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Sample records for hit melbourne australia

  1. Pester power: snackfoods displayed at supermarket checkouts in Melbourne, Australia.

    Dixon, Helen; Scully, Maree; Parkinson, Kristiina

    2006-08-01

    To establish the amount and accessibility of snack food displayed at supermarket checkouts located in Melbourne, Australia. Observational survey of 24 randomly selected supermarkets situated within a 20-kilometre radius of Melbourne's General Post Office. Individual checkouts within each store (n=257) were observed to determine the types of items that were displayed, how they were promoted, and whether they were within the reach of children. All supermarkets surveyed displayed food products at their checkouts, with most checkouts displaying chocolate (87%), gum (81%) and sweets (80%). Only 7% of checkouts had their display of foods or drinks out of the reach of children. Foods displayed at supermarket checkouts in Melbourne are predominantly energy-dense confectionery items. They are often promoted in a way that targets children and encourages parents to impulse buy for their children.

  2. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia

    Jacobs, Stephanie J.; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B.

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h-1 and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h-1 to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  3. Causes of homelessness among older people in Melbourne, Australia.

    Rota-Bartelink, Alice; Lipmann, Bryan

    2007-06-01

    A comparative study of the causes of new episodes of homelessness among people aged 50 years and over has been undertaken in Australia, the United States and England. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect information on the circumstances and problems that contributed to homelessness. This paper presents the findings from Australia, where information was obtained from 125 older homeless people (aged 50+ years) and their key workers in Melbourne. All three participating nations followed identical research methodologies. The factors most frequently reported by respondents as contributing to their homelessness were problems with people with whom they lived, followed by physical and mental ill-health and problems associated with the housing itself. The most frequently reported factors by case workers were problems with alcohol, followed by physical and mental health factors. This study demonstrates a significant under-utilisation of housing and support services among recently homeless older people and provides evidence that people who had previously been homeless appear to be more resigned to their homelessness than do those who had not experienced homelessness before. Significant issues relating to depression and gambling were also noted. The findings support the need for more targeted, specialised services to be developed or improved such that older homeless people can readily gain access to them and for improved collaboration or information exchange among housing providers and welfare agencies.

  4. Breastfeeding practices of ethnic Indian immigrant women in Melbourne, Australia.

    Maharaj, Natasha; Bandyopadhyay, Mridula

    2013-12-18

    The health benefits of breastfeeding are well documented in public health and medical literature worldwide. Despite this, global rates of breastfeeding steadily decline during the first couple of months postpartum. Although immigrant women have higher initiation rates and a longer duration of breastfeeding overall, breastfeeding practices are compromised because of a myriad of socioeconomic and cultural factors, including the acculturation process. The objective of this study was to show how acculturation and cultural identity influenced breastfeeding practices among Indian immigrants in Melbourne, Australia. Twelve case studies were employed to gather narratives of women's lived experiences. Ethnographic field research methods were used to collect data, including participant observation, semi-structured interviews, case studies, and life histories. This provided in-depth information from women on various aspects of the immigrant experience of motherhood, including infant care and feeding. Participants were opportunistically recruited from Indian obstetricians and gynaecologists. Women identifying as ethnic Indian and in their third trimester of pregnancy were recruited. Interviews were conducted in women's homes in metropolitan Melbourne over a 12 month period between 2004 and 2005. Data were coded and analysed thematically. All women identified as ethnic Indian and initiated breastfeeding in accordance with their cultural identity. Social support and cultural connectivity impacted positively on duration of breastfeeding. However, acculturation (adopting Australian cultural values and gender norms, including returning to paid employment) negatively influenced breastfeeding duration. In addition, the high reliance of recent immigrants on the advice of healthcare professionals who gave inconsistent advice negatively affected exclusive breastfeeding. For ethnic Indian immigrant women breastfeeding practice is closely linked to acculturation and identity construction

  5. Tuberculosis infection and homelessness in Melbourne, Australia, 1995-1996.

    Kermode, M; Crofts, N; Speed, B; Miller, P; Streeton, J

    1999-10-01

    To describe tuberculosis infection among persons experiencing homelessness in inner Melbourne, Australia. Homeless people were surveyed during late 1995 and early 1996. In stage one of the study 284 homeless people from crisis and long-term accommodation sites were recruited by means of stratified, systematic, random sampling. In stage two a convenience sample of 100 homeless people from squats and the streets were recruited. Participants completed a questionnaire and Mantoux testing was performed. A past history of tuberculosis was reported by 3%. Thirty-seven per cent had a Mantoux > or =10 mm; 21% > or =15 mm; and 11% > or =20 mm. A Mantoux > or =15 mm was independently associated with being aged > or =40 years, coming from the accommodated sample, overseas birth, and a past history of tuberculosis. Using logistic regression modelling, a Mantoux > or =15 mm was predicted by being aged > or =40 years, overseas birth, and past history of tuberculosis. Mantoux test results suggest that this group of homeless people had a high prevalence of infection with the tubercle bacillus. Many aspects of the physical and social circumstances of homeless people predispose to reactivation and have the potential to enhance rapid spread should latent infection become active disease.

  6. Plan de desarrollo del CBD de Melbourne, Australia

    MAICAS BELTRÁN, TOMÁS

    2015-01-01

    El proyecto se desarrolla en una parcela del CBD (Central Business District) de Melbourne. Se plantea como objetivo la planificación urbana y la repoblación del CBD, y se consideran una serie de aspectos relacionados con el desarrollo sostenible. El programa incluye el desarrollo de zonas verdes, edificación vertical, espacios comerciales, culturales y de ocio, oficinas, hoteles y zona residencial. El desarrollo del proyecto comienza con la creación de las calles. Tras crear la edificación qu...

  7. The World Congress on Controversies in Breast Cancer (CoBRA in Melbourne, Australia

    Ilana Rabinoff-Sofer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Congress on Controversies in Breast Cancer (CoBRA will take place October 22-24, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia.CoBRA is a concept congress dealing with controversial topics in breast cancer in the format of debates and discussions, allowing ample time for speaker-participant interaction.CLICK HERE for more information

  8. Bus network redesign for inner southeast suburbs of Melbourne, Australia

    Pandangwati, S. T.; Milyanab, N. A.

    2017-06-01

    Public transport is the most effective mode of transport in the era of climate change and oil depletion. It can address climate change issues by reducing urban greenhouse gas emission and oil consumption while at the same time improving mobility. However, many public transport networks are not effective and instead create high operating costs with low frequencies and occupancy. Melbourne is one example of a metropolitan area that faces this problem. Even though the city has well-integrated train and tram networks, Melbourne’s bus network still needs to be improved. This study used network planning approach to redesign the bus network in the City of Glen Eira, a Local Government Area (LGA) in the southeastern part of Metropolitan Melbourne. The study area is the area between Gardenvale North and Oakleigh Station, as well as between Caulfield and Patterson Stations. This area needs network improvement mainly because of the meandering bus routes that run within it. This study aims to provide recommendations for improving the performance of bus services by reducing meandering routes, improving transfer point design and implementing coordinated timetables. The recommendations were formulated based on a ‘ready-made’ concept to increase bus occupancy. This approach can be implemented in other cities with similar problems and characteristics including those in Indonesia.

  9. Nasal allergies hayfever among young adults in Melbourne, Australia

    Michael Abramson

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is wide variation in the prevalence of nasal allergies internationally, the extent to which this is due to variation in etiological factors is not known. The purpose of the present study was to define the relative importance of atopy and other risk factors for nasal allergies, including hayfever, among young adults in Melbourne. The subjects were participants in the second phase of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey; 876 adults between 20 and 45 years of age completed a detailed respiratory questionnaire, 745 had skin prick testing with common aeroallergens and 675 underwent methacholine challenge. Total and allergen-specific IgE levels were measured in 701 and 693 subjects by radioimmunoassay and RAST, respectively. Nasal allergies, including hayfever, were reported by 47.5% of randomly selected participants. Females, non- smokers, subjects with a family history of allergies, those with current asthma, a history of eczema and nasal symptoms induced by dust, pollen or food were significantly more likely to have nasal allergies. Oral antihistamines had been used by 45.7% of those reporting nasal allergies and 12.4% had received allergen immunotherapy. The risk of nasal allergies, including hayfever, was increased 6.1-fold by atopy, particularly by positive skin tests to outdoor allergens such as Birch, Timothy grass, plantain, olive, Cladosporium and Rye grass pollen. Total serum IgE was significantly higher in subjects reporting nasal allergies than in those who did not report such allergies. There were significant trends in the prevalence of nasal allergies with increasing titers of specific IgE directed against all allergens tested. In conclusion, the significant independent risk factors for nasal allergies, including hayfever, in young adults were atopy, particularly sensitization to Timothy grass, house dust mites and plantain, current asthma, not smoking, a history of eczema and female gender. Future research

  10. Smoking behavior among patients and staff: a snapshot from a major metropolitan hospital in Melbourne, Australia

    Rahman MA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Aziz Rahman,1,2 Andrew M Wilson,2–4 Rhonda Sanders,3 David Castle,2–4 Karen Daws,3 David R Thompson,2 Chantal F Ski,2 Sarah Matthews,3 Christine Wright,2 Linda Worrall-Carter1–31St Vincent's Centre for Nursing Research (SVCNR, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2The Cardiovascular Research Centre (CvRC, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaBackground: A cross-sectional study was conducted to provide a snapshot of smoking behavior among staff and patients at a major metropolitan hospital in Melbourne.Methods: Patients and staff were surveyed using a questionnaire exploring demographics, nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom test, readiness to quit, and preference for smoking cessation options.Results: A total of 1496 people were screened within 2 hours; 1,301 participated (1,100 staff, 199 patients. Mean age was 42 years, 68% were female. There were 113 (9% current smokers and 326 (25% ex-smokers. Seven percent of the staff were current smokers compared with 19% of the patients. The Fagerstrom test showed that 47% of patients who smoked were moderately nicotine dependent compared with 21% of staff. A third of the staff who smoked did not anticipate health problems related to smoking. Most patients (79% who smoked disagreed that their current health problems were related to smoking. Although more than half of the current smokers preferred pharmacotherapy, one in two of them did not prefer behavior counseling; with consistent results among staff and patients. Multivariate analyses showed that patients were three times more likely (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.9–4.7 to smoke than staff.Conclusion: This study reports lower prevalence of smoking among hospital staff compared with national data. It also indicates an under-appreciation of health effects of smoking, and a

  11. Evaluating outcomes of the emergency nurse practitioner role in a major urban emergency department, Melbourne, Australia.

    Jennings, Natasha; O'Reilly, Gerard; Lee, Geraldine; Cameron, Peter; Free, Belinda; Bailey, Michael

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the introduction of Emergency Nurse Practitioner Candidates (ENPC) on waiting times and length of stay of patients presenting to a major urban Emergency Department (ED) in Melbourne, Australia. As part of a Victorian state funded initiative to improve patient outcomes, the role of the Emergency Nurse Practitioner has been developed. The integration and implementation of this role, is not only new to the Alfred Emergency and Trauma Centre but to EDs in Melbourne, Australia, with aims of providing holistic and comprehensive care for patients. A retrospective case series of all patients with common ED diagnostic subgroups were included. The ENPC group (n = 572) included all patients managed by the ENPC and the Traditional Model (TM) group (n = 2584) included all patients managed by the traditional medical ED model of care. Outcome measures included waiting times and length of stay. Statistically significant differences were evident between the two groups in waiting times and length of stay in the ED. The overall median waiting time for emergency patients to be seen by the ENPC was less than for the TM group [median (IQR): ENPC 12 (5.5-28) minutes; TM 31 (11.5-76) minutes (Wilcoxon p times for ENPC shifts vs. non-ENPC shifts revealed significant differences [median (IQR): ENPC rostered 24 (9-52) minutes; ENPC not rostered 33 (13-80.5) minutes (Wilcoxon p Melbourne, Australia were associated with significantly reduced waiting times and length of stay for emergency patients. Emergency Nurse Practitioners should be considered as a potential long term strategy to manage increased service demands on EDs. Relevance to clinical practice. This study is the first in Australia with a significant sample size to vigorously compare ENPC waiting times and length of stay outcomes with the TM model of care in the ED. The study suggests that ENPCs can have a favourable impact on patient outcomes with regard to waiting times and length

  12. Detection of novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs in the urban soils of Melbourne, Australia

    Thomas J. McGrath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A range of brominated flame retardants (BFRs have been incorporated into polymeric materials like plastics, electronic equipment, foams and textiles to prevent fires. The most common of these, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, have been subject to legislated bans and voluntary withdrawal by manufacturers in North America, Europe and Australia over the past decade due to long-range atmospheric transport, persistence in the environment, and toxicity. Evidence has shown that replacement novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs are released to the environment by the same mechanisms as PBDEs and share similar hazardous properties. The objective of the current research was to characterize soil contamination by NBFRs in the urban soils of Melbourne, Australia. A variety of industrial and non-industrial land-uses were investigated with the secondary objective of determining likely point sources of pollution. Six NBFRs; pentabromotoluene (PBT, pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB, hexabromobenzene (HBB, 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE were measured in 30 soil samples using selective pressurized liquid extraction (S-PLE and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS. NBFRs were detected in 24/30 soil samples with Σ5NBFR concentrations ranging from nd-385 ng/g dw. HBB was the most frequently detected compound (14/30, while the highest concentrations were observed for DBDPE, followed by BTBPE. Electronic waste recycling and polymer manufacturing appear to be key contributors to NBFR soil contamination in the city of Melbourne. A significant positive correlation between Σ8PBDEs and Σ5NBFR soil concentrations was observed at waste disposal sites to suggest that both BFR classes are present in Melbourne's waste streams, while no association was determined among manufacturing sites. This research provides the first account of NBFRs

  13. Greater Melbourne.

    Wulff, M; Burke, T; Newton, P

    1986-03-01

    With more than a quarter of its population born overseas, Melbourne, Australia, is rapidly changing from an all-white British outpost to a multicultural, multilingual community. Since the "white" Australian policy was abandoned after World War II, 3 million immigrants from 100 different countries have moved to Australia. Most of the immigrants come from New Zealand, Rhodesia, South Africa, Britain, Ireland, Greece, Turkey, Yugoslavia, Poland, and Indochina. Melbourne is Australia's 2nd largest city and houses 1 out of 5 Australians. Its 1984 population was 2,888,400. Melbourne's housing pattern consists of subdivisions; 75% of the population live in detached houses. Between 1954 and 1961 Melbourne grew at an annual rate of 3.5%; its growth rate between 1961 and 1971 still averaged 2.5%. In the 1970s the growth rate slowed to 1.4%. Metropolitan Melbourne has no central government but is divided into 56 councils and 8 regions. Both Australia's and Melbourne's fertility rates are high compared to the rest of the developed world, partly because of their younger age structure. 41% of Melbourne's population was under age 24 in 1981. Single-person households are growing faster than any other type. 71% of the housing is owner-occupied; in 1981 the median sized dwelling had 5.2 rooms. Public housing only accounts for 2.6% of all dwellings. Fewer students graduate from high school in Australia than in other developed countries, and fewer graduates pursue higher education. Melbourne's suburban sprawl promotes private car travel. In 1980 Melbourne contained more than 28,000 retail establishments and 4200 restaurants and hotels. Industry accounts for 30% of employment, and services account for another 30%. Its largest industries are motor vehicles, clothing, and footware. Although unemployment reached 10% after the 1973 energy crisis, by 1985 it was down to 6%.

  14. Health seeking narratives of unwell Sri Lankan Tamil refugees in Melbourne Australia.

    Samuel, Sophia; Advocat, Jenny; Russell, Grant

    2018-03-01

    Sri Lankan Tamil refugees are among the largest group of refugees to resettle in Australia in the last decade. The aim of this study is to characterise the narratives of health-seeking among unwell Sri Lankan Tamil refugees in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Drawing on a qualitative, phenomenological perspective, we conducted in-depth interviews in Tamil and English with 12 participants who identified as being unwell for 6 months or more. Findings revealed three narratives of health-seeking: the search for the 'good life' that was lost or never experienced, seeking help from familiar channels in an unfamiliar context, and the desire for financial and occupational independence. These three narratives are undergirded by the metanarrative of a hope-filled recovery. These narratives of Tamil refugees' lived experience provide new insights into clinical care and health service delivery.

  15. Widespread polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) contamination of urban soils in Melbourne, Australia.

    McGrath, Thomas J; Morrison, Paul D; Sandiford, Christopher J; Ball, Andrew S; Clarke, Bradley O

    2016-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used as flame retardants in a variety of materials and products. PBDEs have been shown to accumulate in the environment and human populations while exhibiting a range of toxic effects. In this study, surface soil samples from 30 sites in the city of Melbourne, Australia, were analysed for PBDEs. Eight congeners of environmental concern (BDE-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154 -183 and -209) were assessed using selective pressurized liquid extraction (S-PLE) and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). PBDEs were detected in 29/30 samples with Σ 8 PBDE soil concentrations ranging nd-13,200 ng/g dw and Σ 7 PBDEs (excluding BDE-209) levels of nd-70.5 ng/g dw. Soils from waste disposal sites (n = 6) contained the highest median Σ 7 PBDE and Σ 8 PBDE concentrations, followed by manufacturing sites (n = 18) and then non-source sites (n = 6). Electronics recycling facilities contained the greatest levels of Σ 8 PBDEs by a significant margin (p production, with the most significant congener correlation existing between BDE-47 and BDE-99 (p < 0.001, r = 0.943). This first assessment of PBDEs in Melbourne soils indicates widespread contamination of the urban environment, including locations where direct sources to soil are not clear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Representations of cycling in metropolitan newspapers - changes over time and differences between Sydney and Melbourne, Australia

    Emilsen Adrian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cycling is important for health, transport, environmental and economic reasons. Newspaper reporting of cycling reflects and can influence public and policy maker attitudes towards resource allocation for cycling and cycling infrastructure, yet such coverage has not been systematically examined. Methods The Factiva electronic news archive was searched for articles referring to cycling published in four major metropolitan newspapers - two in Sydney and two in Melbourne, Australia, in the years from 1998 until 2008. After excluding articles not about cycling, there were 61 articles published in 1998, 45 in 1999, 51 in 2003, 82 in 2007 and 87 in 2008. Each article was coded for positive or negative orientation, and for framing of cyclists and cycling. Inter-rater reliability was calculated on a sample of 30 articles. Results Over the past decade there has been an increase in the reporting of cycling in the major newspapers in Sydney and Melbourne (from 106 in 1998/99 to 169 stories in 2007/08, with a significant increase in reporting of cycling in Melbourne, from 49 to 103 stories (p = 0.04. Recent reporting of cycling was generally positive (47% of articles, compared with 30% of articles which were negative and focused on benefits such as health and the environment. Three quarters of negative stories involved injury or death of a cyclist. The Sydney based The Daily Telegraph reported the most negative stories (n = 60. We found positive framing of 'cycling' was more widespread than negative, whereas framing of 'cyclists' was more negative than positive. Conclusions Quantity of reporting of cycling varies over time and by newspaper, and even between newspapers in different cities owned by the same media company. News coverage appears to reflect developments in the different cities, with increases in positive reporting of cycling in Melbourne following increases in cycling in that city. Negative cycling newspaper stories may deter

  17. Mental health claims management and return to work: qualitative insights from Melbourne, Australia.

    Brijnath, Bianca; Mazza, Danielle; Singh, Nabita; Kosny, Agnieszka; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Collie, Alex

    2014-12-01

    Mental health conditions (MHC) are an increasing reason for claiming injury compensation in Australia; however little is known about how these claims are managed by different gatekeepers to injury entitlements. This study, drawing on the views of four stakeholders-general practitioners (GPs), injured persons, employers and compensation agents, aims to describe current management of MHC claims and to identify the current barriers to return to work (RTW) for injured persons with a MHC claim and/or mental illness. Ninety-three in-depth interviews were undertaken with GPs, compensation agents, employers and injured persons. Data were collected in Melbourne, Australia. Thematic techniques were used to analyse data. MHC claims were complex to manage because of initial assessment and diagnostic difficulties related to the invisibility of the injury, conflicting medical opinions and the stigma associated with making a MHC claim. Mental illness also developed as a secondary issue in the recovery process. These factors made MHC difficult to manage and impeded timely RTW. It is necessary to undertake further research (e.g. guideline development) to improve current practice in order to enable those with MHC claims to make a timely RTW. Further education and training interventions (e.g. on diagnosis and management of MHC) are also needed to enable GPs, employers and compensation agents to better assess and manage MHC claims.

  18. Contraception knowledge and attitudes: truths and myths among African Australian teenage mothers in Greater Melbourne, Australia.

    Ngum Chi Watts, Mimmie C; Liamputtong, Pranee; Carolan, Mary

    2014-08-01

    To discuss the contraception knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of African Australian teenagers and women with a refugee background in Melbourne. The numbers of African Australian persons continue to increase, with a significant proportion being refugee women and children. Attitudes and behaviours towards contraception in this group continue to be influenced by culture, family and beliefs. This study is based on qualitative research that was underpinned by intersectionality theory, cultural competency and phenomenology. Sixteen teenagers and women who had experienced teenage pregnancy in Greater Melbourne, Australia, were interviewed. In-depth interviews were conducted with the sixteen African Australian teenagers and women. Following data collection, data were transcribed verbatim, and coded, and key themes identified and analysed using thematic analysis. Knowledge of contraception among this group of migrants was low and filled with myths. Attitudes towards contraception use were insufficient and influenced by beliefs and external factors such as partner, family and community attitudes towards contraception. Migration status and other instabilities in the lives of these participants all intersected to shape their health beliefs and contraception decision-making. Refugee teenage mothers' knowledge of contraception was low and their attitude towards contraceptive use was poor. Myths and external factors continued to influence teenagers' and women's attitudes towards contraceptives. The events and life experiences of African Australian teenagers/women, culture, and family and community influences should be taken into consideration when providing healthcare services and sexual health education to this migrant group. Service providers should consider the multiple intersections in the lives of these women when delivering healthcare services and information to them. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Different conditions and strategies to utilize forensic radiology in the cities of Melbourne, Australia and Berlin, Germany.

    Bedford, Paul J; Oesterhelweg, Lars

    2013-09-01

    Forensic radiology has become a common modality in many forensic practices around the world. Here, we report and compare the usage patterns in the cities of Melbourne, Australia, and Berlin, Germany, using 16 multislice scanners in two large forensic facilities with both machines integrated in the mortuary. While in Melbourne all bodies receive a full body computed tomography (CT) scan resulting in nearly 5,000 scans per year, the situation differs in Berlin where approximately 250 state prosecutor sanctioned cases are scanned per year. While in Melbourne the CT scanner is an integral element of the process of determining whether further examinations will follow, in contrast in Berlin all cases proceed to autopsy irrespective of the findings from the CT scan. While pathologists in Berlin receive on site training to use the CT scanner by a highly experienced forensic pathologist who has previously been involved in the Virtopsy(®) program in Switzerland, training of pathologists in Melbourne is multifaceted. A radiologist with extensive experience in the forensic environment is employed part time at the institute in Melbourne and provides radiology lectures including topics such as postmortem artifacts, regional anatomy, and neuroradiology. CT is gaining acceptance as a useful modality for presenting information to the courts and juries, as well as providing an easily accessible platform to review cases and initiated research projects.

  20. Risk profile of young people admitted to hospital for suicidal behaviour in Melbourne, Australia.

    Borschmann, Rohan; Stark, Patrick; Prakash, Chidambaram; Sawyer, Susan M

    2018-05-20

    Self-harm and suicidal behaviour is most prevalent during adolescence, but little is known about the risk profile of adolescents admitted to hospital for suicidal behaviour. Young people who self-harm are at an increased risk of mortality compared to those who do not self-harm; adolescents admitted to hospital for suicidal behaviour are particularly at risk. The aim of this study was to generate a risk profile of adolescents admitted to hospital with suicidal behaviour. We conducted a 12-month retrospective audit of adolescent admissions to the mental health inpatient unit at a tertiary children's hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Routinely collected data were used to generate a risk profile. We found that 212 of 271 (78.2%) admissions were due to suicidal behaviour. Of these, 107 (51%) adolescents were diagnosed with one or more mental disorders at discharge, most commonly major depressive disorder. Beyond known distal determinants of health risk, the proximal risk profile of these adolescents included factors relating to gender, substance use, prior mental health diagnoses and prior admission to hospital. Poor sleep was also a risk factor, with 159 (75%) reporting a recent history of sleeping problems. The very high proportion of admissions to the mental health inpatient unit due to suicidal behaviour reinforces the importance of finding effective methods of identification of the risk processes underpinning suicidal behaviours to reduce the unnecessary waste of young lives by suicide. © 2018 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Reaching out to Ray: delivering palliative care services to a homeless person in Melbourne, Australia.

    MacWilliams, Judy; Bramwell, Michael; Brown, Sally; O'Connor, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Most terminally ill people express a preference for dying at home. Within established models of palliative care, achieving death at home is a particular challenge for homeless people. This paper describes a quality-improvement project undertaken by a community-based palliative care service in Melbourne, Australia, to understand homeless people's palliative care needs and the challenges that workers face. Six semi-structured interviews with workers in hospital and community-based settings were undertaken and a case study documented. The results were used to initiate discussion about how policy and protocols for the community-based palliative care service might serve this population more effectively. The findings confirmed that homeless people have complex psychosocial and medical needs. They may be periodically uncontactable or living in unsafe settings, experience isolation from social support networks, and have issues of compliance with treatment protocols exacerbated by mental health problems and/or substance abuse. Service providers had particular challenges in meeting the palliative care needs of homeless people. A flexible, compassionate, and coordinated response is required, and more work is needed to explore how the needs of this particular group can be met.

  2. Short-term changes in thermal perception associated with heatwave conditions in Melbourne, Australia

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Gallant, Ailie J. E.; Tapper, Nigel J.

    2018-05-01

    Variations in human thermal perception have been described on timescales from minutes to seasons. However, the effect of weather-related thermal extremes on inter-daily changes to outdoor thermal perception has not been well characterised. This study used human thermal comfort data from an outdoor botanic garden in sub-urban Melbourne, Australia as a case study. We examined inter-daily variations in local visitors' thermal perception before (11-12 January 2014) and after (18-19 January 2014) a severe heatwave from 14 to 17 January 2014, when daily maximum temperature exceeded 41 °C for 4 consecutive days. We compared thermal comfort survey results (pre-heatwave: n = 342, post-heatwave: n = 294) with air temperature and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) measurements. Even though the days preceding and following the heatwave had a similar range in temperature (19-25 °C) and UTCI (26-32 °C), the visitors felt cooler in the days following the heatwave (i.e. lower thermal sensation votes). In the 2 days following the heatwave, visitors also wore less clothing compared with before the heatwave. Our results show that the thermal perception of visitors changed significantly following their exposure to the heatwave, even after controlling for changes in clothing choices and the ages of survey participants. Psychological adaptation to heat (such as thermal history and expectation) might be one of the possible explanations for this inter-daily variability of local visitors' thermal perception.

  3. A Cluster of Fentanyl-Laced Heroin Deaths in 2015 in Melbourne, Australia.

    Rodda, Luke N; Pilgrim, Jennifer L; Di Rago, Matthew; Crump, Kerryn; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Drummer, Olaf H

    2017-05-01

    The prevalence of opioid use in therapeutic and recreational settings has steadily increased throughout the western world. The addition of fentanyl into heroin products can produce potentially dangerous consequences, even to opioid tolerant individuals who may be unaware of such additions. Following an observed spike of heroin-fentanyl related deaths in Melbourne, Australia, a study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of these cases. All reportable deaths occurring in Victoria during 2015 and submitted to the toxicology laboratory were analysed using LC-MS-MS to confirm the combination of the heroin marker 6-acetylmorphine and/or morphine, and fentanyl. Over 4,000 coronial cases in 2015 underwent toxicological analysis for these drugs, there were nine cases identified that involved fentanyl-laced heroin. There was no specific mention of fentanyl use in any of these cases. All occurred within 2 months and in two distinct locations. The first four deaths occurred within 3 days of each other, in neighboring suburbs. The ages ranged from 25 to 57 years with an average of 40 and median of 37 years, and consisted of eight males and one female. The average and median femoral blood concentration of fentanyl was 18 and 20 ng/mL (range: fentanyl, which supported the likelihood of fentanyl-laced heroin. This is the first reported case series of fatalities involving heroin and fentanyl outside of North America in published literature. These findings may help inform public health and prevention strategies serving to decrease the potential for such fatalities in the future. © Crown copyright 2017.

  4. An outbreak of foodborne norovirus gastroenteritis linked to a restaurant in Melbourne, Australia, 2014

    Shaun P. Coutts

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In May 2014 an outbreak of norovirus occurred among patrons of a restaurant in Melbourne, Australia. Investigations were conducted to identify the infectious agent, mode of transmission and source of illness, and to implement controls to prevent further transmission. Methods: A retrospective case-control study was conducted to test the hypothesis that food served at the restaurant between 9 and 15 May 2014 was the vehicle for infection. A structured questionnaire was used to collect demographic, illness and food exposure data from study participants. To ascertain whether any food handlers had experienced gastroenteritis symptoms and were a possible source of infection, investigators contacted and interviewed staff who had worked at the restaurant between 9 and 16 May 2014. Results: Forty-six cases (including 16 laboratory-confirmed cases of norovirus and 49 controls were interviewed and enrolled in the study. Results of the analysis revealed a statistically significant association with illness and consumption of grain salad (OR: 21.6, 95% CI: 1.8–252.7, p = 0.015 and beetroot dip (OR: 22.4, 95% CI: 1.9–267.0, p = 0.014. An interviewed staff member who reported an onset of acute gastrointestinal illness on 12 May 2014 had prepared salads on the day of onset and the previous two days. Discussion: The outbreak was likely caused by person-to-food-to-person transmission. The outbreak emphasizes the importance of the exclusion of symptomatic food handlers and strict hand hygiene practices in the food service industry to prevent contamination of ready-to-eat foods and the kitchen environment.

  5. Joint National Symposium on the Influence of Aviation on Engineering and the Future of Aeronautics in Australia, Melbourne, Australia, August 8, 9, 1985, Preprints and Supplementary Papers

    1985-01-01

    The present conference considers computer-integrated manufacturing, the manufacture of bonded composite assemblies for aircraft, advancements in the condition monitoring of gears and rolling element bearings, condition monitoring of large commercial turbofan engines, novel gas turbine materials, and advanced fiber-reinforced composites for airframe applications. Also discussed are the future of air power in the defense of Australia, future procurement and operations of rotary wing aircraft in the Royal Australia Navy, the future balance between Australian aerospace-related education, research and industry, and the educational requirements for the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology aeronautical engineering degree.

  6. Does parkland influence walking? The relationship between area of parkland and walking trips in Melbourne, Australia

    King Tania L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using two different measures of park area, at three buffer distances, we sought to investigate the ways in which park area and proximity to parks, are related to the frequency of walking (for all purposes in Australian adults. Little previous research has been conducted in this area, and results of existing research have been mixed. Methods Residents of 50 urban areas in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia completed a physical activity survey (n = 2305. Respondents reported how often they walked for ≥10 minutes in the previous month. Walking frequency was dichotomised to ‘less than weekly’ (less than 1/week and ‘at least weekly’ (1/week or more. Using Geographic Information Systems, Euclidean buffers were created around each respondent’s home at three distances: 400metres (m, 800 m and 1200 m. Total area of parkland in each person’s buffer was calculated for the three buffers. Additionally, total area of ‘larger parks’, (park space ≥ park with Australian Rules Football oval (17,862 m2, was calculated for each set of buffers. Area of park was categorised into tertiles for area of all parks, and area of larger parks (the lowest tertile was used as the reference category. Multilevel logistic regression, with individuals nested within areas, was used to estimate the effect of area of parkland on walking frequency. Results No statistically significant associations were found between walking frequency and park area (total and large parks within 400 m of respondent’s homes. For total park area within 800 m, the odds of walking at least weekly were lower for those in the mid (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.91 and highest (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.44-0.95 tertile of park area compared to those living in areas with the least amount of park area. Similar results were observed for total park area in the 1200 m buffers. When only larger parks were investigated, again more frequent walking was less likely when respondents had

  7. Evaluation of mental health first aid training with members of the Vietnamese community in Melbourne, Australia.

    Minas, Harry; Colucci, Erminia; Jorm, Anthony F

    2009-09-07

    The aim of this project was to investigate in members of the Vietnamese community in Melbourne the impact of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training on attitudes to people with mental illness and on knowledge about mental disorders. Our hypotheses were that at the end of the training participants would have increased knowledge of mental disorders and their treatments, and decreased negative attitudes towards people with mental disorders. Respondents were 114 participants in two-day MHFA training workshops for the Vietnamese community in Melbourne conducted by two qualified MHFA trainers. Participants completed the research questionnaire prior to the commencement of the training (pre-test) and at its completion (post-test). The questionnaires assessed negative attitudes towards people with mental illness (as described in four vignettes), ability to recognise the mental disorders described in the vignettes, and knowledge about how to assist someone with one of these disorders. Responses to open-ended questions were content analysed and coded. To evaluate the effect of the training, answers to the structured questions and to the coded open-ended questions given at pre- and post-test were compared using McNemar tests for dichotomous values and Wilcoxon tests for other scores. Between pre- and post-test there was significant improvement in recognition of mental disorders; more targeted and appropriate mental health first aid responses, and reduction in inappropriate first aid responses; and negative attitudes to the people described in the vignettes declined significantly on many items of the stigma scale. A two-day, MHFA training course for general members of the Vietnamese community in Melbourne demonstrated significant reductions in stigmatising attitudes, improved knowledge of mental disorders and improved knowledge about appropriate forms of assistance to give to people in the community with mental disorder. There is sufficient evidence to scale up to a population

  8. Public lectures about high energy physics the ICHEP 2012 in Melbourne, Australia

    Barney, D

    2012-01-01

    An evening with the world’s leaders in high energy physics. A panel of physicists from the International Conference in High Energy Physics The world’s leaders in high energy physics are meeting in Melbourne to unveil the latest results in particle physics. Where is the Higgs boson? Is supersymmetry dead? Do we need an even Larger Hadron Collider? What is dark energy and the new cosmology? In this special Physics July Lecture, we will be presenting a panel of theoretical and experimental physicists to discuss the most recent developments at the LHC and what it means for ‘future physics’.

  9. Evaluation of Mental Health First Aid training with members of the Vietnamese community in Melbourne, Australia

    Jorm Anthony F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this project was to investigate in members of the Vietnamese community in Melbourne the impact of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA training on attitudes to people with mental illness and on knowledge about mental disorders. Our hypotheses were that at the end of the training participants would have increased knowledge of mental disorders and their treatments, and decreased negative attitudes towards people with mental disorders. Methods Respondents were 114 participants in two-day MHFA training workshops for the Vietnamese community in Melbourne conducted by two qualified MHFA trainers. Participants completed the research questionnaire prior to the commencement of the training (pre-test and at its completion (post-test. The questionnaires assessed negative attitudes towards people with mental illness (as described in four vignettes, ability to recognise the mental disorders described in the vignettes, and knowledge about how to assist someone with one of these disorders. Responses to open-ended questions were content analysed and coded. To evaluate the effect of the training, answers to the structured questions and to the coded open-ended questions given at pre- and post-test were compared using McNemar tests for dichotomous values and Wilcoxon tests for other scores. Results Between pre- and post-test there was significant improvement in recognition of mental disorders; more targeted and appropriate mental health first aid responses, and reduction in inappropriate first aid responses; and negative attitudes to the people described in the vignettes declined significantly on many items of the stigma scale. Conclusion A two-day, MHFA training course for general members of the Vietnamese community in Melbourne demonstrated significant reductions in stigmatising attitudes, improved knowledge of mental disorders and improved knowledge about appropriate forms of assistance to give to people in the community with mental

  10. “Weather” transit is reliable? Using AVL data to explore tram performance in Melbourne, Australia

    Mahmoud Mesbah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses automatic vehicle location (AVL records to investigate the effect of weather conditions on the travel time reliability of on-road rail transit, through a case study of the Melbourne streetcar (tram network. The datasets available were an extensive historical AVL dataset as well as weather observations. The sample size used in the analysis included all trips made over a period of five years (2006–2010 inclusive, during the morning peak (7 am–9 am for fifteen randomly selected radial tram routes, all traveling to the Melbourne CBD. Ordinary least square (OLS regression analysis was conducted to create a linear model, with tram travel time being the dependent variable. An alternative formulation of the model is also compared. Travel time was regressed on various weather effects including precipitation, air temperature, sea level pressure and wind speed; as well as indicator variables for weekends, public holidays and route numbers to investigate a correlation between weather condition and the on-time performance of the trams. The results indicate that only precipitation and air temperature are significant in their effect on tram travel time. The model demonstrates that on average, an additional millimeter of precipitation during the peak period adversely affects the average travel time during that period by approximately 8 s, that is, rainfall tends to increase the travel time. The effect of air temperature is less intuitive, with the model indicating that trams adhere more closely to schedule when the temperature is different in absolute terms to the mean operating conditions (taken as 15 °C.

  11. Assessment of soil metal concentrations in residential and community vegetable gardens in Melbourne, Australia.

    Laidlaw, Mark A S; Alankarage, Dileepa H; Reichman, Suzie M; Taylor, Mark Patrick; Ball, Andrew S

    2018-05-01

    Gardening and urban food production is an increasingly popular activity, which can improve physical and mental health and provide low cost nutritious food. However, the legacy of contamination from industrial and diffuse sources may have rendered surface soils in some urban gardens to have metals value in excess of recommended guidelines for agricultural production. The objective of this study was to establish the presence and spatial extent of soil metal contamination in Melbourne's residential and inner city community gardens. A secondary objective was to assess whether soil lead (Pb) concentrations in residential vegetable gardens were associated with the age of the home or the presence or absence of paint. The results indicate that most samples in residential and community gardens were generally below the Australian residential guidelines for all tested metals except Pb. Mean soil Pb concentrations exceeded the Australian HIL-A residential guideline of 300 mg/kg in 8% of 13 community garden beds and 21% of the 136 residential vegetable gardens assessed. Mean and median soil Pb concentrations for residential vegetable gardens was 204 mg/kg and 104 mg/kg (range soil Pb concentration for community vegetable garden beds was 102 mg/kg and 38 mg/kg (range = 17-578 mg/kg), respectively. Soil Pb concentrations were higher in homes with painted exteriors (p = 0.004); generally increased with age of the home (p = 0.000); and were higher beneath the household dripline than in vegetable garden beds (p = 0.040). In certain circumstances, the data indicates that elevated soil Pb concentrations could present a potential health hazard in a portion of inner-city residential vegetable gardens in Melbourne. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence and risk factors for VRE colonisation in a tertiary hospital in Melbourne, Australia: a cross sectional study

    Karki Surendra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE has been established as a significant health-care associated problem since its first isolation in Australia in 1994. In this study, we measured the point prevalence and identified risk factors associated with vanB VRE colonisation in a tertiary care hospital in Melbourne, Australia where VRE has been endemic for 15 years. Methods A hospital-wide point prevalence survey was conducted on October 13, 2008 with colonisation detected using rectal swab culture. Patient’s demographic and medical information was collected through a review of medical records. Factors associated with VRE colonisation in univariate analysis were included in multivariate logistic regression model to adjust for confounding. Results The prevalence of VRE colonisation on the day of screening was 17.5% (95% CI, 13.7 to 21.9. VRE was detected from patients in each ward with the prevalence ranging from 3% to 29%. Univariate analysis showed the use of any antibiotic, meropenem, ciprofloxacin, diarrhoea and longer length of hospital stay were associated with increased risk of VRE colonisation (p0.05. Multivariate analysis showed the exposure to meropenem (p=0.004, age (≥65 years (p=0.036 and length of stay ≥7 days (p Conclusion Our study suggests that exposure to antibiotics may have been more important than recent cross transmission for a high prevalence of vanB VRE colonisation at our hospital.

  13. "Embodied Knowing": Exploring the Founding of the Melbourne Rudolf Steiner School in 1970S Victoria, Australia

    Bak, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Education in Victoria, Australia not only underwent significant change in the 1970s, but was witness to a widespread educational reform project. Whilst exploration of the more widespread alternatives has been of some interest, the smaller progressive traditions that emerged in some ways "alongside" the broader reforms have rarely been…

  14. Singing in "La Voce Della Luna" Italian Women's Choir in Melbourne, Australia

    Southcott, Jane; Joseph, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Australia is a country of ongoing migration that embraces diversity, creative expression and cultural activity. Membership of community music groups by older people can enhance life quality, and may provide a space through which cultural and linguistic identity may be shared and celebrated. This qualitative phenomenological case study explores…

  15. "The Show Must Go On": Older Entertainers Making Music in the Community in Melbourne, Australia

    Joseph, Dawn; Southcott, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Globally countries are faced with an aging population and Australia is no different. This creates challenges for the maintenance of well-being which can be enhanced by active engagement in society. There is extensive research that confirms that engagement in music by older people is positively related to individual and community well-being. Music…

  16. Concentrations of legacy and novel brominated flame retardants in indoor dust in Melbourne, Australia: An assessment of human exposure.

    McGrath, Thomas J; Morrison, Paul D; Ball, Andrew S; Clarke, Bradley O

    2018-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel brominated flame retardants (NBFR) have been used in a range of polymers to inhibit the spread of fires but also have a propensity to migrate out of consumer materials and contaminate indoor dust. In this study, a total of 57 dust samples were collected from 12 homes, eight offices and eight vehicles in Melbourne, Australia and analysed for eight PBDEs (-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154, -183 and -209) and seven NBFRs (PBT, PBEB, HBB, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, BTBPE and DBDPE) to determine human exposure risks from dust ingestion. Samples were analysed using selective pressurized liquid extraction (S-PLE) and gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Legacy and replacement flame retardants were detected in all samples with overall ∑PBDE concentrations ranging from 120 to 1700,000 ng/g (median 2100 ng/g) and ∑NBFRs ranging from 1.1 to 10,000 ng/g (median 1800 ng/g). BDE-209 and DBDPE were the dominant compounds in dust samples, followed by congeners associated with commercial Penta-BDE formulations (-47, -99, -100, -153 and -154) and then EH-TBB of the FireMaster 550 and BZ-54 products. ∑Penta-BDE concentrations were elevated in office samples compared with homes and vehicles, while EH-TBB and BDE-209 measured higher concentrations in vehicles compared with their respective levels in homes and offices. Risk assessment estimates revealed the majority of exposure to occur in the home for both adults and toddlers in the City of Melbourne. Generally, body weight adjusted exposure to PBDEs and NBFRs was predicted to be 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher for toddlers than adults. Estimated rates of BDE-47, -99, -153 and -209 ingestion were each 2 orders of magnitude or more below the USEPA's prescribed oral reference dose values (RfDs) for typical exposure scenarios. However, exposure rates for BDE-47 and -99 reached as high as 52 and 95% of RfDs, respectively, for adults and 4.4 and 7

  17. Immunizations under sedation at a paediatric hospital in Melbourne, Australia from 2012-2016.

    Cheng, Daryl R; Elia, Sonja; Perrett, Kirsten P

    2018-05-09

    Sedation for immunizations is of particular importance in a subset of paediatric patients with anxiety disorders, needle phobia, developmental or behavioural disorders. The Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) Melbourne offers a unique immunization under sedation service for these patients. We aimed to evaluate the number and types of patients using inpatient sedation for immunizations, distraction and sedation techniques used, and outcomes of these procedures. A medical record review was conducted on all patients who had immunization under sedation between January 2012 to December 2016 in the RCH Day Medical Unit (DMU). A total of 139 children and adolescents had 213 vaccination encounters. More than half of the vaccination encounters involved multiple vaccines. A total of 400 vaccines were administered. One third of patients (32.3%) had multiple DMU admissions for vaccinations. The median age of patients was 13 years. There were only 10 (4.7%) failed attempts at vaccination; all due to patient non-compliance with prescribed sedation. The majority of patients (58.9%) had a diagnosis of needle phobia. Sedation was most commonly adequately achieved with inhaled nitrous oxide (54.7% sole agent). Midazolam was often used as an adjunct therapy (42.8%). Local anaesthetic cream or play therapy, were used in only 5.9% and 3.9% of patients respectively, although this may reflect poor documentation rather than actual practice. For a subset of paediatric patients for which standard immunization procedures have failed, distraction techniques and conscious sedation enable immunizations to be given safely and effectively. Future research will develop protocols to streamline immunization procedures under sedation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The persistence of predictors of wellbeing among refugee youth eight years after resettlement in Melbourne, Australia.

    Correa-Velez, Ignacio; Gifford, Sandra M; McMichael, Celia

    2015-10-01

    This short report assesses the predictors of subjective health and happiness among a cohort of refugee youth over their first eight years in Australia. Five waves of data collection were conducted between 2004 (n = 120) and 2012-13 (n = 51) using mixed methods. Previous schooling, self-esteem, moving house in the previous year, a supportive social environment, stronger ethnic identity and perceived discrimination were significant predictors of wellbeing after adjusting for demographic and pre-migration factors. When compared with a previous analysis of this cohort over their first three years of settlement, experiences of social exclusion still have a significant impact on wellbeing eight years after arriving in Australia. This study contributes to mounting evidence in support of policies that discourage discrimination and promote social inclusion and cultural diversity and which underpin the wellbeing of resettled refugee youth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dietary factors and the risk of glioma in adults: results of a case-control study in Melbourne, Australia.

    Giles, G G; McNeil, J J; Donnan, G; Webley, C; Staples, M P; Ireland, P D; Hurley, S F; Salzberg, M

    1994-11-01

    In a population-based case-control study of 416 incident gliomas in adults carried out in Melbourne, Australia, between 1987 and 1991, 409 age-sex-matched case-control pairs (243 male and 166 female) had adequate data available to examine associations between the dietary intake of N-nitroso compounds, N-nitroso precursors, other nutrients including N-nitroso inhibitors, and the risk of glioma. Dietary intakes were based on the reported frequency of consumption of 59 food items. Increased odds ratio (OR) were observed in males who consumed high levels of bacon, corned meats, apples, melons and oil. OR less than unity were observed in men consuming cabbage and cola drinks, and in women who consumed wholegrain bread, pasta, corned meat, bananas, cauliflower, brocoli, cola drinks and nuts. Generally, N-nitroso associations were greater in men and micronutrient associations were greater in women. Elevated OR in men, but not women, were associated with the intake of N-nitroso dimethylamine (NDMA), retinol and vitamin E. The intake of nitrate (largely of vegetable origin) was protective in women but not in men. When analyzed using multiple logistic regression, the association with NDMA intake in males was not modified by dietary micronutrient intakes. In females, beta carotene alone, though not directly associated with risk, modified the effect of NDMA. On balance, this study added only limited support to the N-nitroso hypothesis of glial carcinogenesis.

  20. A store cohort study of compliance with a point-of-sale cigarette display ban in Melbourne, Australia.

    Zacher, Meghan; Germain, Daniella; Durkin, Sarah; Hayes, Linda; Scollo, Michelle; Wakefield, Melanie

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate compliance with legislation which restricted cigarette displays in retail outlets, and to assess prevalence of pro- and anti-tobacco elements in stores pre- and post-legislation. METHODS Three audits of 302 stores in Melbourne, Australia by trained observers who gathered information on point-of-sale tobacco displays 2-3 months before and 3-4 and 11-12 months after the enactment of new restrictions. Between the first and second audits, nine stores stopped selling tobacco and three stores had either shut down or were closed for renovations. Of the remaining 290 stores, 94.1% observed the full ban on cigarette package visibility, while new restrictions on price board size and new requirements for graphic health warnings were followed in 85.9% and 67.2% of stores, respectively. Between the second and third audits, another seven stores ended tobacco sales and two stores closed. In Audit 3, 89.7% of the remaining 281 stores complied with price board restrictions, and 82.2% of stores followed requirements for graphic health warnings. Overall, the prevalence of anti-tobacco signage increased and pro-tobacco features decreased between audits for every store type and neighborhood socio-economic status. Tobacco retailers were almost universally compliant with placing cigarettes out of sight and a substantial majority were compliant with regulations on price board size and display of graphic health warnings, demonstrating that such legislation can be implemented successfully.

  1. The impact of sustained hot weather on risk of acute work-related injury in Melbourne, Australia

    McInnes, Judith Anne; MacFarlane, Ewan M.; Sim, Malcolm R.; Smith, Peter

    2018-02-01

    It has been reported that weather-related high ambient temperature is associated with an increased risk of work-related injury. Understanding this relationship is important because work-related injuries are a major public health problem, and because projected climate changes will potentially expose workers to hot days, including consecutive hot days, more often. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of exposure to sustained periods of hot weather on work-related injury risk for workers in Melbourne, Australia. A time-stratified case crossover study design was utilised to examine the association between two and three consecutive days and two and three consecutive nights of hot weather and the risk of work-related injury, using definitions of hot weather ranging from the 60th to the 95th percentile of daily maximum and minimum temperatures for the Melbourne metropolitan area, 2002-2012. Workers' compensation claim data was used to identify cases of acute work-related injury. Overall, two and three consecutive days of hot weather were associated with an increased risk of injury, with this effect becoming apparent at a daily maximum temperature of 27.6 °C (70th percentile). Three consecutive days of high but not extreme temperatures were associated with the strongest effect, with a 15% increased risk of injury (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.30) observed when daily maximum temperature was ≥33.3 °C (90th percentile) for three consecutive days, compared to when it was not. At a threshold of 35.5 °C (95th percentile), there was no significant association between temperature and injury for either two or three consecutive days of heat. These findings suggest that warnings to minimise harm to workers from hot weather should be given, and prevention protocol initiated, when consecutive warm days of temperatures lower than extreme heat temperatures are forecast, and well before the upper ranges of ambient daytime temperatures are reached.

  2. The impact of sustained hot weather on risk of acute work-related injury in Melbourne, Australia.

    McInnes, Judith Anne; MacFarlane, Ewan M; Sim, Malcolm R; Smith, Peter

    2018-02-01

    It has been reported that weather-related high ambient temperature is associated with an increased risk of work-related injury. Understanding this relationship is important because work-related injuries are a major public health problem, and because projected climate changes will potentially expose workers to hot days, including consecutive hot days, more often. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of exposure to sustained periods of hot weather on work-related injury risk for workers in Melbourne, Australia. A time-stratified case crossover study design was utilised to examine the association between two and three consecutive days and two and three consecutive nights of hot weather and the risk of work-related injury, using definitions of hot weather ranging from the 60th to the 95th percentile of daily maximum and minimum temperatures for the Melbourne metropolitan area, 2002-2012. Workers' compensation claim data was used to identify cases of acute work-related injury. Overall, two and three consecutive days of hot weather were associated with an increased risk of injury, with this effect becoming apparent at a daily maximum temperature of 27.6 °C (70th percentile). Three consecutive days of high but not extreme temperatures were associated with the strongest effect, with a 15% increased risk of injury (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.30) observed when daily maximum temperature was ≥33.3 °C (90th percentile) for three consecutive days, compared to when it was not. At a threshold of 35.5 °C (95th percentile), there was no significant association between temperature and injury for either two or three consecutive days of heat. These findings suggest that warnings to minimise harm to workers from hot weather should be given, and prevention protocol initiated, when consecutive warm days of temperatures lower than extreme heat temperatures are forecast, and well before the upper ranges of ambient daytime temperatures are reached.

  3. The effects of summer temperature, age and socioeconomic circumstance on Acute Myocardial Infarction admissions in Melbourne, Australia

    Tapper Nigel J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Published literature detailing the effects of heatwaves on human health is readily available. However literature describing the effects of heat on morbidity is less plentiful, as is research describing events in the southern hemisphere and Australia in particular. To identify susceptible populations and direct public health responses research must move beyond description of the temperature morbidity relationship to include social and spatial risk factors. This paper presents a spatial and socio-demographic picture of the effects of hot weather on persons admitted to hospital with acute myocardial infarction (AMI in Melbourne. Results In this study, the use of a spatial and socio-economic perspective has identified two groups within the population that have an increased 'risk' of AMI admissions to hospital during hot weather. AMI increases during hot weather were only identified in the most disadvantaged and the least disadvantaged areas. Districts with higher AMI admissions rates during hot weather also had larger proportions of older residents. Age provided some explanation for the spatial distribution of AMI admissions on single hot days whereas socio-economic circumstance did not. During short periods (3-days of hot weather, age explained the spatial distribution of AMI admissions slightly better than socioeconomic circumstance. Conclusions This study has demonstrated that both age and socioeconomic inequality contribute to AMI admissions to hospital in Melbourne during hot weather. By using socioeconomic circumstance to define quintiles, differences in AMI admissions were quantified and demographic differences in AMI admissions were described. Including disease specificity into climate-health research methods is necessary to identify climate-sensitive diseases and highlight the burden of climate-sensitive disease in the community. Cardiac disease is a major cause of death and disability and identifying cardiac

  4. Forest Fire Smoke Exposures and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests in Melbourne, Australia: A Case-Crossover Study.

    Dennekamp, Martine; Straney, Lahn D; Erbas, Bircan; Abramson, Michael J; Keywood, Melita; Smith, Karen; Sim, Malcolm R; Glass, Deborah C; Del Monaco, Anthony; Haikerwal, Anjali; Tonkin, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    Millions of people can potentially be exposed to smoke from forest fires, making this an important public health problem in many countries. In this study we aimed to measure the association between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and forest fire smoke exposures in a large city during a severe forest fire season, and estimate the number of excess OHCAs due to the fire smoke. We investigated the association between particulate matter (PM) and other air pollutants and OHCA using a case-crossover study of adults (≥ 35 years of age) in Melbourne, Australia. Conditional logistic regression models were used to derive estimates of the percent change in the rate of OHCA associated with an interquartile range (IQR) increase in exposure. From July 2006 through June 2007, OHCA data were collected from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. Hourly air pollution concentrations and meteorological data were obtained from a central monitoring site. There were 2,046 OHCAs with presumed cardiac etiology during our study period. Among men during the fire season, greater increases in OHCA were observed with IQR increases in the 48-hr lagged PM with diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) (8.05%; 95% CI: 2.30, 14.13%; IQR = 6.1 μg/m(3)) or ≤ 10 μm (PM10) (11.1%; 95% CI: 1.55, 21.48%; IQR = 13.7 μg/m(3)) and carbon monoxide (35.7%; 95% CI: 8.98, 68.92%; IQR = 0.3 ppm). There was no significant association between the rate of OHCA and air pollutants among women. One hundred seventy-four "fire-hours" (i.e., hours in which Melbourne's air quality was affected by forest fire smoke) were identified during 12 days of the 2006/2007 fire season, and 23.9 (95% CI: 3.1, 40.2) excess OHCAs were estimated to occur due to elevations in PM2.5 during these fire-hours. This study found an association between exposure to forest fire smoke and an increase in the rate of OHCA. These findings have implications for public health messages to raise community awareness and for planning of emergency

  5. Sex workers talk about sex work: six contradictory characteristics of legalised sex work in Melbourne, Australia.

    Begum, Sufia; Hocking, Jane S; Groves, Jan; Fairley, Christopher K; Keogh, Louise A

    2013-01-01

    Despite research suggesting that legal sex work is safe and that emotional risks and social stigma are of greater concern than health risks, much research on sex work has focused on health risks. Given the legalisation of sex work in Victoria, Australia, it is timely to look beyond health. Three focus groups were conducted with a total of 14 female sex workers on their experience of legal sex work, both positive and negative, and the social acceptability of their profession. Thematic analysis was used to identify the key ways that sex workers described sex work. Women saw legal sex work as safer than illegal sex work, but still not socially acceptable. However, they also described six contradictory elements of sex work, which was seen as: financially rewarding and entrapping; empowering and demeaning; increasing some opportunities while reducing others; flexible and demanding; offering both intimacy and competition; and leading to a 'double life'. While legalisation has improved the safety of sex work, stigma and discrimination persist.

  6. Cognitive behavioural group treatment for Chinese parents with children with developmental disabilities in Melbourne, Australia: an efficacy study.

    Wong, Fu Keung Daniel; Poon, Ada

    2010-08-01

    This study attempted to test the efficacy of a culturally attuned cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) group for Chinese parents with children with developmental disabilities at risk of developing mental health problems in Melbourne, Australia. It was hypothesized that the participants in the experimental group would have less parenting stress and fewer dysfunctional attitudes, rules, and values, and better mental health and quality of life than the participants in the control group post-test. A total of 58 participants were randomly assigned into CBT and waiting list control groups. While ANCOVAs were used to compare the differences in General Health Questionnaires-12 (GHQ-12), Parenting Stress Index- Parent Domain (PSI-PD), Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnnaire-18 (Q-LES-Q-18) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) between participants of the experiemental and control groups, effect size statistics were performed to measure the magnitude of changes in the above instruments at post treatment. After ten weeks of treatment, the participants in the CBT group showed significant improvement in GHQ-12, Parenting Stress Index (PSI)-Parent Domain and Q-LES-Q-18 scores, but not in DAS scores. The effect size statistics revealed large differences in GHQ-12, PSI-Parent Domain and Q-LES-Q-18 scores between the participants in the experimental and control groups at post-treatment. When a GHQ score of 4 or greater was used as the recommended cut-off score, about 89% and 10% of the participants in the experimental and control groups, respectively, were classified as not at-risk cases at post-treatment. The initial findings suggest that a culturally attuned CBT group may help Chinese parents with children with developmental disabilities to reduce their parenting stress and improve their general mental health and quality of life.

  7. The Effects of Flattening the Effective Marginal Rate Structure in Australia: Policy Simulations Using the Melbourne Institute Tax and Transfer Simulator

    John Creedy; Guyonne Kalb; Hsein Kew

    2001-01-01

    This paper uses the Melbourne Institute Tax and Transfer Simulator (MITTS) to examine the effects of a reduction in the means-tested benefit taper, or withdrawal, rates in Australia to 30 per cent. That is, all taper rates of 50 per cent and 70 per cent in the 1998 system are reduced to 30 per cent, while leaving all basic benefit levels unchanged. This change is therefore expected to ‘flatten’ the tax structure by reducing the high marginal tax rates applying to those with relatively low inc...

  8. Characterisation of current and future GNSS performance in urban canyons using a high quality 3-D urban model of Melbourne, Australia

    Gang-jun, Liu; Kefei, Zhang; Falin, Wu; Liam, Densley; Retscher, Günther

    2009-03-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is a critical space-borne geospatial infrastructure providing essential positioning supports to a range of location-sensitive applications. GNSS is currently dominated by the US Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation. The next generation GNSS is expected to offer more satellites, better positioning provision, and improved availability and continuity of navigation support. However, GNSS performance in 3-D urban environments is problematic because GNSS signals are either completely blocked or severely degraded by high-rising geographic features like buildings. The aim of this study is to gain an in-depth understanding of the changing spatial patterns of GNSS performance, measured by the number of visible satellites (NVS) and position dilution-of-precision (PDOP), in the urban canyons of Melbourne, Australia. The methodology used includes the following steps: (1) determination of the dynamic orbital positions of current and future GNSS satellites; (2) development of a 3-D urban model of high geometric quality for Melbourne Central Business District (CBD); (3) evaluation of GNSS performance for every specified location in the urban canyons; and (4) visualisation and characterisation of the dynamic spatial patterns of GNSS performances in the urban canyons. As expected, the study shows that the integration of the GPS and Galileo constellations results in higher availability and stronger geometry, leading to significant improvement of GNSS performance in urban canyons of Melbourne CBD. Some conclusions are drawn and further research currently undertaken is also outlined.

  9. Mental health first aid training for the Chinese community in Melbourne, Australia: effects on knowledge about and attitudes toward people with mental illness.

    Lam, Angus Yk; Jorm, Anthony F; Wong, Daniel Fk

    2010-06-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate in members of the Chinese community in Melbourne the impact of Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training on knowledge about mental disorders and on attitudes to people with mental illness. The hypotheses were that at the end of the training participants would have increased knowledge of mental disorders and related treatments, and decreased negative attitudes towards people with mental disorders. Respondents were 108 participants of three MHFA training workshops for the Chinese community in Melbourne conducted by a qualified MHFA trainer. Participants completed the research questionnaire prior to the commencement of the training (pre-test) and at its completion (post-test). The questionnaires assessed participants' ability to recognize a mental disorder (depression and schizophrenia) described in the vignettes, knowledge about the professional help and treatment, and negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Between pre- and post-test there was significant improvement in the recognition of mental disorders, beliefs about treatment became more concordant with health professionals, and negative attitudes reduced. The MHFA training course for general members of the Chinese community in Melbourne produced significant positive change in the level of mental health literacy and reductions in stigmatizing attitudes. The evidence from this study, together with the accumulated evidence of the benefits of MHFA training in the general Australian community, suggests that this approach should be scaled up to a level where it can have an impact on the whole of the Chinese community in Australia.

  10. Human coronavirus OC43 causes influenza-like illness in residents and staff of aged-care facilities in Melbourne, Australia.

    Birch, C. J.; Clothier, H. J.; Seccull, A.; Tran, T.; Catton, M. C.; Lambert, S. B.; Druce, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    Three outbreaks of respiratory illness associated with human coronavirus HCoV-OC43 infection occurred in geographically unrelated aged-care facilities in Melbourne, Australia during August and September 2002. On clinical and epidemiological grounds the outbreaks were first thought to be caused by influenza virus. HCoV-OC43 was detected by RT-PCR in 16 out of 27 (59%) specimens and was the only virus detected at the time of sampling. Common clinical manifestations were cough (74%), rhinorrhoea (59%) and sore throat (53%). Attack rates and symptoms were similar in residents and staff across the facilities. HCoV-OC43 was also detected in surveillance and diagnostic respiratory samples in the same months. These outbreaks establish this virus as a cause of morbidity in aged-care facilities and add to increasing evidence of the significance of coronavirus infections. PMID:15816152

  11. An evaluation of the performance of a WRF multi-physics ensemble for heatwave events over the city of Melbourne in southeast Australia

    Imran, H. M.; Kala, J.; Ng, A. W. M.; Muthukumaran, S.

    2018-04-01

    Appropriate choice of physics options among many physics parameterizations is important when using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The responses of different physics parameterizations of the WRF model may vary due to geographical locations, the application of interest, and the temporal and spatial scales being investigated. Several studies have evaluated the performance of the WRF model in simulating the mean climate and extreme rainfall events for various regions in Australia. However, no study has explicitly evaluated the sensitivity of the WRF model in simulating heatwaves. Therefore, this study evaluates the performance of a WRF multi-physics ensemble that comprises 27 model configurations for a series of heatwave events in Melbourne, Australia. Unlike most previous studies, we not only evaluate temperature, but also wind speed and relative humidity, which are key factors influencing heatwave dynamics. No specific ensemble member for all events explicitly showed the best performance, for all the variables, considering all evaluation metrics. This study also found that the choice of planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme had largest influence, the radiation scheme had moderate influence, and the microphysics scheme had the least influence on temperature simulations. The PBL and microphysics schemes were found to be more sensitive than the radiation scheme for wind speed and relative humidity. Additionally, the study tested the role of Urban Canopy Model (UCM) and three Land Surface Models (LSMs). Although the UCM did not play significant role, the Noah-LSM showed better performance than the CLM4 and NOAH-MP LSMs in simulating the heatwave events. The study finally identifies an optimal configuration of WRF that will be a useful modelling tool for further investigations of heatwaves in Melbourne. Although our results are invariably region-specific, our results will be useful to WRF users investigating heatwave dynamics elsewhere.

  12. Intergenerational differences in acculturation experiences, food beliefs and perceived health risks among refugees from the Horn of Africa in Melbourne, Australia.

    Wilson, Alyce; Renzaho, Andre

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the differences in acculturation experiences between parent and adolescent refugees from the Horn of Africa in Melbourne, Australia and to explore food beliefs and perceived health risks from an intergenerational perspective. Qualitative cross-sectional study involving a combination of semi-structured one-on-one interviews and focus group discussions. North-West suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. Eritrean, Ethiopian, Somali and Sudanese refugees. Using a purposeful sampling technique, twelve semi-structured face-to-face interviews (nine adults and three adolescents) and four in-depth focus groups (two with adolescents each containing six participants and two with adults one containing six participants and the other ten participants) were carried out. Thus overall data were obtained on fifteen adolescents and twenty-five parents. Qualitative analysis identified differences between parents and adolescents in relation to lifestyle, diet and physical activity. Views regarding health consequences of their changed diets also differed. Parental feeding practices encompassed a variety of methods and were enforced in an attempt by parents to control their children's dietary behaviours and prevent their drift away from traditional eating habits. These findings call for more research to contextualise dietary acculturation among refugee youth and the impact of migration on parenting styles and feeding practices in communities from the Horn of Africa. Preventive health programmes with Horn of Africa refugees need to acknowledge the effect of acculturation on diet and physical activity levels and a socio-cultural framework needs to be developed with respect to the importance and influence of the family environment.

  13. Social connections among parents of pre-school-age children in an inner and outer area of Melbourne, Australia

    Fiona Jane Andrews

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parents’ social connectedness is an important factor in child health and development outcomes and has been strongly linked to place. This study aimed to compare social connectedness amongst parents in inner versus outer-suburbs of Melbourne using a mixed methods approach. Parents were recruited via playgroups, mother’s groups and preschools and interviewed face- to-face regarding their social networks, with a second open-ended interview focusing on parents’ ideals and experiences of raising children in their current location. Parents in the two areas identified a similar number of contacts, but had differently structured networks. Outer-suburban parents were more likely than inner-suburban parents to have very few contacts, and to name their general practitioner as among their significant contacts. They were less likely to have more extended networks or to include neighbours among their contacts. Parents in both areas had met at least some of their network members through local organisations or services with outer-suburban parents having met a greater proportion of their contacts in this way. Qualitative interview data supported the network analysis revealing the different priorities parents placed on neighbours, barriers experienced in connecting with neighbours in the outer- suburbs and the consequent heavy reliance on organised activities to form social connections. The different types of social connections parents in inner and outer Melbourne made in relation to raising their preschool-aged children revealed in this study have implications for both service delivery and social planning of new developments.

  14. Child oral health in migrant families: A cross-sectional study of caries in 1-4 year old children from migrant backgrounds residing in Melbourne, Australia.

    Gibbs, L; de Silva, A M; Christian, B; Gold, L; Gussy, M; Moore, L; Calache, H; Young, D; Riggs, E; Tadic, M; Watt, R; Gondal, I; Waters, E

    2016-06-01

    Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is the most common, preventable disease of childhood. It can affect children's health and wellbeing and children from migrant families may be at greater risk of developing ECC. To describe ECC in children from migrant families, and explore possible influences. Cross-sectional analysis of caries data collected as baseline data for an oral health promotion study. The analysis sample included 630 1-4 year-old children clustered within 481 Iraqi, Lebanese and Pakistani families in Melbourne, Australia. Child participants received a community-based visual dental examination. Parents completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographics, ethnicity, and oral health knowledge, behaviour and attitudes. Child caries experience. Bivariate associations between oral health behaviours and ethnicity were tested for significance using chi-square. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify associations with ECC, adjusting for demographic variables and accounting for clustering by family. Overall, 34% of children in the sample experienced caries (both non-cavitated and cavitated). For all caries lesions, parent' length of residence in Australia, consumption of sweet drinks and parental education remained as independent predictors of child caries experience. Adding sugar to drinks was an additional risk factor for cavitation. Ethnicity was associated with some individual oral health behaviours suggesting cultural influences on health, however the relationship was not independent of other predictors. Culturally competent oral health promotion interventions should aim to support migrant families with young children, and focus on reducing sweet drink consumption.

  15. Alcohol intoxication in the context of major public holidays, sporting and social events: a time-series analysis in Melbourne, Australia, 2000-2009.

    Lloyd, Belinda; Matthews, Sharon; Livingston, Michael; Jayasekara, Harindra; Smith, Karen

    2013-04-01

    To assess the relationship between ambulance attendances, emergency department (ED) presentations and hospital admissions for acute alcohol intoxication and the timing of public holidays, sporting and social events. Time-series analysis was used to explore trends in intoxication in the context of major events. Population of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia between 2000 and 2009. All patients attended by ambulance, presenting to hospital EDs, or admitted to hospital who were classified as acutely alcohol intoxicated. Analysis of daily numbers of presentations for acute alcohol intoxication associated with major events were undertaken, including lead and lag effects. Analyses controlled for day of week and month of year to address temporal and seasonal variations. Alcohol intoxication presentations were significantly elevated the day before all public holidays, with intoxication cases on the day of public holidays only higher on New Year's Day (ambulance 6.57, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 3.4-9.74; ED 3.34, 95% CI: 1.28-5.4) and ANZAC Day (ambulance 3.71, 95% CI: 0.68-6.75). The Australian Football League (AFL) Grand Final (ED 2.37, 95% CI: 0.55-4.19), Commonwealth Games (ED 2.45, 95% CI: 0.6-4.3) and Melbourne Cup Day (ambulance 6.14, 95% CI: 2.42-9.85) represented the sporting events with significant elevations in acute intoxication requiring medical attention. The last working day before Christmas was the only social event where a significant increase in acute intoxication occurred (ambulance 8.98, 95% CI: 6.8-11.15). Acute alcohol intoxication cases requiring ambulance, emergency department and hospital in-patient treatment increase substantially on the day preceding public holidays and other major social events. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. Verification of the Performance of a Vertical Ground Heat Exchanger Applied to a Test House in Melbourne, Australia

    Koon Beng Ooi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The ground heat exchanger is traditionally used as a heat source or sink for the heat pump that raises the temperature of water to about 50 °C to heat houses. However, in winter, the heating thermostat (temperature at which heating begins in the Australian Nationwide House Energy Rating Scheme (NatHERS is only 20 °C during daytime and 15 °C at night. In South-East Melbourne, the temperature at the bottom of a 50-meter-deep borehole has been recorded with an Emerson™ recorder at 17 °C. Melbourne has an annual average temperature of 15 °C, so the ground temperature increases by 2 °C per 50-m depth. A linear projection gives 23 °C at 200-m of depth, and as the average undisturbed temperature of the ground for a 400-m-deep vertical ground heat exchanger (VGHE. This study, by simulation and experimentation, aims to verify that the circulation of water in the VGHE’s U-tube to low-temperature radiators (LTRs could heat a house to thermal comfort. A literature review is included in the introduction. A simulation, using a model of a 60-m2 experimental house, shows that the daytime circulation of water in this VGHE/LTR-on-opposite-walls system during the 8-month cold half of the year, heats the indoors to NatHERS settings. Simulation for the cold half shows that this VGHE-LTR system could cool the indoors. Instead, a fan creating a cooling sensation of up to 4 °C is used so that the VGHE is available for the regeneration of heat extracted from the ground during the cold portion. Simulations for this hot portion show that a 3.4-m2 flat plate solar collector can collect more than twice the heat extracted from the ground in the cold portion. Thus, it can thus replenish the ground heat extracted for houses double the size of this 60-m2 experimental house. Therefore, ground heat is sustainable for family-size homes. Since no heat pump is used, the cost of VGHE-LTR systems could be comparable to systems using the ground source heat pump. Water

  17. Metal accumulation in roadside soil in Melbourne, Australia: Effect of road age, traffic density and vehicular speed

    De Silva, Shamali; Ball, Andrew S.; Huynh, Trang; Reichman, Suzie M.

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of vehicular emitted heavy metals in roadside soils result in long term environmental damage. This study assessed the relationships between traffic characteristics (traffic density, road age and vehicular speed) and roadside soil heavy metals. Significant levels were recorded for Cd (0.06–0.59 mg/kg), Cr (18–29 mg/kg), Cu (4–12 mg/kg), Ni (7–20 mg/kg), Mn (92–599 mg/kg), Pb (16–144 mg/kg) and Zn (10.36–88.75 mg/kg), with Mn concentrations exceeding the Ecological Investigation Level. Significant correlations were found between roadside soil metal concentration and vehicular speed (R = 0.90), road age (R = 0.82) and traffic density (R = 0.68). Recently introduced metals in automotive technology (e.g. Mn and Sb) were higher in younger roads, while the metals present for many years (e.g. Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) were higher in medium and old age roads confirming the risk of significant metal deposition and soil metal retention in roadside soils. - Highlights: • Elevated metal concentrations were recorded from Melbourne roadside soils. • Mn and Sb tended to be higher in younger roads. • Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were particularly elevated in medium and old age roads. • Accumulation of Ag, Co and Sb were identified as potential emerging risks. • Mn concentrations exceeded Australian ecological investigation levels. - Investigating relationships between road age, traffic density and vehicular speed on the concentrations of metals in roadside soils.

  18. Bilingual Advertising in Melbourne Chinatown

    Chen, Sherry Yong

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the function of bilingual advertising by analyzing a case study of bilingual advertising in the Chinatown of Melbourne, Australia. The use of bilingual advertising in an immigrant setting differentiates itself from those in Asian settings where English is not used by dominant proportion of speakers in the society, and this…

  19. A health-promoting community dental service in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia: protocol for the North Richmond model of oral health care.

    Hall, Martin; Christian, Bradley

    2017-10-01

    Despite the best efforts and commitment of oral health programs, there is no evidence that the current surgical output-based model of oral health care is delivering better oral health outcomes to the community. In fact, Australian evidence indicates the oral health of the community could be getting worse. It is now well-understood that this traditional surgical model of oral health care will never successfully manage the disease itself. It is proposed that a health-promoting, minimally invasive oral disease management model of care may lead to a sustainable benefit to the oral health status of the individual and community groups. The aim of this paper is to describe such a model of oral health care (MoC) currently being implemented by the North Richmond Community Health Oral Health (NRCH-OH) program in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; this model may serve as a template for other services to re-orient their healthcare delivery towards health promotion and prevention. The paper describes the guiding principles and theories for the model and also its operational components, which are: pre-engagement while on the waitlist; client engagement at the reception area; the assessment phase; oral health education (high-risk clients only); disease management; and reviews and recall.

  20. The maintenance effect of cognitive-behavioural treatment groups for the Chinese parents of children with intellectual disabilities in Melbourne, Australia: a 6-month follow-up study.

    Wong, D F K; Poon, A; Kwok, Y C Lai

    2011-11-01

    Caring for a child with intellectual disability can be stressful. No data on the longer-term effects of cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) on parents from a Chinese-speaking background who have children with intellectual disabilities are available in the literature. This study attempted to fill this research gap by examining the maintenance effect of CBT among the Chinese parents of such children in Melbourne, Australia. Thirty-nine participants took part in our CBT groups and attended follow-up meetings. A questionnaire comprising four instruments, the Parenting Stress Index (PS) - Parent Domain, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), Abbreviated Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q-18) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS), was administered to the participants at the pre- and post-test stage and at the 6-month follow-up. One-way repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed significant time and group effects in the PS (F(2,27) = 16.93, P times. The participants continued to maintain significant improvements in mental health and quality of life and declines in the severity of parenting stress and dysfunctional attitudes at the 6-month follow-up. Effect size analyses revealed mostly large differences in the foregoing measurements (Cohen's d = 0.76-2.18) between the pre-test and 6-month follow-up. Employing a cut-off score of 3/4 in the GHQ-12 to identify at-risk and not-at-risk cases, approximately 90.5% of the participants could be classified as not-at-risk at the follow-up. Lastly, regression analyses showed that changes in DAS scores significantly predicted changes in the GHQ-12 and Q-LES-Q-18 scores at the follow-up. This study provides preliminary evidence of the 6-month maintenance effect of CBT groups for the Melbourne-resident Chinese parents of children with intellectual disabilities. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Personal, musical and social benefits of singing in a community ensemble: Three case studies in Melbourne (Australia

    Dawn Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia has a diverse, multilayered society that reflects its rich musical life. There are many community choirs formed by various cultural and linguistically diverse groups. This article is part of an ongoing project, Well-being and ageing: community, diversity and the arts (since 2008, undertaken by Deakin University and Monash University, that explores the cultural diversity within Australian society and how active music engagement fosters well-being. The singing groups selected for this discussion are the Skylarkers, the Bosnian Behar Choir, and the Coro Furlan. The Skylarkers and the Bosnian Behar Choir are mixed groups who respectively perform popular music from their generation and celebrate their culture through music. The Coro Furlan is an Italian male choir who understand themselves as custodians of their heritage. In these interpretative, qualitative case studies semi-structured interviews were undertaken and analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. In this approach there is an exploration of participants’ understanding of their lived experiences. The analysis of the combined data identified musical and social benefits that contribute to participants’ sense of individual well-being. Musical benefits occurred through sharing, learning and singing together. Social benefits included opportunities to build friendships, overcome isolation and gain a sense of validation. Many found that singing enhanced their health and happiness. Active music making in community choirs and music ensembles continues to be an effective way to support individuals, build community, and share culture and heritage.

  2. Brand placement on price boards after tobacco display bans: a point-of-sale audit in Melbourne, Australia.

    Wakefield, Melanie; Zacher, Meghan; Scollo, Michelle; Durkin, Sarah

    2012-11-01

    This study aims to explore how cigarette brands are arranged on boards listing tobacco products and/or prices following the 1 January 2011 ban on point-of-sale tobacco displays in Victoria, Australia. An audit undertaken in late 2011 gathered information on the prevalence and contents of tobacco product information displays ('price boards'). We examined how often all or most of the brands listed at the top of price boards were owned by the same tobacco company, and whether premium, mainstream and value brands were listed in prominent positions more frequently in different store types and socio-economic areas (SES). Of the 281 stores audited, 64% (179) had legible price boards. Of the 178 with factory-made products, 11% arranged brands alphabetically, 2% by price and 87% did so in some other way. In 65% of stores where brands were arranged in some other way, at least three of the top four positions were devoted to brands owned by the same tobacco company. Premium brands were given greater prominence than would be expected by market share. Neighbourhood SES was significantly related to the representation in the most prominent price board positions of brands from the most appropriate market segment. Price boards are being used to target brands to consumers. Jurisdictions should also prohibit price board display when they ban tobacco product display; prices might instead be itemised in alphabetical order on a list only viewable upon customer request.

  3. Population and age-group trends in weekend sun protection and sunburn over two decades of the SunSmart programme in Melbourne, Australia.

    Makin, J K; Warne, C D; Dobbinson, S J; Wakefield, M A; Hill, D J

    2013-01-01

    In response to the high skin cancer burden in Australia, the multicomponent, community-wide SunSmart programme has worked since 1988 to reduce excessive sun exposure.  To examine trends in key sun-protection behaviours and sunburn for the Melbourne population from 1987 to 2007, and examine for the first time patterns of change among age groups.   Representative cross-sectional weekly telephone surveys of weekend sun protection and sunburn were conducted over 11 of the summers in the period 1987-88 to 2006-07. Trends were analysed for the population and for age groups, adjusting for ambient temperature and ultraviolet radiation, which are environmental determinants of sun-related behaviour and sunburn.   The general pattern of trends suggests two distinct periods, one with rapid improvement in behaviours (more sunscreen use, less unprotected body exposure and less sunburn) from 1987-88 to 1994-95, and the second from 1997-98 to 2006-07 with fewer changes in behaviours noted. The age-group analyses showed a similar pattern of change over time across groups, with a few notable exceptions.  The similarity of the pattern of trends among age groups suggests that external influences including the SunSmart programme's activity had a relatively similar impact across the population. Sun-related behaviours continue to be amenable to change. More recent relative stability with some declines in sun protection suggests further intensive campaigns and other strategies may be needed to maintain previous successes and to achieve more universal use of sun protection. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Patterns of, and Factors Associated With, Illicit Pharmaceutical Opioid Analgesic Use in a Prospective Cohort of People Who Inject Drugs in Melbourne, Australia.

    Horyniak, Danielle; Agius, Paul A; Degenhardt, Louisa; Reddel, Siobhan; Higgs, Peter; Aitken, Campbell; Stoové, Mark; Dietze, Paul

    2015-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are a key population engaging in pharmaceutical opioid analgesic (PO) use, yet little is known about patterns of illicit PO use among this group. The aims of this research were to measure the prevalence and frequency of lifetime and past-month illicit PO use and injection in a sample of regular PWID, to examine patterns of past-month illicit PO use within individuals over time, and to identify factors independently associated with past-month illicit PO use. Data were drawn from a prospective cohort study of regular PWID (N = 666) in Melbourne, Australia. Data from five waves of annual data collection (including baseline) were analyzed descriptively and using generalized estimating equations (GEE). At baseline, 59% of participants reported lifetime illicit PO use and 20% reported past-month use, predominantly through injecting. Most illicit PO users at baseline transitioned to nonuse of illicit POs across the study period. In multivariable GEE analysis, factors associated with past-month illicit PO use included past-year arrest [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.39], opioids other than heroin as drug of choice (AOR: 5.14), experiencing poorer physical health (AOR: 0.98) and a range of other drug use variables. We found little evidence of ongoing illicit PO use among those followed up, with illicit PO use linked to polydrug use more broadly. Nonetheless, trends in illicit PO use among PWID should continue to be monitored and harm reduction interventions implemented to reduce the associated public health risks.

  5. Associations between the purchase of healthy and fast foods and restrictions to food access: a cross-sectional study in Melbourne, Australia.

    Burns, Cate; Bentley, Rebecca; Thornton, Lukar; Kavanagh, Anne

    2015-01-01

    To examine the associations between financial, physical and transport conditions that may restrict food access (which we define as food security indicators) and the purchase of fast foods and nutritious staples such as bread and milk. Multilevel logistic and multinomial regression analysis of cross-sectional survey data to assess associations between the three indicators of food insecurity and household food shopping adjusted for sociodemographic and socio-economic variables. Random selection of households (n 3995) from fifty Census Collector Districts in Melbourne, Australia, in 2003. The main food shoppers in each household (n 2564). After adjustment for confounders, analysis showed that a greater likelihood of purchasing chain-brand fast food on a weekly basis compared with never was associated with running out of money to buy food (OR = 1·59; 95 % CI 1·08, 2·34) and reporting difficulties lifting groceries (OR = 1·77; 95 % CI 1·23, 2·54). Respondents without regular access to a car to do food shopping were less likely to purchase bread types considered more nutritious than white bread (OR = 0·75; 95 % CI 0·59, 0·95) and milk types considered more nutritious than full-cream milk (OR = 0·62; 95 % CI 0·47, 0·81). The food insecurity indicators were not associated with the purchasing of fruits, vegetables or non-chain fast food. Householders experiencing financial and physical barriers were more likely to frequently purchase chain fast foods while limited access to a car resulted in a lower likelihood that the nutritious options were purchased for two core food items (bread and milk). Policies and interventions that improve financial access to food and lessen the effect of physical limitations to carrying groceries may reduce the purchasing of fast foods. Further research is required on food sourcing and dietary quality among those with food access restrictions.

  6. Retailer-Led Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Price Increase Reduces Purchases in a Hospital Convenience Store in Melbourne, Australia: A Mixed Methods Evaluation.

    Blake, Miranda R; Peeters, Anna; Lancsar, Emily; Boelsen-Robinson, Tara; Corben, Kirstan; Stevenson, Christopher E; Palermo, Claire; Backholer, Kathryn

    2018-06-01

    Limited evidence has been gathered on the real-world impact of sugar-sweetened beverage price changes on purchasing behavior over time or in community-retail settings. Our aim was to determine changes in beverage purchases, business outcomes, and customer and retailer satisfaction associated with a retailer-led sugar-sweetened beverage price increase in a convenience store. We hypothesized that purchases of less-healthy beverages would decrease compared to predicted sales. A convergent parallel mixed methods design complemented sales data (122 weeks pre-intervention, 17 weeks during intervention) with stakeholder interviews and customer surveys. Electronic beverage sales data were collected from a convenience store in Melbourne, Australia (August through November 2015). Convenience store staff completed semi-structured interviews (n=4) and adult customers exiting the store completed surveys (n=352). Beverages were classified using a state government framework. Prices of "red" beverages (eg, nondiet soft drinks, energy drinks) increased by 20%. Prices of "amber" (eg, diet soft drinks, small pure fruit juices) and "green" beverages (eg, water) were unchanged. Changes in beverage volume, item sales, and revenue during the intervention were compared with predicted sales. Sales data were analyzed using time series segmented regression while controlling for pre-intervention trends, autocorrelation in sales data, and seasonal fluctuations. Beverage volume sales of red (-27.6%; 95% CI -32.2 to -23.0) and amber (-26.7%; 95% CI -39.3 to -16.0) decreased, and volume of green beverages increased (+26.9%; 95% CI +14.1 to +39.7) in the 17th intervention week compared with predicted sales. Store manager and staff considered the intervention business-neutral, despite a small reduction in beverage revenue. Fifteen percent of customers noticed the price difference and 61% supported the intervention. A 20% sugar-sweetened beverage price increase was associated with a reduction

  7. Pesticide and trace metal occurrence and aquatic benchmark exceedances in surface waters and sediments of urban wetlands and retention ponds in Melbourne, Australia.

    Allinson, Graeme; Zhang, Pei; Bui, AnhDuyen; Allinson, Mayumi; Rose, Gavin; Marshall, Stephen; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    Samples of water and sediments were collected from 24 urban wetlands in Melbourne, Australia, in April 2010, and tested for more than 90 pesticides using a range of gas chromatographic (GC) and liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques, sample 'hormonal' activity using yeast-based recombinant receptor-reporter gene bioassays, and trace metals using spectroscopic techniques. At the time of sampling, there was almost no estrogenic activity in the water column. Twenty-three different pesticide residues were observed in one or more water samples from the 24 wetlands; chemicals observed at more than 40% of sites were simazine (100%), atrazine (79%), and metalaxyl and terbutryn (46%). Using the toxicity unit (TU) concept, less than 15% of the detected pesticides were considered to pose an individual, short-term risk to fish or zooplankton in the ponds and wetlands. However, one pesticide (fenvalerate) may have posed a possible short-term risk to fish (log10TUf > -3), and three pesticides (azoxystrobin, fenamiphos and fenvalerate) may have posed a risk to zooplankton (logTUzp between -2 and -3); all the photosystem II (PSII) inhibiting herbicides may have posed a risk to primary producers in the ponds and wetlands (log10TUap and/or log10TUalg > -3). The wetland sediments were contaminated with 16 different pesticides; no chemicals were observed at more than one third of sites, but based on frequency of detection and concentrations, bifenthrin (33%, maximum 59 μg/kg) is the priority insecticide of concern for the sediments studied. Five sites returned a TU greater than the possible effect threshold (i.e. log10TU > 1) as a result of bifenthrin contamination of their sediments. Most sediments did not exceed Australian sediment quality guideline levels for trace metals. However, more than half of the sites had threshold effect concentration quotients (TECQ) values >1 for Cu (58%), Pb (50%), Ni (67%) and Zn (63%), and 75% of sites had mean probable effect concentration quotients

  8. Occupational radiation exposure at the self-shielded IBA CYCLONE 10/5, cyclotron of the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne, Australia

    Tochon-Danguy, H.; Sachinidis, J.I.; U, P.; Egan, G.; Mukherjee, B.

    1999-01-01

    A series of health physics measurements was carried out at the IBA CYCLONE 10/5 Medical Cyclotron of the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne. The neutron attenuation factor of the cyclotron shielding was estimated using the Superheated Bubble dosimeters. The neutron and gamma dose rates at various public access and radiation worker's area in the vicinity of the cyclotron facility were evaluated during the 11 C, 18 F, 13 N and 15 O production conditions. (authors)

  9. Astronomical publications of Melbourne Observatory

    Andropoulos, Jenny Ioanna

    2014-05-01

    During the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century, four well-equipped government observatories were maintained in Australia - in Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. These institutions conducted astronomical observations, often in the course of providing a local time service, and they also collected and collated meteorological data. As well, some of these observatories were involved at times in geodetic surveying, geomagnetic recording, gravity measurements, seismology, tide recording and physical standards, so the term "observatory" was being used in a rather broad sense! Despite the international renown that once applied to Williamstown and Melbourne Observatories, relatively little has been written by modern-day scholars about astronomical activities at these observatories. This research is intended to rectify this situation to some extent by gathering, cataloguing and analysing the published astronomical output of the two Observatories to see what contributions they made to science and society. It also compares their contributions with those of Sydney, Adelaide and Perth Observatories. Overall, Williamstown and Melbourne Observatories produced a prodigious amount of material on astronomy in scientific and technical journals, in reports and in newspapers. The other observatories more or less did likewise, so no observatory of those studied markedly outperformed the others in the long term, especially when account is taken of their relative resourcing in staff and equipment.

  10. Application of a random effects negative binomial model to examine tram-involved crash frequency on route sections in Melbourne, Australia.

    Naznin, Farhana; Currie, Graham; Logan, David; Sarvi, Majid

    2016-07-01

    Safety is a key concern in the design, operation and development of light rail systems including trams or streetcars as they impose crash risks on road users in terms of crash frequency and severity. The aim of this study is to identify key traffic, transit and route factors that influence tram-involved crash frequencies along tram route sections in Melbourne. A random effects negative binomial (RENB) regression model was developed to analyze crash frequency data obtained from Yarra Trams, the tram operator in Melbourne. The RENB modelling approach can account for spatial and temporal variations within observation groups in panel count data structures by assuming that group specific effects are randomly distributed across locations. The results identify many significant factors effecting tram-involved crash frequency including tram service frequency (2.71), tram stop spacing (-0.42), tram route section length (0.31), tram signal priority (-0.25), general traffic volume (0.18), tram lane priority (-0.15) and ratio of platform tram stops (-0.09). Findings provide useful insights on route section level tram-involved crashes in an urban tram or streetcar operating environment. The method described represents a useful planning tool for transit agencies hoping to improve safety performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Impact of “Unseasonably” Warm Spring Temperatures on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in Melbourne, Australia: A City with a Temperate Climate

    Margaret Loughnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of extreme temperatures on human health have been well described. However, the adverse health effects of warm weather that occurs outside the summer period have had little attention. We used daily anomalous AMI morbidity and daily anomalous temperature to determine the impact of “unseasonable” temperature on human health. The “unseasonably” warm weather was attributed to a slow moving high pressure system to the east of Melbourne. No morbidity displacement was noted during either of these periods suggesting that morbidity due to “unseasonable” temperatures is avoidable. An increase in warmer weather during the cooler months of spring may result in increased morbidity, and an alert system based on summer thresholds may not be appropriate for early season heat health warnings. A straightforward alert system based on calculating anomalous temperature from daily weather forecasts may reduce the public health impact of “unseasonably” warm weather.

  12. The great Melbourne telescope

    Gillespie, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Erected at Melbourne Observatory in 1869, the telescope was the second largest in the world, designed to explore the nature of the nebulae in the southern skies. Richard Gillespie, head of the History and Technology department at the Melbourne museum has written an entertaining account of the telescope's extraordinary history and tells the story through an amazing cast of characters whose lives intersected with the telescope.

  13. Addressing the midwifery workforce crisis: evaluating an employment model for undergraduate midwifery students at a tertiary maternity hospital in Melbourne, Australia.

    McLachlan, Helen L; Forster, Della A; Ford, Rachael L; Farrell, Tanya

    2011-12-01

    In Victoria, maternity services are under significant strain due to increased numbers of women giving birth and critical workforce shortages. Hospitals have experienced challenges in adequately staffing maternity units, particularly on postnatal wards. In 2008, a tertiary maternity hospital in Melbourne introduced a model where undergraduate midwifery students were employed as Division 2 nurses (SMW_Div2) (enrolled nurses), to work in the postnatal area only. This study explored the pilot employment model from the perspective of the SMW_Div2 and hospital midwives. A web-based survey was administered to hospital midwives and the SMW_Div2s in the employment model in January 2010. The survey explored the views of midwives and SMW_Div2s regarding the perceived impact of the model on workforce readiness, recruitment and retention, and clinical competence and confidence. Forty-seven of 158 midwives (30%) and five of nine SMW_Div2s employed in the model responded to the survey. Both groups considered the model to have benefits for the organisation, including increased: student workforce readiness; clinical confidence and competence; and organisational loyalty. Both groups also considered that the model would facilitate: workforce recruitment; a teaching and learning culture within the organisation; and enhanced partnerships between students, hospitals and universities. Caution was expressed regarding workload and the need for ongoing support for SMW_Div2s working in the model. SMW_Div2s and midwives were positive about the introduction of the paid employment model at the Women's. The findings are consistent with evaluations of similar programs in the nursing setting. The employment model has potential short and long term individual and organisational advantages, which is important in the context of increasing births and workforce shortages. Progression of such models will be contingent on the collaboration and cooperation of the various stakeholders involved in maternity

  14. HIV Incidence and Predictors of Incident HIV among Men Who Have Sex with Men Attending a Sexual Health Clinic in Melbourne, Australia.

    King T Cheung

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for HIV infection and the incidence in men who have sex with men (MSM. It is important to identify subgroups of MSM in which preventive interventions such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP offered at the time of their last negative test would be considered cost-effective.We conducted a retrospective cohort study of MSM attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC during 2007-2013 with at least two HIV tests within 12 months of each other. Demographic characteristics, sexual and other behaviours, and bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI diagnoses were extracted from the date of the last negative HIV test. HIV incidence rate (IR per 100 person-years for each risk factor was calculated.Of the 13907 MSM who attended MSHC, 5256 MSM had at least two HIV tests and were eligible, contributing 6391 person-years follow-up. 81 new HIV diagnoses were identified within 12 months of an HIV negative test with an incidence of 1.3 (95% CI: 1.0-1.6 per 100 person-years. Significant associations with subsequent HIV infection were: rectal gonorrhea (HIV IR: 3.4 95% CI: 2.1-5.2, rectal chlamydia (HIV IR: 2.6 95% CI: 1.7-3.7, inconsistent condom use (HIV IR: 2.1 95% CI: 1.6-2.7, use of post-exposure prophylaxis (HIV IR: 2.3 95% CI: 1.7-3.1, and injecting drug use (HIV IR: 8.5 95% CI: 3.4-17.5.The incidence of HIV was above 2.0% in subgroups of MSM with specific characteristics at the last HIV negative test. PrEP is considered cost effective at this incidence and could potentially be used along with other preventive interventions for these individuals in more than half of the population.

  15. Concordance of gonorrhoea of the rectum, pharynx and urethra in same-sex male partnerships attending a sexual health service in Melbourne, Australia.

    Cornelisse, Vincent J; Zhang, Lei; Law, Matthew; Chen, Marcus Y; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Bellhouse, Clare; Fairley, Christopher K; Chow, Eric P F

    2018-02-27

    We aimed to describe anatomic site-specific concordance of gonococcal infections in partnerships of men who have sex with men (MSM). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data from MSM partnerships attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between March 2011 and February 2015. Logistic regression models (random effect) were used to examine the association between gonococcal infections of the urethra, rectum and pharynx. Gonococci were detected by culture at all anatomic sites. The analysis included 495 partnerships. Of the men with urethral gonorrhoea, 33% (95% CI 18-52) had partners with pharyngeal gonorrhoea and 67% (95% CI 48-82) had partners with rectal gonorrhoea. The adjusted odds of having urethral gonorrhoea was 4.6 (95% CI 1.2-17.1) for a man whose partner had pharyngeal gonorrhoea, and 48.1 (95% CI 18.3-126.7) for a man whose partner had rectal gonorrhoea. Of the men with rectal gonorrhoea, 46% (95% CI 31-61) had a partner with urethral gonorrhoea and 23% (95% CI 12-37) had a partner with pharyngeal gonorrhoea. The adjusted odds of having rectal gonorrhoea was 63.9 (95% CI 24.7-165.6) for a man whose partner had urethral gonorrhoea. Of the men with pharyngeal gonorrhoea, 42% (95% CI 23-63) had a partner with rectal gonorrhoea and 23% (95% CI 9-44) had a partner with had a partner with pharyngeal gonorrhoea. The adjusted odds of having pharyngeal gonorrhoea was 8.9 (95% CI 3.2-24.6) for a man whose partner had rectal gonorrhoea. The crude odds of having pharyngeal gonorrhoea was 14.2 (95% CI 5.1-39.0) for a man whose partner had pharyngeal gonorrhoea. These data provide the first estimates of concordance of anatomic site-specific gonococcal infections in MSM partnerships, and confirm that urethral gonorrhoea is contracted from both rectal and pharyngeal sites, and suggest that gonococci transmit between the rectum and pharynx. However, due to use of culture rather than NAAT, our analysis was not adequately powered to assess pharynx

  16. Tamil in Melbourne

    Fernandez, Sue; Clyne, Michael

    2007-01-01

    There have been few Australian studies of language maintenance amongst immigrant languages from the Indian subcontinent. The present study focuses on Tamil speakers in Melbourne from Sri Lanka or India, who are Hindus or Christians. Tamil is a pluricentric language that has been under the domination of English in these countries, at least amongst…

  17. Assessment of vitamin D and its association with cardiovascular disease risk factors in an adult migrant population: an audit of patient records at a Community Health Centre in Kensington, Melbourne, Australia.

    Ruwanpathirana, Thilanga; Reid, Christopher M; Owen, Alice J; Fong, David P S; Gowda, Usha; Renzaho, Andre M N

    2014-11-11

    Vitamin D deficiency is a global public health problem associated with increased risk of cardio-metabolic diseases and osteoarthritis. Migrants with dark skin settled in temperate climates are at greater risk of both vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular diseases. This study aims to identify the risk of vitamin D deficiency and associations with cardiovascular disease in a migrant population in Australia. An audit was carried out at a Community Health Service in Kensington, Melbourne which, services a large migrant population. Data from the clinical records of all adults who visited the medical centre at least once during the period from 1st January 2010 to 31st December 2012 was extracted. The future (10 year) coronary heart disease risk was estimated using Framingham Risk Score. The centre has given higher priority to vitamin D testing in migrants, those middle-aged, females and those with diabetes and osteoarthritis. Migrants from countries located in lower latitude regions (Latitude N230 to S230) were 1.48 (95% C.I. 1.32-1.65) times more likely to develop vitamin D deficiency post migration and 0.44 (95% C.I. 0.31-0.62) times less likely to have a >15% 10-year risk of coronary heart disease when compared to their Australian-born counterparts. Adherence to a high risk strategy for vitamin D testing was observed in the centre. Pre-migration latitude is an important factor for vitamin D deficiency (lower the latitude higher the risk) and in predicting future risk of cardiovascular disease in migrants. These findings suggest that a targeted approach for vitamin D testing, including zone of origin might better identify individuals at higher risk of both vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular disease.

  18. 9Th Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference, Melbourne ...

    Test

    The 9th Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference was held in Melbourne,. Australia, from 24 to 26 July 2009. This conference formed part of a series of conferences initiated in 1993 by the Monash University's Accident Research Centre (MOARC) in partnership ... outputs in injury presentation work. The speaker ...

  19. Hit Parade

    Backe, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath, Max Alexander Wrighton, Hans-Joachim Backe. Hit Parade. Installation. Kulturnatten 2017, ITU, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 13, 2017.......Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath, Max Alexander Wrighton, Hans-Joachim Backe. Hit Parade. Installation. Kulturnatten 2017, ITU, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 13, 2017....

  20. Hit Parade

    Cermak, Daniel; Wrighton, Max Alexander; Backe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath, Max Alexander Wrighton, Hans-Joachim Backe. Hit Parade. Installation. Demo Night, ITU, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 5, 2016.......Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath, Max Alexander Wrighton, Hans-Joachim Backe. Hit Parade. Installation. Demo Night, ITU, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 5, 2016....

  1. Hit Parade

    Cermak, Daniel; Wrighton, Max Alexander; Backe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath, Max Alexander Wrighton, Hans-Joachim Backe. Hit Parade. Installation. Kulturnatten 2016, Danish Science Ministry, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 14, 2016.......Daniel Cermak-Sassenrath, Max Alexander Wrighton, Hans-Joachim Backe. Hit Parade. Installation. Kulturnatten 2016, Danish Science Ministry, Copenhagen, DK, Oct 14, 2016....

  2. Preschool Italian in Melbourne

    Hannan, Siobhan

    2010-01-01

    Kindergarten in Victoria, Australia is the preschool year, attended by children who are four going on five, and who will go onto primary school the following year. These are part-time programs, run over a small number of sessions per week, typically for 3-5 hours per session for 10-12 hours per week. North West Brunswick Kindergarten, in the…

  3. Dirty Hits

    Clarke, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Issue 9 of the Saatchi Gallery Magazine: Art&Music is dedicated to Sex. The article Dirty Hits invited a cross-section of contemporary artists and musicians to answer: What makes a dirty hit? As one of the artists invited, I wrote an autobiographical piece to reveal how these fumbling, feral sexual experiences of my childhood landscape, along with irrational superstition and folk law inform my life and underpin my work. The article also included an artwork: Louise Clarke, Sip (2009)

  4. Perceived religiousness is protective for colorectal cancer: data from the Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study.

    Kune, G A; Kune, S; Watson, L F

    1993-01-01

    The perceived or self-reported degree of 'religiousness' was obtained by interview from 715 colorectal cancer patients and 727 age/sex matched community controls, as part of a large, comprehensive population-based study of colorectal cancer incidence, aetiology and survival (The Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study) conducted in Melbourne, Australia. Self-reported or perceived 'religiousness', as defined in the study, was a statistically significant protective factor [relative risk (RR) = 0.70, ...

  5. Art history’s history in Melbourne: Franz Philipp in correspondence with Arthur Boyd

    Jaynie Anderson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the Austrian born art historian Franz Philipp, who came to Australia and made his career at the University of Melbourne in the years after the Second World War. At Vienna Philipp was one of the last pupils of Julius von Schlossser and he brought to Australia the principles of the Vienna School of Art History. Like other art historians of the diaspora he became entranced with Australian art and wrote the first monograph on Arthur Boyd. His correspondence with Boyd (Archives of the University of Melbourne shows how European methods of art history allowed Philipp to interpret Boyd’s work in a cross cultural manner.

  6. Cardiovascular Nursing: From Florence to Melbourne.

    Thompson, David R

    2016-08-01

    This paper, based on the 2015 CSANZ Cardiovascular Nursing Lecture, takes its title from the invitation to give this lecture in Melbourne being received when the author was visiting Florence, after whom Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, is named. Her work has indirectly shaped and influenced cardiovascular nursing, which has developed over the past 50 years. Despite its relatively short history, cardiovascular nursing has made a major contribution to improving the cardiovascular health and well-being of patients and families through health promotion, risk reduction and disease prevention. Examples include cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention and chronic heart failure disease management. Challenges, however, remain, including nurses practising to the full extent of their education and training, working as full partners with physicians and other health professionals in redesigning healthcare, ensuring better data collection and being more active in advocacy and policy initiatives. Cardiovascular nursing has a strong record of innovation but should always remember that it is there to serve the public and, bearing in mind the risk of potential harm versus benefit, be mindful of Florence Nightingale's wise counsel, "First, do no harm". Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Activity Patterns and Pollution Exposure. A Case Study of Melbourne

    Marquez, L.; Smith, N.; Trinidad, G.; Guo, J.

    2001-01-01

    In recent times there has been increasing interest in modelling policies to limit impacts of air pollution due to motor vehicles. Impacts of air pollution on human health and comfort depend on the relationship between the distribution of pollutants and the spatial distribution of the urban population. As emissions, weather conditions and the location of the population vary with time of day, day of month and season of the year, the problem is complex. Travel demand models with activity-based approaches and a focus on the overall structure of activity/travel relations, not only spatially, but temporally can make a valuable contribution. They are often used to estimate emissions due to the travel patterns of city populations but may equally be used to provide distributions of urban populations during the day. A case study for Melbourne, Australia demonstrates the use of activity data in the estimation of population exposure. Additionally the study shows some marked differences in activity between seasons and even greater the differences in effect of that activity on exposure to air pollution. Numbers of cities will have seasonal pollutant patterns similar to Melbourne and others will benefit from exploring such patterns

  8. Crossing Boundaries: Acts of Citizenship among Migrant Youth in Melbourne

    Fethi Mansouri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on how migrant youth in Melbourne with experience of direct or indirect migration negotiate cross-cultural engagements and tensions between family, community and the greater society in which they are supposed to participate as political subjects. It examines whether the meaning and interpretation of citizenship in Australia allows migrant youth to act as full and active citizens with all the contradictions and difficulties inherent in acting as “a bridge between two worlds”. By voicing the personalised journeys of young people dealing with uneasy questions of displacement, identity and belonging, this paper examines the complex ways through which migrant youth negotiate and in some cases bridge intercultural tensions within a multicultural society.

  9. Late Hebrew Immersion at Mt. Scopus College, Melbourne: Towards Complete Hebrew Fluency for Jewish Day School Students.

    Lorch, S. C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates a Hebrew immersion program for Jewish day school students at Mt. Scopus College in Melbourne, Australia. Specific sections address the following: (1) the first year; (2) the second year; (3) designing the evaluation of the program; (4) results of the evaluation (including academic outcomes, student and parent…

  10. Art history’s history in Melbourne: Franz Philipp in correspondence with Arthur Boyd

    Jaynie Anderson

    2011-01-01

    The article considers the Austrian born art historian Franz Philipp, who came to Australia and made his career at the University of Melbourne in the years after the Second World War. At Vienna Philipp was one of the last pupils of Julius von Schlossser and he brought to Australia the principles of the Vienna School of Art History. Like other art historians of the diaspora he became entranced with Australian art and wrote the first monograph on Arthur Boyd. His correspondence with Boyd (Archiv...

  11. Eesti perearst Melbourne'is / Sirje Jõgi

    Jõgi, Sirje

    2004-01-01

    üle 20 aasta Tallinnas perearstina töötanud Siiri Kasesalu-Ludimois elab koos bioloogist abikaasa Jaanisega Austraalias alates 2003.a. märtsist, 2004. a. augustist töötab ta Melbourne'is Hoppers Crossing Wyndham Health Care'is

  12. A new 'bio-comfort' perspective for Melbourne based on heat stress, air pollution and pollen.

    Jacobs, Stephanie J; Pezza, Alexandre B; Barras, Vaughan; Bye, John

    2014-03-01

    Humans are at risk from exposure to extremes in their environment, yet there is no consistent way to fully quantify and understand the risk when considering more than just meteorological variables. An outdoor 'bio-comfort' threshold is defined for Melbourne, Australia using a combination of heat stress, air particulate concentration and grass pollen count, where comfortable conditions imply an ideal range of temperature, humidity and wind speed, acceptable levels of air particulates and a low pollen count. This is a new approach to defining the comfort of human populations. While other works have looked into the separate impacts of different variables, this is the first time that a unified bio-comfort threshold is suggested. Composite maps of surface pressure are used to illustrate the genesis and evolution of the atmospheric structures conducive to an uncomfortable day. When there is an uncomfortable day due to heat stress conditions in Melbourne, there is a high pressure anomaly to the east bringing warm air from the northern interior of Australia. This anomaly is part of a slow moving blocking high originating over the Indian Ocean. Uncomfortable days due to high particulate levels have an approaching cold front. However, for air particulate cases during the cold season there are stable atmospheric conditions enhanced by a blocking high emanating from Australia and linking with the Antarctic continent. Finally, when grass pollen levels are high, there are northerly winds carrying the pollen from rural grass lands to Melbourne, due to a stationary trough of low pressure inland. Analysis into days with multiple types of stress revealed that the atmospheric signals associated with each type of discomfort are present regardless of whether the day is uncomfortable due to one or multiple variables. Therefore, these bio-comfort results are significant because they offer a degree of predictability for future uncomfortable days in Melbourne.

  13. A new `bio-comfort' perspective for Melbourne based on heat stress, air pollution and pollen

    Jacobs, Stephanie J.; Pezza, Alexandre B.; Barras, Vaughan; Bye, John

    2014-03-01

    Humans are at risk from exposure to extremes in their environment, yet there is no consistent way to fully quantify and understand the risk when considering more than just meteorological variables. An outdoor `bio-comfort' threshold is defined for Melbourne, Australia using a combination of heat stress, air particulate concentration and grass pollen count, where comfortable conditions imply an ideal range of temperature, humidity and wind speed, acceptable levels of air particulates and a low pollen count. This is a new approach to defining the comfort of human populations. While other works have looked into the separate impacts of different variables, this is the first time that a unified bio-comfort threshold is suggested. Composite maps of surface pressure are used to illustrate the genesis and evolution of the atmospheric structures conducive to an uncomfortable day. When there is an uncomfortable day due to heat stress conditions in Melbourne, there is a high pressure anomaly to the east bringing warm air from the northern interior of Australia. This anomaly is part of a slow moving blocking high originating over the Indian Ocean. Uncomfortable days due to high particulate levels have an approaching cold front. However, for air particulate cases during the cold season there are stable atmospheric conditions enhanced by a blocking high emanating from Australia and linking with the Antarctic continent. Finally, when grass pollen levels are high, there are northerly winds carrying the pollen from rural grass lands to Melbourne, due to a stationary trough of low pressure inland. Analysis into days with multiple types of stress revealed that the atmospheric signals associated with each type of discomfort are present regardless of whether the day is uncomfortable due to one or multiple variables. Therefore, these bio-comfort results are significant because they offer a degree of predictability for future uncomfortable days in Melbourne.

  14. Nedley Depression Hit Hypothesis

    Nedley, Neil; Ramirez, Francisco E.

    2014-01-01

    Depression is often diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5) criteria. We propose how certain lifestyle choices and non-modifiable factors can predict the development of depression. We identified 10 cause categories (hits or ?blows? to the brain) and theorize that four or more active hits could trigger a depression episode. Methods. A sample of 4271 participants from our community-based program (70% female; ages 17-94 years) was assessed ...

  15. Beam optics on the Melbourne proton microprobe

    Jamieson, D.N.; Colman, R.A.; Allan, G.L.; Legge, G.J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This review paper summarises results of ion optics development work conducted on the Melbourne Proton Microprobe and the associated Pelletron accelerator. The properties of a field ionization ion source have been investigated with the aim of replacing the existing R.F. ion source in the accelerator in order to obtain a brighter beam for the microprobe. The electrostatic emitter lens in the terminal of the accelerator has also been investigated with the aim of improving the focus of the accelerated beam. Finally, the aberrations of the probe forming lens system have been studied and it is shown how some of these may be corrected with an octupole lens

  16. The SVT Hit Buffer

    Belforte, S.; Dell'Orso, M.; Donati, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Hit Buffer is part of the Silicon Vertex Tracker, a trigger processor dedicated to the reconstruction of particle trajectories in the Silicon Vertex Detector and the Central Tracking Chamber of the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The Hit Buffer is a high speed data-traffic node, where thousands of words are received in arbitrary order and simultaneously organized in an internal structured data base, to be later promptly retrieved and delivered in response to specific requests. The Hit Buffer is capable of processing data at a rate of 25 MHz, thanks to the use of special fast devices like Cache-Tag RAMs and high performance Erasable Programmable Logic Devices from the XILINX XC7300 family

  17. Tram-related trauma in Melbourne, Victoria.

    Mitra, Biswadev; Al Jubair, Jubair; Cameron, Peter A; Gabbe, Belinda J

    2010-08-01

    To establish the incidence and pattern of injuries in patients presenting to hospital with tram-related injuries. Data on tram-related injury pertaining to 2001-2008 calendar years were extracted from three datasets: the population-based Victorian State Trauma Registry for major trauma cases, the Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset for ED presentations and the National Coroners' Information System for deaths. Incidence rates adjusted for the population of Melbourne, and trends in the incidence of tram-related ED presentations and major trauma cases, were analysed and presented as incidence rate ratios (IRR). There were 1769 patients who presented to ED after trauma related to trams in Melbourne during the study period. Of these, 107 patients had injuries classified as major trauma. There was a significant increase in the rate of ED presentations (IRR 1.03, P = 0.010) with falls (46%) the most commonly reported mechanism. Most falls occurred inside the trams. There was also a significant increase in the incidence rates of major trauma cases (IRR 1.12, P = 0.006) with pedestrians accounting for most major trauma cases. Most cases of trauma related to trams have minor injuries and are discharged following ED management. Primary prevention of falls in trams and the separation of pedestrians from trams are key areas requiring immediate improvement. In the face of increasing trauma associated with trams, continuing safety surveillance and targeted public safety messages are important to sustain trams as safe and effective mode of transport.

  18. Socioeconomic differences in outdoor food advertising at public transit stops across Melbourne suburbs.

    Settle, Philippa J; Cameron, Adrian J; Thornton, Lukar E

    2014-10-01

    To assess and compare the number and type of outdoor food advertisements at public transit stops within suburbs of varying levels of socioeconomic disadvantage. An observational audit tool was developed and implemented to assess the number and type of food advertisements at public transit stops within Melbourne, Victoria. A total of 20 Melbourne neighbourhoods (suburbs) from across the least and the most socioeconomically disadvantaged areas were selected. All public transit stops, including train stations and bus and tram stops with a shelter were audited.  A similar proportion of transit stops in the least and most-disadvantaged suburbs displayed food advertisements (total n=203). However, some differences in the type of advertisements across suburbs were noted with advertisements for fast food restaurants, flavoured milk and fruit juice more common in the most-disadvantaged neighbourhoods (all padvertisements for diet soft drink, tea, coffee and convenience stores more common in the least-disadvantaged neighbourhoods (all padvertising at Melbourne transit stops found 30% displayed food advertisements, with those in more disadvantaged suburbs more frequently promoting chain-brand fast food and less frequently promoting diet varieties of soft drinks. These findings may help raise awareness of unhealthy environmental exposures. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. Harmonising and Matching IPR Holders at IP Australia

    T’Mir D. Julius; Gaétan de Rassenfosse

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the methodology developed by the Melbourne Institute to: (i) harmonise holders of intellectual property rights (IPRs) at IP Australia (applications for patent, designs, trademarks and plant breeder’s rights); (ii) match Australian IPRs holders to the Australian business register; (iii) identify the ultimate owners within Australia; and (iv) identify which holders are small and medium size enterprises.

  20. Exploring road design factors influencing tram road safety - Melbourne tram driver focus groups.

    Naznin, Farhana; Currie, Graham; Logan, David

    2018-01-01

    Melbourne, Australia has the largest tram/streetcar network in the world including the largest mixed traffic tram operating environment. Therefore, Melbourne tram drivers are responsible for controlling one of the heaviest vehicles on road ranging from shared tram lanes to exclusive tram lanes. In addition to different tram lane configurations, tram drivers need to follow different traffic signal phases at intersections including tram priority signals as well as need to serve passengers at various types of closely spaced tram stops. Despite all these challenges, no research has explored tram driver perceptions of the risk factors on different tram route road design configurations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate how tram drivers' safety perceptions alter along various tram route sections, signal settings and stop configurations. A tram driver focus group approach was adopted for this research involving thirty tram drivers (4 female and 26 male drivers). The tram drivers' age ranged from 29 to 63 years, with an average age of 47.6 years (standard deviation of 10.1 years), and their experience of tram driving ranged from 1.17 to 31 years, with an average experience of 12.5 years (standard deviation of 10.2 years). The participating tram drivers perceived that the raised tram tracks and tramways with raised yellow curbing beside tracks are safer lane priority features on the Melbourne tram network compared to full-time, part-time and mixed traffic tram lanes. They regarded 'hook turns' as a safe form of tram signal priority treatment at intersections and platform tram stops as the safest tram stop design for all passengers among all other tram stop designs in Melbourne. Findings of this research could enhance the understanding of crash risk factors for different tram route features and thus can offer effective planning strategies for transit agencies to improve tram road safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Observing urban forests in Australia

    E.G. McPherson

    2009-01-01

    From February 13 to 28, 2009 I had the good fortune of visiting Australia, and touring urban forests in Sydney, Canberra, Brisbane, and Melbourne. My visits were only a day or two in each city, so in no case did I get an in-depth view of the urban forest resource or its management. The following observations are based on rather superficial field assessments and brief...

  2. Innovative urban forestry governance in Melbourne?

    Gulsrud, Natalie Marie; Hertzog, Kelly; Shears, Ian

    2018-01-01

    and legitimizing the delivery of ecosystem services (ES). There are, however, many challenges to applying a socio-ecological agenda to urban climate resilience and thereby re-framing ES delivery as community and people focused, a knowledge gap extensively outlined in the environmental governance literature......A nature-based approach to climate resilience aims to challenge and re-frame conventional environmental management methods by refocusing solutions from technological strategies to socio-ecological principles such as human well-being and community-based governance models, thereby improving....... In this paper, we aim to contribute to this re-assesment of urban environmental governance by examining the City of Melbourne's approach to urban re-naturing governance from a place-based perspective. Here we focus on the city's internationally-acclaimed urban forest strategy (UFS), investigating how...

  3. Pancreatic trauma: Universities of Melbourne HPB Group.

    Fleming, W R; Collier, N A; Banting, S W

    1999-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma is uncommon, but carries high morbidity and mortality rates, especially when diagnosis is delayed or inappropriate surgery is attempted. Although the retroperitoneal position of the pancreas confers it some immunity to injury, the force required to do so often results in severe associated injuries to other organs, which may be life threatening. Diagnosis may be difficult and surgery can be a considerable technical challenge. All patients with pancreatic trauma who attended one of three Melbourne teaching hospitals from 1977 to 1998 were identified. Injuries were graded and the method of diagnosis and treatment studied. The incidence and causation of postoperative morbidity and mortality was identified. Thirty-eight patients (26 men and 12 women) were studied. Blunt trauma was responsible in 30 patients, stab wounds in five, gunshot wounds in two and iatrogenic injury in one. Injuries to other organs occurred in 30 patients. Surgical procedures were undertaken in 34 patients, resulting in the death of five and complications in 25. Complications and death are related to the associated injuries, as much as to the pancreatic injury itself. In this study, we review the experience of the management of pancreatic trauma in three large teaching hospitals in Melbourne over a 21-year period, and suggest a strategy for dealing with these difficult patients. Adherence to the basic concepts of control of bleeding from associated vascular injury, minimization of contamination, accurate pancreatic assessment, judicious resection and adequate drainage can diminish the risk. By approaching the problem in a systematic way and adopting a generally conservative management plan, complications and deaths can be minimized in these complex cases.

  4. Computational Physics' Greatest Hits

    Bug, Amy

    2011-03-01

    The digital computer, has worked its way so effectively into our profession that now, roughly 65 years after its invention, it is virtually impossible to find a field of experimental or theoretical physics unaided by computational innovation. It is tough to think of another device about which one can make that claim. In the session ``What is computational physics?'' speakers will distinguish computation within the field of computational physics from this ubiquitous importance across all subfields of physics. This talk will recap the invited session ``Great Advances...Past, Present and Future'' in which five dramatic areas of discovery (five of our ``greatest hits'') are chronicled: The physics of many-boson systems via Path Integral Monte Carlo, the thermodynamic behavior of a huge number of diverse systems via Monte Carlo Methods, the discovery of new pharmaceutical agents via molecular dynamics, predictive simulations of global climate change via detailed, cross-disciplinary earth system models, and an understanding of the formation of the first structures in our universe via galaxy formation simulations. The talk will also identify ``greatest hits'' in our field from the teaching and research perspectives of other members of DCOMP, including its Executive Committee.

  5. Validation of the Impact of Health Information Technology (I-HIT) Scale: an international collaborative.

    Dykes, Patricia C; Hurley, Ann C; Brown, Suzanne; Carr, Robyn; Cashen, Margaret; Collins, Rita; Cook, Robyn; Currie, Leanne; Docherty, Charles; Ensio, Anneli; Foster, Joanne; Hardiker, Nicholas R; Honey, Michelle L L; Killalea, Rosaleen; Murphy, Judy; Saranto, Kaija; Sensmeier, Joyce; Weaver, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Nursing Informatics Community developed a survey to measure the impact of health information technology (HIT), the I-HIT Scale, on the role of nurses and interdisciplinary communication in hospital settings. In 2007, nursing informatics colleagues from Australia, England, Finland, Ireland, New Zealand, Scotland and the United States formed a research collaborative to validate the I-HIT across countries. All teams have completed construct and face validation in their countries. Five out of six teams have initiated reliability testing by practicing nurses. This paper reports the international collaborative's validation of the I-HIT Scale completed to date.

  6. Counterpublic health and the design of drug services for methamphetamine consumers in Melbourne.

    Duff, Cameron; Moore, David

    2015-01-01

    This article is interested in how notions of the 'public' are conceived, marshalled and enacted in drug-treatment responses to methamphetamine use in Melbourne, Australia. After reviewing qualitative data collected among health-care providers and methamphetamine consumers, we draw on the work of Michael Warner to argue that services for methamphetamine consumers in Melbourne betray ongoing tensions between 'public' and 'counterpublic' constituencies. Our analysis indicates that these tensions manifest in two ways: in the management of 'street business' in the delivery of services and in negotiating the meaning of health and the terms of its restoration or promotion. Reflecting these tensions, while the design of services for methamphetamine consumers is largely modelled on public health principles, the everyday experience of these services may be more accurately characterised in terms of what Kane Race has called 'counterpublic health'. Extending Race's analysis, we conclude that more explicit focus on the idea of counterpublic health may help local services engage with methamphetamine consumers in new ways, providing grounds for novel outreach, harm-reduction and treatment strategies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Examining the nutritional quality of food and beverage consumed at Melbourne aquatic and recreation centres.

    Boelsen-Robinson, Tara; Chung, Alexandra; Khalil, Marianne; Wong, Evelyn; Kurzeme, Ariana; Peeters, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Examine the nutritional quality of food and beverages consumed across a sample of community aquatic and recreation centres in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Interviewer-administered surveys of randomly selected patrons attending four aquatic and recreation centres were conducted to ascertain food and beverage items consumed over two data collection periods (May-June 2014, January-February 2015). We selected centres in and around metropolitan Melbourne with a sit-down cafeteria and children's swimming classes. We classified items by government nutrient profiling guidelines; 'green' (best choice), 'amber' (choose carefully) or 'red' (limit). A total of 2,326 surveys were conducted (response rate 63%). Thirty-five per cent of surveyed patrons consumed food or beverages while at the centre; 54% of patrons purchased from the café and 61% brought items to the centre. More than half the food consumed from the café was 'red', increasing to 92% for children. One in five children visiting the centre consumed a 'red' item bought from the centre café. The nutritional quality of food and beverages consumed at recreation centres was generally poor, with the on-site cafés providing the majority of discretionary items consumed. Implications for public health: Community aquatic and recreation centres provide an opportunity to promote healthy eating by increasing the provision of healthy options and limiting discretionary food and drink items. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Social construction of stormwater control measures in Melbourne and Copenhagen:

    Madsen, Herle Mo; Brown, Rebekah; Elle, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Urban stormwater systems in cities around the world are challenged by urbanization and climate change, and a range of Stormwater Control Measures (SCMs) are being implemented as solutions to these challenges. We developed a conceptual framework of technological stabilization based on Social...... differences in their application due to different physical, organizational and cultural contexts in the two cities, drought being the main driver during the past decade in Melbourne (1997–2010) and pluvial flooding in Copenhagen (2007-). In Melbourne there is currently a strong integrated understanding...

  9. Sharing Music and Culture through Singing in Australia

    Joseph, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the notion of sharing music and culture as an effective platform to celebrate diversity in Melbourne, Australia. My research project "Celebrating Music Making and Finding Meaning" investigates and illustrates a context of diversity, one that promotes respect in a multicultural society sharing music and culture of a…

  10. Victualling for Future Royal Australia Navy Platforms - Alternative Technologies

    2014-11-01

    Stanek, Simon Kilner, Chris Forbes-Ewan, Phil Warwick, Terry Moon, Roger Stanley, Kate Flinders and Julia Carins. UNCLASSIFIED DSTO-TN-1379...factors, in International Nonthermal Food Processing Workshop - FIESTA 2012. 2012: Melbourne, Australia. p. 52. 11. Higgins , K.T., The 80-foot microwave

  11. Astronomy in Australia

    Watson, F.; Couch, W.

    2017-12-01

    Australians have watched the sky for tens of thousands of years. The nineteenth century saw the foundation of government observatories in capital cities such as Sydney and Melbourne. While early twentieth-century astronomy focused largely on solar physics, the advent of radio astronomy at the end of the Second World War enabled Australia to take a leading role in the new science, with particular emphasis on low-frequency studies. Today, the radio quietness of its outback interior provides an excellent location for the Australian core of the Square Kilometre Array. Australian optical astronomy has flourished since the 1960s, with the 3.9-metre Anglo-Australian Telescope becoming the principal national facility in 1974. Access to ESO’s facilities at the La Silla Paranal Observatory is warmly welcomed by all Australian astronomers.

  12. Breast milk donation after neonatal death in Australia: a report

    Carroll, Katherine E; Lenne, Brydan S; McEgan, Kerri; Opie, Gillian; Amir, Lisa H; Bredemeyer, Sandra; Hartmann, Ben; Jones, Rachel; Koorts, Pieter; McConachy, Helen; Mumford, Patricia; Polverino, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Lactation and breast milk can hold great value and meaning for grieving mothers who have experienced a recent death of an infant. Donation to a human milk bank (HMB) as an alternative to discarding breast milk is one means of respecting the value of breast milk. There is little research, national policy discussion, or organizational representation in Australia on the subject of breast milk donation after infant death. On 29 November 2013 the Mercy Hospital for Women in Melbourne, Australia ho...

  13. The Melbourne Institute Tax and Transfer Simulator (MITTS)

    John Creedy; Guyonne Kalb; Hsein Kew

    2001-01-01

    This publication is a manual for the use of the Melbourne Institute Tax and Transfer Simulator (MITTS). MITTS provides a tool for analysing policy changes. It allows us to examine the effect of a variety of policy changes on labour supply and income distribution for the Australian.

  14. Living on the Outside: cultural diversity and the transformation of public space in Melbourne

    Andrew Jakubowicz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Melbourne has been described as Australia’s most liveable and most multicultural city. What relation do these descriptions have to each other? How has the public culture of Victoria been influenced by the cultural diversity of the state? The political class in Victoria has tended to be more in favour of multiculturalism as a policy, more resistant to populist racism and more positive about immigration than elsewhere in Australia. How has this orientation been affected by the institutional embedding of ethnic power during the past four decades? The organization of ethnic groups into political lobbies, which have collaborated across ethnic borders, has brought about cultural transformations in the “mainstream”. Often the public experiences these transformations through changing uses of public spaces. This paper offers an historical sociology of this process, and argues for a view of public space as a physical representation of the relative power of social forces. It is based on research for the Making Multicultural Australia (Victoria project. (http://multiculturalaustralia.edu.au. An online version of the paper inviting user-generated comments can be found at http://mmav1.wordpress.com.

  15. Acceptability of general practice services for Afghan refugees in south-eastern Melbourne.

    Manchikanti, Prashanti; Cheng, I-Hao; Advocat, Jenny; Russell, Grant

    2017-04-01

    Over 750000 refugees have resettled in Australia since 1945. Despite complex health needs related to prior traumatic experiences and the challenges of resettlement in a foreign country, refugees experience poor access to primary care. Health and settlement service providers describe numerous cultural, communication, financial and health literacy barriers. This study aimed to investigate the acceptability of general practitioner (GP) services and understand what aspects of acceptability are relevant for Afghan refugees in south-eastern Melbourne. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with two Afghan community leaders and 16 Dari- or English-speaking Afghan refugees who accessed GP services. Two distinct narratives emerged - those of recently arrived refugees and established refugees (living in Australia for 3 years or longer). Transecting these narratives, participants indicated the importance of: (1) a preference for detailed clinical assessments, diagnostic investigations and the provision of prescriptions at the first consultation; (2) 'refugee-friendly' staff; and (3) integrated, 'one-stop-shop' GP clinic features. The value of acceptable personal characteristics evolved over time - GP acceptability was less a consideration for recently arrived, compared with more, established refugees. The findings reinforce the importance of tailoring healthcare delivery to the evolving needs and healthcare expectations of newly arrived and established refugees respectively.

  16. A model for an inland port in Australia

    K. T.K. Toh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of an inland port particular to the outer regions of Melbourne, Australia. In this study, it has been experienced that the broad use of terminology, in the Melbourne context, has been a stumbling block. In its particular context, this has provided the impetus for the development of a model for an inland port that is unambiguous. It is clear from international examples that such a development acts as a significant potential nucleus for regional economic growth, but the lack of a facilitated discussion is an impediment. This model is offered as a facilitator and a useful tool in the construction of a common understanding.

  17. Shade Sails and Passive Recreation in Public Parks of Melbourne and Denver: A Randomized Intervention

    English, Dallas R.; Buller, Mary Klein; Simmons, Jody; Chamberlain, James A.; Wakefield, Melanie; Dobbinson, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To test whether shade sails will increase the use of passive recreation areas (PRAs). Methods. We conducted a stratified randomized pretest–posttest controlled design study in Melbourne, Australia, and Denver, Colorado, in 2010 to 2014. We randomized a sample of 144 public parks with 2 PRAs in full sun in a 1:3 ratio to treatment or control. Shade sails were built at 1 PRA per treatment park. The outcome was any use of the study PRA (n = 576 pretest and n = 576 posttest observations; 100% follow-up). Results. Compared with control PRAs (adjusted probability of use: pretest = 0.14, posttest = 0.17), use of treatment PRAs (pretest = 0.10, posttest = 0.32) was higher at posttest (odds ratio [OR] = 3.91; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.71, 8.94). Shade increased use of PRAs in Denver (control: pretest = 0.18, posttest = 0.19; treatment: pretest = 0.16, posttest = 0.47) more than Melbourne (control: pretest = 0.11, posttest = 0.14; shaded: pretest = 0.06, posttest = 0.19; OR = 2.98; 95% CI = 1.09, 8.14). Conclusions. Public investment in shade is warranted for skin cancer prevention and may be especially useful in the United States. Trial Registration. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02971709. PMID:29048958

  18. Shade Sails and Passive Recreation in Public Parks of Melbourne and Denver: A Randomized Intervention.

    Buller, David B; English, Dallas R; Buller, Mary Klein; Simmons, Jody; Chamberlain, James A; Wakefield, Melanie; Dobbinson, Suzanne

    2017-12-01

    To test whether shade sails will increase the use of passive recreation areas (PRAs). We conducted a stratified randomized pretest-posttest controlled design study in Melbourne, Australia, and Denver, Colorado, in 2010 to 2014. We randomized a sample of 144 public parks with 2 PRAs in full sun in a 1:3 ratio to treatment or control. Shade sails were built at 1 PRA per treatment park. The outcome was any use of the study PRA (n = 576 pretest and n = 576 posttest observations; 100% follow-up). Compared with control PRAs (adjusted probability of use: pretest = 0.14, posttest = 0.17), use of treatment PRAs (pretest = 0.10, posttest = 0.32) was higher at posttest (odds ratio [OR] = 3.91; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.71, 8.94). Shade increased use of PRAs in Denver (control: pretest = 0.18, posttest = 0.19; treatment: pretest = 0.16, posttest = 0.47) more than Melbourne (control: pretest = 0.11, posttest = 0.14; shaded: pretest = 0.06, posttest = 0.19; OR = 2.98; 95% CI = 1.09, 8.14). Public investment in shade is warranted for skin cancer prevention and may be especially useful in the United States. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02971709.

  19. Mixed Hitting-Time Models

    Abbring, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    We study mixed hitting-time models, which specify durations as the first time a Levy process (a continuous-time process with stationary and independent increments) crosses a heterogeneous threshold. Such models of substantial interest because they can be reduced from optimal-stopping models with

  20. 42 CFR 495.344 - Approval of the State Medicaid HIT plan, the HIT PAPD and update, the HIT IAPD and update, and...

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approval of the State Medicaid HIT plan, the HIT PAPD and update, the HIT IAPD and update, and the annual HIT IAPD. 495.344 Section 495.344 Public... Requirements Specific to the Medicaid Program § 495.344 Approval of the State Medicaid HIT plan, the HIT PAPD...

  1. 77 FR 32639 - HIT Standards Committee and HIT Policy Committee; Call for Nominations

    2012-06-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee and HIT Policy Committee; Call for... Health Information Technology Policy Committee (HITPC). Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee and HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committees: The HITSC is charged to provide...

  2. Translation, reliability, and clinical utility of the Melbourne Assessment 2.

    Gerber, Corinna N; Plebani, Anael; Labruyère, Rob

    2017-10-12

    The aims were to (i) provide a German translation of the Melbourne Assessment 2 (MA2), a quantitative test to measure unilateral upper limb function in children with neurological disabilities and (ii) to evaluate its reliability and aspects of clinical utility. After its translation into German and approval of the back translation by the original authors, the MA2 was performed and videotaped twice with 30 children with neuromotor disorders. For each participant, two raters scored the video of the first test for inter-rater reliability. To determine test-retest reliability, one rater additionally scored the video of the second test while the other rater repeated the scoring of the first video to evaluate intra-rater reliability. Time needed for rater training, test administration, and scoring was recorded. The four subscale scores showed excellent intra-, inter-rater, and test-retest reliability with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.90-1.00 (95%-confidence intervals 0.78-1.00). Score items revealed substantial to almost perfect intra-rater reliability (weighted kappa k w  = 0.66-1.00) for the more affected side. Score item inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the same extremity were, with one exception, moderate to almost perfect (k w  = 0.42-0.97; k w  = 0.40-0.89). Furthermore, the MA2 was feasible and acceptable for patients and clinicians. The MA2 showed excellent subscale and moderate to almost perfect score item reliability. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a lack of high-quality studies about psychometric properties of upper limb measurement tools in the neuropediatric population. The Melbourne Assessment 2 is a promising tool for reliable measurement of unilateral upper limb movement quality in the neuropediatric population. The Melbourne Assessment 2 is acceptable and practicable to therapists and patients for routine use in clinical care.

  3. Quantum walks with infinite hitting times

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2006-01-01

    Hitting times are the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given starting vertex. The hitting time for a classical random walk on a connected graph will always be finite. We show that, by contrast, quantum walks can have infinite hitting times for some initial states. We seek criteria to determine if a given walk on a graph will have infinite hitting times, and find a sufficient condition, which for discrete time quantum walks is that the degeneracy of the evolution operator be greater than the degree of the graph. The set of initial states which give an infinite hitting time form a subspace. The phenomenon of infinite hitting times is in general a consequence of the symmetry of the graph and its automorphism group. Using the irreducible representations of the automorphism group, we derive conditions such that quantum walks defined on this graph must have infinite hitting times for some initial states. In the case of the discrete walk, if this condition is satisfied the walk will have infinite hitting times for any choice of a coin operator, and we give a class of graphs with infinite hitting times for any choice of coin. Hitting times are not very well defined for continuous time quantum walks, but we show that the idea of infinite hitting-time walks naturally extends to the continuous time case as well

  4. An empirical Bayes safety evaluation of tram/streetcar signal and lane priority measures in Melbourne.

    Naznin, Farhana; Currie, Graham; Sarvi, Majid; Logan, David

    2016-01-01

    Streetcars/tram systems are growing worldwide, and many are given priority to increase speed and reliability performance in mixed traffic conditions. Research related to the road safety impact of tram priority is limited. This study explores the road safety impacts of tram priority measures including lane and intersection/signal priority measures. A before-after crash study was conducted using the empirical Bayes (EB) method to provide more accurate crash impact estimates by accounting for wider crash trends and regression to the mean effects. Before-after crash data for 29 intersections with tram signal priority and 23 arterials with tram lane priority in Melbourne, Australia, were analyzed to evaluate the road safety impact of tram priority. The EB before-after analysis results indicated a statistically significant adjusted crash reduction rate of 16.4% after implementation of tram priority measures. Signal priority measures were found to reduce crashes by 13.9% and lane priority by 19.4%. A disaggregate level simple before-after analysis indicated reductions in total and serious crashes as well as vehicle-, pedestrian-, and motorcycle-involved crashes. In addition, reductions in on-path crashes, pedestrian-involved crashes, and collisions among vehicles moving in the same and opposite directions and all other specific crash types were found after tram priority implementation. Results suggest that streetcar/tram priority measures result in safety benefits for all road users, including vehicles, pedestrians, and cyclists. Policy implications and areas for future research are discussed.

  5. Building Energy and Cost Performance: An Analysis of Thirty Melbourne Case Studies

    Yu Lay Langston

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the energy and cost performance of thirty recent buildings in Melbourne, Australia. Commonly, building design decisions are based on issues pertaining to construction cost, and consideration of energy performance is made only within the context of the initial project budget. Even where energy is elevated to more importance, operating energy is seen as the focus and embodied energy is nearly always ignored. For the first time, a large sample of buildings has been assembled and analyzed to improve the understanding of both energy and cost performance over their full life cycle, which formed the basis of a wider doctoral study into the inherent relationship between energy and cost. The aim of this paper is to report on typical values for embodied energy, operating energy, capital cost and operating cost per square metre for a range of building functional types investigated in this research. The conclusion is that energy and cost have quite different profiles across projects, and yet the mean GJ/m2 or cost/m2 have relatively low coefficients of variation and therefore may be useful as benchmarks of typical building performance.  

  6. Negotiating Family, Navigating Resettlement: Family Connectedness amongst Resettled Youth with Refugee Backgrounds Living in Melbourne, Australia

    McMichael, C.; Gifford, S. M.; Correa-Velez, I.

    2011-01-01

    Refugee adolescents resettling in a new country face many challenges, and being part of a supportive family is a critical factor in assisting them to achieve wellbeing and create positive futures. This longitudinal study documents experiences of family life in the resettlement context of 120 young people with refugee backgrounds living in…

  7. Advances in ontologies, proceedings of the Australasian ontology workshop, Melbourne, Australia

    Meyer, T (ed)

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Iannella Ken Kaneiwa C. Maria Keet Kevin Lee Laurent Lefort Constantine Mantratzis Lars Moench Deshendran Moodley Mehmet Orgun Maurice Pagnucco Debbie Richards Rolf Schwitter Murat Sensoy Barry Smith Markus Stumptner Boontawee...

  8. Prevalence, correlates and attitudes towards sexting among young people in Melbourne, Australia.

    Yeung, Timothy H; Horyniak, Danielle R; Vella, Alyce M; Hellard, Margaret E; Lim, Megan S C

    2014-09-01

    Background 'Sexting' is the exchange of sexually explicit material via communication technologies. Despite significant media attention, there has been little examination of sexting in the Australian setting. This study aimed to provide insight into sexting behaviours and attitudes among young Australians. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a convenience sample of people aged 16-29 years attending a music festival (n=1372). Correlates of lifetime sexting were determined using multivariate logistic regression. Attitudes towards and perceived consequences of sexting were explored in focus group discussions (FGDs) with 39 young people. Forty percent of survey participants reported that they had ever sent or received a sext (48% of males, 36% of females), most commonly with a regular partner. Lower levels of education, greater recreational spending, greater number of sexual partners, inconsistent condom use with a regular partner, identifying as being nonheterosexual and risky alcohol consumption were all independent correlates of sexting. FGD participants made a clear distinction between consensual creating, sending and possessing of sexts, and nonconsensual sharing of sexts. Positive outcomes of consensual sexting included flirting and sexual experimentation, with sexting perceived as a normalised aspect of sexual interaction. Sexting is a common and normalised practice among young Australians. Our findings highlight the distinction in young people's minds between consensual sexting and the nonconsensual sharing or circulation of sexts, which is not currently well recognised in sexuality education, the media or the law.

  9. Regional development via high-speed rail : A study of the Stockholm-Mälaren region and possibilities for Melbourne-regional Victoria

    Bayley, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine, based on a study of the regional high-speed corridors in the Stockholm-Mälaren Region, the possibilities for regional high-speed rail in Melbourne-regional Victoria (Australia) to improve accessibility, and achieve regional development and balanced growth between the capital and its surrounding regions. It deals with the concept of 'regional' high-speed rail, a variant of classic high-speed rail that serves centres along regional corridors stemming fr...

  10. Melbourne versus Sydney: semiotic reflections on first and second cities.

    Massimo Leone

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban marketing has recently been adopting the concept, and the label, of “second city”. However, this concept requires sharper theoretical definition in order to turn heuristic. Thus far, it has been conceived in relation to an “ideology of ranking”, strictly related to the worldview of post-modern globalization. A more fruitful definition of “second cities” results from Charles S. Peirce’s idea of secondness: a city is second to another not in quantitative, but in qualitative and relational terms. The semiotic model of Jurij M. Lotman offers a suitable methodology to analyse this relational definition, as it is exemplified by the case-study of the rivalry between Melbourne and Sydney. A historical survey of their relation shows that the latter progressively embraced an identity of “secondness” so as to successfully market an alternative vision of urban life. Melbourne therefore provides a model for non-quantitative construction of urban distinctiveness.

  11. The Protective Function of Meaning of Life on Life Satisfaction among Chinese Students in Australia and Hong Kong: A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study

    Pan, Jia-Yan; Wong, Daniel Fu Keung; Joubert, Lynette; Chan, Cecilia Lai Wan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the predictive effects of acculturative stressors and meaning of life on life satisfaction between Chinese students in Australia and in Hong Kong. Participants: In 2006, the researchers recruited 606 Chinese students studying abroad at the University of Melbourne in Australia and at 6 universities in Hong Kong.…

  12. Consumers' health perceptions of three types of milk: a survey in Australia

    Bus, A.E.M.; Worsley, A.

    2003-01-01

    A survey was conducted among 345 randomly selected shoppers in Melbourne, Australia, to identify their perceptions of the healthiness of whole milk, reduced fat milk and soy milk and to investigate demographic influences on health perceptions and types of milk consumption. The survey revealed major

  13. Singing and Companionship in the Hawthorn University of the Third-Age Choir, Australia

    Joseph, Dawn; Southcott, Jane

    2015-01-01

    The international University of the Third Age (U3A) embodies the principles of lifelong learning and personal fulfilment amongst members. The research reported in this article focused on the Choir of the U3A Hawthorn, Melbourne, Australia and the benefits perceived by members undertaking this active music engagement in non-competitive choral…

  14. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation in Australia

    Lewis, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Australian synchrotron is being built at Monash University near Melbourne. The 3 GeV machine is well-suited to the mid X-ray region and will have nine beamlines in its initial phase. The high level of biomedical research in Australia has led to the demand for a beamline capable of supporting medical research in both imaging and therapy. The design features for a versatile imaging and hard X-ray beamline capable of operating in the energy range 10-120 keV are outlined here together with a short review of some of the science that is envisaged

  15. Adapting the botanical landscape of Melbourne Gardens (Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria in response to climate change

    Timothy J. Entwisle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Botanic gardens around the world maintain collections of living plants for science, conservation, education, beauty and more. These collections change over time – in scope and content – but the predicted impacts of climate change will require a more strategic approach to the succession of plant species and their landscapes. Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria has recently published a ‘Landscape Succession Strategy’ for its Melbourne Gardens, a spectacular botanical landscape established in 1846. The strategy recognizes that with 1.6 million visitors each year, responsibility for a heritage-listed landscape and the need to care for a collection of 8500 plant species of conservation and scientific importance, planting and planning must take into account anticipated changes to rainfall and temperature. The trees we plant today must be suitable for the climate of the twenty-second century. Specifically, the Strategy sets out the steps needed over the next twenty years to transition the botanic garden to one resilient to the climate modelled for 2090. The document includes a range of practical measures and achievable (and at times somewhat aspirational targets. Climate analogues will be used to identify places in Australia and elsewhere with conditions today similar to those predicted for Melbourne in 2090, to help select new species for the collection. Modelling of the natural and cultivated distribution of species will be used to help select suitable growth forms to replace existing species of high value or interest. Improved understanding of temperature gradients within the botanic garden, water holding capacity of soils and plant water use behaviour is already resulting in better targeted planting and irrigation. The goal is to retain a similar diversity of species but transition the collection so that by 2036 at least 75% of the species are suitable for the climate in 2090. Over the next few years we hope to provide 100% of irrigation water

  16. Water governance and the quality of water services in the city of Melbourne

    van Leeuwen, Cornelis Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Integrated water resources management (IWRM) was reviewed in the city of Melbourne. Melbourne performs well and shows a good level of commitment to sustainable solutions. The city scores highly in areas such as water efficiency, wastewater efficiency, i.e., energy recovery, and climate change

  17. What keeps Melbourne GPs satisfied in their jobs?

    Walker, Kate Anne; Pirotta, Marie

    2007-10-01

    Workforce shortages make it important to promote job satisfaction and career longevity in general practitioners. We aimed to investigate strategies that maintain and improve Melbourne (Victoria) GP job satisfaction. A postal survey of a random selection of The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners vocationally recognised GPs (N=860). Open ended answers were coded according to themes and compared between genders. Thirty-eight percent of surveyed GPs responded. The mean satisfaction score was 50 out of 70 (SD 9). Women GPs were more satisfied than men with life-work balance (pwork and intellectual stimulation. Strategies to improve GP satisfaction were increased pay, reduced paperwork, and improved administrative systems. General practitioners were satisfied with their jobs due to the intrinsic qualities of their work and workplace. Decreasing the administrative burden, increasing remuneration and improving practice supports may improve metropolitan GP job satisfaction.

  18. Pattern recognition with vector hits

    Frühwirth, R

    2012-01-01

    Trackers at the future high-luminosity LHC, designed to have triggering capability, will feature layers of stacked modules with a small stack separation. This will allow the reconstruction of track stubs or vector hits with position and direction information, but lacking precise curvature information. This opens up new possibilities for track finding, online and offline. Two track finding methods, the Kalman filter and the convergent Hough transform are studied in this context. Results from a simplified fast simulation are presented. It is shown that the performance of the methods depends to a large extent on the size of the stack separation. We conclude that the detector design and the choice of the track finding algorithm(s) are strongly coupled and should proceed conjointly.

  19. The impact of Health Information Technology (I-HIT) Scale: the Australian results.

    Cook, Robyn; Foster, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    One of role of the nurse in the clinical setting is that of co-ordinating communication across the healthcare team. On a daily basis nurses interact with the person receiving care, their family members, and multiple care providers thus placing the nurse in the central position with access to a vast array of information on the person. Through this nurses have historically functioned as "information repositories". With the advent of Health Information Technology (HIT) tools there is a potential that HIT could impact interdisciplinary communication, practice efficiency and effectiveness, relationships and workflow in acute care settings [1][3]. In 2005, the HIMSS Nursing Informatics Community developed the I-HIT Scale to measure the impact of HIT on the nursing role and interdisciplinary communication in USA hospitals. In 2007, nursing informatics colleagues from Australia, Finland, Ireland, New Zealand, Scotland and the USA formed a research collaborative to validate the I-HIT in six additional countries. This paper will discuss the background, methodology, results and implications from the Australian I-HIT survey of over 1,100 nurses. The results are currently being analyzed and will be presented at the conference.

  20. An integrated healthcare service for asylum seekers and refugees in the South-Eastern Region of Melbourne: Monash Health Refugee Health and Wellbeing.

    McBride, Jacquie; Block, Andrew; Russo, Alana

    2017-09-01

    Asylum seekers and refugees generally have poorer health than the broader Australian population. However, these groups experience a range of barriers to accessing universal health services. Generalist and specialist refugee health services have been established in Australia to improve the health of humanitarian migrant groups. This article describes a refugee health service established in a high-settlement region of Melbourne, Australia, and explores clients' experiences with the service. Client feedback was captured through interviews (n=18) and surveys (n=159). Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the service, and highlighted the value in having trusting relationships with staff, access to bicultural workers, onsite interpreting services and integrated care. The findings indicate that it is possible to engage asylum seekers and refugees through healthcare delivery that is responsive to the unique needs of this priority population.

  1. The Melbourne East Monash General Practice Database (MAGNET: Using data from computerised medical records to create a platform for primary care and health services research

    Danielle Mazza

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Melbourne East MonAsh GeNeral PracticE DaTabase (MAGNET research platform was launched in 2013 to provide a unique data source for primary care and health services research in Australia.  MAGNET contains information from the computerised records of 50 participating general practices and includes data from the computerised medical records of more than 1,100,000 patients.  The data extracted is patient-level episodic information and includes a variety of fields related to patient demographics and historical clinical information, along with the characteristics of the participating general practices.  While there are limitations to the data that is currently available, the MAGNET research platform continues to investigate other avenues for improving the breadth and quality of data, with the aim of providing a more comprehensive picture of primary care in Australia

  2. The Melbourne East Monash General Practice Database (MAGNET): Using data from computerised medical records to create a platform for primary care and health services research.

    Mazza, Danielle; Pearce, Christopher; Turner, Lyle Robert; De Leon-Santiago, Maria; McLeod, Adam; Ferriggi, Jason; Shearer, Marianne

    2016-07-04

    The Melbourne East MonAsh GeNeral PracticE DaTabase (MAGNET) research platform was launched in 2013 to provide a unique data source for primary care and health services research in Australia.  MAGNET contains information from the computerised records of 50 participating general practices and includes data from the computerised medical records of more than 1,100,000 patients.  The data extracted is patient-level episodic information and includes a variety of fields related to patient demographics and historical clinical information, along with the characteristics of the participating general practices.  While there are limitations to the data that is currently available, the MAGNET research platform continues to investigate other avenues for improving the breadth and quality of data, with the aim of providing a more comprehensive picture of primary care in Australia.

  3. 77 FR 23250 - HIT Standards Committee; Schedule for the Assessment of HIT Policy Committee Recommendations

    2012-04-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee; Schedule for the Assessment of HIT Policy Committee Recommendations AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information... 2009 mandates that the HIT Standards Committee develop a schedule for the assessment of policy...

  4. 76 FR 25355 - HIT Standards Committee; Schedule for the Assessment of HIT Policy Committee Recommendations

    2011-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee; Schedule for the Assessment of HIT Policy Committee Recommendations AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information... 2009 mandates that the HIT Standards Committee develop a schedule for the assessment of policy...

  5. 78 FR 29134 - HIT Standards Committee; Schedule for the Assessment of HIT Policy Committee Recommendations

    2013-05-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee; Schedule for the Assessment of HIT Policy Committee Recommendations AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information... 2009 mandates that the HIT Standards Committee develop a schedule for the assessment of policy...

  6. Developing Health Information Technology (HIT) Programs and HIT Curriculum: The Southern Polytechnic State University Experience

    Zhang, Chi; Reichgelt, Han; Rutherfoord, Rebecca H.; Wang, Andy Ju An

    2014-01-01

    Health Information Technology (HIT) professionals are in increasing demand as healthcare providers need help in the adoption and meaningful use of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems while the HIT industry needs workforce skilled in HIT and EHR development. To respond to this increasing demand, the School of Computing and Software Engineering…

  7. Management and treatment perceptions among young adults with asthma in Melbourne: the Australian experience from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey.

    Reid, D; Abramson, M; Raven, J; Walters, H E

    2000-09-01

    As part of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) in 1992-1993 we assessed management practices and treatment perceptions among young asthmatic adults in Melbourne, Australia. We conducted a postal questionnaire survey of 4500 randomly selected adults (aged 20-44 years), drawn from three electoral districts, of whom 3200 (71%) subjects responded. A randomly selected sample of 1642 respondents, 'enriched' by a further 433 symptomatic subjects, was invited to complete a second phase respiratory questionnaire. The questionnaire was completed by 757 subjects who underwent laboratory testing. A further 119 subjects who were unable to attend the laboratory completed an identical questionnaire by telephone interview (42% response rate). In the second phase, 16% of subjects reported 'current asthma' (group I) as defined by physician confirmation and a recent attack (within 1 year), 10% had confirmed asthma but reported no recent attack (group II) and 74% did not have asthma (group III). Inhaled corticosteroid use was significantly higher in group I than in group II subjects (45% vs 24%, Ptime. Despite national education campaigns, the majority of young asthmatic adults in Melbourne did not adhere to prescribed treatment, but continued to rely upon beta2-agonists alone with neglect of regular inhaled corticosteroid which has probably contributed to Australia's continued high asthma morbidity and mortality rates.

  8. Tay-Sachs disease: current perspectives from Australia

    Lew RM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Raelia M Lew,1,7 Leslie Burnett,2,3,4 Anné L Proos,2 Martin B Delatycki5,6 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, QEII Research Institute for Mothers and Infants, The University of Sydney, Australia; 2NSW Health Pathology North, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Australia; 3SEALS, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, Australia; 4Sydney Medical School-Northern, Royal North Shore Hospital E25, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 5Department of Clinical Genetics, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Australia; 6Bruce Lefroy Centre for Genetic Health Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Parkville, Australia; 7Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia Abstract: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD is a fatal, recessively inherited neurodegenerative condition of infancy and early childhood. Although rare in most other populations, the carrier frequency is one in 25 in Ashkenazi Jews. Australian high-school-based TSD preconception genetic screening programs aim to screen, educate, and optimize reproductive choice for participants. These programs have demonstrated high uptake, low psychological morbidity, and have been shown to result in fewer than expected Jewish TSD-affected births over 18 years of operation. The majority of Jewish individuals of reproductive age outside of the high school screening program setting in Australia have not accessed screening. Recent recommendations advocate supplementing the community high school screening programs with general practitioner- and obstetrician-led genetic screening of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals for TSD and other severe recessive diseases for which this group is at risk. Massively parallel DNA sequencing is expected to become the testing modality of choice over the coming years. Keywords: Tay-Sachs disease, genetic screening, Australia

  9. Statistics of hits to bone cell nuclei

    Kruglikov, I.L.; Polig, E.; Jee, W.S.S.

    1993-01-01

    The statistics of hits to the nuclei of bone cells irradiated from alpha sources labeling bone tissue is described. It is shown that the law of remodeling of a bone structural unit (BSU), which describes the distribution of quiescence periodes of this unit, affects the statistics of hits. It the irradiation of bone cells occurs during the whole cell cycle, the mean number of hits is independent of the law of remodeling. In this case the variance of hits has the minimum value for constant quiescence periods of BSUs (deterministic remodeling) and the maximum value for exponentially distributed quiescence periods (random remodeling). For the first generation of bone cells, i.e. for the cells which existed at the moment of the uptake of the nuclide, the mean number of hits depends on the law of remodeling. For random remodeling the mean number is equal to the mean value for the complete remodeling cycle. For deterministic remodeling the mean is only half this value. For the first generation of bone cells, changing the law of remodeling from random to deterministic increases the probability of no hits to the nuclei of bone cells. For the same mean value of hits, the difference does not exceed 13.3% of the total number of cells. For the subsequent generations of bone cells, such a change of the law of remodeling decreases the probability of no hits up to 20.4% of the total number of cells. (orig.)

  10. Venous thromboembolism management in Northeast Melbourne: how does it compare to international guidelines and data?

    Lim, Hui Y; Chua, Chong C; Tacey, Mark; Sleeman, Matthew; Donnan, Geoffrey; Nandurkar, Harshal; Ho, Prahlad

    2017-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with significant heterogeneity in its management, both within our local practice and in international guidelines. To provide a holistic evaluation of 'real-world' Australian experience in the warfarin era, including how we compare to international guidelines. Retrospective evaluation of VTE from July 2011 to December 2012 at two major hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. These results were compared to recommendations in the international guidelines. A total of 752 episodes involving 742 patients was identified. Contrary to international guidelines, an unwarranted heritable thrombophilia screen was performed in 22.0% of patients, amounting to a cost of AU$29 000. The duration of anticoagulation was longer compared to international recommendations, although the overall recurrence (3.2/100 person-years) and clinically significant bleeding rates (2.4/100 person-years) were comparable to 'real-world' data. Unprovoked VTE (hazard ratio 2.06; P = 0.01) was a risk factor for recurrence, and there was no difference in recurrence between major VTE (proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or pulmonary embolism) and isolated distal DVT (3.02 vs 3.94/100 person-years; P = 0.25). Fourteen patients were subsequently diagnosed with malignancy, and patients with recurrent VTE had increased risk of prospective cancer diagnosis (relative risk 6.68; P management strategies, including excessive thrombophilia screening and longer duration of anticoagulation. This audit highlights the need for national VTE guidelines, as well as prospective auditing of VTE management, in the direct oral anticoagulant era for future comparison. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Mediators of improved child diet quality following a health promotion intervention: the Melbourne InFANT Program.

    Spence, Alison C; Campbell, Karen J; Crawford, David A; McNaughton, Sarah A; Hesketh, Kylie D

    2014-11-04

    Young children's diets are currently suboptimal. Given that mothers have a critical influence on children' diets, they are typically a target of interventions to improve early childhood nutrition. Understanding the maternal factors which mediate an intervention's effect on young children's diets is important, but has not been well investigated. This research aimed to test whether maternal feeding knowledge, maternal feeding practices, maternal self-efficacy, and maternal dietary intakes acted as mediators of the effect of an intervention to improve child diet quality. The Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program was a cluster-randomized controlled trial, conducted from 2008-2010. This novel, low-dose, health promotion intervention was delivered quarterly over 15 months and involved educational activities, promotion of peer discussion, a DVD and written materials. Post-intervention, when children were approximately 18 months of age, child diets were assessed using multiple 24-hour recalls and a purpose-developed index of diet quality, the Obesity Protective Dietary Index. Maternal mediators were assessed using a combination of previously validated and purpose-deigned tools. Mediation analysis was conducted using the test of joint significance and difference of coefficients methods. Across 62 parents' groups in Melbourne, Australia, 542 parents were recruited. Post- intervention, higher maternal feeding knowledge and lower use of foods as rewards was found to mediate the direct intervention effect on child diet quality. While other aspects of maternal feeding practices, self-efficacy and dietary intakes did not act as mediators, they were associated with child diet quality. Mediation analysis of this novel health promotion intervention showed the importance of maternal feeding knowledge and use of foods as rewards in impacting child diet quality. The other maternal factors assessed were appropriate targets but further research on how to

  12. Data Grids and High Energy Physics: A Melbourne Perspective

    Winton, Lyle

    2003-04-01

    The University of Melbourne, Experimental Particle Physics group recognises that the future of computing is an important issue for the scientific community. It is in the nature of research for the questions posed to become more complex, requiring larger computing resources for each generation of experiment. As institutes and universities around the world increasingly pool their resources and work together to solve these questions, the need arises for more sophisticated computing techniques. One such technique, grid computing, is under investigation by many institutes across many disciplines and is the focus of much development in the computing community. ‘The Grid’, as it is commonly named, is heralded as the future of computing for research, education, and industry alike. This paper will introduce the basic concepts of grid technologies including the Globus toolkit and data grids as of July 2002. It will highlight the challenges faced in developing appropriate resource brokers and schedulers, and will look at the future of grids within high energy physics.

  13. Constructive Technology Assessment for HIT development

    Høstgaard, Anna Marie Balling; Bertelsen, Pernille; Petersen, Lone Stub

    2013-01-01

    Experience and time has shown a need for new evaluation methods for evaluating Health Information Technology (HIT), as summative evaluation methods fail to accommodate the rapid and constant changes in HIT over time and to involve end-users, which has been recognized as an important success facto...... during all the phases in the process. Thereby anumber of problems were prevented to occur later on.Thus, the CTA method and its framework are useful for evaluators and project-management in order to facilitate and support successful HIT development....

  14. Women in STEM hit by discrimination

    Randall, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Almost a third of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in Australia are considering leaving their job within the next five years, according to a survey by the employee association Professionals Australia.

  15. Tilt signals at Mount Melbourne, Antarctica: evidence of a shallow volcanic source

    Salvatore Gambino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mount Melbourne (74°21′ S, 164°43′ E is a quiescent volcano located in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Tilt signals have been recorded on Mount Melbourne since early 1989 by a permanent shallow borehole tiltmeter network comprising five stations. An overall picture of tilt, air and permafrost temperatures over 15 years of continuous recording data is reported. We focused our observations on long-term tilt trends that at the end of 1997 showed coherent changes at the three highest altitude stations, suggesting the presence of a ground deformation source whose effects are restricted to the summit area of Mount Melbourne. We inverted these data using a finite spherical body source, thereby obtaining a shallow deflation volume source located under the summit area. The ground deformation observed corroborates the hypothesis that the volcanic edifice of Mount Melbourne is active and should be monitored multidisciplinarily.

  16. Language and Language Education: Working Papers of The National Languages Institute of Australia, Volume 1, Number 1.

    Language and Language Education: Working Papers of the National Languages Institute of Australia, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This volume on language issues within Australia contains five research papers: "Patterns of Inter-Cultural Communication in Melbourne Factories: Some Research in Progress" (Michael Clyne); "Developing Proficiency Scales for Communicative Assessment" (D. E. Ingram, Elaine Wylie); "Rapid Profile: A Second Language Screening…

  17. The validation of Huffaz Intelligence Test (HIT)

    Rahim, Mohd Azrin Mohammad; Ahmad, Tahir; Awang, Siti Rahmah; Safar, Ajmain

    2017-08-01

    In general, a hafiz who can memorize the Quran has many specialties especially in respect to their academic performances. In this study, the theory of multiple intelligences introduced by Howard Gardner is embedded in a developed psychometric instrument, namely Huffaz Intelligence Test (HIT). This paper presents the validation and the reliability of HIT of some tahfiz students in Malaysia Islamic schools. A pilot study was conducted involving 87 huffaz who were randomly selected to answer the items in HIT. The analysis method used includes Partial Least Square (PLS) on reliability, convergence and discriminant validation. The study has validated nine intelligences. The findings also indicated that the composite reliabilities for the nine types of intelligences are greater than 0.8. Thus, the HIT is a valid and reliable instrument to measure the multiple intelligences among huffaz.

  18. A fast online hit verification method for the single ion hit system at GSI

    Du, G.; Fischer, B.; Barberet, P.; Heiss, M.

    2006-01-01

    For a single ion hit facility built to irradiate specific targets inside biological cells, it is necessary to prove that the ions hit the selected targets reliably because the ion hits usually cannot be seen. That ability is traditionally tested either indirectly by aiming at pre-etched tracks in a nuclear track detector or directly by making the ion tracks inside cells visible using a stain coupled to special proteins produced in response to ion hits. However, both methods are time consuming and hits can be verified only after the experiment. This means that targeting errors in the experiment cannot be corrected during the experiment. Therefore, we have developed a fast online hit verification method that measures the targeting accuracy electronically with a spatial resolution of ±1 μm before cell irradiation takes place. (authors)

  19. How I treat double-hit lymphoma.

    Friedberg, Jonathan W

    2017-08-03

    The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification for lymphoma has included a new category of lymphoma, separate from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, termed high-grade B-cell lymphoma with translocations involving myc and bcl-2 or bcl-6 . These lymphomas, which occur in hit lymphomas (or triple-hit lymphomas if all 3 rearrangements are present). It is important to differentiate these lymphomas from the larger group of double-expressor lymphomas, which have increased expression of MYC and BCL-2 and/or BCL-6 by immunohistochemistry, by using variable cutoff percentages to define positivity. Patients with double-hit lymphomas have a poor prognosis when treated with standard chemoimmunotherapy and have increased risk of central nervous system involvement and progression. Double-hit lymphomas may arise as a consequence of the transformation of the underlying indolent lymphoma. There are no published prospective trials in double-hit lymphoma, however retrospective studies strongly suggest that aggressive induction regimens may confer a superior outcome. In this article, I review my approach to the evaluation and treatment of double-hit lymphoma, with an eye toward future clinical trials incorporating rational targeted agents into the therapeutic armamentarium. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Validation of clinical case definition of acute intussusception in infants in Viet Nam and Australia.

    Bines, Julie E; Liem, Nguyen Thanh; Justice, Frances; Son, Tran Ngoc; Carlin, John B; de Campo, Margaret; Jamsen, Kris; Mulholland, Kim; Barnett, Peter; Barnes, Graeme L

    2006-07-01

    To test the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical case definition of acute intussusception in infants to assist health-care workers in settings where diagnostic facilities are not available. Prospective studies were conducted at a major paediatric hospital in Viet Nam (the National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi) from November 2002 to December 2003 and in Australia (the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne) from March 2002 to March 2004 using a clinical case definition of intussusception. Diagnosis of intussusception was confirmed by air enema or surgery and validated in a subset of participants by an independent clinician who was blinded to the participant's status. Sensitivity of the definition was evaluated in 584 infants agedclinical features consistent with intussusception but for whom another diagnosis was established (234 infants in Hanoi; 404 in Melbourne). In both locations the definition used was sensitive (96% sensitivity in Hanoi; 98% in Melbourne) and specific (95% specificity in Hanoi; 87% in Melbourne) for intussusception among infants with sufficient data to allow classification (449/533 in Hanoi; 50/51 in Melbourne). Reanalysis of patients with missing data suggests that modifying minor criteria would increase the applicability of the definition while maintaining good sensitivity (96-97%) and specificity (83-89%). The clinical case definition was sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of acute intussusception in infants in both a developing country and a developed country but minor modifications would enable it to be used more widely.

  1. Unsettling Australia

    Jensen, Lars

    This book is a critical intervention into debates on Australia's cultural history. The book demonstrates the interconnectedness of themes commonly seen as separate discursive formations, and shows the fruitfulness of bringing a combined cultural studies and postcolonial approach to bear on a number...

  2. Impact of e-publication changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code, 2012) - did we need to "run for our lives"?

    Nicolson, Nicky; Challis, Katherine; Tucker, Allan; Knapp, Sandra

    2017-05-25

    At the Nomenclature Section of the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia (IBC), the botanical community voted to allow electronic publication of nomenclatural acts for algae, fungi and plants, and to abolish the rule requiring Latin descriptions or diagnoses for new taxa. Since the 1st January 2012, botanists have been able to publish new names in electronic journals and may use Latin or English as the language of description or diagnosis. Using data on vascular plants from the International Plant Names Index (IPNI) spanning the time period in which these changes occurred, we analysed trajectories in publication trends and assessed the impact of these new rules for descriptions of new species and nomenclatural acts. The data show that the ability to publish electronically has not "opened the floodgates" to an avalanche of sloppy nomenclature, but concomitantly neither has there been a massive expansion in the number of names published, nor of new authors and titles participating in publication of botanical nomenclature. The e-publication changes introduced in the Melbourne Code have gained acceptance, and botanists are using these new techniques to describe and publish their work. They have not, however, accelerated the rate of plant species description or participation in biodiversity discovery as was hoped.

  3. Variation in outcomes of the Melbourne Infant, Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program according to maternal education and age.

    Cameron, Adrian J; Ball, Kylie; Hesketh, Kylie D; McNaughton, Sarah A; Salmon, Jo; Crawford, David A; Lioret, Sandrine; Campbell, Karen J

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program according to maternal education and age. A cluster-randomised controlled trial involving 542 mother/infant pairs from 62 existing first-time parent groups was conducted in 2008 in Melbourne, Australia. The intervention involved 6 × 2-hour dietitian-delivered sessions, DVD and written resources from infant age 4-15 months. Outcomes included infant diet (3 × 24 h diet recalls), physical activity (accelerometry), television viewing and body mass index. We tested for moderation by maternal education (with/without a University degree) and age (education and age. The intervention effects on vegetable (positive effect) and sweet snack consumption (negative effect) were greater in children with higher educated mothers while intervention effects on water consumption (positive effect) were greater in infants with lower educated mothers. The intervention was also more effective in increasing both vegetable and water consumption in infants with mothers aged education and age. Evidence of differential effects is important for informing more sensitively targeted/tailored approaches. © 2013.

  4. NIMROD Simulations of the HIT-SI and HIT-SI3 Devices

    Morgan, Kyle; Jarboe, Tom; Hossack, Aaron; Chandra, Rian; Everson, Chris

    2017-10-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI) experiment uses a set of inductively driven helicity injectors to apply non-axisymmetric current drive on the edge of the plasma, driving an axisymmetric spheromak equilibrium in a central confinement volume. Significant improvements have been made to extended MHD modeling of HIT-SI, with both the resolution of disagreement at high injector frequencies in HIT-SI in addition to successes with the new upgraded HIT-SI3 device. Previous numerical studies of HIT-SI, using a zero-beta eMHD model, focused on operations with a drive frequency of 14.5 kHz, and found reduced agreement with both the magnetic profile and current amplification at higher frequencies (30-70 kHz). HIT-SI3 has three helicity injectors which are able to operate with different mode structures of perturbations through the different relative temporal phasing of the injectors. Simulations that allow for pressure gradients have been performed in the parameter regimes of both devices using the NIMROD code and show improved agreement with experimental results, most notably capturing the observed Shafranov-shift due to increased beta observed at higher finj in HIT-SI and the variety of toroidal perturbation spectra available in HIT-SI3. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02- 96ER54361.

  5. 2009 Melbourne metropolitan sewerage strategy: a portfolio of decentralised and on-site concept designs.

    Brown, V; Jackson, D W; Khalifé, M

    2010-01-01

    The bulk and retail water companies of the greater Melbourne area are developing the 2009 Metropolitan Sewerage Strategy to provide sustainable sewerage services to 2060. The objective of the strategy is to establish long term principles and near term actions to produce a robust sewage management system for Melbourne. Melbourne's existing sewerage system is largely centralised and discharges to two major treatment plants. Several small satellite treatment plants service local urban areas generally more distant from the centralised system. Decentralised and on-site wastewater systems are options for future sewage management and could play a role in local recycling. A portfolio of 18 on-site and decentralised concept designs was developed, applicable to the full range of urban development types in Melbourne. The concepts can be used in evaluation of metropolitan system configurations as part of future integrated water cycle planning. The options included secondary and tertiary treatment systems incorporating re-use of water for non potable uses, urine separation, black and greywater separation and composting toilets. On-site and cluster treatment systems were analysed. Each option is described by its indicative capital and operating costs, energy use and water and nutrient balances. This paper summarises and compares the portfolio mix of decentralized and on-site options in Melbourne's context.

  6. Australia: Population.

    The Australian Bureau of Census and Statistics reported on 27 August 1979 that Australia's total population was 14,376,400 at the end of the first quarter of 1979. Net immigration gain during the same period was 12,700. Natural increase was 32,100--births were 57,100 and deaths were 25,000. In January 1979, Australia introduced a new immigration scheme to improve methods of selecting immigrants. Points are awarded on the basis of personal qualities and employability; an applicant must score 60 out of 100. This scheme supersedes the earlier system under which immigrants were selected on the family reunion criterion and employability. Migrants from Britain and Ireland made up the bulk of the new comers, but their proportion has dropped from 50% in the mid-1960s to 30% in early 1979. In contrast, Asian immigrants have risen from 2% to 22% over the same period. Asian immigration began in the mid-1960s with the relaxation of the "White Australia" policy which barred non-European migrants, and increased when the ban was abolished by Prime Minister Gough Whitlam in 1973.

  7. Parametric Analysis of Acoustical Requirements for Lateral Reflections: Melbourne Recital Hall Case Study

    Erica Claustro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an investigation of the Melbourne Recital Centre as a case study to define the parameters necessary for good acoustical quality as it relates to the Binaural Quality Index and determining the intimacy of the hall by its initial time delay gap. The Melbourne Recital Centre, designed by Ashton Raggatt McDougall Architects, is a significant case study, as its design was driven by the acoustic requirements of reflection and diffusion through Odeon Acoustical Software. It achieves the same acoustical quality of older, ornately designed shoebox concert halls, from the perspective of contemporary design and fabrication tools and techniques. The sleek design of the Melbourne Recital Centre successfully reflects sound waves in low, mid, and high frequencies due to corresponding wall panel differentiation in the corresponding scales, as engineered by Arup Acoustics.

  8. Australia`s uranium opportunities

    Alder, K.

    1996-12-31

    The book is a personal account by an insider who was deeply involved in the rise and fall of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC), and in particular in its efforts to bring Australia into the nuclear age. It reveals the thinking behind the Commission`s research programmes and major projects, such as the centrifuge enrichment program and Jervis Bay Nuclear Power project. It shows how politics, politicians and sensational journalism had disastrous effects on the AAEC, its programmes and aspirations. ills.

  9. Statistical properties and pre-hit dynamics of price limit hits in the Chinese stock markets.

    Wan, Yu-Lei; Xie, Wen-Jie; Gu, Gao-Feng; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Xiong, Xiong; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Price limit trading rules are adopted in some stock markets (especially emerging markets) trying to cool off traders' short-term trading mania on individual stocks and increase market efficiency. Under such a microstructure, stocks may hit their up-limits and down-limits from time to time. However, the behaviors of price limit hits are not well studied partially due to the fact that main stock markets such as the US markets and most European markets do not set price limits. Here, we perform detailed analyses of the high-frequency data of all A-share common stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange and the Shenzhen Stock Exchange from 2000 to 2011 to investigate the statistical properties of price limit hits and the dynamical evolution of several important financial variables before stock price hits its limits. We compare the properties of up-limit hits and down-limit hits. We also divide the whole period into three bullish periods and three bearish periods to unveil possible differences during bullish and bearish market states. To uncover the impacts of stock capitalization on price limit hits, we partition all stocks into six portfolios according to their capitalizations on different trading days. We find that the price limit trading rule has a cooling-off effect (object to the magnet effect), indicating that the rule takes effect in the Chinese stock markets. We find that price continuation is much more likely to occur than price reversal on the next trading day after a limit-hitting day, especially for down-limit hits, which has potential practical values for market practitioners.

  10. Statistical Properties and Pre-Hit Dynamics of Price Limit Hits in the Chinese Stock Markets

    Wan, Yu-Lei; Xie, Wen-Jie; Gu, Gao-Feng; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Xiong, Xiong; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Price limit trading rules are adopted in some stock markets (especially emerging markets) trying to cool off traders’ short-term trading mania on individual stocks and increase market efficiency. Under such a microstructure, stocks may hit their up-limits and down-limits from time to time. However, the behaviors of price limit hits are not well studied partially due to the fact that main stock markets such as the US markets and most European markets do not set price limits. Here, we perform detailed analyses of the high-frequency data of all A-share common stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange and the Shenzhen Stock Exchange from 2000 to 2011 to investigate the statistical properties of price limit hits and the dynamical evolution of several important financial variables before stock price hits its limits. We compare the properties of up-limit hits and down-limit hits. We also divide the whole period into three bullish periods and three bearish periods to unveil possible differences during bullish and bearish market states. To uncover the impacts of stock capitalization on price limit hits, we partition all stocks into six portfolios according to their capitalizations on different trading days. We find that the price limit trading rule has a cooling-off effect (object to the magnet effect), indicating that the rule takes effect in the Chinese stock markets. We find that price continuation is much more likely to occur than price reversal on the next trading day after a limit-hitting day, especially for down-limit hits, which has potential practical values for market practitioners. PMID:25874716

  11. Validation of clinical case definition of acute intussusception in infants in Viet Nam and Australia.

    Bines, JE; Liem, NT; Justice, F; Son, TN; Carlin, JB; de Campo, M; Jamsen, K; Mulholland, K; Barnett, P; Barnes, GL

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical case definition of acute intussusception in infants to assist health-care workers in settings where diagnostic facilities are not available. METHODS: Prospective studies were conducted at a major paediatric hospital in Viet Nam (the National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi) from November 2002 to December 2003 and in Australia (the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne) from March 2002 to March 2004 using a clinical case definition ...

  12. Post-arrival health screening in Karen refugees in Australia.

    Paxton, Georgia A; Sangster, Katrina J; Maxwell, Ellen L; McBride, Catherine R J; Drewe, Ross H

    2012-01-01

    To document the prevalence of nutritional deficiencies, infectious diseases and susceptibility to vaccine preventable diseases in Karen refugees in Australia. Retrospective audit of pathology results. Community based cohort in Melbourne over the period July 2006-October 2009. 1136 Karen refugee children and adults, representing almost complete local area settlement and 48% of total Victorian Karen humanitarian intake for the time period. Prevalence of positive test results for refugee health screening, with breakdown by age group (Karen refugees have high rates of nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases and may be susceptible to vaccine preventable diseases. These data support the need for post-arrival health screening and accessible, funded catch-up immunisation.

  13. Issues in nano technologies for Australia

    Tegart, G.

    2007-01-01

    The Australian Government in late 2005 created a National Nano technology Taskforce that produced a paper, 'Options for a National Nano technology Strategy', in November last year. As an input to the National Nano technology Strategy Taskforce, in early 2006 the National Academies Forum was contracted by the Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources to produce a report Environmental, Social, Legal and Ethical Aspects of the Development of Nano technologies in Australia (which is available at www.naf.org.au/symposia). The report drew on the expertise of Fellows from the four academies in workshops in Melbourne and Sydney and from discussions with other experts, and expressed its outcomes as a set of opinions to assist in developing guidelines for a National Nano technology Strategy

  14. Upgrade tracking with the UT Hits

    Gandini, P; Wang, J

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the LHCb tracking system for the upgrade on long tracks is evaluated in terms of efficiency and ghost rate reduction for several different sets of requirements. We find that the efficiency is quite high and that the ghost rate reduction is substantial. We also describe the current algorithm for adding UT hits to the tracks.

  15. Double-hit B-cell lymphomas

    Aukema, Sietse M.; Siebert, Reiner; Schuuring, Ed; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Boerma, Evert-Jan; Kluin, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    In many B-cell lymphomas, chromosomal translocations are biologic and diagnostic hallmarks of disease. An intriguing subset is formed by the so-called double-hit (DH) lymphomas that are defined by a chromosomal breakpoint affecting the MYC/8q24 locus in combination with another recurrent breakpoint,

  16. A national audit of retail lamb loin quality in Australia.

    Safari, E; Channon, H A; Hopkins, D L; Hall, D G; van de Ven, R

    2002-07-01

    A retail audit of lamb loin tenderness was conducted over a 12-month period to determine the variation in tenderness of Australian lamb. Tenderness was objectively measured using Warner-Bratzler (WB) shear force. Muscle pH and cooking loss were determined on all samples and colour was measured on a sub-sample of loins. A total of 909 midloins from retail butcher shops and supermarkets located in four Australian capital cities (Sydney, Canberra, Melbourne, and Perth) were evaluated at four sampling times (December 1997 and March, June, and October 1998). Overall, 20.3% of all midloins purchased had a WB shear force value above the threshold level of 5 kg. Generic samples from Melbourne butcher shops were similar for WB shear force on average to the generic samples from Canberra and Sydney, whereas those from Melbourne supermarkets had significantly (Plamb had a greater WB shear force (Plamb. No relationship was found between price per kg and shear force (r=0.02) for loins purchased in Sydney (n=220). Price per kg differed between months (Plamb sold in the domestic market. A lamb eating quality assurance system, based on set protocols, is one approach that is currently being investigated in Australia to ensure the supply of consistently high eating quality lamb to consumers.

  17. Occupational skin disease in Victoria, Australia.

    Cahill, Jennifer L; Williams, Jason D; Matheson, Melanie C; Palmer, Amanda M; Burgess, John A; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2016-05-01

    To describe the characteristics of patients with occupational skin disease (OSD) in a tertiary referral clinic in Victoria, Australia. A retrospective review was conducted of records from patients seen at the Occupational Dermatology Clinic in Melbourne, Australia between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2010. Of the 2894 people assessed in the clinic during the 18-year period, 44% were women and 56% were men. In all, 2177 (75%) were diagnosed with occupational skin disease (OSD). Of the patients with a work-related skin condition, 45% (n = 979) were considered to be atopic. The most common diagnosis in those with OSD was irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) (44%), followed by allergic contact dermatitis (33%) and endogenous eczema (11%). Women were significantly more likely to have soaps and detergents (P Occupational groups with the highest incidence of OSD were the hair and beauty professions (70 per 100 000), followed by machine and plant operators (38 per 100 000) and health-care workers (21 per 100 000). We confirm the importance of occupational contact dermatitis as the most common cause of OSD, with ICD being the most common diagnosis. There are differences in the causes of ICD between our group of male and female workers. For the first time in Australia, rates of OSD in certain industries have been calculated. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  18. Real wages in Australia and Canada, 1870-1913

    Greasley, David; Madsen, Jakob Brøchner; Oxley, Les

    2000-01-01

    Australia's and Canada's real wage experiences between 1870 and 1913 were distinctive. Faster productivity growth underpinned Canada's overtaking of Australia's wage levels. The globalization forces of migration and trade also shaped their comparative wages, principally by reducing wage growth...... in Canada. Immigration increased slightly Australia's real wages, but reduced wage levels in Canada, and tempered there the beneficial effects of rising productivity and improving terms of trade. In contrast, wage earners' share of national income rose after 1890 in Australia, with the productivity slowdown...... hitting chiefly rents and profits. Distributional shifts favouring wage earners in Australia, and the depressing effects of mass immigration on wages in Canada, limited Canada's wage lead before 1914, despite her faster productivity growth...

  19. Health Information Technology (HIT) Adaptation: Refocusing on the Journey to Successful HIT Implementation.

    Yen, Po-Yin; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; Huerta, Timothy R

    2017-09-07

    In past years, policies and regulations required hospitals to implement advanced capabilities of certified electronic health records (EHRs) in order to receive financial incentives. This has led to accelerated implementation of health information technologies (HIT) in health care settings. However, measures commonly used to evaluate the success of HIT implementation, such as HIT adoption, technology acceptance, and clinical quality, fail to account for complex sociotechnical variability across contexts and the different trajectories within organizations because of different implementation plans and timelines. We propose a new focus, HIT adaptation, to illuminate factors that facilitate or hinder the connection between use of the EHR and improved quality of care as well as to explore the trajectory of changes in the HIT implementation journey as it is impacted by frequent system upgrades and optimizations. Future research should develop instruments to evaluate the progress of HIT adaptation in both its longitudinal design and its focus on adaptation progress rather than on one cross-sectional outcome, allowing for more generalizability and knowledge transfer. ©Po-Yin Yen, Ann Scheck McAlearney, Cynthia J Sieck, Jennifer L Hefner, Timothy R Huerta. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 07.09.2017.

  20. Post-hit dynamics of price limit hits in the Chinese stock markets

    Wu, Ting; Wang, Yue; Li, Ming-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Price limit trading rules are useful to cool off traders short-term trading mania on individual stocks. The price dynamics approaching the limit boards are known as the magnet effect. However, the price dynamics after opening price limit hits are not well investigated. Here, we provide a detailed analysis on the price dynamics after the hits of up-limit or down-limit is open based on all A-share stocks traded in the Chinese stock markets. A "W" shape is found in the expected return, which reveals high probability of a continuous price limit hit on the following day. We also find that price dynamics after opening limit hits are dependent on the market trends. The time span of continuously hitting the price limit is found to an influence factor of the expected profit after the limit hit is open. Our analysis provides a better understanding of the price dynamics around the limit boards and contributes potential practical values for investors.

  1. Taas tublisid Melbourne´i noori : Kylie Mikkor / Sirje Jõgi

    Jõgi, Sirje

    2006-01-01

    fotol Melbourne´i Eesti Maja esimehe Arnold ja Asta Mikkori poja Kuno tütar Kylie Mikkor, kes lõpetas edukalt ülikooli ja sai Bachelor of Engineering (Aerospace Engineering) with honours 1st class ja Bachelor of Business (Business Administration) with distinction

  2. Status of the Melbourne experimental particle physics DAQ, silicon hodoscope and readout systems

    Moorhead, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    This talk will present a brief review of the current status of the Melbourne Experimental Particle Physics group's primary data acquisition system (DAQ), the associated silicon hodoscope and trigger systems, and of the tests currently underway and foreseen. Simulations of the propagation of 106-Ru β particles through the system will also be shown

  3. Developments of new generation nuclear microprobe systems at the University of Melbourne

    Rout, B.; Jamieson, D.N.; Hopt, R.; Hearne, S.; Szymaski, R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A review of the recent developments in fabricating a new generation nuclear microprobe systems at University of Melbourne, Melbourne, will be presented. These new generation systems present high spatial resolution (less than 1 micrometer) with increasing current density (in excess of 100 pA/micrometer 2 ) of the probing ion beam. Detectors with large solid angles and high brightness of the ion source of the accelerator increase the capabilities of these microprobes many fold. Some of the key ingredients of these microprobes are (i) novel magnetic quadrupole lens quintuplet probe forming system (ii) integrated fast data acquisition system to handle high count rates (excess of 100 KHz) due to increasing current density as well as large detector solid angles up to 4 detector stations. Full dead time corrected and charge normalised maps are also implemented to counter the problems normally associated with such high count rate systems. First version of these systems is presently under operation at CSIRO, Sydney. Another similar system is currently being installed at Dutch Institute for Nuclear and High Energy Physics, Amsterdam, Netherlands. A further optimised version of the CSIRO/MARC quintuplet probe forming systems is currently being fabricated at University of Melbourne. Some of the applications involve microelectronic materials, superconductors and geological samples. We will be presenting exciting results arising out of investigations into these materials. We will be demonstrating ultimate spatial resolution of the new microprobe being fabricated at Melbourne

  4. Harvesting Australia's mineral wealth

    1982-07-01

    Anderson Strathclyde plc is becoming increasingly involved in supplying equipment for the coal industry in Australia. It now has 2 subsidiary companies based in Australia: Anderson Strathclyde Australia and A B Rea.

  5. On the Hitting Probability of Max-Stable Processes

    Hofmann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The probability that a max-stable process {\\eta} in C[0, 1] with identical marginal distribution function F hits x \\in R with 0 < F (x) < 1 is the hitting probability of x. We show that the hitting probability is always positive, unless the components of {\\eta} are completely dependent. Moreover, we consider the event that the paths of standard MSP hit some x \\in R twice and we give a sufficient condition for a positive probability of this event.

  6. Simplified validation of borderline hits of database searches

    Thomas, Henrik; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2008-01-01

    Along with unequivocal hits produced by matching multiple MS/MS spectra to database sequences, LC-MS/MS analysis often yields a large number of hits of borderline statistical confidence. To simplify their validation, we propose to use rapid de novo interpretation of all acquired MS/MS spectra and, with the help of a simple software tool, display the candidate sequences together with each database search hit. We demonstrate that comparing hit database sequences and independent de novo interpre...

  7. 78 FR 29135 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting

    2013-05-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting AGENCY: Office of...: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to the National... Federal Health IT Strategic Plan, and in accordance with policies developed by the HIT Policy Committee...

  8. Cosmic Ray Hit Detection with Homogenous Structures

    Smirnov, O. M.

    Cosmic ray (CR) hits can affect a significant number of pixels both on long-exposure ground-based CCD observations and on the Space Telescope frames. Thus, methods of identifying the damaged pixels are an important part of the data preprocessing for practically any application. The paper presents an implementation of a CR hit detection algorithm based on a homogenous structure (also called cellular automata ), a concept originating in artificial intelligence and dicrete mathematics. Each pixel of the image is represented by a small automaton, which interacts with its neighbors and assumes a distinct state if it ``decides'' that a CR hit is present. On test data, the algorithm has shown a high detection rate (~0.7 ) and a low false alarm rate (frame. A homogenous structure is extremely trainable, which can be very important for processing large batches of data obtained under similar conditions. Training and optimizing issues are discussed, as well as possible other applications of this concept to image processing.

  9. All hypertopologies are hit-and-miss

    Somshekhar Naimpally

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We solve a long standing problem by showing that all known hypertopologies are hit-and-miss. Our solution is not merely of theoretical importance. This representation is useful in the study of comparison of the Hausdorff-Bourbaki or H-B uniform topologies and the Wijsman topologies among themselves and with others. Up to now some of these comparisons needed intricate manipulations. The H-B uniform topologies were the subject of intense activity in the 1960's in connection with the Isbell-Smith problem. We show that they are proximally locally finite topologies from which the solution to the above problem follows easily. It is known that the Wijsman topology on the hyperspace is the proximal ball (hit-and-miss topology in”nice” metric spaces including the normed linear spaces. With the introduction of a new far-miss topology we show that the Wijsman topology is hit-and-miss for all metric spaces. From this follows a natural generalization of the Wijsman topology to the hyperspace of any T1 space. Several existing results in the literature are easy consequences of our work.

  10. Heparin-independent, PF4-dependent binding of HIT antibodies to platelets: implications for HIT pathogenesis.

    Padmanabhan, Anand; Jones, Curtis G; Bougie, Daniel W; Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G; Wang, Demin; Aster, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies specific for platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes are the hallmark of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (HIT), but many antibody-positive patients have normal platelet counts. The basis for this is not fully understood, but it is believed that antibodies testing positive in the serotonin release assay (SRA) are the most likely to cause disease. We addressed this issue by characterizing PF4-dependent binding of HIT antibodies to intact platelets and found that most antibodies testing positive in the SRA, but none of those testing negative, bind to and activate platelets when PF4 is present without any requirement for heparin (P HIT antibodies recognize PF4 in a complex with heparin, only a subset of these antibodies recognize more subtle epitopes induced in PF4 when it binds to CS, the major platelet glycosaminoglycan. Antibodies having this property could explain "delayed HIT" seen in some individuals after discontinuation of heparin and the high risk for thrombosis that persists for weeks in patients recovered from HIT. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Eyewitness Identification Reforms: Are Suggestiveness-Induced Hits and Guesses True Hits?

    Wells, Gary L; Steblay, Nancy K; Dysart, Jennifer E

    2012-05-01

    Research-based reforms for collecting eyewitness identification evidence (e.g., unbiased pre-lineup instructions, double-blind administration) have been proposed by psychologists and adopted in increasing numbers of jurisdictions across the United States. It is well known that reducing rates of mistaken identifications can also reduce accurate identification rates (hits). But the reforms are largely designed to reduce the suggestiveness of the procedures they are meant to replace. Accordingly, we argue that it is misleading to label any hits obtained because of suggestive procedures as "hits" and then saddle reforms with the charge that they reduce the rate of these illegitimate hits. Eyewitness identification evidence should be based solely on the independent memory of the witness, not aided by biased instructions, cues from lineup administrators, or the use of lineup fillers who make the suspect stand out. Failure to call out these hits as being illegitimate can give solace to those who are motivated to preserve the status quo. © The Author(s) 2012.

  12. Mapping Progress : Human Rights and International Students in Australia

    Andrew Jakubowicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth in international student numbers in Australia in the first decade of the  2000s was accompanied by a series of public crises. The most important of these was the outbreak in Melbourne Victoria and elsewhere of physical attacks on the students. Investigations at the time also pointed to cases of gross exploitation, an array of threats that severely compromised their human rights. This paper reviews and pursues the outcomes of a report prepared by the authors in 2010 for Universities Australia and the Human Rights Commission. The report reviewed social science research and proposed a series of priorities for human rights interventions that were part of the Human Rights Commission’s considerations.  New activity, following the innovation of having international students specifically considered by the Human Rights Commission, points to initiatives that have not fully addressed the wide range of questions at state.

  13. Establishing a distributed national research infrastructure providing bioinformatics support to life science researchers in Australia.

    Schneider, Maria Victoria; Griffin, Philippa C; Tyagi, Sonika; Flannery, Madison; Dayalan, Saravanan; Gladman, Simon; Watson-Haigh, Nathan; Bayer, Philipp E; Charleston, Michael; Cooke, Ira; Cook, Rob; Edwards, Richard J; Edwards, David; Gorse, Dominique; McConville, Malcolm; Powell, David; Wilkins, Marc R; Lonie, Andrew

    2017-06-30

    EMBL Australia Bioinformatics Resource (EMBL-ABR) is a developing national research infrastructure, providing bioinformatics resources and support to life science and biomedical researchers in Australia. EMBL-ABR comprises 10 geographically distributed national nodes with one coordinating hub, with current funding provided through Bioplatforms Australia and the University of Melbourne for its initial 2-year development phase. The EMBL-ABR mission is to: (1) increase Australia's capacity in bioinformatics and data sciences; (2) contribute to the development of training in bioinformatics skills; (3) showcase Australian data sets at an international level and (4) enable engagement in international programs. The activities of EMBL-ABR are focussed in six key areas, aligning with comparable international initiatives such as ELIXIR, CyVerse and NIH Commons. These key areas-Tools, Data, Standards, Platforms, Compute and Training-are described in this article. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Literacy for Youth: Programs, Problems and Perspectives. Proceedings of the Youth Literacy Forum (Melbourne, Australia, July 30, 1999).

    Sanguinetti, Jill, Ed.; Jones, Myfanwy, Ed.

    These proceedings document some of the work and the stories of literacy teachers who work with youth outside the school system and help to paint the educational and policy context of their work. "Professionalism and Passion: A Report on Teachers Working with the Literacy Needs of Unemployed Youth" (Beverley Campbell) introduces the…

  15. Differences in health literacy profiles of patients admitted to a public and a private hospital in Melbourne, Australia

    Jessup, Rebecca L.; Osborne, Richard H.; Beauchamp, Alison; Bourne, Allison; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2018-01-01

    Background Health literacy refers to an individual’s ability to find, understand and use health information in order to promote and maintain health. An individual’s health literacy may also be influenced by the way health care organisations deliver care. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hospital service type (public versus private) on individual health literacy. Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted using the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ), a multi-d...

  16. Health information technology knowledge and skills needed by HIT employers.

    Fenton, S H; Gongora-Ferraez, M J; Joost, E

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the health information technology (HIT) workforce knowledge and skills needed by HIT employers. Statewide face-to-face and online focus groups of identified HIT employer groups in Austin, Brownsville, College Station, Dallas, El Paso, Houston, Lubbock, San Antonio, and webinars for rural health and nursing informatics. HIT employers reported needing an HIT workforce with diverse knowledge and skills ranging from basic to advanced, while covering information technology, privacy and security, clinical practice, needs assessment, contract negotiation, and many other areas. Consistent themes were that employees needed to be able to learn on the job and must possess the ability to think critically and problem solve. Many employers wanted persons with technical skills, yet also the knowledge and understanding of healthcare operations. The HIT employer focus groups provided valuable insight into employee skills needed in this fast-growing field. Additionally, this information will be utilized to develop a statewide HIT workforce needs assessment survey.

  17. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC). The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF) with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication) the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank). Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined. To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon. PMID:22287918

  18. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    McNeill John

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined. To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  19. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, BMC Evolutionary Biology, Cladistics, Mycotaxon, MycoKeys, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, PLoS ONE, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  20. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-09-14

    Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC). The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF) with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication) the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank). Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined. To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  1. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  2. Hype, Hope, and Hit in Movies

    Dholakia, Nikhilesh; Turcan, Romeo V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is part of an ongoing project to develop an interdisciplinary metatheory of bubbles, relevant to the contemporary era of globalization and rapid, technology-aided communication flows. Just in the first few years of the 21st century, several bubbles have appeared – the so-called dotcom ...... cultural field where relatively small bubbles may form. Movies represent a good arena to examine cultural bubbles on a scale that is not daunting, and where the hype-hope-hit dynamics can be observed more frequently than in most other settings....

  3. Academic posts at The University of Melbourne - 28 years of history.

    Manski-Nankervis, Jo-Anne; Vergara, Edward; Daniel, Deepa; Young, Doris

    2011-12-01

    General practice registrars have the opportunity to undertake an academic post during their training. This 12 month part time post provides an opportunity to train in various facets of the emerging area of primary care research. The Department of General Practice (DGP) at The University of Melbourne (UoM) has hosted academic registrars for the past 28 years. Over this time, some important changes have occurred.

  4. The availability of snack food displays that may trigger impulse purchases in Melbourne supermarkets

    Thornton Lukar E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supermarkets play a major role in influencing the food purchasing behaviours of most households. Snack food exposures within these stores may contribute to higher levels of consumption and ultimately to increasing levels of obesity, particularly within socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. We aimed to examine the availability of snack food displays at checkouts, end-of-aisle displays and island displays in major supermarket chains in the least and most socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods of Melbourne. Methods Within-store audits of 35 Melbourne supermarkets. Supermarkets were sampled from the least and most socioeconomically disadvantaged suburbs within 30 km of the Melbourne CBD. We measured the availability of crisps, chocolate, confectionery, and soft drinks (diet and regular at the checkouts, in end-of-aisle displays, and in island bin displays. Results Snack food displays were most prominent at checkouts with only five stores not having snack foods at 100% of their checkouts. Snack foods were also present at a number of end-of-aisle displays (at both the front (median 38% and back (median 33% of store, and in island bin displays (median number of island displays: 7; median total circumference of island displays: 19.4 metres. Chocolate items were the most common snack food item on display. There was no difference in the availability of these snack food displays by neighbourhood disadvantage. Conclusions As a result of the high availability of snack food displays, exposure to snack foods is almost unavoidable in Melbourne supermarkets, regardless of levels of neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Results of this study could promote awareness of the prominence of unhealthy food items in chain-brand supermarkets outlets.

  5. The Henderson Question? The Melbourne Institute and fifty years of welfare policy

    R. G. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    We discuss selected research contributions of the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economics and Social Research, to fifty years of welfare policy for those of work force age and focus particularly on the policy focus of R. F. Henderson, the inaugural director. Following the spirit of his 1960s poverty research, government, in the mid-1970s, doubled unemployment allowances in real terms and increased pensions by approximately forty per cent. Both income support payments were to be indexed by av...

  6. Muusikamaailm : Rostropovitsh Shostakovitshiga Madridis. Melbourne'i orkester Euroopas. Weilli aasta ka Ameerikas. Klaverifestival Manchesteris / Priit Kuusk

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2000-01-01

    D. Shostakovitshi ooperi "Mtsenski maakonna leedi Macbeth" esmalavastusest Madridi Teatro Realis M. Rostropovitshi dirigeerimisel. Melbourne'i orkestri kontserdireisist Euroopasse. K. Weilli 100. sünniaastapäeva üritustest USAs. Manchesteris toimuvast klaverimuusikafestivalist

  7. Võidupüha ja jaanipidu Melbourne'is / Raivo Rähni ; foto: Raivo Rähni

    Rähni, Raivo, 1925-

    2009-01-01

    Melbourne'i Eesti Ühing "Kodu" poolt korraldatud peost Eesti Majas, kus sõna võtsid Bruno Metsar ja Diana Ritchie, esinesid Hilja Toom, Ambrose Ritchie, Mart ja Max Saarelaht, MEÜ "Kodu" Naiskoor, Angela Kerig jpt.

  8. A Partial Proportional Odds Model for Pedestrian Crashes at Mid-Blocks in Melbourne Metropolitan Area

    Toran Pour Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian crashes account for 11% of all reported traffic crashes in Melbourne metropolitan area between 2004 and 2013. There are very limited studies on pedestrian accidents at mid-blocks. Mid-block crashes account for about 46% of the total pedestrian crashes in Melbourne metropolitan area. Meanwhile, about 50% of all pedestrian fatalities occur at mid-blocks. In this research, Partial Proportional Odds (PPO model is applied to examine vehicle-pedestrian crash severity at mid-blocks in Melbourne metropolitan area. The PPO model is a logistic regression model that allows the covariates that meet the proportional odds assumption to affect different crash severity levels with the same magnitude; whereas the covariates that do not meet the proportional odds assumption can have different effects on different severity levels. In this research vehicle-pedestrian crashes at mid-blocks are analysed for first time. In addition, some factors such as distance of crashes to public transport stops, average road slope and some social characteristics are considered to develop the model in this research for first time. Results of PPO model show that speed limit, light condition, pedestrian age and gender, and vehicle type are the most significant factors that influence vehicle-pedestrian crash severity at mid-blocks.

  9. The Rock that Hit New York

    Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Keksis, August Lawrence [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-03

    On January 12, 1975, a rock seemed to fall from the sky over New York State’s Schoharie County hitting the tractor of a local farmer, who was “preparing his fields for spring planting.” As the farmer later described the event to a reporter from the UFO INVESTIGATOR, the object glanced off the tractor, fell to the ground, and melted its way through a patch of ice that was two and one half inches thick. The farmer, Leonard Tillapaugh, called the county sheriff, Harvey Stoddard, who recovered the rock, noting that it “was still warm.” Why and how a sample of the rock came to Los Alamos is not known. However, it captivated a wide Laboratory audience, was subjected to rigorous testing and evaluation. Los Alamos used the scientific method in the manner promoted by Hynek. Did Los Alamos solve the mystery of the rock’s origin? Not definitively. Although the exact origin could not be determined, it was shown conclusively that the rock was not from outer space. With that said, the saga of Rock that hit New York came to an end. Nothing more was said or written about it. The principals involved have long since passed from the scene. The NICAP ceased operations in 1980. And, the rock, itself, has disappeared.

  10. Multiple-hit parameter estimation in monolithic detectors.

    Hunter, William C J; Barrett, Harrison H; Lewellen, Tom K; Miyaoka, Robert S

    2013-02-01

    We examine a maximum-a-posteriori method for estimating the primary interaction position of gamma rays with multiple interaction sites (hits) in a monolithic detector. In assessing the performance of a multiple-hit estimator over that of a conventional one-hit estimator, we consider a few different detector and readout configurations of a 50-mm-wide square cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate block. For this study, we use simulated data from SCOUT, a Monte-Carlo tool for photon tracking and modeling scintillation- camera output. With this tool, we determine estimate bias and variance for a multiple-hit estimator and compare these with similar metrics for a one-hit maximum-likelihood estimator, which assumes full energy deposition in one hit. We also examine the effect of event filtering on these metrics; for this purpose, we use a likelihood threshold to reject signals that are not likely to have been produced under the assumed likelihood model. Depending on detector design, we observe a 1%-12% improvement of intrinsic resolution for a 1-or-2-hit estimator as compared with a 1-hit estimator. We also observe improved differentiation of photopeak events using a 1-or-2-hit estimator as compared with the 1-hit estimator; more than 6% of photopeak events that were rejected by likelihood filtering for the 1-hit estimator were accurately identified as photopeak events and positioned without loss of resolution by a 1-or-2-hit estimator; for PET, this equates to at least a 12% improvement in coincidence-detection efficiency with likelihood filtering applied.

  11. High energy ion hit technique to local area using microbeam

    Tanaka, Ryuichi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Suda, Tamotsu; Sakai, Takuro; Hirao, Toshio; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Single energetic ion hit technique has been developed as an application of ion microbeam technique, in order to study the effect of local damage or injury to materials and living organisms. The overall performance is basically defined by those of separate techniques: microbeam formation, microbeam positioning, single ion detection, detection signal processing, hit timing control, and hit verification. Recent progress on the developments of these techniques at JAERI-TIARA facility are reviewed. (author)

  12. Recent Improvements in the SHIELD-HIT Code

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Lühr, Armin Christian; Herrmann, Rochus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The SHIELD-HIT Monte Carlo particle transport code has previously been used to study a wide range of problems for heavy-ion treatment and has been benchmarked extensively against other Monte Carlo codes and experimental data. Here, an improved version of SHIELD-HIT is developed concentra......Purpose: The SHIELD-HIT Monte Carlo particle transport code has previously been used to study a wide range of problems for heavy-ion treatment and has been benchmarked extensively against other Monte Carlo codes and experimental data. Here, an improved version of SHIELD-HIT is developed...

  13. Assessment of Natural Ventilation Potential for Residential Buildings across Different Climate Zones in Australia

    Zijing Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the natural ventilation potential of residential buildings was numerically investigated based on a typical single-story house in the three most populous climate zones in Australia. Simulations using the commercial simulation software TRNSYS (Transient System Simulation Tool were performed for all seasons in three representative cities, i.e., Darwin for the hot humid summer and warm winter zone, Sydney for the mild temperate zone, and Melbourne for the cool temperate zone. A natural ventilation control strategy was generated by the rule-based decision-tree method based on the local climates. Natural ventilation hour (NVH and satisfied natural ventilation hour (SNVH were employed to evaluate the potential of natural ventilation in each city considering local climate and local indoor thermal comfort requirements, respectively. The numerical results revealed that natural ventilation potential was related to the local climate. The greatest natural ventilation potential for the case study building was observed in Darwin with an annual 4141 SNVH out of 4728 NVH, while the least natural ventilation potential was found in the Melbourne case. Moreover, summer and transition seasons (spring and autumn were found to be the optimal periods to sustain indoor thermal comfort by utilising natural ventilation in Sydney and Melbourne. By contrast, natural ventilation was found applicable over the whole year in Darwin. In addition, the indoor operative temperature results demonstrated that indoor thermal comfort can be maintained only by utilising natural ventilation for all cases during the whole year, except for the non-natural ventilation periods in summer in Darwin and winter in Melbourne. These findings could improve the understanding of natural ventilation potential in different climates, and are beneficial for the climate-conscious design of residential buildings in Australia.

  14. Allergic contact dermatitis to indium in jewellery: diagnosis made possible through the use of the Contact Allergen Bank Australia.

    Gamboni, Sarah E; Simmons, Ivan; Palmer, Amanda; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2013-05-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old woman from Adelaide who developed allergic contact dermatitis to the rare allergen indium in her ring. The allergen was sourced for patch testing using the Contact Allergen Bank Australia (CABA), based at the Skin and Cancer Foundation in Melbourne, and posted to Adelaide. This case illustrates the usefulness of CABA in facilitating patch testing throughout Australia, especially when rare allergens are involved. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  15. Uranium mining in Australia

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  16. A Two-Hit Model of Autism: Adolescence as the Second Hit

    Picci, Giorgia; Scherf, K. Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence brings dramatic changes in behavior and neural organization. Unfortunately, for some 30% of individuals with autism, there is marked decline in adaptive functioning during adolescence. We propose a two-hit model of autism. First, early perturbations in neural development function as a “first hit” that sets up a neural system that is “built to fail” in the face of a second hit. Second, the confluence of pubertal hormones, neural reorganization, and increasing social demands during adolescence provides the “second hit” that interferes with the ability to transition into adult social roles and levels of adaptive functioning. In support of this model, we review evidence about adolescent-specific neural and behavioral development in autism. We conclude with predictions and recommendations for empirical investigation about several domains in which developmental trajectories for individuals with autism may be uniquely deterred in adolescence. PMID:26609500

  17. Early Detection of Breast Cancer and Barrier to Screening Programmes amongst Thai Migrant Women in Australia: A Qualitative Study

    Suwankhong, Dusanee; Liamputtong, Pranee

    2018-04-27

    Background: Breast cancer screening programme is seen as the best practice to detect breast cancer early. However, there are circumstances that can prevent immigrant women from attending screening programmes. Little is known about Thai migrants and the barriers to their seeking breast cancer screening when living in a new homeland. This paper aimed to discuss the barriers to attending screening services among Thai migrant women living in Australia. Methods: This study adopted qualitative approach. Semi-structured in-depth interviewing and drawing methods were employed as data collection technique with 25 Thai migrant women who had not experienced breast cancer and were living in Metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Thematic analysis method was employed to analyse the data. Results: Basing on the Health Belief Model, most Thai migrant women did not perceive that they were at risk of breast cancer. Despite seeing a breast cancer screening programme as important, the women rarely paid attention to breast cancer screening and used the mammography services provided by the Australian health care system. The barriers included the location of the services, unfamiliar patterns of health care provision, and language difficulties. Conclusions: There are many barriers that that they encountered in Australia that prevent Thai migrant women living in Melbourne Australia to pay attention to mammographic screening service provided by Australia health system. Our findings suggest that health services and interventions need to be designed more sensitive to the needs and socio-cultural context of migrant women in general and Thai migrant women in particular. Creative Commons Attribution License

  18. Current insights into the laboratory diagnosis of HIT.

    Bakchoul, T; Zöllner, H; Greinacher, A

    2014-06-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an adverse drug reaction and prothrombotic disorder caused by immunization against platelet factor 4 (PF4) after complex formation with heparin or other polyanions. After antibody binding to PF4/heparin complexes, HIT antibodies are capable of intravascular platelet activation by cross-linking Fc gamma receptor IIa (FcγRIIa) on the platelet surface leading to a platelet count decrease and/or thrombosis. In contrast to most other immune-mediated disorders, the currently available laboratory tests for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies show a high sensitivity also for clinically irrelevant antibodies. This makes the diagnosis of HIT challenging and bears the risk to substantially overdiagnose HIT. The strength of the antigen assays for HIT is in ruling out HIT when the test is negative. Functional assays have a higher specificity for clinically relevant antibodies, but they are restricted to specialized laboratories. Currently, a Bayesian approach combining the clinical likelihood estimation for HIT with laboratory tests is the most appropriate approach to diagnose HIT. In this review, we give an overview on currently available diagnostic procedures and discuss their limitations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Reduction of multiple hits in atom probe tomography

    Thuvander, Mattias; Kvist, Anders; Johnson, Lars J.S.; Weidow, Jonathan; Andrén, Hans-Olof

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of compositional measurements using atom probe tomography is often reduced because some ions are not recorded when several ions hit the detector in close proximity to each other and within a very short time span. In some cases, for example in analysis of carbides, the multiple hits result in a preferential loss of certain elements, namely those elements that frequently field evaporate in bursts or as dissociating molecules. In this paper a method of reducing the effect of multiple hits is explored. A fine metal grid was mounted a few millimeters behind the local electrode, effectively functioning as a filter. This resulted in a decrease in the overall detection efficiency, from 37% to about 5%, but also in a decrease in the fraction of multiple hits. In an analysis of tungsten carbide the fraction of ions originating from multiple hits decreased from 46% to 10%. As a result, the measured carbon concentration increased from 48.2 at%to 49.8 at%, very close to the expected 50.0 at%. The characteristics of the multiple hits were compared for analyses with and without the grid filter. - Highlights: ► APT experiments have been performed with a reduced amount of multiple hits. ► The multiple hits were reduced by placing a grid behind the electrode. ► This resulted in improved carbon measurement of WC

  20. The Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program follow-up.

    Hesketh, Kylie D; Campbell, Karen; Salmon, Jo; McNaughton, Sarah A; McCallum, Zoe; Cameron, Adrian; Ball, Kylie; Gold, Lisa; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Crawford, David

    2013-01-01

    The Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program, is a community-based, cluster-randomised controlled trial of an obesity prevention intervention delivered to first-time parents of infants from age 4-20 months. Conducted from 2008 to 2010, the program had high uptake and retention and showed positive impacts on some dietary outcomes and television viewing. Funding was secured for a follow-up study of participants two and 3.5 years post intervention (at child ages ~3.5 and 5 years). The follow-up study aims to assess intervention effects, mediators and moderators of effects, and program cost-effectiveness over the longer term. The 492 families still enrolled in the Melbourne InFANT Program at intervention conclusion will be recontacted and renewed consent sought to participate in this follow-up study. No further intervention will occur. Home visit data collections will occur approximately two and 3.5 years post intervention. Main outcomes to be assessed include child body mass index, waist circumference, diet (3 × 24-hour recalls; food frequency questionnaire), physical activity (8 days ActiGraph accelerometer data; parent reported active play) and sedentary time (8days ActiGraph accelerometer and ActivPAL inclinometer data; parent reported screen time). Follow-up of participants of the Melbourne InFANT Program at two and 3.5 years post intervention will allow assessment of longer term intervention effects, investigation of potential mediators and moderators of such effects, and economic evaluation of the longer term outcomes. This information will be valuable to researchers and policy makers in progressing the field of early childhood obesity prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A parent focused child obesity prevention intervention improves some mother obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne inFANT program.

    Lioret, Sandrine; Campbell, Karen J; Crawford, David; Spence, Alison C; Hesketh, Kylie; McNaughton, Sarah A

    2012-08-28

    The diets, physical activity and sedentary behavior levels of both children and adults in Australia are suboptimal. The family environment, as the first ecological niche of children, exerts an important influence on the onset of children's habits. Parent modeling is one part of this environment and a logical focus for child obesity prevention initiatives. The focus on parent's own behaviors provides a potential opportunity to decrease obesity risk behaviors in parents as well. To assess the effect of a parent-focused early childhood obesity prevention intervention on first-time mothers' diets, physical activity and TV viewing time. The Melbourne InFANT Program is a cluster-randomized controlled trial which involved 542 mothers over their newborn's first 18 months of life. The intervention focused on parenting skills and strategies, including parental modeling, and aimed to promote development of healthy child and parent behaviors from birth, including healthy diet, increased physical activity and reduced TV viewing time. Data regarding mothers' diet (food frequency questionnaire), physical activity and TV viewing times (self-reported questionnaire) were collected using validated tools at both baseline and post-intervention. Four dietary patterns were derived at baseline using principal components analyses including frequencies of 55 food groups. Analysis of covariance was used to measure the impact of the intervention. The scores of both the "High-energy snack and processed foods" and the "High-fat foods" dietary patterns decreased more in the intervention group: -0.22 (-0.42;-0.02) and -0.25 (-0.50;-0.01), respectively. No other significant intervention vs. control effects were observed regarding total physical activity, TV viewing time, and the two other dietary patterns, i.e. "Fruits and vegetables" and "Cereals and sweet foods". These findings suggest that supporting first-time mothers to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors in their infants impacts maternal

  2. A parent focused child obesity prevention intervention improves some mother obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne infant program

    Lioret Sandrine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diets, physical activity and sedentary behavior levels of both children and adults in Australia are suboptimal. The family environment, as the first ecological niche of children, exerts an important influence on the onset of children’s habits. Parent modeling is one part of this environment and a logical focus for child obesity prevention initiatives. The focus on parent’s own behaviors provides a potential opportunity to decrease obesity risk behaviors in parents as well. Objective To assess the effect of a parent-focused early childhood obesity prevention intervention on first-time mothers’ diets, physical activity and TV viewing time. Methods The Melbourne InFANT Program is a cluster-randomized controlled trial which involved 542 mothers over their newborn’s first 18 months of life. The intervention focused on parenting skills and strategies, including parental modeling, and aimed to promote development of healthy child and parent behaviors from birth, including healthy diet, increased physical activity and reduced TV viewing time. Data regarding mothers’ diet (food frequency questionnaire, physical activity and TV viewing times (self-reported questionnaire were collected using validated tools at both baseline and post-intervention. Four dietary patterns were derived at baseline using principal components analyses including frequencies of 55 food groups. Analysis of covariance was used to measure the impact of the intervention. Results The scores of both the "High-energy snack and processed foods" and the "High-fat foods" dietary patterns decreased more in the intervention group: -0.22 (−0.42;-0.02 and −0.25 (−0.50;-0.01, respectively. No other significant intervention vs. control effects were observed regarding total physical activity, TV viewing time, and the two other dietary patterns, i.e. “Fruits and vegetables” and “Cereals and sweet foods”. Conclusions These findings suggest that

  3. 42 CFR 495.340 - As-needed HIT PAPD update and as-needed HIT IAPD update requirements.

    2010-10-01

    ... limited to any of the following: (a) A projected cost increase of $100,000 or more. (b) A schedule... implementation approach, or scope of activities beyond that approved in the HIT planning advance planning document or the HIT implementation advance planning document. (d) A change in implementation concept or a...

  4. Hitting your foothills target the first time

    Ewanek, J. [MI Drilling Fluids Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada); Young, S. [M-I L.L.C., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    As the demand for gas increases, operators are exploring for more long-term gas reserves in the foothills and in more complex structural traps and reservoirs. The high tectonic activity in the foothills has rendered the structural geology complex, making it difficult to hit an exploration target the first time. Costly sidetracking operations are common. The use of oil based fluids is often necessary for drilling in such technically challenging environments. However, dips/structural evaluation tools such as the Formation Micro Imager (FMI) and the GeoVision 675 Logging While Drilling (LWD) tool cannot be used because of the non-conductive nature of oil based fluids. Therefore, a conductive oil based fluid was developed with the recent advances in oil based mud technology, and it is now available. This new conductive oil based fluid allows LWD tools to transmit structural information in real time and FMI logs to give detailed structural information while wireline logging the hole. The combination of LWD and FMI data plus a conductive oil based fluid makes it possible to gather better structural information while drilling. This minimizes sidetracks and leads to a better understanding of the structural geology in that field. It was concluded that the use of this technology well enable better pre-planning on future well sites and will make it possible to reduce costs associated with drilling and oilfield operations in the foothills. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs.

  5. The first neutron beam hits EAR2

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    On 25 July 2014, about a year after construction work began, the Experimental Area 2 (EAR2) of CERN’s neutron facility n_TOF recorded its first beam. Unique in many aspects, EAR2 will start its rich programme of experimental physics this autumn.   The last part of the EAR2 beamline: the neutrons come from the underground target and reach the top of the beamline, where they hit the samples. Built about 20 metres above the neutron production target, EAR2 is in fact a bunker connected to the n_TOF underground facilities via a duct 80 cm in diameter, where the beamline is installed. The feet of the bunker support pillars are located on the concrete structure of the n_TOF tunnel and part of the structure lies above the old ISR building. A beam dump located on the roof of the building completes the structure. Neutrons are used by physicists to study neutron-induced reactions with applications in a number of fields, including nuclear waste transmutation, nuclear technology, nuclear astrop...

  6. Evaluation of radioxenon releases in Australia using atmospheric dispersion modelling tools

    Tinker, Rick; Orr, Blake; Grzechnik, Marcus; Hoffmann, Emmy; Saey, Paul; Solomon, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The origin of a series of atmospheric radioxenon events detected at the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) International Monitoring System site in Melbourne, Australia, between November 2008 and February 2009 was investigated. Backward tracking analyses indicated that the events were consistent with releases associated with hot commission testing of the Australian Nuclear Science Technology Organisation (ANSTO) radiopharmaceutical production facility in Sydney, Australia. Forward dispersion analyses were used to estimate release magnitudes and transport times. The estimated 133 Xe release magnitude of the largest event (between 0.2 and 34 TBq over a 2 d window), was in close agreement with the stack emission releases estimated by the facility for this time period (between 0.5 and 2 TBq). Modelling of irradiation conditions and theoretical radioxenon emission rates were undertaken and provided further evidence that the Melbourne detections originated from this radiopharmaceutical production facility. These findings do not have public health implications. This is the first comprehensive study of atmospheric radioxenon measurements and releases in Australia.

  7. Innovative urban forestry governance in Melbourne?: Investigating "green placemaking" as a nature-based solution.

    Gulsrud, Natalie Marie; Hertzog, Kelly; Shears, Ian

    2018-02-01

    A nature-based approach to climate resilience aims to challenge and re-frame conventional environmental management methods by refocusing solutions from technological strategies to socio-ecological principles such as human well-being and community-based governance models, thereby improving and legitimizing the delivery of ecosystem services (ES). There are, however, many challenges to applying a socio-ecological agenda to urban climate resilience and thereby re-framing ES delivery as community and people focused, a knowledge gap extensively outlined in the environmental governance literature. In this paper, we aim to contribute to this re-assesment of urban environmental governance by examining the City of Melbourne's approach to urban re-naturing governance from a place-based perspective. Here we focus on the city's internationally-acclaimed urban forest strategy (UFS), investigating how and to which extent the governance arrangements embedded within the UFS draw strength from diverse perspectives and allow for institutional arrangements that support "situated" reflexive decision making and co-creation. We find that Melbourne's UFS governance process fosters green placemaking by re-focusing climate adaptation solutions from technological strategies to situated socio-ecological principles such as human well-being and community-based decision making. In this sense, this case provides valuable insight for the broader UGI governance field regarding the opportunities and challenges associated with a socio-cultural approach to urban re-naturing and ES delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Personality as a risk factor in large bowel cancer: data from the Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study.

    Kune, G A; Kune, S; Watson, L F; Bahnson, C B

    1991-02-01

    In a case control study which formed one arm of a large, population-based investigation of colorectal cancer incidence, aetiology and survival. 'The Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study', among others, 22 psychosocially orientated questions were asked by personal interview of 637 histologically confirmed new cases of colorectal cancer and 714 age/sex frequency matched community controls, from Melbourne (population 2.81 million). Self-reported childhood or adult life 'unhappiness' was statistically significantly more common among the cancer cases, while 'unhappiness with retirement' was similarly distributed among cases and controls. Questions which were formulated to test a particular personality profile as a cancer risk, and which included the elements of denial and repression of anger and of other negative emotions, a commitment to prevailing social norms resulting in the external appearance of a 'nice' or 'good' person, a suppression of reactions which may offend others and the avoidance of conflict, showed a statistically significant discrimination between cases and controls. The risk of colorectal cancer with respect to this model was independent of the previously found risk factors of diet, beer intake, and family history of colorectal cancer, and was also independent of other potential confounding factors of socioeconomic level, marital status, religion and country of birth. Although the results must be interpreted with caution, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that this personality type may play a role in the clinical expression of colorectal cancer and merits further study.

  9. Mothers' perceptions of Melbourne InFANT Program: informing future practice.

    Lunn, Priscilla L; Roberts, Sanae; Spence, Alison; Hesketh, Kylie D; Campbell, Karen J

    2016-09-01

    Intervention programs to prevent childhood obesity are more likely to be successful when mothers are involved and engaged. Yet programs that involve mothers do not often employ process evaluation to identify aspects of the intervention that participants enjoyed or viewed as useful. The aims of this study were to describe how participants of the Melbourne InFANT Program-an early childhood obesity prevention intervention-engaged in the program and perceived its usefulness. Process evaluation data were collected at multiple time points during and after the intervention, using mixed methods drawing upon both quantitative and qualitative data. Results from short surveys (n = 271) and interview transcripts (n = 26) revealed that the Melbourne InFANT Program was perceived as useful and relevant by most (82-93%) participants. The formats through which the knowledge and skills were delivered were considered concise and effective, and aspects considered particularly useful included group sessions and advice on practical strategies to minimize stress around mealtimes. Findings from this study are important to inform future practice and the development of interventions which are well received by participants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Nutritional vulnerability seen within asylum seekers in Australia.

    O'Reilly, Sharleen; O'Shea, Tess; Bhusumane, Sibusiso

    2012-04-01

    To examine the extent of nutritional vulnerability seen in a cohort of asylum seekers in Australia. Twenty-one asylum seekers (15 males, 6 females) that used a food bank were interviewed over a 6 week period at the Melbourne based Asylum Seeker Resource Centre about foods consumed in the previous 24-h and any non food bank foods obtained. A basket audit was conducted after participants accessed the food bank on the day of interview, Participants obtained significantly less than the minimum requirements for the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating in the vegetables and legumes (P bank, their primary or sole food source. A high level of nutritional vulnerability was seen in this cohort due to their inability to meet minimum nutritional requirements from their primary food access point. Health professionals working with asylum seeker populations need to be aware of this issue and the resulting potential for longer term ill health as a consequence.

  11. Loneliness and life satisfaction in Japan and Australia.

    Schumaker, J F; Shea, J D; Monfries, M M; Groth-Marnat, G

    1993-01-01

    We examined the relationship between loneliness and life satisfaction in 121 residents of Fukoku, Japan, and 139 residents of Melbourne, Australia, using the Satisfaction With Life Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1983) and the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale (Russell, Peplau, & Cutrona, 1980). Australian subjects reported significantly less loneliness and significantly greater life satisfaction than Japanese subjects. A high inverse correlation was found between loneliness and life satisfaction in Australian subjects, with a much smaller inverse relationship observed among the Japanese, suggesting that loneliness in Japanese subjects did not emotionally translate into life dissatisfaction as it did in Australian subjects. Instead, the experience of loneliness in Japanese individuals may remain largely independent of general life satisfaction.

  12. Indoor radon measurements in Adelaide, South Australia

    Paix, D.

    1989-01-01

    In 1986 a study of radon levels in homes in Melbourne was made, using activated charcoal to adsorb the gas from indoor air. Cups containing 25g of activated charcoal were exposed for periods of nominally 7 days. The cups were sealed and the accumulated activity was measured by gamma counting. Cup activity was related to ambient radon concentration by calibrations done in the Australian Radiation Laboratory's radon reference chamber. This work was continued in Adelaide, South Australia (S.A.) between July and November 1986 using the same methods. Cups were exposed in their homes by 213 volunteers from the staff of the S.A. Institute of Technology and the S.A. Health Commission. The median concentration of radon in air was 10 Bq/m 3 , with 90% of values below 35 Bq/m 3 , and 100% below 75 Bq/m 3 . The lower bound of the distribution is poorly defined because of inadequate counting statistics. 4 refs., 6 figs

  13. Energy in Australia 2011

    Cuevas-Cubria, C.; Schultz, A.; Petchey, R.; Beaini, F.; New, R.

    2011-04-01

    Securing access to affordable, reliable and clean energy is one of the great challenges facing governments around the world. The Australian Government is committed to ensuring the security of Australia's domestic energy systems as a fundamental part of Australia's social and economic prosperity. Energy in Australia 2011 is a key reference for anyone with an interest in Australian energy issues. It provides a detailed overview of energy in Australia from production to consumption, and serves as a useful resource to inform industry, government and the community.

  14. The Status of Industrial Ecology in Australia: Barriers and Enablers

    Glen D. Corder

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on current international industrial ecology thinking and experiences with Australian initiatives, this article critically overviews the current status of industrial ecology in Australia and examines the barriers and potential strategies to realise greater uptake and application of the concept. The analysis is conducted across three categories: heavy industrial areas (including Kwinana and Gladstone, mixed industrial parks (Wagga Wagga and Port Melbourne, and waste exchange networks, and identifies the past and future significance of seven different types of barriers—regulation, information, community, economic, technical, cooperation and trust, commitment to sustainable development—for each of the three categories. The outcomes from this analysis highlight that regulation, information, and economic barriers for heavy industrial area and mixed industrial parks, and economic and technical barriers for waste exchange networks are the current and future focus for industrial ecology applications in Australia. These findings appear to be consistent with recently published frameworks and learnings. The authors propose key questions that could enhance greater adoption of industrial ecology applications in Australia and acknowledge that international research and experiences, while partly providing answers to these questions, need to be adapted and refined for the Australian context.

  15. Implementation of a rapid HIT immunoassay at a university hospital - Retrospective analysis of HIT laboratory orders in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    Black, Anne; Heimerl, Susanne; Oertli, Linnéa; Wilczek, Wolf; Greinacher, Andreas; Spannagl, Michael; Herr, Wolfgang; Hart, Christina

    2017-10-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare cause of thrombocytopenia and a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction. Clinical overdiagnosis of HIT results in costly laboratory tests and anticoagulation. Criteria and algorithms for diagnosis are established, but their translation into clinical practice is still challenging. In a retrospective approach we studied all HIT related laboratory test requests within four years and evaluated data before (1st period, 24month) and after (2nd period, 24month) replacing particle gel immunoassay (PaGIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) by a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). HIT was confirmed by heparin-induced platelet activation (HIPA) test. Clinical pretest probability for HIT using an implemented simplified 4Ts score and platelet count were evaluated. Costs for laboratory tests and alternative anticoagulation were calculated. In 1850 patients with suspected HIT, 2327 laboratory orders were performed. In 87.2% of these orders an intermediate/high simplified 4Ts score was found. Thrombocytopenia was present in 87.1%. After replacing PaGIA and ELISA by CLIA the number of immunological and functional laboratory tests was reduced by 38.2%. The number of positive HIT immunoassays declined from 22.6% to 6.0%, while the number of positive HIPA tests among positive immunological tests increased by 19%. Altogether, acute HIT was confirmed in 59 patients. A decline in the use of alternative anticoagulants was observed in the 2nd period. Our study shows that in a university hospital setting HIT is well-known, but diagnosis requires a precise laboratory confirmation. Replacing PaGIA and ELISA by CLIA did not influence laboratory order behavior but results in reduced overall costs for laboratory diagnostics and alternative anticoagulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast milk donation after neonatal death in Australia: a report.

    Carroll, Katherine E; Lenne, Brydan S; McEgan, Kerri; Opie, Gillian; Amir, Lisa H; Bredemeyer, Sandra; Hartmann, Ben; Jones, Rachel; Koorts, Pieter; McConachy, Helen; Mumford, Patricia; Polverino, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Lactation and breast milk can hold great value and meaning for grieving mothers who have experienced a recent death of an infant. Donation to a human milk bank (HMB) as an alternative to discarding breast milk is one means of respecting the value of breast milk. There is little research, national policy discussion, or organizational representation in Australia on the subject of breast milk donation after infant death. On 29 November 2013 the Mercy Hospital for Women in Melbourne, Australia hosted Australia's first National Stakeholder Meeting (NSM) on the topic of milk donation after neonatal death. The NSM drew together representatives from Australian HMBs, neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) currently using donor human milk, and Australia's chief NICU parent support organization. The NSM was video-recorded and transcribed, and analyzed thematically by researchers. This article reports the seven dominant themes discussed by stakeholders during the NSM: the spectrum of women's lactation and donation experiences after infant death; the roles of the HMB and NICU in meeting the needs of the bereaved donor; how bereaved mothers' lactation autonomy may interface with a HMB's donation guidelines; how milk donation may be discussed with bereaved mothers; the variation between four categories of milk donation after neonatal death; the impact of limited resources and few HMBs on providing donation programs for bereaved mothers in Australia. This article provides evidence from researchers and practitioners that can assist HMB staff in refining their bank's policy on milk donation after infant death, and provides national policy makers with key considerations to support lactation, human milk banking, and bereavement services nation-wide.

  17. Do pigeons prefer alternatives that include near-hit outcomes?

    Stagner, Jessica P; Case, Jacob P; Sticklen, Mary F; Duncan, Amanda K; Zentall, Thomas R

    2015-07-01

    Pigeons show suboptimal choice on a gambling-like task similar to that shown by humans. Humans also show a preference for gambles in which there are near hits (losses that come close to winning). In the present research, we asked if pigeons would show a preference for alternatives with near-hit-like trials. In Experiment 1, we included an alternative that presented a near hit, in which a stimulus associated with reinforcement (a presumed conditioned reinforcer) changed to a stimulus associated with the absence of reinforcement (a presumed conditioned inhibitor). The pigeons tended to avoid this alternative. In Experiment 2, we varied the duration of the presumed conditioned reinforcer (2 vs. 8 s) that changed to a presumed conditioned inhibitor (8 vs. 2 s) and found that the longer the conditioned reinforcer was presented, the more the pigeons avoided it. In Experiment 3, the near-hit alternative involved an ambiguous stimulus for 8 s that changed to a presumed conditioned reinforcer (or a presumed conditioned inhibitor) for 2 s, but the pigeons still avoided it. In Experiment 4, we controlled for the duration of the conditioned reinforcer by presenting it first for 2 s followed by the ambiguous stimulus for 8 s. Once again, the pigeons avoided the alternative with the near-hit trials. In all 4 experiments, the pigeons tended to avoid alternatives that provided near-hit-like trials. We concluded that humans may be attracted to near-hit trials because near-hit trials give them the illusion of control, whereas this does not appear to be a factor for pigeons. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Combined hit theory-microdosimetric explanation of cellular radiobiological action

    Bond, V.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1983-01-01

    Hit theory is combined with microdosimetry in a stochastic approach that explains the observed responses of cell populations exposed in radiation fields of different qualities. The central thesis is that to expose a population of cells in a low-level radiation field is to subject the cells to the potential for interaction with charged particles in the vicinity of the cells, quantifiable in terms of the charged particle fluence theta. When such an interaction occurs there is a resulting stochastic transfer of energy to a critical volume (CV) of cross section sigma, within the cell(s). The severity of cell injury is dependent on the amount of energy thus imparted, or the hit size. If the severity is above some minimal level, there is a non-zero probability that the injury will result in a quantal effect (e.g., a mutational or carcinogenic initial event, cell transformation). A microdosimetric proportional counter, viewed here as a phantom cell CV that permits measurements not possible in the living cell, is used to determine the incidence of hit cells and the spectrum of hit sizes. Each hit is then weighted on the basis of an empirically-determined function that provides the fraction of cells responding quantally, as a function of hit size. The sum of the hits so weighted provides the incidence of quantally-responding cells, for any amount of exposure theta in a radiation field of any quality or mixture qualities. The hit size weighting function for pink mutations in Tradescantia is discussed, as are its implications in terms of a replacement for RBE and dose equivalent. 14 references, 9 figures

  19. A fast DSP-based calorimeter hit scanning system

    Sekikawa, S.; Arai, I.; Suzuki, A.; Watanabe, A.; Marlow, D.R.; Mindas, C.R.; Wixted, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    A custom made digital signal processor (DSP) based system has been developed to scan calorimeter hits read by a 32-channel FASTBUS waveform recorder board. The scanner system identifies hit calorimeter elements by surveying their discriminated outputs. This information is used to generate a list of addresses, which guides the read-out process. The system is described and measurements of the scan times are given. (orig.)

  20. Australia: a matter of Queues and As

    NONE

    2007-05-15

    Australia has been very much in the news recently, with ship queues at port terminals and storms hitting the Hunter Valley, flooding coal yards and rail links. In December 2006 a 'capacity balancing system' (CBS) introduced by Port Waratah Coal Services to solve queuing problems in Newcastle ports in mid-2004 was discontinued but then the queues started to grow again. A new CBS was introduced and was beginning to take effect when storms struck New South Wales. Port Dalrymple Coal Services has a queue management system but nevertheless there were 58 ships waiting in Dalrymple Bay and Hay Point in late June. A number of coal terminals are undergoing expansion in an attempt to solve the situation. 4 photos.

  1. Rare transformation to double hit lymphoma in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.

    Okolo, Onyemaechi N; Johnson, Ariel C; Yun, Seongseok; Arnold, Stacy J; Anwer, Faiz

    2017-08-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a lymphoproliferative lymphoma that is characterized by monoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) protein and bone marrow infiltration. Its incidence is rare and rarer still is its ability to transform to a B-cell lymphoma, particularly the aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which bodes a poor prognosis. When transformation includes mutations of MYC, BCL-2 and/or BCL-6, it is known as a 'double hit' or 'triple hit' lymphoma respectively. This paper presents a rare case of WM with mutations positive for MYC and BCL2, making it a case of double hit B-cell lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma with plasmatic differentiation without morphological transformation to aggressive histology like DLBCL. The paper also broadens to include discussions on current topics in the classification, diagnosis, possible causes of transformation, and treatment of WM, including transformation to double hit lymphoma. The significance of this case lies in that the presence of double hit lymphoma-like genetic mutations in WM have not been previously described in the literature and potentially such changes are harbinger of extra-nodal presentation, aggressive growth, and possibly poor prognosis, if data from other double-hit lymphoma are extrapolated.

  2. Overview of the HIT-SI3 spheromak experiment

    Hossack, A. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Chandra, R. N.; Morgan, K. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Everson, C. J.; Penna, J. M.; Nelson, B. A.

    2017-10-01

    The HIT-SI and HIT-SI3 spheromak experiments (a = 23 cm) study efficient, steady-state current drive for magnetic confinement plasmas using a novel method which is ideal for low aspect ratio, toroidal geometries. Sustained spheromaks show coherent, imposed plasma motion and low plasma-generated mode activity, indicating stability. Analysis of surface magnetic fields in HIT-SI indicates large n = 0 and 1 mode amplitudes and little energy in higher modes. Within measurement uncertainties all the n = 1 energy is imposed by the injectors, rather than being plasma-generated. The fluctuating field imposed by the injectors is sufficient to sustain the toroidal current through dynamo action whereas the plasma-generated field is not (Hossack et al., Phys. Plasmas, 2017). Ion Doppler spectroscopy shows coherent, imposed plasma motion inside r 10 cm in HIT-SI and a smaller volume of coherent motion in HIT-SI3. Coherent motion indicates the spheromak is stable and a lack of plasma-generated n = 1 energy indicates the maximum q is maintained below 1 for stability during sustainment. In HIT-SI3, the imposed mode structure is varied to test the plasma response (Hossack et al., Nucl. Fusion, 2017). Imposing n = 2, n = 3, or large, rotating n = 1 perturbations is correlated with transient plasma-generated activity. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-96ER54361.

  3. Verbs in the lexicon: Why is hitting easier than breaking?

    McKoon, Gail; Love, Jessica

    2011-11-01

    Adult speakers use verbs in syntactically appropriate ways. For example, they know implicitly that the boy hit at the fence is acceptable but the boy broke at the fence is not. We suggest that this knowledge is lexically encoded in semantic decompositions. The decomposition for break verbs (e.g. crack, smash) is hypothesized to be more complex than that for hit verbs (e.g. kick, kiss). Specifically, the decomposition of a break verb denotes that "an entity changes state as the result of some external force" whereas the decomposition for a hit verb denotes only that "an entity potentially comes in contact with another entity." In this article, verbs of the two types were compared in a lexical decision experiment - Experiment 1 - and they were compared in sentence comprehension experiments with transitive sentences (e.g. the car hit the bicycle and the car broke the bicycle) - Experiments 2 and 3. In Experiment 1, processing times were shorter for the hit than the break verbs and in Experiments 2 and 3, processing times were shorter for the hit sentences than the break sentences, results that are in accord with the complexities of the postulated semantic decompositions.

  4. Community Music in Australia

    Harrison, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a historical perspective to the development of community music in Australia. Finding political support in Australia's progressive arts policies of the late 1970s, community music is discussed as embracing the principles of access and equity and supporting the development of musical skills in the context of social change and…

  5. The Tucson-Melbourne Three-Body Force in a Translationally-Invariant Harmonic Oscillator Basis

    Marsden, David; Navratil, Petr; Barrett, Bruce

    2000-09-01

    A translationally-invariant three-body basis set has been employed in shell model calculations on ^3H and ^3He including the Tucson-Melbourne form of the real nuclear three-body force. The basis consists of harmonic oscillators in Jacobi coordinates, explicitly avoiding the centre of mass drift problem in the calculations. The derivation of the three-body matrix elements and the results of large basis effective interaction shell model calculations will be presented. J. L. Friar, B. F. Gibson, G. L. Payne and S. A. Coon; Few Body Systems 5, 13 (1988) P. Navratil, G.P. Kamuntavicius and B.R. Barrett; Phys. Rev. C. 61, 044001 (2000)

  6. International Students from Melbourne Describing Their Cross-Cultural Transitions Experiences: Culture Shock, Social Interaction, and Friendship Development

    Belford, Nish

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from a study that explored how international students experience cross-cultural transitions after living and studying in Melbourne for a few years, this paper, in particular, examines the participants' experiences with culture shock, social interaction, and friendship development. The findings include narratives of their personal stories…

  7. Ruth Flockart and Dr Wood: A Crucial Relationship in the Development of Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College Music Program

    Jenkins, Louise

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the notion that particular working relationships within school music programs can have a significant affect on the program's development and progress. To explore this notion the research focussed on the working relationship of a music teacher at Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College (MLC), Ruth Flockart (1891-1985) and the…

  8. Single-hit mechanism of tumour cell killing by radiation.

    Chapman, J D

    2003-02-01

    To review the relative importance of the single-hit mechanism of radiation killing for tumour response to 1.8-2.0 Gy day(-1) fractions and to low dose-rate brachytherapy. Tumour cell killing by ionizing radiation is well described by the linear-quadratic equation that contains two independent components distinguished by dose kinetics. Analyses of tumour cell survival curves that contain six or more dose points usually provide good estimates of the alpha- and beta-inactivation coefficients. Superior estimates of tumour cell intrinsic radiosensitivity are obtained when synchronized populations are employed. The characteristics of single-hit inactivation of tumour cells are reviewed and compared with the characteristics of beta-inactivation. Potential molecular targets associated with single-hit inactivation are discussed along with strategies for potentiating cell killing by this mechanism. The single-hit mechanism of tumour cell killing shows no dependence on dose-rate and, consequently, no evidence of sublethal damage repair. It is uniquely potentiated by high linear-energy-transfer radiation, exhibits a smaller oxygen enhancement ratio and exhibits a larger indirect effect by hydroxyl radicals than the beta-mechanism. alpha-inactivation coefficients vary slightly throughout interphase but mitotic cells exhibit extremely high alpha-coefficients in the range of those observed for lymphocytes and some repair-deficient cells. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that chromatin in compacted form could be a radiation-hypersensitive target associated with single-hit radiation killing. Analyses of tumour cell survival curves demonstrate that it is the single-hit mechanism (alpha) that determines the majority of cell killing after doses of 2Gy and that this mechanism is highly variable between tumour cell lines. The characteristics of single-hit inactivation are qualitatively and quantitatively distinct from those of beta-inactivation. Compacted chromatin in tumour cells

  9. 75 FR 21629 - HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2010-04-26

    ... Technology; HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Office of the National... only. Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee's Workgroups: Clinical Operations Vocabulary... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The HIT Standards Committee Workgroups will hold the...

  10. 76 FR 46297 - HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee's... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The HIT Standards Committee Workgroups will hold the...

  11. 75 FR 62399 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    2010-10-08

    ... Technology; HIT Standards Committee Schedule for the Assessment of HIT Policy Committee Recommendations.... SUMMARY: Section 3003(b)(3) of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 mandates that the HIT Standards Committee develop a schedule for the assessment of policy recommendations developed by the HIT...

  12. 77 FR 66617 - HIT Policy and Standards Committees; Workgroup Application Database

    2012-11-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy and Standards Committees; Workgroup Application... of New ONC HIT FACA Workgroup Application Database. The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) has.... Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee and HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the...

  13. Uranium mining in Australia

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Known uranium deposits and the companies involved in uranium mining and exploration in Australia are listed. The status of the development of the deposits is outlined and reasons for delays to mining are given

  14. Uranium production in Australia

    Fisk, B.G.

    1984-01-01

    The history of uranium mining and milling in Australia is briefly outlined, particular attention being given to the development of Australia's only two operating mills, Nabarlek and Ranger, and its only operating mine, Ranger. The latter project is used to illustrate the prerequisites for development of the industry and the complex roles of the various parties involved in establishing a new mine: equity holders, customers, financiers, the securities industry, trade unions, and the public. The moves currently being taken to resolve the future of the industry in Australia, particularly the examination of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle being conducted by the Australian Science and Technology Council, preclude any firm conclusions being drawn, but the various options open to the government are reviewed and the record of Australian governments and unions and the attitude of the Australian public are described. (Author) (3 tabs., fig.)

  15. Uranium mining in Australia

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Western world requirements for uranium based on increasing energy consumption and a changing energy mix, will warrant the development of Australia's resources. By 1985 Australian mines could be producing 9500 tonnes of uranium oxide yearly and by 1995 the export value from uranium could reach that from wool. In terms of benefit to the community the economic rewards are considerable but, in terms of providing energy to the world, Australias uranium is vital

  16. Influence of Running on Pistol Shot Hit Patterns.

    Kerkhoff, Wim; Bolck, Annabel; Mattijssen, Erwin J A T

    2016-01-01

    In shooting scene reconstructions, risk assessment of the situation can be important for the legal system. Shooting accuracy and precision, and thus risk assessment, might be correlated with the shooter's physical movement and experience. The hit patterns of inexperienced and experienced shooters, while shooting stationary (10 shots) and in running motion (10 shots) with a semi-automatic pistol, were compared visually (with confidence ellipses) and statistically. The results show a significant difference in precision (circumference of the hit patterns) between stationary shots and shots fired in motion for both inexperienced and experienced shooters. The decrease in precision for all shooters was significantly larger in the y-direction than in the x-direction. The precision of the experienced shooters is overall better than that of the inexperienced shooters. No significant change in accuracy (shift in the hit pattern center) between stationary shots and shots fired in motion can be seen for all shooters. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. The Job Consciousness for Radiological Technologists in Korea, Canada, and Australia

    Han, Eun Ok; Kwon, Deok Mun; Park, Kwang Hun; Choi, Seung Yoon; Jung, Chung Hyun; Bae, Sang Il; Oh, Chang Woo

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to provide basic information on overseas employment to the radiological technologists and students majoring in radiology in Korea who consider the overseas employment by investigating the job consciousness for radiological technologists in Canada and Australia which have a high level of interest for overseas employment and want to compare their status with that of Korean radiological technologists. This study was performed by visiting hospitals such as Prince George Regional Hospital, 1475 Edmonton Street, Prince George, BC, Canada on August 13, 2007, Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road Melbourne 3004, Australia on August 4, 2008, and other Korea hospitals that show the similar scale as Canada and Australia on September 10, 2007. The results were summarized as follows : 1. Differences were observed in this sexual composition, such as 18 males (90%) in Korea, 14 females (73.7%) in Canada, and 25 females in Australia (86.2%). 2. The item of 'aptitude' which is one of the most important criteria, showed the highest level in Korea, Canada, and Australia, and the second most considered item was 'salary'. 3. In the values in jobs, the items of 'economic self-sufficiency', 'recognized by others', and 'establishing a social position' represented high levels in Korea, and the items of 'like the job itself', 'establishing self-actualization', 'feel the meaning of life', and 'make new friends' showed high levels in Canada and Australia. 4. Regarding the item of 'a job is important as much as a marriage', 'Yes' showed high level in Korea, and 'No' showed high levels in Canada and Australia. 5. Radiological technologists in Korea demonstrated a low level in the job consciousness compared to those of Canada and Australia. Although this study shows some limitations for showing whole idea of radiological technologists due to the lack of the scope in samples for each country as a practical manner, this study can be regarded significant to compare some countries

  18. Recent results from the HIT-II and HIT-SI helicity injection current drive experiments

    Jarboe, T.R.; Hamp, W.T.; Izzo, V.A.; Nelson, B.A.; O'Neill, R.G.; Raman, R.; Redd, A.J.; Sieck, P.E.; Smith, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Three important results are reported. 1) CHI startup has produced 100 kA of closed current without using poloidal field (PF) coils or any transformer action. The initial equilibrium is then driven to 240 kA with a 3 V transformer loop voltage, indicating high quality plasma. 2) For the first time CHI alone has produced toroidal currents (350 kA) that far exceed q a I inj , and with I p /I tf as high as 1.2. The key to these new results appears to be having the toroidal field small enough that relaxation will occur. 3) The steady inductive helicity injection spheromak experiment has operated at 5 kHz for 6 ms with current amplitudes up to 11 kA in each injector. The helicity injection rate is nearly constant with the ExB flow always into the plasma and not into the walls. NIMROD simulations of HIT-SI show a buildup of spheromak fields. (author)

  19. Translation into Chinese of: "Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?". Translated by Li-Bing Zhang

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  20. Translation into Portuguese of: "Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?". Translated by Jefferson Prado, Regina Y. Hirai, and Cíntia Kameyama

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  1. Translation into Russian of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?” Translated by Irina V. Belyaeva and Maria S. Vorontsova

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  2. Multi-hit time-to-amplitude CAMAC module (MTAC)

    Kang, H.

    1980-10-01

    A Multi-Hit Time-to-Amplitude Module (MTAC) for the SLAC Mark III drift chamber system has been designed to measure drift time by converting time-proportional chamber signals into analog levels, and converting the analog data by slow readout via a semi-autonomous controller in a CAMAC crate. The single width CAMAC module has 16 wire channels, each with a 4-hit capacity. An externally generated common start initiates an internal precision ramp voltage which is then sampled using a novel shift register gating scheme and CMOS sampling switches. The detailed design and performance specifications are described

  3. Does ′heparin-induced thrombocytopenia′ hit our minds?

    Arun R Thangavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unfractionated heparin is a widely used drug to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli in patients at risk. With the advent of newer anticoagulants having lesser side effects, its use has diminished but not out of service. Here, we report a case of deep venous thrombosis, in a patient on prophylactic dose of heparin, which was later found to be a manifestation of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Thrombosis in the presence of heparin prophylaxis should be considered as HIT rather than a failure of anticoagulation.

  4. Direct determination of the hit locations from experimental HPGe pulses

    Désesquelles, P., E-mail: Pierre.Desesquelles@in2p3.fr [Univ. Paris-Sud, CSNSM CNRS/IN2P3, 15 rue G. Clémenceau, 91405 Orsay (France); Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Dimmock, M.R. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, The University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Ljungvall, J. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CSNSM CNRS/IN2P3, 15 rue G. Clémenceau, 91405 Orsay (France); Nelson, L. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, The University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Nga, D.-T. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CSNSM CNRS/IN2P3, 15 rue G. Clémenceau, 91405 Orsay (France); Nolan, P.J.; Rigby, S.V. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, The University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Van-Oanh, N.-T. [Univ. Paris-Sud, LCP UMR8000 CNRS, 15 rue G. Clémenceau, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2013-11-21

    The gamma-tracking technique optimises the determination of the energy and emission angle of gamma-rays detected by modern segmented HPGe detectors. This entails the determination, using the delivered pulse shapes, of the interaction points of the gamma-ray within the crystal. The direct method presented here allows the localisation of the hits using only a large sample of pulses detected in the actual operating conditions. No external crystal scanning system or pulse shape simulation code is needed. In order to validate this method, it is applied to sets of pulses obtained using the University of Liverpool scanning system. The hit locations are determined by the method with good precision.

  5. Possilibity of estimating payoff matrix from model for hit phenomena

    Ishii, Akira; Sakaidani, Shota; Iwanaga, Saori

    2016-01-01

    The conflicts of topics on social media is considered using an extended mathematical model based on the mathematical model for hit phenomena that has been used to analyze entertainment hits. The social media platform used in this study was blog. The calculation results shows examples of strong conflict, weak conflict, and no conflict cases. Since the conflict of two topics can be considered in the framework of game theory, the results can be used to determine each matrix element of the payoff matrix of game theory.

  6. The Melbourne Assessment of Schizotypy in Kids: A Useful Measure of Childhood Schizotypal Personality Disorder

    Harvey P. Jones

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being identified as a high risk cohort for psychosis, there has been relatively little research on the clinical presentation and assessment of Schizotypal Personality Disorder (SPD in childhood. The current study aimed to develop a measure of childhood SPD (Melbourne Assessment of Schizotypy in Kids (MASK and assess discriminant validity against another neurodevelopmental disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Sixty-eight children aged between 5 and 12 (21 SPD, 15 ASD, and 32 typically developing and their parents were administered the MASK. The MASK is a 57-item semistructured interview that obtains information from the child, their parents, and the clinician. The results showed high internal consistency for the MASK and higher scores in the SPD group. A factor analysis revealed two MASK factors: social/pragmatic symptoms and positive schizotypal symptoms. Both factors were associated with SPD, while only the social/pragmatic factor was associated with ASD. Within the two clinical groups, a receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the MASK (cut-off score: 132 out of 228 was a good indicator of SPD diagnosis. These preliminary MASK findings were reliable and consistent and suggest that childhood SPD is characterised by complex symptomology distinguishable from ASD.

  7. Drug use among homeless young people in Los Angeles and Melbourne.

    Rosenthal, Doreen; Mallett, Shelley; Milburn, Norweeta; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2008-09-01

    To examine the effect of time spent homeless on young people's substance use and use of drug and alcohol services in two countries with contrasting policy and service environments. A crossnational survey was conducted of recently homeless and experienced homeless young people in Melbourne (N = 674) and Los Angeles (N = 620). Questions were asked about alcohol and drug use in the past 3 months, frequency of use, injecting drug use, drug dependency, and perceived need for, and use of, drug and alcohol services. Data were analyzed using logistic regression. Substantial numbers of young people reported use of alcohol and drugs. More Australians than Americans and more experienced than newly homeless reported drug use, although there were no differences in frequency of use in the past 3 months. Polydrug use was common, as were injecting drugs and responses that signified drug dependency. All were more common among Australians and experienced homeless young people. A substantial number of young people had "ever" taken part in a drug or alcohol program, but only a minority believed that they needed help from services. Of these, only a minority had sought help. This was particularly so among those who were classified as drug dependent. Reasons for failure to seek help varied. Substance use is alarmingly high compared to national samples of young people, especially among those who had been homeless for longer periods. Programs to reduce substance use must take account of the prevailing drug cultures, as well as different subgroups of the population.

  8. Adaptation and validation of the Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire to Brazilian Portuguese.

    Cotrena, Charles; Branco, Laura Damiani; Fonseca, Rochele Paz

    2018-03-01

    Decision making (DM) is among the most important abilities for everyday functioning. However, the most widely used measures of DM come from behavioral paradigms, whose ecological validity and standalone use has been criticized in the literature. Though these issues could be addressed by the use of DM questionnaires as a complementary assessment method, no such instruments have been validated for use in Brazilian Portuguese. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct the translation and validation of the Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire (MDMQ) for use in a Brazilian population. The adaptation of the MDMQ involved the following steps: translation, back-translation, expert review and pilot study. These steps were followed by factor analysis and internal consistency measurements, which led to the exclusion of 4 items from the scale. The 18-item version of the MDMQ was then administered to a validation sample consisting of healthy adults, as well as patients with bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). The instrument displayed good internal consistency, with the hypervigilance subscale showing the lowest, though still acceptable, Cronbach's alpha value. Its factor structure was comparable to that of the original MDMQ according to confirmatory factor analysis. Nevertheless, the MDMQ was sensitive to both depression severity and the presence of MDD and BD, both of which are known to have an impact on DM ability. The version of the MDMQ produced in the present study may be an important addition to neuropsychological assessment batteries with a focus on DM and related abilities.

  9. Fertility and work-force participation: The experience of Melbourne Wives.

    Ware, H

    1976-11-01

    Summary Current and retrospective data on the fertility control, work-force participation intentions and practice of Melbourne wives are combined in an examination of the causal link between work-force participation and reduced family size. Stress is laid on the analysis of the interaction between work-force participation and fertility over time, taking into account the proportion of married life spent in the work-force, rather than relying exclusively on a measure of current participation, the only option available in the analysis of census-type data. The wide range of information available makes it possible to study the effects of work-force participation on wives of unimpaired fertility, as well as the different consequences of planned and unplanned participation, and of working in a variety of occupations and for a number of distinct reasons. Examination of the future fertility intentions and current contraceptive practice of the younger wives shows that working wives are not, in these respects, markedly different from their house-wife peers. Overall, the balance of the evidence indicates that in the majority of cases fertility influences work-force participation rather than the converse.

  10. Hit Identification and Optimization in Virtual Screening: Practical Recommendations Based Upon a Critical Literature Analysis

    Zhu, Tian; Cao, Shuyi; Su, Pin-Chih; Patel, Ram; Shah, Darshan; Chokshi, Heta B.; Szukala, Richard; Johnson, Michael E.; Hevener, Kirk E.

    2013-01-01

    A critical analysis of virtual screening results published between 2007 and 2011 was performed. The activity of reported hit compounds from over 400 studies was compared to their hit identification criteria. Hit rates and ligand efficiencies were calculated to assist in these analyses and the results were compared with factors such as the size of the virtual library and the number of compounds tested. A series of promiscuity, drug-like, and ADMET filters were applied to the reported hits to assess the quality of compounds reported and a careful analysis of a subset of the studies which presented hit optimization was performed. This data allowed us to make several practical recommendations with respect to selection of compounds for experimental testing, defining hit identification criteria, and general virtual screening hit criteria to allow for realistic hit optimization. A key recommendation is the use of size-targeted ligand efficiency values as hit identification criteria. PMID:23688234

  11. Hit identification and optimization in virtual screening: practical recommendations based on a critical literature analysis.

    Zhu, Tian; Cao, Shuyi; Su, Pin-Chih; Patel, Ram; Shah, Darshan; Chokshi, Heta B; Szukala, Richard; Johnson, Michael E; Hevener, Kirk E

    2013-09-12

    A critical analysis of virtual screening results published between 2007 and 2011 was performed. The activity of reported hit compounds from over 400 studies was compared to their hit identification criteria. Hit rates and ligand efficiencies were calculated to assist in these analyses, and the results were compared with factors such as the size of the virtual library and the number of compounds tested. A series of promiscuity, druglike, and ADMET filters were applied to the reported hits to assess the quality of compounds reported, and a careful analysis of a subset of the studies that presented hit optimization was performed. These data allowed us to make several practical recommendations with respect to selection of compounds for experimental testing, definition of hit identification criteria, and general virtual screening hit criteria to allow for realistic hit optimization. A key recommendation is the use of size-targeted ligand efficiency values as hit identification criteria.

  12. Water Recycling in Australia

    Ross Young

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth and, more importantly, experiences the most variable rainfall of all the continents on our planet. The vast majority of Australians live in large cities on the coast. Because wastewater treatments plants were all located near the coast, it was thought that large scale recycling would be problematic given the cost of infrastructure and pumping required to establish recycled water schemes. This all changed when Australia experienced a decade of record low rainfall and water utilities were given aggressive targets to increase the volume of water recycled. This resulted in recycled water being accepted as a legitimate source of water for non-drinking purposes in a diversified portfolio of water sources to mitigate climate risk. To ensure community support for recycled water, Australia lead the world in developing national guidelines for the various uses of recycled water to ensure the protection of public health and the environment. Australia now provides a great case study of the developments in maximizing water recycling opportunities from policy, regulatory and technological perspectives. This paper explores the evolution in thinking and how approaches to wastewater reuse has changed over the past 40 years from an effluent disposal issue to one of recognizing wastewater as a legitimate and valuable resource. Despite recycled water being a popular choice and being broadly embraced, the concept of indirect potable reuse schemes have lacked community and political support across Australia to date.

  13. Do repeated rumble strip hits improve driver alertness?

    Watling, C.N.; Akerstedt, T.; Kecklund, L.G.; Anund, A.

    2016-01-01

    Driving while sleepy is associated with increased crash risk. Rumble strips are designed to alert a sleepy or inattentive driver when they deviate outside their driving lane. The current study sought to examine the effects of repeated rumble strip hits on levels of physiological and subjective

  14. Madoff Debacle Hits Colleges and Raises Questions about Trustee Conflicts

    Fain, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Several colleges and universities lost millions in the alleged $50-billion Ponzi scheme run by the Wall Street trader Bernard L. Madoff. The losses include institutions' endowment holdings in hedge funds that were invested with Madoff as well as hits taken by supporting foundations and donors. Several foundations that have been active in higher…

  15. The probability of a tornado missile hitting a target

    Goodman, J.; Koch, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that tornado missile transportation is a diffusion Markovian process. Therefore, the Green's function method is applied for the estimation of the probability of hitting a unit target area. This propability is expressed through a joint density of tornado intensity and path area, a probability of tornado missile injection and a tornado missile height distribution. (orig.)

  16. Concentrated Hitting Times of Randomized Search Heuristics with Variable Drift

    Lehre, Per Kristian; Witt, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Drift analysis is one of the state-of-the-art techniques for the runtime analysis of randomized search heuristics (RSHs) such as evolutionary algorithms (EAs), simulated annealing etc. The vast majority of existing drift theorems yield bounds on the expected value of the hitting time for a target...

  17. COPD: A stepwise or a hit hard approach?

    A.J. Ferreira

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Current guidelines differ slightly on the recommendations for treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD patients, and although there are some undisputed recommendations, there is still debate regarding the management of COPD. One of the hindrances to deciding which therapeutic approach to choose is late diagnosis or misdiagnosis of COPD. After a proper diagnosis is achieved and severity assessed, the choice between a stepwise or “hit hard” approach has to be made. For GOLD A patients the stepwise approach is recommended, whilst for B, C and D patients this remains debatable. Moreover, in patients for whom inhaled corticosteroids (ICS are recommended, a step-up or “hit hard” approach with triple therapy will depend on the patient's characteristics and, for patients who are being over-treated with ICS, ICS withdrawal should be performed, in order to optimize therapy and reduce excessive medications.This paper discusses and proposes stepwise, “hit hard”, step-up and ICS withdrawal therapeutic approaches for COPD patients based on their GOLD group. We conclude that all approaches have benefits, and only a careful patient selection will determine which approach is better, and which patients will benefit the most from each approach. Keywords: COPD, Stepwise, Hit hard, Step-up, ICS withdrawal, Bronchodilators, ICS

  18. Biophysics: for HTS hit validation, chemical lead optimization, and beyond.

    Genick, Christine C; Wright, S Kirk

    2017-09-01

    There are many challenges to the drug discovery process, including the complexity of the target, its interactions, and how these factors play a role in causing the disease. Traditionally, biophysics has been used for hit validation and chemical lead optimization. With its increased throughput and sensitivity, biophysics is now being applied earlier in this process to empower target characterization and hit finding. Areas covered: In this article, the authors provide an overview of how biophysics can be utilized to assess the quality of the reagents used in screening assays, to validate potential tool compounds, to test the integrity of screening assays, and to create follow-up strategies for compound characterization. They also briefly discuss the utilization of different biophysical methods in hit validation to help avoid the resource consuming pitfalls caused by the lack of hit overlap between biophysical methods. Expert opinion: The use of biophysics early on in the drug discovery process has proven crucial to identifying and characterizing targets of complex nature. It also has enabled the identification and classification of small molecules which interact in an allosteric or covalent manner with the target. By applying biophysics in this manner and at the early stages of this process, the chances of finding chemical leads with novel mechanisms of action are increased. In the future, focused screens with biophysics as a primary readout will become increasingly common.

  19. Markov chains with quasitoeplitz transition matrix: first zero hitting

    Alexander M. Dukhovny

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper continues the investigation of Markov Chains with a quasitoeplitz transition matrix. Generating functions of first zero hitting probabilities and mean times are found by the solution of special Riemann boundary value problems on the unit circle. Duality is discussed.

  20. First hitting probabilities for semi markov chains and estimation

    Georgiadis, Stylianos

    2017-01-01

    We first consider a stochastic system described by an absorbing semi-Markov chain with finite state space and we introduce the absorption probability to a class of recurrent states. Afterwards, we study the first hitting probability to a subset of states for an irreducible semi-Markov chain...

  1. Assessing the lipophilicity of fragments and early hits

    Mortenson, Paul N.; Murray, Christopher W.

    2011-07-01

    A key challenge in many drug discovery programs is to accurately assess the potential value of screening hits. This is particularly true in fragment-based drug design (FBDD), where the hits often bind relatively weakly, but are correspondingly small. Ligand efficiency (LE) considers both the potency and the size of the molecule, and enables us to estimate whether or not an initial hit is likely to be optimisable to a potent, druglike lead. While size is a key property that needs to be controlled in a small molecule drug, there are a number of additional properties that should also be considered. Lipophilicity is amongst the most important of these additional properties, and here we present a new efficiency index (LLEAT) that combines lipophilicity, size and potency. The index is intuitively defined, and has been designed to have the same target value and dynamic range as LE, making it easily interpretable by medicinal chemists. Monitoring both LE and LLEAT should help both in the selection of more promising fragment hits, and controlling molecular weight and lipophilicity during optimisation.

  2. Patterns of Inter-Cultural Communication in Melbourne Factories: Some Research in Progress.

    Clyne, Michael

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on research conducted in the Language and Society Centre of the National Languages Institute of Australia, Monash University, into interaction in English between non-native speakers from different ethnolinguistic backgrounds. The project emphasizes two aspects of verbal interaction where language-specific rules are closely…

  3. Understanding extreme rainfall events in Australia through historical data

    Ashcroft, Linden; Karoly, David John

    2016-04-01

    Historical climate data recovery is still an emerging field in the Australian region. The majority of Australia's instrumental climate analyses begin in 1900 for rainfall and 1910 for temperature, particularly those focussed on extreme event analysis. This data sparsity for the past in turn limits our understanding of long-term climate variability, constraining efforts to predict the impact of future climate change. To address this need for improved historical data in Australia, a new network of recovered climate observations has recently been developed, centred on the highly populated southeastern Australian region (Ashcroft et al., 2014a, 2014b). The dataset includes observations from more than 39 published and unpublished sources and extends from British settlement in 1788 to the formation of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in 1908. Many of these historical sources provide daily temperature and rainfall information, providing an opportunity to improve understanding of the multidecadal variability of Australia's extreme events. In this study we combine the historical data for three major Australian cities - Melbourne, Sydney and Adelaide - with modern observations to examine extreme rainfall variability over the past 174 years (1839-2013). We first explore two case studies, combining instrumental and documentary evidence to support the occurrence of severe storms in Sydney in 1841 and 1844. These events appear to be at least as extreme as Sydney's modern 24-hour rainfall record. Next we use a suite of rainfall indices to assess the long-term variability of rainfall in southeastern Australia. In particular, we focus on the stationarity of the teleconnection between the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon and extreme rainfall events. Using ENSO reconstructions derived from both palaeoclimatic and documentary sources, we determine the historical relationship between extreme rainfall in southeastern Australia and ENSO, and examine whether or not this

  4. Nedley Depression Hit Hypothesis: Identifying Depression and Its Causes.

    Nedley, Neil; Ramirez, Francisco E

    2016-11-01

    Depression is often diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5) criteria. We propose how certain lifestyle choices and non-modifiable factors can predict the development of depression. We identified 10 cause categories (hits or "blows" to the brain) and theorize that four or more active hits could trigger a depression episode. Methods. A sample of 4271 participants from our community-based program (70% female; ages 17-94 years) was assessed at baseline and at the eighth week of the program using a custom test. Ten cause categories were examined as predictors of depression are (1) Genetic, (2)Developmental, (3)Lifestyle, (4)Circadian Rhythm, (5)Addiction, (6)Nutrition, (7)Toxic, (8)Social/Complicated Grief, (9)Medical Condition, and (10)Frontal Lobe. Results. The relationship between the DSM-5 score and a person having four hits categories in the first program week showed a sensitivity of 89.98 % (95% CI: 89.20 % - 90.73%), specificity 48.84% (CI 45.94-51.75) and Matthew Correlation Coefficient (MCC) .41 . For the eight-week test, the results showed a sensitivity 83.6% (CI 81.9-85.5), specificity 53.7% (CI 51.7-55.6) and MCC .38. Overall, the hits that improved the most from baseline after the eighth week were: Nutrition (47%), Frontal lobe (36%), Addiction (24%), Circadian rhythm (24%), Lifestyle (20%), Social (12%) and Medical (10%). Conclusions. The Nedley four-hit hypothesis seems to predict a depressive episode and correlates well with the DSM-5 criteria with good sensitivity and MCC but less specificity. Identifying these factors and applying lifestyle therapies could play an important role in the treatment of depressed individuals.

  5. Nuclear issues in Australia

    Switkowski, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: After a twenty year pause in discussion of nuclear power in Australia, the public debate has resumed in this past year - partly in search for clean, non fossil fuel energy alternatives, and partly from the different political strategies in the lead up to this year's federal election. Although there is evidence of a revival of interest in the nuclear power globally, countries considering installing their first nuclear reactor confront formidable obstacles including community concerns and long lead times. This presentation will describe the Climate Change context which shapes political and corporate strategies, possible nuclear scenarios for Australia, solutions to the still long list of reservations, and likely milestones ahead. It concludes that if we are to decarbonise our economy, and continue on a path of improving standards of living and prosperity, then any strategy for adding the required base-load electricity generation capacity must consider nuclear power for Australia

  6. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  7. Uranium exploration in Australia

    Battey, G.C.; Hawkins, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    As a result of exploration which recommenced in 1966 Australia's uranium reserves increased from 6,200 tonnes in 1967 to 227,000 tonnes uranium by June 1976. Most discoveries in the early 1950's were made by prospectors. The increase in reserves during the past decade is the result of exploration by companies utilising improved technology in areas selected as geologically favourable. These reserves were established at relatively low cost. In the Alligator Rivers Uranium Province the ''vein'' type deposits at Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra and Nabarlek contain 17% of the world's reserves. Most of these discoveries resulted from the investigation of airborne radiometric anomalies but cover over the prospective host rocks will necessitate the future use of costlier and more indirect exploration techniques. There was exploration for sandstone type uranium deposits in most of Australia's sedimentary basins. The greatest success was achieved in the Lake Frome Basin in South Australia. Other deposits were found in the Ngalia and Amadeus Basins in Central Australia and in the Westmoreland area, N.W. Queensland. A major uranium deposit was found in an unusual environment at Yeelirrie, Western Australia where carnotite occurs in a caliche and clay host which fills a shallow, ancient drainage channel. Although caliche occurrences are relatively widespread on the Precambrian shield no other economic deposit has been found. Recent discoveries in the Georgetown area of Queensland indicate the presence of another uranium province but it is too early to assess its potential. The ore occurs in clastic sediments at the base of a volcanic sequence overlying a Precambrian basement. Several companies which have established large uranium reserves have a number of additional attractive prospects. Exploration activity in Australia in 1975 was at a lower level than in previous years, but the potential for discovering further deposits is considered to be high

  8. Business Use of the Internet in Australia

    Joanne Loundes

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides summary statistics of Internet usage by Australian businesses using several data sources. Aggregate statistics are provided from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Business Use of Information Technology. More detailed information on firm characteristics and Internet usage are provided from the Melbourne Institute Business Survey, conducted by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research. Despite being a relatively new phenomenon, the academic rese...

  9. Virtual Surgical Planning for Correction of Delayed Presentation Scaphocephaly Using a Modified Melbourne Technique.

    Macmillan, Alexandra; Lopez, Joseph; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Major, Melanie; Medina, Miguel A; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2018-02-23

    Late treatment of scaphocephaly presents challenges including need for more complex surgery to achieve desired head shape. Virtual surgical planning for total vault reconstruction may mitigate some of these challenges, but has not been studied in this unique and complex clinical setting. A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients with scaphocephaly who presented to our institution between 2000 and 2014. Patients presenting aged 12 months or older who underwent virtual surgical planning-assisted cranial vault reconstruction were included. Patient demographic, intraoperative data, and postoperative outcomes were recorded. Pre- and postoperative anthropometric measurements were obtained to document the fronto-occipital (FO) and biparietal (BP) distance and calculate cephalic index (CI). Virtual surgical planning predicted, and actual postoperative anthropometric measurements were compared. Five patients were identified who fulfilled inclusion criteria. The mean age was 50.6 months. One patient demonstrated signs of elevated intracranial pressure preoperatively. Postoperatively, all but one needed no revisional surgery (Whitaker score of 1). No patient demonstrated postoperative evidence of bony defects, bossing, or suture restenosis. The mean preoperative, simulated, and actual postoperative FO length was 190.3, 182, and 184.3 mm, respectively. The mean preoperative, simulated, and actual postoperative BP length was 129, 130.7, and 131 mm, respectively. The mean preoperative, simulated, and actual postoperative CI was 66, 72, and 71.3, respectively. Based on our early experience, virtual surgical planning using a modified Melbourne technique for total vault remodeling achieves good results in the management of late presenting scaphocephaly.

  10. Visitors' perception of thermal comfort during extreme heat events at the Royal Botanic Garden Melbourne

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel

    2018-01-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort studies have mainly examined the perception of local residents, and there has been little work on how those conditions are perceived differently by tourists, especially tourists of diverse origins. This issue is important because it will improve the application of thermal indices in predicting the thermal perception of tourists. This study aims to compare the differences in thermal perception and preferences between local and overseas visitors to the Royal Botanic Garden (RBG) in Melbourne during summer. An 8-day survey was conducted in February 2014 at four sites in the garden ( n = 2198), including 2 days with maximum temperature exceeding 40 °C. The survey results were compared with data from four weather stations adjacent to the survey locations. One survey location, `Fern Gully', has a misting system and visitors perceived the Fern Gully to be cooler than other survey locations. As the apparent temperature exceeded 32.4 °C, visitors perceived the environment as being `warm' or `hot'. At `hot' conditions, 36.8 % of European visitors voted for no change to the thermal conditions, which is considerably higher than the response from Australian visitors (12.2 %) and Chinese visitors (7.5 %). Study results suggest that overseas tourists have different comfort perception and preferences compared to local Australians in hot weather based at least in part on expectations. Understanding the differences in visitors' thermal perception is important to improve the garden design. It can also lead to better tour planning and marketing to potential visitors from different countries.

  11. Adaptation and validation of the Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire to Brazilian Portuguese

    Charles Cotrena

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Decision making (DM is among the most important abilities for everyday functioning. However, the most widely used measures of DM come from behavioral paradigms, whose ecological validity and standalone use has been criticized in the literature. Though these issues could be addressed by the use of DM questionnaires as a complementary assessment method, no such instruments have been validated for use in Brazilian Portuguese. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct the translation and validation of the Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire (MDMQ for use in a Brazilian population. Methods: The adaptation of the MDMQ involved the following steps: translation, back-translation, expert review and pilot study. These steps were followed by factor analysis and internal consistency measurements, which led to the exclusion of 4 items from the scale. The 18-item version of the MDMQ was then administered to a validation sample consisting of healthy adults, as well as patients with bipolar disorder (BD and major depressive disorder (MDD. Results: The instrument displayed good internal consistency, with the hypervigilance subscale showing the lowest, though still acceptable, Cronbach's alpha value. Its factor structure was comparable to that of the original MDMQ according to confirmatory factor analysis. Nevertheless, the MDMQ was sensitive to both depression severity and the presence of MDD and BD, both of which are known to have an impact on DM ability. Conclusion: The version of the MDMQ produced in the present study may be an important addition to neuropsychological assessment batteries with a focus on DM and related abilities

  12. Vitamin D status and the risk of type 2 diabetes: the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Heath, Alicia K; Williamson, Elizabeth J; Hodge, Allison M; Ebeling, Peter R; Eyles, Darryl W; Kvaskoff, David; O'Dea, Kerin; Giles, Graham G; English, Dallas R

    2018-05-18

    Inverse associations between vitamin D status and risk of type 2 diabetes observed in epidemiological studies could be biased by confounding and reverse causality. We investigated the prospective association between vitamin D status and type 2 diabetes and the possible role of reverse causality. We conducted a case-cohort study within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS), including a random sample of 628 participants who developed diabetes and a sex-stratified random sample of the cohort (n=1,884). Concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in samples collected at recruitment. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of type 2 diabetes for quartiles of 25(OH)D relative to the lowest quartile and per 25 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D, adjusting for confounding variables. The ORs for the highest versus lowest 25(OH)D quartile and per 25 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D were 0.60 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.81) and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.92; p=0.004), respectively. In participants who reported being in good/very good/excellent health approximately four years after recruitment, ORs for the highest versus lowest 25(OH)D quartile and per 25 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D were 0.46 (95% CI: 0.29, 0.72) and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.56, 0.89; p=0.003), respectively. In this sample of middle-aged Australians, vitamin D status was inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes, and this association did not appear to be explained by reverse causality. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Psychometric and Clinimetric Properties of the Melbourne Assessment 2 in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    Wang, Tien-Ni; Liang, Kai-Jie; Liu, Yi-Chia; Shieh, Jeng-Yi; Chen, Hao-Ling

    2017-09-01

    To examine the psychometric and clinimetric properties of the Melbourne Assessment 2 (MA2), an outcome measurement that is increasingly used in clinical studies. Psychometric and clinimetric study. Community. Seventeen children with cerebral palsy (CP) from 5 to 12 years were recruited for the estimation of the test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change (MDC). Thirty-five children with CP were recruited to receive an 8-week intensive neurorehabilitation intervention to estimate the validity, responsiveness, and minimal clinically important difference (MCID). Thirty-five children with CP received upper limb neurorehabilitation programs for 8 weeks. The MA2 and the criterion measures, including the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, 2nd edition (BOT-2), the Box and Blocks Test (BBT), and the Pediatric Motor Activity Log-Revised (PMAL-R), were evaluated at pretreatment and posttreatment. The MA2 has 4 subscales: range of motion, fluency, accuracy, and dexterity. The test-retest reliability of the MA2 is high (intraclass correlation coefficient, .92-.98). The significant relationships between the MA2 and BBT, BOT-2, and PMAL-R support its validity. The significance of paired t test results (PMA2. The MDC values of the 4 subscales of the MA2 are 2.85, 1.63, 1.97, and 1.84, respectively, and the suggested MCID values of these 4 subscales are 2.35, 3.20, 2.09, and 2.22, respectively, indicating the minimum scores of improvement to be interpreted as both statistically significant and clinically important. The study findings indicate that the MA2 has sound psychometric and clinimetric properties and is thus an adequate measurement for research and clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Economy Profile of Australia

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    Doing Business 2018 is the 15th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Australia. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies; for 2018 Aust...

  15. Australia's nuclear graveyard

    Milliken, R.

    1987-01-01

    Britain and Australia have become locked in a battle of wills and wits over a nuclear legacy that is now more than 30 years old. At stake is the issue of who will pay to clean up a stretch of the central Australian outback where at least 23 kilograms of plutonium are buried in nuclear graveyards or scattered in fine particles on the ground. The plutonium was left there after a series of British nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s. The cost of cleaning it up today, and rendering the ground safe the the Aborigines who claim it as their tribal homeland, has been estimated at up to $158 million. Australia's minister for resources, Senator Gareth Evans, went to London in October 1986 to try to involve the British in the cleanup. But Britain is still taking the stand that it had discharged any obligations on this score long ago. This question is at the heart of controversy that began mounting in the late 1970s over the British nuclear tests. It was then that Aborigines and test veterans from Britain and Australia started alleging that they had been exposed to unduly high doses of radiation. Clearly, the nuclear tests, which began as a political exercise between Britain and Australia more than 30 years ago, seem destined to remain the source of much legal, diplomatic, and financial fallout between the two countries for a long time to come

  16. Mathematical Sciences in Australia

    Thomas, Jan; Muchatuta, Michelle; Wood, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates enrolment trends in mathematical sciences in Australian universities. Data has been difficult to extract and the coding for mathematical disciplines has made investigation challenging. We show that the number of mathematics major undergraduates in Australia is steadily declining though the number studying…

  17. Creating White Australia

    McLisky, Claire Louise; Carey, Jane

    Vedtagelsen af White Australien som regeringens politik i 1901 viser, at hvidheden var afgørende for den måde, hvorpå den nye nation i Australien blev konstitueret. Og alligevel har historikere i vid udstrækning overset hvidhed i deres studier af Australiens race fortid. 'Creating White Australia...

  18. Banknote Quality in Australia

    Arianna Cowling; Monica Howlett

    2012-01-01

    The Reserve Bank aims to keep the quality of banknotes in circulation high to ensure that they meet the needs of the public and to make it more difficult for counterfeits to be passed or remain in circulation. This article discusses the quality of banknotes in Australia and Reserve Bank initiatives that have improved the quality of banknotes in recent years.

  19. Australia's nuclear headache

    Marinova, D.

    1997-01-01

    With the temporary storage of nuclear waste, constituted by HIFAR spent fuel, at Lucas Heights reaching full capacity by 1998, there is an urgent need for a technical, social and political solution. Some of the fundamental uncertainties in relation to nuclear waste disposal and hence the operation of a nuclear research reactor in Australia are presented

  20. Identifying and Synchronizing Health Information Technology (HIT) Events from FDA Medical Device Reports.

    Kang, Hong; Wang, Frank; Zhou, Sicheng; Miao, Qi; Gong, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Health information technology (HIT) events, a subtype of patient safety events, pose a major threat and barrier toward a safer healthcare system. It is crucial to gain a better understanding of the nature of the errors and adverse events caused by current HIT systems. The scarcity of HIT event-exclusive databases and event reporting systems indicates the challenge of identifying the HIT events from existing resources. FDA Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is a potential resource for HIT events. However, the low proportion and the rapid evolvement of HIT-related events present challenges for distinguishing them from other equipment failures and hazards. We proposed a strategy to identify and synchronize HIT events from MAUDE by using a filter based on structured features and classifiers based on unstructured features. The strategy will help us develop and grow an HIT event-exclusive database, keeping pace with updates to MAUDE toward shared learning.

  1. Australia's uranium export potential

    Mosher, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    During the period 1954-71 in Australia approximately 9000 MT of U 3 O 8 was produced from five separate localities. Of this, 7000 MT was exported to the United Kingdom and United States and the balance stockpiled by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC). Australia's uranium ore reserves occur in eight deposits in three states and the Northern Territory. However, 83% of Australia's reserves are contained in four deposits in lower Proterozoic rocks in the East Alligator River region of the Northern Territory. The AAEC has calculated Australia's recoverable uranium reserves by eliminating estimated losses during the mining and milling of the ores. AAEC has estimated reasonably assured resources of 289,000 MT of uranium at a recovery cost of less than US$80 per kilogram uranium. The companies have collectively announced a larger ore reserve than the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. This difference is a result of the companies adopting different ore reserve categories. On August 25, 1977, the federal government announced that Australia would develop its uranium resources subject to stringent environmental controls, recognition of Aboriginal Land Rights, and international safeguards. Australian uranium production should gradually increase from 1981 onward, growing to 10,000 to 15,000 MT by 1985-86. Further increases in capacity may emerge during the second half of the 1980s when expansion plans are implemented. Exploration for uranium has not been intensive due to delays in developing the existing deposits. It is likely that present reserves can be substantially upgraded if more exploration is carried out. 6 figures, 3 tables

  2. Climate Change. Solutions for Australia

    Coleman, T.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Karoly, D.; Lowe, I.; McMichael, T.; Mitchell, C.; Pearman, G.; Scaife, P.; Reynolds, A. (eds.)

    2004-06-01

    The Australian Climate Group was convened in late 2003 by WWF Australia and the Insurance Australia Group (IAG) in response to the increasing need for action on climate change in Australia. This group proposes a set of solutions to lower the risk that climate change will reach a dangerous level.

  3. DEPDC5 takes a second hit in familial focal epilepsy.

    Anderson, Matthew P

    2018-04-30

    Loss-of-function mutations in a single allele of the gene encoding DEP domain-containing 5 protein (DEPDC5) are commonly linked to familial focal epilepsy with variable foci; however, a subset of patients presents with focal cortical dysplasia that is proposed to result from a second-hit somatic mutation. In this issue of the JCI, Ribierre and colleagues provide several lines of evidence to support second-hit DEPDC5 mutations in this disorder. Moreover, the authors use in vivo, in utero electroporation combined with CRISPR-Cas9 technology to generate a murine model of the disease that recapitulates human manifestations, including cortical dysplasia-like changes, focal seizures, and sudden unexpected death. This study provides important insights into familial focal epilepsy and provides a preclinical model for evaluating potential therapies.

  4. Hit size effectiveness in relation to the microdosimetric site size

    Varma, M.N.; Wuu, C.S.; Zaider, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of site size (that is, the diameter of the microdosimetric volume) on the hit size effectiveness function (HSEF), q(y), for several endpoints relevant in radiation protection. A Bayesian and maximum entropy approach is used to solve the integral equations that determine, given microdosimetric spectra and measured initial slopes, the function q(y). All microdosimetric spectra have been calculated de novo. The somewhat surprising conclusion of this analysis is that site size plays only a minor role in selecting the hit size effectiveness function q(y). It thus appears that practical means (e.g. conventional proportional counters) are already at hand to actually implement the HSEF as a radiation protection tool. (Author)

  5. Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome in Double-Hit Lymphoma

    Prakash Peddi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS is a painful condition characterized by hemicranial pain, retroorbital pain, loss of vision, oculomotor nerve paralysis, and sensory loss in distribution of ophthalmic and maxillary division of trigeminal nerve. Lymphomas rarely involve cavernous sinus and simulate Tolosa-Hunt syndrome. Here we present a first case of double-hit B cell lymphoma (DHL relapsing and masquerading as Tolosa-Hunt syndrome. The neurological findings were explained by a lymphomatous infiltration of the right Gasserian ganglion which preceded systemic relapse. As part of this report, the diagnostic criteria for Tolosa-Hunt syndrome and double-hit lymphoma are reviewed and updated treatment recommendations are presented.

  6. Heparin- induced thrombocytopenia (HIT: a case report of CABG patient

    Alireza Jahangirifard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heparin- induced thrombocytopenia (HIT is an antibody mediated adverse effect of heparin therapy which is classified into two subtypes, HITI which is non-immune, spontaneously reversible thrombocytopenia and; HITII which is an autoimmune-mediated adverse effect of heparin therapy. In this case report, we described a 65-year old male patient with HITII after coronary artery bypass grafting.Key words: Heparin- induced thrombocytopenia, Heparin- induced thrombosis, coronary artery bypass grafting.

  7. 76 FR 46298 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held virtually on August 17, 2011...

  8. 76 FR 55914 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-09-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups... standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT...

  9. 77 FR 16035 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-03-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on March 27, 2012, from 9 a.m...

  10. 75 FR 65636 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    2010-10-26

    ... Technology; HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards... Strategic Plan, and in accordance with policies developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The...

  11. 76 FR 79684 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-12-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on January 25, 2012, from 9 a...

  12. 76 FR 50734 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on September 28, 2011, from 9...

  13. 77 FR 2727 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on February 29, 2012, from 9...

  14. 77 FR 15760 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on April 18, 2012, from 9 a.m...

  15. 76 FR 46297 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups... standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT...

  16. 76 FR 14976 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on April 20, 2011, from 9 a.m...

  17. 76 FR 70455 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-11-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on December 14, 2011, from 9...

  18. 75 FR 5595 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2010-02-03

    ... Technology HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National... Health Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT... Federal Health IT Strategic Plan, and in accordance with policies developed by the HIT Policy Committee...

  19. 76 FR 4352 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee's...

    2011-01-25

    ... Technology; HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Office of the National... only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups: Meaningful Use, Privacy & Security Tiger..., implementation specifications, and certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT Policy Committee...

  20. 76 FR 39109 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-07-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on July 20, 2011, from 9 a.m...

  1. 77 FR 73661 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2012-12-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meetings; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: These meetings will be held on the following dates and...

  2. 76 FR 70454 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-11-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups... certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT Policy Committee Workgroups will hold the following...

  3. 75 FR 57027 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    2010-09-17

    ... Technology; HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards... Strategic Plan, and in accordance with policies developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The...

  4. 76 FR 28784 - HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee's... implementation of the Federal Health IT Strategic Plan, and in accordance with policies developed by the HIT...

  5. 76 FR 28782 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on June 22, 2011, from 9 a.m...

  6. 77 FR 27459 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on June 20, 2012, from 9 a.m...

  7. 76 FR 22399 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-04-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups... standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT...

  8. 76 FR 28784 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups... standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT...

  9. 75 FR 29762 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2010-05-27

    ... Technology HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Office of the National... only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups: Meaningful Use, Privacy & Security Policy... specifications, and certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT Policy Committee Workgroups will...

  10. 76 FR 50736 - HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee's... implementation of the Federal Health IT Strategic Plan, and in accordance with policies developed by the HIT...

  11. 77 FR 37408 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee... with policies developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on July 19...

  12. 76 FR 14975 - HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee's... implementation of the Federal Health IT Strategic Plan, and in accordance with policies developed by the HIT...

  13. 77 FR 22787 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-04-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on May 24, 2012, from 9 a.m...

  14. 77 FR 65691 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-10-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on November 13, 2012, from 9...

  15. 77 FR 50690 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-08-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on September 19, 2012, from 9...

  16. 75 FR 21628 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2010-04-26

    ... Technology HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards... Strategic Plan, and in accordance with policies developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The...

  17. 76 FR 14974 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups... standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT...

  18. 76 FR 22396 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-04-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on May 18, 2011, from 9 a.m...

  19. 76 FR 55913 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-09-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held virtually on October 21, 2011...

  20. 76 FR 50735 - HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of... be open to the public via dial-in access only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups... standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT...

  1. 77 FR 60438 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-10-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on October 17, 2012, from 9 a...

  2. 75 FR 3906 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee's...

    2010-01-25

    ... Technology; HIT Policy Committee's Workgroup Meetings; Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Office of the National... only. Name of Committees: HIT Policy Committee's Workgroups: Meaningful Use, Privacy & Security Policy... specifications, and certification criteria are needed. Date and Time: The HIT Policy Committee Workgroups will...

  3. 77 FR 65690 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-10-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on December 19, 2012, from 9...

  4. 76 FR 9783 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-02-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on March 29, 2011, from 9 a.m...

  5. 77 FR 45353 - HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-07-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of... public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on August 15, 2012, from 9:00...

  6. 75 FR 42090 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    2010-07-20

    ... Technology; HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards... Strategic Plan, and in accordance with policies developed by the HIT Policy Committee. Date and Time: The...

  7. The scientific and technical requirements for biology at Australia's Replacement Research Reactor

    2001-01-01

    A Symposium and Workshop on Neutrons for Biology was held in the School of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Melbourne, under the auspices of AINSE, Univ of Melbourne and ANSTO. Invited talks were given on the subjects of Genome, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a critical framework for understanding bio-molecular, neutron diffraction at high and low resolution, and the investigation of viruses and large-scale biological structures using neutrons. There were also talks from prominent NMR practitioners and X-ray protein crystallographers, with substantial discussion about how the various methods might fit together in the future. Significant progress was made on defining Australia's needs, which include a strong push to use SANS and reflectometry for the study of macromolecular complexes and model membranes, and a modest network of supporting infrastructure in Brisbane, Melbourne and the Sydney Basin. Specific recommendations were that the small-angle neutron scattering and reflectometry instruments in the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) be pursued with high priority, that there be no specific effort to provide high-resolution protein-crystallography facilities at the RRR, but that a watching brief be kept on instrumentation and sample-preparation technologies elsewhere. A watch be kept on inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering capabilities elsewhere, although these methods will not initially be pursued at the RRR and that should be input from this community into the design of the biochemistry/chemistry laboratories at the Replacement Research Reactor. It was also recommended that a small number of regional facilities be established (or enhanced) to allow users to perform deuteration of biomolecules. These facilities would be of significant value to the NMR and neutron scattering communities

  8. Development of pulsation technique for single ion hit system

    Sakai, Takuro; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Hirao, Toshio; Kamiya, Tomihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-12-01

    When a high energy heavy ion enters into a substance, high density of ionization and excitement occurrs along its flying trace. Especially, when such an ion enters into a semiconductor cell, a bit inversion called single event is occurred or a phenomenon destroyed element itself on case of the worst is formed. The present semiconductor cell is made in a size of some micron square, as different from its accumulated degree. In order to analyze the single event phenomenon formed by entering ion into such fine region in detail, a technique possible enter heavy ion beam with space resolution under 1 micron to each sample is necessary. In order to develop this technique, a static type high speed beam switch for control of entering a beam into a sample and a single ion detector for detecting entrance of ion into the sample were installed to heavy ion microbeam forming apparatus. The single ion hit system in Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, JAERI succeeded in detection and control technique of the single ion and control of noise due to pulsization and finished development of basic technique of the single ion hit, since now. After today, it is planned to hit actually the single ion onto the sample and evaluate its accuracy. (G.K.)

  9. Effective progression of nuclear magnetic resonance-detected fragment hits.

    Eaton, Hugh L; Wyss, Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become increasingly popular over the last decade as an alternate lead generation tool to HTS approaches. Several compounds have now progressed into the clinic which originated from a fragment-based approach, demonstrating the utility of this emerging field. While fragment hit identification has become much more routine and may involve different screening approaches, the efficient progression of fragment hits into quality lead series may still present a major bottleneck for the broadly successful application of FBDD. In our laboratory, we have extensive experience in fragment-based NMR screening (SbN) and the subsequent iterative progression of fragment hits using structure-assisted chemistry. To maximize impact, we have applied this approach strategically to early- and high-priority targets, and those struggling for leads. Its application has yielded a clinical candidate for BACE1 and lead series in about one third of the SbN/FBDD projects. In this chapter, we will give an overview of our strategy and focus our discussion on NMR-based FBDD approaches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Outbreaks of sarcoptic mange in free-ranging koala populations in Victoria and South Australia: a case series.

    Speight, K N; Whiteley, P L; Woolford, L; Duignan, P J; Bacci, B; Lathe, S; Boardman, W; Scheelings, T F; Funnell, O; Underwood, G; Stevenson, M A

    2017-07-01

    To describe outbreaks of sarcoptic mange caused by Sarcoptes scabiei in free-ranging koalas in Victoria (December 2008 to November 2015) and South Australia (October 2011 to September 2014). Koalas affected by mange-like lesions were reported by wildlife carers, veterinary practitioners or State Government personnel to the Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences at The University of Melbourne and the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences at The University of Adelaide. Skin scrapings were taken from live and dead koalas and S. scabiei mites were identified. Tissues from necropsied koalas were examined histologically. Outbreaks of sarcoptic mange were found to occur in koalas from both Victoria (n = 29) and South Australia (n = 29) for the first time. The gross pathological and histopathological changes are described. We present the first reported cases of sarcoptic mange outbreaks in free-ranging koalas. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  11. Reconstruction of hit time and hit position of annihilation quanta in the J-PET detector using the Mahalanobis distance

    Sharma Neha Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The J-PET detector being developed at the Jagiellonian University is a positron emission tomograph composed of the long strips of polymer scintillators. At the same time, it is a detector system that will be used for studies of the decays of positronium atoms. The shape of photomultiplier signals depends on the hit time and hit position of the gamma quantum. In order to take advantage of this fact, a dedicated sampling front-end electronics that enables to sample signals in voltage domain with the time precision of about 20 ps and novel reconstruction method based on the comparison of examined signal with the model signals stored in the library has been developed. As a measure of the similarity, we use the Mahalanobis distance. The achievable position and time resolution depend on the number and values of the threshold levels at which the signal is sampled. A reconstruction method as well as preliminary results are presented and discussed.

  12. WAVFH delegates' reports: Australia

    Scanlan, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation measuring and control before Chernobyl: Continuous measurements of fallout in different parts of Australia, including the food producing areas, have been made since the mid 1950s. Levels have decreased rapidly since the cessation of atmospheric nuclear tests in the Southern Hemisphere in 1974 and in the Northern Hemisphere in 1980. Measurements of concentrations of radionuclides arising from fallout were made for the major groups of foods affected by the radioactive contaminants, starting in the 1950s and continuing until concentrations were so low that further effort in measurement was not warranted, i.e., less than 0.1 Bq/kg or 0.1 Bq/l. Changes in the concentrations of radionuclides in foods follow the same trends as the fallout levels. Based on the low levels of fallout measured in Australia since the 1950s, and taking into account the extremely low levels during the past decade, the concentrations of radionuclides arising from fallout in foods grown and processed in Australia are extremely small. Results from the fall-out from Chernobyl. Since the Chernobyl accident, measurements of the concentrations of 137 Cs in a variety of foodstuffs grown in Australia have been made, mainly for export purposes. A summary of the results of these measurements is given in Table 111 of Attachment 2. No 134 Cs has been detected, nor is it likely to be. By taking into account these measurements, the earlier measurements of foodstuffs, predictive modelling values and the very low levels of fall-out in deposit and in air, it is concluded that the concentrations of 137 Cs in all foodstuffs grown in Australia are extremely small. Accordingly, their consumption would result in no significant risk to the health of a population. With world atmospheric conditions being as they are, it will probably be 12 to 18 months before any fallout reaches Australia. Even if some fall-out does occur, it will be minimal and should not significantly increase our very low natural levels

  13. Tissue banking in australia.

    Ireland, Lynette; McKelvie, Helen

    2003-01-01

    The legal structure for the regulation of tissue banking has existed for many years. In Australia, the donation of human tissue is regulated by legislation in each of the eight States and Territories. These substantially uniform Acts were passed in the late 1970's and early 1980's, based on model legislation and underpinned by the concept of consensual giving. However, it was not until the early 1990's that tissue banking came under the notice of regulatory authorities. Since then the Australian Government has moved quickly to oversee the tissue banking sector in Australia. Banked human tissue has been deemed to be a therapeutic good under the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989, and tissue banks are required to be licensed by the Therapeutic Goods Administration and are audited for compliance with the Code of Good Manufacturing Practice- Human Blood and Tissues. In addition, tissue banks must comply with a myriad of other standards, guidelines and recommendations.

  14. Pleistocene Paleoart of Australia

    Robert G. Bednarik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pleistocene rock art is abundant in Australia, but has so far received only limited attention. Instead there has been a trend, begun over a century ago, to search for presumed depictions of extinct megafauna and the tracks of such species. All these notions have been discredited, however, and the current evidence suggests that figurative depiction was introduced only during the Holocene, never reaching Tasmania. Nevertheless, some Australian rock art has been attributed to the Pleistocene by direct dating methods, and its nature implies that a significant portion of the surviving corpus of rock art may also be of such age. In particular much of Australian cave art is of the Ice Age, or appears to be so, and any heavily weathered or patinated petroglyphs on particularly hard rocks are good candidates for Pleistocene antiquity. On the other hand, there is very limited evidence of mobiliary paleoart of such age in Australia.

  15. Synchrotron radiation in Australia

    Garrett, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Synchrotron radiation research in Australia is entering a new era with the commencement of the Australian synchrotron project, which will construct a 3 GeV third generation synchrotron facility at Monash University in Victoria. To date Australian scientists have used overseas facilities, primarily those managed by the Australian Synchrotron Research Program in Japan and the USA. A fast developing and maturing Australian synchrotron user program has developed around these overseas facilities. The field of synchrotron radiation and its importance to a wide range of research will be introduced and Australia's current involvement and facilities will be described. The current status and technical specifications of the Australian synchrotron will be presented. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  16. Mineral industry in Australia

    Parbo, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reviews the history and growth of the mineral industry in Australia and its significance to the nation's economic growth and overseas trade, particularly over the last twenty years during which time production of coal, iron ore, manganese and mineral sands has increased greatly and new discoveries of petroleum, bauxite and nickel have given rise to major new industries. Australia ranks fourteenths in the value of world trade and is among the world's largest exporters of alumina, iron ore, mineral sands, coal, lead, zinc and nickel. Some details of production, processing and exports of the major minerals are given. Comment is made on the policies and roles of the six State Governments and the Federal Government in respect of ownership and control of the mining, processing and exporting of both energy and non-energy minerals. (orig.) [de

  17. Casemix funding in Australia.

    Braithwaite, J; Hindle, D; Phelan, P D; Hanson, R

    1998-06-01

    Casemix funding for hospitals with the use of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), which organise patients' conditions into similar clinical categories with similar costs, was introduced in Australia five years ago. It has been applied in different ways and to a greater or lesser extent in different Australian States. Only Victoria and South Australia have implemented casemix funding across all healthcare services. Attempts have been made to formally evaluate its impact, but they have not met the required scientific standards in controlling for confounding factors. Casemix funding remains a much-discussed issue. In this Debate, Braithwaite and Hindle take a contrary position, largely to stimulate policy debate; Phelan defends the casemix concept and advocates retaining its best features; and Hanson adds a plea for consumer input.

  18. Mothers' health and babies' weights: the biology of poverty at the Melbourne Lying-in Hospital, 1857-83.

    Mccalman, Janet; Morley, Ruth

    2003-04-01

    Birth weight remains a major focus of medical research into the relationship between pre-natal growth and life course health, and historians have used mean birth weight to assess women's standard of living. However, there are intrinsic difficulties in inferring maternal health and nutritional status from birth weight, and some of the known data sets produce puzzling results. One rich data set comes from the Melbourne Lying-in Hospital, 1857-83, and the article discusses the complex institutional, social, and economic causes that may underlie its apparently counter-intuitive anthropometric results. This data set reveals the biological effects differential social conditions can inflict, even within an otherwise affluent society.

  19. Mapping Homophobia in Australia

    Flood, Michael Gaston; Flood, Michael; Flood, C.; Hamilton, Clive

    2008-01-01

    One-third of the Australian population believe that 'homosexuality is immoral', and this belief is spread in distinct ways across the nation. Using data from a survey of nearly 25,000 Australians, we can 'map' homophobia in Australia. Homophobic attitudes are worst in country areas of Queensland and Tasmania. Men are far more likely than women to feel that homosexuality does not have moral legitimacy, and this gender gap in attitudes persists across age, socioeconomic, educational, and region...

  20. HIT and brain reward function: A case of mistaken identity (theory).

    Wright, Cory; Colombo, Matteo; Beard, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    This paper employs a case study from the history of neuroscience-brain reward function-to scrutinize the inductive argument for the so-called 'Heuristic Identity Theory' (HIT). The case fails to support HIT, illustrating why other case studies previously thought to provide empirical support for HIT also fold under scrutiny. After distinguishing two different ways of understanding the types of identity claims presupposed by HIT and considering other conceptual problems, we conclude that HIT is not an alternative to the traditional identity theory so much as a relabeling of previously discussed strategies for mechanistic discovery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Australia's atomic conspiracy theory

    Binnie, A.

    2001-01-01

    The author questions claims by the Newcastle University historian Wayne Reynolds in his book 'Australia's Bid for the Bomb', that the impetus behind the Snowy Mountains Scheme was to provide a secure source of power for the enrichment of uranium and production of heavy water so that Australia could produce its own atomic bombs. Reynolds also argued that the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) was set up so that Australia had a trained scientific workforce to produce plutonium for the bomb. While the book is well researched, Reynolds does not seem to understand the principles of basic science and engineering. After the Second World War, a manufacturing and industrial base with a skilled and trained workforce was needed so it could be converted to war or defence manufacturing when the need arose. This new manufacturing community would require electrical power to sustain it. Hydroelectricity and atomic energy could help provide these needs. Even though war was still raging, Prime Minister John Curtin looked ahead and set up a Department of Post-War Reconstruction. It was through this department that the Snowy Mountains Scheme would be established. Curtin did not live to see this. He died in 1945 but his successor, Ben Chifley, continued the vision. The author believes, an understanding of the science behind these developments and an appreciation of how how humans interact with each others when it comes to getting something they want is likely to give a more balanced view of the past

  2. Australia's energy profile

    Dickson, A.

    1999-01-01

    Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE)'s biennial fuel and electricity survey provides a comprehensive database with which is possible to examine recent trends and developments in Australia's energy market. Some key development are outlined in this article. While energy consumption in Australia has been increasing steadily since 1973-74, substantial changes have occurred 'behind the scenes' in terms of the states and sectors in which energy is consumed and the overall fuel mix. Historically, the south-eastern states of New South Wales and Victoria have accounted for the largest shares of total energy consumption In recent years, however, the dominance of New South Wales and Victoria (and particularly New South Wales) has come under pressure from the states of Queensland. Western Australia, and to a lesser extent, the Northern Territory. Each of these states has experienced rapid growth in energy consumption, due mainly to a number of strongly growing energy intensive industries, particularly in the mining and minerals processing sectors. High economic and population growth over this period were also important factors. An increase in the share of natural gas- and a corresponding decline in the share of crude oil - is the most evident change to have occurred in the fuel mix since 1973-1974. However, since 1993, the trend has changed, the share of coal (and particularly brown coal) increased strongly, making it the primary fuel source for thermal electricity generation. This recent shift has been driven by developments in Queensland and Victoria

  3. Effect of long-term acclimatization on summer thermal comfort in outdoor spaces: a comparative study between Melbourne and Hong Kong

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun

    2018-04-01

    The Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) is an index for assessing outdoor thermal environment which aims to be applicable universally to different climates. However, the scale of UTCI thermal stress classification can be interpreted depending on the context. Previous studies validated the UTCI in individual cities, but comparative studies between different cities are scarce. This study examines the differences in thermal perception and clothing choices between residents from two climate zones over similar UTCI ranges in summer. We compared summer thermal comfort survey data from Melbourne (n = 2162, January-February 2014) and Hong Kong (n = 414, July-August 2007). We calculated the UTCI from outdoor weather station data and used t tests to compare the differences in thermal sensation and clothing between Hong Kong and Melbourne residents. When the UTCI was between 23.0 and 45.9 °C, Melbourne residents wore significantly more clothing (0.1 clo) than Hong Kong residents. Hong Kong residents reported neutral to warm sensation at a higher UTCI range compared with the dynamic thermal sensation (DTS) model. Moreover, Melbourne residents reported warm and hot sensation at a higher UTCI range than the DTS model. Respondents in Melbourne also exhibited different responses to the mean radiant temperature under shaded and sunny conditions, while such a trend was not observed in Hong Kong. It would be advisable to define different thermal sensation thresholds for the UTCI scale according to different climate zones for better prediction of the outdoor thermal comfort of different urban populations.

  4. Translating an early childhood obesity prevention program for local community implementation: a case study of the Melbourne InFANT Program

    R. Laws

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is a growing interest in the field of research translation, there are few published examples of public health interventions that have been effectively scaled up and implemented in the community. This paper provides a case study of the community-wide implementation of the Melbourne Infant, Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT, an obesity prevention program for parents with infants aged 3–18 months. The study explored key factors influencing the translation of the Program into routine practice and the respective role of policy makers, researchers and implementers. Methods Case studies were conducted of five of the eight prevention areas in Victoria, Australia who implemented the Program. Cases were selected on the basis of having implemented the Program for 6 months or more. Data were collected from January to June 2015 and included 18 individual interviews, one focus group and observation of two meetings. A total of 28 individuals, including research staff (n = 4, policy makers (n = 2 and implementers (n = 22, contributed to the data collected. Thematic analysis was conducted using cross case comparisons and key themes were verified through member checking. Results Key facilitators of implementation included availability of a pre-packaged evidence based program addressing a community need, along with support and training provided by research staff to local implementers. Partnerships between researchers and policy makers facilitated initial program adoption, while local partnerships supported community implementation. Community partnerships were facilitated by local coordinators through alignment of program goals with existing policies and services. Workforce capacity for program delivery and administration was a challenge, largely overcome by embedding the Program into existing roles. Adapting the Program to fit local circumstance was critical for feasible and sustainable delivery, however

  5. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (29th, Melbourne, Australia, July 10-15, 2005). Volume 1

    Chick, Helen L., Ed.; Vincent, Jill L., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The first volume of the 29th annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education contains plenary lecture and research forum papers as listed below. Short oral communications papers, poster presentations, brief summaries of discussion groups, and working sessions are also included in the volume. The plenary…

  6. The Maintenance Effect of Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment Groups for the Chinese Parents of Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Melbourne, Australia: A 6-Month Follow-Up Study

    Wong, D. F. K.; Poon, A.; Kwok, Y. C. Lai

    2011-01-01

    Background: Caring for a child with intellectual disability can be stressful. No data on the longer-term effects of cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) on parents from a Chinese-speaking background who have children with intellectual disabilities are available in the literature. This study attempted to fill this research gap by examining the…

  7. Proceedings of the International Conferences on Internet Technologies & Society (ITS), Education Technologies (ICEduTECH), and Sustainability, Technology and Education (STE) (Melbourne, Australia, December 6-8, 2016)

    Kommers, Piet, Ed.; Issa, Tomayess, Ed.; Issa, Theodora, Ed.; McKay, Elspeth, Ed.; Isias, Pedro, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers and posters of the International Conferences on Internet Technologies & Society (ITS 2016), Educational Technologies (ICEduTech 2016) and Sustainability, Technology and Education (STE 2016), which have been organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society and…

  8. Research Reports from the First Pre-ICME Satellite Conference on Diagnostic and Prescriptive Mathematics (Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, August 21-22, 1984).

    Blane, Dudley, Ed.

    Provided are the papers presented at a conference which served as an international forum on diagnostic and prescriptive mathematics education. They are: (1) "The Evolution of the Research Council for Diagnostic and Prescriptive Mathematics" by Robert Underhill; (2) "The Interaction of Knowledge and Cognitive Processes in Diagnosis…

  9. Multibeam collection for SOJN08MV: Multibeam data collected aboard Melville from 1997-05-14 to 1997-05-26, Melbourne, Australia to Papeete, French Polynesia

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  10. Novel HIT antibody detection method using Sonoclot® coagulation analyzer.

    Wanaka, Keiko; Asada, Reiko; Miyashita, Kumiko; Kaneko, Makoto; Endo, Hirokazu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Since heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), caused by the generation of antibodies against platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes (HIT antibodies), may induce serious complications due to thrombosis, a prompt diagnosis is desirable. Functional tests with platelet activation to detect HIT antibodies are useful for diagnosis of HIT, in particular (14)C-selotonin release assay (SRA). However, they are complicated and so can be performed only in limited laboratories. We tested if a blood coagulation test using Sonoclot® analyzer can serve for the detection of HIT antibodies. A murine monoclonal antibody (HIT-MoAb) against PF4/heparin complexes was used as an alternative to human HIT antibodies. To the mixture of HIT-MoAb and heparin (0.5 U/mL, final), whole blood obtained from a healthy volunteer was added, and then the activated clotting time (ACT), clot rate (CR), and area under the curve (AUC) were measured with Sonoclot® analyzer for 30minutes. The HIT-MoAb (30 to 100μg/mL, final) concentration dependently suppressed the anticoagulation activity (prolongation of ACT and decrease of CR and AUC) of heparin. The suppression of anticoagulation effect of heparin by HIT-MoAb was demonstrated by measurements using Sonoclot® analyzer. This method may provide a new tool for screening of HIT antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Is There an Association Between Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT) and Autoimmune Disease?

    Klinkhammer, Brent; Gruchalla, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a drug-induced, immunoglobulin G medicated autoimmune disorder associated with several negative clinical outcomes including increased morbidity, mortality, and increased medical costs. Previous studies have shown associations between comorbid autoimmune diseases, but there is little known about associations between HIT and autoimmunity. To provide clinical data to suggest an association between HIT and autoimmunity. Retrospective chart review of 59 cases with a diagnosis of HIT and 251 matched controls without a HIT diagnosis, comparing the prevalence of autoimmunity in each group. A single, large upper Midwest health care system. Patients with a diagnosis of HIT were significantly more likely to have a comorbid autoimmune disease than those without a HIT diagnosis (55.9% vs 10.8%, P HIT were significantly more likely to have a diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (15.3% vs 0.0%, P HIT were significantly older than controls ( P HIT and autoimmune disease and suggests a need for more research into the relationship between HIT and autoimmunity. These results could alter the anticoagulation management of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients with a previously identified autoimmune disease. Copyright© Wisconsin Medical Society.

  12. The Melbourne Family Support Program: evidence-based strategies that prepare family caregivers for supporting palliative care patients

    Hudson, Peter; Aranda, Sanchia

    2014-01-01

    Background A key component of palliative care is support for family caregivers. Although some family caregivers identify positive aspects, the impact is typically burdensome; they are prone to physical and psychological morbidity, financial disadvantage and social isolation. Outcomes of systematic reviews have highlighted the importance of investment in family caregiver intervention research. Purpose To provide an overview of the development, evaluation and outcomes arising from of a programme of research (The Melbourne Family Support Program (FSP)), which focused on reducing the psychosocial burden of family caregivers. Methods Developmental work involved a systematic literature review; focus groups with family caregivers and health professionals; and identification of a conceptual framework. Following a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT), a programme of psychoeducational intervention studies was developed and tested; one via RCT, the others via prepost test. Results Four psychoeducational interventions, incorporating one-to-one and group format delivery, conducted in both the home and inpatient hospital/hospice were evaluated. Statistically significant outcomes included improvements in family caregivers’ preparedness, competence, positive emotions, more favourable levels of psychological wellbeing and a reduction in unmet needs. Internationally endorsed guidelines for the psychosocial support of family caregivers were produced and several resources were constructed. Fifteen publications in international peer-reviewed journals have arisen from this programme. Conclusions The interventions and resources from the Melbourne FSP provide several evidenced-based and clinically relevant approaches that focus on reducing the psychosocial burden of the caregiving role. In several instances, however, more rigorous methodological testing is advocated. PMID:24644195

  13. Current drive experiments on the HIT-II spherical torus

    Jarboe, T.R.; Raman, R.; Nelson, B.A.; Holcomb, C.T.; McCollam, K.J.; Sieck, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the following new achievements from the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT) program: a) formation and sustainment of a toroidal magnetic equilibrium using coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in a conducting shell that has an L/R time much shorter than the pulse length; b) static formation of a spherical torus with plasma current over 180 kA using a transformer and feedback controlled equilibrium coils; and c) production of a current increase in a transformer produced spherical torus using CHI. (author)

  14. Current drive experiments on the HIT-II spherical torus

    Jarboe, T.; Raman, R.; Nelson, B.; Holcomb, C.T.; McCollam, K.J.; Sieck, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the following new achievements from the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT) program: a) formation and sustainment of a toroidal magnetic equilibrium using coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in a conducting shell that has an L/R time much shorter than the pulse length; b) static formation of a spherical torus with plasma current over 180 kA using a transformer and feedback controlled equilibrium coils; and c) production of a current increase in a transformer produced spherical torus using CHI. (author)

  15. Current drive experiments in the HIT-II spherical tokamak

    Jarboe, T.R.; Gu, P.; Isso, V.A.; Jewell, P.E.; McCollam, K.J.; Nelson, B.A.; Ramon, R.; Redd, A.J.; Sieck, P.E.; Smith, R.J.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus (Hit) program has made progress in understanding relaxation and helicity injection current drive. Helicity-conserving MHD activity during the inductive (Ohmic) current ramp demonstrates the profile flattening needed for coaxial helicity injection (CHI). Results from cathode and anode central column (CC) CHI pulses are consistent with the electron locking model of current drive from a pure n=1 mode. Finally, low density CHI, compatible with Ohmic operation, has been achieved. Some enhancement of CHI discharges with the application of Ohmic is shown. (author)

  16. The Holistic Integrity Test (HIT - quantified resilience analysis

    Dobson Mike

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Holistic Integrity Test (HIT - Quantified Resilience Analysis. Rising sea levels and wider climate change mean we face an increasing risk from flooding and other natural hazards. Tough economic times make it difficult to economically justify or afford the desired level of engineered risk reduction. Add to this significant uncertainty from a range of future predictions, constantly updated with new science. We therefore need to understand not just how to reduce the risk, but what could happen should above design standard events occur. In flood terms this includes not only the direct impacts (damage and loss of life, but the wider cascade impacts to infrastructure systems and the longer term impacts on the economy and society. However, understanding the “what if” is only the first part of the equation; a range of improvement measures to mitigate such effects need to be identified and implemented. These measures should consider reducing the risk, lessening the consequences, aiding the response, and speeding up the recovery. However, they need to be objectively assessed through quantitative analysis, which underpins them technically and economically. Without such analysis, it cannot be predicted how measures will perform if the extreme events occur. It is also vital to consider all possible hazards as measures for one hazard may hinder the response to another. The Holistic Integrity Test (HIT, uses quantitative system analysis and “HITs” the site, its infrastructure, contained dangers and wider regional system to determine how it copes with a range of severe shock events, Before, During and After the event, whilst also accounting for uncertainty (as illustrated in figure 1. First explained at the TINCE 2014 Nuclear Conference in Paris, it was explained in terms of a Nuclear Facility needing to analyse the site in response to post Fukushima needs; the hit is however universally applicable. The HIT has three key risk reduction goals: The

  17. Liquid Argon TPC Signal Formation, Signal Processing and Hit Reconstruction

    Baller, Bruce [Fermilab

    2017-03-11

    This document describes the early stage of the reconstruction chain that was developed for the ArgoNeuT and MicroBooNE experiments at Fermilab. These experiments study accelerator neutrino interactions that occur in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber. Reconstructing the properties of particles produced in these interactions requires knowledge of the micro-physics processes that affect the creation and transport of ionization electrons to the readout system. A wire signal deconvolution technique was developed to convert wire signals to a standard form for hit reconstruction, to remove artifacts in the electronics chain and to remove coherent noise.

  18. ANALYSIS MUSIC CONCERTS ADOPTING THE MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF HIT PHENOMENA

    Kawahata Yasuko; Genda Etsuo; Ishii Akira

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model for the hit phenomenon in entertainment within a society is presented as a stochastic process of interactions of human dynamics. In this paper, we analyzed music to the concert.Knowing the cost of advertising the concert is difficult. But exposure to the media of the artist can be seen. We tried to analysis of music concert itself by performing a prediction of reputation of artists during the concert tour from this exposure.In this paper, The world most pop...

  19. Reality check of laboratory service effectiveness during pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Victoria, Australia.

    Catton, Michael; Druce, Julian; Papadakis, Goergina; Tran, Thomas; Birch, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    In Australia, the outbreak of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 began in Melbourne, Victoria; in the first 17 days, the Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory detected 977 cases. Although the laboratory had a pandemic plan in place, a retrospective evaluation found 3 major variations from plan assumptions: 1) higher peak demand not limited by a case definition, 2) prolonged peak demand because containment attempts continued despite widespread influenza, and 3) unexpected influence of negative test results on public health actions. Although implementation of the plan was generally successful, the greatest challenges were limited availability of skilled staff and test reagents. Despite peak demand of 1,401 tests per day, results were provided within the usual 24 hours of specimen receipt; however, turnaround time seemed slower because of slow transport times (>3 days for 45% of specimens). Hence, effective laboratory capability might be enhanced by speeding transport of specimens and improving transmission of clinical data.

  20. Use of radiation in medicine and medical research in Australia

    Bonnyman, J.

    1994-01-01

    On 1 April, 1994, The Age, Melbourne, published an article claiming that hundreds of Australians had been given radioactive doses in medical experiments performed after the Second World War. Data for the article were obtained by researching information available in the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) library and the Nation Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Minutes in Canberra. In this article, the author gives a balanced view of the situation relating to medical experiments with radioactive substances in the 1930-1940s. Usage can be classified into the following categories : established therapeutic use; investigational therapeutic use; established diagnostic use; investigational diagnostic use and research. The limited search has indicated that considerable use has been made of radioisotopes in medicine and medical research in Australia. In most of the research studies, there would have been no benefit to the patient. Although in some cases the radiation dose would have exceeded that which is acceptable today for research studies, no cases were found where the dose delivered was dangerous. The concern is that there may be isolated studies published in medical journals which could be described in poor light in the print and electronic news media

  1. Australia needs nuclear education

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A matter of increasing concern in Australian society is the absence of a Commonwealth Government policy on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The lack of University level teaching facilities in nuclear energy engineering is also perceived to be an issue of national importance which must be addressed. More and more Australians deeply regret the lack of informed realism and scientific integrity which goes into endless debates on the technical, environmental and societal aspects of nuclear energy. Within the Australian community such important issues as uranium mining in Kakadu National Park, research reactor operation at Lucas Heights, the establishment of an international nuclear waste repository in Western Australia or the domestic use of nuclear electricity generation to minimise Australia's greenhouse emissions are still being debated at the intellectual level of radio talkback programs. Decision making in such areas deserves the disciplines of appropriate tertiary education. The Australian community has a right to know the relative risks and the environmental impacts of various fuel cycles as well as the technical limitations, true costs and energy audits of the 'alternative' energy technologies. Presently the Commonwealth of Australia is without a single School of Nuclear Engineering operating at a University level. Such a situation is believed to be unprecedented amongst the developed countries of the world. It is viewed with a measure of incredulity by the academic, diplomatic and political communities of the 'developing' countries of East Asia and the Pacific Basin. Many of these have a massive investment in the growth of peaceful nuclear energy and nuclear science and technology within their borders. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Energy News

  2. The impact of climate change on hailstorms in southeastern Australia

    Niall, Stephanie; Walsh, Kevin

    2005-11-01

    Data from a number of locations around southeastern Australia were analysed to determine the influence of climate change on the frequency and intensity of hail events in this region. The relationship between Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), frequently used as a measure of atmospheric instability, and hailstorms was investigated using both NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data (a data set comprising a blend of observations and model simulations) and also direct sounding data obtained from the Australian National Climate Centre. Two locations were chosen in southeastern Australia, Mount Gambier and Melbourne, over the months August to October for the period 1980-2001. A statistically significant relationship between hail incidence and CAPE values was established for both NCEP/NCAR and sounding data at both study sites. A stronger relationship was found between hail incidence and the CAPE, which was calculated using NCEP/NCAR data, than that between hail and the CAPE from the actual sounding data. A similar analysis was also conducted at both sites using the totals-totals index (TT index), which is an alternative measure of atmospheric instability.The CSIRO Mk3 Climate System Model was used to simulate values of CAPE for Mount Gambier in an environment containing double the pre-industrial concentrations of equivalent CO2. The results showed a significant decrease in CAPE values in the future. From this, assuming the relationship between CAPE and hail remains unchanged under enhanced greenhouse conditions, it is possible that there will be a decrease in the frequency of hail in southeastern Australia if current rates of CO2 emission are sustained. The severity of future hail events was investigated using crop-loss data from insurance companies. Strongest correlations were found between the crop-loss ratio (value of crop lost to hail damage over the total insured value of crop) and the number of days in a crop season with a TT index greater than 55. Results from the

  3. Hitting Restart: Learning and Gaming in an Australian Classroom

    Altura, Gerard J.; Curwood, Jen Scott

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that video games can foster deep engagement, critical thinking, and collaborative learning. To highlight how video games promote student achievement, we focus on a year 9 elective class in Australia. Our findings suggest that this games-based class encouraged student learning and motivated students to develop advanced literacy…

  4. Australia's approach to monetary policy

    Jane Sneddon Little

    2002-01-01

    According to Australia's Reserve Bank Act, the central bank's broad policy objectives include maintaining the stability of the currency, full employment, and the economic prosperity and welfare of the people of Australia. In 1993 the Reserve Bank of Australia adopted a specific, and thus transparent, inflation target as its operating objective; it aims to keep overall inflation between 2 percent and 3 percent on average over the business cycle.

  5. Lake Carnegie, Western Australia

    2002-01-01

    Ephemeral Lake Carnegie, in Western Australia, fills with water only during periods of significant rainfall. In dry years, it is reduced to a muddy marsh. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 19, 1999. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, infrared, and red wavelengths. The image has also been sharpened using the sensor's panchromatic band. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch. This image is part of the ongoing Landsat Earth as Art series.

  6. Australia's radiation protection standards

    1989-01-01

    In Australia, public exposure to ionizing radiation above background is considered to be negligible. Average occupational exposures are about 0.5 millisievert per year, although there are some specialized industries and professions where they are much higher. The National Health and Medical Research Council has therefore adopted a position similar to that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. For the moment, no revision of exposure limits is recommended, but users are remined of their responsibility to ensure that exposures are kept low, particularly in those workplaces where significant exposures take place

  7. Experiences in occupational therapy with Afghan clients in Australia.

    Maroney, Pamela; Potter, Marianne; Thacore, Vinod Rai

    2014-02-01

    With a steady increase of refugees arriving in Australia from Afghanistan coupled with reports that prevalence of mental illness amongst Afghan refugees in South-East Melbourne is particularly high, mental health providers will need to acquire cultural competence to provide effective treatment. There is a dearth of literature on the subject of rehabilitation of Afghan psychiatric clients in the Australian context, providing the impetus for this article. To illustrate the impact of Afghan socio-cultural beliefs and attitudes on the implementation of occupational therapy and rehabilitation programmes in a mental health facility and adaptations to accommodate the needs of the clients and their families. Two case vignettes of Afghan clients are presented to illustrate the variance in goals and expectations of the clients and their families to that of the occupational therapy and rehabilitation programmes offered. Family expectations and involvement, culture-specific factors and religion play significant roles in the presentation and treatment of clients from the Muslim culture and require modification in implementation of rehabilitation programmes. A need for developing family or community-based services is proposed coupled with culturally responsive practices. Culture sensitive models of occupational therapy will need to be developed as younger generations of refugee families acculturate and need psychological help to deal with conflicts with parents and elders who hold values different from those adopted by their children born and brought up in the Australian socio-cultural environment. These and other issues mentioned above provide fertile fields for research in this evolving area of occupational therapy. © 2014 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  8. Human rights trauma and the mental health of West Papuan refugees resettled in Australia.

    Rees, Susan; Silove, Derrick M; Tay, Kuowei; Kareth, Moses

    2013-08-19

    To document the extent and nature of human rights violations and other traumatic events reported by West Papuan refugees resettled in Australia and to assess trauma-related psychological disorders, distress and disability. Australian-based sample, mixed-methods design with 44 participants, conducted in Australia between October 2007 and November 2010 in communities in North Queensland and Melbourne. West Papuan refugees aged 18 years and over (88% response rate). Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms (Harvard Trauma Questionnaire) and premigration potentially traumatic events (PTEs), psychological distress (Kessler Psychological Distress Scale [K10]), post-migration living difficulties, days out of role. Of the 44 West Papuan refugees, 40 reported one or more PTE, including inability to access medical care for family (40), lack of food and water (39) and lack of access to medical treatment (38). The most frequent postmigration stressors were separation from and worries about family members remaining in West Papua (43) and being unable to return home in an emergency because of ongoing conflict (41). Twenty-six participants reached a lower threshold for PTSD symptoms of 2.0, and 13 reached the clinical threshold of 2.5. Fourteen reported severe psychological distress. West Papuan refugees resettled in Australia report a wide range of premigration PTEs including human rights violations, as well as symptoms of PTSD and distress. The data add to concerns about the state of human rights and mental health among West Papuans.

  9. Final Report on Trends in R and D in New Materials Technology in Australia

    NONE

    1992-04-09

    Research in the field of new or advanced materials in Australia is conducted in a strong, diverse, independent university segment; a small but high quality government segment; and a very small private/commercial segment which is dominated by a few, large corporations. Australia's research and development activities relatively small in scale are away from new or advanced materials, and are oriented toward process improvement and cost reduction. Basic studies will dwindle in the future and efforts in cooperation with foreign countries will stay. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) is a governmental establishment situated in Melbourne and is the largest research institute for new or advanced materials in Australia. It has plans to study ceramics, composite materials, intermetallic compounds, catalysts, etc. Its budget is two thirds from the government and the rest from aboard or from contracts with joint ventures. Among other research institutes, the Defence Science and Technology Organization (DSTO) and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) are to be named. Semi-governmental corporations for example The Australian and Overseas Telecommunications Corporation (AOTC) and 44 universities are also engaged in some study of materials. (NEDO)

  10. Final Report on Trends in R and D in New Materials Technology in Australia

    NONE

    1992-04-09

    Research in the field of new or advanced materials in Australia is conducted in a strong, diverse, independent university segment; a small but high quality government segment; and a very small private/commercial segment which is dominated by a few, large corporations. Australia's research and development activities relatively small in scale are away from new or advanced materials, and are oriented toward process improvement and cost reduction. Basic studies will dwindle in the future and efforts in cooperation with foreign countries will stay. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) is a governmental establishment situated in Melbourne and is the largest research institute for new or advanced materials in Australia. It has plans to study ceramics, composite materials, intermetallic compounds, catalysts, etc. Its budget is two thirds from the government and the rest from aboard or from contracts with joint ventures. Among other research institutes, the Defence Science and Technology Organization (DSTO) and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) are to be named. Semi-governmental corporations for example The Australian and Overseas Telecommunications Corporation (AOTC) and 44 universities are also engaged in some study of materials. (NEDO)

  11. Orthopaedic research in Australia: a bibliographic analysis of the publication rates in the top 15 journals.

    Hohmann, Erik; Glatt, Vaida; Tetsworth, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the publications rates and characteristics of the authors for manuscripts originating from Australia in the 15 highest ranked orthopaedic journals over a 5-year period. The 15 highest ranked journals in orthopaedics, based on their 2015 impact factor, were used to establish the total number of publications and cumulative impact factor points between January 2010 and December 2014. The affiliations of the primary author and co-authors were used to determine the involvement of Australian trained orthopaedic surgeons. Study location, research topic and anatomic areas were recorded. A total of 478 publications were identified; 110 of these manuscripts were principally authored by Australian trained orthopaedic surgeons or medical professionals affiliated with orthopaedics. In addition, 158 articles were published with orthopaedic surgery involvement where one of the co-authors was an Australian trained surgeon. Australian orthopaedic surgeon (FRACS) involvement was most commonly observed in the knee (n = 90; 33.6%) followed by the hip (n = 69; 25.7%) and basic sciences (n = 27; 10.1%). Surgeons in Sydney had the highest number of publications (n = 95; 35.4%), followed by Adelaide (n = 55; 20.5%) and Melbourne (n = 54; 20.1%). The results of this study demonstrate that the minority (23%) of the publications originating from Australia in the 15 highest-ranking orthopaedic journals were principally authored by either an Australian trained surgeon or a trainee surgeon. A total of 59% of the publications focused on the hip and knee. Sydney was the leading region, followed by Adelaide and Melbourne. These three regions published 76% of all manuscripts identified during the 5-year study period. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Capture orbits around asteroids by hitting zero-velocity curves

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Hongwei; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Guangfu

    2017-12-01

    The problem of capturing a spacecraft from a heliocentric orbit into a high parking orbit around binary asteroids is investigated in the current study. To reduce the braking Δ V, a new capture strategy takes advantage of the three-body gravity of the binary asteroid to lower the inertial energy before applying the Δ V. The framework of the circular restricted three-body problem (CR3BP) is employed for the binary asteroid system. The proposed capture strategy is based on the mechanism by which inertial energy can be decreased sharply near zero-velocity curves (ZVCs). The strategy has two steps, namely, hitting the target ZVC and raising the periapsis by a small Δ V at the apoapsis. By hitting the target ZVC, the positive inertial energy decreases and becomes negative. Using a small Δ V, the spacecraft inserts into a bounded orbit around the asteroid. In addition, a rotating mass dipole model is employed for elongated asteroids, which leads to dynamics similar to that of the CR3BP. With this approach, the proposed capture strategy can be applied to elongated asteroids. Numerical simulations validate that the proposed capture strategy is applicable for the binary asteroid 90 Antiope and the elongated asteroid 216 Kleopatra.

  13. Adiabatic condition and the quantum hitting time of Markov chains

    Krovi, Hari; Ozols, Maris; Roland, Jeremie

    2010-01-01

    We present an adiabatic quantum algorithm for the abstract problem of searching marked vertices in a graph, or spatial search. Given a random walk (or Markov chain) P on a graph with a set of unknown marked vertices, one can define a related absorbing walk P ' where outgoing transitions from marked vertices are replaced by self-loops. We build a Hamiltonian H(s) from the interpolated Markov chain P(s)=(1-s)P+sP ' and use it in an adiabatic quantum algorithm to drive an initial superposition over all vertices to a superposition over marked vertices. The adiabatic condition implies that, for any reversible Markov chain and any set of marked vertices, the running time of the adiabatic algorithm is given by the square root of the classical hitting time. This algorithm therefore demonstrates a novel connection between the adiabatic condition and the classical notion of hitting time of a random walk. It also significantly extends the scope of previous quantum algorithms for this problem, which could only obtain a full quadratic speedup for state-transitive reversible Markov chains with a unique marked vertex.

  14. Promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles (PrATs): a frequent hitting scaffold.

    Devine, Shane M; Mulcair, Mark D; Debono, Cael O; Leung, Eleanor W W; Nissink, J Willem M; Lim, San Sui; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; Vazirani, Mansha; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Simpson, Jamie S; Baell, Jonathan B; Scammells, Peter J; Norton, Raymond S; Scanlon, Martin J

    2015-02-12

    We have identified a class of molecules, known as 2-aminothiazoles (2-ATs), as frequent-hitting fragments in biophysical binding assays. This was exemplified by 4-phenylthiazol-2-amine being identified as a hit in 14/14 screens against a diverse range of protein targets, suggesting that this scaffold is a poor starting point for fragment-based drug discovery. This prompted us to analyze this scaffold in the context of an academic fragment library used for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) and two larger compound libraries used for high-throughput screening (HTS). This analysis revealed that such "promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles" (PrATs) behaved as frequent hitters under both FBDD and HTS settings, although the problem was more pronounced in the fragment-based studies. As 2-ATs are present in known drugs, they cannot necessarily be deemed undesirable, but the combination of their promiscuity and difficulties associated with optimizing them into a lead compound makes them, in our opinion, poor scaffolds for fragment libraries.

  15. Coal mining in Australia

    Mills, L J

    1981-12-01

    In 1959 black coal production in Australia totalled some 21.9 million tonnes per annum, 70% of this being produced from underground mines in the coalfields of New South Wales. By 1980 output levels had increased by nearly 350% to 75.4 million tonnes per annum (54% of which was exported) compared with 5% some 20 years earlier. Because it is blessed with large reserves of coal and other forms of energy, it is inevitable that the Australian coal mining industry will be required to play a major role in the development of the international coal market through to the end of the present century. Experts now predict a need for the black coal output in Australia to be developed from its present level to a minimum of 293 million tonnes per annum by the year 2000. This paper examines the present circumstances in the Australian coal industry and attempts to outline the development which has to be undertaken in order to meet the needs of an energy hungry world.

  16. Year book Australia 1985

    Cameron, R J

    1985-01-01

    The Year Book is the principal reference work produced by the Central Office of the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). It provides a comprehensive and detailed statistical review of all aspects of the economy and social conditions of Australia. In addition, it contains descriptive matter dealing with Australia's history, geography, physiography, climate and meteorology, government, defence and repatriation services and international relations. The first Official Year Book was published in 1908. This is the sixty-ninth Year Book issued under the authority of the Commonwealth Government and follows a similar pattern to previous editions. However, chapters have been revised and new material has been added. Most of the statistics contained in this volume relate to the years ended June or December 1983 or 1984. More detailed, and in many cases more recent, statistics are available in other ABS publications. The more significant of these publications are listed at the end of the relevant chapters of the Year book; the ABS Catalogue of Publications (1101.0) lists all current publications of the ABS.

  17. Ground for concern. Australia's uranium and human survival. [Australia

    Elliot, M

    1977-01-01

    The book contains a number of articles which propose that Australia should not mine and export its uranium in order to influence the nuclear establishment against uncontrollable proliferation. Topics covered include: uranium mining in Australia, reactor safety, nuclear wastes, nuclear weapons proliferation, nuclear theft and the politics of the nuclear industry.

  18. Correlação entre as escalas visual analógica, de Melbourne e filamentos de Von Frey na avaliação da dor pós-operatória em cadelas submetidas à ovariossalpingohisterectomia Correlation between visual analog scale, Melbourne pain scale and Von Frey filaments in post-operatory pain evaluation in bitches submitted to ovaryhysterectomy

    Virgínia Heinze Pohl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação da dor em animais necessita da utilização de escalas de avaliação, que dependem da interpretação realizada por observadores. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a correlação entre a escala visual analógica (EVA, escala de Melbourne e os filamentos de Von Frey, na avaliação da dor pós-operatória em 42 cadelas adultas e saudáveis, submetidas à ovariossalpingohisterectomia (OSH. A dor pós-operatória foi avaliada por dois observadores cegos aos tratamentos analgésicos, em intervalos de uma hora, utilizando a EVA, a escala de Melbourne e os filamentos de Von Frey, aplicados ao redor da incisão cirúrgica. Foram considerados como critérios para realização da analgesia resgate uma pontuação de 50mm na EVA ou de 13 pontos na escala de Melbourne. A EVA revelou-se a escala mais sensível, uma vez que 100% dos animais receberam resgate seguindo esse método. Os valores obtidos na EVA e na escala de Melbourne determinaram boa correlação, com r=0,74, o que não ocorreu com os filamentos de Von Frey (r=-0,18. Já a correlação entre a escala de Melbourne e os filamentos de Von Frey foi de -0.37. Apesar de a EVA e a escala de Melbourne apresentarem boa correlação, sugere-se que se considere uma pontuação menor na escala de Melbourne como critério para administração de analgesia resgate.Pain evaluation in animals requires the use of evaluation scales, which depend on the interpretation made by observers. The present study aimed to evaluate the correlation between visual analog scale (VAS, Melbourne pain scale and Von Frey filaments in the evaluation of post-operatory pain in fourty two healthy adult bitches submited to ovariohysterectomy. Post-operatory pain was evaluated by two observers unaware of the analgesic protocol used, in one-hour intervals, using VAS, Melbourne pain scale and Von Frey filaments, applied around the surgical wound. A score of 50mm in VAS or 13 points in the Melbourne pain scale were

  19. SHIELD-HIT12A - a Monte Carlo particle transport program for ion therapy research

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Lühr, Armin

    2014-01-01

    . We experienced that new users quickly learn to use SHIELD-HIT12A and setup new geometries. Contrary to previous versions of SHIELD-HIT, the 12A distribution comes along with easy-to-use example files and an English manual. A new implementation of Vavilov straggling resulted in a massive reduction......Abstract. Purpose: The Monte Carlo (MC) code SHIELD-HIT simulates the transport of ions through matter. Since SHIELD-HIT08 we added numerous features that improves speed, usability and underlying physics and thereby the user experience. The “-A” fork of SHIELD-HIT also aims to attach SHIELD....... It supports native formats compatible with the heavy ion treatment planning system TRiP. Stopping power files follow ICRU standard and are generated using the libdEdx library, which allows the user to choose from a multitude of stopping power tables. Results: SHIELD-HIT12A runs on Linux and Windows platforms...

  20. Plasma response to sustainment with imposed-dynamo current drive in HIT-SI and HIT-SI3

    Hossack, A. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Chandra, R. N.; Morgan, K. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Penna, J. M.; Everson, C. J.; Nelson, B. A.

    2017-07-01

    The helicity injected torus—steady inductive (HIT-SI) program studies efficient, steady-state current drive for magnetic confinement plasmas using a novel experimental method. Stable, high-beta spheromaks have been sustained using steady, inductive current drive. Externally induced loop voltage and magnetic flux are oscillated together so that helicity and power injection are always positive, sustaining the edge plasma current indefinitely. Imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) theory further shows that the entire plasma current is sustained. The method is ideal for low aspect ratio, toroidal geometries with closed flux surfaces. Experimental studies of spheromak plasmas sustained with IDCD have shown stable magnetic profiles with evidence of pressure confinement. New measurements show coherent motion of a stable spheromak in response to the imposed perturbations. On the original device two helicity injectors were mounted on either side of the spheromak and the injected mode spectrum was predominantly n  =  1. Coherent, rigid motion indicates that the spheromak is stable and a lack of plasma-generated n  =  1 energy indicates that the maximum q is maintained below 1 during sustainment. Results from the HIT-SI3 device are also presented. Three inductive helicity injectors are mounted on one side of the spheromak flux conserver. Varying the relative injector phasing changes the injected mode spectrum which includes n  =  2, 3, and higher modes.

  1. Australia's marine virtual laboratory

    Proctor, Roger; Gillibrand, Philip; Oke, Peter; Rosebrock, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    In all modelling studies of realistic scenarios, a researcher has to go through a number of steps to set up a model in order to produce a model simulation of value. The steps are generally the same, independent of the modelling system chosen. These steps include determining the time and space scales and processes of the required simulation; obtaining data for the initial set up and for input during the simulation time; obtaining observation data for validation or data assimilation; implementing scripts to run the simulation(s); and running utilities or custom-built software to extract results. These steps are time consuming and resource hungry, and have to be done every time irrespective of the simulation - the more complex the processes, the more effort is required to set up the simulation. The Australian Marine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) is a new development in modelling frameworks for researchers in Australia. MARVL uses the TRIKE framework, a java-based control system developed by CSIRO that allows a non-specialist user configure and run a model, to automate many of the modelling preparation steps needed to bring the researcher faster to the stage of simulation and analysis. The tool is seen as enhancing the efficiency of researchers and marine managers, and is being considered as an educational aid in teaching. In MARVL we are developing a web-based open source application which provides a number of model choices and provides search and recovery of relevant observations, allowing researchers to: a) efficiently configure a range of different community ocean and wave models for any region, for any historical time period, with model specifications of their choice, through a user-friendly web application, b) access data sets to force a model and nest a model into, c) discover and assemble ocean observations from the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN, http://portal.aodn.org.au/webportal/) in a format that is suitable for model evaluation or data assimilation, and

  2. Indigenous actinorhizal plants of Australia

    Indigenous species of actinorhizal plants of Casuarinaceae, Elaeagnaceae and Rhamnaceae are found in specific regions of Australia. Most of these plants belong to Casuarinaceae, the dominant actinorhizal family in Australia. Many of them have significant environmental and economical value. The other two families with ...

  3. Building nuclear skills in Australia

    Cameron, R.

    2007-01-01

    Demand for nuclear skills in Australia has traditionally been met by recruitment but as the nuclear industry grows worldwide, such skills are in demand. This paper discusses he likely numbers of skilled people needed for a nuclear industry in Australia and what initiatives have been, or could be in, taken to address the needs

  4. Lexicography in Australia | Delbridge | Lexikos

    The emergence of Australian English as the national language is traced, and its relations with the Australian Aboriginal languages touched on. The greatest change in the language setting came with Australia's immigration policy in its post-World War II form. This resulted in the government's eventual recognition of Australia ...

  5. Recent developments: Japan and Australia

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in the nuclear industry in Japan and Australia are briefly reviewed. Topics discussed include: the world energy situation; and nuclear power generation trends and completion the nuclear fuel cycle in Japan. Recent events that suggest possible policy changes in Australia are briefly discussed

  6. Direct oral anticoagulants for treatment of HIT: update of Hamilton experience and literature review.

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Pai, Menaka; Linkins, Lori-Ann

    2017-08-31

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are attractive options for treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). We report our continuing experience in Hamilton, ON, Canada, since January 1, 2015 (when we completed our prospective study of rivaroxaban for HIT), using rivaroxaban for serologically confirmed HIT (4Ts score ≥4 points; positive platelet factor 4 [PF4]/heparin immunoassay, positive serotonin-release assay). We also performed a literature review of HIT treatment using DOACs (rivaroxaban, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban). We focused on patients who received DOAC therapy for acute HIT as either primary therapy (group A) or secondary therapy (group B; initial treatment using a non-DOAC/non-heparin anticoagulant with transition to a DOAC during HIT-associated thrombocytopenia). Our primary end point was occurrence of objectively documented thrombosis during DOAC therapy for acute HIT. We found that recovery without new, progressive, or recurrent thrombosis occurred in all 10 Hamilton patients with acute HIT treated with rivaroxaban. Data from the literature review plus these new data identified a thrombosis rate of 1 of 46 patients (2.2%; 95% CI, 0.4%-11.3%) in patients treated with rivaroxaban during acute HIT (group A, n = 25; group B, n = 21); major hemorrhage was seen in 0 of 46 patients. Similar outcomes in smaller numbers of patients were observed with apixaban (n = 12) and dabigatran (n = 11). DOACs offer simplified management of selected patients, as illustrated by a case of persisting (autoimmune) HIT (>2-month platelet recovery with inversely parallel waning of serum-induced heparin-independent serotonin release) with successful outpatient rivaroxaban management of HIT-associated thrombosis. Evidence supporting efficacy and safety of DOACs for acute HIT is increasing, with the most experience reported for rivaroxaban. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Prenatal cannabis exposure - The "first hit" to the endocannabinoid system.

    Richardson, Kimberlei A; Hester, Allison K; McLemore, Gabrielle L

    As more states and countries legalize medical and/or adult recreational marijuana use, the incidences of prenatal cannabis exposure (PCE) will likely increase. While young people increasingly view marijuana as innocuous, marijuana preparations have been growing in potency in recent years, potentially creating global clinical, public health, and workforce concerns. Unlike fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, there is no phenotypic syndrome associated with PCE. There is also no preponderance of evidence that PCE causes lifelong cognitive, behavioral, or functional abnormalities, and/or susceptibility to subsequent addiction. However, there is compelling circumstantial evidence, based on the principles of teratology and fetal malprogramming, suggesting that pregnant women should refrain from smoking marijuana. The usage of marijuana during pregnancy perturbs the fetal endogenous cannabinoid signaling system (ECSS), which is present and active from the early embryonic stage, modulating neurodevelopment and continuing this role into adulthood. The ECSS is present in virtually every brain structure and organ system, and there is also evidence that this system is important in the regulation of cardiovascular processes. Endocannabinoids (eCBs) undergird a broad spectrum of processes, including the early stages of fetal neurodevelopment and uterine implantation. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive chemical in cannabis, enters maternal circulation, and readily crosses the placental membrane. THC binds to CB receptors of the fetal ECSS, altering neurodevelopment and possibly rewiring ECSS circuitry. In this review, we discuss the Double-Hit Hypothesis as it relates to PCE. We contend that PCE, similar to a neurodevelopmental teratogen, delivers the first hit to the ECSS, which is compromised in such a way that a second hit (i.e., postnatal stressors) will precipitate the emergence of a specific phenotype. In summary, we conclude that perturbations of the

  8. Warragamba. Sydney, Australia

    Seshadri, B.

    1959-02-01

    Full Text Available El pantano de Warragamba, cuyo objeto es el de producir energía hidroeléctrica en su primera fase de explotación y solamente agua potable cuando las necesidades de ésta así lo requieran, se haya situado en las proximidades de Sydney (Australia. Su extensa cuenca está constituida por una serie de ríos en cuyas cabeceras se han construido diques de retención, que no solamente almacenan grandes cantidades de agua, sino que sirven parcialmente para la regularización de caudales, función de gran interés en esta zona donde las avenidas, seguidas de extensas inundaciones, se hacen sentir con relativa frecuencia.

  9. South Australia, uranium enrichment

    1976-02-01

    The Report sets out the salient data relating to the establishment of a uranium processing centre at Redcliff in South Australia. It is conceived as a major development project for the Commonwealth, the South Australian Government and Australian Industry comprising the refining and enrichment of uranium produced from Australian mines. Using the data currently available in respect of markets, demand, technology and possible financial return from overseas sales, the project could be initiated immediately with hexafluoride production, followed rapidly in stages by enrichment production using the centrifuge process. A conceptual development plan is presented, involving a growth pattern that would be closely synchronised with the mining and production of yellowcake. The proposed development is presented in the form of an eight-and-half-year programme. Costs in this Report are based on 1975 values, unless otherwise stated. (Author)

  10. Interrater reliability of the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    Spirtos, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: We examined the interrater reliability of the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function. METHOD: Three occupational therapists independently scored 34 videotaped assessments of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy aged 6 yr, 1 mo, to 14 yr, 5 mo. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) at a 95% confidence interval were calculated for total scores, category scores, and item scores. RESULTS: The correlation between raters\\' total scores was high (ICC = .961). The highest correlation for test components between raters was found for fluency (ICC = .902), followed by range of movement (ICC = .866), and the lowest correlation was found for quality of movement (ICC = .683). The ICCs for individual test item scores varied and ranged from .368 to .899. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated high interrater reliability for total scores, with scoring of some individual components and items requiring further consideration from both a clinical and a research perspective.

  11. Declining prevalence of undiagnosed HIV in Melbourne : results from community-based bio-behavioural studies of gay and bisexual men

    Stoové, Mark; Asselin, Jason; Pedrana, Alisa; Lea, Toby; Hellard, Margaret; Wilson, David B; Prestage, Garrett; de Wit, John; Holt, Martin

    OBJECTIVE: To measure changes in undiagnosed HIV among gay and bisexual men (GBM) in Melbourne. METHODS: Undiagnosed HIV was compared between GBM recruited anonymously in 2008 in gay venues only and GBM anonymously or confidentially (results delivery) recruited in 2014 at gay venues and a community

  12. Film and Language Learning in Victorian Schools: A Study of the 2009 Next Gen Program of the "Melbourne International Film Festival"

    Lo Bianco, Hana

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the role of film in language education based on a study of the 2009 "Melbourne International Film Festival" (MIFF). It is structured around a literature review and results from surveys of students and teachers who participated in the young people's section of the program, Next Gen. The article argues that film…

  13. The Melbourne Family Support Program: evidence-based strategies that prepare family caregivers for supporting palliative care patients.

    Hudson, Peter; Aranda, Sanchia

    2014-09-01

    A key component of palliative care is support for family caregivers. Although some family caregivers identify positive aspects, the impact is typically burdensome; they are prone to physical and psychological morbidity, financial disadvantage and social isolation. Outcomes of systematic reviews have highlighted the importance of investment in family caregiver intervention research. To provide an overview of the development, evaluation and outcomes arising from of a programme of research (The Melbourne Family Support Program (FSP)), which focused on reducing the psychosocial burden of family caregivers. Developmental work involved a systematic literature review; focus groups with family caregivers and health professionals; and identification of a conceptual framework. Following a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT), a programme of psychoeducational intervention studies was developed and tested; one via RCT, the others via prepost test. Four psychoeducational interventions, incorporating one-to-one and group format delivery, conducted in both the home and inpatient hospital/hospice were evaluated. Statistically significant outcomes included improvements in family caregivers' preparedness, competence, positive emotions, more favourable levels of psychological wellbeing and a reduction in unmet needs. Internationally endorsed guidelines for the psychosocial support of family caregivers were produced and several resources were constructed. Fifteen publications in international peer-reviewed journals have arisen from this programme. The interventions and resources from the Melbourne FSP provide several evidenced-based and clinically relevant approaches that focus on reducing the psychosocial burden of the caregiving role. In several instances, however, more rigorous methodological testing is advocated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. The Job Consciousness for Radiological Technologists in Korea, Canada, and Australia

    Han, Eun Ok; Kwon, Deok Mun; Park, Kwang Hun; Choi, Seung Yoon; Jung, Chung Hyun [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Il [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Woo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This study attempts to provide basic information on overseas employment to the radiological technologists and students majoring in radiology in Korea who consider the overseas employment by investigating the job consciousness for radiological technologists in Canada and Australia which have a high level of interest for overseas employment and want to compare their status with that of Korean radiological technologists. This study was performed by visiting hospitals such as Prince George Regional Hospital, 1475 Edmonton Street, Prince George, BC, Canada on August 13, 2007, Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road Melbourne 3004, Australia on August 4, 2008, and other Korea hospitals that show the similar scale as Canada and Australia on September 10, 2007. The results were summarized as follows : 1. Differences were observed in this sexual composition, such as 18 males (90%) in Korea, 14 females (73.7%) in Canada, and 25 females in Australia (86.2%). 2. The item of 'aptitude' which is one of the most important criteria, showed the highest level in Korea, Canada, and Australia, and the second most considered item was 'salary'. 3. In the values in jobs, the items of 'economic self-sufficiency', 'recognized by others', and 'establishing a social position' represented high levels in Korea, and the items of 'like the job itself', 'establishing self-actualization', 'feel the meaning of life', and 'make new friends' showed high levels in Canada and Australia. 4. Regarding the item of 'a job is important as much as a marriage', 'Yes' showed high level in Korea, and 'No' showed high levels in Canada and Australia. 5. Radiological technologists in Korea demonstrated a low level in the job consciousness compared to those of Canada and Australia. Although this study shows some limitations for showing whole idea of radiological technologists due to the lack of the scope

  15. Inflammation and the Two-Hit Hypothesis of Schizophrenia

    Feigenson, Keith A.; Kusnecov, Alex W.; Silverstein, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    The high societal and individual cost of schizophrenia necessitates finding better, more effective treatment, diagnosis, and prevention strategies. One of the obstacles in this endeavor is the diverse set of etiologies that comprises schizophrenia. A substantial body of evidence has grown over the last few decades to suggest that schizophrenia is a heterogeneous syndrome with overlapping symptoms and etiologies. At the same time, an increasing number of clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have shown links between schizophrenia and inflammatory conditions. In this review, we analyze the literature on inflammation and schizophrenia, with a particular focus on comorbidity, biomarkers, and environmental insults. We then identify several mechanisms by which inflammation could influence the development of schizophrenia via the two-hit hypothesis. Lastly, we note the relevance of these findings to clinical applications in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:24247023

  16. Tracking, aiming, and hitting the UAV with ordinary assault rifle

    Racek, František; Baláž, Teodor; Krejčí, Jaroslav; Procházka, Stanislav; Macko, Martin

    2017-10-01

    The usage small-unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is significantly increasing nowadays. They are being used as a carrier of military spy and reconnaissance devices (taking photos, live video streaming and so on), or as a carrier of potentially dangerous cargo (intended for destruction and killing). Both ways of utilizing the UAV cause the necessity to disable it. From the military point of view, to disable the UAV means to bring it down by a weapon of an ordinary soldier that is the assault rifle. This task can be challenging for the soldier because he needs visually detect and identify the target, track the target visually and aim on the target. The final success of the soldier's mission depends not only on the said visual tasks, but also on the properties of the weapon and ammunition. The paper deals with possible methods of prediction of probability of hitting the UAV targets.

  17. Aggressive B cell Lymphoma: Optimal Therapy for MYC-positive, Double-Hit, and Triple-Hit DLBCL.

    Dunleavy, Kieron

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 10% of cases of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) harbor a MYC rearrangement and this has been associated with an inferior outcome following standard therapy across many different studies. Double-hit and triple-hit lymphomas harbor concurrent rearrangements of MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 and are also associated with a very aggressive course and poor clinical outcome. It is unclear and there is lack of consensus on how these diseases should be approached therapeutically. They are characterized typically by high tumor proliferation and likely require Burkitt lymphoma-type strategies and several retrospective studies suggest that more intensive approaches than rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) may be beneficial. One challenge in this respect is that most patients with these diseases are older than 60 years and generally have poor tolerability of regimens typically used in Burkitt lymphoma. Dose-adjusted EPOCH-R is an alternative effective immunochemotherapy platform for DLBCL and is effective in Burkitt lymphoma, and retrospective studies suggest that it is effective and feasible in patients with DLBCL that harbors a MYC rearrangement with or without a BCL-2 translocation (double-hit). A multicenter study of this approach in MYC-rearranged DLBCL is ongoing and preliminary results are very encouraging. There is a lack of consensus on the role of consolidation stem cell transplantation in patients who achieve a good response to initial therapy but at this point in time, no (retrospective) studies have demonstrated any benefit. These diseases are also associated with a high rate of CNS involvement and progression and checking for cerebrospinal fluid by cytology and flow cytometry at initial diagnosis should be considered. In summary, based on retrospective data and preliminary prospective data (as more mature data is awaited), while Burkitt-type regimens may be feasible in young patients, DA-EPOCH-R is a

  18. Effect of long-term acclimatization on summer thermal comfort in outdoor spaces: a comparative study between Melbourne and Hong Kong.

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun

    2018-04-12

    The Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) is an index for assessing outdoor thermal environment which aims to be applicable universally to different climates. However, the scale of UTCI thermal stress classification can be interpreted depending on the context. Previous studies validated the UTCI in individual cities, but comparative studies between different cities are scarce. This study examines the differences in thermal perception and clothing choices between residents from two climate zones over similar UTCI ranges in summer. We compared summer thermal comfort survey data from Melbourne (n = 2162, January-February 2014) and Hong Kong (n = 414, July-August 2007). We calculated the UTCI from outdoor weather station data and used t tests to compare the differences in thermal sensation and clothing between Hong Kong and Melbourne residents. When the UTCI was between 23.0 and 45.9 °C, Melbourne residents wore significantly more clothing (0.1 clo) than Hong Kong residents. Hong Kong residents reported neutral to warm sensation at a higher UTCI range compared with the dynamic thermal sensation (DTS) model. Moreover, Melbourne residents reported warm and hot sensation at a higher UTCI range than the DTS model. Respondents in Melbourne also exhibited different responses to the mean radiant temperature under shaded and sunny conditions, while such a trend was not observed in Hong Kong. It would be advisable to define different thermal sensation thresholds for the UTCI scale according to different climate zones for better prediction of the outdoor thermal comfort of different urban populations.

  19. HIT-6 and MIDAS as measures of headache disability in a headache referral population.

    Sauro, Khara M; Rose, Marianne S; Becker, Werner J; Christie, Suzanne N; Giammarco, Rose; Mackie, Gordon F; Eloff, Arnoldas G; Gawel, Marek J

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the headache impact test (HIT-6) and the migraine disability assessment scale (MIDAS) as clinical measures of headache-related disability. The degree of headache-related disability is an important factor in treatment planning. Many quality of life and headache disability measures exist but it is unclear which of the available disability measures is the most helpful in planning and measuring headache management. We compared HIT-6 and MIDAS scores from 798 patients from the Canadian Headache Outpatient Registry and Database (CHORD). Correlation and regression analyses were used to examine the relationships between the HIT-6 and MIDAS total scores, headache frequency and intensity, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) scores. A positive correlation was found between HIT-6 and MIDAS scores (r = 0.52). The BDI-II scores correlated equally with the HIT-6 and the MIDAS (r = 0.42). There was a non-monotonic relationship between headache frequency and the MIDAS, and a non-linear monotonic relationship between headache frequency and the HIT-6 (r = 0.24). The correlation was higher between the intensity and the HIT-6 scores (r = 0.46), than MIDAS (r = 0.26) scores. Seventy-nine percent of patients fell into the most severe HIT-6 disability category, compared with the 57% of patients that fell into the most severe MIDAS disability category. Significantly more patients were placed in a more severe category with the HIT-6 than with the MIDAS (McNemar chi-square = 191 on 6 d.f., P MIDAS appear to measure headache-related disability in a similar fashion. However, some important differences may exist. Headache intensity appears to influence HIT-6 score more than the MIDAS, whereas the MIDAS was influenced more by headache frequency. Using the HIT-6 and MIDAS together may give a more accurate assessment of a patient's headache-related disability.

  20. Lead generation and examples opinion regarding how to follow up hits.

    Orita, Masaya; Ohno, Kazuki; Warizaya, Masaichi; Amano, Yasushi; Niimi, Tatsuya

    2011-01-01

    In fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), not only identifying the starting fragment hit to be developed but also generating a drug lead from that starting fragment hit is important. Converting fragment hits to leads is generally similar to a high-throughput screening (HTS) hits-to-leads approach in that properties associated with activity for a target protein, such as selectivity against other targets and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADME/Tox), and physicochemical properties should be taken into account. However, enhancing the potency of the fragment hit is a key requirement in FBDD, unlike HTS, because initial fragment hits are generally weak. This enhancement is presently achieved by adding additional chemical groups which bind to additional parts of the target protein or by joining or combining two or more hit fragments; however, strategies for effecting greater improvements in effective activity are needed. X-ray analysis is a key technology attractive for converting fragments to drug leads. This method makes it clear whether a fragment hit can act as an anchor and provides insight regarding introduction of functional groups to improve fragment activity. Data on follow-up chemical synthesis of fragment hits has allowed for the differentiation of four different strategies: fragment optimization, fragment linking, fragment self-assembly, and fragment evolution. Here, we discuss our opinion regarding how to follow up on fragment hits, with a focus on the importance of fragment hits as an anchor moiety to so-called hot spots in the target protein using crystallographic data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hit-and-run, hit-and-stay, and commensal bacteria present different peptide content when viewed from the perspective of the T cell.

    He, Lu; De Groot, Anne S; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-11-27

    Different types of bacteria face different pressures from the immune system, with those that persist ("hit-and-stay") potentially having to adapt more in order to escape than those prone to short-lived infection ("hit-and-run"), and with commensal bacteria potentially different from both due to additional physical mechanisms for avoiding immune detection. The Janus Immunogenicity Score (JIS) was recently developed to assess the likelihood of T cell recognition of an antigen, using an analysis that considers both binding of a peptide within the antigen by major histocompatability complex (MHC) and recognition of the peptide:MHC complex by cognate T cell receptor (TCR). This score was shown to be predictive of T effector vs. T regulatory or null responses in experimental data, as well as to distinguish viruses representative of the hit-and-stay vs. hit-and-run phenotypes. Here, JIS-based analyses were conducted in order to characterize the extent to which the pressure to avoid T cell recognition is manifested in genomic differences among representative hit-and-run, hit-and-stay, and commensal bacteria. Overall, extracellular proteins were found to have different JIS profiles from cytoplasmic ones. Contrasting the bacterial groups, extracellular proteins were shown to be quite different across the groups, much more so than intracellular proteins. The differences were evident even at the level of corresponding peptides in homologous protein pairs from hit-and-run and hit-and-stay bacteria. The multi-level analysis of patterns of immunogenicity across different groups of bacteria provides a new way to approach questions of bacterial immune camouflage or escape, as well as to approach the selection and optimization of candidates for vaccine design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chest radiographic appearances in adult inpatients admitted with swine flu infection: local experience in Melbourne

    Pirakalathanan, Janu; Lau, Kenneth K.; Joosten, Simon A.

    2013-01-01

    The influenza A virus (H1N1) pandemic began in Mexico in March 2009. As of July 2009, there were 5298 reported cases in Australia including 10 deaths. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the local chest radiographic findings in adult inpatients with proven H1N1, to assess the radiological disease progression and resolution, and to evaluate whether the severity of chest X-rays findings had a bearing on the length of admission and need for intensive care admission. Eleven H1N1 patients (5 males and 6 females, mean age of 36), presenting with cough (64%), fever (55%) and shortness of breath (55%), were admitted to our hospital between 13 August and 1 November 2010. Details of radiographic features, risk factors, clinical course including length of stay, doubling time of consolidation and time for 50% resolution of consolidation were recorded and analysed. Seventy-three per cent of our patients presented with bilateral mid and/or lower zone alveolar consolidation. One patient with underlying cystic fibrosis had only bilateral upper zone consolidation. No pleural effusion, lymphadenopathy or cardiomegaly was noted on any of the plain chest radiographs. The mean doubling time of consolidation was 1.5 days. The mean time for 50% resolution of consolidation after antiviral treatment was 10.5 days. The average length of stay in hospital was 22 days. Ninety-one per cent of our patients required intensive-care unit admission with 50% of those requiring intubation. Rapid progression of bilateral mid and lower zone air-space opacities in relatively young unwell patients, with lack of pleural effusion, pericardial effusion or lymphadenopathy on plain radiographs, should raise the clinical suspicion of H1N1 infection. Patients requiring hospital admission usually show slow clinical and radiological improvement, and require prolonged hospital stays.

  3. A short history of the origins of radiography in Australia

    Smith, Tony

    2009-01-01

    At the time of Roeentgen's discovery of X-rays, Australia was in a period of social transition. Federation under a centralised Australian government was at hand, while regional population centres were growing rapidly under various influences, such as the gold rush of the 1850s, the opening up of new pastoral land and the Great Drought of the 1890s. Reports of Roeentgen's discovery first appeared in Australian newspapers towards the end of January 1896. The first limited description of his experimental techniques appeared on the 15th February, arousing excitement in the antipodean scientific community. Independent attempts were made to produce X-ray images at several locations in Australia, the necessary apparatus being widely available. Three men have been separately credited with having been the first to produce a radiographic image using the techniques described by Roeentgen. Thomas Rankin Lyle, a Professor at Melbourne University performed a demonstration on the 3rd March 1896, X-raying a colleague's foot. The image was reproduced in the newspaper the following day. Lyle also performed a pre-surgical foreign body localisation on 12th June. Meanwhile, electrician and amateur scientist, Walter Filmer, produced a radiograph at Newcastle, also to localise a needle prior to surgical removal. Although the date of this examination is uncertain, it reportedly took place within days of the 15th February newspaper story, making it both the first successful attempt at radiography and the first medical use of X-rays in Australia. Filmer was later appointed to Newcastle Hospital as honorary 'X-ray operator'. The third was a catholic priest and Science Master at St Stanislaus' College at Bathurst in western New South Wales, Father Joseph Slattery. On 25th July 1896 he X-rayed the hand of a former student to locate gunshot pellets, saving the hand from amputation. All three men were remarkable for their scientific knowledge and ability and all are deserving of the title of

  4. A short history of the origins of radiography in Australia

    Smith, Tony [University Department of Rural Health, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Locked Bag 9783 NEMSC, Tamworth NSW 2348 (Australia)], E-mail: tony.smith@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au

    2009-12-15

    At the time of Roeentgen's discovery of X-rays, Australia was in a period of social transition. Federation under a centralised Australian government was at hand, while regional population centres were growing rapidly under various influences, such as the gold rush of the 1850s, the opening up of new pastoral land and the Great Drought of the 1890s. Reports of Roeentgen's discovery first appeared in Australian newspapers towards the end of January 1896. The first limited description of his experimental techniques appeared on the 15th February, arousing excitement in the antipodean scientific community. Independent attempts were made to produce X-ray images at several locations in Australia, the necessary apparatus being widely available. Three men have been separately credited with having been the first to produce a radiographic image using the techniques described by Roeentgen. Thomas Rankin Lyle, a Professor at Melbourne University performed a demonstration on the 3rd March 1896, X-raying a colleague's foot. The image was reproduced in the newspaper the following day. Lyle also performed a pre-surgical foreign body localisation on 12th June. Meanwhile, electrician and amateur scientist, Walter Filmer, produced a radiograph at Newcastle, also to localise a needle prior to surgical removal. Although the date of this examination is uncertain, it reportedly took place within days of the 15th February newspaper story, making it both the first successful attempt at radiography and the first medical use of X-rays in Australia. Filmer was later appointed to Newcastle Hospital as honorary 'X-ray operator'. The third was a catholic priest and Science Master at St Stanislaus' College at Bathurst in western New South Wales, Father Joseph Slattery. On 25th July 1896 he X-rayed the hand of a former student to locate gunshot pellets, saving the hand from amputation. All three men were remarkable for their scientific knowledge and ability and all are

  5. Supply constraints : Australia and Canada coal industry face logistics and capacity challenges

    Borsato, J.

    2010-01-01

    Australia and Canada are benefiting from a global increase in coal consumption, but face challenges regarding coal and coal export capacity. Coal is Australia's biggest export commodity, accounting for over 50 percent of world coking coal exports, with almost 75 percent of those exports destined for Asian markets, primarily Japan. However, the number of ships delayed at Australian ports hit a record of 223 bulk carriers in early 2010. Compared to Canada, Australia faces greater logistical issues getting coal into port and onto ships at its 9 loading terminals. Two of Canada's 3 major shipping terminals, Westshore and Neptune, have some additional capacity. Its third terminal, Ridley Island, has considerable potential to carry more coal. With 98 percent of all coal moved by rail in Australia, rail issues also hinder growth. A national approach to planning freight transport on both roads and rail is being developed. While infrastructure issues remain the single greatest barrier to export growth for Australia's coal sector, Canada's most immediate issues pertain to mine permitting and mine-site expansion. In 2009, Canada exported 28 million tonnes of coal, 90 percent of it metallurgical. With approximately 70 million tonnes of annual production, mostly in British Columbia and Alberta, coal remains the number one commodity in Canada carried by rails and shipped from ports. 1 fig.

  6. Asian student migration to Australia.

    Shu, J; Hawthorne, L

    1996-01-01

    "This paper presents an overview of Asian student migration to Australia, together with an analysis of political and educational aspects of the overseas student programme. It focuses on some significant consequences of this flow for Australia. The characteristics of key student groups are contrasted to provide some perspective of the diversity of historical and cultural backgrounds, with the source countries of Malaysia, Indonesia and PRC [China] selected as case studies. Since the issue of PRC students in Australia has attracted considerable public attention and policy consideration, particular focus is placed on their experience." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA) excerpt

  7. Algae Reefs in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia

    1990-01-01

    Numerous algae reefs are seen in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia (26.0S, 113.5E) especially in the southern portions of the bay. The south end is more saline because tidal flow in and out of the bay is restricted by sediment deposited at the north and central end of the bay opposite the mouth of the Wooramel River. This extremely arid region produces little sediment runoff so that the waters are very clear, saline and rich in algae.

  8. 77 FR 57567 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-09-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  9. 77 FR 50690 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-08-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  10. 77 FR 15760 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  11. 76 FR 39108 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-07-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS ACTION: Notice of... the public. Name of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide...

  12. 77 FR 37407 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  13. 76 FR 22397 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-04-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  14. 77 FR 22787 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-04-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  15. 77 FR 27459 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide recommendations to...

  16. A C++ object-oriented toolkit for track finding with k-dimensional hits

    Uiterwijk, J.W.E.; Panman, J.; Vyver, B. van de

    2006-01-01

    A library is described for the recognition of tracks in a set of hits. The hits are assumed to be k-dimensional points (k-d), with k>=1, of which a subset can be grouped into tracks by using short-range correlations. A connection graph between the hits is created by sorting the hits first in k-d space using one of the developed, fast, k-space containers. The track-finding algorithm considers any connection between two hits as a possible track seed and grows these seeds into longer track segments using a modified depth-first search of the connection graph. All hit-acceptance decisions are called via abstract methods of an acceptance criterion class which isolates the library from the application's hit and track model. An application is tuned for a particular tracking environment by creating a concrete implementation for the hit and track acceptance calculations. The implementer is free to trade tracking time for acceptance complexity (influencing efficiency) depending on the requirements of the particular application. Results for simulated data show that the track finding is both efficient and fast even for high noise environments

  17. 76 FR 28783 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  18. 76 FR 79684 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-12-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  19. 77 FR 73660 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meetings; Notice of Meetings

    2012-12-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meetings; Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  20. 77 FR 28881 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-05-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide recommendations to...

  1. 76 FR 46298 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  2. 77 FR 65691 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-10-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  3. 76 FR 70455 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-11-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide recommendations to...

  4. 77 FR 2727 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  5. 75 FR 21629 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2010-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Policy Committee...

  6. 76 FR 14975 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: to provide recommendations to...

  7. 76 FR 50734 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  8. 76 FR 55912 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2011-09-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... the public. Name of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide...

  9. 75 FR 6398 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee's...

    2010-02-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee's Adoption/Certification Workgroup Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee's Adoption/Certification Workgroup. General Function of the...

  10. 77 FR 41788 - HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    2012-07-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... of Committee: HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide recommendations to...

  11. 76 FR 1432 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    2011-01-10

    ... Technology; HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. This notice announces a... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards...

  12. 75 FR 8954 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    2010-02-26

    ... Technology; HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS ACTION: Notice of meeting. This notice announces a... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards...

  13. 75 FR 70923 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee...

    2010-11-19

    ... Technology; HIT Policy Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS ACTION: Notice of meeting. This notice announces a... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Policy Committee...

  14. 75 FR 70923 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    2010-11-19

    ... Technology; HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. This notice announces a... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards...

  15. 75 FR 29761 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology: HIT Standards Committee...

    2010-05-27

    ... Technology: HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. This notice announces a... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards...

  16. Role of Health Information Technology (HIT) in disability determinations: when medical records become medical evidence.

    Tulu, Bengisu; Daniels, Susan; Feldman, Sue; Horan, Thomas A

    2008-11-06

    This exploratory study investigated the impact of incomplete medical evidence on the SSA disability determination process and the role of HIT as a solution. We collected qualitative data from nineteen expert-interviews. Findings indicate that HIT can lead to innovative solutions that can significantly improve the determination process.

  17. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Impact of Health Information Technology (I-HIT) scale.

    Dykes, Patricia C; Hurley, Ann; Cashen, Margaret; Bakken, Suzanne; Duffy, Mary E

    2007-01-01

    The use of health information technology (HIT) for the support of communication processes and data and information access in acute care settings is a relatively new phenomenon. A means of evaluating the impact of HIT in hospital settings is needed. The purpose of this research was to design and psychometrically evaluate the Impact of Health Information Technology scale (I-HIT). I-HIT was designed to measure the perception of nurses regarding the ways in which HIT influences interdisciplinary communication and workflow patterns and nurses' satisfaction with HIT applications and tools. Content for a 43-item tool was derived from the literature, and supported theoretically by the Coiera model and by nurse informaticists. Internal consistency reliability analysis using Cronbach's alpha was conducted on the 43-item scale to initiate the item reduction process. Items with an item total correlation of less than 0.35 were removed, leaving a total of 29 items. Item analysis, exploratory principal component analysis and internal consistency reliability using Cronbach's alpha were used to confirm the 29-item scale. Principal components analysis with Varimax rotation produced a four-factor solution that explained 58.5% of total variance (general advantages, information tools to support information needs, information tools to support communication needs, and workflow implications). Internal consistency of the total scale was 0.95 and ranged from 0.80-0.89 for four subscales. I-HIT demonstrated psychometric adequacy and is recommended to measure the impact of HIT on nursing practice in acute care settings.

  18. 76 FR 4354 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    2011-01-25

    ... Technology; HIT Standards Committee Advisory Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. This notice announces a... Information Technology (ONC). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: HIT Standards...

  19. Visual Illusions and the Control of Ball Placement in Goal-Directed Hitting

    Caljouw, Simone R.; Van der Kamp, John; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2010-01-01

    When hitting, kicking, or throwing balls at targets, online control in the target area is impossible. We assumed this lack of late corrections in the target area would induce an effect of a single-winged Muller-Lyer illusion on ball placement. After extensive practice in hitting balls to different landing locations, participants (N = 9) had to hit…

  20. Neutron scattering in Australia

    Knott, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains

  1. Neutron scattering in Australia

    Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains.

  2. Australia's unresolved nuclear problems

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines three acts of monumental incompetence which have all but destroyed Australia's once great potential to play a leading role in nuclear technology in South East Asia. Political chicanery and monumental technological and economic foresight, professional weakness and vacillation in the engineering community and the vicious pseudo scientific propaganda of most branches of the media, the teaching profession and sadly, even the politicisation of our churches, has all but destroyed a potential Australian ''sunrise industry''. Over the next forty years the population of planet Earth will approximately double. Unless Australians realise that their children and grand-children, and future generations of our neighbouring third world countries will require nuclear technology for an equitable and acceptable shared life-style, they will continue to allow taxpayers' money to be wasted on costly, technically unacceptable and environmentally undesirable attempts to develop ''alternative'' or ''renewable'' energy sources. These are neither alternative nor renewable but politically trendy. The tragedy of such projects is that their limited applicability and suitability for small scale energy production by wealthy users in limited geographical locations will only increase the need for base load energy supplies of the conventional type. Unless this is nuclear, planet Earth faces environmental despolation of monumental proportions. (J.P.N.)

  3. Environmental radioactivity in Australia

    Twining, John [Environmental Science Division, ANSTO, Menai (Australia)

    2002-06-01

    Environmental research mainly carried out at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) related to nuclear activities in Australia such as uranium mining, transfer factor studies related to U- and Th-series radionuclides, dose assessment modelling, radiation monitoring, and nuclear waste repository, is outlined. Many aspects of radioecology, marine and freshwater geochemistry and radiochemical dating techniques; bioaccumulation including archival monitoring and kinetics, ground water studies, atmospheric issues including climate change and geomorphology are being studied with the help of a high neutron flux reactor, a cyclotron and a tandem accelerator as well as modern analytical equipment. Only a very small number of examples of radioactivity applications are presented: Microbiotic crusts covering up to 50% of the soil surface at Maralinga nuclear test site where more than 80% of the residual Am-241 was found to retain within the top 5 mm after 30 years. SIMS analysis of crocodile bones indicating that the only metal affected by U mining in Kakadu region was lead (Pb). In mineral sands such as zircon, U(VI) is more stable than U(IV) as evidenced by ion beam and SEM imaging and XANES analysis. Use of radioisotopes in atmospheric and climate studies, terrestrial studies particularly in dating techniques, and aquatic-continental and aquatic-ocean waters, and in biological studies such as biokinetics of copper metabolism in rainbow fishes living downstream of a mine are presented. (S. Ohno)

  4. Heron Island, Australia

    2002-01-01

    Heron Island is located at the sourthern end of Australia's 2,050 km-long Great Barrier Reef. Surrounded by coral reef and home to over 1000 species of fish, scuba divers and scientists alike are drawn to the island's resort and research station. The true-color image above was taken by Space Imaging's Ikonos satellite with a resolution of 4 meters per pixel-high enough to see individual boats tied up at the small marina. The narrow channel leading from the marina to the ocean was blasted and dredged decades ago, before the island became a national park. Since then the Australian government has implemented conservation measures, such as limiting the number of tourists and removing or recycling, instead of incinerating, all trash. One of the applications of remote sensing data from Ikonos is environmental monitoring, including studies of coral reef health. For more information about the island, read Heron Island. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data copyright Space Imaging

  5. Factors associated with ownership and use of written asthma action plans in North-West Melbourne.

    Sulaiman, N D; Barton, C A; Abramson, M J; Liaw, T; Harris, C; Chondros, P; Dharmage, S; Clarke, D

    2004-12-01

    Written asthma action plans (WAAPs) have become a core component of asthma management in Australia. We investigated ownership, utilisation and factors associated with ownership of asthma action plans by caregivers. 443/776 (57%) caregivers of children aged 2-14 years with asthma were identified from 32 GP clinics as part of a randomised controlled trial (RCT), and completed self-administered questionnaires. Only 29% of participants owned a WAAP, while 13% possessed verbal instructions, and 56% had no plan. An asthma action plan for children, which was developed by a general practitioner (GP) was more likely to comprise verbal instructions (p = 0.001), while action plans developed by paediatricians were more likely to be written (p time they visited their doctor for asthma. Factors associated with WAAP ownership included nights waking (p = 0.013), self reported severity (p = 0.001), and days lost from school (p = 0.037). Children who had seen a GP in the last 3 months for asthma, or who had been to the Emergency Department (ED) or hospital were more likely to possess a WAAP (p < 0.001). Caregivers who were less satisfied with their child's asthma control were more likely to own a WAAP (p = 0.037). Caregivers with any action plan found it useful and 82% reported using their action plan for management of an acute attack. However, caregivers with a WAAP were more likely to adhere to the plan for an acute attack compared to caregivers with verbal instructions (OR = 4.5, p < 0.05). Caregivers with a WAAP were more knowledgeable about asthma (p = 0.002), better able to recognise the difference between preventer and reliever medications (p = 0.01), and better able to recognise an asthma attack (p = 0.006). Ownership of WAAPs in this group was still too low. Importantly, caregivers with written instructions were more knowledgeable about asthma and more likely to report following the action plan during an asthma attack.

  6. Recent trends in Australian percutaneous coronary intervention practice: insights from the Melbourne Interventional Group registry.

    Yan, Bryan P; Ajani, Andrew E; Clark, David J; Duffy, Stephen J; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Brennan, Angela L; Loane, Philippa; Reid, Christopher M

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) practice trends and 12-month outcomes in Australia in the era of drug-eluting stents (DES). Prospective study of consecutive patients undergoing 9204 PCIs between 1 April 2004 and 31 March 2008 at seven Victorian public hospitals. Temporal trends in baseline characteristics and in-hospital and 12-month clinical outcomes including death, myocardial infarction (MI), target vessel revascularisation (TVR) and composite major adverse cardiac events (MACE), from year to year. Between 2004-2005 and 2007-2008, the mean age of patients undergoing PCI was stable (65 ± 12 years), and comorbidities such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, peripheral arterial disease and stroke increased (P < 0.05). There were fewer elective and more urgent PCIs, especially for MI < 24 hours (17.6% in 2004-2005 to 27.2% in 2007-2008, P < 0.01). Overall stent use remained high (mean, 94.6%), but use of DES declined steadily (53.9% in 2004-2005 to 32.0% in 2007-2008, P < 0.01), despite increases in complex lesions. Planned clopidogrel therapy of ≥ 12 months after insertion of DES increased from 54.7% in 2004-2005 to 98.0% in 2007-2008 (P < 0.01). The overall procedural success rate was high (mean, 95.9%), and 12-month rates of mortality (3.8%), MI (4.8%), TVR (6.8%) and stent thrombosis (1.8%) remained low. Selective use of DES was an independent predictor of freedom from MACE at 12 months (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.56-0.81). Use of DES declined steadily from 2004-2005 to 2007-2008, despite increasing patient risk profile and lesion complexity. Procedural success remained high and 12-month adverse outcomes remained low, with increasing use of prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy.

  7. PageRank, HITS and a unified framework for link analysis

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Husbands, Parry; Zha, Hongyuan; Simon, Horst

    2001-10-01

    Two popular webpage ranking algorithms are HITS and PageRank. HITS emphasizes mutual reinforcement between authority and hub webpages, while PageRank emphasizes hyperlink weight normalization and web surfing based on random walk models. We systematically generalize/combine these concepts into a unified framework. The ranking framework contains a large algorithm space; HITS and PageRank are two extreme ends in this space. We study several normalized ranking algorithms which are intermediate between HITS and PageRank, and obtain closed-form solutions. We show that, to first order approximation, all ranking algorithms in this framework, including PageRank and HITS, lead to same ranking which is highly correlated with ranking by indegree. These results support the notion that in web resource ranking indegree and outdegree are of fundamental importance. Rankings of webgraphs of different sizes and queries are presented to illustrate our analysis.

  8. Expectations of vulnerability in Australia

    Alice M Neikirk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability of refugees to gain admission to Australia is increasingly based on perceptions of helplessness, suffering and ‘deservingness’. One consequence is that men in particular are marginalised following resettlement.

  9. Migration from India to Australia.

    Awasthi, S P; Chandra, A

    1994-01-01

    "The article examines the contemporary trends and future prospects of migration from India to Australia. The focus is on Indian Settlers and Temporary Entrants admitted to Australia for employment and Indian students admitted to Australia for higher studies. The volume of emigration for permanent residence during the early 1990s has made India one of the leading source countries of migration to Australia. A majority of Indians admitted as Settlers every year join the labor force. Recent data indicate that, among Indian Settlers, there is a preponderance of unsponsored Independent Skilled Migrants. Given the anticipated growth in the number of Indian students, the coming years are likely to witness a spurt in Skilled Temporary Workers from India." excerpt

  10. Temporal associations with declining Trichomonas vaginalis diagnosis rates among women in the state of Victoria, Australia, 1947 to 2005.

    Marrone, John; Fairley, Christopher K; Saville, Marian; Bradshaw, Catriona; Bowden, Francis J; Horvath, Leonie B; Donovan, Basil; Chen, Marcus; Hocking, Jane S

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the temporal associations between Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) diagnoses in women at a large urban sexual health clinic and a major Papanicolaou (Pap) smear screening laboratory in Victoria, Australia with Pap smear screening rates and the introduction of nitroimidazole treatments. An ecological analysis of TV diagnosis rates at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre and the Victorian Cytology Service, Pap smear screening rates and nitroimidazole prescription data. Diagnoses of TV at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre peaked in the 1950s at 20% to 30% and then rapidly declined through the 1960s and 1970s to below 1% in 1990. A similar pattern was observed at the Victorian Cytology Service. Metronidazole prescribing and opportunistic Pap smear screening began in Victoria in the 1960s coinciding with declining TV. The availability of tinidazole in 1976 led to further declines in TV in the late 1970s. A national cervical screening program introduced in 1991 was temporally associated with further declines in TV. Our analyses suggest that the introduction of metronidazole was associated with a large reduction in TV among Victorian women in the 1960s. The subsequent availability of tinidazole and increased Pap smear screening may have contributed to the current low TV prevalence in Victoria.

  11. Rethinking "Commercial" Surrogacy in Australia.

    Millbank, Jenni

    2015-09-01

    This article proposes reconsideration of laws prohibiting paid surrogacy in Australia in light of increasing transnational commercial surrogacy. The social science evidence base concerning domestic surrogacy in developed economies demonstrates that payment alone cannot be used to differentiate "good" surrogacy arrangements from "bad" ones. Compensated domestic surrogacy and the introduction of professional intermediaries and mechanisms such as advertising are proposed as a feasible harm-minimisation approach. I contend that Australia can learn from commercial surrogacy practices elsewhere, without replicating them.

  12. Acculturative stressor and meaning of life as predictors of negative affect in acculturation: a cross-cultural comparative study between Chinese international students in Australia and Hong Kong.

    Pan, Jia-Yan; Wong, Daniel Fu Keung; Joubert, Lynette; Chan, Cecilia Lai Wan

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the predictive effects of acculturative stressor and meaning of life on negative affect in the process of acculturation between Chinese international students in Australia and Hong Kong. Four hundred mainland Chinese students studying at six universities in Hong Kong and 227 Chinese international students studying at the University of Melbourne in Australia completed a questionnaire that included measures of acculturative stressor, meaning of life, negative affect and demographic information. The Australian sample was found to have a higher level of acculturative stressor and negative affect than the Hong Kong sample. Acculturative stressor had a positive impact on negative affect in both samples, but the impact of different domains of acculturative stressor on negative affect varied between the two groups. Finally, meaning of life partially mediated the relationship between acculturative stressor and negative affect in the Hong Kong sample, but no such effect was found in the Australia sample. Acculturative stressor is a critical risk factor for negative affect in acculturation for Chinese international students in Australia and Hong Kong. Meaning of life acted as a protective factor that mitigated negative affect for mainland Chinese students in Hong Kong, but not for the Chinese international students in Australia. The theoretical and practical implications for resilience-based and meaning-oriented intervention for Chinese international students are discussed.

  13. Iterative development of Stand Up Australia: a multi-component intervention to reduce workplace sitting

    2014-01-01

    booklet, and supportive emails from managers to staff), environmental (height-adjustable workstations), and individual level (face-to-face coaching session and telephone support). Stand Up Australia is currently being evaluated in the context of a cluster-randomised controlled trial at the Department of Human Services (DHS) in Melbourne, Australia. Conclusions Stand Up Australia is an evidence-guided and systematically developed workplace intervention targeting reductions in office workers’ sitting time. PMID:24559162

  14. Creating a safe place for pediatric care: A no hit zone.

    Frazier, Erin R; Liu, Gilbert C; Dauk, Kelly L

    2014-07-01

    Our goal was to create and implement a program, Kosair Children's Hospital's No Hit Zone, which trains health care workers in de-escalation techniques to address parental disruptive behaviors and physical discipline of children commonly encountered in the hospital environment. The Child Abuse Task Force, a multidisciplinary group, along with key hospital administrators developed specific content for the policy, as well as marketing and educational materials. The No Hit Zone policy designates Kosair Children's Hospital as "an environment in which no adult shall hit a child, no adult shall hit another adult, no child shall hit an adult, and no child shall hit another child. When hitting is observed, it is everyone's responsibility to interrupt the behavior as well as communicate system policy to those present." Via a multidisciplinary, collaborative approach, the No Hit Zone was successfully implemented at Kosair Children's Hospital in 2012. Cost was nominal, and the support of key hospital administrators was critical to the program's success. Education of health professionals on de-escalation techniques and intervention with families at the early signs of parental stress occurred via live sessions and online training via case-based scenarios. The No Hit Zone is an important program used to provide a safe and caring environment for all families and staff of Kosair Children's Hospital. Demand for the program continues, demonstrated by the establishment of No Hit Zones at other local hospitals and multiple outpatient clinics. This article offers information for other organizations planning to conduct similar initiatives. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Australia: uranium and nuclear policy

    Crick, R.

    1991-01-01

    Australia's uranium and nuclear policies have gone through several stages of development since the commercialisation of the industry. The early stages laid the foundations and built the superstructure of Australia's uranium development, export and safeguards policies. The uranium industry and other governments have understood the nature and operation of these policies. An important aim of this paper will be to explain the design and current construction stage of policies. This needs to be done against the background of broader industry developments. Within the past twelve months (1989/90) there have been dramatic changes, both within Australia and internationally, which have affected the uranium market. Internationally, we have seen the spot price indicators for uranium fall to an all time low. Within Australia, we have seen the removal of the fixed floor price requirement for the sale of Australia uranium. This was replaced by a requirement that contract prices reflect the market. This change in policy allowed the outcome of several major long-term contract renegotiations to be approved. It also allowed Australian producers to secure several new long-term contracts, despite the overall depressed state of the market. The 'three mines' policy remains in place although only two, Ranger in Northern Territory and Olympic Dare in Southern Australia are currently operating. The biggest unknown is the extent of future uranium demand. (author)

  16. Stochastic, weighted hit size theory of cellular radiobiological action

    Bond, V.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1982-01-01

    A stochastic theory that appears to account well for the observed responses of cell populations exposed in radiation fields of different qualities and for different durations of exposure is described. The theory appears to explain well most cellular radiobiological phenomena observed in at least autonomous cell systems, argues for the use of fluence rate (phi) instead of absorbed dose for quantification of the amount of radiation involved in low level radiation exposure. With or without invoking the cell sensitivity function, the conceptual improvement would be substantial. The approach suggested also shows that the absorbed dose-cell response functions currently employed do not reflect the spectrum of cell sensitivities to increasing cell doses of a single agent, nor can RBE represent the potency ratio for different agents that can produce similar quantal responses. Thus, for accurate comparison of cell sensitivities among different cells in the same individual, or between the cells in different kinds of individuals, it is necessary to quantify cell sensitivity in terms of the hit size weighting or cell sensitivity function introduced here. Similarly, this function should be employed to evaluate the relative potency of radiation and other radiomimetic chemical or physical agents

  17. Scientific impact: the story of your big hit

    Sinatra, Roberta; Wang, Dashun; Deville, Pierre; Song, Chaoming; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    A gradual increase in performance through learning and practice characterize most trades, from sport to music or engineering, and common sense suggests this to be true in science as well. This prompts us to ask: what are the precise patterns that lead to scientific excellence? Does performance indeed improve throughout a scientific career? Are there quantifiable signs of an impending scientific hit? Using citation-based measures as a proxy of impact, we show that (i) major discoveries are not preceded by works of increasing impact, nor are followed by work of higher impact, (ii) the precise time ranking of the highest impact work in a scientist's career is uniformly random, with the higher probability to have a major discovery in the middle of scientific careers being due only to changes in productivity, (iii) there is a strong correlation between the highest impact work and average impact of a scientist's work. These findings suggest that the impact of a paper is drawn randomly from an impact distribution that is unique for each scientist. We present a model which allows to reconstruct the individual impact distribution, making possible to create synthetic careers that exhibit the same properties of the real data and to define a ranking based on the overall impact of a scientist. RS acknowledges support from the James McDonnell Foundation.

  18. Translation into French of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne – what does e-publication mean for you?”. Translated by Christian Feuillet and Valéry Malécot

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  19. Translation into Turkish of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne – what does e-publication mean for you?”. Translated by Ali A. Dönmez, Yusuf Menemen and Zübeyde Uğurlu

    Sandra Knapp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  20. Translation into French of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne – what does e-publication mean for you?”. Translated by Christian Feuillet and Valéry Malécot

    Sandra Knapp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  1. Translation into Arabic of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne – what does e-publication mean for you?”. Translated by Ahmed M. Abdel-Azeem and Gihan S. Soliman

    Sandra Knapp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  2. Translation into Turkish of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne – what does e-publication mean for you?”. Translated by Ali A. Dönmez, Yusuf Menemen and Zübeyde Uğurlu

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  3. Translation into Arabic of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne – what does e-publication mean for you?”. Translated by Ahmed M. Abdel-Azeem and Gihan S. Soliman

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  4. Translation into Spanish of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?”. Translated by Carmen Ulloa Ulloa, Lourdes Rico Arce, and Renée H. Fortunato

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  5. Case clusters of leproid granulomas in foxhounds in New Zealand and Australia.

    Smits, Bronwyn; Willis, Richard; Malik, Richard; Studdert, Virginia; Collins, Desmond M; Kawakami, Pamela; Graham, Duncan; Fyfe, Janet A

    2012-12-01

    Canine leproid granuloma (CLG) characteristically presents as single to multiple circumscribed dermal to subcutaneous nodules in haired skin. An unidentified mycobacterium is considered be the aetiological agent of this entity. Several cases of canine leproid granulomas occurred in dogs in New Zealand during 2010 and 2011. Cases appeared in clusters, affecting multiple closely related foxhounds domiciled in the same kennels. All affected hounds recovered after topical and/or systemic antimicrobial therapy. Two similar outbreaks that occurred in foxhounds near Melbourne, Australia are also reported. Cases were investigated using cytological, histological, microbiological and several molecular techniques. An environmental epidemiological study was also performed. A diagnosis of CLG was established in 11 dogs. Molecular identification of the causative agent confirmed that it was a mycobacterial species with 100% sequence homology within the amplified regions of the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) with that found in association with similar infections from the USA, Brazil and Australia. This report details the first occurrence of multiple cases of CLG occurring in in-contact dogs and the first proven case of CLG in dogs in New Zealand. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2012 ESVD and ACVD.

  6. The use of radioisotopes in medicine and medical research, Australia 1947-73

    Korszniak, N

    1994-12-01

    On March 31, 1994, an article appeared in the Melbourne Age claiming that after the Second World War `hundreds of people were injected with radioactive materials in medical experiments that continued in Australian hospitals until the 1960s. Similar reports subsequently appeared in other newspapers and on the television and radio news. The archival records held at the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) pertaining to the medical uses of radioisotopes during the period 1947-1973 have been examined to ascertain the nature of radioisotope use, and in the case of experimental procedures, any ethical considerations. The material examined indicates that the distribution and medical use of radioactive isotopes was stringently controlled by the Radio-isotope Standing Committee (established by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in 1947 to oversee this area) until its disbandment in 1973, when the responsibility for regulation of the use of radioactive isotopes for medical purposes in Australia passed to the Therapeutic Goods Administration. A database, showing details of over 500 radioisotope use in Australia between 1947-1973 is given in Appendix III . (author) refs., tabs.

  7. The use of radioisotopes in medicine and medical research, Australia 1947-73

    Korszniak, N.

    1994-12-01

    On March 31, 1994, an article appeared in the Melbourne Age claiming that after the Second World War 'hundreds of people were injected with radioactive materials in medical experiments that continued in Australian hospitals until the 1960s. Similar reports subsequently appeared in other newspapers and on the television and radio news. The archival records held at the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) pertaining to the medical uses of radioisotopes during the period 1947-1973 have been examined to ascertain the nature of radioisotope use, and in the case of experimental procedures, any ethical considerations. The material examined indicates that the distribution and medical use of radioactive isotopes was stringently controlled by the Radio-isotope Standing Committee (established by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in 1947 to oversee this area) until its disbandment in 1973, when the responsibility for regulation of the use of radioactive isotopes for medical purposes in Australia passed to the Therapeutic Goods Administration. A database, showing details of over 500 radioisotope use in Australia between 1947-1973 is given in Appendix III . (author)

  8. Database for High Throughput Screening Hits (dHITS): a simple tool to retrieve gene specific phenotypes from systematic screens done in yeast.

    Chuartzman, Silvia G; Schuldiner, Maya

    2018-03-25

    In the last decade several collections of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains have been created. In these collections every gene is modified in a similar manner such as by a deletion or the addition of a protein tag. Such libraries have enabled a diversity of systematic screens, giving rise to large amounts of information regarding gene functions. However, often papers describing such screens focus on a single gene or a small set of genes and all other loci affecting the phenotype of choice ('hits') are only mentioned in tables that are provided as supplementary material and are often hard to retrieve or search. To help unify and make such data accessible, we have created a Database of High Throughput Screening Hits (dHITS). The dHITS database enables information to be obtained about screens in which genes of interest were found as well as the other genes that came up in that screen - all in a readily accessible and downloadable format. The ability to query large lists of genes at the same time provides a platform to easily analyse hits obtained from transcriptional analyses or other screens. We hope that this platform will serve as a tool to facilitate investigation of protein functions to the yeast community. © 2018 The Authors Yeast Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Plasma exchange to remove HIT antibodies: dissociation between enzyme-immunoassay and platelet activation test reactivities.

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Sheppard, Jo-Ann I; Chu, F Victor; Kapoor, Anil; Crowther, Mark A; Gangji, Azim

    2015-01-01

    Repeated therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) has been advocated to remove heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) IgG antibodies before cardiac/vascular surgery in patients who have serologically-confirmed acute or subacute HIT; for this situation, a negative platelet activation assay (eg, platelet serotonin-release assay [SRA]) has been recommended as the target serological end point to permit safe surgery. We compared reactivities in the SRA and an anti-PF4/heparin IgG-specific enzyme immunoassay (EIA), testing serial serum samples in a patient with recent (subacute) HIT who underwent serial TPE precardiac surgery, as well as for 15 other serially-diluted HIT sera. We observed that post-TPE/diluted HIT sera-when first testing SRA-negative-continue to test strongly positive by EIA-IgG. This dissociation between the platelet activation assay and a PF4-dependent immunoassay for HIT antibodies indicates that patients with subacute HIT undergoing repeated TPE before heparin reexposure should be tested by serial platelet activation assays even when their EIAs remain strongly positive. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Throat hit in users of the electronic cigarette: An exploratory study.

    Etter, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey on the Internet in 2012-2014 was used to study the "throat hit," the specific sensation in the throat felt by users of e-cigarettes. Participants were 1672 current users of e-cigarettes, visitors of Websites dedicated to e-cigarettes and to smoking cessation. It was assessed whether the strength of the throat hit was associated with the characteristics of e-cigarettes and e-liquids, modifications of the devices, patterns of use, reasons for use, satisfaction with e-cigarettes, dependence on e-cigarettes, smoking behavior, and perceived effects on smoking. The strongest throat hit was obtained by using better-quality models and liquids with high nicotine content. Those who reported a "very strong" throat hit used liquids with 17.3 mg/mL nicotine, versus 7.1 mg/mL for those reporting a "very weak" hit (p e-cigarette models that provide high levels of nicotine, a strong throat hit, high satisfaction, and more effects on smoking, but may also be addictive, and models than contain less nicotine and are less addictive, but produce a weaker throat hit, are less satisfactory, and are possibly less efficient at helping people quit smoking. This trade-off must be kept in mind when regulating e-cigarettes. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Knowledge of gestational diabetes among a multi-ethnic cohort in Australia.

    Carolan, Mary; Steele, Cheryl; Margetts, Heather

    2010-12-01

    to explore knowledge about gestational diabetes (GDM) among a multi-ethnic sample of women who were receiving antenatal care in Melbourne, Australia. cross-sectional comparative survey. diabetes clinic located in a public hospital in Melbourne's Western suburbs. 143 pregnant women with GDM from Vietnamese, Indian, Filipino and Caucasian backgrounds. 200 questionnaires were distributed and 143 were returned (response rate 71.5%). There were statistically significant differences between ethnic groups in terms of educational level (p=0.001) and fluency in English (p=0.001). Educational levels, measured in completed years of schooling, were lowest among Vietnamese [mean 8.5 years, standard deviation (SD) 1.0], Filipino (mean 8.9 years, SD 1.5) and Caucasian [mean 10.2 years, SD 0.9] women. Indian women had a higher mean level of education (11.6 years, SD 0.9). Fluency in English was reported by 100% of Caucasian, Indian and Filipino women, but 53.3% of Vietnamese women required interpreter services. The women's answers varied with ethnicity and educational status. Vietnamese and Filipino women displayed the least knowledge about GDM and food values. Caucasian women also scored poorly on general knowledge about GDM. Indian women scored highest across all areas of interest. Vietnamese women had the poorest English skills and lowest educational levels, and were identified as the group at greatest risk of misunderstanding GDM. English language proficiency alone, however, was not associated with better comprehension of GDM in this study. Higher educational level was the only factor linked to increased comprehension. It is, therefore, important that new educational strategies are developed to address lower health literacy as well as cultural factors when caring for multi-ethnic populations with GDM. This approach may also serve to address lower levels of comprehension among Caucasian populations. Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Temperature profile data collected from XBT casts in the Indian Ocean from the HMAS MELBOURNE and other vessels from 01 January 1991 to 31 December 2001 (NODC Accession 0000714)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the HMAS MELBOURNE and other vessels in the Indian Ocean from 01 January 1991 to 31 December 2001. Data were...

  13. Lower bounds on the periodic Hamming correlations of frequency hopping sequences with low hit zone

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, several periodic Hamming correlation lower bounds for frequency hopping sequences with low hit zone, with respect to the size p of the frequency slot set, the sequence length L, the family size M, low hit zone LH ( or no hit zone NH ), the maximum periodic Hamming autocorrelation sidelobe Ha and the maximum periodic Hamming crosscorrelation Hc, are established. It is shown that the new bounds include the known Lempel-Greenberger bounds, T.S. Seay bounds and Peng-Fan bounds for the conventional frequency hopping sequences as special cases.

  14. Top-down Estimates of Isoprene Emissions in Australia Inferred from OMI Satellite Data.

    Greenslade, J.; Fisher, J. A.; Surl, L.; Palmer, P. I.

    2017-12-01

    Australia is a global hotspot for biogenic isoprene emission factors predicted by process-based models such as the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN). It is also prone to increasingly frequent temperature extremes that can drive episodically high emissions. Estimates of biogenic isoprene emissions from Australia are poorly constrained, with the frequently used MEGAN model overestimating emissions by a factor of 4-6 in some areas. Evaluating MEGAN and other models in Australia is difficult due to sparse measurements of emissions and their ensuing chemical products. In this talk, we will describe efforts to better quantify Australian isoprene emissions using top-down estimates based on formaldehyde (HCHO) observations from the OMI satellite instrument, combined with modelled isoprene to HCHO yields obtained from the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. The OMI-based estimates are evaluated using in situ observations from field campaigns conducted in southeast Australia. We also investigate the impact on the inferred emission of horizontal resolution used for the yield calculations, particularly in regions on the boundary between low- and high-NOx chemistry. The prevalence of fire smoke plumes roughly halves the available satellite dataset over Australia for much of the year; however, seasonal averages remain robust. Preliminary results show that the top-down isoprene emissions are lower than MEGAN estimates by up to 90% in summer. The overestimates are greatest along the eastern coast, including areas surrounding Australia's major population centres in Sydney, Melbourne, and Brisbane. The coarse horizontal resolution of the model significantly affects the emissions estimates, as many biogenic emitting regions lie along narrow coastal stretches. Our results confirm previous findings that the MEGAN biogenic emission model is poorly calibrated for the Australian environment and suggests that chemical transport models driven by MEGAN are likely

  15. The T10 beam produces a few hits per event. In ALICE the SSD will have to cope with many hits per strip. In the three centimeters of aluminium the beam will produce many secondary particles. This increases the chance of multiple hits per strip, although not to the level in ALICE.

    Nooren, G.

    2004-01-01

    The T10 beam produces a few hits per event. In ALICE the SSD will have to cope with many hits per strip. In the three centimeters of aluminium the beam will produce many secondary particles. This increases the chance of multiple hits per strip, although not to the level in ALICE.

  16. Australia's uranium policy: an examination

    Crook, K.A.W.; Derborough, M.A.; Diesendorf, M.; Inall, E.K.; Peaslee, D.C.; Taylor, S.R.

    1974-12-01

    The mining and export of Australian Uranium poses problems for the safety of the world that any responsible government is bound to consider. The following note lists the major problems, attempts to assess their importance, and to suggest what lines may be relevant to Australia for their solution. These problems were examined because of the concern about the appropriateness of attempting to fulfill projected world energy needs by any means; and their fulfillment, by using nuclear fuels carries special problems of biological, social and political hazards. Any development of Australia's uranium resources should be considered in this light. (author)

  17. Efficiency Improvement of HIT Solar Cells on p-Type Si Wafers.

    Wei, Chun-You; Lin, Chu-Hsuan; Hsiao, Hao-Tse; Yang, Po-Chuan; Wang, Chih-Ming; Pan, Yen-Chih

    2013-11-22

    Single crystal silicon solar cells are still predominant in the market due to the abundance of silicon on earth and their acceptable efficiency. Different solar-cell structures of single crystalline Si have been investigated to boost efficiency; the heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure is currently the leading technology. The record efficiency values of state-of-the art HIT solar cells have always been based on n-type single-crystalline Si wafers. Improving the efficiency of cells based on p-type single-crystalline Si wafers could provide broader options for the development of HIT solar cells. In this study, we varied the thickness of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous Si layer to improve the efficiency of HIT solar cells on p-type Si wafers.

  18. High-Throughput Screening and Hit Validation of Extracellular-Related Kinase 5 (ERK5) Inhibitors.

    Myers, Stephanie M; Bawn, Ruth H; Bisset, Louise C; Blackburn, Timothy J; Cottyn, Betty; Molyneux, Lauren; Wong, Ai-Ching; Cano, Celine; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; Leung, Hing; Rigoreau, Laurent; Vidot, Sandrine; Golding, Bernard T; Griffin, Roger J; Hammonds, Tim; Newell, David R; Hardcastle, Ian R

    2016-08-08

    The extracellular-related kinase 5 (ERK5) is a promising target for cancer therapy. A high-throughput screen was developed for ERK5, based on the IMAP FP progressive binding system, and used to identify hits from a library of 57 617 compounds. Four distinct chemical series were evident within the screening hits. Resynthesis and reassay of the hits demonstrated that one series did not return active compounds, whereas three series returned active hits. Structure-activity studies demonstrated that the 4-benzoylpyrrole-2-carboxamide pharmacophore had excellent potential for further development. The minimum kinase binding pharmacophore was identified, and key examples demonstrated good selectivity for ERK5 over p38α kinase.

  19. Optimal Fixed-Interval Integrated Guidance-Control Laws for Hit-to-Kill Missiles

    Menon, P. K; Sweriduk, G. D; Ohlmeyer, E. J

    2003-01-01

    Due to their potential for reducing the weapon size and efficiency, design methods for realizing hit-to- kill capabilities in missile systems are of significant research interest in the missile flight control community...

  20. 75 FR 32472 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; HIT Standards Committee...

    2010-06-08

    ... Coordinator for Health Information Technology AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of committee recommendations and invitation for public input... Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). Name of Committee: HIT Standards Committee. General...