support of calibration and testing measurement used on ISX-B. The new hardware organization and software components are described in detail. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Career advancement and educational opportunities: experiences and perceptions of internationally educated nurses.

    Salma, Jordana; Hegadoren, Kathleen M; Ogilvie, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The number of internationally educated nurses is increasing in the Canadian workforce. Recruitment of internationally educated nurses is often seen as a solution to ongoing nursing shortages. However, international recruitment needs to be accompanied by strategies to ensure long-term retention. One of the criteria for successful retention is the availability and accessibility of career advancement and educational opportunities. Little research exists on the opportunities for career advancement and education for internationally educated nurses in Canada. This interpretive descriptive study was conducted to look at the perceptions of internationally educated nurses regarding career advancement and educational opportunities in Alberta, Canada. Eleven internationally educated nurses, working as registered nurses in Alberta, were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Five themes were identified: motherhood as a priority, communication and cultural challenges, process of skill recognition, perceptions of opportunity and need for mentorship.

  15. R and D limited partnerships (possible applications in advanced communications satellite technology experiment program)

    1985-01-01

    Typical R&D limited partnership arrangements, advantages and disadvantages of R&D limited partnership (RDLPs) and antitrust and tax implications are described. A number of typical forms of RDLPs are described that may be applicable for use in stimulating R&D and experimental programs using the advanced communications technology satellite. The ultimate goal is to increase the rate of market penetration of goods and/or services based upon advanced satellite communications technology. The conditions necessary for these RDLP forms to be advantageous are outlined.

  16. History of chemically and radiatively important atmospheric gases from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE

    R. G. Prinn

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the organization, instrumentation, datasets, data interpretation, modeling, and accomplishments of the multinational global atmospheric measurement program AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment. AGAGE is distinguished by its capability to measure globally, at high frequency, and at multiple sites all the important species in the Montreal Protocol and all the important non-carbon-dioxide (non-CO2 gases assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (CO2 is also measured at several sites. The scientific objectives of AGAGE are important in furthering our understanding of global chemical and climatic phenomena. They are the following: (1 to accurately measure the temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic gases that contribute the majority of reactive halogen to the stratosphere and/or are strong infrared absorbers (chlorocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons – CFCs, bromocarbons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons – HCFCs, hydrofluorocarbons – HFCs and polyfluorinated compounds (perfluorocarbons – PFCs, nitrogen trifluoride – NF3, sulfuryl fluoride – SO2F2, and sulfur hexafluoride – SF6 and use these measurements to determine the global rates of their emission and/or destruction (i.e., lifetimes; (2 to accurately measure the global distributions and temporal behaviors and determine the sources and sinks of non-CO2 biogenic–anthropogenic gases important to climate change and/or ozone depletion (methane – CH4, nitrous oxide – N2O, carbon monoxide – CO, molecular hydrogen – H2, methyl chloride – CH3Cl, and methyl bromide – CH3Br; (3 to identify new long-lived greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases (e.g., SO2F2, NF3, heavy PFCs (C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16, and C8F18 and hydrofluoroolefins (HFOs; e.g., CH2  =  CFCF3 have been identified in AGAGE, initiate the real-time monitoring of these new gases, and reconstruct their past histories from AGAGE, air archive, and firn air measurements; (4

  17. Building a Governance Strategy for CER: The Patient Outcomes Research to Advance Learning (PORTAL) Network Experience.

    Paolino, Andrea R; McGlynn, Elizabeth A; Lieu, Tracy; Nelson, Andrew F; Prausnitz, Stephanie; Horberg, Michael A; Arterburn, David E; Gould, Michael K; Laws, Reesa L; Steiner, John F

    2016-01-01

    The Patient Outcomes Research to Advance Learning (PORTAL) Network was established with funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in 2014. The PORTAL team adapted governance structures and processes from past research network collaborations. We will review and outline the structures and processes of the PORTAL governance approach and describe how proactively focusing on priority areas helped us to facilitate an ambitious research agenda. For years a variety of funders have supported large-scale infrastructure grants to promote the use of clinical datasets to answer important comparative effectiveness research (CER) questions. These awards have provided the impetus for health care systems to join forces in creating clinical data research networks. Often, these scientific networks do not develop governance processes proactively or systematically, and address issues only as problems arise. Even if network leaders and collaborators foresee the need to develop governance approaches, they may underestimate the time and effort required to develop sound processes. The resulting delays can impede research progress. Because the PORTAL sites had built trust and a foundation of collaboration by participating with one another in past research networks, essential elements of effective governance such as guiding principles, decision making processes, project governance, data governance, and stakeholders in governance were familiar to PORTAL investigators. This trust and familiarity enabled the network to rapidly prioritize areas that required sound governance approaches: responding to new research opportunities, creating a culture of trust and collaboration, conducting individual studies, within the broader network, assigning responsibility and credit to scientific investigators, sharing data while protecting privacy/security, and allocating resources. The PORTAL Governance Document, complete with a Toolkit of Appendices is included for reference and

  18. Re-challenge with pemetrexed in advanced mesothelioma: a multi-institutional experience

    Bearz Alessandra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although first-line therapy for patients affected by advanced mesothelioma is well established, there is a lack of data regarding the impact of second-line treatment. Methods We retrospectively collected data of patients affected by advanced mesothelioma, already treated with first-line therapy based on pemetrexed and platin, with a response (partial response or stable disease lasting at least 6 months, and re-treated with a pemetrexed-based therapy at progression. The primary objective was to describe time to progression and overall survival after re-treatment. Results Overall across several Italian oncological Institutions we found 30 patients affected by advanced mesothelioma, in progression after a 6-month lasting clinical benefit following a first-line treatment with cisplatin and pemetrexed, and re-challenged with a pemetrexed-based therapy. In these patients we found a disease control rate of 66%, with reduction of pain in 43% of patients. Overall time to progression and survival were promising for a second-line setting of patients with advanced mesothelioma, being 5.1 and 13.6 months, respectively. Conclusions In our opinion, when a patient has a long-lasting benefit from previous treatment with pemetrexed combined with a platin compound, the same treatment should be offered at progression.

  19. Examination for the Certificate in Advanced Practice in Cervical Cytology--the first year's experience.

    Smith, P A; Hewer, E M

    2003-06-01

    Following the decision to establish an Advanced Biomedical Scientist Practitioner grade for senior biomedical scientists in the NHS Cervical Screening Programme, a conjoint examination board has been appointed by the Royal College of Pathologists and Institute of Biomedical Science to oversee the Certificate in Advanced Practice in Cervical Cytology examination. The examination consists of a multiple-choice paper, short-answer written questions and practical microscopy sections covering screening of unmarked slides, and more complex discussion cases. In the first year there were 58 entries with 29 successful candidates, a pass rate of 50%. The standard of performance in the examination showed a wide range, and some candidates appear to have underestimated the degree of preparation, knowledge or level of microscopy skill required.

  20. Advancing women and closing the leadership gap: the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program experience.

    Richman, R C; Morahan, P S; Cohen, D W; McDade, S A

    2001-04-01

    Women are persistently underrepresented in the higher levels of academic administration despite the fact that they have been entering the medical profession in increasing numbers for at least 20 years and now make up a large proportion of the medical student body and fill a similar proportion of entry level positions in medical schools. Although there are no easy remedies for gender inequities in medical schools, strategies have been proposed and implemented both within academic institutions and more broadly to achieve and sustain the advancement of women faculty to senior level positions. Substantial, sustained efforts to increase programs and activities addressing the major obstacles to advancement of women must be put in place so that the contributions of women can be fully realized and their skills fittingly applied in meeting the medical education and healthcare needs of all people in the 21st century.

  1. Environmental implications of plastic debris in marine settings--entanglement, ingestion, smothering, hangers-on, hitch-hiking and alien invasions.

    Gregory, Murray R

    2009-07-27

    Over the past five or six decades, contamination and pollution of the world's enclosed seas, coastal waters and the wider open oceans by plastics and other synthetic, non-biodegradable materials (generally known as 'marine debris') has been an ever-increasing phenomenon. The sources of these polluting materials are both land- and marine-based, their origins may be local or distant, and the environmental consequences are many and varied. The more widely recognized problems are typically associated with entanglement, ingestion, suffocation and general debilitation, and are often related to stranding events and public perception. Among the less frequently recognized and recorded problems are global hazards to shipping, fisheries and other maritime activities. Today, there are rapidly developing research interests in the biota attracted to freely floating (i.e. pelagic) marine debris, commonly known as 'hangers-on and hitch-hikers' as well as material sinking to the sea floor despite being buoyant. Dispersal of aggressive alien and invasive species by these mechanisms leads one to reflect on the possibilities that ensuing invasions could endanger sensitive, or at-risk coastal environments (both marine and terrestrial) far from their native habitats.

  2. A pilot study of the experience of family caregivers of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer using a mixed methods approach.

    Sherman, Deborah W; McGuire, Deborah B; Free, David; Cheon, Joo Young

    2014-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer presents a wide spectrum of significant symptomatology. The high symptom burden, coupled with a rapidly fatal diagnosis, limits preparation or time for adjustment for both patients and their family caregivers. From the initial diagnosis and throughout the illness experience, the physical and emotional demands of caregiving can predispose caregivers themselves to illness and a greater risk of mortality. Understanding the negative and positive aspects of caregiving for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer will inform interventions that promote positive caregiver outcomes and support caregivers in their role. To provide feasibility data for a larger, mixed methods, longitudinal study focused on the experience of family caregivers of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and preliminary qualitative data to substantiate the significance of studying this caregiver population. This was a mixed methods study guided by the Stress Process Model. Eight family caregivers of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer from oncology practices of a university-affiliated medical center were surveyed. The pilot results supported the ability to recruit and retain participants and informed recruitment and data collection procedures. The qualitative results provided preliminary insights into caregiver experiences during the diagnosis and treatment phases. Key findings that substantiated the significance of studying these caregivers included the caregiving context of the history of sentinel symptoms, the crisis of diagnosis, the violation of assumptions about life and health, recognition of the circle of association, and contextual factors, as well as primary and secondary stressors, coping strategies, resources, discoveries, gains and growth, associated changes/transitions, and unmet caregiver needs. Findings indicated caregivers' willingness to participate in research, highlighted the negative and positive aspects of the caregiver experience, and reinforced the

  3. Study of the application of advanced control systems to fusion experiments and reactors. Final report

    1974-05-01

    The work accomplished to date toward the formulation of an advanced control system concept for large-scale magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion devices is summarized. The work was concentrated in three major areas: (1) general control studies and identification of control issues, (2) exploration of possible direct interactions with AEC National Laboratories, and (3) identification of simulation requirements to support control studies. (U.S.)

  4. Breast Conserving Surgery and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Single Center Experience

    Atakan Sezer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients with locally advanced breast cancer may undergo breast conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of the study is to evaluate the results of locally advanced breast cancer patients who underwent breast conserving surgery, axillary dissection and sentinel lymph node biopsy in a single center. Material and Methods: 12 patients with locally advanced breast cancer stage IIIA/IIIB were included in the study between 2002-2009. The patients were given anthracycline-based regimen before surgery. Patients underwent breast conserving surgery, axillary dissection, and sentinel lymph node biopsy followed by radiotherapy. Results: There were five patients in stage IIIA, six in stage IIIB, and one in stage IIIC. Patients had received 3-6 regimen of FAC/FEC. Eight had partial and four had complete response. Five positive axilla were detected. The median value of the lymph nodes was 12 (n:8-19. Five patients underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy. The biopsy has failed in one patient and the median value of dissected sentinel node was 3.5 (n:3-4. Locoregional recurrence was not observed in any patients. The mean follow-up of the patients was 29.8 months and median time was 16 (n:2-80 months.Of the 12 patients 10 are alive and 2 were deceased. Conclusion: In selected locally advanced patients, breast conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy may be applied by a multidisciplinary approach, and excellent success may be achieved in those patients as in early breast cancer patients.

  5. The advanced therapy classification procedure. Overview of experience gained so far.

    Voltz-Girolt, C; Celis, P; Boucaumont, M; D'Apote, L; Pinheiro, M-H; Papaluca-Amati, M

    2011-07-01

    The classification procedure, introduced by the European Regulation on advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), has received a tremendous interest from companies, academic and public sponsors developing ATMPs. This procedure gives companies the opportunity to verify whether or not the product they are developing can be considered an ATMP and can therefore benefit from the new regulatory pathway introduced in the European Union for these types of medicinal products. This procedure is optional, free of charge and may take place at any stage of the development of an ATMP in advance of applying for a marketing authorisation. In case of doubt, briefing meetings organised by the European Medicines Agency Innovation Task Force may help preparing for an ATMP classification and are a starting point for the interactions between the Agency and the developers of ATMPs. This article reviews the advantages of the classification procedure for both the developers of ATMPs and the European regulatory network. Since the introduction of this procedure and up to 10 November 2010, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) has finalised 38 applications for classification.

  6. First experience with hypothermia as a component of radiotherapy for locally-advanced skin cancer of the face

    Shental', V.V.; Goldobenko, G.V.; Pustynskij, I.N.; Tkachev, S.I.

    2000-01-01

    The experience of applying hypothermia by radiation therapy in 20 patients with locally advanced skin cancer of the face is described. The radiation effect was achieved with application of photon (6 MeV) and electron (8-10 MeV) radiation and in rare cases with application of gamma-beams. The irradiation was accomplished give times a week with a single focal dose of 2 or 3 Gy. After 2-3 weeks interval the treatment continued by the same scheme up to the total dose of 60-65 Gy. Cooling the tumor by cryoirrigation with vapor-liquid nitrogen was conducted up to 0-5 deg C before each irradiation procedure. It is shown, that combination of cryogenic and radiation impacts on the tumor leads to complete regression of neoplasms oven in the patients with advanced inoperable forms of the head skin cancer. Good functional and cosmetic results are noted [ru

  7. Dedicated Slosh Dynamics Experiment on ISS using SPHERES (Advanced Space Operations in CR)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — At the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) the Launch Services Program is leading an effort to conduct an experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to validate...

  8. Advances in Grid Computing for the Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    Herner, K.; Alba Hernandez, A. F.; Bhat, S.; Box, D.; Boyd, J.; Di Benedetto, V.; Ding, P.; Dykstra, D.; Fattoruso, M.; Garzoglio, G.; Kirby, M.; Kreymer, A.; Levshina, T.; Mazzacane, A.; Mengel, M.; Mhashilkar, P.; Podstavkov, V.; Retzke, K.; Sharma, N.; Teheran, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Fabric for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a major initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division charged with leading the computing model for Fermilab experiments. Work within the FIFE project creates close collaboration between experimenters and computing professionals to serve high-energy physics experiments of differing size, scope, and physics area. The FIFE project has worked to develop common tools for job submission, certificate management, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, robust data transfer, job monitoring, and databases for project tracking. Since the projects inception the experiments under the FIFE umbrella have significantly matured, and present an increasingly complex list of requirements to service providers. To meet these requirements, the FIFE project has been involved in transitioning the Fermilab General Purpose Grid cluster to support a partitionable slot model, expanding the resources available to experiments via the Open Science Grid, assisting with commissioning dedicated high-throughput computing resources for individual experiments, supporting the efforts of the HEP Cloud projects to provision a variety of back end resources, including public clouds and high performance computers, and developing rapid onboarding procedures for new experiments and collaborations. The larger demands also require enhanced job monitoring tools, which the project has developed using such tools as ElasticSearch and Grafana. in helping experiments manage their large-scale production workflows. This group in turn requires a structured service to facilitate smooth management of experiment requests, which FIFE provides in the form of the Production Operations Management Service (POMS). POMS is designed to track and manage requests from the FIFE experiments to run particular workflows, and support troubleshooting and triage in case of problems. Recently a new certificate management infrastructure called

  9. Advances in Grid Computing for the FabrIc for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermialb

    Herner, K. [Fermilab; Alba Hernandex, A. F. [Fermilab; Bhat, S. [Fermilab; Box, D. [Fermilab; Boyd, J. [Fermilab; Di Benedetto, V. [Fermilab; Ding, P. [Fermilab; Dykstra, D. [Fermilab; Fattoruso, M. [Fermilab; Garzoglio, G. [Fermilab; Kirby, M. [Fermilab; Kreymer, A. [Fermilab; Levshina, T. [Fermilab; Mazzacane, A. [Fermilab; Mengel, M. [Fermilab; Mhashilkar, P. [Fermilab; Podstavkov, V. [Fermilab; Retzke, K. [Fermilab; Sharma, N. [Fermilab; Teheran, J. [Fermilab

    2016-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a major initiative within the Fermilab Scientic Computing Division charged with leading the computing model for Fermilab experiments. Work within the FIFE project creates close collaboration between experimenters and computing professionals to serve high-energy physics experiments of diering size, scope, and physics area. The FIFE project has worked to develop common tools for job submission, certicate management, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, robust data transfer, job monitoring, and databases for project tracking. Since the projects inception the experiments under the FIFE umbrella have signicantly matured, and present an increasingly complex list of requirements to service providers. To meet these requirements, the FIFE project has been involved in transitioning the Fermilab General Purpose Grid cluster to support a partitionable slot model, expanding the resources available to experiments via the Open Science Grid, assisting with commissioning dedicated high-throughput computing resources for individual experiments, supporting the eorts of the HEP Cloud projects to provision a variety of back end resources, including public clouds and high performance computers, and developing rapid onboarding procedures for new experiments and collaborations. The larger demands also require enhanced job monitoring tools, which the project has developed using such tools as ElasticSearch and Grafana. in helping experiments manage their large-scale production work ows. This group in turn requires a structured service to facilitate smooth management of experiment requests, which FIFE provides in the form of the Production Operations Management Service (POMS). POMS is designed to track and manage requests from the FIFE experiments to run particular work ows, and support troubleshooting and triage in case of problems. Recently a new certicate management infrastructure called Distributed

  10. A transdisciplinary approach to developing a web-based nursing experiential log system for advanced practice nursing clinical experiences.

    Olson, Brandon D; Fauchald, Sally K

    2011-11-01

    This article describes a transdisciplinary project between the computer information systems department and the graduate nursing department of a higher education institution. The project is the planning, development, and implementation of a Web-based nursing experiential log system for advanced practice nursing clinical experiences, which was funded by a Nursing Education Practice and Retention grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. The article explains the concept and benefits of the transdisciplinary nature of the project. The design team, project leadership, and roles within the team are reviewed, including the role of end-user faculty in the design process. The article describes the focus and scope of the Web-based experiential log system database that is used to document and track advanced practice nursing student clinical experiences, as well as a summary of the design process used to develop the log system and the specific functionality of the database system. The implementation process, including end-user training, pilot implementation, and modifications, lessons learned, and future directions of the project are addressed. The article concludes with the benefits to the clinical experience and graduate nursing program that have been noted since the implementation of the system.

  11. Sorafenib for Egyptian patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma; single center experience

    Abdel-Rahman, O.; Abdelwahab, M.; Shaker, M.; Abdelwahab, Sh.; Elbassiony, M.; Ellithy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: According to the results of a number of phase 3 randomized studies, sorafenib is the only approved systemic therapy for advanced HCC; however the issue of high eco- Sorafenib nomic cost remains challenging; thus we have conducted this retrospective analysis of our HCC patients treated with sorafenib. Methods: HCC Shams University Hospitals, in the period between 2010 and 2012 were reviewed. Eligible patients were those who had received sorafenib for advanced HCC not eligible for or progressed after surgery or locoregional therapy. We investigated the impact of baseline clinico pathological factors (age, gender, child status, performance score, BCLC tumor stage, cause of chronic liver disease, median baseline alpha fetoprotein level and previous treatment received for HCC) on overall survival (OS) in an adjusted Cox regression model. Results: 41 patients were included in the analysis fulfilling the inclusion criteria. At a median follow up period of 13 months, the median PFS for the whole group was 4 months; the median OS for the whole group is 6.25 months. Multivariate analysis identified three baseline characteristics that were prognostic indicators for overall survival: ECOG performance status (median OS for ECOG 1 = 7.01 months and for ECOG 2 = 3.03 months), Child-Pugh status (median OS for child A = 12.04 months and for child B = 5.23 months), and median baseline levels of alpha-fetoprotein. Conclusions: In limited resource countries like Egypt, we suggest that the use of sorafenib for the treatment of advanced HCC cases should be restricted to a highly selected subgroup of patients with good performance and child A.

  12. A single centre experience with sequential and concomitant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced stage IV tonsillar cancer

    Coyle Catherine

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemo-radiotherapy offers an alternative to primary surgery and adjuvant therapy for the management of locally advanced stage IV squamous cell carcinomas of the tonsil. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of the outcomes of 41 patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated non-surgically at the Yorkshire Cancer Centre between January 2004 and December 2005. Due to long radiotherapy waiting times, patients received induction chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by either cisplatin concurrent chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. Results Median age was 55 years (range 34-76 years and 28 (68% patients were male. 35/41 patients (85% received 2 or more cycles of induction chemotherapy. Following induction chemotherapy, 32/41 patients (78% had a clinical response. Concomitant chemotherapy was given to 30/41 (73%. All patients received the planned radiotherapy dose with no delays. There were no treatment related deaths. Six (15% patients had gastrostomy tubes placed before treatment, and 22 (54% required nasogastric tube placement during or after treatment for nutritional support. 17 patients required unplanned admissions during treatment for supportive care. At 4 months post treatment assessment 35 out of 41 (85% patients achieved complete clinical and radiographic response. Median follow-up is 38 months (8-61 months. Local and regional control rate in complete responders at 3 years was 91%. Distant metastases have been found in 4 (9.8% patients. Three year progression-free survival rate in all patients is 75%. The 3-year cause specific survival and overall survival are 75% and 66% respectively. Conclusion Cisplatin-based induction and concurrent chemoradiotherapy provides excellent tumour control with acceptable toxicity for patients with locally advanced tonsillar cancer.

  13. Considerations for advanced reactor design based on EBR-II experience

    King, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The long-term success of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) provides several insights into fundamental characteristics and design features of a nuclear generating station that enhance safety, operability, and maintainability. Some of these same characteristics, together with other features, offer the potential for operational lifetimes well beyond the current licensing time frame, and improved reliability that could potentially reduce amortized capital costs as well as overall operation and maintenance costs if incorporated into advanced plant designs. These features and characteristics are described and the associated benefits are discussed

  14. Radiotherapy of locally advanced laryngeal cancer: the Gliwice Center of Oncology experience, 1990-1996

    Mucha-Malecka, A.; Skladowski, K.; Wygoda, A.; Sasiadek, W.; Tarnawski, R.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of radiotherapy alone in patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer T3 - T4, and to establish the prognostic value of the size and the location of the extra laryngeal infiltrations and of emergency tracheostomy. 296 patients with advanced squamous cell cancer of the larynx were radically treated with radiotherapy alone in Center of Oncology in Gliwice between the years 1990 and 1996. There were 221 cases of supraglottic cancer (75%) and 75 of glottic cancer (25%). The stages were as follows: supraglottic cancer: T3 - 113 (51%), T4 - 108 (49%), glottic cancer: T3 - 69 (92%), T4 - 6 (8%). Positive neck nodes were found in 100 patients with supraglottic cancer (45%), and only in 11 patients with glottic cancer (15%). In cases of extra laryngeaI invasion (T4) the pyriform recess was involved in 33%, the base of tongue and valleculae glosso-epiglotticae in 30%, the hypopharyngeal wall in 9% of cases, while a massive involvement of the larynx, the pyriform recess and the base of the tongue was found in 6% of patients. Cartilage involvement was suspected in 22% of patients. Thirty six patients (12%) underwent emergency tracheostomy. Generally, the 3-year local control rate (LC) and disease free survival rate (DSF) were 46% and 41%, respectively. The probability of LC was similar in both supraglottic and glottic cancer: 44% and 47.5% respectively. The presence of involved neck nodes significantly decreased LC and DFS rates in both groups (about 20%). For stage T4 laryngeal cancer the LC rate was correlated with the location of the extra laryngeal infiltrations. Best prognosis was connected with the suspicion of cartilage infiltration - 56% of 3-year LC rate. The worst results were noted in cases of massive infiltrations spreading from larynx through the hypopharynx - 13.5% of 3-year LC rate. Emergency tracheostomy before radiotherapy was very significantly linked to poorer treatment results. The 3-year LC rate in

  15. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Blomberg, Ben [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Panuganti, Harsha [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Brau, Charles [Vanderbilt U.; Choi, Bo [Vanderbilt U.; Gabella, William [Vanderbilt U.; Ivanov, Borislav [Vanderbilt U.; Mendenhall, Marcus [Vanderbilt U.; Lynn, Christopher [Swarthmore Coll.; Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab; Wagner, Wolfgang [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  16. Construction, commissioning and operational experience of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator

    White, M.; Arnold, N.; Berg, W.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source linear accelerator system consists of a 200 MeV, 2856 MHz S-Band electron linac and a 2-radiation-thick tungsten target followed by a 450 MeV positron linac. The linac system has operated 24 hours per day for the past year to support accelerator commissioning and beam studies and to provide beam for the user experimental program. It achieves the design goal for positron current of 8 mA and produces electron energies up to 650 MeV without the target in place. The linac is described and its operation and performance are discussed

  17. Construction, commissioning and operational experience of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator

    White, M.; Arnold, N.; Berg, W.; Cours, A.; Fuja, R.; Grelick, A. E.; Sereno, N.; Wesolowski, W.; Ko, K.; Qian, Y.L.; Russell, T.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source linear accelerator system consists of a 200-MeV, 2856-MHz S-band electron linac and a 2-radiation-thick tungsten target followed by a 450-MeV positron linac. The linac system has operated 24 hours per day for the past year to support accelerator commissioning and beam studies and to provide beam for the user experimental program. It achieves the design goal for positron current of 8 mA and produces electron energies up to 650 MeV without the target in place. The linac is described and its operation and performance are discussed. (author)

  18. An interesting experience of radiation castration in a patient of advanced breast carcinoma

    Matsubara, Sho; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mine, Hiroko; Maeda, Manabu; Shibuya, Hitoshi

    1980-01-01

    Castration by irradiation was attempted in a patient with advanced breast cancer. Although a dose of irradiation sufficient for castration was given through the field usually used radiation castration, neither cessation of menstruation nor decrease in serum estradiol value could be observed. The subsequent hysteosalpingography revealed that the markedly malpositioned bilateral ovaries were not included within the beam of radiation. The field of irradiation to the malpositioned ovaries was determined based upon the hysterosalpingographic finding and a dose of 1,200 rad to the ovaries resulted in reduction of serum estradiol value in such a degree as surgical castration. (author)

  19. Circular arc fuel plate stability experiments and analyses for the advanced neutron source

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Yahr, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The thin fuel plates planned for the Advanced Neutron Source are to be cooled by forcing heavy water at high velocity, 25 m/s, through thin cooling channels on each side of each plate. Because the potential for structural failure of the plates is a design concern, considerable effort has been expended in assessing this potential. As part of this effort, experimental flow tests and analyses to evaluate the structural response of circular arc plates have been conducted, and the results are given in this report

  20. PET/MRI and PET/CT in advanced gynaecological tumours: initial experience and comparison

    Queiroz, Marcelo A.; Schulthess, Gustav von; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Freiwald-Chilla, Bianka [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Hauser, Nik [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Gynaecology, Baden (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Guerbet AG, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI and PET/CT for staging and re-staging advanced gynaecological cancer patients as well as identify the potential benefits of each method in such a population. Twenty-six patients with suspicious or proven advanced gynaecological cancer (12 ovarian, seven cervical, one vulvar and four endometrial tumours, one uterine metastasis, and one primary peritoneal cancer) underwent whole-body imaging with a sequential trimodality PET/CT/MR system. Images were analysed regarding primary tumour detection and delineation, loco-regional lymph node staging, and abdominal/extra-abdominal distant metastasis detection (last only by PET/CT). Eighteen (69.2 %) patients underwent PET/MRI for primary staging and eight patients (30.8 %) for re-staging their gynaecological malignancies. For primary tumour delineation, PET/MRI accuracy was statistically superior to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Among the different types of cancer, PET/MRI presented better tumour delineation mainly for cervical (6/7) and endometrial (2/3) cancers. PET/MRI for local evaluation as well as PET/CT for extra-abdominal metastases had therapeutic consequences in three and one patients, respectively. PET/CT detected 12 extra-abdominal distant metastases in 26 patients. PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT for primary tumour delineation. No differences were found in detection of regional lymph node involvement and abdominal metastases detection. (orig.)

  1. From hope to hope: the experience of older Chinese people with advanced cancer.

    Chen, Hong; Komaromy, Carol; Valentine, Christine

    2015-03-01

    In our study that explored the current end-of-life care provision for Chinese older people with advanced/terminal cancer, hope emerged as a significant aspect of coping with their condition. Drawing on data from in-depth interviews with a group of older people, their family carers and health professionals, this article explores participants' constructions of hope in terms of what they were hoping for, how their hopes helped them cope with their illness and what sociocultural resources they drew on to build and sustain these hopes. While acknowledging similarities to Western studies of hope in terminal illness, this article identifies significant divergences in terms of the impact of different sociocultural values and their implications for clinical practice in light of an unfavourable health care environment for patients with advanced cancer and a social support system sustained mainly by Chinese families. It argues that hope represents an important resource for coping with terminal illness among these patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    Chakraborty, Santam; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti; Oinam, Arun Singh; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm 3 ), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  3. Tokai Advanced Safeguards Technology Exercise (TASTEX). An experience in international co-operation on safeguards

    Fukuda, G.; Koizumi, T.; Higuchi, K.

    1983-01-01

    TASTEX stands for Tokai Advanced Safeguards Technology Exercise, and was the joint programme of Japan, the United States of America, France and the International Atomic Energy Agency for developing, testing and evaluating advanced safeguards technology to be used in reprocessing facilities. The TASTEX programme, which started early in 1978 and successfully ended in May 1981, consisted of thirteen safeguards-technology-related tasks, from Task A to M. They were classified into four groups from the viewpoints of their usefulness and effectiveness: (1) Tasks technically feasible for international safeguards application in the near future: Tasks E, G, H and part of Task A (underwater CCTV and monitoring cameras); (2) Tasks which can be used in the future if research and development are continued: Tasks F, I, J, C and the other part of Task A (exclusive of the themes shown in (1)); (3) Tasks which may be used in future at the Tokai Reprocessing Facility if research and development are continued: Tasks K and L; and (4) Tasks which are difficult to be used at the Tokai Reprocessing Facility: Tasks B, D and M. The tasks classified under Group (1) are being developed further as part of the JASPAS (Japan Support Programme for Agency's Safeguards) project. (author)

  4. IMPULSE Highlights for recent experiments at the Advanced Photon Source (2/9-2/18 2014)

    Jensen, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-18

    This report is a presentation, with slides noting, Over 40 experiments were completed during this run using X-ray imaging on the IMPULSE system at Sector 32 IDB; Summary of new experiments: Idealized sphere compaction – Capture progression of dynamic densification through an idealized system on 0.500 mm borosilicate glass spheres (Slide 1); Detonator and EBW Imaging Experiments on IMPULSE – First time HE was intentionally detonated at APS (Slide 2); Spall and high strain rate crack nucleation/propagation in PMMA – PCI data is providing new and unique insights for model validation (Slide 3); Fiber composite for armor applications was studied under ballistic impact of Dyneema (Collaboration with Army Research Laboratory) (Slide 4). Summary of on-going experiments; Crack propagation in vitreous carbon – observed crack motion and caustic; Jet formation experiments on large grain cerium to examine phase dependent strength; Ballistic impact of Comp-B and TNT to examine thermo-mechanical response in-situ with various penetrator geometries to vary shear concentration. Other efforts: IMPULSE system moved and installed in Sector 35 (DCS). This includes the 4-frame X-ray detection system, 4- channel PDV, and other gun diagnostics; New remotely operated mobile IMPULSE structure in fabrication – to be delivered to APS in April; 4 Mini-VISAR Systems and 4-channel PDV installed in DCS instrumentation room with all associated diagnostics.

  5. As-Run Physics Analysis for the UCSB-1 Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Nielsen, Joseph Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) -1 experiment was irradiated in the A-10 position of the ATR. The experiment was irradiated during cycles 145A, 145B, 146A, and 146B. Capsule 6A was removed from the test train following Cycle 145A and replaced with Capsule 6B. This report documents the as-run physics analysis in support of Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the test. This report documents the as-run fluence and displacements per atom (DPA) for each capsule of the experiment based on as-run operating history of the ATR. Average as-run heating rates for each capsule are also presented in this report to support the thermal analysis.

  6. The experience of providing end-of-life care to a relative with advanced dementia: an integrative literature review.

    Peacock, Shelley C

    2013-04-01

    The number of people with dementia is growing at an alarming rate. An abundance of research over the past two decades has examined the complex aspects of caring for a relative with dementia. However, far less research has been conducted specific to the experiences of family caregivers providing end-of-life care, which is perplexing, as dementia is a terminal illness. This article presents what is known and highlights the gaps in the literature relevant to the experiences of family caregivers of persons with dementia at the end of life. A thorough search of the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and PubMed databases from 1960 to 2011 was conducted. Ten studies were identified that specifically addressed the experience of family caregivers providing end-of-life care to a relative with advanced dementia. Common themes of these studies included: 1) the experience of grief, 2) guilt and burden with decision making, 3) how symptoms of depression may or may not be resolved with death of the care receiver, 4) how caregivers respond to the end-stage of dementia, and 5) expressed needs of family caregivers. It is evident from this literature review that much remains to be done to conceptualize the experience of end-of-life caregiving in dementia.

  7. OUR EXPERIENCE OF HYPERTHERMIC INTRAPERITONEAL CHEMOTHERAPY FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED GASTRIC CANCER

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Improvement of the results of treatment of patients with locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. Material and methods. From the 2010–2014 we performed 30 surgeries using techniques HICT. Among patients there were 17 men and 13 women. The median of age was 50 years. Locally advanced gastric cancer (T4a-T4b was observed in 22 cases, including 4 patients in the emergency immunocytochemical study with peritoneal lavage detected cancer-free (Cyt + cells in the abdominal cavity. The group of patients with metastatic gastric cancer accounted for 8 patients. Narrow carcinomatosis (P1 was 4 cases, carcinomatosis (P2-P3 — 4. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in the study group was not carried out. In the control group No 1 (n = 51 performed surgery alone, without additional anticancer therapy. In the control group No 2 (n = 66, a combined treatment (surgery + chemotherapy. Results. Follow-up median was 25 months. Overall 1-year survival rate for all three groups was 55%, 39% and 52%, respectively. Median survival in the intervention group versus 21.4 months in the 8 and 12 months, respectively. The most effective HICT is shown for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. In the study group, median overall survival was 29 months. The survival rate of 1-, 2-, 3-year-old was equal to 68%, 61% and 42%. In the first control group, 1-year survival of 45%. None of the patients did not survive 2 years. In the second control group, one-year survival rate was 60%, 2-year survival is not. Results of treatment of metastatic gastric cancer proved to be more modest. In the main group the median survival was 10 months, compared with 6 and 7 months of the two control groups. There were no statistically significant differences. Conclusions. 1. Availability of limited dissemination, free cancer cells in the abdominal cavity, as well as a massive defeat of serous membrane of the stomach can be seen as indications for HICT in gastric cancer. 2. In

  8. Behavioral reactions to advanced cruise control: results of a driving simulator experiment

    Hoedemaeker, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes an experimental study that is conducted in the driving simulator at the Centre for Environmental and Traffic Psychology (COV) of the University of Groningen. In the experiment, two groups of drivers, who differed with respect to reported driving style in terms of speed, drove

  9. Flipping the Classroom and Student Performance in Advanced Statistics: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment

    Touchton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    I administer a quasi-experiment using undergraduate political science majors in statistics classes to evaluate whether "flipping the classroom" (the treatment) alters students' applied problem-solving performance and satisfaction relative to students in a traditional classroom environment (the control). I also assess whether general…

  10. Preliminary experience with external hemipelvectomy for locally advanced and recurrent pelvic carcinoma

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Rasmussen, Peter Chr.; Keller, Johnny Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    was found. With agreement by the multidisciplinary team, surgery was performed by a colorectal surgeon and an orthopaedic sarcoma surgeon and, if needed, by an urologist and vascular surgeon. Patients were reconstructed with either a femoral or a gluteal musculocutaneous flap. Results Of the eight women...... [median age 54.5 (40– 68) years], two had primary carcinoma and six local recurrence of a previously treated carcinoma. R0 was possible in six patients and R1 resection in two. The median duration of hospital stay was 29.5 (17– 102) days. The median follow up was 8.3 (4.7– 52.8) months. Three patients...... for a highly selected group of patients with locally advanced carcinoma or recurrence involving the lumbosacral neural plexus....

  11. Experiences with the ACPMAPS (Advanced Computer Program Multiple Array Processor System) 50 GFLOP system

    Fischler, M.

    1992-10-01

    The Fermilab Computer R ampersand D and Theory departments have for several years collaborated on a multi-GFLOP (recently upgraded to 50 GFLOP) system for lattice gauge calculations. The primary emphasis is on flexibility and ease of algorithm development. This system (ACPMAPS) has been in use for some time, allowing theorists to produce QCD results with relevance for the analysis of experimental data. We present general observations about benefits of such a scientist-oriented system, and summarize some of the advances recently made. We also discuss what was discovered about features needed in a useful algorithm exploration platform. These lessons can be applied to the design and evaluation of future massively parallel systems (commercial or otherwise)

  12. Benchmarking of the advanced hygrothermal model-hygIRC with mid scale experiments

    Maref, W.; Lacasse, M.; Kumaran, K.; Swinton, M.C. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Inst. for Research in Construction

    2002-07-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to benchmark an advanced hygrothermal model entitled hygIRC which can be used to estimate the drying response of oriented strand board (OSB) used in timber-frame construction. Three specimens of OSB boards were immersed in water for 5 days and then allowed to stabilise in a sealed tank. A comparison of results from the computer model simulations to those obtained from experimental tests and laboratory measurements showed good agreement in terms of the shape of the drying curve and time taken to reach equilibrium moisture content. In general, it was determined that the drying process is controlled by the vapour permeability of the membrane. The higher the vapour permeability, the faster the rate of drying in a given condition. 11 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  13. Adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced urothelial carcinoma: an overview of the USC experience.

    Dorff, Tanya B; Tsao-Wei, Denice; Miranda, Gus; Skinner, Donald G; Stein, John P; Quinn, David I

    2009-02-01

    To describe the tolerability of two chemotherapy regimens, gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) and methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (MVAC) for adjuvant treatment of patients with locally advanced urothelial cancer after radical cystectomy. The USC Department of Urology bladder cancer database was searched for subjects who received adjuvant chemotherapy following cystectomy for transitional cell carcinoma with extravesical and/or lymph node involvement, yielding 187 cases. Clinical details regarding toxicity, number of cycles administered, and cancer outcome were analyzed. The majority of subjects had lymph node involvement (70%). Sixty-eight percent of subjects received MVAC and 32% received GC, the latter regimen was predominant after 2000. Fifty-six percent of subjects received all four planned cycles (51% GC and 58% MVAC). With a median follow-up of 11.2 years (range 1.9-19.6), 96 patients (51%) have suffered a relapse, with no significant difference between chemotherapy regimens. Median time to recurrence for the population was 3.7 years and median overall survival is 4.6 years (3.0-9.3). The median time from recurrence to death was 6.7 months and was not significantly different between MVAC and GC. Both MVAC and GC are tolerated after cystectomy for advanced urothelial carcinoma. A significant proportion of high-risk patients survive, free of disease, beyond 10 years. At recurrence, patients previously treated with adjuvant chemotherapy have a survival that appears much shorter than patients who develop metastases in the absence of this exposure, suggesting resistance to salvage chemotherapy.

  14. Clinical practice and outcomes in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor: Experience from an Indian tertiary care center

    Subhadeep Bose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of advanced Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST has been revolutionized with the use of Imatinib guided by mutation analysis. Data from India remains scarce. Materials and Methods: Patients with metastatic GIST who were treated at Department of Gastro-intestinal & Hepaticopancreaticobiliary Oncology Unit at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai between December, 2004 and December 2015 were included in the analysis. Clinical and radiological data was retrieved from stored medical records and charts. Results: A total of 83 patients with metastatic GIST were available for analysis. Median age was 54 years with a 3:1 male predominance. Stomach was the most common site of primary with liver being the most common site of metastasis. c-Kit mutation analysis results were available for 44 patients with exon 11 mutant being the most common mutation. With a median follow up of 33 months, the 10 years estimated progression free and overall survival (OS was 18% and 51% respectively. Overall response rate to first line imatinib was 37.6% and estimated 3 years OS to first line therapy was significantly better for Exon 11 mutated patients (p=0.016. 34 patients received second line therapy in the form of either sunitinib, pazopanib or increased dose imatinib with a clinical benefit rate of 73.5%. C-Kit mutated patients had a better median OS compared to non mutated patients. Conclusions: GIST diagnosed and treated in the Indian subcontinent appears to show improved outcomes. The importance of c-Kit mutation analysis in determining the prognosis and outcomes of patients with advanced GIST is emphasized.

  15. Promising Pedagogy: Advancing the Educational Experience of Queer Students Through Transformative Leadership.

    Zook, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The school experience for queer youth is often quite different from that of their heterosexual and gender-conforming peers; yet it is often the c ase that little attention is given to the disparate and inequitable educational and social conditions under which lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) youth must learn. In fact, the entirety of pedagogical structures in many schools creates milieus where queer youth, those who have loved ones who are queer, and those who are merely perceived to be queer are systematically marginalized and deprived of their right to a safe, supportive, and equitable educational experience. Transformative leadership theory (TLT) inspires educational leaders to create inclusive and excellent schools for all youth. Neither a prescriptive model nor a process-oriented theory, TLT offers eight tenets that operate in concert to form an authentic way of being informing and guiding leaders' decisions and actions toward the goal of individual, organizational, and societal change.

  16. Development of a corrosion detection experiment to evaluate conventional and advanced NDI techniques

    Roach, D.

    1995-12-31

    The Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC) was established by the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (FAATC) at Sandia National Laboratories in August of 1991. The goal of the AANC is to provide independent validation of technologies intended to enhance the structural inspection of aging commuter and transport aircraft. The deliverables from the AANC`s validation activities are assessments of the reliability of existing and emerging inspection technologies as well as analyses of the cost benefits to be derived from their implementation. This paper describes the methodology developed by the AANC to assess the performance of NDI techniques. In particular, an experiment being developed to evaluate corrosion detection devices will be presented. The experiment uses engineered test specimens, as well as complete aircraft test beds to provide metrics for NDI validation.

  17. UK irradiation experience relevant to advanced carbide fuel concepts for LMFBR's

    Bagley, K.Q.; Batey, W.; Paris, R.; Sloss, W.M.; Snape, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Despite discouraging prognoses of fabrication and reprocessing problems, it is recognized that the quest for a carbide fuel pin design which fully exploits the favourable density and thermal conductivity of (U,Pu) monocarbide must be maintained. Studies in aid of carbide fuel development have, therefore, continued in the UK in parallel with those on oxide, albeit at a substantially lower level of effort, and a sufficient body of irradiation experience has been accumulated to allow discrimination of realistic fuel pin designs

  18. Accuracy and initial clinical experience with measurement software (advanced vessel analysis) in three-dimensional imaging

    Abe, Toshi; Hirohata, Masaru; Tanigawa, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the clinical benefits of three dimensional (3D) imaging, such as 3D-CTA and 3D-DSA, in cerebro-vascular disease have been widely recognized. Software for quantitative analysis of vascular structure in 3D imaging (advanced vessel analysis: AVA) has been developed. We evaluated AVA with both phantom studies and a few clinical cases. In spiral and curvy aluminum tube phantom studies, the accuracy of diameter measurements was good in 3D images produced from data set generated by multi-detector row CT or rotational angiography. The measurement error was less than 0.03 mm on aluminum tube phantoms that were 3 mm and 5 mm in diameter. In the clinical studies, the differences of carotid artery diameter measurements between 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA was less than 0.3 mm in. The measurement of length, diameter and angle by AVA should provide useful information for planning surgical and endovascular treatments of cerebro-vascular disease. (author)

  19. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with gemcitabine plus regional hyperthermia for locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Initial experience

    Ohguri, Takayuki; Imada, Hajime; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Korogi, Yukunori; Narisada, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with gemcitabine plus regional hyperthermia (HT) for locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). A total of 29 patients with LAPC treated with concurrent CRT using gemcitabine were retrospectively analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered with a median total dose of 61.2 Gy. Of the 29 patients, 20 (69%) also underwent regional HT during CRT (CRHT group). The remaining 9 patients did not receive regional HT (CRT group) because of a common bile duct stent placement, patient refusal, older age, or obesity. The efficacy and toxicity of the treatments and the predictors of good outcome were evaluated. The median disease progression-free and overall survival times were significantly better for the CRHT group than for the CRT group (8.8 vs. 4.9 months, P=0.02, and 18.6 vs. 9.6 months, P=0.01), respectively. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicities for the CRHT group were detected in eight patients (40%) and grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity in one (diarrhea). Concurrent CRT using gemcitabine with regional HT may be a feasible and promising regimen for LAPC, and the results justified further evaluation in a large number of patients to confirm its definite benefit. (author)

  20. The Availability of Advanced Airway Equipment and Experience with Videolaryngoscopy in the UK: Two UK Surveys

    Rachel L. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibreoptic intubation, high frequency jet ventilation, and videolaryngoscopy form part of the Royal College of Anaesthetists compulsory higher airway training module. Curriculum delivery requires equipment availability and competent trainers. We sought to establish (1 availability of advanced airway equipment in UK hospitals (Survey I and (2 if those interested in airway management (Difficult Airway Society (DAS members had access to videolaryngoscopes, their basic skill levels and teaching competence with these devices and if they believed that videolaryngoscopy was replacing conventional or fibreoptic laryngoscopy (Survey II. Data was obtained from 212 hospitals (73.1% and 554 DAS members (27.6%. Most hospitals (202, 99% owned a fiberscope, 119 (57.5% had a videolaryngoscope, yet only 62 (29.5% had high frequency jet ventilators. DAS members had variable access to videolaryngoscopes with Airtraq 319 (59.6% and Glidescope 176 (32.9% being the most common. More DAS members were happy to teach or use videolaryngoscopes in a difficult airway than those who had used them more than ten times. The majority rated Macintosh laryngoscopy as the most important airway skill. Members rated fibreoptic intubation and videolaryngoscopy skills equally. Our surveys demonstrate widespread availability of fibreoptic scopes, limited availability of videolaryngoscopes, and limited numbers of experienced videolaryngoscope tutors.

  1. Experience of combined cisplatin and radiation therapy for advanced urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma

    Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Utsunomiya, Masato; Itoh, Hiroshi; Itatani, Hiroaki; Namiki, Mikio.

    1987-01-01

    Since March, 1981, 13 patients with locally advanced transitional cell carcinoma were treated by combined cisdiamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin) and full dose radiotherapy. They were 10 men and 3 women. The patient ages ranged from 42 to 79 years, with a median of 59.5 years. The primary sites of transitional cell carcinoma were bladder in 5, ureter in 6, renal pelvis in 1 and prostate in 1. Radiotherapy consisted of a mean tumor dose of 48.7 gray, with a range of 40 to 66.4 gray, was administered with cobalt 60. Cisplatin was infused 5 days a week with a daily dose of 20 to 30 mg. 4 patients recieved 2 courses of cisplatin infusion and others 1 or less. Of the 4 evaluable patients 3 (75 %) achieved a complete response. Toxicity was evaluated for the 13 patients. Mainly gastrointestinal toxicity was noted: appetite loss in 9 (69.2 %), nausea and/or vomiting in 5 (38.5 %) and diarrhea in 5 (38.5 %). Leukocytopenia was noted in 7 patients (53.9 %), but in no one leukocyte count was less than 2000/mm 3 . Mild thrombocytopenia was noted only in 3 patients (23.1 %). All of these toxicities were mild, and the patients recovered soon after the therapy. Herein it is discussed about future problems such as solution of interaction mechanism, detection of practical dose and administering method of cisplatin and radiation. (author)

  2. Palliative care in advanced gynecological cancers: Institute of palliative medicine experience

    Sushmita Pathy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the epidemiological profile, clinical symptoms and referral patterns of patients with gynecological malignancy. To evaluate pain symptoms, response to treatment and factors affecting management in patients with advanced gynecological malignancies. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of the gynecological malignancy cases registered at the Pain and Palliative Care Clinic, Calicut, over a 12-month period between January 2006 and December 2006.Patient characteristics, symptoms and response to treatment were evaluated in detail. Results: A total of 1813 patients registered, of which 64 had gynecological malignancies. Most of the cases were referred from the Oncology Department of the Calicut Medical College. Fifty-five percent of the patients were unaware of their diagnosis. Psychosocial issues and anxiety were observed in 48%. Insomnia was seen in 52% of the cases. Pain was the most common and most distressing symptom. Adequate pain relief was achieved in only 32% of the patients. Conclusions: The number of gynecological malignancy cases attending the Pain and Palliative Care Clinic is small. Pain is the most common and distressing symptom, with only 32% of the patients achieving adequate pain relief. Poor drug compliance, incomplete assessment of pain and the lack of awareness of morphine therapy were identified as the most common causes for poor pain control.

  3. Recent Advances In Structural Vibration And Failure Mode Control In Mainland China: Theory, Experiments And Applications

    Li Hui; Ou Jinping

    2008-01-01

    A number of researchers have been focused on structural vibration control in the past three decades over the world and fruit achievements have been made. This paper introduces the recent advances in structural vibration control including passive, active and semiactive control in mainland China. Additionally, the co-author extends the structural vibration control to failure mode control. The research on the failure mode control is also involved in this paper. For passive control, this paper introduces full scale tests of buckling-restrained braces conducted to investigate the performance of the dampers and the second-editor of the Code of Seismic Design for Buildings. For active control, this paper introduces the HMD system for wind-induced vibration control of the Guangzhou TV tower. For semiactive control, the smart damping devices, algorithms for semi-active control, design methods and applications of semi-active control for structures are introduced in this paper. The failure mode control for bridges is also introduced

  4. Free Flight Ground Testing of ADEPT in Advance of the Sounding Rocket One Flight Experiment

    Smith, B. P.; Dutta, S.

    2017-01-01

    The Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) project will be conducting the first flight test of ADEPT, titled Sounding Rocket One (SR-1), in just two months. The need for this flight test stems from the fact that ADEPT's supersonic dynamic stability has not yet been characterized. The SR-1 flight test will provide critical data describing the flight mechanics of ADEPT in ballistic flight. These data will feed decision making on future ADEPT mission designs. This presentation will describe the SR-1 scientific data products, possible flight test outcomes, and the implications of those outcomes on future ADEPT development. In addition, this presentation will describe free-flight ground testing performed in advance of the flight test. A subsonic flight dynamics test conducted at the Vertical Spin Tunnel located at NASA Langley Research Center provided subsonic flight dynamics data at high and low altitudes for multiple center of mass (CoM) locations. A ballistic range test at the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamics Facility (HFFAF) located at NASA Ames Research Center provided supersonic flight dynamics data at low supersonic Mach numbers. Execution and outcomes of these tests will be discussed. Finally, a hypothesized trajectory estimate for the SR-1 flight will be presented.

  5. Advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR). Design, construction, operation and maintenance experience

    Idesawa, M.

    1998-01-01

    The ABWR has experienced all phases of design, construction, operation and maintenance at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Units No.6 and 7 and confirmed that originally intended development targets have been achieved with highly satisfactory results. This is the fruit of a project that collected wisdom from various sources under a international cooperative organization, with Tokyo Electric Power Company taking the leading role from the onset. These two units have not only demonstrated that ABWRs have superior performance as the first standard units of advanced light water reactor but also aroused a hope for the big potential advantages that ABWRs can provide us. The ABWR has already been awarded a U.S. standard license for having proved that it can comply with the requirements of international regulatory systems with an ample margin. There are also many construction programs with ABWRs progressing both domestically and abroad, suggesting that it has won recognition as an international standard plant. We will do our utmost to perfect the operation and maintenance records of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Units No.6 and 7, which is the top runner among ABWRs, and to make known the superiority of this reactor to the world. (J.P.N.)

  6. Influence of Institutional Experience and Technological Advances on Outcome of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastatic Lung Disease.

    Rieber, Juliane; Abbassi-Senger, Nasrin; Adebahr, Sonja; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Blanck, Oliver; Duma, Marciana; Eble, Michael J; Ernst, Iris; Flentje, Michael; Gerum, Sabine; Hass, Peter; Henkenberens, Christoph; Hildebrandt, Guido; Imhoff, Detlef; Kahl, Henning; Klass, Nathalie Desirée; Krempien, Robert; Lohaus, Fabian; Lohr, Frank; Petersen, Cordula; Schrade, Elsge; Streblow, Jan; Uhlmann, Lorenz; Wittig, Andrea; Sterzing, Florian; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    Many technological and methodical advances have made stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) more accurate and more efficient during the last years. This study aims to investigate whether experience in SBRT and technological innovations also translated into improved local control (LC) and overall survival (OS). A database of 700 patients treated with SBRT for lung metastases in 20 German centers between 1997 and 2014 was used for analysis. It was the aim of this study to investigate the impact of fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) staging, biopsy confirmation, image guidance, immobilization, and dose calculation algorithm, as well as the influence of SBRT experience, on LC and OS. Median follow-up time was 14.3 months (range, 0-131.9 months), with 2-year LC and OS of 81.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 75.8%-85.7%) and 54.4% (95% CI 50.2%-59.0%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, all treatment technologies except FDG-PET staging did not significantly influence outcome. Patients who received pre-SBRT FDG-PET staging showed superior 1- and 2-year OS of 82.7% (95% CI 77.4%-88.6%) and 64.8% (95% CI 57.5%-73.3%), compared with patients without FDG-PET staging resulting in 1- and 2-year OS rates of 72.8% (95% CI 67.4%-78.8%) and 52.6% (95% CI 46.0%-60.4%), respectively (P=.012). Experience with SBRT was identified as the main prognostic factor for LC: institutions with higher SBRT experience (patients treated with SBRT within the last 2 years of the inclusion period) showed superior LC compared with less-experienced centers (P≤.001). Experience with SBRT within the last 2 years was independent from known prognostic factors for LC. Investigated technological and methodical advancements other than FDG-PET staging before SBRT did not significantly improve outcome in SBRT for pulmonary metastases. In contrast, LC was superior with increasing SBRT experience of the individual center. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recent advances in PWR fuel design and performance experience at ABB-CENF

    Corsetti, Lawrence V.

    2004-01-01

    Utilities in the United States continue to move towards longer cycles and higher burnups to improve fuel cycle economics. This has placed increased demands for improved burnable absorber concepts. Zircaloy-4 corrosion behavior remains a high burnup performance concern. Over the past several years there has also been increasing utility interest in fuel reliability improvements. The development and application of erbia as a burnable absorber mixed directly with urania fuel will be discussed. Debris resistant fuel assembly designs and operating experience are reviewed. Oxide thickness measurements showing the improved corrosion resistance of optimized, low-tin Zircaloy-4 are presented. (author)

  8. Experience and evaluation of advanced on-line core monitoring system 'BEACON' at IKATA site

    Fujitsuka, Nobumichi; Tanouchi, Hideyuki; Imamura, Yasuhiro; Mizobuchil, Daisuke

    1997-01-01

    Shikoku Electric Power Company installed BEACON core monitoring system into IKATA unit 3 in May 1994. During its first cycle of core operation, various operational data were obtained including data of some anomalous reactor conditions introduced for the test objective of the plant start-up. This paper presents the evaluation of the BEACON system capability based on this experience. The system functions such as core monitoring and anomaly detection, prediction of future reactor conditions and increased efficiency of core management activities are discussed. Our future plan to utilize the system is also presented. (authors)

  9. Self-reported experiences of discrimination and health: scientific advances, ongoing controversies, and emerging issues.

    Lewis, Tené T; Cogburn, Courtney D; Williams, David R

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, research examining the impact of self-reported experiences of discrimination on mental and physical health has increased dramatically. Studies have found consistent associations between exposure to discrimination and a wide range of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-diagnosed mental disorders as well as objective physical health outcomes. Associations are seen in cross-sectional as well as longitudinal studies and persist even after adjustment for confounding variables, including personality characteristics and other threats to validity. However, controversies remain, particularly around the best approach to measuring experiences of discrimination, the significance of racial/ethnic discrimination versus overall mistreatment, the need to account for "intersectionalities," and the importance of comprehensive assessments. These issues are discussed in detail, along with emerging areas of emphasis including cyber discrimination, anticipatory stress or vigilance around discrimination, and interventions with potential to reduce the negative effects of discrimination on health. We also discuss priorities for future research and implications for interventions and policy.

  10. Experience using individually supplied heater rods in critical power testing of advanced BWR fuel

    Majed, M.; Morback, G.; Wiman, P. [ABB Atom AB, Vasteras (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The ABB Atom FRIGG loop located in Vasteras Sweden has during the last six years given a large experience of critical power measurements for BWR fuel designs using indirectly heated rods with individual power supply. The loop was built in the sixties and designed for maximum 100 bar pressure. Testing up to the mid eighties was performed with directly heated rods using a 9 MW, 80 kA power supply. Providing test data to develop critical power correlations for BWR fuel assemblies requires testing with many radial power distributions over the full range of hydraulic conditions. Indirectly heated rods give large advantages for the testing procedure, particularly convenient for variation of individual rod power. A test method being used at Stern Laboratories (formerly Westinghouse Canada) since the early sixties, allows one fuel assembly to simulate all required radial power distributions. This technique requires reliable indirectly heated rods with independently controlled power supplies and uses insulated electric fuel rod simulators with built-in instrumentation. The FRIGG loop was adapted to this system in 1987. A 4MW power supply with 10 individual units was then installed, and has since been used for testing 24 and 25 rod bundles simulating one subbundle of SVEA-96/100 type fuel assemblies. The experience with the system is very good, as being presented, and it is selected also for a planned upgrading of the facility to 15 MW.

  11. Patient's experience of treatment for sleep apnoea with a mandibular advancement splint.

    Bhamrah, Gurprit; Dhir, Arti; Cash, Alex; Ahmad, Sofia; Winchester, Lindsay J

    2015-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a well recognised clinical disorder in which there is narrowing and repeated collapse of the upper airway during sleep resulting in the cessation of breathing. Patients with mild to moderate sleep apnoea are often provided with mandibular advancement splint (MAS) therapy as a form of first line or definitive treatment. The aims of this audit were to evaluate patient satisfaction and success of MAS therapy. 93 patients diagnosed with sleep apnoea and suitable for a splint were recruited prospectively at Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead between January 2009 and October 2010. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was developed by health professionals involved in the care of patients with sleep apnoea and assessed for face and content validity and reliability. Participants completed the questionnaire six weeks after the splint was fitted. 44% who previously experienced snoring now reported no snoring and 47% reported less snoring since wearing the MAS appliance. 69% reported complete resolution of sleep apnoea symptoms. 37% experienced aching teeth and 33% experienced having a dry throat when wearing the appliance. 86% of sleeping partners felt that their quality of sleep was improved following their partners treatment. The standards set for each criteria in this audit were met. MAS treatment has a key role to play in the management of obstructive sleep apnoea with high rates of patient satisfaction and the majority of patients partners reporting a significant improvement in their own and their partners sleep quality. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Strain rate dependent tensile behavior of advanced high strength steels: Experiment and constitutive modeling

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Daeyong; Han, Heung Nam; Barlat, F.; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    High strain rate tensile tests were conducted for three advanced high strength steels: DP780, DP980 and TRIP780. A high strain rate tensile test machine was used for applying the strain rate ranging from 0.1/s to 500/s. Details of the measured stress–strain responses were comparatively analyzed for the DP780 and TRIP780 steels which show similar microstructural feature and ultimate tensile strength, but different strengthening mechanisms. The experimental observations included: usual strain rate dependent plastic flow stress behavior in terms of the yield stress (YS), the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the uniform elongation (UE) and the total elongation (TE) which were observed for the three materials. But, higher strain hardening rate at early plastic strain under quasi-static condition than that of some increased strain rates was featured for TRIP780 steel, which might result from more active transformation during deformation with lower velocity. The uniform elongation that explains the onset of instability and the total elongation were larger in case of TRIP steel than the DP steel for the whole strain rate range, but interestingly the fracture strain measured by the reduction of area (RA) method showed that the TRIP steel has lower values than DP steel. The fractographs using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at the fractured surfaces were analyzed to relate measured fracture strain and the microstructural difference of the two materials during the process of fracture under various strain rates. Finally, constitutive modeling for the plastic flow stresses under various strain rates was provided in this study. The proposed constitutive law could represent both Hollomon-like and Voce-like hardening laws and the ratio between the two hardening types was efficiently controlled as a function of strain rate. The new strength model was validated successfully under various strain rates for several grades of steels such as mild steels, DP780, TRIP780, DP980 steels.

  13. Advanced medical students' experiences and views on professionalism at Kuwait University.

    Al-Abdulrazzaq, Dalia; Al-Fadhli, Amani; Arshad, Andleeb

    2014-07-23

    Professionalism is a core competency in the medical profession worldwide. Numerous studies investigate how this competency is taught and learned. However, there are few reports on the students' views and experiences with professionalism especially in the Arab world. Our aim was to explore the experiences and views of Kuwait final-year medical students on professionalism. This was a questionnaire study of final-year medical students at Kuwait University (n = 95). Open- and close-ended questions were used to determine the students' experiences and views on: definition, teaching, learning, and assessment of professionalism. Eighty-five of the students completed the questionnaire (89.5%). A total of 252 attributes defining professionalism were listed by our respondents. The majority (98.0%) of these attributes were categorized under the CanMEDS theme describing professionalism as commitment to patients, profession, and society through ethical practice. The most helpful methods in learning about professionalism for the students were contact with positive role models, patients and families, and with their own families, relatives and peers. The students' rating of the quality and quantity of teaching professionalism in the institution was quite variable. Despite this, 68.2% of the students felt very or somewhat comfortable explaining the meaning of medical professionalism to junior medical students. Almost half of the students felt that their education had always or sometimes helped them deal with professionally-challenging situations. Majority (77.6%) of the students thought that their academic assessments should include assessment of professionalism and should be used as a selection criterion in their future academic careers (62.3%). Most of the students discussed and sought advice regarding professionally-challenging situations from their fellow medical students and colleagues. Seventy-five (88.2%) students did not know which organizational body in the institution

  14. Recent advances in the physics of collective excitations in the Paul trap simulator experiment

    Gilson, E.P.; Chung, M.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Efthimion, P.C.; Godbehere, A.B.; Majeski, R.

    2009-01-01

    The Paul trap simulator experiment (PTSX) is a compact laboratory linear Paul trap that simulates the transverse dynamics of a long charged-particle bunch propagating through a magnetic alternating-gradient (AG) transport system. The transverse dynamics of particles in the AG system in the beam's frame-of-reference and those of particles in PTSX are described by the same sets of equations, including all nonlinear space-charge effects. Initial experimental results are presented in which the collective transverse symmetric mode (m=0) and quadrupole mode (m=2) have been observed in pure-barium-ion plasmas in PTSX, with a depressed-tune ν/ν 0 ∼0.9, with the intent of identifying collective modes whose signature will serve as a robust diagnostic for key properties of the beam, such as line density and transverse emittance. The results of particle-in-cell simulations performed with the WARP code are compared to the experimental data.

  15. Experience and improvements in advanced alarm annunciation systems in nuclear power plants. Proceedings

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the meeting is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion on R and D, in-plant experiences and improvements to annunciation systems. In planning the meeting, we have fully recognized that annunciation is an integral part of control centre design and plant operation. However, we have proposed to keep the meeting focussed on annunciation-related topics so as to maximize the benefits from the discussions. Among us this week, we have 62 participants from 9 countries presenting 22 papers. Further, these representatives are from utilities, design/engineering, research and development, and regulatory organizations. The meeting is organized into 7 session, focussing on a specific aspect or perspective on annunciation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  16. Reduction of toroidal magnetic field ripple in the advanced material tokamak experiment on JFT-2M

    Sato, M.; Miura, Y.; Kimura, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Koike, T.; Nakayama, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Urata, K.

    1998-01-01

    In order to reduce fast ion losses due to the toroidal field ripple, the reduction of ripple amplitude (δ) by inserting ferritic steel is studied, taking its toroidal mode number into account. The guideline of the design for reduction is wider and thicker ferritic board (FB) is located at further position from VV. The δ depends on the toroidal magnetic field. The value of B r21 /B t in the case of displacement of few cm is about 1 x 10 -5 which is one order smaller than the critical value. The offsetting of FB is not a problem for locked mode. Preliminary experiments with insertion of one or two FB's indicate no adverse effect on global plasma parameters. (author)

  17. Reduction of toroidal magnetic field ripple in the advanced material tokamak experiment on JFT-2M

    Sato, M.; Miura, Y.; Kimura, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Koike, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan); Nakayama, T. [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan); Hasegawa, M. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp. (Japan); Urata, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    In order to reduce fast ion losses due to the toroidal field ripple, the reduction of ripple amplitude ({delta}) by inserting ferritic steel is studied, taking its toroidal mode number into account. The guideline of the design for reduction is wider and thicker ferritic board (FB) is located at further position from VV. The {delta} depends on the toroidal magnetic field. The value of B{sub r21} /B{sub t} in the case of displacement of few cm is about 1 x 10{sup -5} which is one order smaller than the critical value. The offsetting of FB is not a problem for locked mode. Preliminary experiments with insertion of one or two FB's indicate no adverse effect on global plasma parameters. (author)

  18. Use of information and communication technologies in training, experiences, advances and tends

    Gonzalez, F.; Batuecas, T.; Salve, R.; Rodriguez, E.

    2004-01-01

    Tecnatom has carried out for the last seven years development and investments to use Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in training areas. This paper presents, from a chronological perspective, Tecnatom's representative experiences when implementing solutions and methods. Firstly, a brief explanation of a Training Management and Training Area Intranet application is provided, to focus next on the e-learning approach which has been followed to develop Tecnatom's Virtual Campus. Finally, the paper describes summaries of some interesting and innovative R and D projects for application of virtual and augmented reality to training, and the development of new e-learning courses in the area of maintenance. These projects are the following: VIRMAN, Spanish project to use virtual mock-iups in training; STARMATE, European augmented reality application for training and guided maintenance; PRVIR, virtual reality application for training in radiological protection; SIMU2, virtual reality application for training O and M personnel in radioactive environments. (Author)

  19. Advanced diagnostics for laser plasma interaction studies and some recent experiments

    Chaurasia, S.; Munda, D.S.; Dhareshwar, L.J.

    2008-10-01

    The complete characterization of Laser plasma interaction studies related to inertial confinement fusion laser and Equation of state (EOS) studies needs many diagnostics to explain the several physical phenomena occurring simultaneously in the laser produced plasma. This involves many on ion emission are important to understand physical phenomena which are responsible for generation of laser plasma as well as its interaction with an intense laser. In this report we describe the development of various x-ray diagnostics which are used in determining temporal, spatial and spectral properties of x-rays radiated from laser produced plasma. Diagnostics which have been used in experiments for investigation of laser-produced plasma as a source of ions are also described. Techniques using an optical streak camera and VISAR which are being used in the Equation of States (EOS) studies of various materials, which are important for material science, astrophysics as well as ICF is described in details. (author)

  20. Jagiellonian University Advances in Ps Manipulations and Laser Studies in the AEgIS Experiment

    Caravita, R; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Brusa, R S; Caccia, M; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Demetrio, A; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Evans, C; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Hinterberger, A; Holmestad, H; Kellerbauer, A; Khalidova, O; Krasnický, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Marton, J; Matveev, V; Mazzotta, Z; Müller, S R; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M; Pacifico, N; Pagano, D; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Ravelli, L; Rienäcker, B; Robert, J; Røhne, O M; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Smestad, L; Sorrentino, F; Testera, G; Tietje, I; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zimmer, C; Zmeskal, J; Zurlo, N

    2017-01-01

    Positronium (Ps), the unstable bound state of electron and positron, is a valuable system for neutral antimatter spectroscopic studies and for antihydrogen production. Forming a pulsed beam cold antihydrogen using charge-exchange with the Rydberg Ps is the goal of the AEgIS Collaboration, which aims to measure gravity on neutral antimatter. Recent results achieved in producing, manipulating and studying Ps are summarized. Ps has been first produced with mesoporous silica targets in a reflection geometry. Spectroscopy of Ps n = 3 state has been conducted, yielding as a byproduct an independent estimate of the produced Ps temperature. Efficient laser excitation to the Rydberg levels was then achieved, validating the proof-of-concept of AEgIS. Subsequently, production of Ps from a new class of transmission targets was also achieved, opening the possibility for future experiments.

  1. Inactive experiments for advanced separation processes prior to high activity trials in ATALANTE

    Duhamet, Jean; Lanoe, Jean-Yves; Rivalier, Patrick; Borda, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    Many trials have been performed in ATALANTE's shielded cells to demonstrate the technical feasibility of processes involving minor actinide separation. They required developments of new extractors as well as a step by step procedure have been used to lower the risks of malfunction during high active operation. The design of the extractors developed by Cea has included shielded cells restrictions, miniaturization to lower the quantity of high active material and wastes and the care for being representative of industrial equipment. After individual shake down inactive tests, with actual phases, each process experiment scheduled in ATALANTE has been tested at G1 Facility in Marcoule. The objective was to reproduce as much as possible all the equipment chosen for active tests. This procedure has demonstrated its efficiency to detect many problems that would have heavy impact if they have been discovered during active trials. It was also used for operators'training. (authors)

  2. Experience and improvements in advanced alarm annunciation systems in nuclear power plants. Proceedings

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the meeting is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion on R and D, in-plant experiences and improvements to annunciation systems. In planning the meeting, we have fully recognized that annunciation is an integral part of control centre design and plant operation. However, we have proposed to keep the meeting focussed on annunciation-related topics so as to maximize the benefits from the discussions. Among us this week, we have 62 participants from 9 countries presenting 22 papers. Further, these representatives are from utilities, design/engineering, research and development, and regulatory organizations. The meeting is organized into 7 session, focussing on a specific aspect or perspective on annunciation. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. Feedback of operating experience into development of the advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR)

    Shimoda, S.; Venne, T. van de.

    1989-01-01

    The APWR development, which was successfully completed in 1987 with complete satisfaction of the design objectives, is one of the good examples of the successful international cooperative development. The successful completion of the development through management could be attributed to the following: Sophisticated implementation of development which consists of clear definition of performance goals, review and feedback of operating experience and consideration for reliable design through such development activities as detailed design evaluation, design reviews and verification by testings. Project organization and contractual arrangement which includes program director, project manager and engineering manager, and introduction of lead party/support party concept. Good oversea communication by means of high speed facsimile machine, electronic mail system and telephone conference, and frequent face-to-face meetings. Good communication with the utility companies at progress status and design decision meetings

  4. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments

    Wang, Liqun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe-C microelectrolysis-Fenton process is proposed to pretreat landfill leachate. • Operating variables are optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). • 3D-EEMs and MW distribution explain the mechanism of enhanced biodegradability. • Fixed-bed column experiments are performed at different flow rates. - Abstract: A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H_2O_2 concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD_5/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD_5/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72 g/L, H_2O_2 concentration 12.32 mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate.

  5. Using Technological Advances to Improve Surgery Curriculum: Experience With a Mobile Application.

    Green, Courtney A; Kim, Edward H; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Chern, Hueylan

    2018-01-31

    Our previous home-video basic surgical skills curriculum required substantial faculty time and resources, and was limited by delayed feedback and technical difficulties. Consequently, we integrated that curriculum with a mobile application platform. Our purpose is to describe this application and learner satisfaction. The mobile platform incorporates a patented pedagogical design based on Ericsson's deliberate practice and Bandura's social learning theory. Instructors built step-wise skills modules. During the challenge phase, learners watched a video of surgical tasks completed by experts and uploaded a video of themselves performing the same task. In the Peer Review phase, they used a grading rubric to provide feedback. In the Recap stage, learners received individual feedback and could review their own videos. Two groups of learners, graduating medical students and matriculating surgical residents, participated in this independent learning platform, along with 2 to 4 laboratory sessions, and completed a survey about their experience. Survey responses were summarized descriptively and comments analyzed using content analysis. Fifty learners submitted videos of assigned tasks and completed peer reviews. Learners reported positive experiences specifically for the Peer Review Stage, structured home practice, ease of mobile access to submit and review videos, and ongoing immediate feedback. Over half of the learners reported spending at least 10 to 30 minute practicing skills before recording their videos and over 80% rerecorded at least 2 times before submission. Content analysis revealed learners engaged with the educational concepts designed into the platform. Learners easily used and were satisfied with a mobile-technology teaching platform that maintained the fundamental content, educational theories, and organizational structure of our previously effective surgical skills curriculum. Prior challenges were directly addressed through the mobile application's ease

  6. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments

    Wang, Liqun, E-mail: 691127317@qq.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Qi, E-mail: yangqi@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Dongbo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmli121x@hotmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Fe-C microelectrolysis-Fenton process is proposed to pretreat landfill leachate. • Operating variables are optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). • 3D-EEMs and MW distribution explain the mechanism of enhanced biodegradability. • Fixed-bed column experiments are performed at different flow rates. - Abstract: A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD{sub 5}/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72 g/L, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration 12.32 mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate.

  7. Technology Advancements for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide From Space using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator

    Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Kooi, S. A.; Carrion, W.; Hicks, J.; Fan, T. F.; Nehrir, A. R.; Browell, E. V.; Meadows, B.; Davis, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    This work describes advances in critical lidar technologies and techniques developed as part of the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) system for measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The ACES design demonstrates advancements in: (1) enhanced power-aperture product through the use and operation of multiple co-aligned laser transmitters and a multi-aperture telescope design; (2) high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration operation; and (4) advanced algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument, an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar, was designed for high-altitude aircraft operations and can be directly applied to space instrumentation to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. Specifically, the lidar simultaneously transmits three IM-CW laser beams from the high power EDFAs operating near 1571 nm. The outgoing laser beams are aligned to the field of view of three fiber-coupled 17.8-cm diameter telescopes, and the backscattered light collected by the same three telescopes is sent to the detector/TIA subsystem, which has a bandwidth of 4.9 MHz and operates service-free with a tactical Dewar and cryocooler. The electronic bandwidth is only slightly higher than 1 MHz, effectively limiting the noise level. Two key laser modulation approaches are being tested to significantly mitigate the effects of thin clouds on the retrieved CO2 column amounts. This work provides an over view of these technologies, the modulation approaches, and results from recent test flights during the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Earth Venture Suborbital flight campaign.

  8. The Experience of Older People in the Shared Decision-Making Process in Advanced Kidney Care

    Jenkins, Karen; McManus, Breeda; Gracey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This qualitative descriptive study was designed to understand the experiences of older people (>70 years) when making a decision about renal replacement therapy. This was a coproduced study, whereby patients and carers were involved in all aspects of the research process. Methods. A Patient and Carer Group undertook volunteer and research training. The group developed the interview questions and interviewed 29 people who had commenced dialysis or made a decision not to have dialysis. Interview data were transcribed and analysed, and common themes were identified. Results. 22 men and 7 women (mean age 77.4 yrs) from two hospitals were interviewed. 18 had chosen haemodialysis, 6 peritoneal dialysis, and 5 supportive care. The majority of patients were involved in the dialysis decision. Most were satisfied with the amount of information that they received, although some identified that the quality of the information could be improved, especially how daily living can be affected by dialysis. Conclusion. Our findings show that overall older patients were involved in the dialysis decision along with their families. Our approach is innovative because it is the first time that patients and carers have been involved in a coproduced study about shared decision-making. PMID:27990438

  9. Advances in neuroscience imply that harmful experiments in dogs are unethical.

    Bailey, Jarrod; Pereira, Shiranee

    2018-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) of fully awake and unrestrained dog 'volunteers' has been proven an effective tool to understand the neural circuitry and functioning of the canine brain. Although every dog owner would vouch that dogs are perceptive, cognitive, intuitive and capable of positive emotions/empathy, as indeed substantiated by ethological studies for some time, neurological investigations now corroborate this. These studies show that there exists a striking similarity between dogs and humans in the functioning of the caudate nucleus (associated with pleasure and emotion), and dogs experience positive emotions, empathic-like responses and demonstrate human bonding which, some scientists claim, may be at least comparable with human children. There exists an area analogous to the 'voice area' in the canine brain, enabling dogs to comprehend and respond to emotional cues/valence in human voices, and evidence of a region in the temporal cortex of dogs involved in the processing of faces, as also observed in humans and monkeys. We therefore contend that using dogs in invasive and/or harmful research, and toxicity testing, cannot be ethically justifiable. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. EXPERIENCE OF USING ADVANCED INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN TRAINING FUTURE TRANSLATORS IN UK UNIVERSITIES

    E.V. Dolinskyi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The quality of teaching is not only to use the Internet or e-learning. The novelty of the information and communication technology is to change the orientation of training, the transition to the creation of online and e-learning systems, but also remains an unsolved problem of adaptation of new materials. With IT students develop creativity, independence, professionalism. Interactive technologies provide various kinds of user interaction (sound, images, animations, etc. and is a basic tool for the creation of computer training programs. The synthesis of traditional and modern information technology is based on the activity- when learning activities are the subject of training and help to create an overview of the professional activities of an interpreter as a purposeful, active, long-term process of learning. Using an interdisciplinary approach makes it possible to seamlessly integrate the knowledge of linguistics and computer science, linguistics and psychology. The purpose of this paper is the analysis of experience in the use of new information technologies in the training of future translators in UK universities. In this research we identified the most common programs used in the preparation of translators, substantiated the possibility of their application, named the city and universities in the UK where such training is carried out.

  11. AREVA advanced safety IC solutions and licensing experience for new nuclear builds and modernization projects - 15545

    Fourestie, B.; Pickelmann, J.; Richter, S.; Hilsenkopf, P.; Paris, P.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory requirements for the Instrumentation and Control (IC) for Nuclear Power Plants have become significantly more stringent during the last 10 years in the areas of software development and qualification, traceability, diversity, or seismic requirements for instance, and with the introduction of new standards (such as the IEC 62566, or the IEC 62003). Based on a large and comprehensive experience gained from projects in several regulatory environments and different plant types (including non-OEM plants), AREVA has developed and adapted its processes and products to provide state-of-the-art IC solutions in full compliance with the regulatory demands and requirements in terms of robustness (independence, defense-in-depth, diversity and cyber-security). In this paper we present the safety IC platforms developed by AREVA. These platforms include TELEPERM XS as the computerized safety IC platform for class 1 system implementation, the Qualified Display System (QDS) for safety classified screen-based interface, and UNICORN as fully diverse analog safety IC platform for backup systems

  12. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments.

    Wang, Liqun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin

    2016-11-15

    A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H2O2 concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD5/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD5/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72g/L, H2O2 concentration 12.32mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in neuroscience imply that harmful experiments in dogs are unethical

    Pereira, Shiranee

    2018-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) of fully awake and unrestrained dog ’volunteers' has been proven an effective tool to understand the neural circuitry and functioning of the canine brain. Although every dog owner would vouch that dogs are perceptive, cognitive, intuitive and capable of positive emotions/empathy, as indeed substantiated by ethological studies for some time, neurological investigations now corroborate this. These studies show that there exists a striking similarity between dogs and humans in the functioning of the caudate nucleus (associated with pleasure and emotion), and dogs experience positive emotions, empathic-like responses and demonstrate human bonding which, some scientists claim, may be at least comparable with human children. There exists an area analogous to the ’voice area' in the canine brain, enabling dogs to comprehend and respond to emotional cues/valence in human voices, and evidence of a region in the temporal cortex of dogs involved in the processing of faces, as also observed in humans and monkeys. We therefore contend that using dogs in invasive and/or harmful research, and toxicity testing, cannot be ethically justifiable. PMID:28739639

  14. Update on the DIII-D ECH system: experiments, gyrotrons, advanced diagnostics, and controls

    Lohr John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ECH system on DIII-D is continuing to be upgraded, while simultaneously being operated nearly daily for plasma experiments. The latest major hardware addition is a new 117.5 GHz gyrotron, which generated 1.7 MW for short pulses during factory testing. A new gyrotron control system based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA technology with very high speed system data acquisition has significantly increased the flexibility and reliability of individual gyrotron operation. We have improved the performance of the fast mirror scanning, both by increasing the scan speeds and by adding new algorithms for controlling the aiming using commands generated by the Plasma Control System (PCS. The system is used for transport studies, ELM control, current profile control, non-inductive current generation, suppression of MHD modes, startup assist, plasma density control, and other applications. A program of protective measures, which has been in place for more than two years, has eliminated damage to hardware and diagnostics caused by overdense operation. Other activities not directly related to fusion research have used the ECH system to test components, study methods for improving production of semiconductor junctions and materials, and test the feasibility of using ground based microwave systems to power satellites into orbit.

  15. Update on the DIII-D ECH system: experiments, gyrotrons, advanced diagnostics, and controls

    Lohr, John; Brambila, Rigoberto; Cengher, Mirela; Gorelov, Yuri; Grosnickle, William; Moeller, Charles; Ponce, Dan; Torrezan, Antonio; Ives, Lawrence; Reed, Michael; Blank, Monica; Felch, Kevin; Parisuaña, Claudia; LeViness, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    The ECH system on DIII-D is continuing to be upgraded, while simultaneously being operated nearly daily for plasma experiments. The latest major hardware addition is a new 117.5 GHz gyrotron, which generated 1.7 MW for short pulses during factory testing. A new gyrotron control system based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology with very high speed system data acquisition has significantly increased the flexibility and reliability of individual gyrotron operation. We have improved the performance of the fast mirror scanning, both by increasing the scan speeds and by adding new algorithms for controlling the aiming using commands generated by the Plasma Control System (PCS). The system is used for transport studies, ELM control, current profile control, non-inductive current generation, suppression of MHD modes, startup assist, plasma density control, and other applications. A program of protective measures, which has been in place for more than two years, has eliminated damage to hardware and diagnostics caused by overdense operation. Other activities not directly related to fusion research have used the ECH system to test components, study methods for improving production of semiconductor junctions and materials, and test the feasibility of using ground based microwave systems to power satellites into orbit.

  16. Observation of advanced particle removal rates in pump limiter simulation experiments

    Goebel, D.M.; Conn, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    The performance of particle removal schemes for density and impurity control in tokamaks and mirror machines depends strongly on the plasma parameters and local recycling near the plasma neutralizier plates and gas pumping ducts. The relationship between plasma density, electron temperature, ion energy and gas flow and particle removal rate through a pumping duct located near a plasma neutralizer plate has been experimentally investigated in the steady state plasma device PISCES. Results indicate that initially the particle removal by pumps at the end of the duct is proportional to the plasma flux to the plate. A nonlinear increase in the pumping rate occurs when the ionization mean free path for neutrals from the plate becomes less than the plasma radius. The transition from a transparent to an opaque plasma due to local ionization of the neutrals produced at the neutralizer plate greatly enhances the particle removal rate by recycling of the neutral gas as it flows away from the neutralizer plate or out of the pumping ducts. Parameters were varied to determine the importance of ballistic scattering of higher energy ions from the plate, but no effects were found in these experiments

  17. Impact of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses on Quality Measures: The Missouri Quality Initiative Experience.

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Popejoy, Lori; Vogelsmeier, Amy; Galambos, Colleen; Alexander, Greg; Flesner, Marcia; Murray, Cathy; Crecelius, Charles; Ge, Bin; Petroski, Gregory

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the impact of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) on the quality measure (QM) scores of the 16 participating nursing homes of the Missouri Quality Initiative (MOQI) intervention. The MOQI was one of 7 program sites in the US, with specific interventions unique to each site tested for the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services Innovations Center. While the goals of the MOQI for long-stay nursing home residents did not specifically include improvement of the QM scores, it was anticipated that improvement most likely would occur. Primary goals of the MOQI were to reduce the frequency of avoidable hospital admissions and readmissions; improve resident health outcomes; improve the process of transitioning between inpatient hospitals and nursing facilities; and reduce overall healthcare spending without restricting access to care or choice of providers. A 2-group comparison analysis was conducted using statewide QMs; a matched comparison group was selected from facilities in the same counties as the intervention homes, similar baseline QM scores, similar size and ownership. MOQI nursing homes each had an APRN embedded full-time to improve care and help the facility achieve MOQI goals. Part of their clinical work with residents and staff was to focus on quality improvement strategies with potential to influence healthcare outcomes. Trajectories of QM scores for the MOQI intervention nursing homes and matched comparison group homes were tested with nonparametric tests to examine for change in the desired direction between the 2 groups from baseline to 36 months. A composite QM score for each facility was constructed, and baseline to 36-month average change scores were examined using nonparametric tests. Then, adjusting for baseline, a repeated measures analysis using analysis of covariance as conducted. Composite QM scores of the APRN intervention group were significantly better (P = .025) than the comparison group

  18. Swedish students' and preceptors' perceptions of what students learn in a six-month advanced pharmacy practice experience.

    Wallman, Andy; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark; Gustavsson, Maria; Lindblad, Asa Kettis; Johansson, Markus; Ring, Lena

    2011-12-15

    To identify what pharmacy students learn during the 6-month advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in Sweden. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 pharmacy APPE students and 17 pharmacist preceptors and analyzed in a qualitative directed content analysis using a defined workplace learning typology for categories. The Swedish APPE provides students with task performance skills for work at pharmacies and social and professional knowledge, such as teamwork, how to learn while in a work setting, self-evaluation, understanding of the pharmacist role, and decision making and problem solving skills. Many of these skills and knowledge are not accounted for in the curricula in Sweden. Using a workplace learning typology to identify learning outcomes, as in this study, could be useful for curricula development. Exploring the learning that takes place during the APPE in a pharmacy revealed a broad range of skills and knowledge that students acquire.

  19. Science-Based Approach for Advancing Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy: Integrating Numerical Simulations with Experiments

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Chamorro, L. P.; Hill, C.

    2011-12-01

    experimentally in the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Main Channel. The experiments and simulations are compared with each other and shown to be in very good agreement both in terms of the mean flow and the turbulence statistics. The results are analyzed to study the structure of turbulence in the wake of the turbine and also identify the effects of turbulent fluctuations in the approach flow on the power produced by the turbine. Overall our results make a strong case that high-resolution numerical modeling, validated with detailed laboratory measurements, is a viable tool for assessing and optimizing the performance of MHK devices.

  20. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories: Formation of Iron(III) Thiocyannate

    Clark, Charles R.

    1997-10-01

    A series of 15 stopped-flow kinetic experiments relating to the formation of iron(III)- thiocyanate at 25.0 °C and I = 1.0 M (NaClO4) is described. A methodology is given whereby solution preparation and data collection are able to be carried out within the time scale of a single laboratory period (3-4 h). Kinetic data are obtained using constant [SCN-], and at three H+ concentrations (0.10, 0.20, 0.30 M) for varying concentrations of Fe3+ (ca. 0.0025 - 0.020 M). Rate data (450 nm) are consistent with rate laws for the forward and reverse reactions: kf = (k1 + k2Ka1/[H+])[Fe3+] and kr = k-1 + k-2Ka2/[H+] respectively, with k1,k-1 corresponding to the rate constants for formation and decay of FeSCN2+, k2, k-2 to the rate constants for formation and decay of the FeSCN(OH)+ ion and Ka1,Ka2 to the acid dissociation constants (coordinated OH2 ionization) of Fe3+ and FeSCN2+. Using literature values for the latter two quantities ( Ka1 = 2.04 x 10-3 M, Ka2 = 6.5 x 10-5 M) allows values for the four rate constants to be obtained. A typical data set is analyzed to give k1 = 109(10) M-1s-1, k-1 = 0.79(0.10) s-1, k2= 8020(800) M-1s-1, k-2 = 2630(230) s-1. Absorbance change data for reaction (DeltaA) follow the expression: DeltaA = Alim.Kf.[Fe3+]/(1 + Kf.[Fe3+]), with Alim corresponding to the absorbance of fully formed FeSCN2+ (i.e. free SCN- absent) and Kf to the formation constant of this complex (value in the example 112(5) M-1, c.f. 138(29) M-1 from the kinetic data).

  1. LWR severe accident simulation: Iodine behaviour in FPT2 experiment and advances on containment iodine chemistry

    Girault, N., E-mail: nathalie.girault@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), BP3 - 13115 St.-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bosland, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), BP3 - 13115 St.-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dickinson, S. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Harwell, Oxon OX11 0QT (United Kingdom); Funke, F. [AREVA NP Gmbh, PO Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Guentay, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Herranz, L.E. [Centro des Investigaciones Energeticas, MedioAmbiantales y Tecnologicas, av. Complutense 2, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Powers, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short term gaseous iodine fraction can be produced either in primary circuit or on containment condensing surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gaseous radiolytic reactions convert volatile iodine into non-volatile iodine oxide particulates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline and evaporating sump decrease the iodine volatility in containment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Release of volatile iodine from containment surfaces explained the long term stationary residual gaseous iodine concentration. - Abstract: The Phebus Fission Product (FP) Program studies key phenomena of severe accidents in water-cooled nuclear reactors. In the framework of the Phebus program, five in-pile experiments have been performed that cover fuel rod degradation and behaviour of fission products released via the coolant circuit into the containment vessel. The focus of this paper is on iodine behaviour during the Phebus FPT2 test. FPT2 used a 33 GWd/t uranium dioxide fuel enriched to 4.5%, re-irradiated in situ for 7 days to a burn-up of 130 MWd/t. This test was performed to study the impact of steam-poor conditions and boric acid on the fission product chemistry. For the containment vessel, more specifically, the objective was to study iodine chemistry in an alkaline sump under evaporating conditions. The iodine results of the Phebus FPT2 test confirmed many of the essential features of iodine behaviour in the containment vessel provided by the first two Phebus tests, FPT0 and FPT1. These are the existence of an early gaseous iodine fraction, the persistence of low gaseous iodine concentrations and the importance of the sump in suppressing the iodine partitioning from sump to atmosphere. The main new insights provided by the Phebus FPT2 test were the iodine desorption from stainless steel walls deposits and the role of the evaporating sump in further iodine depletion in the containment atmosphere. The current paper presents an interpretation of

  2. On new paths. Hitchhiker's guide through beryllium chemistry; Auf neuen Pfaden. Per Anhalter durch die Berylliumchemie

    Naglav, Dominik; Bendt, Georg; Schulz, Stephan [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Chemie; Buchner, Magnus R.; Kraus, Florian [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Anorganische Chemie, Fluorchemie

    2016-08-26

    This short essay is intended as an introduction to all less experienced people in the field of beryllium chemistry. Current research findings on the toxicity of the element and its compounds are reviewed and various basic and necessary orientation aids for safe and correct handling in modern chemical research laboratories are presented. Phenomenological observations concerning the uniqueness of the element and its chemistry are communicated and placed in the historical context. We summarize many contributions and experiences of passionate scientists in this field. It is a matter of heart for us that our fellow students critically question and rethink the reservations about beryllium and their connections built up over generations, thus initiating a new era of intensive research into this scorned element. Who in the world should be able to manage beryllium and its connections more safely and more expertly than we do chemists? [German] Dieser Kurzaufsatz soll eine Einfuehrung fuer alle weniger Erfahrenen auf dem Gebiet der Berylliumchemie darstellen. Aktuelle Forschungsergebnisse ueber die Giftigkeit des Elements und seiner Verbindungen werden rezensiert und diverse grundlegende und noetige Orientierungshilfen fuer die sichere und richtige Handhabung in modernen chemischen Forschungslaboren vorgestellt. Phaenomenologische Beobachtungen bezueglich der Einzigartigkeit des Elements und seiner Chemie werden mitgeteilt und in den historischen Kontext gestellt. Wir fassen viele Beitraege und Erfahrungen von auf diesem Gebiet leidenschaftlich taetigen Wissenschaftlern zusammen. Es ist uns ein Herzensanliegen, dass unsere Kommilitonen die ueber Generationen aufgebauten Vorbehalte gegenueber Beryllium und seinen Verbindungen kritisch hinterfragen und ueberdenken und so eine neue Aera intensiver Forschung zu diesem verschmaehten Element eingeleitet wird. Wer in aller Welt soll denn das Beryllium und seine Verbindungen sicherer und fachkundiger handhaben koennen als wir

  3. Physician and parent perceptions of prognosis and end-of-life experience in children with advanced heart disease.

    Balkin, Emily M; Wolfe, Joanne; Ziniel, Sonja I; Lang, Peter; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Dillis, Shay; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Blume, Elizabeth D

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about how physician and parent perspectives compare regarding the prognosis and end-of-life (EOL) experience of children with advanced heart disease (AHD). The study's objective was to describe and compare parent and physician perceptions regarding prognosis and EOL experience in children with AHD. This was a cross-sectional survey study of cardiologists and bereaved parents. Study subjects were parents and cardiologists of children with primary cardiac diagnoses who died in a tertiary care pediatric hospital between January 2007 and December 2009. Inclusion required both physician and parent to have completed surveys respective to the same patient. A total of 31 parent/physician pairs formed the analytic sample. Perceptions were measured of cardiologists and bereaved parents regarding the EOL experience of children with AHD. Nearly half of parents and physicians felt that patients suffered 'a great deal,' 'a lot,' or 'somewhat' at EOL, but there was no agreement between them. At diagnosis, parents more often expected complete repair and normal lifespan while the majority of physicians expected shortened lifespan without normal quality of life. Parents who expected complete repair with normal life were more likely to report 'a lot' of suffering at EOL (p=0.002). In 43% of cases, physicians reported that the parents were prepared for the way in which their child died, while the parents reported feeling unprepared. Both parents and physicians perceive suffering at EOL in patients who die of AHD. Moreover, parent expectations at diagnosis may influence perceptions of suffering at EOL. Physicians overestimate the degree of parent preparedness for their child's death.

  4. The Small Payload Access to Space Experiment (SPASE): Using Non-Traditional Aerospace Technology to Enable a New Generation of Low-Cost Missions

    McDermott, Scott; Aamot, L. Eric

    2001-01-01

    Launching on STS-108 Endeavour in late 2001, the Small Payload Access to Space Experiment (SPASE) demonstrates a number of new technologies, efficient ways to conduct a nanospacecraft development program, and how to take such a spacecraft through the Shuttle Hitchhiker safety and integration process. This paper describes the essential “lessons learned” in each of these areas. Commercial solar panels, batteries, imagers, photocells, integrated circuits, and manufacturing techniques are used th...

  5. The importance of thorium in the context of the generation in advanced reactors and the IPEN's experience

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O.; Mindrisz, Ana C.; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2011-01-01

    thorium compounds and IPEN accumulated since the 60's a wide experience in the purification of thorium, obtained primarily from the monazite processing. Studies were also conducted on obtaining nuclear fuel based on thorium, the reduction of ThF 4 to metallic thorium, neutronic studies and proposition of reactor concepts based on the element. It should also be recorded that there was at IPEN, during this period, the production in pilot scale of over one hundred and seventy metric tons of thorium nitrate with high purity. In this paper, we present briefly the experience accumulated at IPEN-CNEN/SP-Brazil and the different areas that comprise the Thorium Fuel Cycle, and the possibilities and advantages of thorium use in the IV Generation Advanced Reactors. (author)

  6. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    Stellwag, B.; Aaltonen, P.; Hickling, J.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ''on-line'' and ''in-situ'' characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. For confirmation, a complete set of sensors

  7. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections and calculational methods for the advanced neutron source against the FOEHN critical experiments measurements

    Smith, L.A.; Gallmeier, F.X.; Gehin, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    The FOEHN critical experiment was analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections and Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutronics computer codes in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. The ANSL-V 99-group master cross section library was used for all the calculations. Three different critical configurations were evaluated using the multigroup KENO Monte Carlo transport code, the multigroup DORT discrete ordinates transport code, and the multigroup diffusion theory code VENTURE. The simple configuration consists of only the fuel and control elements with the heavy water reflector. The intermediate configuration includes boron endplates at the upper and lower edges of the fuel element. The complex configuration includes both the boron endplates and components in the reflector. Cross sections were processed using modules from the AMPX system. Both 99-group and 20-group cross sections were created and used in two-dimensional models of the FOEHN experiment. KENO calculations were performed using both 99-group and 20-group cross sections. The DORT and VENTURE calculations were performed using 20-group cross sections. Because the simple and intermediate configurations are azimuthally symmetric, these configurations can be explicitly modeled in R-Z geometry. Since the reflector components cannot be modeled explicitly using the current versions of these codes, three reflector component homogenization schemes were developed and evaluated for the complex configuration. Power density distributions were calculated with KENO using 99-group cross sections and with DORT and VENTURE using 20-group cross sections. The average differences between the measured values and the values calculated with the different computer codes range from 2.45 to 5.74%. The maximum differences between the measured and calculated thermal flux values for the simple and intermediate configurations are ∼ 13%, while the average differences are < 8%

  8. The advance care planning experiences of people with dementia, family caregivers and professionals: a synthesis of the qualitative literature.

    Ryan, Tony; Amen, Karwan M; McKeown, Jane

    2017-10-01

    There exists compelling evidence that advance care planning (ACP) remains a key factor in the delivery of appropriate end of life care and facilitates the timely transition to palliative care for people with dementia. Take up of ACP within the dementia population is low, especially when compared with other conditions. Quantitative research has helped in identifying some of the key factors in enabling or inhibiting the use of ACP within the dementia population. Qualitative research can, however, shed further light upon the experiences of all. We carried out a search of the qualitative literature addressing the ACP experiences of people with dementia, family caregivers and professionals. An approach to qualitative synthesis involving coding of original text, developing descriptive themes and generating analytical themes was utilized. We identified five papers and subsequently five analytical themes: breadth and scope of future planning; challenges to ACP; postponing ACP; confidence in systems and making ACP happen for people with dementia. The synthesized findings shed light on the ongoing challenges of the use and further development of ACP in the population of people with dementia. In particular attention is drawn to the difficulties in the timing of ACP and the preference for informal approaches to planning within the families of people affected by dementia. The ACP capacity of the workforce is also addressed. The paper reveals considerable complexity in undertaking ACP in a context of dementia. It is suggested that the preference for informal approaches and the timing of initial conversations be considered and that the skills of those involved in initiating discussions should be given primacy.

  9. Operation experience of the advanced fuel assemblies at Unit 1 of Volgodonsk NPP within four fuel cycles

    Vasilchenko, I.; Kobelev, S.; Kushmanov, S.

    2006-01-01

    The first commissioning of Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1 with standard reactor WWER-1000 (project V-320) was in 2001. The reactor core, starting from the first fuel charge, was arranged completely with Advanced Fuel Assemblies (AFAs). In this way, it is possible to obtain the experience in startup and operation of the core, completely arranged with AFAs, and also to get a possibility of performing the comprehensive check for justification of newly commissioned units and justification of design solutions accepted in the design of reactor core for Taiwan NPP, Bushehr NPP and Kudankulam NPP. The first fuel charge of the Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1 is a reference and unified for Tiawan NPP (V-428), Bushehr NPP (V-446), Kudankulam NPP(V-412) with small differences caused by design features of RP V-320. The first core charge of Unit 1 of Volgodonsk NPP was arranged of 163 AFAs, comprising 61 CPS ARs and 42 BAR bundles. The subsequent fuel charges were arranged of AFAs with gadolinium oxide integrated into fuel instead of BAR. By 2005 the results of operation of the core at Unit 1 of Volgodonsk NPP during four fuel cycles showed that AFA is sufficiently reliable and serviceable. The activity of the primary coolant of the Volgodonsk NPP is at stable low level. During the whole time of the core operation of the Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1 no leaky AFAs were revealed. The modifications of the internals, made during pre-operational work, are reasonable and effective to provide for fuel mechanical stability in the course of operation. The modifications, made in AFA structure during operation of the Volgodonsk NPP Unit 1, are aimed at improving the service and operational reliability of its components. Correctness of the solutions taken is confirmed by AFAs operation experience both at the Volgodonsk NPP, and at other operating Russian NPPs

  10. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    Stellwag, B [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany); Aaltonen, P [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hickling, J [CML GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ``on-line`` and ``in-situ`` characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. A national survey exploring UK trainees' perceptions, core training experience, and decisions to pursue advanced training in breast radiology.

    Lowes, S; Bydder, M; Sinnatamby, R

    2017-11-01

    To investigate UK radiology trainees' perceptions of breast radiology and the factors that influenced their decision whether or not to choose breast radiology as an area of special interest. An online survey was compiled and distributed to all UK specialty trainees in clinical radiology via the Royal College of Radiologists Junior Radiologists' Forum (JRF) regional representatives. There were 275 respondents, representing 22% of all UK radiology trainees. Responses were received from all regions. A significant factor identified in influencing whether or not trainees decide to pursue advanced training in breast radiology is the timing and quality of their initial core training experience. Specific positive aspects of breast radiology that were repeatedly identified included the high level of patient contact and frequent use of interventional procedures. Recurring negative aspects of breast radiology included isolation from general radiology and finding the subject matter boring. Breast radiology faces a significant workforce shortfall that is predicted to worsen in the coming years. There has never been a greater need to recruit specialty trainees into this field, and action is urgently needed to help ensure the sustainability of breast services and drive further improvements to patient care. The findings from this survey should be regarded as a challenge to all breast radiologists to engage with trainees from an early stage in their training and to enthuse them with the many positive aspects of a career in breast radiology. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. AIDA: A 16-channel amplifier ASIC to read out the advanced implantation detector array for experiments in nuclear decay spectroscopy

    Braga, D. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P. J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Davinson, T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Page, R. D. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Thomas, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    We have designed a read-out ASIC for nuclear decay spectroscopy as part of the AIDA project - the Advanced Implantation Detector Array. AIDA will be installed in experiments at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in GSI, Darmstadt. The AIDA ASIC will measure the signals when unstable nuclei are implanted into the detector, followed by the much smaller signals when the nuclei subsequently decay. Implant energies can be as high as 20 GeV; decay products need to be measured down to 25 keV within just a few microseconds of the initial implants. The ASIC uses two amplifiers per detector channel, one covering the 20 GeV dynamic range, the other selectable over a 20 MeV or 1 GeV range. The amplifiers are linked together by bypass transistors which are normally switched off. The arrival of a large signal causes saturation of the low-energy amplifier and a fluctuation of the input voltage, which activates the link to the high-energy amplifier. The bypass transistors switch on and the input charge is integrated by the high-energy amplifier. The signal is shaped and stored by a peak-hold, then read out on a multiplexed output. Control logic resets the amplifiers and bypass circuit, allowing the low-energy amplifier to measure the subsequent decay signal. We present simulations and test results, demonstrating the AIDA ASIC operation over a wide range of input signals. (authors)

  13. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations.

    Alsharif, Naser Z; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O'Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-04-25

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of understanding (MoUs) from pharmacy programs were also examined. In addition, a preliminary draft was developed and the findings and recommendations were reviewed in a 90-minute roundtable discussion at the 2014 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting. Recommendations for the host country include travel considerations (eg, passport, visa, air travel), safety, housing, transportation, travel alerts and warnings, health issues, and financial considerations. For the home country, considerations for establishment of G/I APPE site (eg, vetting process, MoU, site expectations) are described. The paper is a resource for development of new G/I APPEs and provides guidance for continuous quality improvement of partnerships focusing on G/I pharmacy education.

  14. Can Individualized Learning Plans in an advanced clinical experience course for fourth year medical students foster Self-Directed Learning?

    Chitkara, Maribeth B; Satnick, Daniel; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Fleit, Howard; Go, Roderick A; Chandran, Latha

    2016-09-01

    Residency programs have utilized Individualized Learning Plans (ILPs) to customize resident education while undergraduate medical education has not done so in a meaningful way. We discuss the use of ILPs within a fourth year medical school course to facilitate self-directed learning (SDL). At Stony Brook University School of Medicine, an ILP component was added to the Advanced Clinical Experience (ACE) course for fourth year students. Each completed an ILP outlining personal learning goals and strategies to achieve them. An adaptation of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) (Duncan T and McKeachie W, Educ Psych 40(2):117-128, 2005 and Cook DA et al., Med Ed 45:1230-1240, 2011) was used to measure success of ILPs in improving SDL. Qualitative data analysis was conducted on the ILPs and self-reflections. Forty-eight students participated. Two of the four SDL sub-domains identified on the MSLQ showed improvement; self-efficacy (p = .001) and self-regulation (p = .002). 'Medical Knowledge' was the competency most frequently identified as an area of concentration (90 %) and professionalism was selected least frequently (4 %). A higher percentage (83 %) of students who reported complete achievement of their ILP goals also reported feeling better prepared for entering residency. ILPs improve SDL strategies among medical students and may serve as useful tools to help shape future learning goals as they transition to residency training.

  15. The Story of a Hitchhiker

    Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Charrier, Gregory; Thonig, Anne

    2016-01-01

    the phylogeography of this species. Here, we characterize the population genetic structure and model dispersal dynamics of the barnacle B. improvisus, and describe how human-mediated spreading via shipping as well as natural larval dispersal may have contributed to observed genetic variation. We used both...... mitochondrial DNA (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I: COI) and nuclear microsatellites to characterize the genetic structure in 14 populations of B. improvisus on a global and regional scale (Baltic Sea). Genetic diversity was high in most populations, and many haplotypes were shared among populations on a global...... scale, indicating that long-distance dispersal (presumably through shipping and other anthropogenic activities) has played an important role in shaping the population genetic structure of this cosmopolitan species. We could not clearly confirm prior claims that B. improvisus originates from the western...

  16. A metasynthesis study of family caregivers' transition experiences caring for community-dwelling persons with advanced cancer at the end of life.

    Duggleby, Wendy; Tycholiz, Jamie; Holtslander, Lorraine; Hudson, Peter; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; Mirhosseini, Mehrnoush; Parmar, Jasneet; Chambers, Thane; Alook, Angele; Swindle, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Family caregivers (broadly defined as family and friends) experience multiple concurrent transitions when caring for a person with advanced cancer. To (a) explore the transition experience of family caregivers caring for persons with advanced cancer living in the community, (b) describe potential triggers for transitions, (c) identify what influences this experience, and (d) develop a conceptual framework of their transition experience. Sandelowski and Barroso's methodology for synthesizing qualitative research included (a) a comprehensive search of empirical literature, (b) quality appraisal of qualitative studies, (c) classification of studies, and (d) synthesis of the findings. Literature was sourced from six electronic data bases. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (a) published qualitative studies (and mixed-method designs) of the caregiving experience of family caregivers of community-living persons with advanced cancer at the end of life, (b) participants (caregivers and care recipients) of 18 years of age and above, (c) studies published in English in any country, and (d) studies published between 2004 and 2014. A total of 72 studies were included in the metasynthesis. Family caregivers experience a "life transition" whereby their lives are permanently altered. The participants described the process of redefining normal which consisted of coming to terms with their situation and connecting with others. Outcomes of these processes were as follows: (a) maintaining a sense of personhood, (b) reframing hope, (c) maintaining self-efficacy, (d) finding meaning, and (e) preparing for the death of their care recipient. The findings provide a framework to guide the development of supportive programs and future research.

  17. Radiation exposure reduction technologies for a Japanese Advanced BWR (Dose Rate Reduction Experience in Shika Unit 2)

    Saito, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Koji; Ishimaru, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Motohiro; Sato, Yoshiteru; Morita, Shoichi

    2012-09-01

    Operating experiences of the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) have been accumulated in Japan since the first ABWRs Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS unit 6 and 7 came into service. Shika NPS unit 2 (Shika-2) of Hokuriku Electric Power Co. is the fourth ABWR plant in Japan. Since ABWRs have no piping of the reactor recirculation system (RRS), which is the largest source of radiation in conventional BWRs, carbon steel piping of the reactor water cleanup system (RWCU) and residual heat removal system (RHR) are the largest source in ABWRs. Therefore we have focused on reduction methods of radioactive material on carbon steel surface in order to reduce the quantity of occupational exposure in Shika-2. In Shika-2 the following methods have been adopted. Before fuel loading, alkaline pre-filming process was applied to the RWCU piping during plant startup testing. After start of operation, the feed water iron concentration control (or nickel/iron ratio control) method was applied. Furthermore, during shutdown operation the RHR system was operated when the reactor water temperature was dropped to 120 degree C with the use of condenser heat sink cooling operation. These dose rate reduction methods worked well in Shika-2 as expected. The quantity of occupational exposure at the 3 rd outage in Shika-2 was approximately 0.35 person-Sv. On the basis of the results obtained thus far, the occupational dose expected at the outage after deposition amount of radioactivity reaching the equilibrium state has been estimated to be around 0.5 person-Sv. This value is considered to be in low level compared with the worldwide statistics. (authors)

  18. Using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) on the International Space Station (ISS), The Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) and MacroMolecular Biophysics (MMB)

    Meyer, William; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Sicker, Ronald; Abbott-Hearn, Amber; Chao, David; Chiaramonte, Fran; Atherton, Arthur; Beltram, Alexander; Bodzioney, Christopher M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began science operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2016, if all goes as planned, three experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Heated base-2 (ACE-H2) and [2] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Temperature control (ACE-T1). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al. and [2] from Chungnam National University, Daejeon, S. Korea: Chang-Soo Lee, et al.

  19. Risk factors for early complications after laparoscopic total mesorectal excision for locally advanced rectal cancer: A single center experience

    Liye Liu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Aged patients, large tumor, lower tumor location and conversion were risk factors in performing laparoscopic TME for locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients with these characteristics should be carefully considered before undergoing laparoscopic total mesorectal excision.

  20. Effect of an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience on Medication Therapy Management Services in a Centralized Retail Pharmacy Program.

    Vande Griend, Joseph P; Rodgers, Melissa; Nuffer, Wesley

    2017-05-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) delivery is increasingly important in managed care. Successful delivery positively affects patient health and improves Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services star ratings, a measure of health plan quality. As MTM services continue to grow, there is an increased need for efficient and effective care models. The primary objectives of this project were to describe the delivery of MTM services by fourth-year Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) students in a centralized retail pharmacy system and to evaluate and quantify the clinical and financial contributions of the students. The secondary objective was to describe the engagement needed to complete comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) and targeted interventions. From May 2015 to December 2015, thirty-five APPE students from the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy provided MTM services at Albertsons Companies using the OutcomesMTM and Mirixa platforms. Students delivered patient care services by phone at the central office and provided face-to-face visits at pharmacies in the region. With implementation of the MTM APPE in 2015, the team consisted of 2 MTM pharmacists and pharmacy students, as compared with 1 MTM pharmacist in 2014. The number of CMRs and targeted interventions completed and the estimated additional revenue generated during the 2015 time period were compared with those completed from May through December 2014. The patient and provider engagement needed to complete the CMRs and targeted interventions was summarized. 125 CMRs and 1,918 targeted interventions were billed in 2015, compared with 13 CMRs and 767 targeted interventions in 2014. An estimated $16,575-$49,272 of additional revenue was generated in 2015. To complete the interventions in 2015, the team engaged in 1,714 CMR opportunities and 4,686 targeted intervention opportunities. In this MTM rotation, students provided real-life care to patients, resulting in financial and clinical

  1. Real-life experience of ceritinib in crizotinib-pretreated ALK+ advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Jacques Cadranel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Here we report our experience of ceritinib in crizotinib-pretreated patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK positive (ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in a French temporary authorisation for use (TAU study. The French TAU study included crizotinib-pretreated patients with advanced ALK+ or ROS proto-oncogene 1 positive (ROS1+ tumours. Patients received oral ceritinib (750 mg·day−1 as a starting dose and best tumour response (as evaluated by the investigator and safety were reported every 3 months. A total of 242 TAUs were granted from March 12, 2013 to August 05, 2015. Of the 242 patients, 228 had ALK+ NSCLC and 13 had ROS1+ NSCLC. The median age of ALK+ patients (n=214 was 58.5 years, 51.9% were female, 70.8% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG performance status (PS of 0–1 and 50.0% had brain metastases. Of the 149 efficacy evaluable ALK+ NSCLC patients, 5.4% had a complete response (CR, 47.0% had a partial response (PR and 22.8% had stable disease (SD. At September 05, 2015, the median duration of ceritinib treatment (n=182 was 3.9 months but 5.5 months for patients (n=71 with a follow-up of ≥12 months. Higher objective response rate (ORR was observed for patients with ECOG PS 0 to 1 (55.0% versus 42.4% and those receiving prior crizotinib for >5 months (51.6% versus 36.1%. Treatment-related adverse events (AEs were reported in 118 of 208 patients (56.7%, the most common being diarrhoea (22.1% and hepatic toxicity (19.7%. Ceritinib (750 mg·day−1 demonstrated efficacy similar efficacy to ASCEND-1, ASCEND-2 and phase 3 ASCEND-5 trials with manageable safety in crizotinib-pretreated patients with ALK+ NSCLC.

  2. Ten years experience in organ preservation using HDR brachytherapy boost for nodal negative, locally advanced prostate cancer

    Kovacs, G.; Wirth, B.; Bertermann, H.; Galalae, R.; Kohr, P.; Wilhelm, R.; Kimmig, B.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: In 1986 Bertermann and Brix established the combined external beam (EBT) and HDR brachytherapy (BT) boost treatment for localized prostate cancer. The aim of this analysis is to judge the results of this method after 10 years experience. Material and methods: The treatment and follow-up data of 158 histologically proven, localized (N- by imaging) prostate cancer patients were analyzed. Tumor stages (using transrectal ultrasound/TRUS/) ranged from A2 (T1b) in two, to B (T2) in 105 and C (T3) in 51 cases. Tumor grading: 21 highly differentiated (G1), 79 moderately differentiated (G2) as well as 52 poorly differentiated (G3) and one undifferentiated (G4) tumor. Forty-four patients (pts) had previous surgery on the bladder neck. Forty-eight pts had transitory androgen deprivation or antiandrogen treatment prior to radiation, which lasted for a max. of 6 months and was finished before radiation. Initial PSA was known in 126 cases. In 13% values under 4 ng/ml (Hybritech), as well as 46% not above 20 ng/ml and 40 % above 20 ng/ml, respectively. Ultrasound guided conformal BT treatment planning was carried out. The 2x 15 Gy HDR-BT boost was integrated into the EBT schedule, the total dose was 50 Gy for subclinical disease and 70 Gy for the prostate in 6-7 weeks. Regular follow-up by clinical examination, TRUS + volumetry, PSA, bone scan and after 12 months biopsy. Median follow-up 55 months (6-144 months). Results: Eight of 158 pts died of prostate cancer, 15 of intercurrent disease. Clinical progression in 18 cases (12 systemic, 5 local, 1 both syst. + local). All cases of clinical progression with PSA elevation. All pts, whose PSA did not decrease under 1 ng/ml developed progression (p<0.001). Progression developed in 11% of the 107 organ-confined (T1-2 or A2-B) and 7 (14%) of the advanced tumors (T3 or C). The relation between tumor grading and total progression (clinical + PSA) was as follows: four out of 26 G1 tumors, 9 out of 79 G2 tumors and 21 of the 53

  3. The Advance Experience of Foreign Top-level Think Tanks and its Enlightment to the Construction of Chinese University Think-Tank

    Tao Yong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper expounds the development course and current situation of foreign top-level Think Tank, and analyzes the important effects of foreign colleges and universities Think Tank in supporting national scientific decision-making and rapid development. It analyzes the development course and advanced experience of top-level Think Tank in America and other countries. The paper summaries the advance experiences, combines with the background and features of Think Tank construction of colleges and universities in China. It puts forward that Chinese colleges and universities Think Tank should aim at the national strategic needs, play the advantages of talents gathering and main innovation force, insist on opening, and set constructing professional colleges and universities Think Tank as the breakthrough point. The think tanks produce strategic consulting research results with high quality. The paper proposes the reference effect of foreign Think Tank on characteristic Think Tank construction of colleges and universities in China and the development strategy recommendations.

  4. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  5. Application of Design of Experiments and Surrogate Modeling within the NASA Advanced Concepts Office, Earth-to-Orbit Design Process

    Zwack, Mathew R.; Dees, Patrick D.; Holt, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Decisions made during early conceptual design have a large impact upon the expected life-cycle cost (LCC) of a new program. It is widely accepted that up to 80% of such cost is committed during these early design phases. Therefore, to help minimize LCC, decisions made during conceptual design must be based upon as much information as possible. To aid in the decision making for new launch vehicle programs, the Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides rapid turnaround pre-phase A and phase A concept definition studies. The ACO team utilizes a proven set of tools to provide customers with a full vehicle mass breakdown to tertiary subsystems, preliminary structural sizing based upon worst-case flight loads, and trajectory optimization to quantify integrated vehicle performance for a given mission. Although the team provides rapid turnaround for single vehicle concepts, the scope of the trade space can be limited due to analyst availability and the manpower requirements for manual execution of the analysis tools. In order to enable exploration of a broader design space, the ACO team has implemented an advanced design methods (ADM) based approach. This approach applies the concepts of design of experiments (DOE) and surrogate modeling to more exhaustively explore the trade space and provide the customer with additional design information to inform decision making. This paper will first discuss the automation of the ACO tool set, which represents a majority of the development effort. In order to fit a surrogate model within tolerable error bounds a number of DOE cases are needed. This number will scale with the number of variable parameters desired and the complexity of the system's response to those variables. For all but the smallest design spaces, the number of cases required cannot be produced within an acceptable timeframe using a manual process. Therefore, automation of the tools was a key enabler for the successful

  6. The Experiences of Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Diploma Program Participants: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Research

    Park, Kelly; Caine, Vera; Wimmer, Randolph

    2014-01-01

    Enriched high school curricula like the Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Diploma programs are endorsed as "pathway programs" for postsecondary-bound students. Program participation is perceived to have benefits that appeal to a broad stakeholder group of universities, administrators, teachers, students, and parents. In…

  7. Experience of the remote dismantling of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor and Windscale pile chimneys

    Wright, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper gives brief descriptions of some of the remote dismantling work and equipment used on two large decommissioning projects: the BNFL Windscale Pile Chimneys Project (remote handling machine, waste packaging machine, remotely controlled excavator, remotely controlled demolition machine) and the AEA Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor Project (remote dismantling machine, operational waste, bulk removal techniques, semi-remote cutting operations)

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor monitoring in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated with radiofrequency ablation plus octreotide: a single center experience.

    Montella, L; Addeo, R; Caraglia, M; Faiola, V; Guarrasi, R; Vincenzi, B; Palmeri, A; Capasso, E; Nocera, V; Tarantino, L; Ariete, M; Martorelli, A; Del Prete, S

    2008-08-01

    Local therapies such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) represent a valuable choice in limited hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and are increasingly used also in advanced tumors. Medical treatments generally gave frustrating results in advanced HCC especially if comorbidities exist. Several biologic non-chemotherapeutic drugs are currently tested in HCC and, among them, octreotide was evaluated in single series of HCC patients reporting conflicting results. We have treated a series of 35 patients affected by advanced HCC (26 M and 9 F; age range: 55-85 years, median: 73 years) with RFA followed by octreotide to primarily evaluate the safety of combined treatment and to give preliminary evaluation on its activity. We have also evaluated serum VEGF changes during the study. Child A and Child B represented 60% and about 34% of the cases, respectively. Only two patients with Child C compensated cirrhosis were included in this study. All patients have multiple liver HCC nodules and one had bone metastases. Two complete responses, 3 partial responses and 23 disease stabilization for at least three months were obtained (overall response rate, 14,2%; clinical benefit, 80%). Mean overall survival was 31.4 months. The combined treatment was well tolerated. Statistically significant correlation was found between serum VEGF and tumor progression. In conclusion, the combination of RFA and octreotide was active in advanced HCC, however, confirmation in a larger series is required.

  9. Web-based Java application to advanced JT-60 Man-Machine Interfacing System for remote experiments

    Totsuka, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Sakata, Shinya; Oshima, Takayuki; Iba, Katsuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Since remote participation in ITER experiments is planned, it is expected to demonstrate that the JT-60SA experiment is controlled from a Japanese remote experiment center located in Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken, Japan as a part of the ITER-BA project. Functions required for this experiment are monitoring of the discharge sequence status, handling of the discharge parameter, checking of experiment data, and monitoring of plant data, all of which are included in the existing JT-60 Man-Machine Interfacing System (MMIF). The MMIF is now only available to on-site users at the Naka site due to network safety. The motivation for remote MMIF is prompted by the issue of developing and achieving compatibility with network safety. The Java language has been chosen to implement this task. This paper deals with details of the JT-60 MMIF for the remote experiment that has evolved using the Java language

  10. Hospital care following emergency admission: a critical incident case study of the experiences of patients with advanced lung cancer and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Bailey, Cara; Hewison, Alistair; Karasouli, Eleni; Staniszewska, Sophie; Munday, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    To explore the experiences of patients with advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and lung cancer, their carers and healthcare professionals following emergency admission to acute care hospital. Emergency admissions of people with lung cancer and COPD have increased and there is global concern about the number of patients who die in hospital. The experience of patients with advanced lung cancer and COPD admitted to hospital as an emergency when nearing the end of life has not previously been investigated. Qualitative critical incident case study. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 39 patients (15 with COPD and 24 with lung cancer), 20 informal carers and 50 healthcare professionals, exploring patients' experiences of emergency hospital admission. Interviews took place after admission and following discharge. Participants nominated relatives and healthcare professionals for interview. Data were analysed thematically. Patients were satisfied with their 'emergency' care but not the care they received once their initial symptoms had been stabilised. The poorer quality care they experienced was characterised by a lack of attention to their fundamental needs, lack of involvement of the family, poor communication about care plans and a lack of continuity between primary and secondary care. A conceptual model of 'spectacular' and 'subtacular' trajectories of care was used to relate the findings to the wider context of health care provision. The complex nature of illness for patients with advanced respiratory disease makes emergency hospital admissions likely. Whilst patients (with COPD and lung cancer) were satisfied with care in the acute 'spectacular' phase of their admission, more attention needs to be given to the continuing care needs of patients in the 'subtacular' phase. This is the first study to explore the patient experience of acute care following an emergency admission and identifies where there is potential for care to be improved.

  11. Experience and regulatory activities on advanced instrumentation and control systems applied to nuclear power plants in Korea

    Kim, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the status for applying microprocessor-based systems to nuclear power plants in Korea and the regulatory activities performed by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). And this presents the development of safety and regulatory technology for advanced I and C systems that has been carried out as a part of the next generation reactor development program in Korea. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  12. Dosimetry-guided high-activity 131I therapy in patients with advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma: initial experience

    Verburg, Frederik A.; Haenscheid, Heribert; Biko, Johannes; Hategan, Maria C.; Lassmann, Michael; Kreissl, Michael C.; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus

    2010-01-01

    In patients with advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), therapy with the highest safe 131 I activity is desirable to maximize the tumour radiation dose yet avoid severe myelotoxicity. Recently, the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) published a standard operational procedure (SOP) for pre-therapeutic dosimetry in DTC patients incorporating a safety threshold of a 2 Gy absorbed dose to the blood as a surrogate for the red marrow. We sought to evaluate the safety and effectiveness in everyday tertiary referral centre practice of treating advanced DTC with high 131 I activities chosen primarily based on the results of dosimetry following this SOP. We retrospectively assessed toxicity as well as biochemical and scintigraphic response in our first ten patients receiving such therapy for advanced DTC. The 10 patients received a total of 13 dosimetrically guided treatments with a median administered activity of 14.0 GBq (range: 7.0-21.4 GBq) 131 I. After 6 of 13 treatments in 6 of 10 patients, short-term side effects of 131 I therapy, namely nausea, vomiting or sialadenitis, were observed. Leukocyte and platelet counts dropped significantly in the weeks after 131 I treatment, but returned to pre-treatment levels by 3 months post-therapy. Serum thyroglobulin levels decreased after 12 of 13 treatments (median reduction: 58%) in 9 of 10 patients. In our initial patient cohort, high-activity 131 I therapy for advanced DTC based on pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry following the EANM SOP was safe and well tolerated. Such treatment almost always produced a partial biochemical tumour response. (orig.)

  13. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for the treatment of advanced epithelial and recurrent ovarian carcinoma: a single center experience.

    Pavlov, Maja J; Ceranic, Miljan S; Latincic, Stojan M; Sabljak, Predrag V; Kecmanovic, Dragutin M; Sugarbaker, Paul H

    2017-09-07

    With standard treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), prognosis is very poor. The aim of this study is to show early and late results in patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This was a retrospective single centre study. All patients with advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) or modified early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) were included in the study. In the period 1995-2014, 116 patients were treated, 55 with primary EOC and 61 with recurrent EOC. The mean age was 59 years (26-74). Statistically, median survival time was significantly longer in the group with primary advanced cancer of the ovary (41.3 months) compared to relapsed ovarian cancer (27.3 months). Survival for the primary EOC was 65 and 24% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Survival for recurrent EOC was 33 and 16% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Mortality was 1/116 (0.8%). Morbidity was 11/116 (9.5%). Peritoneal cancer index (PCI) was ≤20 in 59 (51%) patients and statistically, their average survival was significantly longer than in the group of 57 (49%) patients with PCI >20 (p = 0.014). In advanced or recurrent EOC, a curative therapeutic approach was pursued that combined optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. PCI and timing of the intervention (primary or recurrent) were the strongest independent prognostic factors.

  14. Radiation with cisplatin or carboplatin for locally advanced cervix cancer: the experience of a tertiary cancer centre

    Au-Yeung, George; Mileshkin, Linda; Rischin, Danny; Bernshaw, David M.; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Narayan, Kailash

    2013-01-01

    Definitive treatment with concurrent cisplatin and radiation is the standard of care for locally advanced cervix cancer. The optimal management of patients with a contraindication to cisplatin has not been established. We conducted a retrospective audit of concurrent chemotherapy in a cohort of patients with locally advanced cervix cancer. All patients with locally advanced cervix cancer treated with definitive radiation were entered into a prospective database. Information regarding their demographics, stage, histology, recurrence and survival were recorded. Pharmacy records were reviewed to determine concurrent chemotherapy use. A total of 442 patients were included in the audit. Two hundred sixty-nine patients received cisplatin, 59 received carboplatin and 114 received no concurrent chemotherapy. Overall survival was significantly improved with the use of concurrent cisplatin compared with radiation alone (adjusted hazard ratio 0.53, P=0.001), as was disease-free survival and rate of distant failure. The use of carboplatin was not associated with any significant benefit in terms of overall survival or disease-free survival. The results of this audit are consistent with the known significant survival benefit with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy. However, there did not appear to be any significant benefit with carboplatin although there were potential confounding factors. The available evidence in the literature would favour the use of non-platinum chemotherapy rather than carboplatin in patients with contraindications to cisplatin.

  15. INTERSTITIAL BRACHYTHERAPY USING TEMPLATE FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED GYNAECOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES- REVISITING THE FORGOTTEN CLASSICAL ART- A SINGLE INSTITUTE EXPERIENCE

    Chatharaju Swarna Kumari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Brachytherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of locally advanced gynaecologic (GYN cancers despite evolution of different newer radiotherapy techniques like high-dose-rate and image-guided BT. Despite being used in the management of advanced gynaecological cancer, currently there is a scarcity of studies and data on interstitial BT in Indian context. This is a retrospective analysis on 71 patients with locally advanced gynaecological malignancies treated in the period of 2010 to 2016 to assess the local tumour control, survival, and complications with the template (Syed-Neblett guided interstitial technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS The patients with a median age of 51 years treated from July 2010 to May 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. This study included previously unirradiated 71 patients with advance stage of gynaecological malignancies, not suitable for intracavitary brachytherapy due to distorted anatomy or extensive disease stage. Histologically all patients had squamous cell carcinoma (cervix= 56, vault= 9, vagina= 6 and treated by whole pelvis external beam radiation therapy (EBRT up to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. These patients were further treated by high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy using SyedNeblett dedicated vaginal plastic template. During treatment all these patients were re-optimised and a dose of 15-21 Gy was delivered in 3 fractions with a minimum gap of 6 hours between fractions using Varisource iX HDR unit. RESULTS Out of 71 patients 5 were lost to followup during study period and they were excluded from the final analysis. The average followup duration ranged between 6-71 months and median followup was 20 months. This study included parameters like local disease control, acute/late complications and distant metastasis. Out of 66 patients, local disease control was seen in 54 (81.81% patients, whereas local recurrence was observed in 12 patients (18.18%. Distant

  16. Sharing perspectives and experiences of doctoral fellows in the first cohort of Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa: 2011–2014

    Babatunde Adedokun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resolution of public health problems in Africa remains a challenge because of insufficient skilled human resource capacity. The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA was established to enhance capacity in multi-disciplinary health research that will make a positive impact on population health in Africa. Objective: The first cohort of the CARTA program describes their perspectives and experiences during the 4 years of fellowship and puts forward suggestions for future progress and direction of research in Africa. Conclusions: The model of training as shown by the CARTA program is an effective model of research capacity building in African academic institutions. An expansion of the program is therefore warranted to reach out to more African academics in search of advanced research training.

  17. Sharing perspectives and experiences of doctoral fellows in the first cohort of Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa: 2011–2014

    Adedokun, Babatunde; Nyasulu, Peter; Maseko, Fresier; Adedini, Sunday; Akinyemi, Joshua; Afolabi, Sulaimon; de Wet, Nicole; Sulaimon, Adedokun; Sambai, Caroline; Utembe, Wells; Opiyo, Rose; Awotidebe, Taofeek; Chirwa, Esnat; Nabakwe, Esther; Niragire, François; Uwizeye, Dieudonné; Niwemahoro, Celine; Kamndaya, Mphatso; Mwakalinga, Victoria; Otwombe, Kennedy

    2014-01-01

    Background Resolution of public health problems in Africa remains a challenge because of insufficient skilled human resource capacity. The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA) was established to enhance capacity in multi-disciplinary health research that will make a positive impact on population health in Africa. Objective The first cohort of the CARTA program describes their perspectives and experiences during the 4 years of fellowship and puts forward suggestions for future progress and direction of research in Africa. Conclusions The model of training as shown by the CARTA program is an effective model of research capacity building in African academic institutions. An expansion of the program is therefore warranted to reach out to more African academics in search of advanced research training. PMID:25280739

  18. Cyclophosphamide-hydroxycamptothecin as second-line chemotherapy for advanced Ewing's sarcoma: experience of a single institution.

    Han, Kun; Sun, Yuanjue; Zhang, Jianjun; He, Aina; Zheng, Shui'er; Shen, Zan; Yao, Yang

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of cyclophosphamide (CTX)-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) as second-line chemotherapy on advanced Ewing's sarcoma. From April 2009 to November 2010, 27 patients with advanced Ewing's sarcoma who had progressive disease after the first-line chemotherapy regimen of vincristine, dactinomycin and cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide and etoposide were retrospectively reviewed in this analysis. CTX was given (0.6 g/m(2), i.v. push day 1) and HCPT (6 mg/m(2), i.v. drip days 1-5) as second-line chemotherapy every 3 weeks. The primary end-point was overall response rate, the secondary end-point included progression-free, overall survival, disease control rate and toxicities. A total of 134 cycles were given, median four cycles per patient (range 2-6). Overall response rate was 30% and disease control rate was 82%, with two complete response (8%), six partial remission (22%) and 14 stable disease (52%). The median time to progression and overall survival time were 7 months (95% CI 3-10) and 11 months (95% CI 5-18), respectively. Major severe toxicities (grade 3 and 4) were: nausea/vomiting (17%), alopecia (17%); leukopenia (27%) in total cycles. Mild toxicities (grade 1 or 2) were leukopenia (73%), nausea/vomiting (83%), hepatic lesion (14%) and anemia (44%). A CTX-HCPT regimen can control disease progression effectively and the side effects can be tolerable for Chinese advanced Ewing's sarcoma patients. Further assessment is necessary to confirm the safety and efficacy of this treatment. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Design and realization experience of Advanced Control Rod Group and Individual Control System (GIC) for VVER-1000 reactors

    Cerny, V.; Novy, L.; Janour, J.; Ris, M.; Zidek, P.

    1997-01-01

    During the reactor refueling outage of unit 1 of the South Ukrainian nuclear power plant in mid-1996, full replacement of the reactor's group and individual control (GIC) system was performed. The main functions of the GIC system are briefly characterized. The structure of the advanced GIC system is described and shown by means of a diagram. The criteria used in deciding on the upgrading strategy are discussed in some detail. The implementation of the replacement is also dealt with, as is the testing and commissioning of the system. (A.K.)

  20. Recent results and future plans for a 45 actuator adaptive x-ray optics experiment at the advanced light source

    Brejnholt, Nicolai F., E-mail: brejnholt1@llnl.gov; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Hill, Randal M.; Pardini, Tommaso; Hagler, Lisle; Jackson, Jessie; Jeon, Jae; McCarville, Thomas J.; Palmer, David W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Celestre, Richard [Advanced Light Source - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Brooks, Audrey D. [Northrop Grumman - AOA Xinetics Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We report on the current status of the Adaptive X-ray Optics project run by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LLNL is collaborating with the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to demonstrate a near real-time adaptive X-ray optic. To this end, a custom-built 45 cm long deformable mirror has been installed at ALS beamline 5.3.1 (end station 2) for a two-year period that started in September 2014. We will outline general aspects of the instrument, present results from a recent experimental campaign and touch on future plans for the project.

  1. A prospective comparison of perioperative morbidity in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer: Primary versus interval cytoreduction - experience from India

    Sheikh Zahoor Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective was to compare perioperative morbidity and mortality of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC treated with either of the two treatment approaches; neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT followed by interval debulking versus upfront surgery. Design: Prospective comparative observational study. Participants: In total, 51 patients were included in the study. All patients with diagnosed advanced EOC (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics IIIC and IV presenting for the 1st time were included in the study. Interventions: Patients were either operated upfront (n = 19 if deemed operable or were subjected to NACT followed by interval debulking (n = 32. Primary and Secondary Outcomes: Intra- and postoperative morbidity and mortality were the primary outcome measures. Results: Patients with interval cytoreduction were noted to have significantly lesser operative time, blood loss, and extent of surgery. Their discharge time was also significantly earlier. However, they did not differ from the other group vis. a vis. postoperative complications or mortality. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy although has a positive impact on various intraoperative adverse events, fails to show any impact on immediate postoperative negative outcomes.

  2. Two-Person Technique of Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Achalasia with an Advanced Endoscopist and a Thoracic Surgeon: Initial Experience

    Madhusudhan R. Sanaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. We initiated peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM utilizing a two-person technique with combination of an advanced endoscopist and a thoracic surgeon with complementary skills. Our aim was to determine the feasibility and outcomes in initial 20 patients. Methods. In this observational study, main outcomes measured were therapeutic success in relieving symptoms (Eckardt score < 3, decrease in lower esophageal sphincter (LES pressures, improvement in emptying on timed barium esophagogram (TBE, and complications. Results. POEM was successful in all 20 patients with a mean operative time of 140.1+32.9 minutes. Eckardt symptom scores decreased significantly at two-month follow-up (6.4+2.9 versus 0.25+0.45, p<0.001. Both basal and residual LES pressures decreased significantly (28.2+14.1 mmHg versus 12.8+6.3 and 22.4+11.3 versus 6.3+3.4 mmHg, p=0.025 and <0.001, resp.. Barium column height at 5 minutes on TBE reduced from 6.8+4.9 cm to 2.3+2.9 cm (p=0.05. Two patients (10% had mucosal perforations and one had delayed bleeding (5%. Conclusions. Two-person technique of POEM with combination of an advanced endoscopist and a thoracic surgeon is highly successful with low risk of complications.

  3. How passive image viewers became active multimedia users : new trends and recent advances in subjective assessment of quality of experience

    Redi, J.A.; Zhu, Y.; Ridder, de H.; Heynderickx, I.E.J.; Deng, C.; Ma, L.; Lin, W.; Ngan, K.N.

    2015-01-01

    Subjective assessment of quality of experience (QoE) is key to understanding user preferences with respect to multimedia fruition. As such, it is a necessary step to multimedia delivery optimization, since QoE needs to take into account technology limitations as well as user satisfaction. The study

  4. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) 5 Developed to Test Advanced Solar Cell Technology Aboard the ISS

    Wilt, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The testing of new technologies aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is facilitated through the use of a passive experiment container, or PEC, developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. The PEC is an aluminum suitcase approximately 2 ft square and 5 in. thick. Inside the PEC are mounted Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) plates that contain the test articles. The PEC is carried to the ISS aboard the space shuttle or a Russian resupply vehicle, where astronauts attach it to a handrail on the outer surface of the ISS and deploy the PEC, which is to say the suitcase is opened 180 deg. Typically, the PEC is left in this position for approximately 1 year, at which point astronauts close the PEC and it is returned to Earth. In the past, the PECs have contained passive experiments, principally designed to characterize the durability of materials subjected to the ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen present at the ISS orbit. The MISSE5 experiment is intended to characterize state-of-art (SOA) and beyond photovoltaic technologies.

  5. Advance Care Planning: Understanding Clinical Routines and Experiences of Interprofessional Team Members in Diverse Health Care Settings.

    Arnett, Kelly; Sudore, Rebecca L; Nowels, David; Feng, Cindy X; Levy, Cari R; Lum, Hillary D

    2017-12-01

    Interprofessional health care team members consider advance care planning (ACP) to be important, yet gaps remain in systematic clinical routines to support ACP. A clearer understanding of the interprofessional team members' perspectives on ACP clinical routines in diverse settings is needed. One hundred eighteen health care team members from community-based clinics, long-term care facilities, academic clinics, federally qualified health centers, and hospitals participated in a 35-question, cross-sectional online survey to assess clinical routines, workflow processes, and policies relating to ACP. Respondents were 53% physicians, 18% advanced practice nurses, 11% nurses, and 18% other interprofessional team members including administrators, chaplains, social workers, and others. Regarding clinical routines, respondents reported that several interprofessional team members play a role in facilitating ACP (ie, physician, social worker, nurse, others). Most (62%) settings did not have, or did not know of, policies related to ACP documentation. Only 14% of settings had a patient education program. Two-thirds of the respondents said that addressing ACP is a high priority and 85% felt that nonphysicians could have ACP conversations with appropriate training. The clinical resources needed to improve clinical routines included training for providers and staff, dedicated staff to facilitate ACP, and availability of patient/family educational materials. Although interprofessional health care team members consider ACP a priority and several team members may be involved, clinical settings lack systematic clinical routines to support ACP. Patient educational materials, interprofessional team training, and policies to support ACP clinical workflows that do not rely solely on physicians could improve ACP across diverse clinical settings.

  6. Water experiments on thermal striping in reactor vessel of advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor. Influence of flow collector of backup CR guide tube

    Kobayashi, Jun; Ezure, Toshiki; Tanaka, Masaaki; Kamide, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Design study of an advanced large-scale sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) has been conducted in JAEA. In the region between the bottom of the Upper Internal Structure (UIS) and the core outlet, the hot sodium from the fuel subassembly mixes with the cold sodium from the neighbor control rod (CR) channel. Therefore, temperature fluctuation due to mixing fluids at different temperatures may cause high cycle thermal fatigue at the bottom of the UIS. In the advanced design, installation of a flow guide structure named Flow-Collector (FC) to the backup control rod (BCR) guide tube is considered to enhance reliable operation of self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) and to ensure reactor shutdown operation. Previously, water experiments without the FC model had been examined in JAEA to investigate effective countermeasures to the significant temperature fluctuation generation at the bottom of the UIS. Since the FC may affect the thermal mixing behavior at the bottom of the UIS, influence of the FC on characteristics of the temperature fluctuation around the BCR channels was investigated using a water experimental facility with structure model of the FC. Through the experiment, small influence of the FC on the temperature fluctuation distribution at the bottom of the UIS was indicated. (author)

  7. Toward a Mechanistic Source Term in Advanced Reactors: A Review of Past U.S. SFR Incidents, Experiments, and Analyses

    Bucknor, Matthew; Brunett, Acacia J.; Grabaskas, David

    2016-04-17

    In 2015, as part of a Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP) effort for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs), Argonne National Laboratory investigated the current state of knowledge of source term development for a metal-fueled, pool-type SFR. This paper provides a summary of past domestic metal-fueled SFR incidents and experiments and highlights information relevant to source term estimations that were gathered as part of the RTDP effort. The incidents described in this paper include fuel pin failures at the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) facility in July of 1959, the Fermi I meltdown that occurred in October of 1966, and the repeated melting of a fuel element within an experimental capsule at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) from November 1967 to May 1968. The experiments described in this paper include the Run-Beyond-Cladding-Breach tests that were performed at EBR-II in 1985 and a series of severe transient overpower tests conducted at the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) in the mid-1980s.

  8. Ovarian preservation in locally advanced cervical cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical surgery: our experience and analysis of the literature.

    Signorelli, Mauro; Bogani, Giorgio; Chiappa, Valentina; Ditto, Antonino; Scaffa, Cono; Martinelli, Fabio; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2018-03-30

    The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of ovarian metastases and recurrences among patients affected by locally advanced stage cancer patients (LACC), undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and radical surgery with conservation of ovaries. Retrospective evaluation of consecutive patients affected by LACC (stage IB2- IIB), treated by NACT followed by radical surgery at National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy, between 1990-2015. Overall, 331 patients were included. Stage at presentation included stage IB2, IIA and IIB in 120 (36.3%), 63 (19%) and 148 (44.7%) patients, respectively. Main histotype was squamous cell carcinoma (n=265, 80.1%) followed by adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous (n=51, 15.4%), and more than half of patients had a grade 3 carcinoma . Overall, 102 (30.8%) women had at least one ovary preserved during surgery, while 229 (69.2%) had bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Comparing patients who had ovarian preservation with patients who had not, we observed that the two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics. Survival outcomes were not influenced by ovarian preservation (disease-free (p=0.93) and overall (p=0.65) survivals). One (1%) woman had a localized ovarian recurrence. Our data suggest that ovarian preservation at the time of surgery is a safe option among women with LACC after NACT with no detrimental impact on oncologic outcome. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  9. Clinical outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for advanced transverse and descending colon cancer: a single-center experience.

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Okuda, Junji; Tanaka, Keitaro; Kondo, Keisaku; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2012-06-01

    The role of laparoscopic surgery in management of transverse and descending colon cancer remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to investigate the short-term and oncologic long-term outcomes associated with laparoscopic surgery for transverse and descending colon cancer. This cohort study analyzed 245 patients (stage II disease, n = 70; stage III disease, n = 63) who underwent resection of transverse and descending colon cancers, including 200 laparoscopic surgeries (LAC) and 45 conventional open surgeries (OC) from December 1996 to December 2010. Short-term and oncologic long-term outcomes were recorded. The operative time was longer in the LAC group than in the OC group. However, intraoperative blood loss was significantly lower and postoperative recovery time was significantly shorter in the LAC group than in the OC group. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates for patients with stage II were 84.9% and 84.9% in the OC group and 93.7% and 90.0% in the LAC group, respectively. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates for patients with stage III disease were 63.4% and 54.6% in the OC group and 66.7% and 56.9% in the LAC group, respectively. Use of laparoscopic surgery resulted in acceptable short-term and oncologic outcomes in patients with advanced transverse and descending colon cancer.

  10. Advanced life support (ALS) instructors experience of ALS education in Western Australia: a qualitative exploratory research study.

    Taplin, John; McConigley, Ruth

    2015-04-01

    When cardiac arrest occurs, timely competent advanced life support (ALS) interventions by nursing staff can influence patient outcomes. Ongoing ALS education influences maintenance of competency and avoids skill decay. To explore the methods of ALS education delivery for nurses in the workplace; describe the issues relating to maintaining ALS competency; explore ALS competency decay for nurses and develop recommendations for the provision of continuing ALS education. A qualitative exploratory design was used to study ALS education provision in the workplace. Data were collected from ALS nurse experts in Western Australia by face-to-face and phone interviews. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and organised around a set of predetermined questions. Two major themes were identified; the first theme Demand and Supply describes the increasing demand for ALS education for nurses and the challenges with providing timely cost effective traditional face-to-face ALS education. The second theme, Choosing The Best Education Options describes new ways to provide ALS education using emerging technologies. The study suggested that using e-learning methods would assist with educating the maximum amount of nurses in a timely manner and e-learning and teleconferencing offer opportunities to reach nurses in distant locations. Delivering ALS education more frequently than annually would increase skills maintenance and lessen skill decay. Further research is required to explore which blended e-learning model is best suited to ALS education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Operating boundaries of full-scale advanced water reuse treatment plants: many lessons learned from pilot plant experience.

    Bele, C; Kumar, Y; Walker, T; Poussade, Y; Zavlanos, V

    2010-01-01

    Three Advanced Water Treatment Plants (AWTP) have recently been built in South East Queensland as part of the Western Corridor Recycled Water Project (WCRWP) producing Purified Recycled Water from secondary treated waste water for the purpose of indirect potable reuse. At Luggage Point, a demonstration plant was primarily operated by the design team for design verification. The investigation program was then extended so that the operating team could investigate possible process optimisation, and operation flexibility. Extending the demonstration plant investigation program enabled monitoring of the long term performance of the microfiltration and reverse osmosis membranes, which did not appear to foul even after more than a year of operation. The investigation primarily identified several ways to optimise the process. It highlighted areas of risk for treated water quality, such as total nitrogen. Ample and rapid swings of salinity from 850 to 3,000 mg/l-TDS were predicted to affect the RO process day-to-day operation and monitoring. Most of the setpoints used for monitoring under HACCP were determined during the pilot plant trials.

  12. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH FAST FIBER-OPTIC BEAM LOSS MONITORS FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE STORAGE RING SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATORS

    Dooling, J.; Harkay, K.; Sajaev, V.; Shang, H.

    2017-06-25

    Fast fiber-optic (FFO) beam loss monitors (BLMs) installed with the first two superconducting undulators (SCUs) in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring have proven to be a useful diagnostic for measuring deposited charge (energy) during rapid beam loss events. The first set of FFOBLMs were installed outside the cryostat of the short SCU, a 0.33-m long device, above and below the beam centerline. The second set are mounted with the first 1.1-mlong SCU within the cryostat, on the outboard and inboard sides of the vacuum chamber. The next 1.1-m-long SCU is scheduled to replace the short SCU later in 2016 and will be fitted with FFOBLMs in a manner similar to original 1.1-m device. The FFOBLMs were employed to set timing and voltage for the abort kicker (AK) system. The AK helps to prevent quenching of the SCUs during beam dumps [1] by directing the beam away from the SC magnet windings. The AK is triggered by the Machine Protection System (MPS). In cases when the AK fails to prevent quenching, the FFOBLMs show that losses often begin before detection by the MPS.

  13. Advanced plasma flow simulations of cathodic-arc and ferroelectric plasma sources for neutralized drift compression experiments

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-space-scale and long-time-scale plasma flow simulations are executed in order to study the spatial and temporal evolution of plasma parameters for two types of plasma sources used in the neutralized drift compression experiment (NDCX. The results help assess the charge neutralization conditions for ion beam compression experiments and can be employed in more sophisticated simulations, which previously neglected the dynamical evolution of the plasma. Three-dimensional simulations of a filtered cathodic-arc plasma source show the coupling efficiency of the plasma flow from the source to the drift region depends on geometrical factors. The nonuniform magnetic topology complicates the well-known general analytical considerations for evaluating guiding-center drifts, and particle-in-cell simulations provide a self-consistent evaluation of the physics in an otherwise challenging scenario. Plasma flow profiles of a ferroelectric plasma source demonstrate that the densities required for longitudinal compression experiments involving ion beams are provided over the drift length, and are in good agreement with measurements. Simulations involving azimuthally asymmetric plasma creation conditions show that symmetric profiles are nevertheless achieved at the time of peak on-axis plasma density. Also, the ferroelectric plasma expands upstream on the thermal expansion time scale, and therefore avoids the possibility of penetration into the acceleration gap and transport sections, where partial neutralization would increase the beam emittance. Future experiments on NDCX will investigate the transverse focusing of an axially compressing intense charge bunch to a sub-mm spot size with coincident focal planes using a strong final-focus solenoid. In order to fill a multi-tesla solenoid with the necessary high-density plasma for beam charge neutralization, the simulations predict that supersonically injected plasma from the low-field region will penetrate and

  14. The lived experience of family caregivers who provided end-of-life care to persons with advanced dementia.

    Peacock, Shelley; Duggleby, Wendy; Koop, Priscilla

    2014-04-01

    Dementia is a terminal illness, and family caregivers play a vital role in providing end-of-life care to their relative. The present study begins to address the paucity of research regarding end-of-life caregiving experience with dementia. This study utilized Munhall's methodology for interpretive phenomenology. Seven women and four men were interviewed two to three times within a year of their relative's death; interviews were transcribed verbatim and hermeneutically analyzed. Findings reveal two essential aspects of end-of-life dementia caregiving: being-with and being-there. Further findings are organized according to the existential life worlds. Examination of the life worlds demonstrates that 1) spatiality provided a sense or lack of feeling welcome to provide end-of-life care; 2) temporality was an eternity or time melting away quickly, or the right or wrong time to die; 3) corporeality revealed feelings of exhaustion; and 4) relationality was felt as a closeness to others or in tension-filled relationships. An understanding from bereaved caregivers' perspectives will help healthcare practitioners better support and empathize with family caregivers. Further research is warranted that focuses on other places of death and differences in experience based on gender or relationship to the care receiver.

  15. Innovative Training Experience for Advancing Entry Level, Mid-Skilled and Professional Level URM Participation in the Geosciences Workforce

    Okoro, M. H.; Johnson, A.

    2015-12-01

    The representation of URMs in the U.S. Geosciences workforce remains proportionally low compared to their representation in the general population (Bureau of Labor Sta.s.cs, 2014). Employment in this and related industries is projected to grow 32% by 2030 for minority workers (Gillula and Fullenbaum, 2014), corresponding to an additional 48,000 jobs expected to be filled by minorities (National Research Council, 2014). However, there is a shortage of employees with proper training in the hard sciences (Holeywell, 2014; Ganzglass, 2011), as well as craft skills (Hoover and Duncan, 2013), both important for middle skill employment. Industry recognizes the need for developing and retaining a diverse workforce, therefore we hightlight a program to serve as a potential vanguard initative for developing an innovative training experience for URM and underserved middle skilled workers with essential knowledge, experience and skills necessary to meet the demands of the Geosciences industry's growing need for a safe, productive and diverse workforce. Objectives are for participants to achieve the following: understanding of geosciences workforce trends and associated available opportunities; mastery of key environmental, health and safety topics; improvements in decision making skills and preparedness for responding to potential environmental, health and safety related situations; and engagement in one-on-one coaching sessions focused on resume writing, job interviewing and key "soft skills" (including conflict resolution, problem solving and critical observation, representing 3 major skills that entry- level workers typically lack.

  16. Patterns of failure after induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: the Queen Mary Hospital experience

    Chua, Daniel T.T.; Sham, Jonathan S.T.; Choy, Damon; Kwong, Dora L.W.; Au, Gordon K.H.; Kwong, Philip W.K.; Yau, C.-C.; Cheng, Ashley C.K.; Wan, K.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Our center contributed 183 patients to the Asian-Oceanian Clinical Oncology Association (AOCOA) multicenter randomized trial comparing induction chemotherapy (CT) followed by radiotherapy (RT) vs. RT alone in patients with locoregionally advanced undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In a preliminary report no difference in terms of overall survival or relapse-free survival was found between the 2 treatment arms. To study the long-term outcome and patterns of failure after CT for NPC, we analyzed our own center data for which a uniform radiation treatment protocol was adopted and a longer follow-up time was available. Methods and Materials: Between September 1989 and August 1993, a total of 183 patients were recruited into the AOCOA randomized study from our center. Patients with newly diagnosed NPC of Ho's T3 disease, N2-N3 disease, or with neck node size of at least 3 cm were eligible. Stratification was made according to the nodal size (≤3 cm, >3-6 cm, > 6 cm). Patients were randomized to receive 2-3 cycles of CT with cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 and epirubicin 110 mg/m 2 D1 followed by RT or RT alone. Four patients were excluded from the current analysis (2 died before treatment, 2 received treatment elsewhere). The remaining 179 patients were randomized to the two treatment arms, with 92 to the CT arm and 87 to the RT arm. Two patients in the CT arm had RT only, and all patients completed radiation treatment. Overall survival (OAS), relapse-free survival (RFS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), nodal relapse-free survival (NRFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method and significance of survival curve differences calculated using log-rank test. Analysis was performed based on the intent-to-treat. Results: The median follow-up was 70 months. At the time of analysis, 50% of patients in the CT arm and 61% in the RT arm had relapse, while 32% in the CT arm and 36% in the RT arm had died of the disease

  17. Initial Experience with "Honoring Choices Wisconsin": Implementation of an Advance Care Planning Pilot in a Tertiary Care Setting.

    Peltier, Wendy L; Gani, Faiz; Blissitt, Jennifer; Walczak, Katherine; Opper, Kristi; Derse, Arthur R; Johnston, Fabian M

    2017-09-01

    Although previous research on advance care planning (ACP) has associated ACP with improved quality of care at the end of life, the appropriate use of ACP remains limited. To evaluate the impact of a pilot program using the "Honoring Choices Wisconsin" (HCW) model for ACP in a tertiary care setting, and to understand barriers to system-wide implementation. Retrospective review of prospectively collected data. Patients who received medical or surgical oncology care at Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin. Patient demographics, disease characteristics, patient satisfaction, and clinical outcomes. Data from 69 patients who died following the implementation of the HCW program were reviewed; 24 patients were enrolled in the HCW program while 45 were not. Patients enrolled in HCW were proportionally less likely to be admitted to the ICU (12.5% vs. 17.8%) and were more likely to be "do not resuscitate" (87.5% vs. 80.0%), as well as have a completed ACP (83.3% vs. 79.1%). Furthermore, admission to a hospice was also higher among patients who were enrolled in the HCW program (79.2% vs. 25.6%), with patients enrolled in HCW more likely to die in hospice (70.8% vs. 53.3%). The HCW program was favorably viewed by patients, patient caregivers, and healthcare providers. Implementation of a facilitator-based ACP care model was associated with fewer ICU admissions, and a higher use of hospice care. System-level changes are required to overcome barriers to ACP that limit patients from receiving end-of-life care in accordance with their preferences.

  18. ICC Experiment Performance Improvement through Advanced Feedback Controllers for High-Power Low-Cost Switching Power Amplifiers

    Nelson, Brian A.

    2006-01-01

    Limited resources force most smaller fusion energy research experiments to have little or no feedback control of their operational parameters, preventing achievement of their full operational potential. Recent breakthroughs in high-power switching technologies have greatly reduced feedback-controlled power supply costs, primarily those classified as switching power amplifiers. However, inexpensive and flexible controllers for these power supplies have not been developed. A uClinux-based micro-controller (Analog Devices Blackfin BF537) was identified as having the capabilities to form the base of a digital control system for switching power amplifiers. A control algorithm was created, and a Linux character device driver was written to realize the algorithm. The software and algorithm were successfully tested on a switching power amplifier and magnetic field coil using University of Washington (subcontractor) resources

  19. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  20. Sensitivity Evaluation of the Daily Thermal Predictions of the AGR-1 Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Grant Hawkes; James Sterbentz; John Maki

    2011-05-01

    A temperature sensitivity evaluation has been performed for the AGR-1 fuel experiment on an individual capsule. A series of cases were compared to a base case by varying different input parameters into the ABAQUS finite element thermal model. These input parameters were varied by ±10% to show the temperature sensitivity to each parameter. The most sensitive parameters are the outer control gap distance, heat rate in the fuel compacts, and neon gas fraction. Thermal conductivity of the compacts and graphite holder were in the middle of the list for sensitivity. The smallest effects were for the emissivities of the stainless steel, graphite, and thru tubes. Sensitivity calculations were also performed varying with fluence. These calculations showed a general temperature rise with an increase in fluence. This is a result of the thermal conductivity of the fuel compacts and graphite holder decreasing with fluence.

  1. Experiences Gained from Independent Assessment in Licensing of Advanced I and C Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    Lindner, Arndt B.; Wach, Dieter H.

    2003-01-01

    Operational benefits and enlarged functionality of modern technology, but also the physical and the technological aging of conventional instrumentation and control (I and C) systems, are motivations for modernization of I and C systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). In case of safety-relevant I and C systems, the licensing authorities require the demonstration of sufficient safety of the systems.In several countries ongoing research and development projects are directed to provide a scientific basis and engineering solutions for cost-effective assessment of software-based I and C systems important to safety in NPPs. International initiatives have been started to develop a harmonized safety assessment methodology. The Institute for Safety Technology (ISTec) has been engaged in national and international programs as well as in establishing a two-phase qualification approach, which comprises a generic plant-independent qualification of hardware and software components and a plant-specific system qualification phase.In both generic qualification and plant-specific system qualification, ISTec has been involved as an independent third-party assessor for the relevant state authority. This paper reports experiences from the ISTec involvement in the assessment projects, e.g., in the assessment of the I and C important to safety in the new German High-Flux Research Reactor (FRM-2) in Munich and in the assessments of I and C modernization in NPPs of foreign countries (Bohunice, Slovak Republic; Paks, Hungary; and others). Conclusions are drawn from the experiences with respect to the practicability of the two-phase qualification concept and from the major findings in the plant-specific I and C assessments

  2. Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments

    Rapp, Vi H.; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-03-01

    The research summarized in this report is part of a larger effort to evaluate the potential air quality impacts of using liquefied natural gas in California. A difference of potential importance between many liquefied natural gas blends and the natural gas blends that have been distributed in California in recent years is the higher Wobbe number of liquefied natural gas. Wobbe number is a measure of the energy delivery rate for appliances that use orifice- or pressure-based fuel metering. The effect of Wobbe number on pollutant emissions from residential water heaters was evaluated in controlled experiments. Experiments were conducted on eight storage water heaters, including five with “ultra low-NO{sub X}” burners, and four on-demand (tankless) water heaters, all of which featured ultra low-NO{sub X} burners. Pollutant emissions were quantified as air-free concentrations in the appliance flue and fuel-based emission factors in units of nanogram of pollutant emitter per joule of fuel energy consumed. Emissions were measured for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}), nitrogen oxide (NO), formaldehyde and acetaldehyde as the water heaters were operated through defined operating cycles using fuels with varying Wobbe number. The reference fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number ranging from 1344 to 1365. Test fuels had Wobbe numbers of 1360, 1390 and 1420. The most prominent finding was an increase in NO{sub X} emissions with increasing Wobbe number: all five of the ultra low-NO{sub X} storage water heaters and two of the four ultra low-NO{sub X} on-demand water heaters had statistically discernible (p<0.10) increases in NO{sub X} with fuel Wobbe number. The largest percentage increases occurred for the ultra low-NO{sub X} water heaters. There was a discernible change in CO emissions with Wobbe number for all four of the on-demand devices tested. The on-demand water heater with the highest CO emissions also had the largest CO increase

  3. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  4. Commissioning and early experience with a new-generation low-energy linear accelerator with advanced delivery and imaging functionalities

    Fogliata Antonella

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new-generation low-energy linear accelerator (UNIQUE was introduced in the clinical arena during 2009 by Varian Medical Systems. The world's first UNIQUE was installed at Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland and put into clinical operation in June 2010. The aim of the present contribution was to report experience about its commissioning and first year results from clinical operation. Methods Commissioning data, beam characteristics and the modeling into the treatment planning system were summarized. Imaging system of UNIQUE included a 2D-2D matching capability and tests were performed to identify system repositioning capability. Finally, since the system is capable of delivering volumetric modulated arc therapy with RapidArc, a summary of the tests performed for such modality to assess its performance in preclinical settings and during clinical usage was included. Results Isocenter virtual diameter was measured as less than 0.2 mm. Observed accuracy of isocenter determination and repositioning for 2D-2D matching procedures in image guidance was Conclusions The results of the commissioning tests and of the first period of clinical operation, resulted meeting specifications and having good margins respect to tolerances. UNIQUE was put into operation for all delivery techniques; in particular, as shown by the pre-treatment quality assurance results, it enabled accurate and safe delivery of RapidArc plans.

  5. Investigations, Experiments, and Implications for using existing Pulse Magnets for 'TOPOFF' Operation at the Advanced Light Source

    Stover, Gregory D.; Baptiste, Kenneth Michael; Barry, Walter; Gath, William; Julian, James; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Prestemon, Soren; Schlueter, Ross; Shuman, Derek; Steier, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    ALS top-off mode of operation will require injection of the electron beam from the Booster Ring into the Storage Ring at the full ALS energy level of 1.9 GeV. Currently the Booster delivers a beam at 1.5 GeV to the Storage Ring where it is then ramped to the full energy and stored for the user operation. The higher Booster beam energy will require the pulse magnets in the Booster and Storage Rings to operate at proportionally higher magnetic gap fields. Our group studied and tested the possible design and installation modifications required to operate the magnets and drivers at ''top-off'' levels. Our results and experiments show that with minor electrical modifications all the existing pulse magnet systems can be used at the higher energy levels, and the increased operational stresses should have a negligible impact on magnet reliability. Furthermore, simple electrical modifications to the storage ring thick septum will greatly reduce the present level of septum stray leakage fields into the storage ring beam

  6. Managing, making sense of and finding meaning in advanced illness: a qualitative exploration of the coping and wellbeing experiences of patients with lung cancer.

    Harrop, Emily; Noble, Simon; Edwards, Michelle; Sivell, Stephanie; Moore, Barbara; Nelson, Annmarie

    2017-11-01

    Coping plays an essential role in maintaining the wellbeing of patients with cancer. A number of different coping responses and strategies have been identified in the literature. The value and relevance of meaning based coping theory has also been emphasised, including Antonovosky's Sense of Coherence (SoC) theory. Ten patients with advanced lung cancer were interviewed up to three times. A total of twenty in depth interviews were carried out, fully transcribed and data were analysed following a methodology of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Three broad domains were identified to categorise the core life concerns of participants; making sense of and managing one's illness; maintaining daily life and relationships and confronting the future. Within these domains multiple coping themes are identified, which to varying degrees help to maintain patient wellbeing and quality of life. This article considers the relevance of SoC theory for understanding the coping experiences of patients with advanced cancer, and identifies resources and factors likely to support patient coping, with implications for health and social care services. © 2017 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL.

  7. Wellness in Sickness and Health (The W.I.S.H. Project): Advance Care Planning Preferences and Experiences Among Elderly Latino Patients.

    Maldonado, Lauren Y; Goodson, Ruth B; Mulroy, Matthew C; Johnson, Emily M; Reilly, Jo M; Homeier, Diana C

    2017-10-25

    To assess advance care planning (ACP) preferences, experiences, and comfort in discussing end-of-life (EOL) care among elderly Latinos. Patients aged 60 and older from the Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center Geriatrics Clinic (n = 41) participated in this intervention. Trained staff conducted ACP counseling with participants in their preferred language, which included: (a) pre-counseling survey about demographics and EOL care attitudes, (b) discussion of ACP and optional completion of an advance directive (AD), and (c) post-session survey. Patients were primarily Spanish speaking with an average of 2.7 chronic medical conditions. Most had not previously documented (95%) or discussed (76%) EOL wishes. Most were unaware they had control over their EOL treatment (61%), but valued learning about EOL options (83%). Post-counseling, 85% reported comfort discussing EOL goals compared to 66% pre-session, and 88% elected to complete an AD. Nearly half of patients reported a desire to discuss EOL wishes sooner. Elderly Latino patients are interested in ACP, given individualized, culturally competent counseling in their preferred language. Patients should be offered the opportunity to discuss and document EOL wishes at all primary care appointments, regardless of health status. Counseling should be completed in the patient's preferred language, using culturally competent materials, and with family members present if this is the patient's preference. Cultural-competency training for providers could enhance the impact of EOL discussions and improve ACP completion rates for Latino patients.

  8. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of the "Tennis Ball" Dimer and Subsequent Encapsulation of Methane. An Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Hof, Fraser; Palmer, Liam C.; Rebek, Julius, Jr.

    2001-11-01

    While important to the biological and materials sciences, noncovalent interactions, self-folding, and self-assembly often receive little discussion in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. The synthesis and NMR characterization of a molecular "tennis ball" in an advanced undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory is a simple and effective way to introduce the relevance of these concepts. In appropriate solvents, the monomer dimerizes through a seam of eight hydrogen bonds with encapsulation of a guest molecule and symmetry reminiscent of a tennis ball. The entire experiment can be completed in three lab periods, however large-scale synthetic preparation of the starting monomer by a teaching assistant would reduce the laboratory to a single lab period for NMR studies.

  9. French experience in design, operation and revamping of nuclear research reactors, in support of advanced reactors development

    Barre, B.; Bergeonneau, P.; Merchie, F.; Minguet, J.L.; Rousselle, P.

    1996-01-01

    The French nuclear program is strongly based on the R and D work performed in the CEA nuclear research centers and particularly on the various experimental programs carried out in its research reactors in the frame of cooperative actions between the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Framatome and Electricite de France (EDF). Several types of research reactors have been built by Technicatome and CEA to carry out successfully this considerable R and D work on fuels and materials, among them the socalled Materials Testing Reactors (MTR) SILOE (35 MW) and OSIRIS (70 MW) which are indeed very well suited for technological irradiations. Their simple and flexible design and the large irradiation space available around the core, the SILOE and OSIRIS reactors can be shared by several types of applications such as fuel and material testings for nuclear power plants, radioisotopes production, silicon doping and fundamental research. It is worthwhile recalling that Technicatome and CEA have also built research reactors fully dedicated to safety experimental studies, such as the CABRI, SCARABEE and PHEBUS reactors at Cadarache, and others dedicated to fundamental research such as ORPHEE (14 MW) and the Reacteur a Haut Flux -High Flux Reactor- (RHF 57 MW). This paper will present some of the most significant conceptual and design features of all these reactors as well as the main improvements brought to most of them in the last years. Based on this wide experience, CEA and Technicatome have specially designed for export a new multipurpose research reactor named SIRIUS, with two versions depending on the utilization spectrum and the power range (5 MW to 30 MW). At last, CEA has recently launched the preliminary project study of a new MTR, the Jules Horowitz Reactor, to meet the future needs of fuels and materials irradiations in the next 4 or 5 decades, in support of the French long term nuclear power program. (J.P.N.)

  10. Combining Experiments and Simulations of Extraction Kinetics and Thermodynamics in Advanced Separation Processes for Used Nuclear Fuel

    Nilsson, Mikael

    2018-05-15

    This 3-year project was a collaboration between University of California Irvine (UC Irvine), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and with an international collaborator at ForschungZentrum Jülich (FZJ). The project was led from UC Irvine under the direction of Profs. Mikael Nilsson and Hung Nguyen. The leads at PNNL, INL, ANL and FZJ were Dr. Liem Dang, Dr. Peter Zalupski, Dr. Nathaniel Hoyt and Dr. Giuseppe Modolo, respectively. Involved in this project at UC Irvine were three full time PhD graduate students, Tro Babikian, Ted Yoo, and Quynh Vo, and one MS student, Alba Font Bosch. The overall objective of this project was to study how the kinetics and thermodynamics of metal ion extraction can be described by molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and how the simulations can be validated by experimental data. Furthermore, the project includes the applied separation by testing the extraction systems in a single stage annular centrifugal contactor and coupling the experimental data with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations. Specific objectives of the proposed research were: 1. Study and establish a rigorous connection between MD simulations based on polarizable force fields and extraction thermodynamic and kinetic data. 2. Compare and validate CFD simulations of extraction processes for An/Ln separation using different sizes (and types) of annular centrifugal contactors. 3. Provide a theoretical/simulation and experimental base for scale-up of batch-wise extraction to continuous contactors. We approached objective 1 and 2 in parallel. For objective 1 we started by studying a well established extraction system with a relatively simple extraction mechanism, namely tributyl phosphate. What we found was that well optimized simulations can inform experiments and new information on TBP behavior was presented in this project, as well be discussed below. The second objective proved a larger

  11. Configuration and supervision of advanced distributed data acquisition and processing systems for long pulse experiments using JINI technology

    Gonzalez, Joaquin; Ruiz, Mariano; Barrera, Eduardo; Lopez, Juan Manuel; de Arcas, Guillermo; Vega, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    The development of tools for managing the capabilities and functionalities of distributed data acquisition systems is essential in long pulse fusion experiments. The intelligent test and measurement system (ITMS) developed by UPM and CIEMAT is a technology that permits implementation of a scalable data acquisition and processing system based on PXI or CompactPCI hardware. Several applications based on JINI technology have been developed to enable use of this platform for extensive implementation of distributed data acquisition and processing systems. JINI provides a framework for developing service-oriented, distributed applications. The applications are based on the paradigm of a JINI federation that supports mechanisms for publication, discovering, subscription, and links to remote services. The model we implemented in the ITMS platform included services in the system CPU (SCPU) and peripheral CPUs (PCPUs). The resulting system demonstrated the following capabilities: (1) setup of the data acquisition and processing to apply to the signals, (2) information about the evolution of the data acquisition, (3) information about the applied data processing and (4) detection and distribution of the events detected by the ITMS software applications. With this approach, software applications running on the ITMS platform can be understood, from the perspective of their implementation details, as a set of dynamic, accessible, and transparent services. The search for services is performed using the publication and subscription mechanisms of the JINI specification. The configuration and supervision applications were developed using remotely accessible (LAN or WAN) objects. The consequence of this approach is a hardware and software architecture that provides a transparent model of remote configuration and supervision, and thereby a means to simplify the implementation of a distributed data acquisition system with scalable and dynamic local processing capability developed in a

  12. Configuration and supervision of advanced distributed data acquisition and processing systems for long pulse experiments using JINI technology

    Gonzalez, Joaquin; Ruiz, Mariano [Grupo de Investigacion en Instrumentacion y Acustica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), Ctra. Valencia Km-7, 28031, Madrid (Spain); Barrera, Eduardo [Grupo de Investigacion en Instrumentacion y Acustica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), Ctra. Valencia Km-7, 28031, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: eduardo.barrera@upm.es; Lopez, Juan Manuel; de Arcas, Guillermo [Grupo de Investigacion en Instrumentacion y Acustica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), Ctra. Valencia Km-7, 28031, Madrid (Spain); Vega, Jesus [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    The development of tools for managing the capabilities and functionalities of distributed data acquisition systems is essential in long pulse fusion experiments. The intelligent test and measurement system (ITMS) developed by UPM and CIEMAT is a technology that permits implementation of a scalable data acquisition and processing system based on PXI or CompactPCI hardware. Several applications based on JINI technology have been developed to enable use of this platform for extensive implementation of distributed data acquisition and processing systems. JINI provides a framework for developing service-oriented, distributed applications. The applications are based on the paradigm of a JINI federation that supports mechanisms for publication, discovering, subscription, and links to remote services. The model we implemented in the ITMS platform included services in the system CPU (SCPU) and peripheral CPUs (PCPUs). The resulting system demonstrated the following capabilities: (1) setup of the data acquisition and processing to apply to the signals, (2) information about the evolution of the data acquisition, (3) information about the applied data processing and (4) detection and distribution of the events detected by the ITMS software applications. With this approach, software applications running on the ITMS platform can be understood, from the perspective of their implementation details, as a set of dynamic, accessible, and transparent services. The search for services is performed using the publication and subscription mechanisms of the JINI specification. The configuration and supervision applications were developed using remotely accessible (LAN or WAN) objects. The consequence of this approach is a hardware and software architecture that provides a transparent model of remote configuration and supervision, and thereby a means to simplify the implementation of a distributed data acquisition system with scalable and dynamic local processing capability developed in a

  13. Application of discrete choice experiments to enhance stakeholder engagement as a strategy for advancing implementation: a systematic review.

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Shenkman, Elizabeth A; Louviere, Jordan J; Chambers, David A

    2017-11-23

    One of the key strategies to successful implementation of effective health-related interventions is targeting improvements in stakeholder engagement. The discrete choice experiment (DCE) is a stated preference technique for eliciting individual preferences over hypothetical alternative scenarios that is increasingly being used in health-related applications. DCEs are a dynamic approach to systematically measure health preferences which can be applied in enhancing stakeholder engagement. However, a knowledge gap exists in characterizing the extent to which DCEs are used in implementation science. We conducted a systematic literature search (up to December 2016) of the English literature to identify and describe the use of DCEs in engaging stakeholders as an implementation strategy. We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, Econlit, PsychINFO, and the CINAHL using mesh terms. Studies were categorized according to application type, stakeholder(s), healthcare setting, and implementation outcome. Seventy-five publications were selected for analysis in this systematic review. Studies were categorized by application type: (1) characterizing demand for therapies and treatment technologies (n = 32), (2) comparing implementation strategies (n = 22), (3) incentivizing workforce participation (n = 11), and (4) prioritizing interventions (n = 10). Stakeholders included providers (n = 27), patients (n = 25), caregivers (n = 5), and administrators (n = 2). The remaining studies (n = 16) engaged multiple stakeholders (i.e., combination of patients, caregivers, providers, and/or administrators). The following implementation outcomes were discussed: acceptability (n = 75), appropriateness (n = 34), adoption (n = 19), feasibility (n = 16), and fidelity (n = 3). The number of DCE studies engaging stakeholders as an implementation strategy has been increasing over the past decade. As DCEs are more widely used as a

  14. Application of discrete choice experiments to enhance stakeholder engagement as a strategy for advancing implementation: a systematic review

    Ramzi G. Salloum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the key strategies to successful implementation of effective health-related interventions is targeting improvements in stakeholder engagement. The discrete choice experiment (DCE is a stated preference technique for eliciting individual preferences over hypothetical alternative scenarios that is increasingly being used in health-related applications. DCEs are a dynamic approach to systematically measure health preferences which can be applied in enhancing stakeholder engagement. However, a knowledge gap exists in characterizing the extent to which DCEs are used in implementation science. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search (up to December 2016 of the English literature to identify and describe the use of DCEs in engaging stakeholders as an implementation strategy. We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, Econlit, PsychINFO, and the CINAHL using mesh terms. Studies were categorized according to application type, stakeholder(s, healthcare setting, and implementation outcome. Results Seventy-five publications were selected for analysis in this systematic review. Studies were categorized by application type: (1 characterizing demand for therapies and treatment technologies (n = 32, (2 comparing implementation strategies (n = 22, (3 incentivizing workforce participation (n = 11, and (4 prioritizing interventions (n = 10. Stakeholders included providers (n = 27, patients (n = 25, caregivers (n = 5, and administrators (n = 2. The remaining studies (n = 16 engaged multiple stakeholders (i.e., combination of patients, caregivers, providers, and/or administrators. The following implementation outcomes were discussed: acceptability (n = 75, appropriateness (n = 34, adoption (n = 19, feasibility (n = 16, and fidelity (n = 3. Conclusions The number of DCE studies engaging stakeholders as an implementation strategy has been increasing over the

  15. T/P23, 24, 911 and 92: New grades for advanced coal-fired power plants-Properties and experience

    Vaillant, J.C.; Vandenberghe, B.; Hahn, B.; Heuser, H.; Jochum, C.

    2008-01-01

    After the development of the well-known T/P91 grade in the early 1980s and the long industrial experiences since the early 1990s, it has been necessary to develop new steels to answer the demand of the powergen industry. New (ultra) super critical boilers require materials with advanced creep properties to reach severe steam parameters. For the 2.25% Cr family, grades 23 and 24 are now available to be used instead of the previous grade 22 with many technical and economical advantages. For the 9% Cr steels, new grades such as T/P911 and T/P92 have been developed with higher creep properties than T/P91. Thanks to its large industrial experience in these new grades, Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes and Boehler Thyssen Schweisstechnik have now worldwide references of use with these new steel grades. In this paper, information on properties, behaviour and workability will be presented with a focus on ·elevated temperature properties and allowable stresses, ·oxidation and maximum service temperature and ·weldability procedures and recommendations

  16. 'Informed and uninformed decision making'--women's reasoning, experiences and perceptions with regard to advanced maternal age and delayed childbearing: a meta-synthesis.

    Cooke, Alison; Mills, Tracey A; Lavender, Tina

    2010-10-01

    To identify what factors affect women's decisions to delay childbearing, and to explore women's experiences and their perceptions of associated risks. Systematic procedures were used for search strategy, study selection, data extraction and analysis. Findings were synthesised using an approach developed from meta-ethnography. We included qualitative papers, not confined to geographical area (1980-2009). Databases included CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, ASSIA, MIDIRS, British Nursing Index and the National Research Register. We selected qualitative empirical studies exploring the views and experiences of women of advanced maternal age who were childless or primigravidae with a singleton pregnancy or primiparous. Twelve papers fulfilled the selection criteria and were included for synthesis. Women appear to face an issue of 'informed and uninformed decision making'; those who believe they are informed but may not be, those who are not informed and find out they are at risk once pregnant, and those who are well informed but choose to delay pregnancy anyway. Maternity services could provide information to enable informed choice regarding timing of childbearing. Health professionals need to be mindful of the fact that women delay childbearing for various reasons. A strategy of pre-conception education may be beneficial in informing childbearing decisions. Obstetricians and midwives should be sensitive to the fact that women may not be aware of all the risks associated with delayed childbearing. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory - a novel approach to undergraduate internships for first generation community college students

    Raftery, C. L.; Davis, H. B.; Peticolas, L. M.; Paglierani, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley launched an NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program in the summer of 2015. The "Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences" (ASSURE) program recruited heavily from local community colleges and universities, and provided a multi-tiered mentorship program for students in the fields of space science and engineering. The program was focussed on providing a supportive environment for 2nd and 3rd year undergraduates, many of whom were first generation and underrepresented students. This model provides three levels of mentorship support for the participating interns: 1) the primary research advisor provides academic and professional support. 2) The program coordinator, who meets with the interns multiple times per week, provides personal support and helps the interns to assimilate into the highly competitive environment of the research laboratory. 3) Returning undergraduate interns provided peer support and guidance to the new cohort of students. The impacts of this program on the first generation students and the research mentors, as well as the lessons learned will be discussed.

  18. Advances in Ludomusical Experience Profiling

    Gasselseder, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    relevance of situation and its awareness. The present study intends to set a first step to investigate the correlation between processing styles related to trait music empathizing and immersive tendency with experienced emotion and spatial presence in a video game. The obtained results point towards...

  19. Providers with Limited Experience Perform Better in Advanced Life Support with Assistance Using an Interactive Device with an Automated External Defibrillator Linked to a Ventilator.

    Busch, Christian Werner; Qalanawi, Mohammed; Kersten, Jan Felix; Kalwa, Tobias Johannes; Scotti, Norman Alexander; Reip, Wikhart; Doehn, Christoph; Maisch, Stefan; Nitzschke, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Medical teams with limited experience in performing advanced life support (ALS) or with a low frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) while on duty, often have difficulty complying with CPR guidelines. This study evaluated whether the quality of CPR of trained medical students, who served as an example of teams with limited experience in ALS, could be improved with device assistance. The primary outcome was the hands-off time (i.e., the percentage of the entire CPR time without chest compressions). The secondary outcome was seven time intervals, which should be as short as possible, and the quality of ventilations and chest compressions on the mannequin. We compared standard CPR equipment to an interactive device with visual and acoustic instructions for ALS workflow measures to guide briefly trained medical students through the ALS algorithm in a full-scale mannequin simulation study with a randomized crossover study design. The study equipment consisted of an automatic external defibrillator and ventilator that were electronically linked and communicating as a single system. Included were regular medical students in the third to sixth years of medical school of one class who provided written informed consent for voluntary participation and for the analysis of their CPR performance data. No exclusion criteria were applied. For statistical measures of evaluation we used an analysis of variance for crossover trials accounting for treatment effect, sequence effect, and carry-over effect, with adjustment for prior practical experience of the participants. Forty-two medical students participated in 21 CPR sessions, each using the standard and study equipment. Regarding the primary end point, the study equipment reduced the hands-off time from 40.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 36.9-43.4%) to 35.6% (95% CI 32.4-38.9%, p = 0.031) compared with the standard equipment. Within the prespecified secondary end points, study equipment reduced the time interval until

  20. Patient Experience of Symptoms and Side Effects when Treated with Osimertinib for Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Qualitative Interview Substudy.

    Rydén, Anna; Blackhall, Fiona; Kim, Hye Ryun; Pillai, Rathi N; Braam, Lauren; Martin, Mona L; Walding, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Capturing the patient experience during treatment is important to both regulatory authorities and to patients starting treatment. We identified the symptoms and side effects experienced by patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer during osimertinib treatment, to understand treatment expectations, satisfaction, and the level of difficulty coping with the side effects experienced during treatment. Qualitative interviews (approximately 4-6 weeks after treatment initiation and again after approximately 4 months of treatment) were conducted during the phase I/II AURA clinical trial of osimertinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor-sensitizing and T790M resistance mutations. During the first interview (23 patients), the most commonly reported symptoms/side effects were coughing, itching, tiredness (each reported by 56.5% of patients), and rash (43.5%). During the second interview (21 patients), compared with the first interview, shortness of breath and diarrhea were reported by more patients (57.1 and 38.1%, respectively; both increased from 34.8%); tiredness remained predominant (42.9%); and itching (38.1%), coughing (38.1%), and rash (14.3%) were reported by fewer patients. At both interviews, the most frequently reported symptoms/side effects were also those most often rated by patients for bothersomeness and severity, and generally received mean scores in the low-to-moderate range. However, several rarely expressed symptoms/side effects (e.g., abdominal pain, frequent day time urination) received high bothersomeness ratings. At the second interview, patients were highly satisfied with osimertinib and had a low level of difficulty in coping with side effects during treatment. These data enhance our understanding of patients' experiences of symptoms/side effects, which could increase the accuracy of the osimertinib benefit-risk assessment, guide management of adverse events, and improve the information given to patients

  1. Advanced electron microscopic techniques applied to the characterization of irradiation effects and fission product identification of irradiated TRISO coated particles from the AGR-1 experiment

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Lillo, T.M.; Trowbridge, T.L.; Madden, J.M.; Wu, Y.Q.; Goran, D.

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary electron microscopy of coated fuel particles from the AGR-1 experiment was conducted using characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). Microscopic quantification of fission-product precipitates was performed. Although numerous micro- and nano-sized precipitates observed in the coating layers during initial SEM characterization of the cross-sections, and in subsequent TEM diffraction patterns, were indexed as UPd 2 Si 2 , no Ag was conclusively found. Additionally, characterization of these precipitates highlighted the difficulty of measuring low concentrations of Ag in precipitates in the presence of significantly higher concentrations of Pd and U. The electron microscopy team followed a multi-directional and phased approach in the identification of fission products in irradiated TRISO fuel. The advanced electron microscopy techniques discussed in this paper, not only demonstrate the usefulness of the equipment (methods) as relevant research tools, but also provide relevant scientific results which increase the knowledge about TRISO fuel particles microstructure and fission products transport

  2. Radiation budget studies using collocated observations from advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, High-Resolution Infrared Sounder/2, and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment instruments

    Ackerman, Steven A.; Frey, Richard A.; Smith, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Collocated observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), High-Resolution Infrared Sounder/2 (HIRS/2), and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments onboard the NOAA 9 satellite are combined to describe the broadband and spectral radiative properties of the earth-atmosphere system. Broadband radiative properties are determined from the ERBE observations, while spectral properties are determined from the HIRS/2 and AVHRR observations. The presence of clouds, their areal coverage, and cloud top pressure are determined from a combination of the HIRS/2 and the AVHRR observations. The CO2 slicing method is applied to the HIRS/2 to determine the presence of upper level clouds and their effective emissivity. The AVHRR data collocated within the HIRS/2 field of view are utilized to determine the uniformity of the scene and retrieve sea surface temperature. Changes in the top of the atmosphere longwave and shortwave radiative energy budgets, and the spectral distribution of longwave radiation are presented as a function of cloud amount and cloud top pressure. The radiative characteristics of clear sky conditions over oceans are presented as a function of sea surface temperature and atmospheric water vapor structure.

  3. Self-expandable metal stent for palliation of malignant dysphagia & quality of life improvement in advanced cancer esophagus: Upper Egypt experience

    Mohamed Abdelshafy; Mohammed A. Omar; Mohamed Abdel Bary; Mohamed Mostafa Wahaman; Rafaat Abd elaal Bakheet

    2017-01-01

    Background: In advanced cancer esophagus patients, self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) are utilized to relieve malignant difficulty in swallowing and improve their quality of the life. Retrospectively, we evaluated the efficacy, feasibility, and outcomes of SEMS in palliation of malignant dysphagia in advanced cancer esophagus and its' complications. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data of 350 patients with malignant dysphagia due to advanced cancer esophagus from December 2012 to ...

  4. Advanced Electron Linacs

    Siemann, R.

    2005-02-14

    The research into advanced acceleration concepts for electron linear accelerators being pursued at SLAC is reviewed. This research includes experiments in laser acceleration, plasma wakefield acceleration, and mmwavelength RF driven accelerators.

  5. Using Advances in Research on Louisiana Coastal Restoration and Protection to Develop Undergraduate Hydrology Education Experiences Delivered via a Web Interface

    Bodin, M.; Habib, E. H.; Meselhe, E. A.; Visser, J.; Chimmula, S.

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing advances in hydrologic research and technology, learning modules can be developed to deliver visual, case-based, data and simulation driven educational experiences. This paper focuses on the development of web modules based on case studies in Coastal Louisiana, one of three ecosystems that comprise an ongoing hydrology education online system called HydroViz. The Chenier Plain ecosystem in Coastal Louisiana provides an abundance of concepts and scenarios appropriate for use in many undergraduate water resource and hydrology curricula. The modules rely on a set of hydrologic data collected within the Chenier Plain along with inputs and outputs of eco-hydrology and vegetation-change simulation models that were developed to analyze different restoration and protection projects within the 2012 Louisiana Costal Master Plan. The modules begin by investigating the basic features of the basin and it hydrologic characteristics. The eco-hydrology model is then introduced along with its governing equations, numerical solution scheme and how it represents the study domain. Concepts on water budget in a coastal basin are then introduced using the simulation model inputs, outputs and boundary conditions. The complex relationships between salinity, water level and vegetation changes are then investigated through the use of the simulation models and associated field data. Other student activities focus on using the simulation models to evaluate tradeoffs and impacts of actual restoration and protection projects that were proposed as part of 2012 Louisiana Master Plan. The hands-on learning activities stimulate student learning of hydrologic and water management concepts by providing real-world context and opportunity to build fundamental knowledge as well as practical skills. The modules are delivered through a carefully designed user interface using open source and free technologies which enable wide dissemination and encourage adaptation by others.

  6. The Hitchhiker's Guide to Flow Chemistry ∥.

    Plutschack, Matthew B; Pieber, Bartholomäus; Gilmore, Kerry; Seeberger, Peter H

    2017-09-27

    Flow chemistry involves the use of channels or tubing to conduct a reaction in a continuous stream rather than in a flask. Flow equipment provides chemists with unique control over reaction parameters enhancing reactivity or in some cases enabling new reactions. This relatively young technology has received a remarkable amount of attention in the past decade with many reports on what can be done in flow. Until recently, however, the question, "Should we do this in flow?" has merely been an afterthought. This review introduces readers to the basic principles and fundamentals of flow chemistry and critically discusses recent flow chemistry accounts.

  7. "Hitch-Hiking" on Creativity in Nature.

    Offner, David

    1990-01-01

    An "Introduction to Bionics" course is described, focusing on objectives, the case study method used in the course, a sample case involving the design of a self-locking spine positioner for a catfish, course coverage, idea-generating techniques, and course benefits. (JDD)

  8. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition

  9. Incineration experiences at the Tsuruga P.S. and outline of the advanced type incineration system at the Tokai No. 2 P.S

    Yui, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Inoue, S.; Takamori, H.; Karita, Y.

    1987-01-01

    In 1978, the first radwaste incineration plant among Japanese nuclear power stations started its operation at Tsuruga P.S., and the first advanced radwaste incineration plant has been constructed and accomplished the test operation in September 1986. This paper describes the outline of Tsuruga incineration plant and its operation achievements, and the outline of advanced incineration technology, Tokai No. 2 incineration plant and its test operation results

  10. Notion Of Artificial Labs Slow Global Warming And Advancing Engine Studies Perspectives On A Computational Experiment On Dual-Fuel Compression-Ignition Engine Research

    Tonye K. Jack

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To appreciate clean energy applications of the dual-fuel internal combustion engine D-FICE with pilot Diesel fuel to aid public policy formulation in terms of present and future benefits to the modern transportation stationary power and promotion of oil and gas green- drilling the brief to an engine research team was to investigate the feasible advantages of dual-fuel compression-ignition engines guided by the following concerns i Sustainable fuel and engine power delivery ii The requirements for fuel flexibility iii Low exhausts emissions and environmental pollution iv Achieving low specific fuel consumption and economy for maximum power v The comparative advantages over the conventional Diesel engines vi Thermo-economic modeling and analysis for the optimal blend as basis for a benefitcost evaluation Planned in two stages for reduced cost and fast turnaround of results - initial preliminary stage with basic simple models and advanced stage with more detailed complex modeling. The paper describes a simplified MATLAB based computational experiment predictive model for the thermodynamic combustion and engine performance analysis of dual-fuel compression-ignition engine studies operating on the theoretical limited-pressure cycle with several alternative fuel-blends. Environmental implications for extreme temperature moderation are considered by finite-time thermodynamic modeling for maximum power with predictions for pollutants formation and control by reaction rates kinetics analysis of systematic reduced plausible coupled chemistry models through the NCN reaction pathway for the gas-phase reactions classes of interest. Controllable variables for engine-out pollutants emissions reduction and in particular NOx elimination are identified. Verifications and Validations VampV through Performance Comparisons were made using a clinical approach in selection of StrokeBore ratios greater-than and equal-to one amp88051 low-to-high engine speeds and medium

  11. Two-Dimensional Mapping of the Calculated Fission Power for the Full-Size Fuel Plate Experiment Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Chang, G. S.; Lillo, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program assigned to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the responsibility of developing and demonstrating high uranium density research reactor fuel forms to enable the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors around the world. A series of full-size fuel plate experiments have been proposed for irradiation testing in the center flux trap (CFT) position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These full-size fuel plate tests are designated as the AFIP tests. The AFIP nominal fuel zone is rectangular in shape having a designed length of 21.5-in (54.61-cm), width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), and uniform thickness of 0.014-in (0.03556-cm). This gives a nominal fuel zone volume of 0.482 in3 (7.89 cm3) per fuel plate. The AFIP test assembly has two test positions. Each test position is designed to hold 2 full-size plates, for a total of 4 full-size plates per test assembly. The AFIP test plates will be irradiated at a peak surface heat flux of about 350 W/cm2 and discharged at a peak U-235 burn-up of about 70 at.%. Based on limited irradiation testing of the monolithic (U-10Mo) fuel form, it is desirable to keep the peak fuel temperature below 250°C to achieve this, it will be necessary to keep plate heat fluxes below 500 W/cm2. Due to the heavy U-235 loading and a plate width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), the neutron self-shielding will increase the local-to-average-ratio (L2AR) fission power near the sides of the fuel plates. To demonstrate that the AFIP experiment will meet the ATR safety requirements, a very detailed 2-dimensional (2D) Y-Z fission power profile was evaluated in order to best predict the fuel plate temperature distribution. The ability to accurately predict fuel plate power and burnup are essential to both the design of the AFIP tests as well as evaluation of the irradiated fuel performance. To support this need, a detailed MCNP Y

  12. Advance Organizers: Concret Versus Abstract.

    Corkill, Alice J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relative effects of concrete and abstract advance organizers on students' memory for subsequent prose. Results of the experiments are discussed in terms of the memorability, familiarity, and visualizability of concrete and abstract verbal materials. (JD)

  13. Technology Advancements for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space using the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator

    Obland, Michael D.; Campbell, Joel; Kooi, Susan; Fan, Tai-Fang; Carrion, William; Hicks, Jonathan; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Browell, Edward V.; Meadows, Byron; Davis, Kenneth J.

    2018-04-01

    This work describes advances in critical lidar technologies and techniques developed as part of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator system for measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios. This work provides an overview of these technologies and results from recent test flights during the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Earth Venture Suborbital summer 2016 flight campaign.

  14. MO-FG-207-02: Technological Advances and Challenges: Experience with Time-Of-Flight PET Combined with 3-Tesla MRI

    Jansen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  15. MO-FG-207-02: Technological Advances and Challenges: Experience with Time-Of-Flight PET Combined with 3-Tesla MRI

    Jansen, F. [GE Healthcare (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  16. MO-FG-207-01: Technological Advances and Challenges: Experience with the First Integrated Whole-Body PET/MRI

    Laforest, R. [Washington University School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  17. MO-FG-207-01: Technological Advances and Challenges: Experience with the First Integrated Whole-Body PET/MRI

    Laforest, R.

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  18. Advanced Ceramics

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  19. Detection of the "cp4 epsps" Gene in Maize Line NK603 and Comparison of Related Protein Structures: An Advanced Undergraduate Experiment

    Swope, Nicole K.; Fryfogle, Patrick J.; Sivy, Tami L.

    2015-01-01

    A flexible, rigorous laboratory experiment for upper-level biochemistry undergraduates is described that focuses on the Roundup Ready maize line. The work is appropriate for undergraduate laboratory courses that integrate biochemistry, molecular biology, or bioinformatics. In this experiment, DNA is extracted and purified from maize kernel and…

  20. Assessment of Physician's Systemic Treatment Preferences for Patients with Advanced Desmoid-Type Fibromatosis: Experience-Based Medicine in the Absence of High-Level Evidence.

    Schöffski, Patrick; Requilé, Annelies; van Cann, Tom

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of advanced desmoid-type fibromatosis (DF) is poorly standardized and primarily based on physician's choice. We assessed systemic treatment preferences for advanced DF among European experts, with the aim to define a control treatment for prospective randomized trials. A structured questionnaire was sent to a group of physicians involved in DF treatment. 54 experts from 14 countries (Europe, Israel) responded. Disease progression and failure of local therapy were typical indications for systemic therapy. Treatment preferences for patients with sporadic DF versus DF associated with Gardner's syndrome were similar. Physicians use at least 5 different classes of drugs (27 agents). The most frequently used compounds were anti-estrogens and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs), in combination or as single agents. The second and third most common systemic approach was chemotherapy based on methotrexate or an anthracycline. Trial activity was limited to 1 country/1 multicentric study. There is an unmet medical need for evidence-based treatments and well-designed studies. Clinical trials with systemic agents should ideally select a homogeneous DF population with advanced, progressive, ideally symptomatic disease and/or functional impairment after failure of wait-and-see and/or local treatments, and should be randomized, with placebo, anti-estrogens, NSAIDs, or physician's choice as comparator. © 2018 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  1. Serum biomarkers and transient elastography as predictors of advanced liver fibrosis in a United States cohort: the Boston children's hospital experience.

    Lee, Christine K; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R; Mitchell, Paul D; Raza, Roshan; Afdhal, Nezam H; Jonas, Maureen M

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the ability of serum hyaluronic acid (HA) and human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (YKL-40) values, as well as transient elastography (TE) findings, to predict advanced hepatic fibrosis in a cohort from a single pediatric center. Subjects who underwent liver biopsy analysis within 12 months before enrollment were eligible for this prospective study. HA and YKL-40 measurements were obtained within 1 month of TE. A METAVIR score of F3 or F4 was considered to indicate advanced fibrosis. A total of 128 patients (51% males) aged 1.4 months to 27.6 years (22% aged blood tests and TE. For the prediction of advanced fibrosis, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values were 0.83 for TE, 0.72 for HA, and 0.52 for YKL-40. The AUC of 0.83 for TE was statistically significantly greater than the AUCs for HA (P = .03) and YKL-40 (P fibrosis were 8.6 kPa for TE (P fibrosis (P = .15). In this study, which evaluated TE, HA, and YKL-40 to predict liver fibrosis in children in the US, YKL-40 had no predictive value and TE was superior to HA, but the addition of HA did not improve the performance of TE. Our data suggest that TE and HA may be useful noninvasive tools for assessing liver fibrosis in children. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Jet outflow and open field line measurements on the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment.

    Sheftman, D; Gupta, D; Roche, T; Thompson, M C; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Marsili, P; Moreno, C D

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge and control of the axial outflow of plasma particles and energy along open-magnetic-field lines are of crucial importance to the stability and longevity of the advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma. An overview of the diagnostic methods used to perform measurements on the open field line plasma on C-2U is presented, including passive Doppler impurity spectroscopy, microwave interferometry, and triple Langmuir probe measurements. Results of these measurements provide the jet ion temperature and axial velocity, electron density, and high frequency density fluctuations.

  3. The utility of high-resolution intraoperative MRI in endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary macroadenomas: early experience in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite

    Zaidi, Hasan A.; De Los Reyes, Kenneth; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Litvack, Zachary N.; Bi, Wenya Linda; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Dunn, Ian F.; Laws, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endoscopic skull base surgery has become increasingly popular among the skull base surgery community, with improved illumination and angled visualization potentially improving tumor resection rates. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is used to detect residual disease during the course of the resection. This study is an investigation of the utility of 3-T iMRI in combination with transnasal endoscopy with regard to gross-total resection (GTR) of pituitary macroadenomas. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic transsphenoidal operations performed in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite from November 2011 to December 2014. Inclusion criteria were patients harboring presumed pituitary macroadenomas with optic nerve or chiasmal compression and visual loss, operated on by a single surgeon. Results Of the 27 patients who underwent transsphenoidal resection in the AMIGO suite, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria. The endoscope alone, without the use of iMRI, would have correctly predicted 13 (65%) of 20 cases. Gross-total resection was achieved in 12 patients (60%) prior to MRI. Intraoperative MRI helped convert 1 STR and 4 NTRs to GTRs, increasing the number of GTRs from 12 (60%) to 16 (80%). Conclusions Despite advances in visualization provided by the endoscope, the incidence of residual disease can potentially place the patient at risk for additional surgery. The authors found that iMRI can be useful in detecting unexpected residual tumor. The cost-effectiveness of this tool is yet to be determined. PMID:26926058

  4. Treatment of Advanced Malignant Uterine Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Tumor with mTOR Inhibitors: Single-institution Experience and Review of the Literature.

    Starbuck, Kristen D; Drake, Richard D; Budd, G Thomas; Rose, Peter G

    2016-11-01

    Uterine perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are rare mesenchymal tumors. Many have malignant behavior, and no successful treatment strategy has been established. Identification of mutations in the tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1) and TSC2 genes producing constitutive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway presents an opportunity for targeted therapy. Patients with advanced malignant uterine PEComa treated with mTOR inhibitors were identified and records were retrospectively reviewed for treatment response based on radiographic assessment. Three patients with advanced uterine PEComas underwent debulking surgery followed by mTOR inhibitor therapy; two had a complete response to therapy and disease in one patient progressed. Given the absence of effective therapies for malignant uterine PEComas, targeting the mTOR pathway is a logical strategy to pursue given the known pathobiology involving the Tuberous Sclerosis complex. Treatment of malignant uterine PEComas with mTOR inhibitors was effective in two out of three patients after surgical resection, with durable response. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Esophageal stent fixation with endoscopic suturing device improves clinical outcomes and reduces complications in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer prior to neoadjuvant therapy: a large multicenter experience.

    Yang, Juliana; Siddiqui, Ali A; Kowalski, Thomas E; Loren, David E; Khalid, Ammara; Soomro, Ayesha; Mazhar, Syed M; Rosé, Julian; Isby, Laura; Kahaleh, Michel; Kalra, Ankush; Sarkisian, Alex M; Kumta, Nikhil A; Nieto, Jose; Sharaiha, Reem Z

    2017-03-01

    Endoscopic placement of fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMS) to treat malignant dysphagia in patients with esophageal cancer significantly improves dysphagia; however, these stents have a high migration rate. To determine whether FCSEMS fixation using an endoscopic suturing device treated malignant dysphagia and prevented stent migration in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer receiving neoadjuvant therapy when compared to patients with FCSEMS placement alone. A review of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who underwent FCSEMS placement at 3 centers was performed. Patients were divided into two groups: Group A (n = 26) was composed of patients who underwent FCSEMS placement with suture placement, and Group B (n = 67) was composed of patients with FCSEMS placement alone. There were no significant differences between Groups A and B in demographics, and tumor characteristics. The technical success rate for stent placement was 100 %. There was no difference between Groups A and B in the median stent diameter and stent lengths. Mean dysphagia score obtained at 1 week after stent placement had improved significantly from baseline (2.4 and 1, respectively, p esophageal FCSEMSs by using an endoscopic suturing device in patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy was shown to be feasible, safe, and relatively effective at preventing stent migration compared to those who had stent placed alone.

  6. Preparing a Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) compliant manuscript using the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) FCS file repository (FlowRepository.org).

    Spidlen, Josef; Breuer, Karin; Brinkman, Ryan

    2012-07-01

    FlowRepository.org is a Web-based flow cytometry data repository provided by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC). It supports storage, annotation, analysis, and sharing of flow cytometry datasets. A fundamental tenet of scientific research is that published results should be open to independent validation and refutation. With FlowRepository, researchers can annotate their datasets in compliance with the Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt) standard, thus greatly facilitating third-party interpretation of their data. In this unit, we will mainly focus on the deposition, sharing, and annotation of flow cytometry data.

  7. ADVANCE PAYMENTS

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative Circular Nº 8 makes provision for the granting of advance payments, repayable in several monthly instalments, by the Organization to the members of its personnel. Members of the personnel are reminded that these advances are only authorized in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Director-General. In view of the current financial situation of the Organization, and in particular the loans it will have to incur, the Directorate has decided to restrict the granting of such advances to exceptional or unforeseen circumstances entailing heavy expenditure and more specifically those pertaining to social issues. Human Resources Division Tel. 73962

  8. Advance payments

    Human Resources Division

    2003-01-01

    Administrative Circular N 8 makes provision for the granting of advance payments, repayable in several monthly instalments, by the Organization to the members of its personnel. Members of the personnel are reminded that these advances are only authorized in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Director-General. In view of the current financial situation of the Organization, and in particular the loans it will have to incur, the Directorate has decided to restrict the granting of such advances to exceptional or unforeseen circumstances entailing heavy expenditure and more specifically those pertaining to social issues. Human Resources Division Tel. 73962

  9. Impact of the University of Colorado's Advanced Clinical Training and Service (ACTS) Program on dental students' clinical experience and cognitive skills, 1994-2006.

    Berg, Rob; Call, Richard L; Maguire, Kerry; Berkey, Douglas B; Karshmer, Bernard A; Guyton, Brad; Tawara-Jones, Karen

    2010-04-01

    The University of Colorado Denver School of Dental Medicine has operated a community-based dental education program for all of its students since 1985. A database of student productivity has been maintained in a standardized format, capable of multiyear compilation, since 1994. This study utilizes twelve years of these data to profile the type and amount of clinical treatment that can be provided by a typical fourth-year dental student during a 100-day community-based training experience. Between 1994 and 2006, the school's 423 graduates provided a mean of 922 treatment procedures per student at a mean of 498 patient visits per student. During a typical four-week clinical affiliation, each student provided a mean of approximately twenty-seven restorations on permanent teeth, sixteen restorations on primary teeth, and twenty-four oral surgery procedures (extractions). Students also gained considerable experience in periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, and endodontics. Self-assessed competency ratings tended to increase after completing the program, as did willingness to treat underserved populations after graduation. About 16 percent of graduates reported planning to practice in the public sector after completing dental school. A community-based experience such as this appears to offer an opportunity to substantially augment dental students' clinical training experiences.

  10. Advanced scale conditioning agent and consolidated deposit extraction planning, application experience, and results at Comanche Peak Unit 2 and industrial super critical water oxidation waste reduction

    Forney, M.; Ramaley, D. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Bryant, W. [Luminant Energy, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Advance Scale Conditioning Agent (ASCA) technology has been applied more than forty times worldwide since its inception in 2000. This technology has continually grown in popularity since its development due to the combination of several process benefits and minimal outage impacts. Comanche Peak Unit 2 applied a Top of Tubesheet (TTS) ASCA in 2014 for partial dissolution and softening of consolidated TTS collars. In addition to the ASCA application, a Consolidated Deposit Extraction (CODE) step was applied to the TTS. CODE is a chemical treatment technology that effectively targets and dissolves 'binding species' such as those containing aluminum and silicon from steam generator deposits. Since magnetite dissolution technologies are not wholly effective in removing consolidated TTS 'collars' CODE technology was developed to address this need in the industry. This paper will discuss both the Westinghouse and utility perspective on TTS ASCA/CODE application planning, site execution, and process results. (author)

  11. Outcome in Advanced Ovarian Cancer following an Appropriate and Comprehensive Effort at Upfront Cytoreduction: A Twenty-Year Experience in a Single Cancer Institute

    Anne Marszalek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The purpose of this retrospective evaluation of advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients was to compare outcome with published findings from other centers and to discuss future options for the management of advanced ovarian carcinoma patients. Methods. A retrospective series of 340 patients with a mean age of 58 years (range: 17–88 treated for FIGO stage III and IV ovarian cancer between January 1985 and January 2005 was reviewed. All patients had primary cytoreductive surgery, without extensive bowel, peritoneal, or systematic lymph node resection, thereby allowing initiation of chemotherapy without delay. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in combination with alkylating agents before 2000, whereas carboplatin and paclitaxel regimes were generally used after 1999-2000. Overall survival and disease-free survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Results. With a mean followup of 101 months (range: 5 to 203, 280 events (recurrence or death were observed and 245 patients (72% had died. The mortality and morbidity related to surgery were low. The main prognostic factor for overall survival was postoperative residual disease (P<.0002, while the main prognostic factor for disease-free survival was histological tumor type (P<.0007. Multivariate analysis identified three significant risk factors: optimal surgery (RR=2.2 for suboptimal surgery, menopausal status (RR=1.47 for postmenopausal women, and presence of a taxane in the chemotherapy combination (RR=0.72. Conclusion. These results confirm that optimal surgery defined by an appropriate and comprehensive effort at upfront cytoreduction limits morbidity related to the surgical procedure and allows initiation of chemotherapy without any negative impact on survival. The impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to improve resectability while lowering the morbidity of the surgical procedure is discussed.

  12. Our Experiences with Erlotinib in Second and Third Line Treatment Patients with Advanced Stage Iiib/ Iv Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Bakir Mehić

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available HeadHER1/EGFR is known to play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and is overexpressed in up to 80% of NSCLCs. The study of an Expanded Access Clinical Program of Erlotinib in NSCLC is a phase IV openlabel, non-randomized, multicenter trial in patients with advanced (inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC who were eligible for treatment with erlotinib but had no access to trial participation. Patients for the study from Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H were selected from two Clinical centres (Sarajevo and Banja Luka. The aim of study was to evaluated efficacy and tolerability of erlotinib monotherapy in this setting. All patients who received at least one dose of erlotinib and data were entered in the database as of the CRF cut-off date of 14th May 2008 were included in analysis of data (n = 19. This population is defined as the Intent to Treat (ITT population and includes all patients who had at least one dose of erlotinib regardless of whether major protocol violations were incurred. The findings are consistent with the results of the randomized, placebo-controlled BR.21 study. Indicating that erlotinib is an effective option for patients with advanced NSCLC who are unsuitable for, or who have previously failed standard chemotherapy. In B&H group of patients DCR was almost 84%, and PFS was approximately 24,7 weeks (compared with 44% and 9,7 weeks for erlotinib reported in phase III. Almost three quarter of the patients received erlotinib as their second line of therapy. Overall, erlotinib was well tolerated; there were no patients who withdrew due to a treatment-related AE (mainly rash and there were few dose reductions. 24% of patients experienced an SAE (most commonly gastrointestinal (GI disorders.

  13. Advanced Electronics

    2017-07-21

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2017-0114 TR-2017-0114 ADVANCED ELECTRONICS Ashwani Sharma 21 Jul 2017 Interim Report APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...NUMBER Advanced Electronics 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 4846 Ashwani Sharma 5e. TASK NUMBER...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. (RDMX-17-14919 dtd 20 Mar 2018) 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Space Electronics

  14. Blueprint and First Experiences Bridging Hardware Virtualization and Global Grids for Advanced Scientific Computing: Designing and Building a Global Edge Services Framework (ESF) for OSG, EGEE, and LCG

    Rana, A S; Vaniachine, A; Wurthwein, F; Foster, I; Sotomayor, B; Freeman, T

    2006-01-01

    We report on first experiences with building and operating an edge services framework (ESF) based on Xen virtual machines instantiated via the workspace service in Globus toolkit, and developed as a joint project between EGEE, LCG, and OSG. Many computing facilities are architected with their compute and storage clusters behind firewalls. Edge services (ES) are instantiated on a small set of gateways to provide access to these clusters via standard grid interfaces. Experience on EGEE, LCG, and OSG has shown that at least two issues are of critical importance when designing an infrastructure in support of ES. The first concerns ES configuration. It is impractical to assume that each virtual organization (VO) using a facility will employ the same ES configuration, or that different configurations will coexist easily. Even within a VO, it should be possible to run different versions of the same ES simultaneously. The second issue concerns resource allocation: it is essential that an ESF be able to effectively gu...

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of a Perovskite Barium Zirconate (BaZrO[subscript 3]): An Experiment for an Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    Thananatthanachon, Todsapon

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment, the students explore the synthesis of a crystalline solid-state material, barium zirconate (BaZrO3) by two different synthetic methods: (a) the wet chemical method using BaCl[subscript 2]·2H[subscript 2]O and ZrOCl[subscript 2]·8H[subscript 2]O as the precursors, and (b) the solid-state reaction from BaCO[subscript 3] and…

  16. Technical advances in radiation therapy

    Sause, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial advances have been made in radiation therapy. Many of these advances can be applied in most radiation therapy departments without expensive improvements in equipment. Changes in radiation fractionation, chemotherapeutic sensitization, intraoperative radiation, and interstitial implants can be performed with experience and improved physician training in most medium-sized departments. Advances that require investments in expensive equipment such as particle radiation and hyperthermia will need to be evaluated at designated treatment centers. 106 references

  17. AdvancED Flex 4

    Tiwari, Shashank; Schulze, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    AdvancED Flex 4 makes advanced Flex 4 concepts and techniques easy. Ajax, RIA, Web 2.0, mashups, mobile applications, the most sophisticated web tools, and the coolest interactive web applications are all covered with practical, visually oriented recipes. * Completely updated for the new tools in Flex 4* Demonstrates how to use Flex 4 to create robust and scalable enterprise-grade Rich Internet Applications.* Teaches you to build high-performance web applications with interactivity that really engages your users.* What you'll learn Practiced beginners and intermediate users of Flex, especially

  18. Hedgehog pathway inhibitor in combination with radiation therapy for basal cell carcinomas of the head and neck. First clinical experience with vismodegib for locally advanced disease

    Schulze, Bjoern; Roedel, Claus; Balermpas, Panagiotis [University Hospital Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Frankfurt (Germany); Meissner, Markus [University Hospital Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Dermatology, Frankfurt (Germany); Ghanaati, Shahram [University Hospital Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Craniofacial and Plastic Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Burck, Iris [University Hospital Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Definitive radiotherapy and vismodegib, an oral inhibitor of the hedgehog pathway, are both established treatment options for locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Both have shown good results in local tumor control; however, the effects concerning advanced tumors are often not of a lasting nature and to date no systematic data about the combination of the two modalities are available. We retrospectively analyzed four patients who received vismodegib and radiotherapy in combination. Radiation doses varied between 50.4 Gy and 66.0 Gy. Three patients had recurrent BCC. One patient had locoregional lymph node involvement. Vismodegib was taken once a day (150 mg) during the entire time of irradiation and beyond upon instructions of the attending dermatologist. In three cases a persistent complete response was observed, in one case the tumor remained stable for approximately 6 months until further tumor progression was documented. The combined therapy was well tolerated in all cases. No exceptional side effects pointing at a drug-radiation interaction were observed. The combination of vismodegib and radiation seems feasible and the initial results are promising. In our cohort, there was no increase in unexpected side effects. Further research is needed to evaluate the significance of this combined therapy. (orig.) [German] Sowohl definitive Radiotherapie als auch Vismodegib, ein oraler Inhibitor der Hedgehog-Signalkaskade, sind etablierte Behandlungsoptionen fuer lokal fortgeschrittene Basalzellkarzinome (BCC). Beide Therapien zeigen fuer sich gute Ansprechraten, aber die lokale Tumorkontrolle ist oft nicht dauerhaft und bis heute existieren kaum Daten ueber eine Kombination der beiden Modalitaeten. Wir analysierten retrospektiv vier Patientenfaelle nach simultaner Applikation von Vismodegib und Bestrahlung. Die Bestrahlungsdosis variierte zwischen 50,4 Gy und 66,0 Gy. Drei der Patienten hatten ein rezidiviertes BCC. Ein Patient hatte einen befallenen regionalen

  19. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world.In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care.I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  20. Introduction of staging laparoscopy in the management of advanced epithelial ovarian, tubal and peritoneal cancer: impact on prognosis in a single institution experience.

    Fagotti, A; Vizzielli, G; Fanfani, F; Costantini, B; Ferrandina, G; Gallotta, V; Gueli Alletti, S; Tortorella, L; Scambia, G

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the prognostic impact of routinely use of staging laparoscopy (S-LPS) in patients with primary advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (AEOC). All women were submitted to S-LPS before receiving primary debulking surgery (PDS) or neoadjuvant treatment (NACT). The surgical and survival outcome were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Among 300 consecutive patients submitted to S-LPS no complications related to the surgical procedure were registered. The laparoscopic evaluation showed that almost half of the patients (46.3%) had a high tumor load. One-hundred forty-eight (49.3%) women were considered suitable for PDS and the remaining 152 (50.7%) were submitted to NACT. The percentages of complete (residual tumor, RT=0) and optimal (RTperformance status (p=0.016) maintained an independent association with the PFS. Including S-LPS in a tertiary referral center for the management AEOC does not appear to have a negative impact in terms of survival and it may be helpful to individualize the treatment avoiding unnecessary laparotomies and surgical complications. © 2013.

  1. Patients' perceptions and experiences of using a mobile phone-based advanced symptom management system (ASyMS) to monitor and manage chemotherapy related toxicity.

    McCann, L; Maguire, R; Miller, M; Kearney, N

    2009-03-01

    Chemotherapy forms a core component of treatment for the majority patients with cancer. Recent changes in cancer services mean patients frequently receive such treatment as outpatients and are often required to manage side effects at home without direct support from oncology health professionals. Information technology continues to develop to support patients in the community; this study evaluated the impact of a mobile phone-based advanced symptom management system (ASyMS) on chemotherapy related toxicity in patients with lung, breast or colorectal cancer. One hundred and twelve patients were randomized from seven clinical sites across the UK; 56 patients used the mobile phone to record their symptoms, sending their reports directly to the nurses at their clinical site; 56 control group patients received standard care. Health professionals were alerted about any severe or life-threatening symptoms through the development of a chemotherapy symptom risk model. Patients' perceptions of ASyMS were evaluated pre and post participation. Patients reported many benefits of using ASyMS including improved communication with health professionals, improvements in the management of their symptoms, and feeling reassured their symptoms were being monitored while at home. ASyMS has the potential to positively impact on the management of symptoms in patients receiving chemotherapy treatment.

  2. Nurse's perceptions and experiences of using of a mobile-phone-based Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS) to monitor and manage chemotherapy-related toxicity.

    Maguire, R; McCann, L; Miller, M; Kearney, N

    2008-09-01

    Many people diagnosed with cancer will receive chemotherapy as a core component of their care. Recent changes in the delivery of cancer services mean that patients frequently receive care on an out-patient basis and are therefore often required to manage related side effects at home without direct support from oncology health professionals. The use of information and communications technology may be seen as a means of supporting patients receiving chemotherapy in the home care setting. This mixed methods study, reports on the perceptions of nurses (n=35) who participated in a randomised controlled trial of a mobile phone based, Advanced Symptom Management System (ASyMS), in the management of chemotherapy-related toxicity in patients with breast, lung and colorectal cancer. Nurses' perceptions of ASyMS were evaluated at the start and the end of the study. Overall, they could see the benefits of ASyMS in the remote monitoring of chemotherapy toxicity and its role in facilitating early intervention and subsequent management, demonstrating the potential utility of the system within clinical practice.

  3. Epirubicin is not Superior to Doxorubicin in the Treatment of Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcomas.The Experience of the EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group

    Nielsen, Ole Steen; Dombernowsky, Per; Mouridsen, Henning T

    2000-01-01

    studies the EORTC STBSG tested whether epirubicin (epi) is an alternative to standard dose dox in the treatment of chemonaive patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma. The present report gives the final results of these studies.Patients/Methods. In the first study 210 patients were randomized to receive...... either dox or epi both at a dose of 75 mg/m(2) given as bolus injection at 3-week intervals. In the second study 334 patients were randomized to dox 75 mg/m(2), epi 150 mg/m(2) or epi 50 mg/m(2) days 1-3, all given as bolus injection at 3-week intervals.Results. In the first study no differences...... in median survival and duration of response were found. Of 167 evaluable patients the response rate was slightly in favour of dox (23% vs 18%) but at the expense of more toxicity.These data could suggest that increasing the epi dose may lead to a greater antineoplastic effect with acceptable toxicity...

  4. Radical chemo-irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer in elderly patients: Experience from a tertiary care center in South India.

    Chalissery, J R; Sudheeran, P C; Varghese, K M; Venkatesan, K

    2016-01-01

    To assess the feasibility, tolerance and response of radical chemo irradiation using Intensity modulated Radiotherapy [IMRT] in elderly patients [age >65] with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients aged 65 and above [range 65 to 84years] registered in oncology outpatient unit in our institution between December 2011 to 2014, with stage III and IV head and neck cancer were treated with radical dose of radiotherapy using IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin 40mg/sq.m weekly. Response evaluation and toxicity profile assessment was done 6 to 8 weeks after completion of treatment and 3 monthly thereafter with median follow up of 3 years. Total number of patients analysed were 47. 43(91.5%) patients tolerated 66-.70Gy of radiotherapy and 4 or more cycles of weekly chemotherapy with cisplatin. First follow up evaluation at 6 to 8 weeks showed 81% patients having complete loco regional response. Grade III skin reaction and mucositis was noticed in 24% and 47% respectively. No grade III neutropenia observed. Median follow up of 3 years showed a complete local control in 53% and overall survival of 60%. Radical chemo irradiation with IMRT in elderly patients is a feasible option. Long term local control and overall survival benefits needs to be followed up.

  5. Health care professionals' experience, understanding and perception of need of advanced cancer patients with cachexia and their families: The benefits of a dedicated clinic.

    Scott, David; Reid, Joanne; Hudson, Peter; Martin, Peter; Porter, Sam

    2016-12-30

    Cachexia is defined as the on-going loss of skeletal muscle mass that cannot be fully reversed by conventional nutritional support. It is found in up to 80% of patients with advanced cancer and has profound psycho-social consequences for patients and their families. Previous studies demonstrate that many healthcare professionals receive little formal education in cachexia management leading them to feel that they have limited understanding of the syndrome and cannot intervene effectively. This study aims to examine the value of a dedicated cachexia clinic and its influence on staff understanding and practice. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted. The study employed semi-structured interviews with a range of healthcare professionals responsible for designing and delivering cancer care in a large teaching hospital in Australia. This hospital had a dedicated cachexia clinic. In-depth interviews were conducted with 8 healthcare professionals and senior managers. Four themes were identified: formal and informal education; knowledge and understanding; truth telling in cachexia and palliative care; and, a multi-disciplinary approach. Findings show that improved knowledge and understanding across a staff body can lead to enhanced staff confidence and a willingness to address cancer cachexia and its consequences with patients and their families. Comparisons with similar previous research demonstrate the advantages of providing a structure for staff to gain knowledge about cachexia and how this can contribute to feelings of improved understanding and confidence necessary to respond to the challenge of cachexia.

  6. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC)/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience.

    Gregory, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  7. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  8. What happened when Scottish women were given advance supplies of emergency contraception? A survey and qualitative study of women's views and experiences.

    Ziebland, Sue; Wyke, Sally; Seaman, Pete; Fairhurst, Karen; Walker, Jeremy; Glasier, Anna

    2005-04-01

    The Lothian Emergency Contraception Project in Scotland was a radical intervention in which women aged 16-29 were given 5 packs of emergency contraception (EC) to keep at home. We use survey and qualitative interview data to describe how women used the project packs and their views of advance supplies. The women's accounts suggest that concerns that eased access to emergency contraception will lead to repeated use and risky sex appear to be largely unfounded. Women were pleased to be offered the packs, which were reported as having practical advantages and also sparing them the difficulty of negotiating a sometimes awkward consultation. Respondents explained how they used their packs of EC and in their accounts used justifications, repetition and distancing to emphasise that they would not take risks with contraception or sexually transmitted infections. We interpret the data in the light of the observation that EC has an anomalous role in contraception and the work of applied linguists Candlin and Lucas who have demonstrated the difficulties inherent in the family planning consultation.

  9. Exploring healthcare assistants' role and experience in pain assessment and management for people with advanced dementia towards the end of life: a qualitative study.

    Jansen, Bannin De Witt

    2017-01-19

    Pain assessment and management are key aspects in the care of people with dementia approaching the end of life but become challenging when patient self-report is impaired or unavailable. Best practice recommends the use of observational pain assessments for these patients; however, difficulties have been documented with health professionals\\' use of these tools in the absence of additional collateral patient knowledge. No studies have explored the role, perspectives and experiences of healthcare assistants in pain assessment and management in dementia; this study provides insight into this important area.

  10. SU-C-BRD-05: Implementation of Incident Learning in the Safety and Quality Management of Radiotherapy: The Primary Experience in a New Established Program with Advanced Techniques

    Yang, R; Wang, J [Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the implementation and effectiveness of incident learning for the safety and quality of radiotherapy in a new established radiotherapy program with advanced technology. Methods: Reference to the consensus recommendations by American Association of Physicist in Medicine, an incident learning system was specifically designed for reporting, investigating, and learning of individual radiotherapy incidents in a new established radiotherapy program, with 4D CBCT, Ultrasound guided radiotherapy, VMAT, gated treatment delivered on two new installed linacs. The incidents occurring in external beam radiotherapy from February, 2012 to January, 2014 were reported. Results: A total of 33 reports were analyzed, including 28 near misses and 5 incidents. Among them, 5 originated in imaging for planning, 25 in planning, 1 in plan transfer, 1 in commissioning and 1 in treatment delivery. Among them, three near misses originated in the safety barrier of the radiotherapy process. In terms of error type, 1 incident was classified as wrong patient, 7 near misses/incidents as wrong site, 6 as wrong laterality, 5 as wrong dose, 7 as wrong prescription, and 7 as suboptimal plan quality. 5 incidents were all classified as grade 1/2 of dosimetric severity, 1 as grade 0, and the other 4 as grade 1 of medical severity. For the causes/contributory factors, negligence, policy not followed, inadequate training, failure to develop an effective plan, and communication contributed to 19, 15, 12, 5 and 3 near misses/incidents, respectively. The average incident rate per 100 patients treated was 0.4; this rate fell to 0.28% in the second year from 0.56% in the first year. The rate of near miss fell to 1.24% from 2.22%. Conclusion: Effective incident learning can reduce the occurrence of near miss/incidents, enhance the culture of safety. Incident learning is an effective proactive method for improving the quality and safety of radiotherapy.

  11. Introducing nerve-sparing approach during minimally invasive radical hysterectomy for locally-advanced cervical cancer: A multi-institutional experience.

    Raspagliesi, Francesco; Bogani, Giorgio; Spinillo, Arsenio; Ditto, Antonino; Bogliolo, Stefano; Casarin, Jvan; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Gardella, Barbara; Chiappa, Valentina; Scaffa, Cono; Ferrero, Simone; Cromi, Antonella; Lorusso, Domenica; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of nerve-sparing (NS) approach on outcomes of patients undergoing minimally invasive radical hysterectomy (MRH) for locally advanced stage cervical cancer (LACC). Data of consecutive patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery for LACC were retrospectively retrieved in a multi-institutional setting from 2009 to 2016. All patients included had minimally invasive class III radical hysterectomy (MRH or NS-MRH). Propensity matching algorithm was used to decrease possible allocation bias when comparing outcomes between groups. Overall, 83 patients were included. The prevalence of patients undergoing NS approach increased aver the study period (from 7% in the year 2009-2010 to 97% in the year 2015-2016; p-for-trend < 0.001). NS-MRH and MRH were performed in 47 (57%) and 36 (43%) patients, respectively. After the application the propensity-matching algorithm, we compared 35 patients' pair (total 70 patients). Postoperative complications rate was similar between groups. Patients undergoing NS-LRH experienced shorter hospital stay than patients undergoing LRH (3.6 vs. 5.0 days). 60-day pelvic floor dysfunction rates, including voiding, fecal and sexual alterations, were lower in the NS group in comparison to control group (p = 0.02). Five-year disease-free (p = 0.77) and overall (p = 0.36) survivals were similar comparing NS-MRH with MRH. The implementation of NS approach in the setting of LACC improves patients' outcomes, minimizing pelvic dysfunction rates. NS approach has not detrimental effects on survival outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-C-BRD-05: Implementation of Incident Learning in the Safety and Quality Management of Radiotherapy: The Primary Experience in a New Established Program with Advanced Techniques

    Yang, R; Wang, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the implementation and effectiveness of incident learning for the safety and quality of radiotherapy in a new established radiotherapy program with advanced technology. Methods: Reference to the consensus recommendations by American Association of Physicist in Medicine, an incident learning system was specifically designed for reporting, investigating, and learning of individual radiotherapy incidents in a new established radiotherapy program, with 4D CBCT, Ultrasound guided radiotherapy, VMAT, gated treatment delivered on two new installed linacs. The incidents occurring in external beam radiotherapy from February, 2012 to January, 2014 were reported. Results: A total of 33 reports were analyzed, including 28 near misses and 5 incidents. Among them, 5 originated in imaging for planning, 25 in planning, 1 in plan transfer, 1 in commissioning and 1 in treatment delivery. Among them, three near misses originated in the safety barrier of the radiotherapy process. In terms of error type, 1 incident was classified as wrong patient, 7 near misses/incidents as wrong site, 6 as wrong laterality, 5 as wrong dose, 7 as wrong prescription, and 7 as suboptimal plan quality. 5 incidents were all classified as grade 1/2 of dosimetric severity, 1 as grade 0, and the other 4 as grade 1 of medical severity. For the causes/contributory factors, negligence, policy not followed, inadequate training, failure to develop an effective plan, and communication contributed to 19, 15, 12, 5 and 3 near misses/incidents, respectively. The average incident rate per 100 patients treated was 0.4; this rate fell to 0.28% in the second year from 0.56% in the first year. The rate of near miss fell to 1.24% from 2.22%. Conclusion: Effective incident learning can reduce the occurrence of near miss/incidents, enhance the culture of safety. Incident learning is an effective proactive method for improving the quality and safety of radiotherapy

  13. Use of positron emission tomography scan response to guide treatment change for locally advanced gastric cancer: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience.

    Won, Elizabeth; Shah, Manish A; Schöder, Heiko; Strong, Vivian E; Coit, Daniel G; Brennan, Murray F; Kelsen, David P; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Tang, Laura H; Capanu, Marinela; Rizk, Nabil P; Allen, Peter J; Bains, Manjit S; Ilson, David H

    2016-08-01

    Early metabolic response on 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy is PET non-responders have poor outcomes whether continuing chemotherapy or proceeding directly to surgery. Use of PET may identify early treatment failure, sparing patients from inactive therapy and allowing for crossover to alternative therapies. We examined the effectiveness of PET directed switching to salvage chemotherapy in the PET non-responders. Patients with locally advanced resectable FDG-avid gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma received bevacizumab 15 mg/kg, epirubicin 50 mg/m(2), cisplatin 60 mg/m(2) day 1, and capecitabine 625 mg/m(2) bid (ECX) every 21 days. PET scan was obtained at baseline and after cycle 1. PET responders, (i.e., ≥35% reduction in FDG uptake at the primary tumor) continued ECX + bev. Non-responders switched to docetaxel 30 mg/m(2), irinotecan 50 mg/mg(2) day 1 and 8 plus bevacizumab every 21 days for 2 cycles. Patients then underwent surgery. The primary objective was to improve the 2-year disease free survival (DFS) from 30% (historical control) to 53% in the non-responders. Twenty evaluable patients enrolled before the study closed for poor accrual. Eleven were PET responders and the 9 non-responders switched to the salvage regimen. With a median follow-up of 38.2 months, the 2-year DFS was 55% [95% confidence interval (CI), 30-85%] in responders compared with 56% in the non-responder group (95% CI, 20-80%, P=0.93). The results suggest that changing chemotherapy regimens in PET non-responding patients may improve outcomes. Results from this pilot trial are hypothesis generating and suggest that PET directed neoadjuvant therapy merits evaluation in a larger trial.

  14. Advanced calculus

    Nickerson, HK; Steenrod, NE

    2011-01-01

    ""This book is a radical departure from all previous concepts of advanced calculus,"" declared the Bulletin of the American Mathematics Society, ""and the nature of this departure merits serious study of the book by everyone interested in undergraduate education in mathematics."" Classroom-tested in a Princeton University honors course, it offers students a unified introduction to advanced calculus. Starting with an abstract treatment of vector spaces and linear transforms, the authors introduce a single basic derivative in an invariant form. All other derivatives - gradient, divergent, curl,

  15. Advancing the education in molecular diagnostics: the IFCC-Initiative "Clinical Molecular Biology Curriculum" (C-CMBC); a ten-year experience.

    Lianidou, Evi; Ahmad-Nejad, Parviz; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Izuhara, Kenji; Cremonesi, Laura; Schroeder, Maria-Eugenia; Richter, Karin; Ferrari, Maurizio; Neumaier, Michael

    2014-09-25

    Molecular techniques are becoming commonplace in the diagnostic laboratory. Their applications influence all major phases of laboratory medicine including predisposition/genetic risk, primary diagnosis, therapy stratification and prognosis. Readily available laboratory hardware and wetware (i.e. consumables and reagents) foster rapid dissemination to countries that are just establishing molecular testing programs. Appropriate skill levels extending beyond the technical procedure are required for analytical and diagnostic proficiency that is mandatory in molecular genetic testing. An international committee (C-CMBC) of the International Federation for Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) was established to disseminate skills in molecular genetic testing in member countries embarking on the respective techniques. We report the ten-year experience with different teaching and workshop formats for beginners in molecular diagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Advances in business ICT

    Pełech-Pilichowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Futurists and scientists alike profess the coming of a new era in the history – the knowledge era. The notion of knowledge is as old as humans’ self-consciousness, but new challenges appear. The meaning of the word “knowledge” is changing from cognitive notion to a technical term denoting a structured economic resource to be actively managed. This contributed volume is a result of vivid and extremely valuable discussions held at 3rd International Workshop on Advances in Business ICT (ABICT) in Wrocław, Poland, September 9-12, 2012. The workshop focused on Advances in Business ICT approached from a multidisciplinary perspective. It provided an international forum for scientists/experts from academia and industry to discuss and exchange current results, applications, new ideas of ongoing research and experience on all aspects of Business Intelligence. ABICT has also been an opportunity to demonstrate different ideas and tools for developing and supporting organizational creativity, as well as advances ...

  17. Experiments on the Heat Transfer and Natural Circulation Characteristics of the Passive Residual Heat Removal System for the Advanced Integral Type Reactor

    Park, Hyun-Sik; Choi, Ki-Yong; Cho, Seok; Park, Choon-Kyung; Lee, Sung-Jae; Song, Chul-Hwa; Chung, Moon-Ki; Lee, Un-Chul

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on the heat transfer characteristics and natural circulation performance of the passive residual heat removal system (PRHRS) for the SMART-P have been performed using the high temperature/high pressure thermal-hydraulic test facility (VISTA). The VISTA facility consists of the primary loop, the secondary loop, the PRHRS loop, and auxiliary systems to simulate the SMART-P, a pilot plant of the SMART. The primary loop is composed of the steam generator (SG) primary side, a simulated core, a main coolant pump, and loop piping, and the PRHRS loop consists of the SG secondary side, a PRHRS heat exchanger, and loop piping. The natural circulation performance of the PRHRS, the heat transfer characteristics of the PRHRS heat exchangers and the emergency cooldown tank (ECT), and the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the primary loop are intensively investigated. The experimental results show that the coolant flows steadily in the PRHRS loop and the heat transfers through the PRHRS heat exchanger and the emergency cooldown tank are sufficient enough to enable the natural circulation of the coolant. The results also show that the core decay heat can be sufficiently removed from the primary loop with the operation of the PRHRS. (authors)

  18. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for advanced ovarian and peritoneal cancers in patients following interval debulking surgery or primary cytoreductive surgery: Tom Baker Cancer Centre experience from 2006 to 2009.

    Nelson, Gregory; Lucero, Carlos Aspe; Chu, Pamela; Nation, Jill; Ghatage, Prafull

    2010-03-01

    To describe our experience with cisplatin- and paclitaxel-based IP chemotherapy in patients treated initially with either neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery (IDS) or primary cytoreductive surgery (PCRS). We performed a retrospective review of the records of 67 patients (38 IDS, 29 PCRS) enrolled in the intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy program at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre between 2006 and 2009. Information pertaining to patient demographics, IP chemotherapy toxicity, and catheter complications was extracted, and the median time to recurrence was calculated. Most patients in the study were aged 50 to 70 years and had a diagnosis of stage III serous ovarian cancer. Overall, 295/393 IP cycles (75%) were successfully administered. The proportion of patients completing six cycles of chemotherapy in the IDS and PCRS groups was 53% and 59%, respectively. Frequent (> 25%) Grade 1 to 2 chemotherapy toxicities included fatigue, peripheral neuropathy, and nausea. Catheter complications were observed in 34% of patients (23/67). The recurrence rates for patients completing four or more cycles of IP chemotherapy in the IDS and PCRS groups were 58% and 35%, respectively, with the median time to recurrence approximately one year. Although IP chemotherapy is well tolerated in both IDS and PCRS patients, the median time to recurrence is shorter than expected.

  19. High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Two 9 Gy Fractions in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer - a South Indian Institutional Experience.

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda; Kotne, Sivasankar

    2015-01-01

    Although 3D image based brachytherapy is currently the standard of treatment in cervical cancer, most of the centres in developing countries still practice orthogonal intracavitary brachytherapy due to financial constraints. The quest for optimum dose and fractionation schedule in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is still ongoing. While the American Brachytherapy Society recommends four to eight fractions of each less than 7.5 Gy, there are some studies demonstrating similar efficacy and comparable toxicity with higher doses per fraction. To assess the treatment efficacy and late complications of HDR ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions. This is a prospective institutional study in Southern India carried on from 1st June 2012 to 31st July 2014. In this period, 76 patients of cervical cancer satisfying our inclusion criteria were treated with concurrent chemo-radiation following ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions, five to seven days apart. The median follow-up period in the study was 24 months (range 10.6 - 31.2 months). The 2 year actuarial local control rate, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.1%, 84.2% and 81.8% respectively. Although 38.2% patients suffered from late toxicity, only 3 patients had grade III late toxicity. In our experience, HDR brachytherapy with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions is an effective dose fractionation for the treatment of cervical cancer with acceptable toxicity.

  20. An experimental study on advancement of damping performance of foundations in soft ground. Pt.2: Experiment focusing on damping and antivibration performance of side surface of foundation blocks

    Ishimaru, S.; Shimomura, Y.; Kawamuram, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Hata, I.; Miwa, S.

    2005-01-01

    To aim at progress of damping performance of foundations that will be built at soft ground, we have proposed an improved foundation work of backfilling a damping material into trenches dug along a foundation supported by improved soil medium. This damping material is a mixture of asphalt with crushed stones and rubber chips (MACSRC) and has itself high attenuation and mitigation performance. Not only to comprehend the attenuation ability of the improved foundation work quantitatively and qualitatively but also to verify the effectiveness of this work, we carried out forced vibration tests for two test blocks, which were constructed by a normal construction work and the above improved foundation work. According to the experiment results of the blocks by the normal construction work and by the improved foundation work that were excited by the vibration generator, magnitude of amplitudes of the latter became half than the former. Effectiveness in the attenuation performance of MACSRC was confirmed. When the block by the normal construction work was vibrated, the improved foundation work decreased magnitude of amplitude of the adjacent block than the normal construction work. It is expected that MACSRC would exert mitigation ability against earthquakes or other external and internal forces. (authors)

  1. A dwarf mouse model with decreased GH/IGF-1 activity that does not experience life-span extension: potential impact of increased adiposity, leptin, and insulin with advancing age.

    Berryman, Darlene E; Lubbers, Ellen R; Magon, Vishakha; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J

    2014-02-01

    Reduced growth hormone (GH) action is associated with extended longevity in many vertebrate species. GH receptor (GHR) null (GHR(-)(/-)) mice, which have a disruption in the GHR gene, are a well-studied example of mice that are insulin sensitive and long lived yet obese. However, unlike other mouse lines with reduced GH action, GH receptor antagonist (GHA) transgenic mice have reduced GH action yet exhibit a normal, not extended, life span. Understanding why GHA mice do not have extended life span though they share many physiological attributes with GHR(-)(/-) mice will help provide clues about how GH influences aging. For this study, we examined age- and sex-related changes in body composition, glucose homeostasis, circulating adipokines, and tissue weights in GHA mice and littermate controls. Compared with previous studies with GHR(-)(/-) mice, GHA mice had more significant increases in fat mass with advancing age. The increased obesity resulted in significant adipokine changes. Euglycemia was maintained in GHA mice; however, hyperinsulinemia developed in older male GHA mice. Overall, GHA mice experience a more substantial, generalized obesity accompanied by altered adipokine levels and glucose homeostasis than GHR(-)(/-) mice, which becomes more exaggerated with advancing age and which likely contributes to the lack of life-span extension in these mice.

  2. Regaining a sense of agency and shared self-reliance: the experience of advanced disease cancer patients participating in a multidimensional exercise intervention while undergoing chemotherapy--analysis of patient diaries.

    Midtgaard, Julie; Stelter, Reinhard; Rørth, Mikael; Adamsen, Lis

    2007-04-01

    Evidence is emerging that exercise can reduce psychological distress in cancer patients undergoing treatment. The present study aimed to (qualitatively) explore the experiences of advanced disease cancer patients participating in a 6-week, 9-hours weekly, structured, group-based multidimensional exercise intervention while undergoing chemotherapy. Unstructured diaries from a purposive sample of three females and two males (28-52 years old) who participated in the program served as the database. Data were analyzed using a phenomenological, narrative method. The analysis yielded three themes: shifting position, self-surveillance, and negotiated strength. The intervention highlighted situations making it possible for the participants to negate psychological and physical constraints. The concept of structured exercise contains viable psychotherapeutic potentials by allowing the development of alternative bodily and mental realities complying with cancer patients' demands and abilities to regain autonomy and commitment to discover and adopt a sense of agency and shared self-reliance.

  3. A Compilation of Boiling Water Reactor Operational Experience for the United Kingdom's Office for Nuclear Regulation's Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Generic Design Assessment

    Wheeler, Timothy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liao, Huafei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    United States nuclear power plant Licensee Event Reports (LERs), submitted to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under law as required by 10 CFR 50.72 and 50.73 were evaluated for reliance to the United Kingdom’s Health and Safety Executive – Office for Nuclear Regulation’s (ONR) general design assessment of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design. An NRC compendium of LERs, compiled by Idaho National Laboratory over the time period January 1, 2000 through March 31, 2014, were sorted by BWR safety system and sorted into two categories: those events leading to a SCRAM, and those events which constituted a safety system failure. The LERs were then evaluated as to the relevance of the operational experience to the ABWR design.

  4. Retalhos de avanço no tratamento da fissura anal crônica: experiência inicial Advancement flap in the treatment of chronic anal fissure: inicial experience

    Maria Auxiliadora Prolungatti Cesar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A fissura anal é uma laceração do canal anal relacionada ao trauma, hipertonia esfincteriana e isquemia. A maioria cicatriza espontaneamente ou com tratamento conservador, e poucas requerem tratamento cirúrgico. O objetivo deste trabalho é verificar os resultados clínicos e alterações manométricas de pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico da fissura anal com avançamento de retalhos em v-y. Métodos: Estudo prospectivo, realizado nos anos de 2007, 2008 e 2009, que abrangeu nove pacientes portadores de fissura anal crônica submetidos ao avançamento de retalho anal. Foram avaliadas as pressões do canal anal ao repouso, contração e esforço evacuatório; no pré e pós-operatório. Resultados: Na amostra, todos os pacientes apresentaram hipertonia esfincteriana prévia. seis (66,6% obtiveram resolução total dos sintomas e das lesões. Um (11,11% sofreu deiscência parcial do retalho, sem sintomas clínicos; e outros dois (22,22%, infecção com perda dos mesmos e persistência da fissura. A análise manométrica das pressões de repouso, contração e evacuação nos grupos não mostrou alteração estatisticamente significativa (p>0,05, o que comprova que a cirurgia não incluiu manipulação dos esfíncteres. Conclusão: Os retalhos anais mostraram-se efetivos no tratamento da fissura anal, com cicatrização da lesão, sem que ocorram alterações nas pressões anais desses pacientes.The anal fissure is a laceration of the anal canal related to trauma, hypertonic sphincter and ischemia. The majority heals spontaneously or with conservative treatment and only a few requires surgical treatment. The objective of this study is to verify the clinical results and manometric alterations of patients submitted to the surgical treatment of the anal fissure with advance of v-y skin flaps. Methods: Prospective study, accomplished in 2007,2008 and 2009, in witch nine patients with chronic anal fissure were submitted to v-y advance. The

  5. Proceedings of the Twenty-First NASA Propagation Experiments Meeting (NAPEX XXI) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications industry, academia and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at this meeting by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satellite communications industry. NAPEX XXI took place in El Segundo, California on June 11-12, 1997 and consisted of three sessions. Session 1, entitled "ACTS Propagation Study Results & Outcome " covered the results of 20 station-years of Ka-band radio-wave propagation experiments. Session 11, 'Ka-band Propagation Studies and Models,' provided the latest developments in modeling, and analysis of experimental results about radio wave propagation phenomena for design of Ka-band satellite communications systems. Session 111, 'Propagation Research Topics,' covered a diverse range of propagation topics of interest to the space community, including overviews of handbooks and databases on radio wave propagation. The ACTS Propagation Studies miniworkshop was held on June 13, 1997 and consisted of a technical session in the morning and a plenary session in the afternoon. The morning session covered updates on the status of the ACTS Project & Propagation Program, engineering support for ACTS Propagation Terminals, and the Data Center. The plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  6. Advanced Virgo

    Virgo, a first-generation interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detector, located in the European Gravitational Observatory, EGO, Cascina (Pisa-Italy) and constructed by the collaboration of French and Italian institutes (CNRS and INFN) has successfully completed its long-duration data taking runs. It is now undergoing a fundamental upgrade that exploits available cutting edges technology to open an exciting new window on the universe, with the first detection of a gravitational wave signal. Advanced Virgo (AdV) is the project to upgrade the Virgo detector to a second-generation instrument. AdV will be able to scan a volume of the Universe 1000 times larger than initial Virgo. AdV will be hosted in the same infrastructures as Virgo. The Advanced VIRGO project is funded and at present carried on by a larger collaboration of institutes belonging to CNRS- France , RMKI - Hungary, INFN- Italy, Nikhef - The Netherlands Polish Academy of Science - Poland.

  7. Advanced Combustion

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  8. DART-bid for loco-regionally advanced NSCLC. Summary of acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up; experiences with pulmonary dose constraints

    Wurstbauer, Karl [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Zehentmayr, Franz; Deutschmann, Heinz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Salzburg (Austria); Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Landeskrankenhaus, Salzburg (Austria); Dagn, Karin; Exeli, Ann-Katrin; Kopp, Peter [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Landeskrankenhaus, Salzburg (Austria); Porsch, Peter; Maurer, Birgit; Studnicka, Michael [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Departement of Pneumology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    To report acute and late toxicity with long-term follow-up, and to describe our experiences with pulmonary dose constraints. Between 2002 and 2009, 150 patients with 155 histologically/cytologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; tumor stages II, IIIA, IIIB in 6, 55 and 39%, respectively) received the following median doses: primary tumors 79.2 Gy (range 72.0-90.0 Gy), lymph node metastases 59.4 Gy (54.0-73.8 Gy), nodes electively 45 Gy; with fractional doses of 1.8 Gy twice daily (bid). In all, 86% of patients received 2 cycles of chemotherapy previously. Five treatment-related deaths occurred: pneumonitis, n = 1; progressive pulmonary fibrosis in patients with pre-existing pulmonary fibrosis, n = 2; haemorrhage, n = 2. In all, 8% of patients experienced grade 3 and 1.3% grade 4 pneumonitis; 11% showed late fibrotic alterations grade 2 in lung parenchyma. Clinically relevant acute esophagitis (grade 2 and 3) was seen in 33.3% of patients, 2 patients developed late esophageal stenosis (G3). Patients with upper lobe, middle lobe and central lower lobe tumours (n = 130) were treated with V20 (total lung) up to 50% and patients with peripheral lower lobe tumours (n = 14, basal lateral tumours excluded) up to 42%, without observing acute or late pulmonary toxicity >grade 3. Only patients with basal lateral lower lobe tumours (n = 5) experienced grade 4/5 pulmonary toxicity; V20 for this latter group ranged between 30 and 53%. The mean lung dose was below the QUANTEC recommendation of 20-23 Gy in all patients. The median follow-up time of all patients is 26.3 months (range 2.9-149.4) and of patients alive 80.2 months (range 63.9-149.4.). The median overall survival time of all patients is 26.3 months; the 2-, 5- and 8-year survival rates of 54, 21 and 15%, respectively. The local tumour control rate at 2 and 5 years is 70 and 64%, the regional control rate 90 and 88%, respectively. Grade 4 or 5 toxicity occurred in 7/150 patients (4.7%), which can be

  9. Advanced calculus

    Friedman, Avner

    2007-01-01

    This rigorous two-part treatment advances from functions of one variable to those of several variables. Intended for students who have already completed a one-year course in elementary calculus, it defers the introduction of functions of several variables for as long as possible, and adds clarity and simplicity by avoiding a mixture of heuristic and rigorous arguments.The first part explores functions of one variable, including numbers and sequences, continuous functions, differentiable functions, integration, and sequences and series of functions. The second part examines functions of several

  10. Advanced calculus

    Fitzpatrick, Patrick M

    2009-01-01

    Advanced Calculus is intended as a text for courses that furnish the backbone of the student's undergraduate education in mathematical analysis. The goal is to rigorously present the fundamental concepts within the context of illuminating examples and stimulating exercises. This book is self-contained and starts with the creation of basic tools using the completeness axiom. The continuity, differentiability, integrability, and power series representation properties of functions of a single variable are established. The next few chapters describe the topological and metric properties of Euclide

  11. Advanced trigonometry

    Durell, C V; Robson, A

    1950-01-01

    This volume will provide a welcome resource for teachers seeking an undergraduate text on advanced trigonometry, when few are readily available. Ideal for self-study, this text offers a clear, logical presentation of topics and an extensive selection of problems with answers. Contents include the properties of the triangle and the quadrilateral; equations, sub-multiple angles, and inverse functions; hyperbolic, logarithmic, and exponential functions; and expansions in power-series. Further topics encompass the special hyperbolic functions; projection and finite series; complex numbers; de Moiv

  12. In search of late time evolution self-similar scaling laws of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov hydrodynamic instabilities - recent theorical advance and NIF Discovery-Science experiments

    Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities, and the mixing that they cause, are of crucial importance in describing many phenomena, from very large scales such as stellar explosions (supernovae) to very small scales, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. Such mixing causes the ejection of stellar core material in supernovae, and impedes attempts at ICF ignition. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) occurs at an accelerated interface between two fluids with the lower density accelerating the higher density fluid. The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when a shock wave passes an interface between the two fluids of different density. In the RTI, buoyancy causes ``bubbles'' of the light fluid to rise through (penetrate) the denser fluid, while ``spikes'' of the heavy fluid sink through (penetrate) the lighter fluid. With realistic multi-mode initial conditions, in the deep nonlinear regime, the mixing zone width, H, and its internal structure, progress through an inverse cascade of spatial scales, reaching an asymptotic self-similar evolution: hRT =αRT Agt2 for RT and hRM =αRM tθ for RM. While this characteristic behavior has been known for years, the self-similar parameters αRT and θRM and their dependence on dimensionality and density ratio have continued to be intensively studied and a relatively wide distribution of those values have emerged. This talk will describe recent theoretical advances in the description of this turbulent mixing evolution that sheds light on the spread in αRT and θRM. Results of new and specially designed experiments, done by scientists from several laboratories, were performed recently using NIF, the only facility that is powerful enough to reach the self-similar regime, for quantitative testing of this theoretical advance, will be presented.

  13. Media experiences

    Buhl, Mie

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses mediated experiences from the perspective of the visual modality in combination with the multimodal interaction. ICT-studies has a rapid influx of new words and concepts. Digital technology led to a need to describe the convergence of images, text and sound has taken various w...... to educational practices as still more advanced technology emerge and intertwine the scientific areas in new and cross-disciplinary frameworks....

  14. The Fast Alternative Cryogenic Experiment Testbed

    Nash, Alfred; Holmes, Warren

    2000-01-01

    One of the challenges in the area of cryogenics for space exploration in the next millennium is providing the capability for inexpensive, frequent, access to space. Faced with this challenge during the International Space Station (ISS) build era, when other Space Shuttle manifesting opportunities are unavailable, a "proof of concept" cryostat has been developed to demonstrate the ability to accommodate low temperature science investigations within the constraints of the Hitchhiker siderail carrier. The Hitchhiker siderail carrier is available on a "mass available" basis during the ISS build era. In fact, several hitchhiker payloads flew with the deployment of the Unity module. Hitchhiker siderail carrier payloads have historically flown an average of about four times a year. A hybrid Solid Neon - Superfluid Helium cryostat has been developed with Janis Research Company to accommodate instruments of 16.5 cm diameter and 30 cm. length. This hybrid approach was taken in part to provide adequate on-orbit lifetime for instruments with high (conducted) heat loads from the instrumentation wiring. Mass, volume, lifetime and the launch hold scenario were all design drivers. In addition, with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, a multichannel VME architecture Germanium Resistance Thermometer (GRT) readout and heater control servo system has been developed. In a flight system, the cryostat and electronics payloads would be umbilically attached in a paired Hitchhiker siderail mount, and permit on-orbit command and telemetry capability. The results of performance tests of both the cryostat, and a helium sample instrument will be presented. The instrument features a self contained, miniaturized, nano-Kelvin resolution High Resolution Thermometer (HRT). This high level of thermal resolution is achieved through the utilization of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). Although developed for the Low Temperature Microgravity Fundamental Physics

  15. Experience with oxide fuel for advanced reactors

    Leggett, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use and potential of oxide fuel systems for the LMFBR. The flawless performance of mixed oxide (UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuel in FFTF to 100,000 MWd/MTM is reviewed and means for achieving 200,000 MWd/MTM are presented. This includes using non-swelling alloys for cladding and ducts to overcome the limitations caused by swelling of the current alloys. Examples are provided of the inherently safe characteristics of oxide fuel including a large negative Doppler coefficient, its dispersive nature under hypothetical accident scenarios, and the low energy molten fuel-coolant interaction. Developments in fuel fabrication and reprocessing that stress safety and reduced personnel exposure are presented. Lastly, the flexibility to design for maximum fuel supply (high breeding gain) or minimum fuel cost (long lifetime) is shown

  16. Satisfaction of search experiments in advanced imaging

    Berbaum, Kevin S.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of our research is to understand the perception of multiple abnormalities in an imaging examination and to develop strategies for improved diagnostic. We are one of the few laboratories in the world pursuing the goal of reducing detection errors through a better understanding of the underlying perceptual processes involved. Failure to detect an abnormality is the most common class of error in diagnostic imaging and generally is considered the most serious by the medical community. Many of these errors have been attributed to "satisfaction of search," which occurs when a lesion is not reported because discovery of another abnormality has "satisfied" the goal of the search. We have gained some understanding of the mechanisms of satisfaction of search (SOS) traditional radiographic modalities. Currently, there are few interventions to remedy SOS error. For example, patient history that the prompts specific abnormalities, protects the radiologist from missing them even when other abnormalities are present. The knowledge gained from this programmatic research will lead to reduction of observer error.

  17. Shielding considerations for advanced fuel irradiation experiments

    Kang, Young-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Moon; Kim, Bong-Goo; Kim, Hark-Rho; Lee, Dong-Soo

    2008-01-01

    An in-pile test program for the development of a high burn-up fuel is planned for the HANARO reactor. The source term originates from a leakage of fission products from the anticipated failed fuels into the gas flow tubes and around the instrumentation and control system. In order to quantify the fuel composition in the event of a fuel failure, the isotope generation and depletion code ORIGEN 2.0 was used. The computer program Microshield 6.2 was used to calculate the doses from specific locations, where a high radioactivity is expected during an irradiation. The results indicate that the equivalent dose in the investigated working areas is less than the permitted dose rate of 6.25 μSv/hr. However, access to the area of a decay vessel may need to be limited, and the installation of a Pb wall with a 20.5 cm thickness is recommended. From the analysis of a radioactive decay with time, most of the concerned gaseous nuclides with short half-lives after 3 months, were decayed, with one exception which was Kr-85, thus it should be released in accordance with applicable government laws after measuring its activity in individual holding vessels. (author)

  18. Advancing drug availability-experiences from Africa.

    Powell, Richard A; Kaye, Richard Mugula; Ddungu, Henry; Mwangi-Powell, Faith

    2010-07-01

    International health and drug regulatory authorities acknowledge that analgesics (especially opioids) are insufficiently available for pain management in many countries. In Africa, reported morphine consumption is far below the global mean, with multiple factors hampering opioid supply. Since 2006, the African Palliative Care Association has hosted three regional drug availability workshops across the continent to address this issue. Using an interactive format, the workshops have identified country-specific barriers to opioid and other essential medication accessibility before supporting participants to develop action plans to address recognized impediments. Despite multiple challenges, a number of successes have arisen from the implementation of the plans. However, key issues remain, including the introduction of supportive policy environments, effective educational initiatives, and measures to address supply-chain obstacles impeding drug availability. Copyright 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experience with oxide fuel for advanced reactors

    Leggett, R.D.

    1984-04-01

    This paper focuses on the use and potential of oxide fuel system for the LMFBR. The flawless performance of mixed oxide (UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuel in FFTF to 100,000 MWd/MTM is reviewed and means for achieving 200,000 MWd/MTM are presented. This includes using non-swelling alloys for cladding and ducts to overcome the limitations caused by swelling of the current alloys. Exampled are provided of the inherently safe characteristics of oxide fuel including a large negative Doppler coefficient, its dispersive nature under hypothetical accident scenarios, and the low energy molten fuel-coolant interaction. Developments in fuel fabrication and reprocessing that stress safety and reduced personnel exposure are presented. Lastly, the flexibility to design for maximum fuel supply (high breeding gain) or minimum fuel cost (long lifetime) is shown

  20. Game usability advancing the player experience

    Isbister, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    I. What is usability and why should I care?A. Overview chapter Isbister and Schaffer (Editors)Introduces key concepts and positions book for primary audiences: game developers andstudents aspiring to work in game development. Addresses key concerns that developersmay have about adopting usability, and sets a broad road map of what is to come in thebook.B. Interview with Tobi Saulnier of 1st PlayableA discussion with the CEO of a small game studio about why and how she uses usabilitytechniques in her development.C. Interview with Don Norman of Nielsen Norman groupA discussion with one of the pr

  1. Advanced Pacemaker

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  2. Advanced fuel technology and performance

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of the Advisory Group Meeting on Advanced Fuel Technology and Performance was to review the experience of advanced fuel fabrication technology, its performance, peculiarities of the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle with regard to all types of reactors and to outline the future trends. As a result of the meeting recommendations were made for the future conduct of work on advanced fuel technology and performance. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 20 papers in this issue

  3. Sample Preparation and Extraction in Small Sample Volumes Suitable for Pediatric Clinical Studies: Challenges, Advances, and Experiences of a Bioanalytical HPLC-MS/MS Method Validation Using Enalapril and Enalaprilat

    Burckhardt, Bjoern B.; Laeer, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    In USA and Europe, medicines agencies force the development of child-appropriate medications and intend to increase the availability of information on the pediatric use. This asks for bioanalytical methods which are able to deal with small sample volumes as the trial-related blood lost is very restricted in children. Broadly used HPLC-MS/MS, being able to cope with small volumes, is susceptible to matrix effects. The latter restrains the precise drug quantification through, for example, causing signal suppression. Sophisticated sample preparation and purification utilizing solid-phase extraction was applied to reduce and control matrix effects. A scale-up from vacuum manifold to positive pressure manifold was conducted to meet the demands of high-throughput within a clinical setting. Faced challenges, advances, and experiences in solid-phase extraction are exemplarily presented on the basis of the bioanalytical method development and validation of low-volume samples (50 μL serum). Enalapril, enalaprilat, and benazepril served as sample drugs. The applied sample preparation and extraction successfully reduced the absolute and relative matrix effect to comply with international guidelines. Recoveries ranged from 77 to 104% for enalapril and from 93 to 118% for enalaprilat. The bioanalytical method comprising sample extraction by solid-phase extraction was fully validated according to FDA and EMA bioanalytical guidelines and was used in a Phase I study in 24 volunteers. PMID:25873972

  4. Sample Preparation and Extraction in Small Sample Volumes Suitable for Pediatric Clinical Studies: Challenges, Advances, and Experiences of a Bioanalytical HPLC-MS/MS Method Validation Using Enalapril and Enalaprilat

    Bjoern B. Burckhardt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In USA and Europe, medicines agencies force the development of child-appropriate medications and intend to increase the availability of information on the pediatric use. This asks for bioanalytical methods which are able to deal with small sample volumes as the trial-related blood lost is very restricted in children. Broadly used HPLC-MS/MS, being able to cope with small volumes, is susceptible to matrix effects. The latter restrains the precise drug quantification through, for example, causing signal suppression. Sophisticated sample preparation and purification utilizing solid-phase extraction was applied to reduce and control matrix effects. A scale-up from vacuum manifold to positive pressure manifold was conducted to meet the demands of high-throughput within a clinical setting. Faced challenges, advances, and experiences in solid-phase extraction are exemplarily presented on the basis of the bioanalytical method development and validation of low-volume samples (50 μL serum. Enalapril, enalaprilat, and benazepril served as sample drugs. The applied sample preparation and extraction successfully reduced the absolute and relative matrix effect to comply with international guidelines. Recoveries ranged from 77 to 104% for enalapril and from 93 to 118% for enalaprilat. The bioanalytical method comprising sample extraction by solid-phase extraction was fully validated according to FDA and EMA bioanalytical guidelines and was used in a Phase I study in 24 volunteers.

  5. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  6. Advanced SLARette delivery machine

    Bodner, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    SLARette 1 equipment, comprising of a SLARette Delivery Machine, SLAR Tools, SLAR power supplies and SLAR Inspection Systems was designed, developed and manufactured to service fuel channels of CANDU 6 stations during the regular yearly station outages. The Mark 2 SLARette Delivery Machine uses a Push Tube system to provide the axial and rotary movements of the SLAR Tool. The Push Tubes are operated remotely but must be attached and removed manually. Since this operation is performed at the Reactor face, there is radiation dose involved for the workers. An Advanced SLARette Delivery Machine which incorporates a computer controlled telescoping Ram in the place of the Push Tubes has been recently designed and manufactured. Utilization of the Advanced SLARette Delivery Machine significantly reduces the amount of radiation dose picked up by the workers because the need to have workers at the face of the Reactor during the SLARette operation is greatly reduced. This paper describes the design, development and manufacturing process utilized to produce the Advanced SLARette Delivery Machine and the experience gained during the Gentilly-2 NGS Spring outage. (author)

  7. 刘沈林治疗晚期消化道肿瘤用药经验%Liu Shenlin′s Experiences in the Medication for Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    卢冬雪; 祁明浩; 薛恬; 刘沈林

    2017-01-01

    The patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer have lost their chance for radical surgery and cannot be improved with modern medicine,such as radiochemotherapy,targeted therapy and immunotherapy because those therapies may further damage the body immunity and accelerate the progression of disease.TCM thinks that advanced gastrointestinal cancer is differentiated as the deficiency of anti-pathogenic qi,combined with blood stagnation,toxification,phlegm accumulation and qi stagnation.The treatment emphasizes strengthening the spleen,benefiting qi and supporting the anti-pathogenic qi,assisted with resolving stasis,detoxification,resolving phlegm and masses.The correct case differentiation and herb composition improve body immunity and living quality so thatthe survival quality with cancer is obtained and the survival span is prolonged.Prof.Liu Shenlin believes,in his clinical experiences in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors for years,that advanced gastrointestinal cancer presents the extreme deficiency of anti-pathogenic qi,the simple elimination of pathogens is not applicable in treatment.The basic treating principle of the disease should be benefiting qi and strengthening the anti-pathogenic qi,assisted with resolving stasis.Prof.Liu is good at using herbsprecisely,prefers to the paired herbs in terms of pathogenesis and in combination of the disease with symptoms.Radix astragali and codonopsispilosula are used for strengthening the anti-pathogenic qi,angelica sinensis and radix paeoniae alba for nourishing blood and softening the liver,rhizome sparganii and curcuma zedoary for activating blood circulation and removing stasis.The medicines in the category of insects and worms are combined.The clinical therapeutic effects are very satisfactory.%晚期消化道肿瘤患者失去了根治性手术机会,现代医学治疗主要包括放化疗、靶向治疗、免疫治疗等,但并不能使患者从中获益,反而会进一步损伤机体免疫力,加快

  8. Advanced scenarios for ITER operation

    Sips, A.C.C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    In thermonuclear fusion research using magnetic confinement, the tokamak is the leading candidate for achieving conditions required for a reactor. An international experiment, ITER is proposed as the next essential and critical step on the path to demonstrating the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. ITER is to produce and study plasmas dominated by self heating. This would give unique opportunities to explore, in reactor relevant conditions, the physics of {alpha}-particle heating, plasma turbulence and turbulent transport, stability limits to the plasma pressure and exhaust of power and particles. Important new results obtained in experiments, theory and modelling, enable an improved understanding of the physical processes occurring in tokamak plasmas and give enhanced confidence in ITER achieving its goals. In particular, progress has been made in research to raise the performance of tokamaks, aimed to extend the discharge pulse length towards steady-state operation (advanced scenarios). Standard tokamak discharges have a current density increasing monotonically towards the centre of the plasma. Advanced scenarios on the other hand use a modified current density profile. Different advanced scenarios range from (i) plasmas that sustain a central region with a flat current density profile (zero magnetic shear), capable of operating stationary at high plasma pressure, to (ii) discharges with an off axis maximum of the current density profile (reversed magnetic shear in the core), able to form internal transport barriers, to increase the confinement of the plasma. The physics of advanced tokamak discharges is described, together with an overview of recent results from different tokamak experiments. International collaboration between experiments aims to provide a better understanding, control and optimisation of these plasmas. The ability to explore advanced scenarios in ITER is very desirable, in order to verify the result obtained in

  9. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project: Final Report

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-01-01

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  10. Superconducting magnets advanced in particle physics

    Yamamoto, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Superconducting magnet technology for particle detectors has been advanced to provide large-scale magnetic fields in particle physics experiments. The technology has been progressed to meet physics goals and the detector requirement of having maximum magnetic field with minimum material and space. This paper includes an overview of the advances of particle detector magnets and discusses key technologies

  11. Motion feedback in advanced driving manoeuvres

    Correia Grácio, B.; Wentink, M.; Feenstra, P.J; Mulder, M.; Paassen M.M. van; Bles, W.

    2009-01-01

    During advanced driving manoeuvres, drivers can be hypothesized to use all the available cues to optimize their performance. Fixed-base simulators are commonly used for training of these advanced driving manoeuvres, despite the fact that motion cues are not present. In this experiment we hypothesize

  12. SEG Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    Pierson, Robert; Laughlin, Darren; Brune, Bob

    2016-10-17

    Significant advancements in the development of sensors to enable rotational seismic measurements have been achieved. Prototypes are available now to support experiments that help validate the utility of rotational seismic measurements.

  13. A protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial using the Health Teams Advancing Patient Experience: Strengthening Quality (Health TAPESTRY) platform approach to promote person-focused primary healthcare for older adults.

    Dolovich, Lisa; Oliver, Doug; Lamarche, Larkin; Agarwal, Gina; Carr, Tracey; Chan, David; Cleghorn, Laura; Griffith, Lauren; Javadi, Dena; Kastner, Monika; Longaphy, Jennifer; Mangin, Dee; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Ploeg, Jenny; Raina, Parminder; Richardson, Julie; Risdon, Cathy; Santaguida, P Lina; Straus, Sharon; Thabane, Lehana; Valaitis, Ruta; Price, David

    2016-04-05

    Healthcare systems are not well designed to help people maintain or improve their health. They are generally not person-focused or well-coordinated. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Health Teams Advancing Patient Experience: Strengthening Quality (Health TAPESTRY) approach in older adults. The overarching hypothesis is that using the Health TAPESTRY approach to achieve better integration of the health and social care systems into a person's life that centers on meeting a person's health goals and needs will result in optimal aging. This is a 12-month delayed intervention pragmatic randomized controlled trial. The study will be performed in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada in the two-site McMaster Family Health Team. Participants will include 316 patients who are 70 years of age or older. Participants will be randomized to the Health TAPESTRY approach or control group. The Health TAPESTRY approach includes intentional, proactive conversations about a person's life and health goals and health risks and then initiation of congruent tailored interventions that support achievement of those goals and addressing of risks through (1) trained volunteers visiting clients in their homes to serve as a link between the primary care team and the client; (2) the use of novel technology including a personal health record from the home to link directly with the primary healthcare team; and (3) improved processes for connections, system navigation, and care delivery among interprofessional primary care teams, community service providers, and informal caregivers. The primary outcome will be the goal attainment scaling score. Secondary outcomes include self-efficacy for managing chronic disease, quality of life, the participant perspective on their own aging, social support, access to health services, comprehensiveness of care, patient empowerment, patient-centeredness, caregiver strain, satisfaction with care, healthcare resource utilization, and cost

  14. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  15. Advanced fuel fabrication

    Bernard, H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with the fabrication of advanced fuels, such as mixed oxides for Pressurized Water Reactors or mixed nitrides for Fast Breeder Reactors. Although an extensive production experience exists for the mixed oxides used in the FBR, important work is still needed to improve the theoretical and technical knowledge of the production route which will be introduced in the future European facility, named Melox, at Marcoule. Recently, the feasibility of nitride fuel fabrication in existing commercial oxide facilities was demonstrated in France. The process, based on carbothermic reduction of oxides with subsequent comminution of the reaction product, cold pressing and sintering provides (U, Pu)N pellets with characteristics suitable for irradiation testing. Two experiments named NIMPHE 1 and 2 fabricated in collaboration with ITU, Karlsruhe, involve 16 nitride and 2 carbide pins, operating at a linear power of 45 and 73 kW/m with a smear density of 75-80% TD and a high burn-up target of 15 at%. These experiments are currently being irradiated in Phenix, at Marcoule. (orig.)

  16. Pervasive hitchhiking at coding and regulatory sites in humans.

    James J Cai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Much effort and interest have focused on assessing the importance of natural selection, particularly positive natural selection, in shaping the human genome. Although scans for positive selection have identified candidate loci that may be associated with positive selection in humans, such scans do not indicate whether adaptation is frequent in general in humans. Studies based on the reasoning of the MacDonald-Kreitman test, which, in principle, can be used to evaluate the extent of positive selection, suggested that adaptation is detectable in the human genome but that it is less common than in Drosophila or Escherichia coli. Both positive and purifying natural selection at functional sites should affect levels and patterns of polymorphism at linked nonfunctional sites. Here, we search for these effects by analyzing patterns of neutral polymorphism in humans in relation to the rates of recombination, functional density, and functional divergence with chimpanzees. We find that the levels of neutral polymorphism are lower in the regions of lower recombination and in the regions of higher functional density or divergence. These correlations persist after controlling for the variation in GC content, density of simple repeats, selective constraint, mutation rate, and depth of sequencing coverage. We argue that these results are most plausibly explained by the effects of natural selection at functional sites -- either recurrent selective sweeps or background selection -- on the levels of linked neutral polymorphism. Natural selection at both coding and regulatory sites appears to affect linked neutral polymorphism, reducing neutral polymorphism by 6% genome-wide and by 11% in the gene-rich half of the human genome. These findings suggest that the effects of natural selection at linked sites cannot be ignored in the study of neutral human polymorphism.

  17. A hitchhiker's guide to the older literature of descriptive teratology.

    Beckwith, J Bruce

    2007-12-15

    Though relatively neglected in the age of molecular biology, the older literature of teratology includes superb illustrations and descriptions of malformations, and other information of permanent value to science and medicine. Accessing that literature can be challenging, as most is in works that are rare, published in languages other than English, and not available in digital form. This article describes some valuable sources of information concerning the antiquarian literature of descriptive teratology. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Experiments in physical chemistry

    Wilson, J M; Denaro, A R

    1968-01-01

    Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Second Edition provides a compilation of experiments concerning physical chemistry. This book illustrates the link between the theory and practice of physical chemistry. Organized into three parts, this edition begins with an overview of those experiments that generally have a simple theoretical background. Part II contains experiments that are associated with more advanced theory or more developed techniques, or which require a greater degree of experimental skill. Part III consists of experiments that are in the nature of investigations wherein these invest

  19. The advanced neutron source

    Hayter, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), slated for construction start in 1994, will be a multipurpose neutron research laboratory serving academic and industrial users in chemistry, biology, condensed matter physics, nuclear and fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, and many other fields. It will be centered on the world's highest flux neutron beam reactor, operating at 330 MW, with careful design integration between the neutron source and the experiment systems. Many instruments will be situated in low backgrounds at distances up to 80 m from the reactor, using neutron guides with tailored neutron optical coatings for beam transport. Apart from the many stations for neutron scattering research, specialized stations will also be provided for isotope separation on-line, experiments with liquid hydrogen targets, neutron optical techniques such as interferometry, activation analysis, depth profiling, and positron production. Careful consideration has been given to providing a good research environment for visiting scientists, including easy access to the experimental areas, while maintaining a highly secure nuclear facility. This paper will describe the reactor and experimental facilities and give some examples of the types of research for which ANS has been designed

  20. The Advanced Neutron Source

    Peretz, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is to be a multipurpose neutron research center, constructed around a high-flux reactor now being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its primary purpose is to place the United States in the forefront of neutron scattering in the twenty-first century. Other research programs include nuclear and fundamental physics, isotope production, materials irradiation, and analytical chemistry. The ANS will be a unique and invaluable research tool because of the unprecedented neutron flux available from the high-intensity research reactor. But this reactor would be ineffective without world-class research facilities that allow the fullest utilization of the available neutrons. And, in turn, those research facilities will not produce new and exciting science without a broad population of users from all parts of the nation and the world, placed in a stimulating environment in which experiments can be effectively conducted and in which scientific exchange is encouraged. This paper discusses the measures being taken to ensure that the design of the ANS focuses not only on the reactor, but on providing the experiment and user support facilities needed to allow its effective use

  1. Omics Advances in Ecotoxicology.

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Xia, Pu; Wang, Pingping; Yang, Jianghu; Baird, Donald J

    2018-04-03

    Toxic substances in the environment generate adverse effects at all levels of biological organization from the molecular level to community and ecosystem. Given this complexity, it is not surprising that ecotoxicologists have struggled to address the full consequences of toxic substance release at ecosystem level, due to the limits of observational and experimental tools to reveal the changes in deep structure at different levels of organization. -Omics technologies, consisting of genomics and ecogenomics, have the power to reveal, in unprecedented detail, the cellular processes of an individual or biodiversity of a community in response to environmental change with high sample/observation throughput. This represents a historic opportunity to transform the way we study toxic substances in ecosystems, through direct linkage of ecological effects with the systems biology of organisms. Three recent examples of -omics advance in the assessment of toxic substances are explored here: (1) the use of functional genomics in the discovery of novel molecular mechanisms of toxicity of chemicals in the environment; (2) the development of laboratory pipelines of dose-dependent, reduced transcriptomics to support high-throughput chemical testing at the biological pathway level; and (3) the use of eDNA metabarcoding approaches for assessing chemical effects on biological communities in mesocosm experiments and through direct observation in field monitoring. -Omics advances in ecotoxicological studies not only generate new knowledge regarding mechanisms of toxicity and environmental effect, improving the relevance and immediacy of laboratory toxicological assessment, but can provide a wholly new paradigm for ecotoxicology by linking ecological models to mechanism-based, systems biology approaches.

  2. Advanced Chemical Propulsion

    Bai, S. Don

    2000-01-01

    Design, propellant selection, and launch assistance for advanced chemical propulsion system is discussed. Topics discussed include: rocket design, advance fuel and high energy density materials, launch assist, and criteria for fuel selection.

  3. Advancement of the emergency protection due to implementation of the experiences from Fukushima. Recommendations of the Strahlenschutzkommission; Weiterentwicklung des Notfallschutzes durch Umsetzen der Erfahrungen aus Fukushima. Empfehlung der Strahlenschutzkommission

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    The report on the further development of the emergency protection due to implementation of the experiences from Fukushima includes a description of the reactor accident in Fukushima and the experiences in Japan. The recommendations of the Strahlenschutzkommission concern the internal emergency protection in nuclear facilities and external emergency protection, communication and information.

  4. Prospects for the development of advanced reactors. [Advanced Reactors

    Semenov, B. A.; Kupitz, J.; Cleveland, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Energy and Safety

    1992-01-01

    Energy supply is an important prerequisite for further socio-economic development, especially in developing countries where the per capita energy use is only a very small fraction of that in industrialized countries. Nuclear energy is an essentially unlimited energy resource with the potential to provide this energy in the form of electricity, district heat and process heat under environmentally acceptable conditions. However, this potential will be realized only if nuclear power plants can meet the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide a tremendous amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience forms a sound basis for further improvements. Nuclear programmes in many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability and improved safety in order to overcome the current concerns of nuclear power. Advanced reactors now being developed could help to meet the demand for new plants in developed and developing countries, not only for electricity generation, but also for district heating, desalination and for process heat. The IAEA, as the only global international governmental organization dealing with nuclear power, promotes international information exchange and international co-operation between all countries with their own advanced nuclear power programmes and offers assistance to countries with an interest in exploratory or research programmes.

  5. Ervaringen met Advanced Cruise Control (ACC) in een korte praktijkproef.

    Oei, H.-l.

    2003-01-01

    Experiences with Advanced Cruise Control in traffic; a limited experiment. Advanced Cruise Control (ACC) is an ordinary cruise control in which the desired speed is installed manually, but in which the headway time to the vehicle in front is also taken into account. If the headway time becomes less

  6. Advanced CANDU reactors

    Dunn, J.T.; Finlay, R.B.; Olmstead, R.A.

    1988-12-01

    AECL has undertaken the design and development of a series of advanced CANDU reactors in the 700-1150 MW(e) size range. These advanced reactor designs are the product of ongoing generic research and development programs on CANDU technology and design studies for advanced CANDU reactors. The prime objective is to create a series of advanced CANDU reactors which are cost competitive with coal-fired plants in the market for large electricity generating stations. Specific plant designs in the advanced CANDU series will be ready for project commitment in the early 1990s and will be capable of further development to remain competitive well into the next century

  7. Advances in chemical Physics

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  8. Advances in chemical physics

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics. This volume explores: Quantum Dynamical Resonances in Ch

  9. Advances in chemical physics

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  10. ACR-700 advanced technologies

    Tapping, R.L.; Turner, C.W.; Yu, S.K.W.; Olmstead, R.; Speranzini, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    A successful advanced reactor plant will have optimized economics including reduced operating and maintenance costs, improved performance, and enhanced safety. Incorporating improvements based on advanced technologies ensures cost, safety and operational competitiveness of the ACR-700. These advanced technologies include modern configuration management; construction technologies; operational technology for the control centre and information systems for plant monitoring and analysis. This paper summarizes the advanced technologies used to achieve construction and operational improvements to enhance plant economic competitiveness, advances in the operational technology used for reactor control, and presents the development of the Smart CANDU suite of tools and its application to existing operating reactors and to the ACR-700. (author)

  11. Current status and future potential for advanced volume reduction technologies

    Rutland, L.; Naughton, M.D.; Papaiya, N.C.

    1984-01-01

    With escalating costs for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) from nuclear power plants, and the possibility of unavailability of disposal space, some nuclear power utilities responded by commiting to implementing advanced volume reduction (VR) systems. This paper presents recent experience to implement advanced volume reduction technologies; their performance and typical operating and capital costs. This experience in the light of current economic conditions may enable us to predict the direction that future advanced VR technology commitments is taking

  12. AMPR BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE CAPE EXPERIMENT V2

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) was deployed during the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment (CaPE). AMPR data...

  13. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIC Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of thermoset resins will be studied because it hold the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  14. The advanced composition explorer

    Stone, E.C.; Burlaga, L.F.; Cummings, A.C.; Feldman, W.C.; Frain, W.E.; Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R.E.; Hovestadt, D.; Krimigis, S.M.; Mason, G.M.; McComas, D.; Mewaldt, R.A.; Simpson, J.A.; von Rosenvinge, T.T.; Wiedenbeck, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) was recently selected as one of two new Explorer-class missions to be developed for launch during the mid-1990's ACE will observe particles of solar, interplanetary, interstellar, and galactic origins, spanning the energy range from that of the solar wind (∼1 keV/nucleon) to galactic cosmic ray energies (several hundred MeV/nucleon). Definitive studies will be made of the abundance of nearly all isotopes from H to Zn (1≤Z≤30), with exploratory isotope studies extending to Zr(Z=40). To accomplish this, the ACE payload includes six high-resolution spectrometers, each designed to provide the optimum charge, mass, or charge-state resolution in its particular energy range, and each having a geometry factor optimized for the expected flux levels, so as to provide a collecting power a factor of 10 to 1000 times greater than previous or planned experiments. The payload also includes several instruments of standard design that will monitor solar wind and magnetic field conditions and energetic H, He, and electron fluxes. We summarize here the scientific objectives, instrumentation, spacecraft, and mission approach that were defined for ACE during the Phase-A study period

  15. Advanced Toroidal Facility

    Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a new magnetic confinement plasma device under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that will lead to improvements in toroidal magnetic fusion reactors. The ATF is a type of stellerator, known as a ''torsatron'' which theoretically has the capability to operate at greater than or equal to8% beta in steady state. The ATF plasma has a major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a field of 2 T for a 2 s duration or 1 T steady state. The ATF device consists of a helical field (HF) coil set, a set of poloidal field (PF) coils, an exterior shell structure to support the coils, and a thin, helically contoured vacuum vessel inside the coils. The ATF replaces the Impurities Studies Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B auxiliary systems including 4 MW of electron cyclotron heating. The ATF is scheduled to start operation in late 1986. An overview of the ATF device is presented, including details of the construction process envisioned. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  17. Quantum mechanics II advanced topics

    Rajasekar, S

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Mechanics II: Advanced Topics uses more than a decade of research and the authors’ own teaching experience to expound on some of the more advanced topics and current research in quantum mechanics. A follow-up to the authors introductory book Quantum Mechanics I: The Fundamentals, this book begins with a chapter on quantum field theory, and goes on to present basic principles, key features, and applications. It outlines recent quantum technologies and phenomena, and introduces growing topics of interest in quantum mechanics. The authors describe promising applications that include ghost imaging, detection of weak amplitude objects, entangled two-photon microscopy, detection of small displacements, lithography, metrology, and teleportation of optical images. They also present worked-out examples and provide numerous problems at the end of each chapter.

  18. Advanced technology for nuclear powerplants

    Rohm, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced technology offers significant potential benefit to the nuclear industry. Improvements can be anticipated in plant performance, reliability, and overall plant safety as well as reduced life cycle costs. Utilizing artificial intelligence and expert systems, robotics, advanced instruments and controls, and modularization technologies can enhance plant operations and provide new insights and perspectives to plant risk and thus focus resources to areas of importance. Plant reliability, operability, availability, accident interdiction and limitation, and plant recovery are expected to improve. However, utilizing these technologies is not an automatic process. In addition to the actual costs associated with developing and implementing the technologies, operator training and acceptance represents a potential significant problem. Traditional plant operators have little or no experience with computer technology. There has already been some difficulty getting nuclear plant operators to accept and use the new technologies that have been implemented to accept and use the new technologies that have been implemented thus far

  19. Five important advances in hematopathology.

    Shi, Min; Xiao, Ruobing; Woda, Bruce A; Yu, Hongbo

    2014-03-01

    Hematopathology is a dynamic field that has always been on the frontier of clinical research within the scope of pathology. Several recent developments in hematopathology will likely affect its practice clinically. To review 5 important recent advances in hematopathology: (1) detection and prognostic implication of MYC in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, (2) determining origin and prognosis through immunoglobulin gene usage in mature B-cell neoplasms, (3)detecting minimal residual disease in multiple myeloma, (4) using genome-wide analysis in myelodysplastic syndromes, and (5) employing whole-genome sequencing in acute myeloid leukemias. Literature review and the authors' experiences in an academic center. These advances will bring hematopathology into a new molecular era and help us to better understand the molecular, pathologic mechanisms of lymphomas, leukemias, myelomas, and myelodysplastic syndromes. They will help us to identify diagnostic and prognostic markers and eventually provide new therapeutic targets and treatments for these diseases.

  20. Japan's advanced medicine.

    Sho, Ri; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Murakami, Masayasu

    2013-10-01

    Like health care systems in other developed countries, Japan's health care system faces significant challenges due to aging of the population and economic stagnation. Advanced medicine (Senshin Iryou) is a unique system of medical care in Japan offering highly technology-driven medical care that is not covered by public health insurance. Advanced medicine has recently developed and expanded as part of health care reform. Will it work? To answer this question, we briefly trace the historical development of advanced medicine and describe the characteristics and current state of advanced medical care in Japan. We then offer our opinions on the future of advanced medicine with careful consideration of its pros and cons. We believe that developing advanced medicine is an attempt to bring health care reform in line rather than the goal of health care reform.