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Sample records for histone messenger rna

  1. Messenger RNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cullen

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to DNA, messenger RNA (mRNA) in complex substrata is rarely analyzed, in large part because labile RNA molecules are difficult to purify. Nucleic acid extractions from fungi that colonize soil are particularly difficult and plagued by humic substances that interfere with Taq polymerase (Tebbe and Vahjen 1993 and references therein). Magnetic capture...

  2. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Katahira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex.

  3. Messenger RNA surveillance: neutralizing natural nonsense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischelfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Porse, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Messenger RNA transcripts that contain premature stop codons are degraded by a process termed nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Although previously thought of as a pathway that rids the cell of non-functional mRNAs arising from mutations and processing errors, new research suggests a more general...

  4. RNA decay by messenger RNA interferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Overgaard, Martin; Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo

    2008-01-01

    Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mRNA...... cleaving enzymes such as RelE of Escherichia coli and the corresponding antitoxin RelB. In particular, we describe a set of plasmid vectors useful for the detailed analysis of cleavage sites in model mRNAs....

  5. Processivity and coupling in messenger RNA transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Aitken

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of messenger RNA processing is now being uncovered by experimental techniques that are capable of detecting individual copies of mRNA in cells, and by quantitative real-time observations that reveal the kinetics. This processing is commonly modelled by permitting mRNA to be transcribed only when the promoter is in the on state. In this simple on/off model, the many processes involved in active transcription are represented by a single reaction. These processes include elongation, which has a minimum time for completion and processing that is not captured in the model.In this paper, we explore the impact on the mRNA distribution of representing the elongation process in more detail. Consideration of the mechanisms of elongation leads to two alternative models of the coupling between the elongating polymerase and the state of the promoter: Processivity allows polymerases to complete elongation irrespective of the promoter state, whereas coupling requires the promoter to be active to produce a full-length transcript. We demonstrate that these alternatives have a significant impact on the predicted distributions. Models are simulated by the Gillespie algorithm, and the third and fourth moments of the resulting distribution are computed in order to characterise the length of the tail, and sharpness of the peak. By this methodology, we show that the moments provide a concise summary of the distribution, showing statistically-significant differences across much of the feasible parameter range.We conclude that processivity is not fully consistent with the on/off model unless the probability of successfully completing elongation is low--as has been observed. The results also suggest that some form of coupling between the promoter and a rate-limiting step in transcription may explain the cell's inability to maintain high mRNA levels at low noise--a prediction of the on/off model that has no supporting evidence.

  6. Nonrepetitive DNA Sequence Representation in Sea Urchin Embryo Messenger RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert B.; Galau, Glenn A.; Britten, Roy J.; Davidson, Eric H.

    1973-01-01

    Messenger RNA was prepared from developing sea urchin gastrulae by puromycin release from polyribosomes. Approximately 60% of the total mRNA radioactivity of the postnuclear supernatant was recovered and shown to be free of any other labeled RNA species such as ribosomal and nuclear RNA. The mRNA was examined by hybridization to DNA present in great excess. The mRNA hybridizes almost exclusively with nonrepetitive DNA. Almost all of the messenger RNA molecules of sea urchin gastrulae therefore consist of transcripts from nonrepetitive sequences. It appears that the structural genes expressed at this stage are typically not repeated in the genome and the mRNA does not include recognizable repetitive sequence. PMID:4519642

  7. RNA-Seq: revelation of the messengers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verk, M.C. van; Hickman, R.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Wees, S.C.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) is rapidly outcompeting microarrays as the technology of choice for whole-transcriptome studies. However, the bioinformatics skills required for RNA-Seq data analysis often pose a significant hurdle for many biologists. Here, we put forward the concepts and

  8. Estrogen Regulation of Messenger RNA Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-17

    H f / Slobin, L.I. and Jordan, P. (1984). "Translational repression of mRNA for eucaryotic elogation factors in Friend erythroleukemia cells ...101 19. In vitro Cell -Free Assay Conditions for Studying mRNA Turnover and Schematic of Characterization of Nuclease- Activity 106 20...hours for more stable species. The average half-time of turnover for mRNA in eukaryotic cells is 10-20 hours. This appears to be a weighted average of

  9. Circuit Formation by Spatio-Temporal Control of Messenger RNA ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Circuit Formation by Spatio-Temporal Control of Messenger RNA Translation. The connections inside the brain need to be wired in a precise manner during development to ensure its proper function. This project will provide insight into circuit formation to help us understand how axon regeneration can improve clinical ...

  10. Decreased neuronal nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA and somatostatin messenger RNA in the striatum of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, P J; Waldvogel, H J; Faull, R L; Love, D R; Emson, P C

    1996-06-01

    The cellular abundance of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and somatostatin messenger RNAs was compared in the caudate nucleus, putamen and sensorimotor cortex of Huntington's disease and control cases. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA was significantly decreased in the caudate nucleus and putamen, but not in the sensorimotor cortex in Huntington's disease; the decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA became more pronounced with the severity of the disease. Somatostatin gene expression was significantly decreased in the dorsal putamen in Huntington's disease, but was essentially unchanged in all other regions examined. The density of neurons expressing detectable levels of neuronal nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA was reduced in the striata of Huntington's disease cases with advanced pathology; the density of neurons expressing detectable levels of somatostatin messenger RNA was similar in control and Huntington's disease cases. Neuropeptide Y-, somatostatin- and NADPH-diaphorase-positive neurons were consistently present throughout the striatum across all the grades of the disease. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase and NADPH-diaphorase activity (a histochemical marker for nitric oxide synthase-containing neurons) co-localize with somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in interneurons in the human striatum and cerebral cortex. Although the neurodegeneration associated with Huntington's disease is most evident in the striatum (particularly the dorsal regions), neuronal nitric oxide synthase/neuropeptide Y/somatostatin interneurons are relatively spared. Nitric oxide released by neuronal nitric oxide synthase-containing neurons may mediate glutamate-induced excitotoxic cell death, a mechanism proposed to be instrumental in causing the neurodegeneration seen in Huntington's disease. The results described here suggest that although the population of interneurons containing somatostatin, neuropeptide Y and neuronal nitric oxide synthase do survive in

  11. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  12. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  13. Monitoring global messenger RNA changes in externally controlled microarray experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Peppel, Jeroen; Kemmeren, Patrick; van Bakel, Harm; Radonjic, Marijana; van Leenen, Dik; Holstege, Frank C.P.

    2003-01-01

    Expression profiling is a universal tool, with a range of applications that benefit from the accurate determination of differential gene expression. To allow normalization using endogenous transcript levels, current microarray analyses assume that relatively few transcripts vary, or that any changes that occur are balanced. When normalization using endogenous genes is carried out, changes in expression levels are calculated relative to the behaviour of most of the transcripts. This does not reflect absolute changes if global shifts in messenger RNA populations occur. Using external RNA controls, we have set up microarray experiments to monitor global changes. The levels of most mRNAs were found to change during yeast stationary phase and human heat shock when external controls were included. Even small global changes had a significant effect on the number of genes reported as being differentially expressed. This suggests that global mRNA changes occur more frequently than is assumed at present, and shows that monitoring such effects may be important for the accurate determination of changes in gene expression. PMID:12671682

  14. Arsenic Induces Polyadenylation of Canonical Histone mRNA by Down-regulating Stem-Loop-binding Protein Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, Jason; Fang, Lei; Chervona, Yana; Chen, Danqi; Kiok, Kathrin; Sun, Hong; Tseng, Hsiang-Chi; Xu, Dazhong; Shamy, Magdy; Jin, Chunyuan; Costa, Max

    2014-01-01

    The replication-dependent histone genes are the only metazoan genes whose messenger RNA (mRNA) does not terminate with a poly(A) tail at the 3′-end. Instead, the histone mRNAs display a stem-loop structure at their 3′-end. Stem-loop-binding protein (SLBP) binds the stem-loop and regulates canonical histone mRNA metabolism. Here we report that exposure to arsenic, a carcinogenic metal, decreased cellular levels of SLBP by inducing its proteasomal degradation and inhibiting SLBP transcription via epigenetic mechanisms. Notably, arsenic exposure dramatically increased polyadenylation of canonical histone H3.1 mRNA possibly through down-regulation of SLBP expression. The polyadenylated H3.1 mRNA induced by arsenic was not susceptible to normal degradation that occurs at the end of S phase, resulting in continued presence into mitosis, increased total H3.1 mRNA, and increased H3 protein levels. Excess expression of canonical histones have been shown to increase sensitivity to DNA damage as well as increase the frequency of missing chromosomes and induce genomic instability. Thus, polyadenylation of canonical histone mRNA following arsenic exposure may contribute to arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25266719

  15. Photoaffinity labeling of the messenger RNA cap-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhoads, R.; Patzelt, E.; Blaas, D.; Kuechler, E.

    1986-05-01

    A photoaffinity derivative of a cap analogue, ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)-(4-(benzoylphenyl)methylamido)-7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate, was reacted with the 28-kDa messenger RNA cap-binding protein (CBP), purified by affinity chromatography from rabbit erythrocyte lysate. The predominant labeling was of the 28-kDa species. No labeling occurred without photoillumination or in the presence of 250 ..mu..M m/sup 7/GTP. In addition CBP, two polypeptides of 19 and 17kDa, present in the affinity-purified preparation, were specifically labeled. Another sample tested was the eIF-3 region of a sucrose gradient fractionation, in 100 mM KCl, of rabbit reticulocyte high salt ribosomal wash. The only polypeptide labeled was the 28-kDa CBP. Labeling was more intense than with an equivalent amount of affinity-purified CBP, suggesting the presence of stabilizing or stimulatory factors in the eIF-3 preparation.

  16. A Contemporary, Laboratory-Intensive Course on Messenger RNA Transcription and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Sue; Miller, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) plays a pivotal role in the central dogma of molecular biology. Importantly, molecular events occurring during and after mRNA synthesis have the potential to create multiple proteins from one gene, leading to some of the remarkable protein diversity that genomes hold. The North Carolina State University…

  17. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Anji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins.

  18. Characterization of long noncoding RNA and messenger RNA signatures in melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqi; Fan, Wenliang; Wan, Bing; Tu, Mengqi; Jin, Feng; Liu, Fang; Xu, Haibo; Han, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma, the most aggressive and life-threatening form of skin cancer, has significantly risen over recent decades. Therefore, it is essential to identify the mechanisms that underlie melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis and to explore novel and effective melanoma treatment strategies. Accumulating evidence s uggests that aberrantly expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have vital functions in multiple cancers. However, lncRNA functions in melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles in primary melanomas, metastatic melanomas and normal skin samples from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. We used GSE15605 as the training set (n = 74) and GSE7553 as the validation set (n = 58). In three comparisons (primary melanoma versus normal skin, metastatic melanoma versus normal skin, and metastatic melanoma versus primary melanoma), 178, 295 and 48 lncRNAs and 847, 1758, and 295 mRNAs were aberrantly expressed, respectively. We performed Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses to examine the differentially expressed mRNAs, and potential core lncRNAs were predicted by lncRNA-mRNA co-expression networks. Based on our results, 15 lncRNAs and 144 mRNAs were significantly associated with melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis. A subsequent analysis suggested a critical role for a five-lncRNA signature during melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis. Low expression of U47924.27 was significantly associated with decreased survival of patients with melanoma. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to explore the expression patterns of lncRNAs and mRNAs during melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis by re-annotating microarray data from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray dataset. These findings reveal potential roles for lncRNAs during melanoma tumorigenesis and metastasis and provide a rich candidate reservoir for

  19. Comment on "Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes"

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In recent paper [Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 83}, 042903 (2011)], a simple model for the translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes is provided, and the expression of translational ratio of protein is given. In this comments, varied methods to get this ratio are addressed. Depending on a different method, we find that, roughly speaking, this translational ratio decays exponentially with mRNA length in prokaryotic cell, and reciprocally with mRNA length in eukaryotic cells.

  20. Transfer-messenger RNA controls the translation of cell-cycle and stress proteins in Streptomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barends, Sharief; Zehl, Martin; Bialek, Sylwia

    2010-01-01

    The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)-mediated trans-translation mechanism is highly conserved in bacteria and functions primarily as a system for the rescue of stalled ribosomes and the removal of aberrantly produced proteins. Here, we show that in the antibiotic-producing soil bacterium Streptomyc...... functionality for tmRNA, promoting the translation of the same mRNA it targets, at the expense of sacrificing the first nascent protein. In streptomycetes, tmRNA has evolved into a dedicated task force that ensures the instantaneous response to the exposure to stress....

  1. Single-cell messenger RNA sequencing reveals rare intestinal cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grün, Dominic; Lyubimova, Anna; Kester, Lennart; Wiebrands, Kay; Basak, Onur; Sasaki, Nobuo; Clevers, Hans; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the development and function of an organ requires the characterization of all of its cell types. Traditional methods for visualizing and isolating subpopulations of cells are based on messenger RNA or protein expression of only a few known marker genes. The unequivocal identification

  2. Isolation and Translation of Hordein Messenger RNA from Wild Type and Mutant Endosperms in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Anders Bøving; Ingwersen, J.

    1978-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of four cDNA clones coding for the carboxy-terminal portion of at least two different B1 hordein polypeptides are presented. The open reading frame in the nucleotide sequence of the the largest clone (pc hor2-4, 720 nucleotides) translates into the 181 carboxy-terminal amino.......30 megadaltons. The 11S messenger RNA was translated in vitro into hordein precursor polypeptides which are 2–4 kilodaltons larger than the native hordein polypeptides. The endosperm cell of mutant No. 1508 contained twice as much RNA as the wild type endosperm cell but the same amount of polyadenylated 11S RNA....... The template activity of the latter was 10% of that found for the 11S hordein messenger RNA from the wild type and was limited to translation into one hordein precursor polypeptide....

  3. High-throughput and quantitative genome-wide messenger RNA sequencing for molecular phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John E; Wali, Neha; Sealy, Ian M; Morris, James A; White, Richard J; Leonard, Steven R; Jackson, David K; Jones, Matthew C; Smerdon, Nathalie C; Zamora, Jorge; Dooley, Christopher M; Carruthers, Samantha N; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Stemple, Derek L; Busch-Nentwich, Elisabeth M

    2015-08-05

    We present a genome-wide messenger RNA (mRNA) sequencing technique that converts small amounts of RNA from many samples into molecular phenotypes. It encompasses all steps from sample preparation to sequence analysis and is applicable to baseline profiling or perturbation measurements. Multiplex sequencing of transcript 3' ends identifies differential transcript abundance independent of gene annotation. We show that increasing biological replicate number while maintaining the total amount of sequencing identifies more differentially abundant transcripts. This method can be implemented on polyadenylated RNA from any organism with an annotated reference genome and in any laboratory with access to Illumina sequencing.

  4. A thermostable messenger RNA based vaccine against rabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitz, Lothar; Vogel, Annette; Schnee, Margit; Voss, Daniel; Rauch, Susanne; Mutzke, Thorsten; Ketterer, Thomas; Kramps, Thomas; Petsch, Benjamin

    2017-12-01

    Although effective rabies virus vaccines have been existing for decades, each year, rabies virus infections still cause around 50.000 fatalities worldwide. Most of these cases occur in developing countries, where these vaccines are not available. The reasons for this are the prohibitive high costs of cell culture or egg grown rabies virus vaccines and the lack of a functional cold chain in many regions in which rabies virus is endemic. Here, we describe the excellent temperature resistance of a non-replicating mRNA based rabies virus vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G). Prolonged storage of the vaccine from -80°C to up to +70°C for several months did not impact the protective capacity of the mRNA vaccine. Efficacy after storage was demonstrated by the induction of rabies specific virus neutralizing antibodies and protection in mice against lethal rabies infection. Moreover, storing the vaccine at oscillating temperatures between +4° and +56°C for 20 cycles in order to simulate interruptions of the cold chain during vaccine transport, did not affect the vaccine's immunogenicity and protective characteristics, indicating that maintenance of a cold chain is not essential for this vaccine.

  5. A thermostable messenger RNA based vaccine against rabies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lothar Stitz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although effective rabies virus vaccines have been existing for decades, each year, rabies virus infections still cause around 50.000 fatalities worldwide. Most of these cases occur in developing countries, where these vaccines are not available. The reasons for this are the prohibitive high costs of cell culture or egg grown rabies virus vaccines and the lack of a functional cold chain in many regions in which rabies virus is endemic. Here, we describe the excellent temperature resistance of a non-replicating mRNA based rabies virus vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G. Prolonged storage of the vaccine from -80°C to up to +70°C for several months did not impact the protective capacity of the mRNA vaccine. Efficacy after storage was demonstrated by the induction of rabies specific virus neutralizing antibodies and protection in mice against lethal rabies infection. Moreover, storing the vaccine at oscillating temperatures between +4° and +56°C for 20 cycles in order to simulate interruptions of the cold chain during vaccine transport, did not affect the vaccine's immunogenicity and protective characteristics, indicating that maintenance of a cold chain is not essential for this vaccine.

  6. A thermostable messenger RNA based vaccine against rabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitz, Lothar; Vogel, Annette; Schnee, Margit; Voss, Daniel; Rauch, Susanne; Mutzke, Thorsten; Ketterer, Thomas; Kramps, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Although effective rabies virus vaccines have been existing for decades, each year, rabies virus infections still cause around 50.000 fatalities worldwide. Most of these cases occur in developing countries, where these vaccines are not available. The reasons for this are the prohibitive high costs of cell culture or egg grown rabies virus vaccines and the lack of a functional cold chain in many regions in which rabies virus is endemic. Here, we describe the excellent temperature resistance of a non-replicating mRNA based rabies virus vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G). Prolonged storage of the vaccine from -80°C to up to +70°C for several months did not impact the protective capacity of the mRNA vaccine. Efficacy after storage was demonstrated by the induction of rabies specific virus neutralizing antibodies and protection in mice against lethal rabies infection. Moreover, storing the vaccine at oscillating temperatures between +4° and +56°C for 20 cycles in order to simulate interruptions of the cold chain during vaccine transport, did not affect the vaccine’s immunogenicity and protective characteristics, indicating that maintenance of a cold chain is not essential for this vaccine. PMID:29216187

  7. Messenger RNA during early embryogenesis in Artemia salina: altered translatability and sequence complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, T C; Tata, J R

    1980-02-01

    RNA from developing embryos of Artemia salina (5, 10, and 20 h after re-initiation of development) was translated 3-10 times more efficiently in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate cell-free protein synthesizing system than RNA from dormant gastrulae. The latter did not appear to contain any significant amount of translation inhibitor activity. Ninety percent of the translatable activity in dormant gastrulae was recovered as poly(A)--RNA, whereas 80% of that in post-gastrular developing embryos was present as poly(A)+-RNA. The size of most polypeptides coded for by dormant gastrular RNA was less than 130,000 daltons whereas the size of those coded for by developing embryonic RNA was up to 200,000 daltons, which correlated with a corresponding shift to poly A-containing RNA of higher molecular weight. Two major polypeptides of about 37,000 daltons coded for by dormant gastrular RNA disappeared at 20 h after resumption of development. Hybridization of complementary DNA (cDNA) to a 1000-fold excess of the homologous poly(A)+-RNA revealed the presence of three complexity classes of mRNA. Forty-five percent, 30%, and 25% of RNA in dormant gastrulae were present as high, middle, and low abundance classes comprising about 10, 80, and 9700 species, respectively whereas in the nauplii there were 10, 150, and 7900 species of high, middle, and low abundancy sequences, respectively. Heterologous hybridizations using cDNA complementary to highly abundant messenger population of nauplii (isolated by chromatography on hydroxyapatite) to poly(A)+-RNA from dormant cysts showed considerably divergence in this class of messengers from the two developmental stages. Re-initiation of development of dormant Artemia gastrulae is thus characterized by a "re-programming" seen as a simultaneous and rapid increase in the polyadenylation and translatability of poly(A)+-RNA accompanied by a qualitative change in its sequence complexity.

  8. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, Jolynn B.; McComb, David W.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-02-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery.

  9. Messenger RNA Fluctuations and Regulatory RNAs Shape the Dynamics of Negative Feedback Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, María Rodríguez; Tlusty, Tsvi; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Furman, Itay; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.031924

    2010-01-01

    Single cell experiments of simple regulatory networks can markedly differ from cell population experiments. Such differences arise from stochastic events in individual cells that are averaged out in cell populations. For instance, while individual cells may show sustained oscillations in the concentrations of some proteins, such oscillations may appear damped in the population average. In this paper we investigate the role of RNA stochastic fluctuations as a leading force to produce a sustained excitatory behavior at the single cell level. Opposed to some previous models, we build a fully stochastic model of a negative feedback loop that explicitly takes into account the RNA stochastic dynamics. We find that messenger RNA random fluctuations can be amplified during translation and produce sustained pulses of protein expression. Motivated by the recent appreciation of the importance of non--coding regulatory RNAs in post--transcription regulation, we also consider the possibility that a regulatory RNA transcri...

  10. Aberrant herpesvirus-induced polyadenylation correlates with cellular messenger RNA destruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon J Lee

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of messenger RNA (mRNA stability plays critical roles in controlling gene expression, ensuring transcript fidelity, and allowing cells to respond to environmental cues. Unregulated enhancement of mRNA turnover could therefore dampen cellular responses to such signals. Indeed, several herpesviruses instigate widespread destruction of cellular mRNAs to block host gene expression and evade immune detection. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV promotes this phenotype via the activity of its viral SOX protein, although the mechanism of SOX-induced mRNA turnover has remained unknown, given its apparent lack of intrinsic ribonuclease activity. Here, we report that KSHV SOX stimulates cellular transcriptome turnover via a unique mechanism involving aberrant polyadenylation. Transcripts in SOX-expressing cells exhibit extended poly(A polymerase II-generated poly(A tails and polyadenylation-linked mRNA turnover. SOX-induced polyadenylation changes correlate with its RNA turnover function, and inhibition of poly(A tail formation blocks SOX activity. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic poly(A binding proteins are critical cellular cofactors for SOX function, the latter of which undergoes striking nuclear relocalization by SOX. SOX-induced mRNA turnover therefore represents both a novel mechanism of host shutoff as well as a new model system to probe the regulation of poly(A tail-stimulated mRNA turnover in mammalian cells.

  11. Nuclease escape elements protect messenger RNA against cleavage by multiple viral endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Mandy; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2017-08-01

    During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonu- clease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs, including the transcript encoding interleukin-6 (IL-6), escape SOX-induced cleavage. IL-6 escape is mediated through a 3' UTR RNA regulatory element that overrides the SOX targeting mechanism. Here, we reveal that this protective RNA element functions to broadly restrict cleavage by a range of homologous and non-homologous viral endonucleases. However, it does not impede cleavage by cellular endonucleases. The IL-6 protective sequence may be representative of a larger class of nuclease escape elements, as we identified a similar protective element in the GADD45B mRNA. The IL-6 and GADD45B-derived elements display similarities in their sequence, putative structure, and several associated RNA binding proteins. However, the overall composition of their ribonucleoprotein complexes appears distinct, leading to differences in the breadth of nucleases restricted. These findings highlight how RNA elements can selectively control transcript abundance in the background of widespread virus-induced mRNA degradation.

  12. Regional distribution of glycine receptor messenger RNA in the central nervous system of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, M; Devignot, V; Korn, H; Goblet, C

    2001-01-01

    We report the cloning of the zebrafish beta subunit of the glycine receptor and compare the anatomical distribution of three glycine receptor subunit constituents in adult zebrafish brain (alphaZ1, alphaZ2 and betaZ) to the expression pattern of homologous receptor subunits (alpha1, alpha2 and beta) in the mammalian adult CNS. Non-radioactive hybridization was used to map the distribution of the alphaZ1, alphaZ2 and betaZ glycine receptor subunit messenger RNAs in the adult zebrafish brain. The anterior-posterior expression gradient found in adult zebrafish brain was similar to that reported in mammalian CNS. However, the glycine receptor transcripts, notably the alphaZ1 subunit, were more widely distributed in the anterior regions of the zebrafish than in the adult mammalian brain. The isoform-specific distribution pattern was less regionalized in zebrafish than in the rat mammalian CNS. Nevertheless, there was some regionalization of alphaZ1, alphaZ2 and betaZ transcripts in the diencephalic and mesencephalic nuclei where different sensory and motor centers express either alphaZ1/betaZ or alphaZ2 subunits. In contrast to the widespread distribution of the beta subunit in adult mammalian brain, alphaZ2 messenger RNA presented the widest expression territory of all three glycine receptor subunits tested. alphaZ2 messenger RNA was expressed in the absence of alphaZ1 and betaZ messenger RNA in the outer nuclear layer of the retina, the inferior olive and the raphe of the medulla oblongata, as well as in the nucleus of Cajal of the medulla spinalis. In contrast, an identified central neuron of the reticular formation, the Mauthner cell, expresses all three glycine receptor subunits (alphaZ1, alphaZ2 and betaZ). This report extends the already described glycine receptor expression in the vertebrate CNS and confirms the importance of glycine-mediated inhibition in spinal cord and brainstem.

  13. Maternal provision of non-sex-specific transformer messenger RNA in sex determination of the wasp Asobara tabida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuverink, Elzemiek; Verhulst, E.C.; Leussen, van M.; Zande, L.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    2017-01-01

    In many insect species maternal provision of sex-specifically spliced messenger RNA (mRNA) of sex determination genes is an essential component of the sex determination mechanism. In haplodiploid Hymenoptera, maternal provision in combination with genomic imprinting has been shown for the parasitoid

  14. Differential intragraft cytokine messenger RNA profiles during rejection and repair of clinical heart transplants. A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A; Mol, Wendy M; Niesters, Hubert G M; Maat, Alex P W; van Gelder, Teun; Balk, Aggie H M M; Weimar, Willem; Baan, Carla C

    After clinical heart transplantation, ischemia, acute rejection, and repair mechanisms can trigger the up-regulation of cytokines. To investigate the cytokine profile early after transplantation, we monitored messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), monocyte

  15. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  16. Maternal provision of non-sex-specific transformer messenger RNA in sex determination of the wasp Asobara tabida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuverink, Elzemiek; Verhulst, E.C.; Leussen, van M.; Zande, L.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    2018-01-01

    In many insect species maternal provision of sex-specifically spliced messenger RNA (mRNA) of sex determination genes is an essential component of the sex determination mechanism. In haplodiploid Hymenoptera, maternal provision in combination with genomic imprinting has been shown for the parasitoid

  17. A novel frameshift mutation in the lipoprotein lipase gene is rescued by alternative messenger RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Andrew D; Kyle, Campbell V

    Type I hyperlipoproteinemia, manifesting as chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder usually caused by mutations in the lipoprotein lipase gene (LPL). We sought to determine whether mutations in LPL could explain the clinical indications of a patient presenting with pancreatitis and hypertriglyceridemia. Coding regions of LPL were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by nucleotide sequencing. The LPL messenger RNA transcript was also analyzed to investigate whether alternative splicing was occurring. The patient was homozygous for the mutation c.767_768insTAAATATT in exon 5 of the LPL gene. This mutation is predicted to result in either a truncated nonfunctional LPL, or alternatively a new 5' donor splice site may be used, resulting in a full-length LPL with an in-frame deletion of 3 amino acids. Analysis of messenger RNA from the patient showed that the new splice site is used in vivo. Homozygosity for a mutation in the LPL gene was consistent with the clinical findings. Use of the new splice site created by the insertion mutation rescues an otherwise damaging frameshift mutation, resulting in expression of an almost full-length LPL that is predicted to be partially functional. The patient therefore has a less severe form of type I hyperlipoproteinemia than would be expected if she lacked any functional LPL. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 messenger RNA fail to treat experimental tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, C.D.; Trombone, A.P.F.; Lorenzi, J.C.C.; Almeida, L.P.; Gembre, A.F.; Padilha, E. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.G. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, C.L.; Coelho-Castelo, A.A.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    In the last several years, the use of dendritic cells has been studied as a therapeutic strategy against tumors. Dendritic cells can be pulsed with peptides or full-length protein, or they can be transfected with DNA or RNA. However, comparative studies suggest that transfecting dendritic cells with messenger RNA (mRNA) is superior to other antigen-loading techniques in generating immunocompetent dendritic cells. In the present study, we evaluated a new therapeutic strategy to fight tuberculosis using dendritic cells and macrophages transfected with Hsp65 mRNA. First, we demonstrated that antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA exhibit a higher level of expression of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that Hsp65 mRNA has immunostimulatory properties. We also demonstrated that spleen cells obtained from animals immunized with mock and Hsp65 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells were able to generate a mixed Th1/Th2 response with production not only of IFN-γ but also of IL-5 and IL-10. In contrast, cells recovered from mice immunized with Hsp65 mRNA-transfected macrophages were able to produce only IL-5. When mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated with antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA (therapeutic immunization), we did not detect any decrease in the lung bacterial load or any preservation of the lung parenchyma, indicating the inability of transfected cells to confer curative effects against tuberculosis. In spite of the lack of therapeutic efficacy, this study reports for the first time the use of antigen-presenting cells transfected with mRNA in experimental tuberculosis.

  19. Alterations in micro RNA-messenger RNA (miRNA-mRNA) Coupled Signaling Networks in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease (AD) Hippocampal CA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, V; Zhao, Y; Lukiw, W J

    2017-04-01

    RNA sequencing, DNA microfluidic array, LED-Northern, Western immunoassay and bioinformatics analysis have uncovered a small family of up-regulated human brain enriched microRNAs (miRNAs) and down-regulated messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in short post-mortem interval (PMI) sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. At the mRNA level, a large majority of the expression of human brain genes found to be down-regulated in sporadic AD appears to be a consequence of an up-regulation of a specific group of NF-kB-inducible microRNAs (miRNAs). This group of up-regulated miRNAs - including miRNA-34a and miRNA-146a - has strong, energetically favorable, complimentary RNA sequences in the 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTR) of their target mRNAs which ultimately drive the down-regulation in the expression of certain essential brain genes. Interestingly, just 2 significantly up-regulated miRNAs - miRNA-34a and miRNA-146a - appear to down-regulate mRNA targets involved in synaptogenesis (SHANK3), phagocytosis deficits and tau pathology (TREM2), inflammation (CFH; complement factor H) and amyloidogenesis (TSPAN12), all of which are distinguishing pathological features characteristic of middle-to-late stage AD neuropathology. This paper reports the novel finding of parallel miRNA-34a and miRNA-146a up-regulation in sporadic AD hippocampal CA1 RNA pools and proposes an altered miRNA-mRNA coupled signaling network in AD, much of which is supported by current experimental findings in the recent literature.

  20. Messenger RNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification: research and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Su-hua; Di, Zhou; Zhao, Shu-min; Li, Cheng-tao

    2013-10-01

    Identifying the origin of body fluids left at a crime scene can give a significant insight into crime scene reconstruction by supporting a link between sample donors and actual criminal acts. However, the conventional body fluid identification methods are prone to various limitations, such as time consumption, intensive labor, nonparallel manner, varying degrees of sensitivity and limited specificity. Recently, the analysis of cell-specific messenger RNA expression (mRNA profiling) has been proposed to supplant conventional methods for body fluid identification. Since 2011, the collaborative exercises have been organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in order to evaluate the robustness and reproducibility of mRNA profiling for body fluid identification. The major advantages of mRNA profiling, compared to the conventional methods, include higher sensitivity, greater specificity, the ability of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction, and compatibility with current DNA extraction and analysis procedure. In the current review, we provided an overview of the present knowledge and detection methodologies of mRNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification and discussed its possible practical application to forensic casework.

  1. The ribosome uses two active mechanisms to unwind messenger RNA during translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wen, Jin-Der; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2011-07-06

    The ribosome translates the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA into protein. Folded structures in the coding region of an mRNA represent a kinetic barrier that lowers the peptide elongation rate, as the ribosome must disrupt structures it encounters in the mRNA at its entry site to allow translocation to the next codon. Such structures are exploited by the cell to create diverse strategies for translation regulation, such as programmed frameshifting, the modulation of protein expression levels, ribosome localization and co-translational protein folding. Although strand separation activity is inherent to the ribosome, requiring no exogenous helicases, its mechanism is still unknown. Here, using a single-molecule optical tweezers assay on mRNA hairpins, we find that the translation rate of identical codons at the decoding centre is greatly influenced by the GC content of folded structures at the mRNA entry site. Furthermore, force applied to the ends of the hairpin to favour its unfolding significantly speeds translation. Quantitative analysis of the force dependence of its helicase activity reveals that the ribosome, unlike previously studied helicases, uses two distinct active mechanisms to unwind mRNA structure: it destabilizes the helical junction at the mRNA entry site by biasing its thermal fluctuations towards the open state, increasing the probability of the ribosome translocating unhindered; and it mechanically pulls apart the mRNA single strands of the closed junction during the conformational changes that accompany ribosome translocation. The second of these mechanisms ensures a minimal basal rate of translation in the cell; specialized, mechanically stable structures are required to stall the ribosome temporarily. Our results establish a quantitative mechanical basis for understanding the mechanism of regulation of the elongation rate of translation by structured mRNAs. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  2. Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Biodrugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The lung was saline perfused in vivo, inflated prior to fixation, and will be examined for pathologic changes and immunostained for histones. Future...by neutralization of extracellular histones with nucleic acid aptamers. Kevin Urak, MS, University of Iowa, Iowa City IA. USA (poster) Posters...University of Iowa, Iowa City IA. USA (poster) 2. 11th Annual RNA Consortium, RNA Consortium, Duarte CA, May 5-6, 2017. Treatment of myocardial depression

  3. Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio drugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0179 TITLE: Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio- drugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio- drugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...preclinical animal models and human clinical trials. Furthermore, as a drug to prevent the development of MODS/ARDS and ALI in high risk patients, these bio

  4. In Vitro Translation of Oogenetic Messenger RNA of Sea Urchin Eggs and Picornavirus RNA with a Cell-Free System from Sarcoma 180

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Nancy; Taylor, Milton W.; Raff, Rudolf A.

    1973-01-01

    A cell-free protein-synthesizing system prepared from mouse sarcoma 180 was characterized by use of RNA from mengo virus and sea urchin egg. In the presence of exogenous mammalian transfer RNA, total sea urchin egg RNA and mengo RNA direct incorporation of [3H]leucine into acid-insoluble material. The system is extremely efficient in that a stimulation of 100-times over background can be obtained. Studies with formylmethionyl-transfer RNA, as well as with inhibitors of initiation, indicate that multiple initiation occurs; further, 85-90% of all chains made in vitro are subsequently released from ribosomes. An average translation time of 3.5 min was determined with messenger RNA of sea urchin egg, and product analysis indicates that high-molecular-weight products (greater than 50,000 molecular weight) are being made in vitro. Sequences of sea urchin egg RNA containing poly(A) act as messenger RNA. PMID:4357864

  5. Messenger RNA- versus retrovirus-based induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming strategies: analysis of genomic integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steichen, Clara; Luce, Eléanor; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Desterke, Christophe; Dianat, Noushin; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Awan-Toor, Sarah; Burks, Deborah; Marie, Joëlle; Weber, Anne; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2014-06-01

    The use of synthetic messenger RNAs to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is particularly appealing for potential regenerative medicine applications, because it overcomes the common drawbacks of DNA-based or virus-based reprogramming strategies, including transgene integration in particular. We compared the genomic integrity of mRNA-derived iPSCs with that of retrovirus-derived iPSCs generated in strictly comparable conditions, by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses. We showed that mRNA-derived iPSCs do not differ significantly from the parental fibroblasts in SNP analysis, whereas retrovirus-derived iPSCs do. We found that the number of CNVs seemed independent of the reprogramming method, instead appearing to be clone-dependent. Furthermore, differentiation studies indicated that mRNA-derived iPSCs differentiated efficiently into hepatoblasts and that these cells did not load additional CNVs during differentiation. The integration-free hepatoblasts that were generated constitute a new tool for the study of diseased hepatocytes derived from patients' iPSCs and their use in the context of stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Our findings also highlight the need to conduct careful studies on genome integrity for the selection of iPSC lines before using them for further applications. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. Unusual stability of messenger RNA in snake venom reveals gene expression dynamics of venom replenishment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel B Currier

    Full Text Available Venom is a critical evolutionary innovation enabling venomous snakes to become successful limbless predators; it is therefore vital that venomous snakes possess a highly efficient venom production and delivery system to maintain their predatory arsenal. Here, we exploit the unusual stability of messenger RNA in venom to conduct, for the first time, quantitative PCR to characterise the dynamics of gene expression of newly synthesised venom proteins following venom depletion. Quantitative PCR directly from venom enables real-time dynamic studies of gene expression in the same animals because it circumvents the conventional requirement to sacrifice snakes to extract mRNA from dissected venom glands. Using qPCR and proteomic analysis, we show that gene expression and protein re-synthesis triggered by venom expulsion peaks between days 3-7 of the cycle of venom replenishment, with different protein families expressed in parallel. We demonstrate that venom re-synthesis occurs very rapidly following depletion of venom stores, presumably to ensure venomous snakes retain their ability to efficiently predate and remain defended from predators. The stability of mRNA in venom is biologically fascinating, and could significantly empower venom research by expanding opportunities to produce transcriptomes from historical venom stocks and rare or endangered venomous species, for new therapeutic, diagnostic and evolutionary studies.

  7. An RNA-seq transcriptome analysis of histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes in soybean during floral initiation process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chee Liew

    Full Text Available Epigenetics has been recognised to play vital roles in many plant developmental processes, including floral initiation through the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The histone modifying proteins that mediate these modifications involve the SET domain-containing histone methyltransferases, JmjC domain-containing demethylase, acetylases and deacetylases. In addition, RNA interference (RNAi-associated genes are also involved in epigenetic regulation via RNA-directed DNA methylation and post-transcriptional gene silencing. Soybean, a major crop legume, requires a short day to induce flowering. How histone modifications regulate the plant response to external cues that initiate flowering is still largely unknown. Here, we used RNA-seq to address the dynamics of transcripts that are potentially involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi mediated gene silencing during the floral initiation of soybean. Soybean is a paleopolyploid that has been subjected to at least two rounds of whole genome duplication events. We report that the expanded genomic repertoire of histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes in soybean includes 14 histone acetyltransferases, 24 histone deacetylases, 47 histone methyltransferases, 15 protein arginine methyltransferases, 24 JmjC domain-containing demethylases and 47 RNAi-associated genes. To investigate the role of these histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes during floral initiation, we compared the transcriptional dynamics of the leaf and shoot apical meristem at different time points after a short-day treatment. Our data reveal that the extensive activation of genes that are usually involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi gene silencing in the soybean shoot apical meristem are reprogrammed for floral development following an exposure to inductive conditions.

  8. Genome-Wide Scleral Micro- and Messenger-RNA Regulation During Myopia Development in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metlapally, Ravikanth; Park, Han Na; Chakraborty, Ranjay; Wang, Kevin K; Tan, Christopher C; Light, Jacob G; Pardue, Machelle T; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNA (miRNAs) have been previously implicated in scleral remodeling in normal eye growth. They have the potential to be therapeutic targets for prevention/retardation of exaggerated eye growth in myopia by modulating scleral matrix remodeling. To explore this potential, genome-wide miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) scleral profiles in myopic and control eyes from mice were studied. C57BL/6J mice (n = 7; P28) reared under a 12L:12D cycle were form-deprived (FD) unilaterally for 2 weeks. Refractive error and axial length changes were measured using photorefraction and 1310-nm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, respectively. Scleral RNA samples from FD and fellow control eyes were processed for microarray assay. Statistical analyses were performed using National Institute of Aging array analysis tool; group comparisons were made using ANOVA, and gene ontologies were identified using software available on the Web. Findings were confirmed using quantitative PCR in a separate group of mice (n = 7). Form-deprived eyes showed myopic shifts in refractive error (-2.02 ± 0.47 D; P RNA profiles of test eyes with those of control eyes revealed 54 differentially expressed miRNAs and 261 mRNAs fold-change >1.25 (maximum fold change = 1.63 and 2.7 for miRNAs and mRNAs, respectively) (P < 0.05; minimum, P = 0.0001). Significant ontologies showing gene over-representation (P < 0.05) included intermediate filament organization, scaffold protein binding, detection of stimuli, calcium ion, G protein, and phototransduction. Significant differential expression of Let-7a and miR-16-2, and Smok4a, Prph2, and Gnat1 were confirmed. Scleral mi- and mRNAs showed differential expression linked to myopia, supporting the involvement of miRNAs in eye growth regulation. The observed general trend of relatively small fold-changes suggests a tightly controlled, regulatory mechanism for scleral gene expression.

  9. Gingival Toll-like receptor and cytokine messenger RNA levels in equine periodontitis and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R; Lappin, D F; Dixon, P M; Bennett, D; Riggio, M P

    2017-05-01

    Equine periodontitis is a common and painful condition. However, the disease often goes unnoticed by owners and is thus a major welfare concern. The aetiopathogenesis of the condition remains poorly understood and has been investigated in few studies. The innate immune system is known to play an important role in human periodontitis, but its role in equine periodontitis has not been examined. To quantify the messenger (m)RNA levels of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytokines in gingival tissue from orally healthy horses and those affected by periodontitis. Observational study. Gingival tissue samples were taken post-mortem from 13 horses with no clinical signs of oral disease and 20 horses with periodontitis. mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 and cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. The statistical significance of results was assessed using appropriate t tests. mRNA levels of all TLRs and cytokines were upregulated in equine periodontitis. Significant increases in mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR9, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 (P≤0.05) and IFN-γ (P≤0.01) were observed for both unweighted and age-weighted analyses of diseased gingival tissue samples compared with healthy gingival samples. In comparisons of samples of periodontitis lesions with healthy gingival control samples from the same horse, significant increases in mRNA levels of TLR4, TLR9, IL-10, IFN-γ (P≤0.05), TLR2, IL-1β and IL-12p35 (P≤0.01) were observed. This study has provided an initial insight into the involvement of the immune system in equine periodontitis. Increased mRNA levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 indicate substantial microbial challenge in diseased gingival tissue. A mixed Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine response is produced in equine periodontitis. Further studies are required to more fully characterise the role of the innate immune system in this disease. © 2016

  10. CCL20 and IL22 Messenger RNA Expression After Adalimumab vs Methotrexate Treatment of Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldminz, Ari M.; Suarez-Farinas, Mayte; Wang, Andrew C.; Dumont, Nicole; Krueger, James G.; Gottlieb, Alice B.

    2018-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Methotrexate is a first-line systemic agent for treating of psoriasis, although its onset of effects is slower and overall it is less effective than tumor necrosis factor blockers. OBJECTIVE To differentiate the response of psoriatic disease to adalimumab and methotrexate sodium. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Single-center, randomized, assessor-blind, 2-arm clinical trial of 30 patients from the outpatient dermatology center of Tufts Medical Center, enrolled from August 18, 2009, to October 11, 2011. Patients aged 18 to 85 years with chronic plaque-type psoriasis, a minimum Physician Global Assessment score of 3 (higher scores indicate more severe disease), and a psoriatic plaque of at least 2 cm were randomized in a 1:1 fashion to receive subcutaneous adalimumab or oral methotrexate. Skin biopsy specimens obtained at baseline and weeks 1, 2, 4, and 16 were given a histologic grade by blinded assessors to evaluate treatment response. Analyses were conducted from April 16, 2013, to January 5, 2015. INTERVENTIONS A 16-week course of subcutaneous adalimumab (40 mg every 2 weeks after a loading dose) or low-dosage oral methotrexate sodium (7.5–25 mg/wk). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Changes in genomic, immunohistochemical, and messenger RNA (mRNA) profiles. RESULTS Methotrexate responders experienced significant downregulation of helper T-cell– related (TH1, TH17, and TH22) mRNA expression compared with methotrexate nonresponders. Comparisons among adalimumab-treated patients were limited by the number of nonresponders (n = 1). Between adalimumab and methotrexate responders, we found no significant differences in gene expression at any study point or in the expression of T-cell–related mRNA at week 16. Adalimumab responders demonstrated early downregulation of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) mRNA (mean [SE] at week 2, −1.83 [0.52], P < .001; week 16, −3.55 [0.54], P < .001) compared with late downregulation for methotrexate responders

  11. The intranuclear mobility of messenger RNA binding proteins is ATP dependent and temperature sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calapez, Alexandre; Pereira, Henrique M; Calado, Angelo; Braga, José; Rino, José; Carvalho, Célia; Tavanez, João Paulo; Wahle, Elmar; Rosa, Agostinho C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2002-12-09

    After being released from transcription sites, messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) must reach the nuclear pore complexes in order to be translocated to the cytoplasm. Whether the intranuclear movement of mRNPs results largely from Brownian motion or involves molecular motors remains unknown. Here we have used quantitative photobleaching techniques to monitor the intranuclear mobility of protein components of mRNPs tagged with GFP. The results show that the diffusion coefficients of the poly(A)-binding protein II (PABP2) and the export factor TAP are significantly reduced when these proteins are bound to mRNP complexes, as compared with nonbound proteins. The data further show that the mobility of wild-type PABP2 and TAP, but not of a point mutant variant of PABP2 that fails to bind to RNA, is significantly reduced when cells are ATP depleted or incubated at 22 degrees C. Energy depletion has only minor effects on the intranuclear mobility of a 2,000-kD dextran (which corresponds approximately in size to 40S mRNP particles), suggesting that the reduced mobility of PABP2 and TAP is not caused by a general alteration of the nuclear environment. Taken together, the data suggest that the mobility of mRNPs in the living cell nucleus involves a combination of passive diffusion and ATP-dependent processes.

  12. Modifications of RNA polymerase II CTD: Connections to the histone code and cellular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rakesh; Ahn, Seong Hoon

    2015-11-01

    At the onset of transcription, many protein machineries interpret the cellular signals that regulate gene expression. These complex signals are mostly transmitted to the indispensable primary proteins involved in transcription, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and histones. RNAPII and histones are so well coordinated in this cellular function that each cellular signal is precisely allocated to specific machinery depending on the stage of transcription. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII in eukaryotes undergoes extensive posttranslational modification, called the 'CTD code', that is indispensable for coupling transcription with many cellular processes, including mRNA processing. The posttranslational modification of histones, known as the 'histone code', is also critical for gene transcription through the reversible and dynamic remodeling of chromatin structure. Notably, the histone code is closely linked with the CTD code, and their combinatorial effects enable the delicate regulation of gene transcription. This review elucidates recent findings regarding the CTD modifications of RNAPII and their coordination with the histone code, providing integrative pathways for the fine-tuned regulation of gene expression and cellular function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. RNA-Sequencing Analysis of Messenger RNA/MicroRNA in a Rabbit Aneurysm Model Identifies Pathways and Genes of Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, M; Ding, Y-H; Dai, D; McDonald, R J; McDonald, J S; Kallmes, D F; Kadirvel, R

    2015-09-01

    Rabbit aneurysm models are used for the testing of embolization devices and elucidating the mechanisms of human intracranial aneurysm growth and healing. We used RNA-sequencing technology to identify genes relevant to induced rabbit aneurysm biology and to identify genes and pathways of potential clinical interest. This process included sequencing microRNAs, which are important regulatory noncoding RNAs. Elastase-induced saccular aneurysms were created at the origin of the right common carotid artery in 6 rabbits. Messenger RNA and microRNA were isolated from the aneurysm and from the control left common carotid artery at 12 weeks and processed by using RNA-sequencing technology. The results from RNA sequencing were analyzed by using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. A total of 9396 genes were analyzed by using RNA sequencing, 648 (6.9%) of which were found to be significantly differentially expressed between the aneurysms and control tissues (P 2 or rabbit aneurysms revealed differential regulation of some key pathways, including inflammation and antigen presentation. ANKRD1 and TACR1 were identified as genes of interest in the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  14. Snipper, an Eri1 homologue, affects histone mRNA abundance and is crucial for normal Drosophila melanogaster development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiadis, Anastasios; Delidakis, Christos; Kalantidis, Kriton

    2017-07-01

    The conserved 3'-5' RNA exonuclease ERI1 is implicated in RNA interference inhibition, 5.8S rRNA maturation and histone mRNA maturation and turnover. The single ERI1 homologue in Drosophila melanogaster Snipper (Snp) is a 3'-5' exonuclease, but its in vivo function remains elusive. Here, we report Snp requirement for normal Drosophila development, since its perturbation leads to larval arrest and tissue-specific downregulation results in abnormal tissue development. Additionally, Snp directly interacts with histone mRNA, and its depletion results in drastic reduction in histone transcript levels. We propose that Snp protects the 3'-ends of histone mRNAs and upon its absence, histone transcripts are readily degraded. This in turn may lead to cell cycle delay or arrest, causing growth arrest and developmental perturbations. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. Long non-coding RNA ROR decoys gene-specific histone methylation to promote tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiayan; Xing, Yue; Wen, Xuyang; Jia, Renbin; Ni, Hongyan; He, Jie; Ding, Xia; Pan, Hui; Qian, Guanxiang; Ge, Shengfang; Hoffman, Andrew R; Zhang, He; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-07-14

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are not translated into proteins and were initially considered to be part of the 'dark matter' of the genome. Recently, it has been shown that lncRNAs play a role in the recruitment of chromatin modifying complexes and can influence gene expression. However, it is unknown if lncRNAs function in a similar way in cancer. Here, we show that the lncRNA ROR occupies and activates the TESC promoter by repelling the histone G9A methyltransferase and promoting the release of histone H3K9 methylation. Suppression of ROR in tumors results in silencing of TESC expression, and G9A-mediated histone H3K9 methylation in the TESC promoter is restored, which significantly reduces tumor growth and metastasis. Without ROR silencing, TESC knockdown presents consistent and significant reductions in tumor progression. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which ROR may serve as a decoy oncoRNA that blocks binding surfaces, preventing the recruitment of histone modifying enzymes, thereby specifying a new pattern of histone modifications that promote tumorigenesis.

  16. Designing immunostimulatory double stranded messenger RNA with maintained translational activity through hybridization with poly A sequences for effective vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Yoshinaga, Naoto; Yanagihara, Kayoko; Yuba, Eiji; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2018-01-01

    Messenger (m)RNA vaccines require a safe and potent immunostimulatory adjuvant. In this study, we introduced immunostimulatory properties directly into mRNA molecules by hybridizing them with complementary RNA to create highly immunogenic double stranded (ds)RNAs. These dsRNA formulations, comprised entirely of RNA, are expected to be safe and highly efficient due to antigen expression and immunostimulation occurring simultaneously in the same antigen presenting cells. In this strategy, design of dsRNA is important. Indeed, hybridization using full-length antisense (as)RNA drastically reduced translational efficiency. In contrast, by limiting the hybridized portion to the mRNA poly A region, efficient translation and intense immunostimulation was simultaneously obtained. The immune response to the poly U-hybridized mRNAs (mRNA:pU) was mediated through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3 and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I. We also demonstrated that mRNA:pU activation of mouse and human dendritic cells was significantly more effective than activation using single stranded mRNA. In vivo mouse immunization experiments using ovalbumin showed that mRNA:pU significantly enhanced the intensity of specific cellular and humoral immune responses, compared to single stranded mRNA. Our novel mRNA:pU formulation can be delivered using a variety of mRNA carriers depending on the purpose and delivery route, providing a versatile platform for improving mRNA vaccine efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrative Analysis of Histone ChIP-seq and RNA-seq Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Schäfer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The R package epigenomix has been designed to detect differentially transcribed gene isoforms that, in addition, exhibit altered histone modifications at their respective genomic loci. The package provides methods to map histone ChIP-seq profiles to isoforms and estimate their transcript abundances from RNA-seq data. Based on the differences observed between case and control samples in the RNA-seq and ChIP-seq data, a correlation measure is calculated for each isoform. The distribution of this correlation measure is further investigated by a Bayesian mixture model to (i) reveal the relationship between the studied histone modification and transcriptional activity, and (ii) detect specific isoforms with differences in both transcription values and histone modifications. The method is designed for experiments with a few or no replicates, and is superior to separate analyses of both data types in that setting. This unit illustrates the integrative analysis of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data with epigenomix. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Long non-coding RNA PARTICLE bridges histone and DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Valerie Bríd; Hain, Sarah; Maugg, Doris; Smida, Jan; Azimzadeh, Omid; Tapio, Soile; Ovsepian, Saak Victor; Atkinson, Michael John

    2017-05-11

    PARTICLE (Gene PARTICL- 'Promoter of MAT2A-Antisense RadiaTion Induced Circulating LncRNA) expression is transiently elevated following low dose irradiation typically encountered in the workplace and from natural sources. This long non-coding RNA recruits epigenetic silencers for cis-acting repression of its neighbouring Methionine adenosyltransferase 2A gene. It now emerges that PARTICLE operates as a trans-acting mediator of DNA and histone lysine methylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) and immunological evidence established elevated PARTICLE expression linked to increased histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation. Live-imaging of dbroccoli-PARTICLE revealing its dynamic association with DNA methyltransferase 1 was confirmed by flow cytometry, immunoprecipitation and direct competitive binding interaction through electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Acting as a regulatory docking platform, the long non-coding RNA PARTICLE serves to interlink epigenetic modification machineries and represents a compelling innovative component necessary for gene silencing on a global scale.

  19. Prediction of RNA Polymerase II recruitment, elongation and stalling from histone modification data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Jørgensen, Mette; Kolde, Raivo

    2011-01-01

    in the gene body, the mRNA production originating from the promoter and finally also the stalling characteristics of RNAPII by considering both quantitative and spatial features of histone modifications around the transcription start site (TSS). As the model framework can also pinpoint the signals...... that are the most influential for prediction, it can be used to infer underlying regulatory biology. For example, we show that the H3K4 di- and tri- methylation signals are strongly predictive for promoter location while the acetylation marks H3K9 and H3K27 are highly important in estimating the promoter usage. All...... of these four marks are found to be necessary for recruitment of RNAPII but not sufficient for the elongation. We also show that the spatial distributions of histone marks are almost as predictive as the signal strength and that a set of histone marks immediately downstream of the TSS is highly predictive...

  20. Glutamine methylation in histone H2A is an RNA-polymerase-I-dedicated modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessarz, Peter; Santos-Rosa, Helena; Robson, Sam C

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are decorated with numerous post-translational modifications capable of influencing many DNA processes. Here we describe a new class of histone modification, methylation of glutamine, occurring on yeast histone H2A at position 105 (Q105) and human H2A at Q104. We identify Nop1...... as the methyltransferase in yeast and demonstrate that fibrillarin is the orthologue enzyme in human cells. Glutamine methylation of H2A is restricted to the nucleolus. Global analysis in yeast, using an H2AQ105me-specific antibody, shows that this modification is exclusively enriched over the 35S ribosomal DNA...... and increased transcription at the ribosomal DNA locus. These features are phenocopied by mutations in FACT complex components. Together these data identify glutamine methylation of H2A as the first histone epigenetic mark dedicated to a specific RNA polymerase and define its function as a regulator of FACT...

  1. Glutamine methylation in histone H2A is an RNA-polymerase-I-dedicated modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarz, Peter; Santos-Rosa, Helena; Robson, Sam C.; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B.; Nelson, Christopher J.; Nielsen, Michael L.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are decorated with numerous post-translational modifications capable of influencing many DNA processes. Here we describe a new class of histone modification, methylation of glutamine, occurring on yeast histone H2A at position 105 (Q105) and human H2A at Q104. We identify Nop1 as the methyltransferase in yeast and demonstrate that fibrillarin is the orthologue enzyme in human cells. Glutamine methylation of H2A is restricted to the nucleolus. Global analysis in yeast, using an H2AQ105me-specific antibody, shows that this modification is exclusively enriched over the 35S ribosomal DNA transcriptional unit. We show that the Q105 residue is part of the binding site for the histone chaperone FACT (facilitator of chromatin transcription) complex. Methylation of Q105 or its substitution to alanine disrupts binding to FACT in vitro. A yeast strain mutated at Q105 shows reduced histone incorporation and increased transcription at the ribosomal DNA locus. These features are phenocopied by mutations in FACT complex components. Together these data identify glutamine methylation of H2A as the first histone epigenetic mark dedicated to a specific RNA polymerase and define its function as a regulator of FACT interaction with nucleosomes.

  2. Melatonin, Noncoding RNAs, Messenger RNA Stability and Epigenetics—Evidence, Hints, Gaps and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a highly pleiotropic regulator molecule, which influences numerous functions in almost every organ and, thus, up- or down-regulates many genes, frequently in a circadian manner. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling gene expression is actually now expanding to a previously unforeseen extent. In addition to classic actions of transcription factors, gene expression is induced, suppressed or modulated by a number of RNAs and proteins, such as miRNAs, lncRNAs, piRNAs, antisense transcripts, deadenylases, DNA methyltransferases, histone methylation complexes, histone demethylases, histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Direct or indirect evidence for involvement of melatonin in this network of players has originated in different fields, including studies on central and peripheral circadian oscillators, shift work, cancer, inflammation, oxidative stress, aging, energy expenditure/obesity, diabetes type 2, neuropsychiatric disorders, and neurogenesis. Some of the novel modulators have also been shown to participate in the control of melatonin biosynthesis and melatonin receptor expression. Future work will need to augment the body of evidence on direct epigenetic actions of melatonin and to systematically investigate its role within the network of oscillating epigenetic factors. Moreover, it will be necessary to discriminate between effects observed under conditions of well-operating and deregulated circadian clocks, and to explore the possibilities of correcting epigenetic malprogramming by melatonin. PMID:25310649

  3. Melatonin, Noncoding RNAs, Messenger RNA Stability and Epigenetics—Evidence, Hints, Gaps and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Hardeland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a highly pleiotropic regulator molecule, which influences numerous functions in almost every organ and, thus, up- or down-regulates many genes, frequently in a circadian manner. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling gene expression is actually now expanding to a previously unforeseen extent. In addition to classic actions of transcription factors, gene expression is induced, suppressed or modulated by a number of RNAs and proteins, such as miRNAs, lncRNAs, piRNAs, antisense transcripts, deadenylases, DNA methyltransferases, histone methylation complexes, histone demethylases, histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Direct or indirect evidence for involvement of melatonin in this network of players has originated in different fields, including studies on central and peripheral circadian oscillators, shift work, cancer, inflammation, oxidative stress, aging, energy expenditure/obesity, diabetes type 2, neuropsychiatric disorders, and neurogenesis. Some of the novel modulators have also been shown to participate in the control of melatonin biosynthesis and melatonin receptor expression. Future work will need to augment the body of evidence on direct epigenetic actions of melatonin and to systematically investigate its role within the network of oscillating epigenetic factors. Moreover, it will be necessary to discriminate between effects observed under conditions of well-operating and deregulated circadian clocks, and to explore the possibilities of correcting epigenetic malprogramming by melatonin.

  4. Genetic recombination in plant-infecting messenger-sense RNA viruses: overview and research perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Julian Bujarski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA recombination is one of the driving forces of genetic variability in (+-strand RNA viruses. Various types of RNA-RNA crossovers were described including crosses between the same or different viral RNAs or between viral and cellular RNAs. Likewise, a variety of molecular mechanisms are known to support RNA recombination, such as replicative events (based on internal or end-to-end replicase switchings along with nonreplicative joining among RNA fragments of viral and/or cellular origin. Such mechanisms as RNA decay or RNA interference are responsible for RNA fragmentation and trans-esterification reactions which are likely accountable for ligation of RNA fragments. Numerous host factors were found to affect the profiles of viral RNA recombinants and significant differences in recombination frequency were observed among various RNA viruses. Comparative analyses of viral sequences allowed for the development of evolutionary models in order to explain adaptive phenotypic changes and co-evolving sites. Many questions remain to be answered by forthcoming RNA recombination research. (i How various factors modulate the ability of viral replicase to switch templates, (ii What is the intracellular location of RNA-RNA template switchings, (iii Mechanisms and factors responsible for non-replicative RNA recombination, (iv Mechanisms of integration of RNA viral sequences with cellular genomic DNA, and (v What is the role of RNA splicing and ribozyme activity. From an evolutionary stand point, it is not known how RNA viruses parasitize new host species via recombination, nor is it obvious what the contribution of RNA recombination is among other RNA modification pathways. We do not understand why the frequency of RNA recombination varies so much among RNA viruses and the status of RNA recombination as a form of sex is not well documented.

  5. Contrasting responses to interferon β-1b treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: Does baseline interleukin- 12p35 messenger RNA predict the efficacy of treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxel van-Dezaire, A.H.H.; Trigt van-Hoff, S.C.J.; Killestein, J.; Schrijver, H.M.; Houwelingen, J.C. van; Polman, C.H.; Nagelkerken, L.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β treatment is effective in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) via an as yet unidentified mechanism. In the present study, we investigated whether the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding the interleukin (IL)-12 subunits p40 and p35, IL-12 receptor chains, IL-18,

  6. Quantifying histone and RNA polymerase II post-translational modification dynamics in mother and daughter cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasevich, Timothy J; Sato, Yuko; Nozaki, Naohito; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Post-translational histone modifications are highly correlated with transcriptional activity, but the relative timing of these marks and their dynamic interplay during gene regulation remains controversial. To shed light on this problem and clarify the connections between histone modifications and transcription, we demonstrate how FabLEM (Fab-based Live Endogenous Modification labeling) can be used to simultaneously track histone H3 Lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) together with RNA polymerase II Serine 2 and Serine 5 phosphorylation (RNAP2 Ser2ph/Ser5ph) in single living cells and their progeny. We provide a detailed description of the FabLEM methodology, including helpful tips for preparing and loading fluorescently conjugated antigen binding fragments (Fab) into cells for optimal results. We also introduce simple procedures for analyzing and visualizing FabLEM data, including color-coded scatterplots to track correlations between modifications through the cell cycle and temporal cross-correlation analysis to dissect modification dynamics. Using these methods, we find significant correlations that span cell generations, with a relatively strong correlation between H3K9ac and Ser5ph that appears to peak a few hours before mitosis and may reflect the bookmarking of genes for efficient re-initiation following mitosis. The techniques we have developed are broadly applicable and should help clarify how histone modifications dynamically contribute to gene regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Adipose tissue angiopoietin-like protein 4 messenger RNA changes with altered energy balance in lactating Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltes, D A; Spurlock, D M

    2012-11-01

    Negative energy balance at the onset of lactation is unfavorably associated with fitness traits in high-producing dairy cows. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is an adipokine that has been associated with the regulation of lipid metabolism through the inhibition of lipoprotein lipase activity and regulation of lipolysis. Expression of ANGPTL4 messenger RNA (mRNA) increases during early lactation, but its regulation with changing energy status is currently unknown. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to determine whether ANGPTL4 mRNA abundance is responsive to declining energy balance induced by the transition from pregnancy to lactation, feed restriction, and GH administration in lactating dairy cows. The mRNA abundance of leptin, adiponectin, and adiponectin receptor 2 were also measured to compare adipokine mRNA profiles during changes in energy metabolism. Repeated adipose tissue biopsies were taken from different cows during transition from late pregnancy to lactation (n = 26), feed restriction (n = 19), and GH administration (n = 20). As expected, milk yield increased with the onset of lactation and GH administration (P Energy balance declined in each experiment, resulting in negative energy balance at the onset of lactation and after feed restriction. Abundance of ANGPTL4 mRNA expression increased 2- to 6-fold with declining energy balance in each experiment. Leptin mRNA declined with feed restriction, and adiponectin mRNA decreased with the onset of lactation. The consistency and magnitude of the increase in ANGPTL4 mRNA across multiple models of altered energy balance identifies it as an adipokine that is uniquely responsive to changes in energy balance in the lactating dairy cow. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clenbuterol affects the expression of messenger RNA for interleukin 10 in peripheral leukocytes from horses challenged intrabronchially with lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoven, R; Duvigneau, J C; Hartl, R T; Gemeiner, M

    2006-11-01

    On four occasions, four horses with heaves and four horses with small airway inflammatory diseases inhaled 0.9% saline based aerosol mixtures with or without lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Prior to the first saline and LPS inhalation, horses were untreated, while three and a half days prior to the third and forth inhalation horses had received 0.8 microg/kg clenbuterol intravenously twice daily. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and interferon- gamma (IFN- gamma) was investigated by RT-PCR, all of which were expressed in the white blood cells of samples collected. Inhalation of LPS only changed the cytokine expression profile of IL-10, IL-4 and TNF-alpha mRNA which were higher after challenge with LPS. However in those horses that were treated with clenbuterol the LPS-induced IL-10 mRNA expression was shown to be suppressed. Further changes in IL-4 and TNF-alpha were not significant. Thus the results of this study indicated that clenbuterol can modulate the expression of IL-10 mRNA in peripheral white blood cells in those horses with small airway diseases that have been exposed to LPS.

  9. Maternal provision of non-sex-specific transformer messenger RNA in sex determination of the wasp Asobara tabida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuverink, E; Verhulst, E C; van Leussen, M; van de Zande, L; Beukeboom, L W

    2017-10-14

    In many insect species maternal provision of sex-specifically spliced messenger RNA (mRNA) of sex determination genes is an essential component of the sex determination mechanism. In haplodiploid Hymenoptera, maternal provision in combination with genomic imprinting has been shown for the parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis, known as maternal effect genomic imprinting sex determination (MEGISD). Here, we characterize the sex determination cascade of Asobara tabida, another hymenopteran parasitoid. We show the presence of the conserved sex determination genes doublesex (dsx), transformer (tra) and transformer-2 (tra2) orthologues in As. tabida. Of these, At-dsx and At-tra are sex-specifically spliced, indicating a conserved function in sex determination. At-tra and At-tra2 mRNA is maternally provided to embryos but, in contrast to most studied insects, As. tabida females transmit a non-sex-specific splice form of At-tra mRNA to the eggs. In this respect, As. tabida sex determination differs from the MEGISD mechanism. How the paternal genome can induce female development in the absence of maternal provision of sex-specifically spliced mRNA remains an open question. Our study reports a hitherto unknown variant of maternal effect sex determination and accentuates the diversity of insect sex determination mechanisms. © 2017 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Entomological Society.

  10. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Peterson, B C; Waldbieser, G C

    2015-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that increased growth in channel catfish is associated with expression of the genes that code for uncoupling proteins (UCP) 2 and 3, members of the mitochondrial channel proteins involved in nutrient sensing and metabolism. The specific objective was to contrast the levels of UCP2 messenger RNA (mRNA) in fast vs slow growing catfish as well as in fed vs fasted catfish. Two distinct UCP2 transcripts were identified and named UCP2a and UCP2b, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence of catfish UCP2s were highly similar to UCP2 and other UCPs from other fish and mammals (>75%). Expression of UCP2a mRNA was detectable at very low levels in various metabolically active tissues, whereas the expression of UCP2b mRNA was readily detectable in the muscle and heart. In a 21-wk feeding study, fish that grew faster had a greater percent body fat at the end of the study (P catfish UCP2b may be the analog to UCP3. Moreover, our results suggest selection toward growth and associated fat accumulation appears to be independent of muscle UCP2b mRNA expression and UCP2b-mediated mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of membrane-type 1, 2, and 3 matrix metalloproteinases messenger RNA in ovarian carcinoma cells in serous effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, B; Goldberg, I; Berner, A; Nesland, J M; Givant-Horwitz, V; Bryne, M; Risberg, B; Kristensen, G B; Tropé, C G; Kopolovic, J; Reich, R

    2001-04-01

    We studied the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, membrane-type (MT)1-MMP, MT2-MMP, and MT3-MMP in 43 malignant pleural and peritoneal effusions using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cellular localization of MT1-MMP in 66 effusion specimens and 85 corresponding primary and metastatic tumors using messenger RNA (mRNA) in situ hybridization (ISH). In 43 effusions, MMP-2 mRNA was detected in 37, MT1-MMP in 25, and MT2-MMP in 32. Expression of MT1-MMP and MT2-MMP was found in 21 specimens; in 16 MT-MMP-positive specimens, mRNA for only 1 of 2 enzymes was expressed. MT3-MMP mRNA was not detected. High levels of MMP-2 mRNA were detected more often in effusions with high MT1-MMP and/or MT2-MMP mRNA expression. Using ISH, MT1-MMP mRNA was localized to cancer cells in 27 of 58 malignant effusions; focal signals were detected in mesothelial cells in 7 of 42. MT1-MMP was localized to tumor cells in 32 of 85 primary and metastatic solid lesions, and stromal cells expressed MT1-MMP in 3. Tumor cell MT1-MMP expression in effusion specimens did not differ from primary or metastatic lesions. MT-MMP expression in tumor cells in effusions showed no association with effusion site or tumor type using ISH and RT-PCR.

  12. Translation affects YoeB and MazF messenger RNA interferase activities by different mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Gerdes, Kenn

    2008-01-01

    but does not cleave pure RNA in vitro. RelE exhibits an incomplete RNase fold that may explain why RelE requires its substrate mRNA to presented by the ribosome. In contrast, RelE homologue YoeB has a complete RNase fold and cleaves RNA independently of ribosomes in vitro. Here, we show that YoeB cleavage...

  13. Messenger RNA delivery of a cartilage-anabolic transcription factor as a disease-modifying strategy for osteoarthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aini, Hailati; Itaka, Keiji; Fujisawa, Ayano; Uchida, Hirokuni; Uchida, Satoshi; Fukushima, Shigeto; Kataoka, Kazunori; Saito, Taku; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2016-01-05

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease and a major health problem in the elderly population. No disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD) has been made available for clinical use. Here we present a disease-modifying strategy for OA, focusing on messenger RNA (mRNA) delivery of a therapeutic transcription factor using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polyamino acid block copolymer-based polyplex nanomicelles. When polyplex nanomicelles carrying the cartilage-anabolic, runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) 1 mRNA were injected into mouse OA knee joints, OA progression was significantly suppressed compared with the non-treatment control. Expressions of cartilage-anabolic markers and proliferation were augmented in articular chondrocytes of the RUNX1-injected knees. Thus, this study provides a proof of concept of the treatment of degenerative diseases such as OA by the in situ mRNA delivery of therapeutic transcription factors; the presented approach will directly connect basic findings on disease-protective or tissue-regenerating factors to disease treatment.

  14. Illuminating Messengers: An Update and Outlook on RNA Visualization in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke A. van Gijtenbeek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To be able to visualize the abundance and spatiotemporal features of RNAs in bacterial cells would permit obtaining a pivotal understanding of many mechanisms underlying bacterial cell biology. The first methods that allowed observing single mRNA molecules in individual cells were introduced by Bertrand et al. (1998 and Femino et al. (1998. Since then, a plethora of techniques to image RNA molecules with the aid of fluorescence microscopy has emerged. Many of these approaches are useful for the large eukaryotic cells but their adaptation to study RNA, specifically mRNA molecules, in bacterial cells progressed relatively slow. Here, an overview will be given of fluorescent techniques that can be used to reveal specific RNA molecules inside fixed and living single bacterial cells. It includes a critical evaluation of their caveats as well as potential solutions.

  15. Study of messenger RNA inactivation and protein degradation in an Escherichia coli cell-free expression system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireaux Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large amount of recombinant proteins can be synthesized in a few hours with Escherichia coli cell-free expression systems based on bacteriophage transcription. These cytoplasmic extracts are used in many applications that require large-scale protein production such as proteomics and high throughput techniques. In recent years, cell-free systems have also been used to engineer complex informational processes. These works, however, have been limited by the current available cell-free systems, which are not well adapted to these types of studies. In particular, no method has been proposed to increase the mRNA inactivation rate and the protein degradation rate in cell-free reactions. The construction of in vitro informational processes with interesting dynamics requires a balance between mRNA and protein synthesis (the source, and mRNA inactivation and protein degradation (the sink. Results Two quantitative studies are presented to characterize and to increase the global mRNA inactivation rate, and to accelerate the degradation of the synthesized proteins in an E. coli cell-free expression system driven by the endogenous RNA polymerase and sigma factor 70. The E. coli mRNA interferase MazF was used to increase and to adjust the mRNA inactivation rate of the Firefly luciferase (Luc and of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. Peptide tags specific to the endogenous E. coli AAA + proteases were used to induce and to adjust the protein degradation rate of eGFP. Messenger RNA inactivation rate, protein degradation rate, maturation time of Luc and eGFP were measured. Conclusions The global mRNA turnover and the protein degradation rate can be accelerated and tuned in a biologically relevant range in a cell-free reaction with quantitative procedures easy to implement. These features broaden the capabilities of cell-free systems with a better control of gene expression. This cell-free extract could find some applications in

  16. The nucleolin targeting aptamer AS1411 destabilizes Bcl-2 messenger RNA in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Sridharan; Chen, Weiwei; Spicer, Eleanor K; Courtenay-Luck, Nigel; Fernandes, Daniel J

    2008-04-01

    We sought to determine whether nucleolin, a bcl-2 mRNA-binding protein, has a role in the regulation of bcl-2 mRNA stability in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the efficacy of the aptamer AS1411 in targeting nucleolin and inducing bcl-2 mRNA instability and cytotoxicity in these cells. AS1411 at 5 micromol/L inhibited the growth of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas 20 micromol/L AS1411 had no effect on the growth rate or viability of normal MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. This selectivity of AS1411 was related to a greater uptake of AS1411 into the cytoplasm of MCF-7 cells compared with MCF-10A cells and to a 4-fold higher level of cytoplasmic nucleolin in MCF-7 cells. Stable siRNA knockdown of nucleolin in MCF-7 cells reduced nucleolin and bcl-2 protein levels and decreased the half-life of bcl-2 mRNA from 11 to 5 hours. Similarly, AS1411 (10 micromol/L) decreased the half-life of bcl-2 mRNA in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells to 1.0 and 1.2 hours, respectively. In contrast, AS1411 had no effect on the stability of bcl-2 mRNA in normal MCF-10A cells. AS1411 also inhibited the binding of nucleolin to the instability element AU-rich element 1 of bcl-2 mRNA in a cell-free system and in MCF-7 cells. Together, the results suggest that AS1411 acts as a molecular decoy by competing with bcl-2 mRNA for binding to cytoplasmic nucleolin in these breast cancer cell lines. This interferes with the stabilization of bcl-2 mRNA by nucleolin and may be one mechanism by which AS1411 induces tumor cell death.

  17. Drosophila Kismet regulates histone H3 lysine 27 methylation and early elongation by RNA polymerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrividhya Srinivasan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb and trithorax group proteins regulate cellular pluripotency and differentiation by maintaining hereditable states of transcription. Many Polycomb and trithorax group proteins have been implicated in the covalent modification or remodeling of chromatin, but how they interact with each other and the general transcription machinery to regulate transcription is not well understood. The trithorax group protein Kismet-L (KIS-L is a member of the CHD subfamily of chromatin-remodeling factors that plays a global role in transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II. Mutations in CHD7, the human counterpart of kis, are associated with CHARGE syndrome, a developmental disorder affecting multiple tissues and organs. To clarify how KIS-L activates gene expression and counteracts Polycomb group silencing, we characterized defects resulting from the loss of KIS-L function in Drosophila. These studies revealed that KIS-L acts downstream of P-TEFb recruitment to stimulate elongation by Pol II. The presence of two chromodomains in KIS-L suggested that its recruitment or function might be regulated by the methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 by the trithorax group proteins ASH1 and TRX. Although we observed significant overlap between the distributions of KIS-L, ASH1, and TRX on polytene chromosomes, KIS-L did not bind methylated histone tails in vitro, and loss of TRX or ASH1 function did not alter the association of KIS-L with chromatin. By contrast, loss of kis function led to a dramatic reduction in the levels of TRX and ASH1 associated with chromatin and was accompanied by increased histone H3 lysine 27 methylation-a modification required for Polycomb group repression. A similar increase in H3 lysine 27 methylation was observed in ash1 and trx mutant larvae. Our findings suggest that KIS-L promotes early elongation and counteracts Polycomb group repression by recruiting the ASH1 and TRX histone methyltransferases to chromatin.

  18. TRANSLATION START SITE MULTIPLICITY OF THE CCAAT ENHANCER-BINDING PROTEIN-ALPHA MESSENGER-RNA IS DICTATED BY A SMALL 5' OPEN READING FRAME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CALKHOVEN, CF; BOUWMAN, PRJ; SNIPPE, L; AB, G

    1994-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP) alpha and beta of the bZIP family of transcription factors each occur as multiple forms due to translation initiation at different in-frame AUG codons from the same messenger RNA. The C/EBP alpha mRNAs of chicken, rat and Xenopus all contain a small 5'

  19. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.

  20. Fetuin and fetuin messenger RNA in granulosa cells of the rat ovary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Poul Erik; Terkelsen, O B; Grete Byskov, A

    2001-01-01

    during maturation of the oocyte. We demonstrated fetuin mRNA in the rat ovary by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and localized it by in situ hybridization. Fetuin mRNA was present in all granulosa cells of growing and large follicles. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the fetuin...... function in a paracrine manner to maintain the zona pellucida in a penetrable state for fertilization....

  1. Direct observation of specific messenger RNA in a single living cell under a fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, A; Koshimoto, H; Sato, Y; Hirano, M; Sei-Iida, Y; Kondo, S; Ishibashi, K

    2000-06-01

    We observed the expression of human c-fos mRNA in a living transfected Cos7 cell under a fluorescence microscope by detecting hybrid formed with two fluorescently labeled oligodeoxynucleotides (oligoDNAs) and c-fos mRNA in the cytoplasm. Two fluorescent oligoDNAs were prepared, each labeled with a fluorescence molecule different from the other. When two oligoDNAs hybridized to an adjacent sequence on the target mRNA, the distance between the two fluorophores became very close and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred, resulting in changes in fluorescence spectra. To find sequences of high accessibility of c-fos RNA to oligoDNAs, several sites that included loop structures on the simulated secondary structure were selected. Each site was divided into two halves, and the pair of fluorescent oligoDNAs complementary to the sequence was synthesized. Each site was examined for the efficiency of hybridization to c-fos RNA by measuring changes in fluorescence spectra when c-fos RNA was added to the pair of oligoDNAs in solution. A 40 mer specific site was found, and the pair of oligoDNAs for the site were microinjected into Cos7 cells that expressed c-fos mRNA. To block oligoDNAs from accumulating in the nucleus, oligoDNA was bound to a macromolecule (streptavidin) to prevent passage of nuclear pores. Hybridization of the pair of oligoDNAs to c-fos mRNA in the cytoplasm was detected in fluorescence images indicating FRET.

  2. Expression of {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptor messenger RNA in the human CNS: a {sup 33}P in situ hybridization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peckys, D.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B. [Department of Neurology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Neurozentrum, Breisacherstrasse 64, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    The existence of at least three opioid receptor types, referred to as {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta}, is well established. Complementary DNAs corresponding to the pharmacologically defined {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptors have been isolated in various species including man. The expression patterns of opioid receptor transcripts in human brain has not been established with a cellular resolution, in part because of the low apparent abundance of opioid receptor messenger RNAs in human brain. To visualize opioid receptor messenger RNAs we developed a sensitive in situ hybridization histochemistry method using {sup 33}P-labelled RNA probes. In the present study we report the regional and cellular expression of {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptor messenger RNAs in selected areas of the human brain. Hybridization of the different opioid receptor probes resulted in distinct labelling patterns. For the {mu} and {kappa} opioid receptor probes, the most intense regional signals were observed in striatum, thalamus, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and certain brainstem areas as well as the spinal cord. The most intense signals for the {delta} opioid receptor probe were found in cerebral cortex. Expression of opioid receptor transcripts was restricted to subpopulations of neurons within most regions studied demonstrating differences in the cellular expression patterns of {mu}, {kappa}, and {delta} opioid receptor messenger RNAs in numerous brain regions. The messenger RNA distribution patterns for each opioid receptor corresponded in general to the distribution of opioid receptor binding sites as visualized by receptor autoradiography. However, some mismatches, for instance between {mu} opioid receptor receptor binding and {mu} opioid receptor messenger RNA expression in the anterior striatum, were observed. A comparison of the distribution patterns of opioid receptor messenger RNAs in the human brain and that reported for the rat suggests a homologous

  3. Messenger RNA expression of Pabpnl1 and Mbd3l2 genes in oocytes and cleavage embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biase, Fernando Henrique; Martelli, Lúcia; Puga, Renato; Giuliatti, Silvana; Santos-Biase, Weruska Karyna Freitas; Fonseca Merighe, Giovana Krempel; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira

    2010-05-15

    To identify genes specifically expressed in mammalian oocytes using an in silico subtraction, and to characterize the mRNA patterns of selected genes in oocytes, embryos, and adult tissues. Comparison between oocyte groups and between early embryo stages. Laboratories of embryo manipulation and molecular biology from Departamento de Genética (FMRP) and Departamento de Ciências Básicas (FZEA)--University of São Paulo. Oocytes were collected from slaughtered cows for measurements, in vitro fertilization, and in vitro embryo culture. Somatic tissue, excluding gonad and uterus tissue, was collected from male and female cattle. Messenger RNA levels of poly(A)-binding protein nuclear-like 1 (Pabpnl1) and methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 3-like 2 (Mbd3l2). Pabpnl1 mRNA was found to be expressed in oocytes, and Mbd3l2 transcripts were present in embryos. Quantification of Pabpnl1 transcripts showed no difference in levels between good- and bad-quality oocytes before in vitro maturation (IVM) or between good-quality oocytes before and after IVM. However, Pabpnl1 transcripts were not detected in bad-quality oocytes after IVM. Transcripts of the Mbd3l2 gene were found in 4-cell, 8-cell, and morula-stage embryos, with the highest level observed in 8-cell embryos. Pabpnl1 gene expression is restricted to oocytes and Mbd3l2 to embryos. Different Pabpnl1 mRNA levels in oocytes of varying viability suggest an important role in fertility involving the oocyte potential for embryo development. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ets-1 messenger RNA expression is a novel marker of poor survival in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, B; Reich, R; Goldberg, I; Gotlieb, W H; Kopolovic, J; Berner, A; Ben-Baruch, G; Bryne, M; Nesland, J M

    2001-03-01

    Ets-1 proto-oncogene is a transcription factor involved in several cellular functions, including the activation of several proteases participating in tumor invasion and metastasis. The objective of this study was to analyze the possible correlation between Ets-1 mRNA expression and survival in advanced-stage ovarian carcinomas, studying two patient groups with extremely different disease outcome. Sections from 66 primary ovarian carcinomas and metastatic lesions from 41 patients diagnosed with advanced-stage ovarian carcinoma (International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians stages III and IV) were evaluated for expression of Ets-1 using mRNA in situ hybridization. Patients were divided into long-term (n = 17) and short-term (n = 24) survivors. The mean values for disease-free survival and overall survival were 116 and 133 months for long-term survivors, as compared to 3 and 21 months for short-term survivors, respectively. Expression of Ets-1 mRNA was detected in carcinoma cells and stromal cells in 28 of 66 (42%) and 22 of 66 (33%) lesions, respectively. Ets-1 expression showed an association with mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (P = 0.001 for carcinoma cells; P = 0.004 for stromal cells), basic fibroblast growth factor (P = 0.049 for carcinoma cells), and membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (P = 0.045), which were previously studied in this patient cohort. Ets-1 mRNA was detected more often in both carcinoma and stromal cells in tumors of short-term survivors (P = 0.038 for carcinoma cells). In univariate survival analysis for all cases, Ets-1 expression in both tumor (P = 0.018) and stroma (P = 0.026) correlated with poor survival. These findings were reproduced in an analysis of primary tumors alone (P = 0.039 for tumor cells; P < 0.001 for stromal cells). Ets-1 mRNA expression in stromal cells retained its predictive power in a multivariate survival analysis in which all molecules studied previously in this patient cohort

  5. INDUCTION OF INTERLEUKIN-1-BETA MESSENGER-RNA AFTER FOCAL CEREBRAL-ISCHEMIA IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUTTINI, M; SAUTER, A; BODDEKE, HWGM

    The expression of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) mRNA in the brain in response to cerebral ischaemia in rats was examined using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Focal cerebral ischaemia was induced in spontaneously hypertensive rats by permanent occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery

  6. CCL20 and IL22 Messenger RNA Expression After Adalimumab vs Methotrexate Treatment of Psoriasis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldminz, Ari M; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Wang, Andrew C; Dumont, Nicole; Krueger, James G; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2015-08-01

    Methotrexate is a first-line systemic agent for treating of psoriasis, although its onset of effects is slower and overall it is less effective than tumor necrosis factor blockers. To differentiate the response of psoriatic disease to adalimumab and methotrexate sodium. Single-center, randomized, assessor-blind, 2-arm clinical trial of 30 patients from the outpatient dermatology center of Tufts Medical Center, enrolled from August 18, 2009, to October 11, 2011. Patients aged 18 to 85 years with chronic plaque-type psoriasis, a minimum Physician Global Assessment score of 3 (higher scores indicate more severe disease), and a psoriatic plaque of at least 2 cm were randomized in a 1:1 fashion to receive subcutaneous adalimumab or oral methotrexate. Skin biopsy specimens obtained at baseline and weeks 1, 2, 4, and 16 were given a histologic grade by blinded assessors to evaluate treatment response. Analyses were conducted from April 16, 2013, to January 5, 2015. A 16-week course of subcutaneous adalimumab (40 mg every 2 weeks after a loading dose) or low-dosage oral methotrexate sodium (7.5-25 mg/wk). Changes in genomic, immunohistochemical, and messenger RNA (mRNA) profiles. Methotrexate responders experienced significant downregulation of helper T-cell-related (T(H)1, T(H)17, and T(H)22) mRNA expression compared with methotrexate nonresponders. Comparisons among adalimumab-treated patients were limited by the number of nonresponders (n = 1). Between adalimumab and methotrexate responders, we found no significant differences in gene expression at any study point or in the expression of T-cell-related mRNA at week 16. Adalimumab responders demonstrated early downregulation of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) mRNA (mean [SE] at week 2, -1.83 [0.52], P T-cell signaling in psoriasis. Similar genomic and immunohistochemical response signatures and levels of mRNA downregulation at study completion among adalimumab and methotrexate responders suggest a disease

  7. Messenger RNA is a functional component of a chromatin insulator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzat, Leah H; Dale, Ryan K; Lei, Elissa P

    2013-10-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA protein complexes situated throughout the genome capable of demarcating independent transcriptional domains. Previous studies point to an important role for RNA in gypsy chromatin insulator function in Drosophila; however, the identity of these putative insulator-associated RNAs is not currently known. Here we utilize RNA-immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (RIP-seq) to isolate RNAs stably associated with gypsy insulator complexes. Strikingly, these RNAs correspond to specific sense-strand, spliced and polyadenylated mRNAs, including two insulator protein transcripts. In order to assess the functional significance of these associated mRNAs independent of their coding function, we expressed untranslatable versions of these transcripts in developing flies and observed both alteration of insulator complex nuclear localization as well as improvement of enhancer-blocking activity. Together, these data suggest a novel, noncoding mechanism by which certain mRNAs contribute to chromatin insulator function.

  8. Messenger RNA is a functional component of a chromatin insulator complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzat, Leah H; Dale, Ryan K; Lei, Elissa P

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA protein complexes situated throughout the genome capable of demarcating independent transcriptional domains. Previous studies point to an important role for RNA in gypsy chromatin insulator function in Drosophila; however, the identity of these putative insulator-associated RNAs is not currently known. Here we utilize RNA-immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (RIP-seq) to isolate RNAs stably associated with gypsy insulator complexes. Strikingly, these RNAs correspond to specific sense-strand, spliced and polyadenylated mRNAs, including two insulator protein transcripts. In order to assess the functional significance of these associated mRNAs independent of their coding function, we expressed untranslatable versions of these transcripts in developing flies and observed both alteration of insulator complex nuclear localization as well as improvement of enhancer-blocking activity. Together, these data suggest a novel, noncoding mechanism by which certain mRNAs contribute to chromatin insulator function. PMID:23917615

  9. Detection and Quantification of N6-Methyladenosine in Messenger RNA by TLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Zsuzsanna; Fray, Rupert G

    2017-01-01

    The base-modified nucleotide, N 6 -methyladenosine, is a relatively abundant modification found in the mRNA of most higher eukaryotes. Methylation levels can change dependent upon environmental conditions, cell differentiation state, or following knockdown of members of the methylase complex, and it is often useful to directly measure and compare N 6 -methyladenosine levels between samples. Two dimensional chromatography of radiolabeled nucleotides, following specific nuclease treatments, provides a robust, sensitive, and reproducible assay for this modification.

  10. Detection of colony-stimulating factor messenger RNA in single T cells by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, D J; Owens, T; Pearse, M

    1989-01-01

    In situ hybridization has been used to study the accumulation of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) mRNA in single cells of a T lymphocyte clone (E9.D4) following antibody-mediated (F23.1) activation via the Ti-T3 complex in filler-independent bulk cultures. The specificity of hybridization...... by normal spleen cells and should be useful in the further analysis of lymphokine gene regulation in single T cells....

  11. Ribosome reinitiation can explain length-dependent translation of messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David W; Böttcher, Marvin A; Traulsen, Arne; Greig, Duncan

    2017-06-01

    Models of mRNA translation usually presume that transcripts are linear; upon reaching the end of a transcript each terminating ribosome returns to the cytoplasmic pool before initiating anew on a different transcript. A consequence of linear models is that faster translation of a given mRNA is unlikely to generate more of the encoded protein, particularly at low ribosome availability. Recent evidence indicates that eukaryotic mRNAs are circularized, potentially allowing terminating ribosomes to preferentially reinitiate on the same transcript. Here we model the effect of ribosome reinitiation on translation and show that, at high levels of reinitiation, protein synthesis rates are dominated by the time required to translate a given transcript. Our model provides a simple mechanistic explanation for many previously enigmatic features of eukaryotic translation, including the negative correlation of both ribosome densities and protein abundance on transcript length, the importance of codon usage in determining protein synthesis rates, and the negative correlation between transcript length and both codon adaptation and 5' mRNA folding energies. In contrast to linear models where translation is largely limited by initiation rates, our model reveals that all three stages of translation-initiation, elongation, and termination/reinitiation-determine protein synthesis rates even at low ribosome availability.

  12. Circulating Messenger RNA Profiling with Microarray and Next-generation Sequencing: Cross-platform Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chun-Liang; Luo, Ji-Dung; Chang, John Wen-Cheng; Chen, Tai-Long; Chien, Yu-Tzu; Yu, Chia-Jung; Chiou, Chiuan-Chian

    2015-01-01

    Circulating mRNA is a less invasive and more easily accessed source of samples for biomedical research and clinical applications. However, it is of poor quality. We explored and compared the ability of two high-throughput platforms for the profiling of circulating mRNA regarding their ability to retrieve useful information out of this type of samples. Circulating mRNAs from three non-small cell lung cancer patients and three healthy controls were analyzed by the cDNA-mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation (DASL) assay and high-throughput RNA sequencing (RSEQ). Twelve genes were selected for further confirmation by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The overall expression profiles derived from the two platforms showed modest-to-moderate correlation. Genes with higher expression levels had higher cross-platform concordance than those of medium- and low-expression levels. In addition, the pathway signatures identified by gene set enrichment analysis from both platforms were in agreement. The RT-q PCR results for the selected genes correlated well with that of RSEQ. Genes with higher expression levels have cross-platform concordance and can be potential biomarkers. Furthermore, RSEQ is a better tool for profiling circulating mRNAs. Copyright© 2015, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolation methods on putative reference genes messenger RNA abundance in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragán, M; Martínez, A; Llonch, S; Pujol, A; Vernaeve, V; Vassena, R

    2015-07-01

    Although the male gamete participates in a significant proportion of infertility cases, there are currently no proven molecular markers of sperm quality. The search for significant gene expression markers is partially hindered by the lack of a recognized set of reference genes (RGs) to normalize reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) data across studies. The aim of this study is to define a set of RGs in assisted reproduction patients undergoing different sample collection and RNA isolation methods. Twenty-two normozoospermic men were included in the study. From each man, semen was either cryopreserved by slow freezing or analyzed fresh, and, for each, RNA was extracted with either phenol-free or phenol-based methods. In two cases, both methods were used to isolate RNA. Twenty putative RGs were analyzed and their mRNA abundance across samples was estimated by RT-qPCR. To determine the genes whose steady-state mRNA abundance remains unchanged, three different algorithms (geNorm, BestKeeper and NormFinder) were applied to the qPCR data. We found that RGs such as GAPDH or ACTB, useful in other biological contexts, cannot be used as reference for human spermatozoa. It is possible to compare gene expression from fresh and cryopreserved sperm samples using the same isolation method, while the mRNA abundance of expressed genes becomes different depending on the RNA isolation technique employed. In our conditions, the most appropriate RGs for RT-qPCR analysis were RPLP1, RPL13A, and RPLP2. Published discrepancies in gene expression studies in human spermatozoa may be due in part to inappropriate RGs selection, suggesting a possible different interpretation of PCR data in several reports, which were normalized using unstable RGs. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  14. Dexamethasone alters messenger RNA levels but not synthesis of collagens, fibronectin, or laminin by cultured rat fat-storing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, T; Schuppan, D; de Bleser, P J; Vrijsen, R; Pipeleers-Marichal, M; Beyaert, R; Wisse, E; Geerts, A

    1996-06-01

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to suppress collagen synthesis and gene expression by fibroblasts. However, little is known about their effects on fat-storing cells, the major matrix-producing cells in liver fibrosis. In this study we investigated the effect of dexamethasone on the extracellular matrix expression by cultured rat fat-storing cells. Fat-storing cells were isolated from male Wistar rats by collagenase/pronase digestion and purified by density gradient centrifugation. Fat-storing cells in early primary culture (3-day-old, representing a relatively quiescent phenotype) and in subculture (one passage, about 2-week-old, representing an activated phenotype) were treated with 10(-6) mol/L dexamethasone for messenger RNA (mRNA) study or with 10(-8) to 10(-6) mol/L dexamethasone for protein study. Expression of collagen type I, III, IV, fibronectin, and laminin was analyzed at the mRNA level by Northern hybridization, and at the protein level by metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation. Dexamethasone had a variable effect on the expression of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA level. While a tendency for modest suppression was observed (5%-50%) in primary cells, the difference was not statistically significant. Variable response was observed in subcultured cells. Collagen alpha1(III) mRNA level showed a tendency for stimulation. Dexamethasone stimulated the expression of collagen alpha1 (IV), fibronectin, and laminin B1 mRNA levels by 1.4-, 2.4-, and 1.6-fold respectively, in primary fat-storing cells. Subcultured cells showed a similar response, but the magnitude of stimulation was more variable than that of primary cells. Unexpectedly, at the protein level dexamethasone had no effect on the expression of these proteins. Our results indicate that glucocorticoids do not possess a net suppressive effect on extracellular matrix synthesis by fat-storing cells. Beneficial effects of glucocorticoids may be attributable to other mechanisms of action, such as their anti

  15. Messenger RNA expression of chicken CLOCK gene in the response to Campylobacter jejuni inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Liu, Liying; Zhang, Maozhi; Yang, Ning; Qi, Yukai; Sun, Yu; Li, Xianyao

    2015-09-01

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Previous research has shown that circadian rhythm plays a critical role in host response to C. jejuni colonization. The CLOCK gene is one of the core genes regulating circadian rhythms and shows significant expression on 7 d post-C. jejuni inoculation. The objective of this study was to investigate temporal and spatial expression of chicken CLOCK gene post-C. jejuni inoculation. Cecal and splenic RNA were isolated from 2 distinct chicken breeds and used to compare the mRNA expression of CLOCK gene between inoculated and noninoculated chickens within each breed and between breeds within each of inoculated and noninoculated groups. Our results showed that the CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 20 h postinoculation (hpi) in cecum and spleen in Jiningbairi chicken. CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 4 and 16 hpi and up-regulated at 8 hpi in cecum and spleen in specific pathogen free white leghorn noninoculated chicken. The findings suggested that expression of CLOCK gene was significantly changed post C. jejuin inoculation. This change was affected by genetic background, tissue, and time points postinoculation. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. A Novel Pathogenic BRCA1 Splicing Variant Produces Partial Intron Retention in the Mature Messenger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valeria Esposito

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available About 10% of all breast cancers arise from hereditary mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers; and about 25% of these are associated with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The identification of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations can enable physicians to better tailor the clinical management of patients; and to initiate preventive measures in healthy carriers. The pathophysiological significance of newly identified variants poses challenges for genetic counseling. We characterized a new BRCA1 variant discovered in a breast cancer patient during BRCA1/2 screening by next-generation sequencing. Bioinformatic predictions; indicating that the variant is probably pathogenetic; were verified using retro-transcription of the patient’s RNA followed by PCR amplifications performed on the resulting cDNA. The variant causes the loss of a canonic donor splice site at position +2 in BRCA1 intron 21; and consequently the partial retention of 156 bp of intron 21 in the patient’s transcript; which demonstrates that this novel BRCA1 mutation plays a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. These findings enabled us to initiate appropriate counseling and to tailor the clinical management of this family. Lastly; these data reinforce the importance of studying the effects of sequence variants at the RNA level to verify their potential role in disease onset.

  17. The 5S rRNA-histone repeat in the crustacean Artemia: structure, polymorphism and variation of the 5S rRNA segment in different populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, J; Díaz-Guerra, M; Gil, I; Renart, J

    1989-08-11

    5S rRNA genes are linked to the histone genes in the 13 populations of the crustacean Artemia that we have studied. In all cases, two types of repeat units are found. Southern blot analysis of all populations shows that they can be grouped into three classes: a) American bisexuals; b) Eurasian bisexuals, and c) parthenogenetic organisms (all from Eurasia). Restriction analysis of a bisexual population from San Francisco Bay shows that the two repeat units are of 9.0 and 8.5 kb (with minor heterogeneities of restriction sites). In parthenogenetic organisms, the two repeat units are of approximately 12 kb. Sequencing data from the region of the 5S rRNA from the San Francisco Bay population, shows that in both types of units, the single 5S rRNA gene (315 bp in length), is located 430 bp downstream the 3' regulatory sequences of the H2A gene, the last gene in the histone cluster. We have isolated three clones that contain 5S rRNA sequences. Two of them (one from an American bisexual and the other from a parthenogenetic population) contain histone and 5S rRNA genes, both with the same transcriptional polarity. The third clone, lacking histone genes, is likely to be an orphon derived from the parthenogenetic population.

  18. Differential histone deacetylase mRNA expression patterns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Claas; Schmalbach, Sonja; Boeselt, Sebastian; Sarlette, Alexander; Dengler, Reinhard; Petri, Susanne

    2010-06-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are important regulators of gene expression and cell differentiation. The HDAC inhibitors have recently been considered as potential novel neuroprotective drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A major limitation, however, lies in the broad spectrum of action of currently available HDAC inhibitors that may cause a variety of toxic side effects. The mRNA expression levels of the HDAC isoforms HDACs 1 to 11 have previously been characterized in rat brain but have not been studied in human tissue. Using in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry we assessed the distribution and expression levels of HDACs 1to 11 in postmortem ALS and control brain and spinal cord specimens (n = 6 cases each) to determine alterations in the mRNA expression pattern that could provide a basis for disease-specific therapies. We found a reduction of HDAC 11 mRNA and increased HDAC 2 levels in ALS brain and spinal cord compared with controls. A more precise knowledge of the disease-related expression pattern could lead to the development of more specific pharmacotherapeutic approaches.

  19. Messenger RNA levels and transcription rates of hepatic lipogenesis genes in genetically lean and fat chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douaire Madeleine

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Levels of body fat content in commercial meat chickens have prompted research in order to control the development of this trait. Based on experimentally selected divergent lean and fat lines, many studies have shown that liver metabolism has a major role in the fatness variability. In order to identify which genes are involved in this variability, we investigated the expression of several genes implicated in the hepatic lipid metabolism. The studied genes code for enzymes of fatty acid synthesis [ATP citrate-lyase (ACL, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, fatty acid synthase (FAS, malic enzyme (ME, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD1], for an apolipoprotein [apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1], and for the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα, which is a transcription factor implied in the regulation of several genes of lipid metabolism. The results show that the fat-line chickens display significantly higher hepatic transcription rates and mRNA levels than the lean-line chickens for the ACL, ME and APOA1 genes. This suggests that these genes could be responsible for the phenotypic fatness variability.

  20. Histone gene complement, variant expression, and mRNA processing in a urochordate Oikopleura dioica that undergoes extensive polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioda, Mariacristina; Eskeland, Ragnhild; Thompson, Eric M

    2002-12-01

    Considerable data exist on coding sequences of histones in a wide variety of organisms. Much more restricted information is available on total histone gene complement, gene organization, transcriptional regulation, and histone mRNA processing. In particular, there is a significant phylogenetic gap in information for the urochordates, a subphylum near the invertebrate-vertebrate transition. In this study, we show that the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica has a histone gene complement that is similar to that of humans, though its genome size is 40- to 50-fold smaller. At a total length of 3.5 kb, the H3, H4, H1, H2A, and H2B quintet cluster is the most compact described thus far, but despite very rapid early developmental cleavage cycles, no extensive tandem repeats of the cluster were present. The high degree of variation within each of the complements of O. dioica H2A and H2B subtypes resembled that found in plants as opposed to more closely related vertebrate and invertebrate species, and developmental stage-specific expression of different subtypes was observed. The linker histone H1 was present in relatively few copies per haploid genome and contained short N- and C-terminal tails, a feature similar to that of copepods but different from many standard model organisms. The 3'UTRs of the histone genes contained both the consensus stem-loop sequence and the polyadenylation signals but lacked the consensus histone downstream element that is involved in the processing of histone mRNAs in echinoderms and vertebrates. Two types of transcripts were found, i.e., those containing both the stem-loop and a polyA tail as well as those cleaved at the normal site just 3' of the stem-loop. The O. dioica data are an important addition to the limited number of eukaryotes for which sufficiently extensive information on histone gene complements is available. Increasingly, it appears that understanding the evolution of histone gene organization, transcriptional regulation, and mRNA

  1. Proteomic Profiling and Differential Messenger RNA Expression Correlate HSP27 and Serpin Family B Member 1 to Apical Periodontitis Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalla, Franco; Biguetti, Claudia; Jain, Sameer; Johnson, Cleverick; Letra, Ariadne; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Silva, Renato Menezes

    2017-09-01

    Understanding protein expression profiles of apical periodontitis may contribute to the discovery of novel diagnostic or therapeutic molecular targets. Periapical tissue samples (n = 5) of patients with lesions characterized as nonhealing were submitted for proteomic analysis. Two differentially expressed proteins (heat shock protein 27 [HSP27] and serpin family B member 1 [SERPINB1]) were selected for characterization, localization by immunofluorescence, and association with known biomarkers of acute inflammatory response in human apical periodontitis (n = 110) and healthy periodontal ligaments (n = 26). Apical periodontitis samples were categorized as stable/inactive (n = 70) or progressive/active (n = 40) based on the ratio of expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG). Next, the expression of HSP27, SERPINB1, C-X-C motif Chemokine Receptor 1 (CXCR1), matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and cathepsin G (CTSG) messenger RNA was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Data analysis was performed using the Shapiro-Wilk test, analysis of variance, and the Pearson test. P values periodontitis compared with a healthy periodontium, with 30 of these proteins found to be expressed in all 4 lesions. The expression of HSP27 and SERPINB1 was ∼2-fold higher in apical periodontitis. Next, an increased expression of HSP27 was detected in epithelial cells, whereas SERPINB1 expression was noted in neutrophils and epithelial cells. HSP27 and SERPINB1 transcripts were highly expressed in stable/inactive lesions (P acute inflammation including CXCR1, MPO, and CTSG. Our data suggest HSP27 and SERPINB1 as potential regulators of the inflammatory response in apical periodontitis. Additional functional studies should be performed to further characterize the role of these molecules during the development/progression of apical periodontitis. Copyright © 2017 American Association of

  2. Translational Influence on Messenger Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette

    RNA messenger stability is in uenced by how well it is protected from ribonuclase degradation. The level and distribution of translating ribosomes on the messenger has an effect on messenger stability, which is tuned partly by the nature of the ribosome binding site and partly by the codon...... composition of the coding sequence of a gene. This thesis focussed on illuminating the impact of ribosome binding sites on the functional messenger half-life using a range of ribosome binding sites with altered binding strength. Furthermore, the additive in uence of the transcription terminator, Rho......, on messenger stability was examined. Depending on the translation initiation frequency, the chance of an initial ribosome trailing the RNA polymerase get better for better initiation sites, thus protecting transcription from termination by Rho. A polarity assay in which the activity of the downstream lac...

  3. In vitro Study of a Novel Stent Coating Using Modified CD39 Messenger RNA to Potentially Reduce Stent Angioplasty-Associated Complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike-Kristin Abraham

    Full Text Available Stent angioplasty provides a minimally invasive treatment for atherosclerotic vessels. However, no treatment option for atherosclerosis-associated endothelial dysfunction, which is accompanied by a loss of CD39, is available, and hence, adverse effects like thromboembolism and restenosis may occur. Messenger RNA (mRNA-based therapy represents a novel strategy, whereby de novo synthesis of a desired protein is achieved after delivery of a modified mRNA to the target cells.Our study aimed to develop an innovative bioactive stent coating that induces overexpression of CD39 in the atherosclerotic vessel. Therefore, a modified CD39-encoding mRNA was produced by in vitro transcription. Different endothelial cells (ECs were transfected with the mRNA, and CD39 expression and functionality were analyzed using various assays. Furthermore, CD39 mRNA was immobilized using poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA, and the transfection efficiency in ECs was analyzed. Our data show that ECs successfully translate in vitro-generated CD39 mRNA after transfection. The overexpressed CD39 protein is highly functional in hydrolyzing ADP and in preventing platelet activation. Furthermore, PLGA-immobilized CD39 mRNA can be delivered to ECs without losing its functionality.In summary, we present a novel and promising concept for a stent coating for the treatment of atherosclerotic blood vessels, whereby patients could be protected against angioplasty-associated complications.

  4. Investigation of histone H4 hyperacetylation dynamics in the 5S rRNA genes family by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlibașa, Liliana; Suciu, Ilinca

    2015-12-01

    Oogenesis is a critical event in the formation of female gamete, whose role in development is to transfer genomic information to the next generation. During this process, the gene expression pattern changes dramatically concomitant with genome remodelling, while genomic information is stably maintained. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of H4 acetylation of the oocyte and somatic 5S rRNA genes in Triturus cristatus, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP). Our findings suggest that some epigenetic mechanisms such as histone acetylation could be involved in the transcriptional regulation of 5S rRNA gene families.

  5. A new link between transcriptional initiation and pre-mRNA splicing: The RNA binding histone variant H2A.B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A Soboleva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of histone H2A with its variant forms is critical for regulating all aspects of genome organisation and function. The histone variant H2A.B appeared late in evolution and is most highly expressed in the testis followed by the brain in mammals. This raises the question of what new function(s H2A.B might impart to chromatin in these important tissues. We have immunoprecipitated the mouse orthologue of H2A.B, H2A.B.3 (H2A.Lap1, from testis chromatin and found this variant to be associated with RNA processing factors and RNA Polymerase (Pol II. Most interestingly, many of these interactions with H2A.B.3 (Sf3b155, Spt6, DDX39A and RNA Pol II were inhibited by the presence of endogenous RNA. This histone variant can bind to RNA directly in vitro and in vivo, and associates with mRNA at intron-exon boundaries. This suggests that the ability of H2A.B to bind to RNA negatively regulates its capacity to bind to these factors (Sf3b155, Spt6, DDX39A and RNA Pol II. Unexpectedly, H2A.B.3 forms highly decompacted nuclear subdomains of active chromatin that co-localizes with splicing speckles in male germ cells. H2A.B.3 ChIP-Seq experiments revealed a unique chromatin organization at active genes being not only enriched at the transcription start site (TSS, but also at the beginning of the gene body (but being excluded from the +1 nucleosome compared to the end of the gene. We also uncover a general histone variant replacement process whereby H2A.B.3 replaces H2A.Z at intron-exon boundaries in the testis and the brain, which positively correlates with expression and exon inclusion. Taken together, we propose that a special mechanism of splicing may occur in the testis and brain whereby H2A.B.3 recruits RNA processing factors from splicing speckles to active genes following its replacement of H2A.Z.

  6. LNA flow-FISH: a flow cytometry-fluorescence in situ hybridization method to detect messenger RNA using locked nucleic acid probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kelly L; Thach, Dzung C

    2009-07-15

    We present a novel method using flow cytometry-fluorescence in situ hybridization (flow-FISH) to detect specific messenger RNA (mRNA) in suspended cells using locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide probes. beta-Actin mRNA was targeted in whole A549 epithelial cells by hybridization with a biotinylated, LNA-modified probe. The LNA bound to beta-actin was then stained using phycoerythrin-conjugated streptavidin and detected by flow cytometry. Shifts in fluorescence signal intensity between the beta-actin LNA probe and a biotinylated, nonspecific control LNA were used to determine optimal conditions for this type of flow-FISH. Multiple conditions for permeabilization and hybridization were tested, and it was found that conditions using 3 microg/ml of proteinase K for permeabilization and 90 min hybridization at 60 degrees C with buffer containing 50% formamide allow cells containing the LNA-bound mRNA to be detected and differentiated from the control LNA with high confidence (FISH, can be used for detection and quantification of other RNA species as well as for telomerase measurement and detection.

  7. Involvement of second messengers in the signaling pathway of vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone and their effects on vitellogenin mRNA expression in the whiteleg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sun-Hye; Okutsu, Tomoyuki; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Kang, Bong Jung; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Wilder, Marcy N

    2017-05-15

    We incubated fragments of Litopenaeus vannamei ovary to investigate second messengers involved in the regulation of vitellogenin (vg) mRNA levels. The use of 100nM recombinant vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) (corresponding to recombinant L. vannamei sinus gland peptide-G: rLiv-SGP-G) significantly reduced vg mRNA expression in sub-adults after 8h incubation to less than 20% of the control. The concentration of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) increased 3.2-fold relative to the control after 2h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G. However, it reached levels 18-fold relative to the control after 0.5h incubation with rLiv-SGP-G where 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) was also added. Moreover, vg mRNA expression was significantly reduced to less than 50% of the control after 24h incubation with 1μM A23187 (a calcium ionophore). Thus, rLiv-SGP-G and calcium ionophore reduced vg mRNA expression in in vitro-cultured ovary, and cGMP may be involved in the signaling pathway of VIH. Overall, the above results suggest that vg mRNA expression might be inhibited in vitro by increasing intracellular cGMP and Ca2+ in L. vannamei ovary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative Diagnosis of Human Bocavirus 1 Respiratory Infection With Messenger RNA Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), DNA Quantitative PCR, and Serology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man; Arku, Benedict; Jartti, Tuomas; Koskinen, Janne; Peltola, Ville; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2017-05-15

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) 1 can cause life-threatening respiratory tract infection in children. Diagnosing acute HBoV1 infection is challenging owing to long-term airway persistence. We assessed whether messenger RNA (mRNA) detection would correlate better than DNA detection with acute HBoV1 infection. Paired serum samples from 121 children with acute wheezing were analyzed by means of serology. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription (RT) PCR were applied to nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) samples from all acutely HBoV1-infected children and from controls with nonacute infection. By serology, 16 of 121 children (13.2%) had acute HBoV1 infection, all of whom had HBoV1 DNA in NPS samples, and 12 of 16 (75%) had HBoV1 mRNA. Among 25 children with nondiagnostic results, 6 had HBoV1 DNA in NPS samples, and 1 had mRNA. All 13 mRNA-positive samples exhibited high DNA loads (≥106 copies/mL). No mRNA persisted for 2 weeks, whereas HBoV1 DNA persisted for 2 months in 4 children; 1 year later all 15 samples were DNA negative. Compared with serology, DNA PCR had high clinical sensitivity (100%) but, because of viral persistence, low specificity (76%). In contrast, mRNA RT-PCR had low clinical sensitivity (75%) but high specificity (96%). A combination of HBoV1 serology and nasopharyngeal DNA quantitative PCR and mRNA RT-PCR should be used for accurate diagnosis of HBoV1 infection.

  9. Cannabinoid receptor binding and messenger RNA expression in human brain: an in vitro receptor autoradiography and in situ hybridization histochemistry study of normal aged and Alzheimer's brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, T M; Howlett, A C; Bonner, T I; Matsuda, L A; Herkenham, M

    1994-12-01

    The distribution and density of cannabinoid receptor binding and messenger RNA expression in aged human brain were examined in several forebrain and basal ganglia structures. In vitro binding of [3H]CP-55,940, a synthetic cannabinoid, was examined by autoradiography in fresh frozen brain sections from normal aged humans (n = 3), patients who died with Alzheimer's disease (n = 5) and patients who died with other forms of cortical pathology (n = 5). In the structures examined--hippocampal formation, neocortex, basal ganglia and parts of the brainstem--receptor binding showed a characteristic pattern of high densities in the dentate gyrus molecular layer, globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata, moderate densities in the hippocampus, neocortex, amygdala and striatum, and low densities in the white matter and brainstem. In situ hybridization histochemistry of human cannabinoid receptor, a ribonucleotide probe for the human cannabinoid receptor messenger RNA, showed a pattern of extremely dense transcript levels in subpopulations of cells in the hippocampus and cortex, moderate levels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and neurons of the striatum, amygdala and hypothalamus, and no signal over dentate gyrus granule cells and most of the cells of the thalamus and upper brainstem, including the substantia nigra. In Alzheimer's brains, compared to normal brains, [3H]CP-55,940 binding was reduced by 37-45% in all of the subfields of the hippocampal formation and by 49% in the caudate. Lesser reductions (20-24%) occurred in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus, internal segment. Other neocortical and basal ganglia structures were not different from control levels. Levels of messenger RNA expression did not differ between Alzheimer's and control brains, but there were regionally discrete statistically significant losses of the intensely expressing cells in the hippocampus. The reductions in binding did not correlate with or localize to areas showing

  10. Molecular mechanisms for the regulation of histone mRNA stem-loop-binding protein by phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Tan, Dazhi; DeRose, Eugene F.; Perera, Lalith; Dominski, Zbigniew; Marzluff, William F.; Tong, Liang; Tanaka Hall, Traci M. [NIH; (UNC); (Columbia)

    2014-08-06

    Replication-dependent histone mRNAs end with a conserved stem loop that is recognized by stem-loop–binding protein (SLBP). The minimal RNA-processing domain of SLBP is phosphorylated at an internal threonine, and Drosophila SLBP (dSLBP) also is phosphorylated at four serines in its 18-aa C-terminal tail. We show that phosphorylation of dSLBP increases RNA-binding affinity dramatically, and we use structural and biophysical analyses of dSLBP and a crystal structure of human SLBP phosphorylated on the internal threonine to understand the striking improvement in RNA binding. Together these results suggest that, although the C-terminal tail of dSLBP does not contact the RNA, phosphorylation of the tail promotes SLBP conformations competent for RNA binding and thereby appears to reduce the entropic penalty for the association. Increased negative charge in this C-terminal tail balances positively charged residues, allowing a more compact ensemble of structures in the absence of RNA.

  11. Lower glutamic acid decarboxylase 65-kDa isoform messenger RNA and protein levels in the prefrontal cortex in schizoaffective disorder but not schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glausier, Jill R; Kimoto, Sohei; Fish, Kenneth N; Lewis, David A

    2015-01-15

    Altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been associated with cognitive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Levels of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase 67-kDa isoform (GAD67) in the PFC have been consistently reported to be lower in patients with these disorders, but the status of the second GABA-synthesizing enzyme, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65-kDa isoform (GAD65), remains unclear. GAD65 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were quantified in PFC area 9 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction from 62 subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 62 matched healthy comparison subjects. In a subset of subject pairs, GAD65 relative protein levels were quantified by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Mean GAD65 mRNA levels were 13.6% lower in subjects with schizoaffective disorder but did not differ in subjects with schizophrenia relative to their matched healthy comparison subjects. In the subjects with schizoaffective disorder, mean GAD65 protein levels were 19.4% lower and were correlated with GAD65 mRNA levels. Lower GAD65 mRNA and protein levels within subjects with schizoaffective disorder were not attributable to factors commonly comorbid with the diagnosis. In concert with previous studies, these findings suggest that schizoaffective disorder is associated with lower levels of both GAD65 and GAD67 mRNA and protein in the PFC, whereas subjects with schizophrenia have lower mean levels of only GAD67 mRNA and protein. Because cognitive function is generally better preserved in patients with schizoaffective disorder relative to patients with schizophrenia, these findings may support an interpretation that GAD65 downregulation provides a homeostatic response complementary to GAD67 downregulation that serves to reduce inhibition in the face of lower PFC network activity. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc

  12. Dietary iron supplements and Moringa oleifera leaves influence the liver hepcidin messenger RNA expression and biochemical indices of iron status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, R K; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Srinivasan, K; Giridhar, P

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effects of iron depletion and repletion on biochemical and molecular indices of iron status were investigated in growing male Wistar rats. We hypothesized that iron from Moringa leaves could overcome the effects of iron deficiency and modulate the expression of iron-responsive genes better than conventional iron supplements. Iron deficiency was induced by feeding rats an iron-deficient diet for 10 weeks, whereas control rats were maintained on an iron-sufficient diet (35.0-mg Fe/kg diet). After the depletion period, animals were repleted with different source of iron, in combination with ascorbic acid. Iron deficiency caused a significant (P Moringa leaf was found to be superior compared with ferric citrate in overcoming the effects of iron deficiency in rats. These results suggest that changes in the relative expression of liver hepcidin messenger RNA can be used as a sensitive molecular marker for iron deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Messenger RNA editing in mammals: new members of the APOBEC family seeking roles in the family business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Joseph E; Dance, Geoffrey S C; Sowden, Mark P; Smith, Harold C

    2003-04-01

    Alteration of mRNA sequence through base modification mRNA editing frequently generates protein diversity. Several proteins have been identified as being similar to C-to-U mRNA editing enzymes based on their structural domains and the occurrence of a catalytic domain characteristic of cytidine deaminases. In light of the hypothesis that these proteins might represent novel mRNA editing systems that could affect proteome diversity, we consider their structure, expression and relevance to biomedically significant processes or pathologies.

  14. Radicals derived from histone hydroperoxides damage nucleobases in RNA and DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luxford, C; Dean, R T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    ; this is in accord with previous studies with other proteins. These histone hydroperoxides are stable in the absence of exogenous catalysts (e.g., heat, light, and transition metal ions), but in the presence of these agents decompose rapidly to give a variety of radicals which have been identified by EPR spin...... cross-linked adduct species which have been identified by EPR spectroscopy. HPLC analysis of the products generated on reaction of histone hydroperoxide-derived radicals with 2'-deoxyguanosine, or intact calf thymus DNA, has shown that significant levels of the mutagenic oxidized DNA base 8-oxo-7...... in the transfer of oxidative damage to associated DNA via the formation and subsequent decomposition of protein hydroperoxides to reactive radicals, and provide a novel route for the formation of mutagenic lesions in DNA....

  15. Acceptability and Accuracy of Cervical Cancer Screening Using a Self-Collected Tampon for HPV Messenger-RNA Testing among HIV-Infected Women in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Adamson

    Full Text Available HIV increases women's risk for high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV infection and invasive cervical cancer. South Africa has a high HIV prevalence but low cervical cancer screening coverage. Self-collection of cervical specimens and hrHPV testing, including hrHPV messenger-RNA (mRNA testing, are methods aimed at increasing screening rates. However, data are limited on the acceptability and accuracy of tampon-based self-collection for hrHPV mRNA testing in HIV-infected women.We recruited 325 HIV-infected women seeking care at a government HIV clinic in Pretoria, South Africa. A clinician performed a pelvic examination and obtained an endocervical specimen. Study participants performed self-collection using a tampon. Both clinician- and self-collected specimens were tested for hrHPV mRNA. Acceptability of both collection methods was assessed, the prevalence of hrHPV mRNA in our study population was estimated, test positivity of the two collection methods were compared, and test agreement was assessed by calculating the κ-statistic, sensitivity, and specificity.Over 90% of women reported no difficulties self-collecting specimens and 82% were willing to perform the tampon-collection at home. Based on clinician-collection specimens, the prevalence of hrHPV mRNA in our study population was 36.7% (95% CI: 31.4%- 42.0%. There was no difference in test positivity between clinician-collection, 36.7%, and tampon-collection, 43.5% (p-value = 0.08. Using clinician-collection as the reference test, the sensitivity and specificity for hrHPV mRNA of tampon-collection were 77.4% (95% CI: 69.8-85.0% and 77.8% (95% CI: 71.9-83.6%, respectively.Tampon-based self-collection is acceptable to women and has similar hrHPV mRNA positivity rates as clinician-collection, but has reduced sensitivity and specificity compared to clinician-collection. The hrHPV mRNA prevalence in our study population is high, but similar to other high-risk populations, and highlights the

  16. Myocardial ischemic preconditioning in a porcine model leads to rapid changes in cardiac extracellular vesicle messenger RNA content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Svennerholm

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: These findings demonstrate in an in vivo model that myocardial ischemic preconditioning influences the composition of mRNA in EV, including gene transcripts for proteins associated with the protective effect of ischemic preconditioning. The finding that preconditioned parental cells release EV containing mRNA that is qualitatively different from those released by non-preconditioned cells shows the importance of the external milieu on parental cell EV production.

  17. Altered translatability of messenger RNA from suspended anchorage-dependent fibroblasts: reversal upon cell attachment to a surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, S R; Ben-Ze'av, A; Benecke, B J; Penman, S

    1978-10-01

    Anchorage-dependent cells, when forced into suspension culture, display a repertoire of dramatic, coordinated regulatory phenomena. Message production promptly decreases 5 gold but the cells maintain a constant amount of poly(A)+ by means of a concomitant stabilization of mRNA against decay. Protein synthesis shuts down much later and the mRNA is stored in a nonfunctioning state. In this study, the inactive mRNA is extracted from suspended cells and shown to have aberrant translation properties. Well defined polypeptides are apparently no longer synthesized when this mRNA directs protein formation in either reticulocyte or wheat germ-derived heterologous translation systems. Rather, shortened peptides are formed by this mRNA and these become smaller as mRNA is used from cells suspended for longer periods of time. Very few focused spots are formed when the aberrant polypeptides are analyzed in two-dimensional electrophoresis. The sedimentation properties of suspended cell mRNA and the size of poly(A) are unchanged from control monolayer cells. Cross-hybridization of cDNA transcribed from a control cell message population with suspended cell mRNA shows that all sequences are present in normal concentrations. While most identifiable spots disappear from the two-dimensional gel electropherograms of the protein products produced by suspended cell mRNA, a few polypeptides are still synthesized in relatively normal amounts. Conserved polypeptides are found in products of both the reticulocyte and wheat germ systems, but they are different products in each case. The lesion in the suspended cell mRNA does not seem to be at the 5' termini, since synthesis of the shortened peptides is fully sensitive to inhibition of pm7G. Cells that contain extensively modified message can resume protein synthesis when allowed to reattach to a solid substrate. There is an apparent remodification of mRNA to normal translatability within a few hours of cell reattachment, since mRNA from

  18. Gap junctional connexin messenger RNA expression in the ovine uterus and placenta: effects of estradiol-17β-treatment, early pregnancy stages, and embryo origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M L; Redmer, D A; Reynolds, L P; Grazul-Bilska, A T

    2017-01-01

    Gap junctions play a major role in direct, contact-dependent cell-cell communication, and they have been implicated in the regulation of cellular metabolism and the coordination of cellular functions during growth and differentiation of organs and tissues. Gap junctional channels, composed of connexin (Cx) proteins, have been detected and shown to be influenced by hormones (eg, estrogen and progesterone) in uterine and placental tissues in several species. We hypothesized that (1) the messenger RNA (mRNA) for Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, and Cx43 is expressed in the uterus of ovariectomized sheep treated with estradiol-17β (E2) and in ovine placenta during early pregnancy, (2) E2-treatment of ovariectomized ewes would cause time-specific changes in Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA expression (experiment 1), and (3) expression of these 4 Cx would vary across the days of early pregnancy (experiment 2) and will be affected by embryo origin (ie, after application of assisted reproductive technologies [ARTs]; experiment 3). Thus, we collected uterine tissues at 0 to 24 h after E2 treatments (experiment 1), and placental tissues during days 14 to 30 of early pregnancy after natural (NAT) breeding (experiment 2) and on day 22 of early pregnancy established after transfer of embryos generated through natural breeding (NAT-ET), in vitro fertilization (IVF), or in vitro activation (IVA, parthenotes; experiment 3). In experiment 1, the expression of Cx26, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA increased (P early pregnancy, there were significant changes (P early gestation both after natural mating and with application of ART. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. TIP30 induces apoptosis under oxidative stress through stabilization of p53 messenger RNA in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Chen, Jingjing; Lu, Bin; Dong, Li; Wang, Huajing; Bi, Chongshan; Wu, Guobin; Guo, Huaizu; Wu, Mengchao; Guo, Yajun

    2008-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular oxidant stress have long been associated with cancer. Here, we show that TIP30, also called CC3, regulates p53 mRNA stability and induces apoptosis by sensing of intracellular oxidative stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Introduction of TIP30 induced more cell death in HepG2 cells with a high level of intracellular ROS than that in normal liver cell line, HL7702, which had low level of intracellular ROS. Treatment with an antioxidant agent attenuated TIP30-induced cell death in HepG2 cells, whereas oxidant H(2)O(2) augmented TIP30-induced cell death in HL7702 cells. The conformation of TIP30 was altered with the formation of an intermolecular disulfide bridge under oxidative stress. TIP30 greatly enhanced p53 expression and its transcriptional activity under oxidative stress, which was probably through stabilization of p53 mRNA. TIP30 induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction were blocked by silencing of p53 expression. The nuclear import of mRNA-binding protein HuR was blocked upon TIP30 introduction, which might be due to the interruption of the association of HuR with importin beta2. The elevated cytoplasmic HuR bound to p53 mRNA 3'-untranslated region, resulting in prolonged half-life of p53 mRNA. Our results suggest that TIP30 is involved in cellular oxidative stress surveillance and induces apoptosis through stabilization of p53 mRNA in HCC cells.

  20. Detection of cellular retinol-binding protein messenger RNA in the somatic cells of the rat seminiferous tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, M; Faraonio, R; Colantuoni, V

    1988-08-15

    A cDNA clone coding for Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein (CRBP) was used as a probe to study the expression of the gene in the somatic cells of the seminiferous tubules (Sertoli and peritubular cells). In this paper we demonstrate that these cells are actively involved in the synthesis of the specific mRNA. In Sertoli cells the gene is modulated by the hormones effective in spermatogenesis, such as FSH and testosterone. Moreover, peritubular cells revealed an approximately two times higher concentration of CRBP steady-state mRNA levels when compared with Sertoli cells.

  1. Association of Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) Messenger RNA Level, Food Intake, and Growth in Channel Catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocaine-and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) is a potent hypothalamic anorectic peptide in mammals and fish. We hypothesized that increased food intake is associated with changes in expression of CART mRNA within the brain of channel catfish. Objectives were to clone the CART gene, examine ...

  2. Discontinuous transcription or RNA processing of vaccinia virus late messengers results in a 5' poly(A) leader

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwer, B; Visca, P.; Vos, J C; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    We have demonstrated by primer elongation and cap analysis that mature vaccinia virus late transcripts are discontinuously synthesized. We have shown that RNA transcripts from a translocated 11K and from the authentic 11K and 4b late promoters are extended by approximately 35 nucleotides beyond the

  3. Effect of flax supplementation and growth promotants on lipoprotein lipase and glycogenin messenger RNA concentrations in finishing cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waylan, A T; Dunn, J D; Johnson, B J; Kayser, J P; Sissom, E K

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triacylglycerols into monoacylglycerol and fatty acids, which are taken up by tissues and used for energy. Glycogenin is the core protein on which glycogen molecules are synthesized. There is one molecule of glycogenin per molecule of glycogen in skeletal muscle; therefore, glycogen storage is limited by the amount of glycogenin present in muscle. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feeding flaxseed, a source of PUFA, and administering a growth promoter on steady-state LPL and glycogenin mRNA content of muscle in finishing cattle. Sixteen crossbred steers (initial BW = 397 kg), given ad libitum access to a 92% concentrate diet for 28 d, were used in a four-treatment, 2 x 2 factorial experiment, with flaxseed supplementation (0 or 5% of dietary DM) and implanting (not implanted or implanted with Revalor-S) as the main effects. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the LM at 0, 14, and 28 d, and used to quantify LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations using real-time quantitative PCR. Implanting with Revalor-S did not affect LPL (P = 0.13) or glycogenin (P = 0.98) mRNA concentrations. A day x flaxseed interaction (P 0.10) were observed between 0 and 5% flaxseed supplemented steers; however, at 28 d, nonflaxseed-fed steers had 4.1- and 5.7-fold increases (P < 0.001) over flaxseed steers for LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations, respectively. To further evaluate the effects of alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-LA) on LPL and glycogenin mRNA concentrations, muscle satellite cells were isolated from five finishing steers, and different alpha-LA concentrations were applied in culture. The RNA was isolated from the bovine satellite cells. Addition of alpha-LA numerically increased (P = 0.16) the LPL mRNA concentration 48% at 1 microM alpha-LA compared with the control. The expression of glycogenin was increased (P < 0.05) 50% at 1 microM alpha-LA compared with the control. These results suggest that flaxseed

  4. Gifsy-1 Prophage IsrK with Dual Function as Small and Messenger RNA Modulates Vital Bacterial Machineries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Hershko-Shalev

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available While an increasing number of conserved small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs are known to function in general bacterial physiology, the roles and modes of action of sRNAs from horizontally acquired genomic regions remain little understood. The IsrK sRNA of Gifsy-1 prophage of Salmonella belongs to the latter class. This regulatory RNA exists in two isoforms. The first forms, when a portion of transcripts originating from isrK promoter reads-through the IsrK transcription-terminator producing a translationally inactive mRNA target. Acting in trans, the second isoform, short IsrK RNA, binds the inactive transcript rendering it translationally active. By switching on translation of the first isoform, short IsrK indirectly activates the production of AntQ, an antiterminator protein located upstream of isrK. Expression of antQ globally interferes with transcription termination resulting in bacterial growth arrest and ultimately cell death. Escherichia coli and Salmonella cells expressing AntQ display condensed chromatin morphology and localization of UvrD to the nucleoid. The toxic phenotype of AntQ can be rescued by co-expression of the transcription termination factor, Rho, or RNase H, which protects genomic DNA from breaks by resolving R-loops. We propose that AntQ causes conflicts between transcription and replication machineries and thus promotes DNA damage. The isrK locus represents a unique example of an island-encoded sRNA that exerts a highly complex regulatory mechanism to tune the expression of a toxic protein.

  5. Effect of pioglitazone, quercetin, and hydroxy citric acid on vascular endothelial growth factor messenger RNA (VEGF mRNA) expression in experimentally induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, Krishna Mohan; Vishnu Priya, Veeraraghavan; Mallika, Jainu

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with various ischemic and inflammatory diseases, and plays an important role in the development of liver fibrosis and hepatocarcinogenesis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In this study, the comparative effect of pioglitazone, quercetin, and hydroxy citric acid on VEGF mRNA in experimentally induced NASH was investigated. The experimental protocol consisted of five groups: control, NASH, NASH + pioglitazone, NASH + quercetin, and NASH + hydroxy citric acid. The VEGF mRNA expression was evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR) analysis for all experimental groups, and the levels of VEGF mRNA were quantitatively measured by densitometry. A higher expression of VEGF mRNA was found in the hepatic cells of rats with experimentally induced NASH compared to the control group. A very mild increase in VEGF mRNA expression was observed in the rats treated with quercetin. In contrast, a mild increase in the expression of VEGF mRNA was observed in the rats treated with pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid. Quercetin exhibited an effective inhibition of VEGF mRNA expression, while a lower inhibition of the VEGF mRNA level was observed in the hydroxy citric acid- and the pioglitazone-treated rats.

  6. Loss of the RNA helicase SKIV2L2 impairs mitotic progression and replication-dependent histone mRNA turnover in murine cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onderak, Alexis M; Anderson, James T

    2017-06-01

    RNA surveillance via the nuclear exosome requires cofactors such as the helicase SKIV2L2 to process and degrade certain noncoding RNAs. This research aimed to characterize the phenotype associated with RNAi knockdown of Skiv2l2 in two murine cancer cell lines: Neuro2A and P19. SKIV2L2 depletion in Neuro2A and P19 cells induced changes in gene expression indicative of cell differentiation and reduced cellular proliferation by 30%. Propidium iodide-based cell-cycle analysis of Skiv2l2 knockdown cells revealed defective progression through the G2/M phase and an accumulation of mitotic cells, suggesting SKIV2L2 contributes to mitotic progression. Since SKIV2L2 targets RNAs to the nuclear exosome for processing and degradation, we identified RNA targets elevated in cells depleted of SKIV2L2 that could account for the observed twofold increase in mitotic cells. Skiv2l2 knockdown cells accumulated replication-dependent histone mRNAs, among other RNAs, that could impede mitotic progression and indirectly trigger differentiation. © 2017 Onderak and Anderson; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  7. Contrasting Storage Protein Synthesis and Messenger RNA Accumulation during Development of Zygotic and Somatic Embryos of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krochko, J E; Pramanik, S K; Bewley, J D

    1992-05-01

    During development on hormone-free media, somatic embryos pass through distinct morphological stages that superficially resemble those of zygotic embryo development (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledonary stages). Despite these similarities, they differ from zygotic embryos in the extent of cotyledonary development and the patterns of synthesis and quantitative expression of seed-specific storage proteins (7S, 11S, and 2S proteins). Alfin (7S) is the first storage protein synthesized in developing zygotic embryos (stage IV). The 11S (medicagin) and 2S (Low Molecular Weight, LMW) storage proteins are not detectable until the following stage of development (stage V), although all three are present before the completion of embryo enlargement. Likewise, the 7S storage protein is the first to be synthesized in developing somatic embryos (day 5). Medicagin is evident by day 7 and the LMW protein by day 10. In contrast to zygotic embryos, alfin remains the predominant storage protein in somatic embryos throughout development. Not only are the relative amounts of medicagin and the LMW protein reduced in somatic embryos but the LMW protein is accumulated much later than the other proteins. Quantification of the storage protein mRNAs (7S, 11S, and 2S) by northern blot analysis confirms that there are substantial differences in the patterns of message accumulation in zygotic and somatic embryos of alfalfa (Medicago sativa). In zygotic embryos, the 7S, 11S, and 2S storage protein mRNAs are abundant during maturation and, in particular, during the stages of maximum protein synthesis (alfin, stages VI and VII; medicagin, stage VII; LMW, stage VII). In somatic embryos, the predominance of the 7S storage protein is correlated with increased accumulation of its mRNA, whereas the limited synthesis of the 11S storage protein is associated with much lower steady-state levels of its message. The mRNA for the LMW protein is present already by 3 days after transfer to hormone-free media

  8. Stability of Reference Genes for Messenger RNA Quantification by Real-Time PCR in Mouse Dextran Sodium Sulfate Experimental Colitis.

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    Nour Eissa

    Full Text Available Many animal models have been developed to characterize the complexity of colonic inflammation. In dextran sodium sulfate (DSS experimental colitis in mice the choice of reference genes is critical for accurate quantification of target genes using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR. No studies have addressed the performance of reference genes in mice DSS-experimental colitis. This study aimed to determine the stability of reference genes expression (RGE in DSS-experimental murine colitis.Colitis was induced in male C57BL/6 mice using DSS5% for 5 days, control group received water. RNA was extracted from inflamed and non-inflamed colon. Using RT-qPCR, comparative analysis of 13 RGE was performed according to predefined criteria and relative colonic TNF-α and IL-1β gene expression was determined by calculating the difference in the threshold cycle.Colitis significantly altered the stability of mucosal RGE. Commonly used glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gapdh, β-actin (Actb, or β2-microglobulin (β2m showed the highest variability within the inflamed and control groups. Conversely, TATA-box-binding protein (Tbp and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (Eef2 were not affected by inflammation and were the most stable genes. Normalization of colonic TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels was dependent on the reference gene used. Depending on the genes used to normalize the data, statistical significance varied from significant when TBP / Eef2 were used to non-significant when Gapdh, Actb or β2m were used.This study highlights the appropriate choice of RGE to ensure adequate normalization of RT-qPCR data when using this model. Suboptimal RGE may explain controversial results from published studies. We recommend using Tbp and Eef2 instead of Gapdh, Actb or β2m as reference genes.

  9. Tumor immune microenvironment characterization in clear cell renal cell carcinoma identifies prognostic and immunotherapeutically relevant messenger RNA signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Gejman, Ron S; Winer, Andrew G; Liu, Ming; Van Allen, Eliezer M; de Velasco, Guillermo; Miao, Diana; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Drill, Esther; Luna, Augustin; Weinhold, Nils; Lee, William; Manley, Brandon J; Khalil, Danny N; Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Chen, Yingbei; Danilova, Ludmila; Voss, Martin H; Coleman, Jonathan A; Russo, Paul; Reuter, Victor E; Chan, Timothy A; Cheng, Emily H; Scheinberg, David A; Li, Ming O; Choueiri, Toni K; Hsieh, James J; Sander, Chris; Hakimi, A Ari

    2016-11-17

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells have been linked to prognosis and response to immunotherapy; however, the levels of distinct immune cell subsets and the signals that draw them into a tumor, such as the expression of antigen presenting machinery genes, remain poorly characterized. Here, we employ a gene expression-based computational method to profile the infiltration levels of 24 immune cell populations in 19 cancer types. We compare cancer types using an immune infiltration score and a T cell infiltration score and find that clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is among the highest for both scores. Using immune infiltration profiles as well as transcriptomic and proteomic datasets, we characterize three groups of ccRCC tumors: T cell enriched, heterogeneously infiltrated, and non-infiltrated. We observe that the immunogenicity of ccRCC tumors cannot be explained by mutation load or neo-antigen load, but is highly correlated with MHC class I antigen presenting machinery expression (APM). We explore the prognostic value of distinct T cell subsets and show in two cohorts that Th17 cells and CD8(+) T/Treg ratio are associated with improved survival, whereas Th2 cells and Tregs are associated with negative outcomes. Investigation of the association of immune infiltration patterns with the subclonal architecture of tumors shows that both APM and T cell levels are negatively associated with subclone number. Our analysis sheds light on the immune infiltration patterns of 19 human cancers and unravels mRNA signatures with prognostic utility and immunotherapeutic biomarker potential in ccRCC.

  10. Differential effects of common variants in SCN2A on general cognitive ability, brain physiology, and messenger RNA expression in schizophrenia cases and control individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Dwight; Straub, Richard E; Trampush, Joey W; Gao, Yuan; Feng, Ningping; Xie, Bin; Shin, Joo Heon; Lim, Hun Ki; Ursini, Gianluca; Bigos, Kristin L; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Hashimoto, Ryota; Takeda, Masatoshi; Baum, Graham L; Rujescu, Dan; Callicott, Joseph H; Hyde, Thomas M; Berman, Karen F; Kleinman, Joel E; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2014-06-01

    One approach to understanding the genetic complexity of schizophrenia is to study associated behavioral and biological phenotypes that may be more directly linked to genetic variation. To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with general cognitive ability (g) in people with schizophrenia and control individuals. Genomewide association study, followed by analyses in unaffected siblings and independent schizophrenia samples, functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of brain physiology in vivo, and RNA sequencing in postmortem brain samples. The discovery cohort and unaffected siblings were participants in the National Institute of Mental Health Clinical Brain Disorders Branch schizophrenia genetics studies. Additional schizophrenia cohorts were from psychiatric treatment settings in the United States, Japan, and Germany. The discovery cohort comprised 339 with schizophrenia and 363 community control participants. Follow-up analyses studied 147 unaffected siblings of the schizophrenia cases and independent schizophrenia samples including a total of an additional 668 participants. Imaging analyses included 87 schizophrenia cases and 397 control individuals. Brain tissue samples were available for 64 cases and 61 control individuals. We studied genomewide association with g, by group, in the discovery cohort. We used selected genotypes to test specific associations in unaffected siblings and independent schizophrenia samples. Imaging analyses focused on activation in the prefrontal cortex during working memory. Brain tissue studies yielded messenger RNA expression levels for RefSeq transcripts. The schizophrenia discovery cohort showed genomewide-significant association of g with polymorphisms in sodium channel gene SCN2A, accounting for 10.4% of g variance (rs10174400, P = 9.27 × 10(-10)). Control individuals showed a trend for g/genotype association with reversed allelic directionality. The genotype-by-group interaction was also genomewide

  11. [Histone variants and histone exchange].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2006-04-01

    Histones, as the basic components of nucleosome, are essential to chromatin structure and function. To adapt to various states of chromatin, corresponding histone variants are incorporated in nucleosome, and certain modifications also occur on the variants' tails. These variants change the conformation and stability of nucleosome to facilitate transcriptional activation or deactivation, DNA repairing, heterochromatin formation, and others. During histone exchange, chromatin remodeling complex facilitates histone variant deposition into nucleosome, and different variants have diverse deposition pathways. Recently, research on histone variants is not only a new hotspot in epigenetics, but also a new annotation of "histone code". In addition, histone exchange reveals new changing mechanism of DNA-histone interaction.

  12. Detailed mapping of serotonin 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 1D} receptor messenger RNA and ligand binding sites in guinea-pig brain and trigeminal ganglion: clues for function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leysen, J.E. [Graduate School Neurosciences, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schotte, A.; Jurzak, M.; Luyten, W.H.M.L. [Department of Biochemical Pharmacology, Janssen Research Foundation, Beerse (Belgium); Voorn, P.; Bonaventure, P. [Graduate School Neurosciences, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-10-17

    The similar pharmacology of the 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 1D} receptors, and the lack of selective compounds sufficiently distinguishing between the two receptor subtypes, have hampered functional studies on these receptors. In order to provide clues for differential functional roles of the two subtypes, we performed a parallel localization study throughout the guinea-pig brain and the trigeminal ganglia by means of quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry (using [{sup 35}S]-labelled riboprobes probes for receptor messenger RNA) and receptor autoradiography (using a new radioligand [{sup 3}H]alniditan).The anatomical patterns of 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 1D} receptor messenger RNA were quite different. While 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor messenger RNA was abundant throughout the brain (with highest levels in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, cortex, hypothalamus, hippocampal formation, amygdala, thalamus, dorsal raphe and cerebellum), 5-HT{sub 1D} receptor messenger RNA exhibited a more restricted pattern; it was found mainly in the olfactory tubercle, entorhinal cortex, dorsal raphe, cerebellum, mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus and in the trigeminal ganglion. The density of 5-HT{sub 1B/1D} binding sites (combined) obtained with [{sup 3}H]alniditan autoradiography was high in the substantia nigra, superior colliculus and globus pallidus, whereas lower levels were detected in the caudate-putamen, hypothalamus, hippocampal formation, amygdala, thalamus and central gray. This distribution pattern was indistinguishable from specific 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor labelling in the presence of ketanserin under conditions to occlude 5-HT{sub 1D} receptor labelling; hence the latter were below detection level. Relationships between the regional distributions of the receptor messenger RNAs and binding sites and particular neuroanatomical pathways are discussed with respect to possible functional roles of the 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 1D} receptors. (Copyright (c

  13. Small RNA profiling of influenza A virus-infected cells identifies miR-449b as a regulator of histone deacetylase 1 and interferon beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Buggele

    Full Text Available The mammalian antiviral response relies on the alteration of cellular gene expression, to induce the production of antiviral effectors and regulate their activities. Recent research has indicated that virus infections can induce the accumulation of cellular microRNA (miRNA species that influence the stability of host mRNAs and their protein products. To determine the potential for miRNA regulation of cellular responses to influenza A virus infection, small RNA profiling was carried out using next generation sequencing. Comparison of miRNA expression profiles in uninfected human A549 cells to cells infected with influenza A virus strains A/Udorn/72 and A/WSN/33, revealed virus-induced changes in miRNA abundance. Gene expression analysis identified mRNA targets for a cohort of highly inducible miRNAs linked to diverse cellular functions. Experiments demonstrate that the histone deacetylase, HDAC1, can be regulated by influenza-inducible miR-449b, resulting in altered mRNA and protein levels. Expression of miR-449b enhances virus and poly(I:C activation of the IFNβ promoter, a process known to be negatively regulated by HDAC1. These findings demonstrate miRNA induction by influenza A virus infection and elucidate an example of miRNA control of antiviral gene expression in human cells, defining a role for miR-449b in regulation of HDAC1 and antiviral cytokine signaling.

  14. Clinical performance of a human papillomavirus messenger RNA test (Aptima HPV Assay) on residual material from archived 3-year-old PreservCyt samples with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldstrøm, Marianne; Ornskov, Dorthe

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is widely used in the triage of women with a borderline smear result but the efficiency of testing women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) is less clear, mainly because of lack of specificity. New HPV tests are emerging, which detect E6/E7mes......messenger RNA (mRNA), and preliminary data suggest that they might have a higher specificity. However, mRNA is less stable than DNA, thus posing a challenge to the preservation abilities of the cell-collecting medium.......Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is widely used in the triage of women with a borderline smear result but the efficiency of testing women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) is less clear, mainly because of lack of specificity. New HPV tests are emerging, which detect E6/E7...

  15. Effect of escitalopram versus placebo on GRα messenger RNA expression in peripheral blood cells of healthy individuals with a family history of depression - a secondary outcome analysis from the randomized AGENDA trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, Ulla; Koefoed, Pernille; Gluud, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed as first-line drugs for the treatment of depression. However, the mechanisms of action for SSRIs are unclear and besides neurotransmitter modulation may depend on modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA......) system. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform α plays an important role in the negative feedback regulation of the HPA axis and reduced GRα messenger RNA (mRNA) expression has been shown in mood disorder patients and first-degree relatives compared to healthy individuals with no family history...... to receive daily tablets of escitalopram 10 mg versus placebo for 4 weeks. GRα mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood were measured using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Four weeks of intervention with escitalopram decreased the relative change from baseline in the expression...

  16. Interaction of the Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) with DNA and RNA causes repression of transcription and translation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, LB; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    The 18 kDa histone H1-like protein from Chlamydia trachomatis (Hc1) is a DNA-binding protein thought to be involved in condensation of the chlamydial chromosome during late stages in the chlamydial life cycle. Expression of Hc1 in Escherichia coli results in an overall relaxation of DNA and sever...... concentrations. These results were found to coincide with the formation of condensed Hc1-DNA and Hc1-RNA complexes as revealed by agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The implications of these results for possible functions of Hc1 in vivo are discussed....

  17. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction of mipomersen sodium (ISIS 301012), a 2'-O-methoxyethyl modified antisense oligonucleotide targeting apolipoprotein B-100 messenger RNA, with simvastatin and ezetimibe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rosie Z; Geary, Richard S; Flaim, Joann D; Riley, Gina C; Tribble, Diane L; vanVliet, André A; Wedel, Mark K

    2009-01-01

    Mipomersen sodium (ISIS 301012) is a 20-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that is complementary to human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100) messenger RNA and subsequently reduces translation of ApoB-100 protein, the major apolipoprotein of very low-density lipoprotein, intermediate-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Mipomersen sodium is currently being studied in phase II/III clinical studies to determine its clinical utility as add-on therapy to HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors or other lipid-lowering agents in subjects with hypercholesterolaemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetic interactions of mipomersen sodium with simvastatin and ezetimibe. Another aim was to evaluate the ability of mipomersen sodium to inhibit major cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes in vitro. In a phase I clinical study, ten healthy subjects per cohort received a single oral dose of simvastatin 40 mg or ezetimibe 10 mg followed by four 2-hour intravenous doses of mipomersen sodium 200 mg over an 8-day period, with simvastatin 40 mg or ezetimibe 10 mg being administered again with the last dose of mipomersen sodium. Mipomersen sodium pharmacokinetic profiles were assessed following the first dose (mipomersen sodium alone) and the last dose (mipomersen sodium in combination with simvastatin or ezetimibe). Plasma samples for measurement of simvastatin, simvastatin acid, and free and total ezetimibe concentrations were collected at various timepoints following their first and last oral dosing. A comparative pharmacokinetic analysis was performed to determine if there were any effects resulting from coadministration of mipomersen sodium with these lipid-lowering drugs. In addition to the clinical pharmacokinetic analysis, the ability of mipomersen sodium to inhibit the major CYP isoform enzymes (namely CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) was evaluated in cryo-preserved human hepatocytes in vitro. The area under the plasma concentration

  18. Coordinate Changes in Histone Modifications, mRNA Levels, and Metabolite Profiles in Clonal INS-1 832/13 β-Cells Accompany Functional Adaptations to Lipotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, Siri; Spégel, Peter; Danielsson, Anders P.H.; Nagorny, Cecilia L.; Andersson, Lotta E.; Nitert, Marloes Dekker; Ridderstråle, Martin; Mulder, Hindrik; Ling, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is a presumed pathogenetic process whereby elevated circulating and stored lipids in type 2 diabetes cause pancreatic β-cell failure. To resolve the underlying molecular mechanisms, we exposed clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate for 48 h. We observed elevated basal insulin secretion but impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in palmitate-exposed cells. Glucose utilization was unchanged, palmitate oxidation was increased, and oxygen consumption was impaired. Halting exposure of the clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate largely recovered all of the lipid-induced functional changes. Metabolite profiling revealed profound but reversible increases in cellular lipids. Glucose-induced increases in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were attenuated by exposure to palmitate. Analysis of gene expression by microarray showed increased expression of 982 genes and decreased expression of 1032 genes after exposure to palmitate. Increases were seen in pathways for steroid biosynthesis, cell cycle, fatty acid metabolism, DNA replication, and biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids; decreases occurred in the aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis pathway. The activity of histone-modifying enzymes and histone modifications of differentially expressed genes were reversibly altered upon exposure to palmitate. Thus, Insig1, Lss, Peci, Idi1, Hmgcs1, and Casr were subject to epigenetic regulation. Our analyses demonstrate that coordinate changes in histone modifications, mRNA levels, and metabolite profiles accompanied functional adaptations of clonal β-cells to lipotoxicity. It is highly likely that these changes are pathogenetic, accounting for loss of glucose responsiveness and perturbed insulin secretion. PMID:23476019

  19. The histone variant H3.3 G34W substitution in giant cell tumor of the bone link chromatin and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jinyeong; Park, Joo Hyun; Baude, Annika; Yoo, Yeongran; Lee, Yeon Kyu; Schmidt, Christopher R; Park, Jong Bae; Fellenberg, Jörg; Zustin, Josef; Haller, Florian; Krücken, Irene; Kang, Hyun Guy; Park, Yoon Jung; Plass, Christoph; Lindroth, Anders M

    2017-10-18

    While transcription as regulated by histones and their post-translational modifications has been well described, the function of histone variants in this process remains poorly characterized. Potentially important insight into this process pertain to the frequently occurring mutations of H3.3, leading to G34 substitutions in childhood glioblastoma and giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB). In this study, we have established primary cell lines from GCTB patients and used them to uncover the influence of H3.3 G34W substitutions on cellular growth behavior, gene expression, and chromatin compaction. Primary cell lines with H3.3 G34W showed increased colony formation, infiltration and proliferation, known hallmarks of tumor development. Isogenic cell lines with H3.3 G34W recapitulated the increased proliferation observed in primary cells. Transcriptomic analysis of primary cells and tumor biopsies revealed slightly more downregulated gene expression, perhaps by increased chromatin compaction. We identified components related to splicing, most prominently hnRNPs, by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry that specifically interact with H3.3 G34W in the isogenic cell lines. RNA-sequencing analysis and hybridization-based validations further enforced splicing aberrations. Our data uncover a role for H3.3 in RNA processing and chromatin modulation that is blocked by the G34W substitution, potentially driving the tumorigenic process in GCTB.

  20. Effects of flax supplementation and a combined trenbolone acetate and estradiol implant on circulating insulin-like growth factor-I and muscle insulin-like growth factor-I messenger RNA levels in beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, J D; Johnson, B J; Kayser, J P; Waylan, A T; Sissom, E K; Drouillard, J S

    2003-12-01

    We evaluated effects of a 5% (dry matter basis) ground flaxseed supplement (flax) and a trenbolone acetate and estradiol-17beta implant, Revalor-S, on circulating IGF-I and muscle IGF-I messenger RNA (mRNA). Sixteen crossbred yearling steers (initial BW = 397 kg) were assigned randomly to one of four treatments: 1) flax/implant; 2) nonflax/implant; 3) flax/nonimplant; and 4) nonflax/nonimplant. Serum was harvested from blood collected on d 0 (before implant or flax addition), 14, and 28, and used in subsequent analyses of circulating IGF-I. Biopsy samples (0.5 g) were obtained from the longissimus muscle on d 0, 14, and 28. Total RNA was isolated from the muscle samples, and real-time quantitative-PCR was used to assess relative differences in IGF-I mRNA. Flax supplementation had no effect (P > 0.10) on circulating IGF-I concentrations. Following implantation, sera from implanted steers had 52 and 84% greater (P 0.10) IGF-I mRNA concentration regardless of the level of alphaLA exposure; however, satellite cells from implanted steers exposed to 10 nM and 1 microM alphaLA had 2.5- and 2.0-fold greater IGF-I mRNA levels, respectively, than cells from implanted steers that were not exposed to alphaLA (P < 0.05). Administration of a Revalor-S implant increased circulating IGF-I and local muscle IGF-I mRNA concentrations in finishing cattle. However, muscle IGF-I mRNA levels were decreased by flax supplementation. Muscle cell culture experiments suggested that alphaLA was not responsible for the IGF-I mRNA down-regulation.

  1. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  2. Chromosomal mapping of H3 histone and 5S rRNA genes in eight species of Astyanax (Pisces, Characiformes) with different diploid numbers: syntenic conservation of repetitive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscor, Diovani; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia Pasquali

    2016-03-01

    The genus Astyanax is widely distributed from the southern United States to northern Patagonia, Argentina. While cytogenetic studies have been performed for this genus, little is known about the histone gene families. The aim of this study was to examine the chromosomal relationships among the different species of Astyanax. The chromosomal locations of the 5S rRNA and H3 histone genes were determined in A. abramis, A. asuncionensis, A. altiparanae, A. bockmanni, A. eigenmanniorum, A. mexicanus (all 2n = 50), A. fasciatus (2n = 46), and A. schubarti (2n = 36). All eight species exhibited H3 histone clusters on two chromosome pairs. In six species (A. abramis, A. asuncionensis, A. altiparanae, A. bockmanni, A. eigenmanniorum, and A. fasciatus), syntenic clusters of H3 histone and 5S rDNA were observed on metacentric (m) or submetacentric (sm) chromosomes. In seven species, clusters of 5S rDNA sequences were located on one or two chromosome pairs. In A. mexicanus, 5S rDNA clusters were located on four chromosome pairs. This study demonstrates that H3 histone clusters are conserved on two chromosome pairs in the genus Astyanax, and specific chromosomal features may contribute to the genomic organization of the H3 histone and 5S rRNA genes.

  3. The Histone Acetyltransferase Gcn5 Regulates ncRNA-ICR1 and FLO11 Expression during Pseudohyphal Development in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Chi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous growth is one of the key features of pathogenic fungi during the early infectious phase. The pseudohyphal development of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae shares similar characteristics with hyphae elongation in pathogenic fungi. The expression of FLO11 is essential for adhesive growth and filament formation in yeast and is governed by a multilayered transcriptional network. Here we discovered a role for the histone acetyltransferase general control nonderepressible 5 (Gcn5 in regulating FLO11-mediated pseudohyphal growth. The expression patterns of FLO11 were distinct in haploid and diploid yeast under amino acid starvation induced by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3AT. In diploids, FLO11 expression was substantially induced at a very early stage of pseudohyphal development and decreased quickly, but in haploids, it was gradually induced. Furthermore, the transcription factor Gcn4 was recruited to the Sfl1-Flo8 toggle sites at the FLO11 promoter under 3AT treatment. Moreover, the histone acetylase activity of Gcn5 was required for FLO11 induction. Finally, Gcn5 functioned as a negative regulator of the noncoding RNA ICR1, which is known to suppress FLO11 expression. Gcn5 plays an important role in the regulatory network of FLO11 expression via Gcn4 by downregulating ICR1 expression, which derepresses FLO11 for promoting pseudohyphal development.

  4. The Histone Acetyltransferase Gcn5 Regulates ncRNA-ICR1 and FLO11 Expression during Pseudohyphal Development in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long-Chi; Montalvo-Munoz, Fernando; Tsai, Yuan-Chan; Liang, Chung-Yi; Chang, Chun-Chuan; Lo, Wan-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous growth is one of the key features of pathogenic fungi during the early infectious phase. The pseudohyphal development of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae shares similar characteristics with hyphae elongation in pathogenic fungi. The expression of FLO11 is essential for adhesive growth and filament formation in yeast and is governed by a multilayered transcriptional network. Here we discovered a role for the histone acetyltransferase general control nonderepressible 5 (Gcn5) in regulating FLO11-mediated pseudohyphal growth. The expression patterns of FLO11 were distinct in haploid and diploid yeast under amino acid starvation induced by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3AT). In diploids, FLO11 expression was substantially induced at a very early stage of pseudohyphal development and decreased quickly, but in haploids, it was gradually induced. Furthermore, the transcription factor Gcn4 was recruited to the Sfl1-Flo8 toggle sites at the FLO11 promoter under 3AT treatment. Moreover, the histone acetylase activity of Gcn5 was required for FLO11 induction. Finally, Gcn5 functioned as a negative regulator of the noncoding RNA ICR1, which is known to suppress FLO11 expression. Gcn5 plays an important role in the regulatory network of FLO11 expression via Gcn4 by downregulating ICR1 expression, which derepresses FLO11 for promoting pseudohyphal development.

  5. Changes in brain ribonuclease (BRB) messenger RNA in granulosa cells (GCs) of dominant vs subordinate ovarian follicles of cattle and the regulation of BRB gene expression in bovine GCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentis, J L; Schreiber, N B; Gilliam, J N; Schutz, L F; Spicer, L J

    2016-04-01

    Brain ribonuclease (BRB) is a member of the ribonuclease A superfamily that is constitutively expressed in a range of tissues and is the functional homolog of human ribonuclease 1. This study was designed to characterize BRB gene expression in granulosa cells (GCs) during development of bovine dominant ovarian follicles and to determine the hormonal regulation of BRB in GCs. Estrous cycles of Holstein cows (n = 18) were synchronized, and cows were ovariectomized on either day 3 to 4 or day 5 to 6 after ovulation during dominant follicle growth and selection. Ovaries were collected, follicular fluid (FFL) was aspirated, and GCs were collected for RNA isolation and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Follicles were categorized as small (1-5 mm; pooled per ovary), medium (5-8 mm; individually collected), or large (8.1-17 mm; individually collected) based on surface diameter. Estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in FFL. Abundance of BRB messenger RNA (mRNA) in GCs was 8.6- to 11.8-fold greater (P dominant E2-active (FFL E2 > P4) follicles. In the largest 4 follicles, GCs BRB mRNA abundance was negatively correlated (P 0.10) abundance of BRB mRNA in GCs; thyroxine and luteinizing hormone increased (P < 0.05), whereas prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) decreased (P < 0.05) BRB mRNA abundance in small-follicle GCs. Treatment of small-follicle GCs with recombinant human RNase1 increased (P < 0.05) GCs numbers and E2 production. In conclusion, BRB is a hormonally and developmentally regulated gene in bovine GCs and may regulate E2 production during follicular growth in cattle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Shuttling Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells across the Blood–Brain Barrier In Vitro via the Introduction of De Novo C–C Chemokine Receptor 5 Expression Using Messenger RNA Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime De Laere

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of tolerance-inducing dendritic cells (tolDCs has been proven to be safe and well tolerated in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Nevertheless, several challenges remain, including finding ways to facilitate the migration of cell therapeutic products to lymph nodes, and the site of inflammation. In the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS, the blood–brain barrier (BBB represents a major obstacle to the delivery of therapeutic agents to the inflamed central nervous system (CNS. As it was previously demonstrated that C–C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 may be involved in inflammatory migration of DCs, the aim of this study was to investigate CCR5-driven migration of tolDCs. Only a minority of in vitro generated vitamin D3 (vitD3-treated tolDCs expressed the inflammatory chemokine receptor CCR5. Thus, messenger RNA (mRNA encoding CCR5 was introduced by means of electroporation (EP. After mRNA EP, tolDCs transiently displayed increased levels of CCR5 protein expression. Accordingly, the capacity of mRNA electroporated tolDCs to transmigrate toward a chemokine gradient in an in vitro model of the BBB improved significantly. Neither the tolerogenic phenotype nor the T cell-stimulatory function of tolDCs was affected by mRNA EP. EP of tolDCs with mRNA encoding CCR5 enabled these cells to migrate to inflammatory sites. The approach used herein has important implications for the treatment of MS. Using this approach, tolDCs actively shuttle across the BBB, allowing in situ down-modulation of autoimmune responses in the CNS.

  7. Development of a novel assay to quantify serum human telomerase reverse transcriptase messenger RNA and its significance as a tumor marker for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Norimasa; Maruyama, Shigeo; Oyama, Kenji; Horie, Yutaka; Kohno, Michimori; Noma, Eijiro; Sakaguchi, Seigo; Nagashima, Miki; Kudo, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Yukihiro; Kawasaki, Hironaka; Hasegawa, Junichi; Shiota, Goshi

    2007-01-01

    Currently available tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive AFP (AFP-L3), and Des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP). However, their positive rate can not surpass abdominal ultrasonography (US) as modalities to detect small HCC at early stage, resulting in a possible delay of its diagnosis. There is a need to develop an additional sensitive marker to improve the early detection of HCC. We here introduced a newly developed quantitative detection method for serum hTERT mRNA, which has a clinical significance in HCC diagnosis. Briefly, we examined its sensitivity and specificity in HCC diagnosis, clinical significance in comparison with other tumor markers, and its correlations with the clinical parameters. Serum hTERT mRNA showed higher values in patients with HCC than those with chronic liver diseases. hTERT mRNA expression independently correlated with clinical parameters such as differentiation degree (p < 0.001). The sensitivity/specificity of hTERT mRNA in HCC diagnosis showed 88.2/70.0%. hTERT mRNA proved to be expectedly superior to AFP mRNA , AFP and DCP in HCC diagnosis. Importantly, hTERT mRNA in serum correlated with that in HCC tissue. Thus, we report that serum hTERT mRNA is a novel and available marker for HCC diagnosis. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Anti-tumor necrosis factor α prevents bowel fibrosis assessed by messenger RNA, histology, and magnetization transfer MRI in rats with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jeremy; Rahal, Kinan; Swanson, Scott D; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Rittershaus, Ahren C; Reingold, Laura J; Brudi, Josh S; Shealy, David; Cai, Ann; McKenna, Barbara J; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) with anti-tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) decreases intestinal inflammation, but the effect on fibrosis remains unclear. We hypothesized that treatment with rat-specific anti-TNFα will decrease the development of intestinal fibrosis in a rat model of CD. We further hypothesized that magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging (MT-MRI) will be sensitive in detecting these differences in collagen content. Rats were injected in the distal ileum and cecum with peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-PS) or human serum albumin (control) at laparotomy and then received intraperitoneal injections of rat-specific anti-TNFα or vehicle daily for 21 days after laparotomy. Rats underwent MT-MRI abdominal imaging on day 19 or 20. MT ratio was calculated in the cecal wall. Cecal tissue histologic inflammation was scored. Cecal tissue procollagen, cytokine, and growth factor messenger RNAs were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. PG-PS-injected rats treated with anti-TNFα had less histologic inflammation, and cecal tissue expressed lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine messenger RNAs than vehicle-treated PG-PS-injected rats (IL-1β: 5.59 ± 1.53 versus 10.41 ± 1.78, P = 0.02; IL-6: 23.23 ± 9.33 versus 45.89 ± 11.79, P = 0.07). PG-PS-injected rats treated with anti-TNFα developed less intestinal fibrosis than vehicle-treated PG-PS-injected rats by tissue procollagen I (2.87 ± 0.66 versus 9.28 ± 1.11; P = 0.00002), procollagen III (2.25 ± 0.35 versus 7.28 ± 0.76; P = 0.0000009), and MT-MRI (MT ratio: 17.79 ± 1.61 versus 27.95 ± 1.75; P = 0.0001). Insulin-like growth factor I (2.52 ± 0.44 versus 5.14 ± 0.60; P = 0.0007) and transforming growth factor β1 (2.34 ± 0.29 versus 3.45 ± 0.29; P = 0.006) were also decreased in anti-TNFα-treated PG-PS-injected rats. Anti-TNFα prevents the development of bowel wall inflammation and fibrosis in the PG-PS rat model of CD. MT-MRI measurably demonstrates this decrease in intestinal

  9. Effect of repeated alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent on messenger RNA levels for interleukin-1β, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, and interleukin 10 in the developing rat brain after injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topper, Lauren A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Microglia undergo maturation during the third trimester of human development (equivalent to the first 1-2 weeks of postnatal life in rodents), during which these cells may be particularly sensitive to insult. Alcohol exposure during this period can activate the neuroimmune system, an effect that may contribute to the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Here, we investigated whether repeated alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent in rats has a priming effect on the neuroimmune response to injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Pups were exposed to alcohol in vapor chambers for 4 h daily from postnatal day (PD)2 to PD16 (peak blood alcohol concentrations ∼150 mg/dL). On PD17, rats were injected with either saline or LPS (50 μg/kg) and the frontal cortex, cerebellar vermis, and dentate gyrus were collected 2 h later. Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the pro-inflammatory agents interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 2 (CCL2), as well as levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10), were measured using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. LPS consistently increased IL-1β and CCL2 mRNA levels in the dentate gyrus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum of both male and female rats. Furthermore, the LPS-induced increase of IL-1β mRNA levels was significantly blunted in the frontal cortex of alcohol-exposed female rats. Conversely, LPS only minimally affected IL-10 mRNA expression and there were no significant differences between air- and alcohol-exposed rats. Taken together with the literature regarding the effect of third-trimester alcohol exposure on the neuroimmune system, our findings suggest that chronic exposure to lower levels is less disruptive to the neuroimmune system than binge-like exposure to high doses of alcohol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 messenger RNA level in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells: potential implications for human stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Vamvakopoulos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the regulation of type 1 receptor mRNA in Y-79 human retinoblastoma cells, grown in the absence or presence of pharmacological levels of phorbol esters, forskolin, glucocorticoids and their combinations. To control for inducibility and for assessing the sensitivity of the Y-79 system to glucocorticoids, corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA levels were measured in parallel. All treatments stimulated corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene expression relative to baseline. A weak suppression of corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA level was observed during dexamethasone treatment. The cell line expressed ten-fold excess of receptor to ligand mRNA under basal conditions. The findings predict the presence of functional phorbol ester, cyclic AMP and glucocorticoid response elements in the promoter region of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene and support a potential role for its product during chronic stress and immune/inflammatory reaction.

  11. IL-2 induction of IL-1 beta mRNA expression in monocytes. Regulation by agents that block second messenger pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, E J; Brock, B; Varesio, L

    1989-01-01

    We have previously shown that in mixed cultures of PBL incubation with human rIL-2 induces the rapid expression of IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA. Because studies have demonstrated that IL-2R can be expressed on the surface of human peripheral blood monocytes, we chose to investigate whether IL-1 ...

  12. Messenger RNA sequence rather than protein sequence determines the level of self-synthesis and antigen presentation of the EBV-encoded antigen, EBNA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellam, Judy T; Lekieffre, Lea; Zhong, Jie; Lynn, David J; Khanna, Rajiv

    2012-12-01

    Unique purine-rich mRNA sequences embedded in the coding sequences of a distinct group of gammaherpesvirus maintenance proteins underlie the ability of the latently infected cell to minimize immune recognition. The Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen, EBNA1, a well characterized lymphocryptovirus maintenance protein has been shown to inhibit in cis antigen presentation, due in part to a large internal repeat domain encoding glycine and alanine residues (GAr) encoded by a purine-rich mRNA sequence. Recent studies have suggested that it is the purine-rich mRNA sequence of this repeat region rather than the encoded GAr polypeptide that directly inhibits EBNA1 self-synthesis and contributes to immune evasion. To test this hypothesis, we generated a series of EBNA1 internal repeat frameshift constructs and assessed their effects on cis-translation and endogenous antigen presentation. Diverse peptide sequences resulting from alternative repeat reading frames did not alleviate the translational inhibition characteristic of EBNA1 self-synthesis or the ensuing reduced surface presentation of EBNA1-specific peptide-MHC class I complexes. Human cells expressing the EBNA1 frameshift variants were also poorly recognized by antigen-specific T-cells. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of the mRNA sequences of the corresponding repeat regions of different viral maintenance homologues highlights the high degree of identity between the nucleotide sequences despite very little homology in the encoded amino acid sequences. Based on these combined observations, we propose that the cis-translational inhibitory effect of the EBNA1 internal repeat sequence operates mechanistically at the nucleotide level, potentially through RNA secondary structural elements, and is unlikely to be mediated through the GAr polypeptide. The demonstration that the EBNA1 repeat mRNA sequence and not the encoded protein sequence underlies immune evasion in this class of virus suggests a novel approach to

  13. MicroRNA-181 regulates CARM1 and histone arginine methylation to promote differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Xu

    Full Text Available As a novel epigenetic mechanism, histone H3 methylation at R17 and R26, which is mainly catalyzed by coactivator-associated protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1, has been reported to modulate the transcription of key pluripotency factors and to regulate pluripotency in mouse embryos and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs in previous studies. However, the role of CARM1 in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and the regulatory mechanism that controls CARM1 expression during ESCs differentiation are presently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CARM1 plays an active role in the resistance to differentiation in hESCs by regulating pluripotency genes in response to BMP4. In a functional screen, we identified the miR-181 family as a regulator of CARM1 that is induced during ESC differentiation and show that endogenous miR-181c represses the expression of CARM1. Depletion of CARM1 or enforced expression of miR-181c inhibits the expression of pluripotency genes and induces differentiation independent of BMP4, whereas overexpression of CARM1 or miR-181c inhibitor elevates Nanog and impedes differentiation. Furthermore, expression of CARM1 rescue constructs inhibits the effect of miR-181c overexpression in promoting differentiation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the importance of a miR-181c-CARM1 pathway in regulating the differentiation of hESCs.

  14. Messenger RNA Detection in Leukemia Cell lines by Novel Metal-Tagged in situ Hybridization using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornatsky, Olga I; Baranov, Vladimir I; Bandura, Dmitry R; Tanner, Scott D; Dick, John

    2006-01-01

    Conventional gene expression profiling relies on using fluorescent detection of hybridized probes. Physical characteristics of fluorophores impose limitations on achieving a highly multiplex gene analysis of single cells. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using metal-tagged in situ hybridization for mRNA detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). ICP-MS as an analytical detector has a number of unique and relevant properties: 1) metals and their stable isotopes generate non-overlapping distinct signals that can be detected simultaneously; 2) these signals can be measured over a wide dynamic range; 3) ICP-MS is quantitative and very sensitive. We used commercial antibodies conjugated to europium (Eu) and gold together with biotinylated oligonucleotide probes reacted with terbium-labeled streptavidin to demonstrate simultaneous mRNA and protein detection by ICP-MS in leukemia cells.

  15. Effects of dietary nitrogen concentration on messenger RNA expression and protein abundance of urea transporter-B and aquaporins in ruminal papillae from lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2011-01-01

    lactating dairy cows. Ruminal papillae were harvested from cows fed low N (12.9% crude protein) and high N (17.1% crude protein) diets in a crossover design with 21-d periods. The mRNA expression was determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and protein abundance by immunoblotting. The m......RNA expression of UT-B was not affected by dietary treatment, whereas mRNA expression of AQP3, 7, and 10 were greater in the high N compared with the low N fed cows. Using peptide-derived rabbit antibodies to cow AQP3, 7, and 8, immunoblotting revealed bands of approximately 27, 27, and 24 kDa in ruminal...... papillae, respectively. A peptide-derived chicken antibody to cow UT-B detected a band of approximately 30 to 32 kDa in ruminal papillae. The abundance of UT-B and AQP3 and 7 were not affected by dietary treatment. In contrast, the abundance of AQP8 was greater in high N compared with low N diets...

  16. Appropriateness of reference genes for normalizing messenger RNA in mouse 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis using quantitative real time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Nour; Kermarrec, Laëtitia; Hussein, Hayam; Bernstein, Charles N; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2017-02-10

    2,4-Dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis is an experimental model that mimics Crohn's disease. Appropriateness of reference genes is crucial for RT-qPCR. This is the first study to determine the stability of reference gene expression (RGE) in mice treated with DNBS. DNBS experimental Colitis was induced in male C57BL/6 mice. RNA was extracted from colon tissue and comprehensive analysis of 13 RGE was performed according to predefined criteria. Relative colonic TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels were calculated. Colitis significantly altered the stability of mucosal RGE. Commonly used glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gapdh), β-actin (Actb), or β2-microglobulin (β2m) showed the highest fluctuation within the inflamed and control groups. Conversely, ribosomal protein large P0 (Rplp0), non-POU domain containing (Nono), TATA-box-binding protein (Tbp) and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (Eef2) were not affected by inflammation and were the most stable genes. TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels was dependent on the reference gene used and varied from significant when the most stable genes were used to non-significant when the least stable genes were used. The appropriate choice of RGE is critical to guarantee satisfactory normalization of RT-qPCR data when using DNBS-Model. We recommend using Rplp0, Nono, Tbp, Hprt and Eef2 instead of common reference genes.

  17. Diphosphoinositol Polyphosphates: Metabolic Messengers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shears, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    The diphosphoinositol polyphosphates (“inositol pyrophosphates”) are a specialized subgroup of the inositol phosphate signaling family. This review proposes that many of the current data concerning the metabolic turnover and biological effects of the diphosphoinositol polyphosphates are linked by a common theme: these polyphosphates act as metabolic messengers. This review will also discuss the latest proposals concerning possible molecular mechanisms of action of this intriguing class of molecules. PMID:19439500

  18. [Differential display of messenger RNA and identification of selenocysteine lyase gene in hepatocellular carcinoma cells transiently expressing hepatitis C virus core protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Jesús Orlando; Luz Gunturiz, María; Henao, Luis Felipe; Navas, María Cristina; Balcázar, Norman; Gómez, Luis Alberto

    2006-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus is associated with diverse liver diseases including acute and chronic hepatitis, steatosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Several studies have explored viral mechanisms involved in the establishment of persistent infection and oncogenic Hepatitis C virus. Expression assays of Hepatitis C virus core protein suggest that this protein has transforming and carcinogenic properties with multifunctional activities in host cells. Characterization of expressed genes in cells expressing Core protein is important in order to identify candidate genes responsible for these pathogenic alterations. To compare and identify gene expression profiles in the human hepatocarcinoma derived cell line, HepG2, with transient expression of Hepatitis C virus Core protein. We have used comparative PCR-mediated differential display of mRNA from HepG2 hepatocarcinoma with and without transient expression of HCV Core protein or green fluorescent protein, previously obtained using the Semliki Forest Virus-based expression, through transduction of recombinant particles, rSFV-Core and rSFV-GFP, respectively. We observed differences in band intensities of mRNA in HepG2 cells transduced with rSFV-Core compared with those detected in cells without transduction, and transduced with rSFV-GFP. Cloning and sequencing of a gene fragment (258 bp) that was expressed differentially in HepG2 cells transduced with rSFV-Core, was identified as selenocystein lyase. The results confirm that HCV Core protein expressed in HepG2 is associated with specific changes in mRNA expression, including the gene for selenocystein lyase. This gene may be involved in the pathophysiology of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. Temporal variation for the expression of catalase in Drosophila melanogaster: correlations between rates of enzyme synthesis and levels of translatable catalase-messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, G C; Mackay, W J; Cook, J L

    1986-08-01

    Two variants that alter the temporal expression of catalase have been isolated from a set of third chromosome substitution lines. Each variant has been mapped to a cytogenetic interval flanked by the visible markers st (3-44.0) and cu (3-50.0) at a map position of 47.0, which is within or near the interval 75D-76A previously identified as containing the catalase structural gene on the bases of dosage responses to segmental aneuploidy. Each variant operates by modulating the rate of enzyme synthesis and the level of translatable catalase-mRNA.

  20. A carvacrol-thymol blend decreased intestinal oxidative stress and influenced selected microbes without changing the messenger RNA levels of tight junction proteins in jejunal mucosa of weaning piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H-K; Xue, H-X; Zhou, Z X; Peng, J

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that intestinal oxidative stress and microbiota imbalance is involved in weaning-induced intestinal dysfunction in piglets. We have investigated the effect of feeding a carvacrol-thymol blend supplemented diet on intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations and the intestinal barrier in weaning piglets. The piglets (weaned at 21 days of age) were randomly allocated to two groups with six pens per treatment and 10 piglets per pen. At weaning day (21 days of age), six piglets were sacrificed before weaning to serve as the preweaning group. The weaned group was fed with a basal diet, while the weaned-CB group was fed with the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg/kg carvacrol-thymol (1 : 1) blend for 14 days. On day 7 post-weaning, six piglets from each group were sacrificed to determine intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations, messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of intestinal barrier function. Weaning resulted in intestinal oxidative stress, indicated by the increased concentration of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances present in the intestine. Weaning also reduced the population of Lactobacillus genus and increased the populations of Enterococcus genus and Escherichia coli in the jejunum, and increased mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 (IL-6). In addition, decreased mRNA levels of zonula occludens and occludin in the jejunal mucosa and increased plasma diamine oxidase concentrations indicated that weaning induced dysfunction of the intestinal barrier. On day 7 post-weaning, supplementation with the carvacrol-thymol blend restored weaning-induced intestinal oxidative stress. Compared with the weaned group, the weaned-CB group had an increased population of Lactobacillus genus but reduced populations of Enterococcus genus and E. coli in the jejunum and decreased mRNA levels of TNF-α. The

  1. Contrasting Storage Protein Synthesis and Messenger RNA Accumulation during Development of Zygotic and Somatic Embryos of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krochko, Joan E.; Pramanik, Saroj K.; Bewley, J. Derek

    1992-01-01

    During development on hormone-free media, somatic embryos pass through distinct morphological stages that superficially resemble those of zygotic embryo development (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledonary stages). Despite these similarities, they differ from zygotic embryos in the extent of cotyledonary development and the patterns of synthesis and quantitative expression of seed-specific storage proteins (7S, 11S, and 2S proteins). Alfin (7S) is the first storage protein synthesized in developing zygotic embryos (stage IV). The 11S (medicagin) and 2S (Low Molecular Weight, LMW) storage proteins are not detectable until the following stage of development (stage V), although all three are present before the completion of embryo enlargement. Likewise, the 7S storage protein is the first to be synthesized in developing somatic embryos (day 5). Medicagin is evident by day 7 and the LMW protein by day 10. In contrast to zygotic embryos, alfin remains the predominant storage protein in somatic embryos throughout development. Not only are the relative amounts of medicagin and the LMW protein reduced in somatic embryos but the LMW protein is accumulated much later than the other proteins. Quantification of the storage protein mRNAs (7S, 11S, and 2S) by northern blot analysis confirms that there are substantial differences in the patterns of message accumulation in zygotic and somatic embryos of alfalfa (Medicago sativa). In zygotic embryos, the 7S, 11S, and 2S storage protein mRNAs are abundant during maturation and, in particular, during the stages of maximum protein synthesis (alfin, stages VI and VII; medicagin, stage VII; LMW, stage VII). In somatic embryos, the predominance of the 7S storage protein is correlated with increased accumulation of its mRNA, whereas the limited synthesis of the 11S storage protein is associated with much lower steady-state levels of its message. The mRNA for the LMW protein is present already by 3 days after transfer to hormone-free media

  2. Effect of N-Feruloylserotonin and Methotrexate on Severity of Experimental Arthritis and on Messenger RNA Expression of Key Proinflammatory Markers in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Pašková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease, leading to progressive destruction of joints and extra-articular tissues, including organs such as liver and spleen. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a potential immunomodulator, natural polyphenol N-feruloylserotonin (N-f-5HT, with methotrexate (MTX, the standard in RA therapy, in the chronic phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA in male Lewis rats. The experiment included healthy controls (CO, arthritic animals (AA, AA given N-f-5HT (AA-N-f-5HT, and AA given MTX (AA-MTX. N-f-5HT did not affect the body weight change and clinical parameters until the 14th experimental day. Its positive effect was rising during the 28-day experiment, indicating a delayed onset of N-f-5HT action. Administration of either N-f-5HT or MTX caused reduction of inflammation measured as the level of CRP in plasma and the activity of LOX in the liver. mRNA transcription of TNF-α and iNOS in the liver was significantly attenuated in both MTX and N-f-5HT treated groups of arthritic rats. Interestingly, in contrast to MTX, N-f-5HT significantly lowered the level of IL-1β in plasma and IL-1β mRNA expression in the liver and spleen of arthritic rats. This speaks for future investigations of N-f-5HT as an agent in the treatment of RA in combination therapy with MTX.

  3. IBM1, a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, is involved in the regulation of RNA-directed DNA methylation through the epigenetic control of RDR2 and DCL3 expression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Di; Dai, Yan; Wang, Xuncheng; Wang, Zhenjie; He, Hang; Yang, Hongchun; Cao, Ying; Deng, Xing Wang; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-10-01

    Small RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an important epigenetic pathway in Arabidopsis that controls the expression of multiple genes and several developmental processes. RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 (RDR2) and DICER-LIKE 3 (DCL3) are necessary factors in 24-nt small interfering RNA (siRNA) biogenesis, which is part of the RdDM pathway. Here, we found that Increase in BONSAI Methylation 1 (IBM1), a conserved JmjC family histone demethylase, is directly associated with RDR2 and DCL3 chromatin. The mutation of IBM1 induced the hypermethylation of H3K9 and DNA non-CG sites within RDR2 and DCL3, which repressed their expression. A genome-wide analysis suggested that the reduction in RDR2 and DCL3 expression affected siRNA biogenesis in a locus-specific manner and disrupted RdDM-directed gene repression. Together, our results suggest that IBM1 regulates gene expression through two distinct pathways: direct association to protect genes from silencing by preventing the coupling of histone and DNA methylation, and indirect silencing of gene expression through RdDM-directed repression.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein-3 is an indicator of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Taguchi, Kenichi; Ohno, Shinji; Tokunaga, Eriko; Yamashita, Nami; Kubo, Makoto; Nakamura, Masafumi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of the expressions of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP3) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in phyllodes tumors (PTs). Immunohistochemical staining for IMP3 and EGFR was performed in 130 cases of primary PTs (83 benign, 28 borderline, 19 malignant), 34 recurrent/metastatic PTs, and 26 fibroadenomas (FAs). Among the primary tumors, a high expression of IMP3 was significantly more frequently present in malignant PTs (17/19, 89%) than in the FAs (0/26, 0%), benign PTs (0/83, 0%) and borderline PTs (3/28, 11%). The recurrent and metastatic lesions of malignant PTs also showed high IMP3 expression (3/5 [60%] and 6/6 [100%], respectively). Most malignant PTs showed strong IMP3 expression at the interductal area or more diffusely, whereas weak and focal (low) expression of IMP3 was limited to the periductal area in FAs and benign PTs. EGFR overexpression was significantly correlated with tumor grade and high IMP3 expression. Overexpressions of IMP3 and EGFR were significantly associated with shorter periods of metastasis-free and disease-free survival. The results suggest that high expressions of IMP3 and EGFR with a characteristic staining pattern may be helpful for both identifying malignant PT and predicting the prognosis of these tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  6. The 5S rRNA-histone repeat in the crustacean Artemia: structure, polymorphism and variation of the 5S rRNA segment in different populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Cruces, Jesús; Díaz-Guerra, Margarita; Gil, Inés; Renart, Jaime

    1989-01-01

    5S rRNA genes are linked to the histonc genes in the 13 populations of the crustacean Artemia that we have studied. In all cases, two types of repeat units arc found. Southern blot analysis of all populations shows that they can be grouped into three classes: a) American bisexuals; b) Eurasian bisexuals, and c) parthenogenetic organisms (all from Eurasia). Restriction analysis of a bisexual population from San Francisco Bay shows that the two repeat units are of 9.0 and 8.5 kb (with minor het...

  7. Dynamics of RNA Polymerase II Pausing and Bivalent Histone H3 Methylation during Neuronal Differentiation in Brain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During cellular differentiation, genes important for differentiation are expected to be silent in stem/progenitor cells yet can be readily activated. RNA polymerase II (Pol II pausing and bivalent chromatin marks are two paradigms suited for establishing such a poised state of gene expression; however, their specific contributions in development are not well understood. Here we characterized Pol II pausing and H3K4me3/H3K27me3 marks in neural progenitor cells (NPCs and their daughter neurons purified from the developing mouse cortex. We show that genes paused in NPCs or neurons are characteristic of respective cellular functions important for each cell type, although pausing and pause release were not correlated with gene activation. Bivalent chromatin marks poised the marked genes in NPCs for activation in neurons. Interestingly, we observed a positive correlation between H3K27me3 and paused Pol II. This study thus reveals cell type-specific Pol II pausing and gene activation-associated bivalency during mammalian neuronal differentiation.

  8. Histone modifications: Cycling with chromosomal replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thon, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    Histone modifications tend to be lost during chromosome duplication. Several recent studies suggest that the RNA interference pathway becomes active during the weakened transcriptional repression occurring at centromeres in S phase, resulting in the re-establishment of histone modifications that ...

  9. cAMP-Induced Desensitization of Surface cAMP Receptors in Dictyostelium : Different Second Messengers Mediate Receptor Phosphorylation, Loss of Ligand Binding, Degradation of Receptor, and Reduction of Receptor mRNA Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wang, Mei; Bominaar, Anthony A.; Devreotes, Peter N.; Schaap, Pauline

    Surface cAMP receptors on Dictyostelium cells are linked to several second messenger systems and mediate multiple physiological responses, including chemotaxis and differentiation. Activation of the receptor also triggers events which desensitize signal transduction. These events include the

  10. Histone deacetylase 1/Sp1/microRNA-200b signaling accounts for maintenance of cancer stem-like cells in human lung adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Qin Chen

    Full Text Available The presence of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs is one of the mechanisms responsible for chemoresistance that has been a major hindrance towards lung adenocarcinoma (LAD treatment. Recently, we have identified microRNA (miR-200b as a key regulator of chemoresistance in human docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. However, whether miR-200b has effects on regulating CSCs remains largely unclear and needs to be further elucidated. Here, we showed that miR-200b was significantly downregulated in CD133+/CD326+ cells that exhibited properties of CSCs derived from docetaxel-resistant LAD cells. Also, restoration of miR-200b could inhibit maintenance and reverse chemoresistance of CSCs. Furthermore, suppressor of zeste-12 (Suz-12 was identified as a direct and functional target of miR-200b, and silencing of Suz-12 phenocopied the effects of miR-200b on CSCs. Additionally, overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC 1 was identified as a pivotal mechanism responsible for miR-200b repression in CSCs through a specificity protein (Sp 1-dependent mechanism, and restoration of miR-200b by HDAC1 repression significantly suppressed CSCs formation and reversed chemoresistance of CSCs by regulating Suz-12-E-cadherin signaling. Also, downregulation of HDAC1 or upregulation of miR-200b reduced the in vivo tumorigenicity of CSCs. Finally, Suz-12 was inversely correlated with miR-200b, positively correlated with HDAC1 and up-regulated in docetaxel-resistant LAD tissues compared with docetaxel-sensitive tissues. Taken together, the HDAC1/miR-200b/Suz-12-E-cadherin signaling might account for maintenance of CSCs and formation of chemoresistant phenotype in docetaxel-resistant LAD cells.

  11. Genome-wide microRNA and messenger RNA profiling in rodent liver development implicates mir302b and mir20a in repressing transforming growth factor-beta signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Hou, Juan; Alder, Olivia; Ye, Xin; Lee, Sam; Cullum, Rebecca; Chu, Andy; Zhao, Yongjun; Warner, Stephanie M; Knight, Darryl A; Yang, Decheng; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Hoodless, Pamela A

    2013-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recently discovered small RNA molecules that regulate developmental processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis; however, the identity of miRNAs and their functions during liver development are largely unknown. Here we investigated the miRNA and gene expression profiles for embryonic day (E)8.5 endoderm, E14.5 Dlk1(+) liver cells (hepatoblasts), and adult liver by employing Illumina sequencing. We found that miRNAs were abundantly expressed at all three stages. Using K-means clustering analysis, 13 miRNA clusters with distinct temporal expression patterns were identified. mir302b, an endoderm-enriched miRNA, was identified as an miRNA whose predicted targets are expressed highly in E14.5 hepatoblasts but low in the endoderm. We validated the expression of mir302b in the endoderm by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Interestingly, mir20a, the most highly expressed miRNA in the endoderm library, was also predicted to regulate some of the same targets as mir302b. We found that through targeting Tgfbr2, mir302b and mir20a are able to regulate transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signal transduction. Moreover, mir302b can repress liver markers in an embryonic stem cell differentiation model. Collectively, we uncovered dynamic patterns of individual miRNAs during liver development, as well as miRNA networks that could be essential for the specification and differentiation of liver progenitors. (HEPATOLOGY 2013). Copyright © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. The Messenger Mission to Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Domingue, D. L

    2007-01-01

    NASA’s MESSENGER mission, launched on 3 August, 2004 is the seventh mission in the Discovery series. MESSENGER encounters the planet Mercury four times, culminating with an insertion into orbit on 18 March 2011. It carries a comprehensive package of geophysical, geological, geochemical, and space environment experiments to complete the complex investigations of this solar-system end member, which begun with Mariner 10. The articles in this book, written by the experts in each area of the MESSENGER mission, describe the mission, spacecraft, scientific objectives, and payload. The book is of interest to all potential users of the data returned by the MESSENGER mission, to those studying the nature of the planet Mercury, and by all those interested in the design and implementation of planetary exploration missions.

  13. Yeast linker histone Hho1p is required for efficient RNA polymerase I processivity and transcriptional silencing at the ribosomal DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Anat; Eyal, Miri; Hershkovits, Gitit; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Klutstein, Michael; Katcoff, Don Jay

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosome core particles in eukaryotes are linked by a stretch of DNA that is usually associated with a linker histone. Here, we show in yeast, that the presence of yeast linker histone Hho1p represses expression of a pol II transcribed gene (MET15) embedded in the rDNA. In vivo deletions of Hho1p sequences showed that the second globular domain is sufficient for that repression, whereas the presence of the N terminus is required for its derepression. In contrast, a run-on assay confirmed by...

  14. Lack of pharmacokinetic interaction for ISIS 113715, a 2'-0-methoxyethyl modified antisense oligonucleotide targeting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B messenger RNA, with oral antidiabetic compounds metformin, glipizide or rosiglitazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Richard S; Bradley, JoAnn D; Watanabe, Tanya; Kwon, Younggil; Wedel, Mark; van Lier, Jan J; VanVliet, André A

    2006-01-01

    ISIS 113715 is a 20-mer phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that is complementary to the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B) messenger RNA and subsequently reduces translation of the PTP-1B protein, a negative regulator of insulin receptor. ISIS 113715 is currently being studied in early phase II clinical studies to determine its ability to improve or restore insulin receptor sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Future work will investigate the combination of ISIS 113715 with antidiabetic compounds. In vitro ultrafiltration human plasma protein binding displacement studies and a phase I clinical study were used to characterise the potential for pharmacokinetic interaction of ISIS 113715 and three marketed oral antidiabetic agents. ISIS 113715 was co-incubated with glipizide and rosiglitazone in whole human plasma and tested for increased free drug concentrations. In a phase I clinical study, 23 healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of an antidiabetic compound (either metformin, glipizide or rosiglitazone) both alone and together with subcutaneous ISIS 113715 200 mg in a sequential crossover design. A comparative pharmacokinetic analysis was performed to determine if there were any effects that resulted from coadministration of ISIS 113715 with these antidiabetic compounds. In vitro human plasma protein binding displacement studies showed only minor effects on rosiglitazone and no effect on glipizide when co-incubated with ISIS 113715. The results of the phase I clinical study further indicate that there were no measurable changes in glipizide (5 mg), metformin (500 mg) or rosiglitazone (2 mg) exposure parameters, maximum plasma concentration and the area under the concentration-time curve, or pharmacokinetic parameter, elimination half-life when coadministered with ISIS 113715. Furthermore, there was no effect of ISIS 113715, administered in combination with metformin, on the urinary excretion of metformin. Conversely

  15. Histone variants in plant transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Danhua; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin based organization of eukaryotic genome plays a profound role in regulating gene transcription. Nucleosomes form the basic subunits of chromatin by packaging DNA with histone proteins, impeding the access of DNA to transcription factors and RNA polymerases. Exchange of histone variants in nucleosomes alters the properties of nucleosomes and thus modulates DNA exposure during transcriptional regulation. Growing evidence indicates the important function of histone variants in programming transcription during developmental transitions and stress response. Here we review how histone variants and their deposition machineries regulate the nucleosome stability and dynamics, and discuss the link between histone variants and transcriptional regulation in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  17. mRNA levels of related Abcb genes change opposite to each other upon histone deacetylase inhibition in drug-resistant rat hepatoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adám Sike

    Full Text Available The multidrug-resistant phenotype of tumor cells is acquired via an increased capability of drug efflux by ABC transporters and causes serious problems in cancer treatment. With the aim to uncover whether changes induced by epigenetic mechanisms in the expression level of drug transporter genes correlates with changes in the drug resistance phenotypes of resistant cells, we studied the expression of drug transporters in rat hepatoma cell lines. We found that of the three major rat ABC transporter genes Abcb1a, Abcb1b and Abcc1 the activity of only Abcb1b increased significantly in colchicine-selected, drug-resistant cells. Increased transporter expression in drug-resistant cells results primarily from transcriptional activation. A change in histone modification at the regulatory regions of the chromosomally adjacent Abcb1a and Abcb1b genes differentially affects the levels of corresponding mRNAs. Transcriptional up- and down-regulation accompany an increase in acetylation levels of histone H3 lysine 9 at the promoter regions of Abcb1b and Abcb1a, respectively. Drug efflux activity, however, does not follow tightly the transcriptional activity of drug transporter genes in hepatoma cells. Our results point out the need for careful analysis of cause-and-effect relationships between changes in histone modification, drug transporter expression and drug resistance phenotypes.

  18. Regulation of replication fork progression through histone supply and demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Corpet, Armelle; Cook, Adam J L

    2007-01-01

    DNA replication in eukaryotes requires nucleosome disruption ahead of the replication fork and reassembly behind. An unresolved issue concerns how histone dynamics are coordinated with fork progression to maintain chromosomal stability. Here, we characterize a complex in which the human histone......1 chaperone function, histone supply, and replicative unwinding of DNA in chromatin. We propose that Asf1, as a histone acceptor and donor, handles parental and new histones at the replication fork via an Asf1-(H3-H4)-MCM2-7 intermediate and thus provides a means to fine-tune replication fork...... chaperone Asf1 and MCM2-7, the putative replicative helicase, are connected through a histone H3-H4 bridge. Depletion of Asf1 by RNA interference impedes DNA unwinding at replication sites, and similar defects arise from overproduction of new histone H3-H4 that compromises Asf1 function. These data link Asf...

  19. Mercury after three MESSENGER flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) space-craft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, is the first space probe to visit the planet Mercury in more than 30 years. MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet twice in 2008 and once last fall. The flybys confirmed that Mercury's internal magnetic field is dominantly dipolar, with a vector moment closely aligned with the spin axis. MESSENGER detected mag-nesium in Mercury's exosphere, demonstrated that Mercury's anti-sunward neutral tail contains multiple species, and revealed that the distributions of sodium, calcium, and magnesium in the exosphere and tail vary differently with latitude, time of day, and Mercury's position in or-bit, signatures of multiple source processes. MESSENGER's laser altimeter showed that the equatorial topographic relief of Mercury exceeds 5 km, revealed an equatorial ellipticity aligned with the ellipticity in Mercury's gravitational potential, and documented the form of numer-ous impact craters and fault scarps. MESSENGER images provided evidence for widespread volcanism, and candidate sites for volcanic centers were identified. In addition, newly imaged lobate scarps and other tectonic landforms support the hypothesis that Mercury contracted globally in response to interior cooling. The ˜1500-km-diameter Caloris basin, viewed in its entirety for the first time by MESSENGER, was the focus for concentrations of volcanic cen-ters, some with evidence of pyroclastic deposits, and widespread contractional and extensional deformation; smooth plains interior and exterior to the basin are demonstrably younger than the basin-forming event. The ˜700-km-diameter Rembrandt basin, less volcanically infilled than Caloris, was likewise a focus for concentrated magmatic and deformational activity. A ˜290-km-diameter basin contains interior plains that are among the youngest volcanic material on the planet. The nearly global observations of Mercury surface units

  20. Geodesy at Mercury with MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria t.; Peale, Stanley J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    In 2011 the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft will enter Mercury orbit and begin the mapping phase of the mission. As part of its science objectives the MESSENGER mission will determine the shape and gravity field of Mercury. These observations will enable the topography and the crustal thickness to be derived for the planet and will determine the small libration of the planet about its axis, the latter critical to constraining the state of the core. These measurements require very precise positioning of the MESSENGER spacecraft in its eccentric orbit, which has a periapsis altitude as low as 200 km, an apoapsis altitude near 15,000 km, and a closest approach to the surface varying from latitude 60 to about 70 N. The X-band tracking of MESSENGER and the laser altimetry are the primary data that will be used to measure the planetary shape and gravity field. The laser altimeter, which has an expected range of 1000 to 1200 km, is expected to provide significant data only over the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. For the southern hemisphere, radio occultation measurements obtained as the spacecraft passes behind the planet as seen from Earth and images obtained with the imaging system will be used to provide the long-wavelength shape of the planet. Gravity, derived from the tracking data, will also have greater resolution in the northern hemisphere, but full global models for both topography and gravity will be obtained at low harmonic order and degree. The limiting factor for both gravity and topography is expected to be knowledge of the spacecraft location. Present estimations are that in a combined tracking, altimetry, and occultation solution the spacecraft position uncertainty is likely to be of order 10 m. This accuracy should be adequate for establishing an initial geodetic coordinate system for Mercury that will enable positioning of imaged features on the surface, determination of

  1. Association between fertilin beta, protamines 1 and 2 and spermatid-specific linker histone H1-like protein mRNA levels, fertilization ability of human spermatozoa, and quality of preimplantation embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Kempisty

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization involves a series of cellular interactions culminating in the fusion of gamete membranes, creating a zygote and then an embryo. During the process of human fertilization in vivo or in conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF, sperm must be capable of undergoing the acrosome reaction, binding to the zona pellucida (ZP, and penetrating the ZP to fuse with the oolema. The key role in this process is played by fertilin beta. Protamines and histones are the proteins that bind to sperm chromatin and contribute in chromatin remodeling during early spermiogenesis. It has been suggested that these proteins may also participate in successful fertilization and embryo development. Using reverse transcription and real-time quantitative PCR reaction (QR-PCR methods and zygote and embryo scoring, we compared fertilin beta, protamine 1 (PRM1, protamine 2 (PRM2, spermatid-specific linker histone 1 (HILS1 mRNAs levels, in vitro fertilization ability of mature spermatozoa, and quality of embryos obtained from in vitro fertilization (IVF. We found significantly lower contents of fertilin beta transcript in spermatozoa from patients in which IVF fertilization failed (p<0.001. We also noticed a correlation between high levels of fertilin beta and increased quality of embryos (p<0.05. We observed an increase in PRM1 and PRM2 mRNA levels in spermatozoa obtained from patients with successful in vitro fertilization versus compared to the number of these transcripts isolated from spermatozoa of patients in which in vitro fertilization failed (P<0.001, (P<0.001, respectively. We found direct correlation between PRM1 and PRM2 mRNA levels to the quality of embryos (r=0.31, P=0.012, (r=0.31, P=0.011, respectively. The differences in HILS1 mRNA contents between these two groups were not statistically significant (P>0,05. We did not observe an association between HILS1 transcript contents and quality of embryos (r=0.22, P=0.076. We suggest that fertilin beta and

  2. Histone variants and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghesan, Michela; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Oben, Jude; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    Within nucleosomes, canonical histones package the genome, but they can be opportunely replaced with histone variants. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome is a chief cellular strategy to regulate transcription and cellular metabolism. In pathological terms, cellular steatosis

  3. Interaction of the Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) with DNA and RNA causes repression of transcription and translation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Birkelund, S; Christiansen, G

    1994-01-01

    concentrations. These results were found to coincide with the formation of condensed Hc1-DNA and Hc1-RNA complexes as revealed by agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The implications of these results for possible functions of Hc1 in vivo are discussed. Udgivelsesdato: 1994-Mar...

  4. Cotranscriptional recruitment of RNA exosome cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and two distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) complexes assists the exonuclease Rrp6p in the targeting and degradation of an aberrant messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A Rachid

    2013-11-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs.

  5. Cotranscriptional Recruitment of RNA Exosome Cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and Two Distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) Complexes Assists the Exonuclease Rrp6p in the Targeting and Degradation of an Aberrant Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particle (mRNP) in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2013-01-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs. PMID:24047896

  6. SnapShot: histone modifications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, He; Sabari, Benjamin R; Garcia, Benjamin A; Allis, C David; Zhao, Yingming

    2014-01-01

    Histone proteins are decorated by a variety of protein posttranslational modifications called histone marks that modulate chromatin structure and function, contributing to the cellular gene expression program...

  7. MESSENGER Spacecraft and Payload Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, J. R., Jr.; Leary, J. C.; MESSENGER Team

    The Mercury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, launched in May of this year, will be the first spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury. The >14 kWm-2 solar thermal input and the large velocity change required to reach Mercury orbit make this a very challenging mission from thermal and mass perspectives. MESSENGER overcomes these challenges with innovative applications of existing technologies and materials. The spacecraft uses ordinary space electronics, has minimal moving parts, and has extensive redundancy and cross strapping to enhance its robustness. The major innovations are a ceramic-cloth thermal shade, an integrated lightweight structure, a high-performance propulsion system, and a solar array incorporating optical solar reflectors to prevent overheating. Seven miniaturized instruments, along with the spacecraft telecommunications system, satisfy all scientific objectives of the mission. The payload includes a dual imaging system with wide-angle and narrow-angle cameras; an integrated ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectrometer that is sensitive enough to detect atmospheric emissions and robust enough to map mineralogical absorption features on the sun-lit surface; gamma-ray, X-ray, and neutron spectrometers for remote geochemical mapping; a vector magnetometer; a laser altimeter to determine the topography of surface features and determine whether Mercury has a fluid core; and an energetic particle and plasma spectrometer to characterize ionized species in the magnetosphere. The payload was fully calibrated before launch, and an additional series of calibration measurements are planned during the 5-year cruise to Mercury. The first of the three Venus flybys and two Mercury flybys during the cruise phase of the mission will occur in November 2004

  8. Molecular Diagnosis for Nodal Metastasis in Endoscopically Managed Cervical Cancer: The Accuracy of the APTIMA Test to Detect High-risk Human Papillomavirus Messenger RNA in Sentinel Lymph Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Christhardt; Le, Xin; Dogan, Nasuh Utku; Pfiffer, Tatiana; Schneider, Achim; Marnitz, Simone; Bertolini, Julia; Favero, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of a commercially available test to detect E6/E7 mRNA of 14 subtypes of high-risk HPVs (APTIMA; Hologic, Bedford, MA) in the sentinel lymph nodes of CC patients laparoscopically operated. Prospective pilot study. The study was conducted in the Department of Advanced Operative and Oncologic Gynecology, Asklepios Hospital, Hamburg, Germany. 54 women with HPV-positive CC submitted to laparoscopic sentinel node biopsy alone or sentinel node biopsy followed by systematic pelvic and/or para-aortic endoscopic lymphadenectomy. All removed sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) underwent sample collection by cytobrush for the APTIMA assay before frozen section. Results obtained with the HPV mRNA test were compared with the definitive histopathological analysis of the SLNs and additional lymph nodes removed. A total of 125 SLNs (119 pelvic and 6 paraaortic) were excised with a mean number of 2.3 SLNs per patient. Final histopathologic analysis confirmed nodal metastases in 10 SLNs from 10 different patients (18%). All the histologically confirmed metastatic lymph nodes were also HPV E6/E7 mRNA positive, resulting in a sensitivity of 100%. Four histologically free sentinel nodes were positive for HPV E6/E7 mRNA, resulting in a specificity of 96.4%. The HPV E6/E7 mRNA assay in the SLNs of patients with CC is feasible and highly accurate. The detection of HPV mRNA in 4 women with negative SLNs might denote a shift from microscopic identification of metastasis to the molecular level. The prognostic value of this findings awaits further verification. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Human invariant natural killer T cells acquire transient innate responsiveness via histone H4 acetylation induced by weak TCR stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Bishop, Kathleen A; Hegde, Subramanya; Rodenkirch, Lance A; Pike, J Wesley; Gumperz, Jenny E

    2012-05-07

    Invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells) are innate T lymphocytes that are thought to play an important role in producing an early burst of IFN-γ that promotes successful tumor immunosurveillance and antimicrobial immunity. The cellular activation processes underlying innate IFN-γ production remain poorly understood. We show here that weak T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation that does not directly activate iNKT cell IFN-γ messenger RNA transcription nevertheless induces histone H4 acetylation at specific regions near the IFNG gene locus. This renders the iNKT cells able to produce IFN-γ in an innate manner (i.e., not requiring concurrent TCR stimulation) upon exposure to IL-12 and IL-18. The iNKT cells retain the capacity for innate activation for hours to days after the initial weak TCR stimulation, although their innate responsiveness gradually declines as a function of histone deacetylation. These results explain how iNKT cells are able to mediate rapid innate IFN-γ secretion in a manner that does not require them to undergo permanent T(H1) differentiation. Moreover, our results also indicate that iNKT cell motility is maintained during activation by IL-12 and IL-18. Therefore, iNKT cells activated through this pathway can continue to migrate and may thus disseminate the IFN-γ that they produce, which may amplify its impact.

  10. MESSENGER: Exploring the Innermost Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    One of Earth's closest planetary neighbors, Mercury remained comparatively unexplored for the more than three decades that followed the three flybys of the innermost planet by the Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974-75. Mariner 10 imaged 45% of Mercury's surface at about 1 km/pixel average resolution, confirmed Mercury's anomalously high bulk density and implied large fractional core size, discovered Mercury's internal magnetic field, documented that H and He are present in the planet's tenuous exosphere, and made the first exploration of Mercury's magnetosphere and solar wind environment. Ground-based astronomers later reported Na, K, and Ca in Mercury's exosphere; the presence of deposits in the floors of polar craters having radar characteristics best matched by water ice; and strong evidence from the planet's forced libration amplitude that Mercury has a fluid outer core. Spacecraft exploration of Mercury resumed with the selection for flight, under NASA's Discovery Program, of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury in March of this year. MESSENGER's first chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury's surface indicate that the planet's bulk silicate fraction differs from those of the other inner planets, with a low-Fe surface composition intermediate between basalts and ultramafic rocks and best matched among terrestrial rocks by komatiites. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most planetary formation models. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images (to resolutions of 10 m/pixel) reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, including large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile

  11. Synthetic histone code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischle, Wolfgang; Mootz, Henning D; Schwarzer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic cells. This complex of DNA and histone proteins not only packages and organizes genomes but also regulates gene expression. A multitude of posttranslational histone modifications and their combinations are thought to constitute a code for directing distinct structural and functional states of chromatin. Methods of protein chemistry, including protein semisynthesis, amber suppression technology, and cysteine bioconjugation, have enabled the generation of so-called designer chromatin containing histones in defined and homogeneous modification states. Several of these approaches have matured from proof-of-concept studies into efficient tools and technologies for studying the biochemistry of chromatin regulation and for interrogating the histone code. We summarize pioneering experiments and recent developments in this exciting field of chemical biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Thymine Starvation on Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzati, Denise

    1966-01-01

    Luzzati, Denise (Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique, Paris, France). Effect of thymine starvation on messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:1435–1446. 1966.—During the course of thymine starvation, the rate of synthesis of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA, the rapidly labeled fraction of the RNA which decays in the presence of dinitrophenol or which hybridizes with deoxyribonucleic acid) decreases exponentially, in parallel with the viability of the thymine-starved bacteria. The ability of cell-free extracts of starved bacteria to incorporate ribonucleoside triphosphates into RNA was determined; it was found to be inferior to that of extracts from control cells. The analysis of the properties of cell-free extracts of starved cells shows that their decreased RNA polymerase activity is the consequence of a modification of their deoxyribonucleic acid, the ability of which to serve as a template for RNA polymerase decreases during starvation. PMID:5332402

  13. MicroRNA and mRNA Transcriptome Profiling in Primary Human Astrocytes Infected with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Casselli

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is caused by infection with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb, which is transmitted to humans by deer ticks. The infection manifests usually as a rash and minor systemic symptoms; however, the bacteria can spread to other tissues, causing joint pain, carditis, and neurological symptoms. Lyme neuroborreliosis presents itself in several ways, such as Bell's palsy, meningitis, and encephalitis. The molecular basis for neuroborreliosis is poorly understood. Analysis of the changes in the expression levels of messenger RNAs and non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs, following Bb infection could therefore provide vital information on the pathogenesis and clinical symptoms of neuroborreliosis. To this end, we used cultured primary human astrocytes, key responders to CNS infection and important components of the blood-brain barrier, as a model system to study RNA and microRNA changes in the CNS caused by Bb. Using whole transcriptome RNA-seq, we found significant changes in 38 microRNAs and 275 mRNAs at 24 and 48 hours following Bb infection. Several of the RNA changes affect pathways involved in immune response, development, chromatin assembly (including histones and cell adhesion. Further, several of the microRNA predicted target mRNAs were also differentially regulated. Overall, our results indicate that exposure to Bb causes significant changes to the transcriptome and microRNA profile of astrocytes, which has implications in the pathogenesis, and hence potential treatment strategies to combat this disease.

  14. MESSENGER SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of MESSENGER SPICE data files (''kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains...

  15. Sweet spot supersymmetry and composite messengers

    OpenAIRE

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2008-01-01

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenologically and cosmologically perfect framework to realize a supersymmetric world at short distance. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 10^5 G...

  16. Anti-competitiveness of Instant Messenger Tying by Microsoft

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaehong; Bang, Se Hoon; Hwang, Sunjoo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze Microsoft's tying practice in the instant messenger market. Using a model that highlights distinct features of the instant messenger, which are different from the cases of the web browser and the media player, we show that Microsoft can leverage its monopoly power in the operating system (OS) market to the instant messenger market through tying strategy. Microsoft's messenger tying hurts consumers because it enables Microsoft to monopolize messenger mar...

  17. Histone profiles in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Simone S; Neff, Tobias; Bernt, Kathrin M

    2015-10-01

    While DNA abnormalities have long been recognized as the cause of cancer, the contribution of chromatin is a relatively recent discovery. Excitement in the field of cancer epigenetics is driven by 3 key elements: 1. Chromatin may play an active and often critical role in controlling gene expression, DNA stability and cell identity. 2. Chromatin modifiers are frequent targets of DNA aberrations, in some cancers reaching near 100%. Particularly in cancers with low rates of DNA mutations, the key "driver" of malignancy is often a chromatin modifier. 3. Cancer-associated aberrant chromatin is amenable to pharmacologic modulation. This has sparked the rapidly expanding development of small molecules targeting chromatin modifiers or reader domains, several of which have shown promise in clinical trials. In parallel, technical advances have greatly enhanced our ability to perform comprehensive chromatin/histone profiling. Despite the discovery that distinct histone profiles are associated with prognostic subgroups, and in some instances may point towards an underlying aberration that can be targeted, histone profiling has not entered clinical diagnostics. Even eligibility for clinical trials targeting chromatin hinges on traditional histologic or DNA-based molecular criteria rather than chromatin profiles. This review will give an overview of the philosophical debate around the role of histones in controlling or modulating gene expression and discuss the most common techniques for histone profiling. In addition, we will provide prominent examples of aberrantly expressed or mutated chromatin modifiers that result in either globally or locally aberrant histone profiles, and that may be promising therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Higgs mass from neutrino-messenger mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byakti, Pritibhajan [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Ave, Bangalore 560012 (India); Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science,2A & 2B Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Khosa, Charanjit K. [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Ave, Bangalore 560012 (India); Mummidi, V.S. [Harish-Chandra Research Institute,Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Vempati, Sudhir K. [Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,C.V. Raman Ave, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2017-03-06

    The discovery of the Higgs particle at 125 GeV has put strong constraints on minimal messenger models of gauge mediation, pushing the stop masses into the multi-TeV regime. Extensions of these models with matter-messenger mixing terms have been proposed to generate a large trilinear parameter, A{sub t}, relaxing these constraints. The detailed survey of these models (DOI: 10.1007/JHEP05(2013)055; 10.1007/JHEP08(2013)093 ) so far considered messenger mixings with only MSSM superfields. In the present work, we extend the survey to MSSM with inverse-seesaw mechanism. The neutrino-sneutrino corrections to the Higgs mass in the inverse seesaw model are not significant in the minimal gauge mediation model, unless one considers messenger-matter interaction terms. We classify all possible models with messenger-matter interactions and perform thorough numerical analysis to find out the promising models. We found that out of the 17 possible models 9 of them can lead to Higgs mass within the observed value without raising the sfermion masses significantly. The successful models have stop masses ∼1.5 TeV with small or negligible mixing and yet a light CP even Higgs at 125 GeV.

  19. CSR-1 RNAi pathway positively regulates histone expression in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Palani, Santhosh; Sherman, Yekaterina; Grishok, Alla

    2012-10-03

    Endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) have been discovered in many organisms, including mammals. In C. elegans, depletion of germline-enriched endo-siRNAs found in complex with the CSR-1 Argonaute protein causes sterility and defects in chromosome segregation in early embryos. We discovered that knockdown of either csr-1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) ego-1, or the dicer-related helicase drh-3, leads to defects in histone mRNA processing, resulting in severe depletion of core histone proteins. The maturation of replication-dependent histone mRNAs, unlike that of other mRNAs, requires processing of their 3'UTRs through an endonucleolytic cleavage guided by the U7 snRNA, which is lacking in C. elegans. We found that CSR-1-bound antisense endo-siRNAs match histone mRNAs and mRNA precursors. Consistently, we demonstrate that CSR-1 directly binds to histone mRNA in an ego-1-dependent manner using biotinylated 2'-O-methyl RNA oligonucleotides. Moreover, we demonstrate that increasing the dosage of histone genes rescues the lethality associated with depletion of CSR-1 and EGO-1. These results support a positive and direct effect of RNAi on histone gene expression.

  20. Sweet spot supersymmetry and composite messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2008-05-01

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenological effective Lagrangian of weak scale supersymmetry with a certain set of natural assumptions. This framework is designed to avoid problems in low-energy phenomenology and cosmology of supersymmetric models. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation, whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 105 GeV ≲Mmess ≲1010 GeV. Various values of the effective number of messenger fields Nmess are possible depending on the choice of the gauge group.

  1. Rapid purification of recombinant histones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Klinker

    Full Text Available The development of methods to assemble nucleosomes from recombinant histones decades ago has transformed chromatin research. Nevertheless, nucleosome reconstitution remains time consuming to this day, not least because the four individual histones must be purified first. Here, we present a streamlined purification protocol of recombinant histones from bacteria. We termed this method "rapid histone purification" (RHP as it circumvents isolation of inclusion bodies and thereby cuts out the most time-consuming step of traditional purification protocols. Instead of inclusion body isolation, whole cell extracts are prepared under strongly denaturing conditions that directly solubilize inclusion bodies. By ion exchange chromatography, the histones are purified from the extracts. The protocol has been successfully applied to all four canonical Drosophila and human histones. RHP histones and histones that were purified from isolated inclusion bodies had similar purities. The different purification strategies also did not impact the quality of octamers reconstituted from these histones. We expect that the RHP protocol can be readily applied to the purification of canonical histones from other species as well as the numerous histone variants.

  2. Biochemical Analysis of Histone Succinylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yokoyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modification (PTM of proteins is used to regulate protein activity and stability. Histone PTMs are regarded as some of the most important, as they can directly regulate gene expression through chromatin reorganization. Recently, histone proteins were found to undergo succinylation, adding to other well-known PTMs such as acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. However, there is little information regarding the enzyme which catalyzes histone lysine succinylation. In fact, it is unclear whether this reaction is enzymatic. In this study, we tested histone succinylation activity in vitro using cell nuclear extracts of HepG2 cells. Although whole nuclear extracts did not show histone succinylation activity, we found that an SP 1.0 M KCl fraction of nuclear extracts indeed had such activity. These data offer the first direct evidence that histone succinylation is an enzymatic PTM as are other histone codes in the nucleus.

  3. Intercultural Learning via Instant Messenger Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Li; Erben, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating the viability of instant messenger (IM) interaction to facilitate intercultural learning in a foreign language class. Eight students in a Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) class participated in the study. Each student was paired with a native speaker (NS) of Chinese, and each pair…

  4. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... section and appropriate to assure compliance with safe and sound banking practices. (c) Pick-up and... section and appropriate to assure compliance with safe and sound banking practices. (2) The OCC reviews...) The messenger service maintains ultimate responsibility for scheduling, movement, and routing; (iv...

  5. Multi-Messenger Astronomy with Gravitational Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sound + images show Bailey was out in the India-Australia match on 12 Jan 2016. Image credit: Rediff / Fox news / Twitter. Page 10. Electromagnetic follow up: the Indian context. Page 11. Multi-Messenger Astronomy with Gravitational Waves | LIGO-G1601377-v2. Varun Bhalerao (IUCAA) | 1 July 2016. 11. 20 – 60 keV:.

  6. Schistosoma mansoni histones: from transcription to chromatin regulation; an in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Letícia; Pierce, Raymond J; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a human endoparasite with a complex life cycle that also infects an invertebrate mollusk intermediate host and exhibits many diverse phenotypes. Its complexity is reflected in a large genome and different transcriptome profiles specific to each life cycle stage. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression such as the post-translational modification of histones has a significant impact on phenotypes, and this information storage function resides primarily at histone tails, which results in a varied histone code. Evidence of transcription of the different histone families at all life stages of the parasite was detected by a survey of transcriptome databases; manual curation of each gene prediction at the genome sequence level showed errors in the coding sequences of three of them. The biogenesis of histones is coupled to DNA replication, and a detailed in silico analysis of the specialized machinery of histone mRNA processing in the S. mansoni genome reveals that it is as conserved as in other eukaryotes, consisting in transcription factors and stem-loop binding proteins which recognize the stem loop structure at the histone mRNA 3'UTR. Histone modifying enzymes (HMEs) such as histone acetyltransferases, methyltransferases and deacetylases (HDACs) have been described in S. mansoni, and their potential as new therapeutic targets was evidenced with the apoptotic phenotype that resulted from HDAC inhibition. However, the overall regulation of transcription coupled with gene expression profiles correlated to histone modifications has not yet been characterized. Besides the interaction of HMEs with histones, many factors involved in cellular processes are known to bind to histones, and were identified here by an in silico analysis of the S. mansoni genome. Knowledge of the histone families opens up perspectives for further studies that will lead to a better identification of their post-translational modifications, their gene regulation and to the

  7. Circuit Formation by Spatio-Temporal Control of Messenger RNA ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The connections inside the brain need to be wired in a precise manner during development to ensure its proper function. This project will provide insight into circuit formation to help us understand how axon regeneration can improve clinical outcomes. Brain wiring, damage, and developmental defects Researchers have ...

  8. Analysis of RNA metabolism in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wise, Jo Ann; Nielsen, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Here we focus on the biogenesis and function of messenger RNA (mRNA) in fission yeast cells. Following a general introduction that also briefly touches on other classes of RNA, we provide an overview of methods used to analyze mRNAs throughout their life cycles.......Here we focus on the biogenesis and function of messenger RNA (mRNA) in fission yeast cells. Following a general introduction that also briefly touches on other classes of RNA, we provide an overview of methods used to analyze mRNAs throughout their life cycles....

  9. Distribution of Repetitive and Nonrepetitive Sequence Transcripts in HeLa mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, William H.; Murphy, William; Attardi, Giuseppe; Britten, Roy J.; Davidson, Eric H.

    1974-01-01

    Polyadenylated messenger RNA extracted from HeLa cells was hybridized with a mass excess of HeLa DNA. The kinetics of the hybridization reaction demonstrated that most of the messenger RNA is transcribed from nonrepetitive DNA. The amount of messenger RNA hybridized to DNA was measured both with and without prior RNase treatment. Comparison of the results indicates that within the limits of detection, HeLa messenger RNA does not contain repetitive sequence elements covalently linked to nonrepetitive sequence transcripts. However, a small fraction of the HeLa messenger RNA preparation is transcribed entirely from repetitive DNA sequences. This fraction represents about 6% of the total polyadenylated messenger RNA preparation. PMID:4525461

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the transcriptional regulation of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-a gene: interactive roles of modified histones, histone acetyltransferase, p300, AND Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2014-03-07

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription.

  11. Phosphorylation of Histone H3 at Serine 10 is Indispensable for Neoplastic Cell Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hong Seok; Choi, Bu Young; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Mizuno, Hideya; Kang, Bong Seok; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2005-01-01

    Very little is known about the role of histone H3 phosphorylation in malignant transformation and cancer development. Here, we examine the function of H3 phosphorylation in cell transformation in vivo. Introduction of small interference RNA (siRNA)-H3 into JB6 cells resulted in decreased EGF-induced cell transformation. In contrast, wildtype histone H3-overexpressing cells markedly stimulated EGF-induced cell transformation, whereas the H3 mutant S10A cells suppressed transformation. When wil...

  12. Multi-messenger aspects of cosmic neutrinos*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlers Markus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent observation of TeV-PeV neutrinos by IceCube has opened a new window to the high-energy Universe. I will discuss this signal in the context of multi-messenger astronomy. For extragalactic source scenarios the corresponding gamma-rays are not directly observable due to interactions with the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma ray background observed by Fermi-LAT contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. Interestingly, the overall energy density of the observed neutrino flux is close to a theoretical limit for neutrino production in ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources and might indicate a common origin of these phenomena. I will highlight various multi-messenger relations and their implications for neutrino source scenarios.

  13. Histone methyltransferases in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Mareike; Helin, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is perceived as a heterogeneous group of diseases that is characterized by aberrant patterns of gene expression. In the last decade, an increasing amount of data has pointed to a key role for epigenetic alterations in human cancer. In this review, we focus on a subclass of epigenetic...... regulators, namely histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Several HMTs have been linked to different types of cancer; however, in most cases we only have limited knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms by which the HMTs contribute to disease development. We summarize the current knowledge regarding some...

  14. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. The Energy Messenger, Number 1, Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancil, J. [ed.

    1995-01-01

    `The Energy Messenger` is a Department of Energy publication on energy activities of interest to American Indians. The first issue of 1995 (in a magazine format) includes articles on: tribes winning grants to develop energy resources, recruiting of internships for DOE, information about Title XXVI-Indian Energy Resources, American Indian Heritage Month, tribal perspective on DOE actions, joint ventures between tribes and the DOE, and brief description of recent DOE activities.

  16. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies. PMID:25365782

  17. Histone deacetylase 2 is required for chromatin condensation and subsequent enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Yeh, Victor; Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Murata-Hori, Maki; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-12-01

    During the final stages of differentiation of mammalian erythroid cells, the chromatin is condensed and enucleated. We previously reported that Rac GTPases and their downstream target, mammalian homolog of Drosophila diaphanous 2 (mDia2), are required for enucleation of in vitro cultured mouse fetal liver erythroblasts. However, it is not clear how chromatin condensation is achieved and whether it is required for enucleation. Mouse fetal liver erythroblasts were purified from embryonic day 14.5 pregnant mice and cultured in erythropoietin-containing medium. Enucleation was determined by flow-cytometry based analysis after treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors or infection with lentiviral short hairpin RNA. We showed that histone deacetylases play critical roles in chromatin condensation and enucleation in cultured mouse fetal liver erythroblasts. Enzymatic inhibition of histone deacetylases by trichostatin A or valproic acid prior to the start of enucleation blocked chromatin condensation, contractile actin ring formation and enucleation. We further demonstrated that histone deacetylases 1, 2, 3 and 5 are highly expressed in mouse fetal erythroblasts. Short hairpin RNA down-regulation of histone deacetylase 2, but not of the other histone deacetylases, phenotypically mimicked the effect of trichostatin A or valproic acid treatment, causing significant inhibition of chromatin condensation and enucleation. Importantly, knock-down of histone deacetylase 2 did not affect erythroblast proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis. These results identify histone deacetylase 2 as an important regulator, mediating chromatin condensation and enucleation in the final stages of mammalian erythropoiesis.

  18. A sequence in the Drosophila H3-H4 promoter triggers 1 Histone Locus Body assembly and biosynthesis of replication-coupled histone mRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzler, Harmony R.; Tatomer, Deirdre C.; Malek, Pamela Y.; McDaniel, Stephen L.; Orlando, Anna N.; Marzluff, William F.; Duronio, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Compartmentalization of RNA biosynthetic factors into nuclear bodies (NBs) is a ubiquitous feature of eukaryotic cells. How NBs initially assemble and ultimately affect gene expression remains unresolved. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors necessary for replication-coupled histone mRNA transcription and processing and associates with histone gene clusters. Using a transgenic assay for ectopic Drosophila HLB assembly, we show that a sequence located between, and transcription from, the divergently transcribed H3-H4 genes nucleates HLB formation and activates other histone genes in the histone gene cluster. In the absence of transcription from the H3-H4 promoter, “proto-HLBs”, containing only a subset of HLB components, form and the adjacent histone H2a-H2b genes are not expressed. Proto-HLBs also transiently form in mutant embryos with the histone locus deleted. We conclude that HLB assembly occurs through a stepwise process involving stochastic interactions of individual components that localize to a specific sequence in the H3-H4 promoter. PMID:23537633

  19. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. El; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UWS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft :0 infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The portion of the hot/cold source appears to be highly variable.

  20. Unsupervised Classification of MESSENGER MASC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, M. Cristina; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Ammannito, Eleonora

    2010-05-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft flew by Mercury as part of its journey to Mercury orbit insertion. The Mercury At-mospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) observed Mercury during the first two flybys, includ-ing high-spatial-and spectral-resolution visible to near-infrared (IR) spectra of the Mercury surface. The Visible and InfraRed Spectrograph (VIRS) component of MASCS consists of two linear photodiode arrays covering a spectral range 320-1450 nm. We applied classification method to MASCS data in order to extract information on the mineralogy of Mercury. The classification of the Messenger data will permit to obtain maps of Mercury surface, giving us indication of the different mineralogy and maturity present on the Hermean surface. The data were pre-processed applying photometric correction and the VIS and NIR data were collected in a single spectrum. The data set show very similar featureless spectra. The main differences are in the reflectance levels and in the spectral slopes. To emphasize the spectral differences we have normalized the spectra to an average reflectance spectrum for each flyby. This allows to point out variation of different regions with respect to the aver-age spectral behaviour. Two different approaches have been used to analyze MASCS data of the two Messenger flybys: ISODATA unsupervised classification and a classification based on three different spectral slopes (in the wavelengths' ranges 0.3-0.55, 0.55-0.8 and 0.95-1.49 µm). The identified classes shows differences linked with slopes and reflectance's level: the proposed methods allows to correlate the most important classes with different morphological features on Mercury's surface which differ for weathering, maturity and composition. Our analysis is done in order to test and verify these classification methods that shall be necessary to analyze similar data harvested by SIMBIO-SYS/VIHI (Visible and Infrared Hyper-spectral Imager) aboard the future ESA's BepiColombo mission

  1. Gravitational Waves and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves are produced by a wide variety of sources throughout the cosmos, including the mergers of black hole and neutron star binaries/compact objects spiraling into central black holes in galactic nuclei, close compact binaries/and phase transitions and quantum fluctuations in the early universe. Observing these signals can bring new, and often very precise, information about their sources across vast stretches of cosmic time. In this talk we will focus on thee opening of this gravitational-wave window on the universe, highlighting new opportunities for discovery and multi-messenger astronomy.

  2. The Histone Demethylase Jhdm1a Regulates Hepatic Gluconeogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tie; Yao, Annie Y.; Cooper, Marcus P.; Boyartchuk, Victor; Wang, Yong-Xu

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is required for maintaining blood glucose homeostasis; yet, in diabetes mellitus, this process is unrestrained and is a major contributor to fasting hyperglycemia. To date, the impacts of chromatin modifying enzymes and chromatin landscape on gluconeogenesis are poorly understood. Through catalyzing the removal of methyl groups from specific lysine residues in the histone tail, histone demethylases modulate chromatin structure and, hence, gene expression. Here we perform an RNA interference screen against the known histone demethylases and identify a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) demethylase, Jhdm1a, as a key negative regulator of gluconeogenic gene expression. In vivo, silencing of Jhdm1a promotes liver glucose synthesis, while its exogenous expression reduces blood glucose level. Importantly, the regulation of gluconeogenesis by Jhdm1a requires its demethylation activity. Mechanistically, we find that Jhdm1a regulates the expression of a major gluconeogenic regulator, C/EBPα. This is achieved, at least in part, by its USF1-dependent association with the C/EBPα promoter and its subsequent demethylation of dimethylated H3K36 on the C/EBPα locus. Our work provides compelling evidence that links histone demethylation to transcriptional regulation of gluconeogenesis and has important implications for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22719268

  3. A Rationally Designed Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor with Distinct Antitumor Activity against Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Yang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs are a class of antineoplastic agents previously demonstrating preclinical chemosensitizing activity against drug-resistant cancer cells and mouse xenografts. However, whereas clinical studies have shown efficacy against human hematologic malignancies, solid tumor trials have proved disappointing. We previously developed a novel HDACI, “OSU-HDAC42,” and herein examine its activity against ovarian cancer cell lines and xenografts. OSU-HDAC42, (i unlike most HDACIs, elicited a more than five-fold increase in G2-phase cells, at 2.5 µM, with G2 arrest followed by apoptosis; (ii at 1.0 µM, completely repressed messenger RNA expression of the cell cycle progression gene cdc2; (iii at low doses (0.25–1.0 µM for 24 hours, induced tumor cell epithelial differentiation, as evidenced by morphology changes and a more than five-fold up-regulation of epithelium-specific cytokeratins; (iv potently abrogated the growth of numerous ovarian cancer cells, with IC50 values of 0.5 to 1.0 µM, whereas also remaining eight-fold less toxic (IC50 of 8.6 µM to normal ovarian surface epithelial cells; and (v chemosensitizated platinum-resistant mouse xenografts to cisplatin. Compared with the clinically approved HDACI suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (vorinostat, 1.0 µM OSU-HDAC42 was more biochemically potent (i.e., enzyme-inhibitory, as suggested by greater gene up-regulation and acetylation of both histone and nonhistone proteins. In p53-dysfunctional cells, however, OSU-HDAC42 was two- to eight-fold less inductive of p53-regulated genes, whereas also having a two-fold higher IC50 than p53-functional cells, demonstrating some interaction with p53 tumor-suppressive cascades. These findings establish OSU-HDAC42 as a promising therapeutic agent for drug-resistant ovarian cancer and justify its further investigation.

  4. Chromatin replication and histone dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2017-01-01

    organization into chromatin. We reveal how specialized replication-coupled mechanisms rapidly assemble newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, while the complete restoration of chromatin organization including histone marks is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. Because failure...

  5. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availabili...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  6. Epigenetic histone code and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieker, Jürgen; Muller, Sylviane

    2010-08-01

    The multiple inter-dependent post-translational modifications of histones represent fine regulators of chromatin dynamics. These covalent modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, deimination, and methylation, affect therefore the numerous processes involving chromatin, such as replication, repair, transcription, genome stability, and cell death. Specific enzymes introducing modified residues in histones are precisely regulated, and a single amino acid residue can be subjected to a single or several, independent modifications. Disruption of histone post-translational modifications perturbs the pattern of gene expression, which may result in disease manifestations. It has become evident in recent years that apoptosis-modified histones exert a central role in the induction of autoimmunity, for example in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Certain histone post-translational modifications are linked to cell death (apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell death) and might be involved in lupus in the activation of normally tolerant lymphocyte subpopulations. In this review, we discuss how these modifications can affect the antigenicity and immunogenicity of histones with potential consequences in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  7. PEMBUATAN SYSTEM CORPORATE MESSENGER PADA JARINGAN LAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Puspa Dewi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate messenger is the one of the application that can be used for communication in a local area network. The backgrounds of this topic are needs of sending message process in the LAN. The messages which want to be presented are not only in a text format, but also can be in audio visual format. Computer client will connect to the server. When the connection has been established, the client continued the authentication and started sending message between client and server. Audio and video message sending can be done with peer to peer connection with entering the IP address first from remote user that we want to communicate with. The evaluation of this application was done by using 3 computers and as the result, we found that authentication process can work properly, sending text message was done properly and communication using audio can be heard clearly. In addition to video sending message, we could see directly in remote client. The average time to show the video on remote client is 3.771 seconds. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Corporate messenger merupakan suatu aplikasi yang dapat digunakan untuk berkomunikasi dalam sebuah Local Area Network. Hal ini dilatarbelakangi oleh perlu adanya proses pengiriman pesan secara bersama-sama dalam sebuah Local Area Network. Pesan yang ingin dikomunikasikan tidak hanya berupa teks, tetapi dapat juga menggunakan video maupun audio Komputer client akan melakukan koneksi dengan server. Jika sudah terjadi koneksi dengan server, maka client tersebut akan melanjutkan dengan autentikasi dan kemudian dapat melakukan pengiriman pesan dengan client yang telah terdaftar dalam database server. Pengiriman pesan audio dan video terjadi dengan koneksi peer to peer dengan terlebih dahulu memasukkan IP address dari remote user yang ingin diajak berkomunikasi. Pengujian dilakukan dengan menggunakan tiga buah komputer dan diperoleh bahwa proses autentikasi dapat berjalan dengan baik, pengiriman pesan teks dapat dilakukan

  8. Mercury after the Third MESSENGER Flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.; Bedini, P. D.; Anderson, B. J.; Evans, L. G.; Gold, R. E.; Head, J. W.; Krimigis, S. M.; Murchie, S. L.; Nittler, L.; Phillips, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    MESSENGER is the first spacecraft to visit the planet Mercury in more than 30 years. Images from MESSENGER’s first Mercury flyby, in January 2008, provided evidence for widespread volcanism, and candidate sites for volcanic centers were identified. Newly imaged lobate scarps and other tectonic landforms confirmed that Mercury contracted globally in response to interior cooling. The ~1500-km-diameter Caloris basin, viewed in its entirety for the first time by MESSENGER, was the focus for concentrations of volcanic centers, some with evidence of pyroclastic deposits, and widespread contractional and extensional deformation. Smooth plains interior and exterior to the basin are demonstrably younger than the basin-forming event. Reflectance spectra of Mercury’s surface showed no evidence for FeO in surface silicates. Reflectance and color imaging observations provided fresh support for earlier inferences that Mercury’s surface material consists dominantly of iron-poor, calcium-magnesium silicates with an admixture of spectrally neutral opaque minerals. MESSENGER’s second flyby, in October 2008, revealed the presence of neutral Mg and Ca in Mercury’s anti-sunward tail and documented strongly differing distributions of Mg, Ca, and Na in the nightside exosphere, the result of different combinations of time-variable source, transfer, and loss processes. A southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was accompanied by multiple indications of magnetic reconnection at rates ~10 times typical at Earth; in combination with the more quiescent conditions under northward IMF seen during the first flyby, the results indicate that Mercury’s magnetosphere is more responsive to IMF direction than those of other planets. The internal magnetic field is dominantly dipolar with a vector moment closely aligned with the spin axis. The nearly global observations of Mercury surface units distinguishable by color and composition enforce the importance of the largely volcanic

  9. [Irisin: a messenger from the gods?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, María; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Due to the need to understand the basis of the metabolic benefits of exercise, irisin was discovered a few years ago. This cytokine, secreted by skeletal muscle due to exercise, should have positive effects on energetic metabolism. In particular, it could act as a messenger on white adipose tissue, modifying its phenotype into the beige adipocyte, and increasing its thermogenic capacity. Since it was described, there have been numerous studies led to depict its function, with the aim of determining if irisin could become a therapeutic target in the context of diseases associated with a caloric excess, such as obesity and diabetes. In this review, the irisin discovery is summarized, along with its in vitro and in vivo effects described up until now. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Emerging roles in plant biotechnology for the second messenger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Second messengers are small transient molecules that transmit and/or modulate environmental or hormonal signals linking them to complex and often systemic physiological responses. Recent reports have renewed interest in the second messenger guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) since it has been shown ...

  11. UHRF1 Links the Histone Code and DNA Methylation to Ensure Faithful Epigenetic Memory Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bronner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is the study of the transmission of cell memory through mitosis or meiosis that is not based on the DNA sequence. At the molecular level the epigenetic memory of a cell is embedded in DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications, RNA interference and histone isoform variation. There is a tight link between histone post-translational modifications (the histone code and DNA methylation, as modifications of histones contribute to the establishment of DNA methylation patterns and vice versa. Interestingly, proteins have recently been identified that can simultaneously read both methylated DNA and the histone code. UHRF1 fulfills these requirements by having unique structural domains that allow concurrent recognition of histone modifications and methylated DNA. Herein, we review our current knowledge of UHRF1 and discuss how this protein ensures the link between histone marks and DNA methylation. Understanding the molecular functions of this protein may reveal the physiological relevance of the linkage between these layers of epigenetic marks.

  12. Histone code or not? Combinatorial pattern analyses of histone modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Chongzhi; Peng, Weiqun; Wang, Zhibin; Schones, Dustin E.; Barski, Artem; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Zhao, Keji; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Zhang, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are organized into chromatin, the structure of which plays critical role in the program of gene expression. Chromatin structure and function is regulated by a myriad of posttranslational modifications on histone tails of the nucleosomes, the fundamental unit of chromatin. It remains unclear how different modifications interact. Based on high- resolution genomic maps of close to 40 histone methylations and acetylations in human T-cells obtained experimentally by ChIP- Seq technique, we investigated the combinatorial patterns of histone modifications at gene promoter regions. We found that a very limited number of patterns dominate. Modifications within a pattern are strongly correlated and each pattern is associated with a distinct gene expression distribution. Our results suggest that it is the patterns rather than the individual modifications that affect the downstream readout.

  13. Curcumin modulates the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines by type II alveolar epithelial cells in a rat COPD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lixing Gan,1 Chengye Li,2 Jian Wang,1 Xuejun Guo3 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Xin Hua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Studies have suggested that histone modification has a positive impact on various aspects associated with the progression of COPD. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2 suppresses proinflammatory gene expression through deacetylation of core histones.Objective: To investigate the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II in a rat COPD model and regulation of HDAC2 expression by curcumin in comparison with corticosteroid.Materials and methods: The rat COPD model was established by cigarette smoke exposure and confirmed by histology and pathophysioloy. AEC II were isolated and cultured in vitro from the COPD models and control animals. The cells were treated with curcumin, corticosteroid, or trichostatin A, and messenger RNA (mRNA expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2α (MIP-2α was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The expression of HDAC2 was measured by Western blot. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to detect H3/H4 acetylation and H3K9 methylation in the promoter region of three kinds of chemokine genes (IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-2α. Results: Compared to the control group, the mRNAs of MCP-1, IL-8, and MIP-2α were upregulated 4.48-fold, 3.14-fold, and 2.83-fold, respectively, in the AEC II from COPD model. The protein expression of HDAC2 in the AEC II from COPD model was significantly lower than from the control group (P<0

  14. Cracking the enigmatic linker histone code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godde, James S; Ura, Kiyoe

    2008-03-01

    Recently, the existence of a 'histone code' has been proposed to explain the link between the covalent chemical modification of histone proteins and the epigenetic regulation of gene activity. Although the role of the four 'core' histones has been extensively studied, little is known about the involvement of the linker histone, histone H1 and its variants, in this code. For many years, few sites of chemical modification had been mapped in linker histones, but this has changed recently with the use of functional proteomic techniques, principally mass spectrometry, to characterize these modifications. The functionality of many of these sites, however, remains to be determined.

  15. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibitor ACY-1215 protects against experimental acute liver failure by regulating the TLR4-MAPK/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Hai-Yue; Jiao, Fang-Zhou; Wang, Lu-Wen; Zhang, Hong; Gong, Zuo-Jiong

    2018-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is considered a new target for anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and neurodegenerative treatment. ACY-1215 is a selective histone deacetylase 6 inhibitor, and it has been recognized as a potential anticancer and anti-inflammation drug. The aim of our study was to investigate whether ACY-1215 has protective effects on acute liver failure (ALF) in mice and explore its potential mechanism. Male C57/BL6 mice were divided into normal, model, and ACY-1215 groups. ACY-1215 (25mg/kg) and same amounts of saline were given to mice. After 2h, the ALF models were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100μg/kg) combined with D-galactosamine (D-gal, 400mg/kg). All animals were killed after 24h. The expressions of HDAC6 were determined by western blotting and RT-PCR assay. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines were detected by ELISA and RT-PCR. The protein expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) species were determined by western blot. The mortality of mice with ALF induced by LPS and D-gal was significantly decreased by ACY-1215 pretreatment. Procedures to manage ALF caused adversely affected liver histology and function; this damage was repaired by pretreatment of ACY-1215. ACY-1215 treatment also attenuated the serum and messenger RNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines. Pretreatment of ACY-1215 significantly decreased the protein expression of TLR4 and the activation of MAPK and NF-κB signalling pathways. ACY-1215 has potential therapeutic value in mice with ALF by directly inhibiting inflammatory response via regulation of the TLR4-MAPK/NF-kB pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Erasure of histone acetylation by Arabidopsis HDA6 mediates large-scale gene silencing in nucleolar dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Keith; Lawrence, Richard J.; Pontes, Olga; Reuther, Rachel; Enciso, Angel J.; Silva, Manuela; Neves, Nuno; Gross, Michael; Viegas, Wanda; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2006-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance describes the silencing of one parental set of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in a genetic hybrid, an epigenetic phenomenon that occurs on a scale second only to X-chromosome inactivation in mammals. An RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown screen revealed that the predicted Arabidopsis histone deacetylase, HDA6, is required for rRNA gene silencing in nucleolar dominance. In vivo, derepression of silenced rRNA genes upon knockdown of HDA6 is accompanied by nucleolus organizer region (NOR) decondensation, loss of promoter cytosine methylation, and replacement of histone H3 Lys 9 (H3K9) dimethylation with H3K4 trimethylation, H3K9 acetylation, H3K14 acetylation, and histone H4 tetra-acetylation. Consistent with these in vivo results, purified HDA6 deacetylates lysines modified by histone acetyltransferases whose substrates include H3K14, H4K5, and H4K12. HDA6 localizes, in part, to the nucleolus, supporting a model whereby HDA6 erases histone acetylation as a key step in an epigenetic switch mechanism that silences rRNA genes through concerted histone and DNA modifications. PMID:16648464

  17. LIN28 binds messenger RNAs at GGAGA motifs and regulates splicing factor abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Melissa L; Huelga, Stephanie C; Kapeli, Katannya; Stark, Thomas J; Liang, Tiffany Y; Chen, Stella X; Yan, Bernice Y; Nathanson, Jason L; Hutt, Kasey R; Lovci, Michael T; Kazan, Hilal; Vu, Anthony Q; Massirer, Katlin B; Morris, Quaid; Hoon, Shawn; Yeo, Gene W

    2012-10-26

    LIN28 is a conserved RNA-binding protein implicated in pluripotency, reprogramming, and oncogenesis. It was previously shown to act primarily by blocking let-7 microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, but here we elucidate distinct roles of LIN28 regulation via its direct messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. Through crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cells expressing exogenous LIN28, we have defined discrete LIN28-binding sites in a quarter of human transcripts. These sites revealed that LIN28 binds to GGAGA sequences enriched within loop structures in mRNAs, reminiscent of its interaction with let-7 miRNA precursors. Among LIN28 mRNA targets, we found evidence for LIN28 autoregulation and also direct but differing effects on the protein abundance of splicing regulators in somatic and pluripotent stem cells. Splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrated that exogenous LIN28 expression causes widespread downstream alternative splicing changes. These findings identify important regulatory functions of LIN28 via direct mRNA interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MESSENGER MERCURY RSS/MLA LEVEL 5 DERIVED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains archival results from radio science investigations conducted during the MESSENGER mission. Radio measurements were made using the MESSENGER...

  19. Natural RNA circles function as efficient microRNA sponges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas B; Jensen, Trine I; Clausen, Bettina H

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so-called comp......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so......-called competing endogenous RNA in humans and target mimicry in plants. We previously identified a highly expressed circular RNA (circRNA) in human and mouse brain. Here we show that this circRNA acts as a miR-7 sponge; we term this circular transcript ciRS-7 (circular RNA sponge for miR-7). ciRS-7 contains more...... sponge, suggesting that miRNA sponge effects achieved by circRNA formation are a general phenomenon. This study serves as the first, to our knowledge, functional analysis of a naturally expressed circRNA....

  20. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, M. H.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Vervack, R. J.; Sarantos, M.; Sprague, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere known to contain hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Because the exosphere is collisionless, its composition represents a balance of active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high-spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data is the substantial differences among species, which was detected during three close flybys of the planet and has been persistantly present during MESSENGER's orbital phase. Our modeling demonstrates that these differences are not because of post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure, but rather result from differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each species is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry, with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere substantially greater than that on the dusk side. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. In this model, Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced by ejection of CaO followed by dissociation to produce Ca and O. Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Data from the flybys are consistent with a high temperature (~1-2 x 104 K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. Such a high temperature resutls from dissociation of CaO in a near

  1. Histone Lysine Methylation and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hoon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylation of several lysine residues of histones is a crucial mechanism for relatively long-term regulation of genomic activity. Recent molecular biological studies have demonstrated that the function of histone methylation is more diverse and complex than previously thought. Moreover, studies using newly available genomics techniques, such as exome sequencing, have identified an increasing number of histone lysine methylation-related genes as intellectual disability-associated genes, which highlights the importance of accurate control of histone methylation during neurogenesis. However, given the functional diversity and complexity of histone methylation within the cell, the study of the molecular basis of histone methylation-related neurodevelopmental disorders is currently still in its infancy. Here, we review the latest studies that revealed the pathological implications of alterations in histone methylation status in the context of various neurodevelopmental disorders and propose possible therapeutic application of epigenetic compounds regulating histone methylation status for the treatment of these diseases.

  2. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  3. Expression of P450c17 messenger ribonucleic acid in postmenopausal human ovary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, M; Puche, C; Cabero, A; Cabero, L; Meseguer, A

    1999-03-01

    To investigate the expression of the P450c17 gene in postmenopausal human ovaries compared with normal cycling ovaries. Prospective nonrandomized clinical research study. Servei de Medicina Reproductiva and Centre d'Investigacions en Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Hospitals Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. Six premenopausal women and four postmenopausal women undergoing bilateral oophorectomy for nonovarian gynecologic disease. Extraction of 10 mL of peripheral venous blood for hormone measurements. Extraction of RNA from surgically removed ovaries for Northern blot, ribonuclease protection, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction Southern blot assays. Definition of the reproductive cycle state of each patient and determination of the level of P450c17 gene expression in all samples with the use of the semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction Southern blot assay. P450c17 messenger RNA levels in postmenopausal ovaries varied considerably between samples. Although the levels were similar to those detected in the early follicular phase, one of the samples had levels as high as those observed in the late follicular phase. Although the degree varied from one sample to another, all the postmenopausal ovaries studied expressed the P450c17 gene at the messenger RNA level. In a sample from a patient with endometrial adenocarcinoma, the level was as high as the levels observed in the late follicular phase.

  4. The histone acetyltransferase p300 inhibitor C646 reduces pro-inflammatory gene expression and inhibits histone deacetylases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, Thea; Boichenko, Alexander; Leus, Niek G J; Ourailidou, Maria Eleni; Wapenaar, Hannah; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Imhof, Axel; Bischoff, Rainer; Haisma, Hidde J; Dekker, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylations are reversible posttranslational modifications of histone and non-histone proteins that play important regulatory roles in signal transduction cascades and gene expression. Lysine acetylations are regulated by histone acetyltransferases as writers and histone deacetylases as

  5. MicroRNA-627 mediates the epigenetic mechanisms of vitamin D to suppress proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells and growth of xenograft tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padi, Sathish K R; Zhang, Qunshu; Rustum, Youcef M; Morrison, Carl; Guo, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D protects against colorectal cancer through unclear mechanisms. We investigated the effects of calcitriol (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; the active form of vitamin D) on levels of different microRNAs (miRNAs) in colorectal cancer cells from humans and xenograft tumors in mice. Expression of miRNAs in colorectal cancer cell lines was examined using the Ambion mirVana miRNA Bioarray. The effects of calcitriol on expression of miR-627 and cell proliferation were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and WST-1 assay, respectively; growth of colorectal xenograft tumors was examined in nude mice. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze levels of miR-627 in human colon adenocarcinoma samples and nontumor colon mucosa tissues (controls). In HT-29 cells, miR-627 was the only miRNA significantly up-regulated by calcitriol. Jumonji domain containing 1A (JMJD1A), which encodes a histone demethylase, was found to be a target of miR-627. By down-regulating JMJD1A, miR-627 increased methylation of histone H3K9 and suppressed expression of proliferative factors, such as growth and differentiation factor 15. Calcitriol induced expression of miR-627, which down-regulated JMJD1A and suppressed growth of xenograft tumors from HCT-116 cells in nude mice. Overexpression of miR-627 prevented proliferation of colorectal cancer cell lines in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Conversely, blocking the activity of miR-627 inhibited the tumor suppressive effects of calcitriol in cultured colorectal cancer cells and in mice. Levels of miR-627 were decreased in human colon adenocarcinoma samples compared with controls. miR-627 mediates tumor-suppressive epigenetic activities of vitamin D on colorectal cancer cells and xenograft tumors in mice. The messenger RNA that encodes the histone demethylase JMJD1A is a direct target of miR-627. Reagents designed to target JMJD1A or its messenger RNA, or increase the function of miR-627, might have the same

  6. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variations, but there are no obvious year-to-year variations in most of the observations. We do not see the episodic variability reported by some ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere, at about 1200 K, is much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  7. Diversity and Divergence of Dinoflagellate Histone Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Georgi K; Lynch, Michael

    2015-12-08

    Histone proteins and the nucleosomal organization of chromatin are near-universal eukaroytic features, with the exception of dinoflagellates. Previous studies have suggested that histones do not play a major role in the packaging of dinoflagellate genomes, although several genomic and transcriptomic surveys have detected a full set of core histone genes. Here, transcriptomic and genomic sequence data from multiple dinoflagellate lineages are analyzed, and the diversity of histone proteins and their variants characterized, with particular focus on their potential post-translational modifications and the conservation of the histone code. In addition, the set of putative epigenetic mark readers and writers, chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones are examined. Dinoflagellates clearly express the most derived set of histones among all autonomous eukaryote nuclei, consistent with a combination of relaxation of sequence constraints imposed by the histone code and the presence of numerous specialized histone variants. The histone code itself appears to have diverged significantly in some of its components, yet others are conserved, implying conservation of the associated biochemical processes. Specifically, and with major implications for the function of histones in dinoflagellates, the results presented here strongly suggest that transcription through nucleosomal arrays happens in dinoflagellates. Finally, the plausible roles of histones in dinoflagellate nuclei are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Marinov and Lynch.

  8. Diversity and Divergence of Dinoflagellate Histone Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi K. Marinov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Histone proteins and the nucleosomal organization of chromatin are near-universal eukaroytic features, with the exception of dinoflagellates. Previous studies have suggested that histones do not play a major role in the packaging of dinoflagellate genomes, although several genomic and transcriptomic surveys have detected a full set of core histone genes. Here, transcriptomic and genomic sequence data from multiple dinoflagellate lineages are analyzed, and the diversity of histone proteins and their variants characterized, with particular focus on their potential post-translational modifications and the conservation of the histone code. In addition, the set of putative epigenetic mark readers and writers, chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones are examined. Dinoflagellates clearly express the most derived set of histones among all autonomous eukaryote nuclei, consistent with a combination of relaxation of sequence constraints imposed by the histone code and the presence of numerous specialized histone variants. The histone code itself appears to have diverged significantly in some of its components, yet others are conserved, implying conservation of the associated biochemical processes. Specifically, and with major implications for the function of histones in dinoflagellates, the results presented here strongly suggest that transcription through nucleosomal arrays happens in dinoflagellates. Finally, the plausible roles of histones in dinoflagellate nuclei are discussed.

  9. A PSHaver for centromeric histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folco, H Diego; Desai, Arshad

    2010-11-12

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Hewawasam et al. (2010) and Ranjitkar et al. (2010) identify and characterize Psh1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that specifically targets the centromeric histone Cse4 in budding yeast and limits its misincorporation at noncentromeric regions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypophosphorylated ASF/SF2 binds TAP and is present in messenger ribonucleoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2004-07-23

    Serine/arginine-rich proteins (SR proteins) function in precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) splicing and may also act as adaptors for mRNA export. SR proteins are dynamically phosphorylated in their RS domain, and differential phosphorylation modulates their splicing activity and subcellular localization. In this study, we investigated the influence of phosphorylation on the function of SR proteins in events occurring during mRNA maturation. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the mRNA export receptor TAP associates preferentially with the hypophosphorylated form of shuttling SR proteins, including ASF/SF2. Overexpression of ASF induced subnuclear relocalization of TAP to SR protein-enriched nuclear speckles, suggesting their interaction in vivo. Moreover, the ASF found in a nucleoplasmic fraction rich in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complexes is hyperphosphorylated, whereas mature messenger RNP (mRNP)-bound ASF is hypophosphorylated. Therefore, hypophosphorylation of ASF in mRNPs coincides with its higher affinity for TAP, suggesting that dephosphorylation of ASF promotes both its incorporation into mRNPs and recruitment of TAP for mRNA export. Thus, the phosphorylation state of RS domains may modulate the function of mammalian shuttling SR proteins during mRNA maturation or export.

  11. Compact Imagers Based on MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, N. L.; Murchie, S. L.; Hawkins, S. E.; Hayes, J. R.; Boldt, J. D.; Barnouin, O. S.; Heffernan, K.; Noble, M. W.

    2012-10-01

    MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) has acquired >130,000 images since launch in 2004, including the first images from Mercury orbit. MDIS, composed of two miniature cameras, has capabilities well matched to future planetary missions.

  12. Dynamic changes in the interchromosomal interaction of early histone gene loci during development of sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Masaya; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T; Hayashi, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Takashi; Awazu, Akinori; Sakamoto, Naoaki

    2017-12-15

    The nuclear positioning and chromatin dynamics of eukaryotic genes are closely related to the regulation of gene expression, but they have not been well examined during early development, which is accompanied by rapid cell cycle progression and dynamic changes in nuclear organization, such as nuclear size and chromatin constitution. In this study, we focused on the early development of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus and performed three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization of gene loci encoding early histones (one of the types of histone in sea urchin). There are two non-allelic early histone gene loci per sea urchin genome. We found that during the morula stage, when the early histone gene expression levels are at their maximum, interchromosomal interactions were often formed between the early histone gene loci on separate chromosomes and that the gene loci were directed to locate to more interior positions. Furthermore, these interactions were associated with the active transcription of the early histone genes. Thus, such dynamic interchromosomal interactions may contribute to the efficient synthesis of early histone mRNA during the morula stage of sea urchin development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Drug Addiction and Histone Code Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Dae; Call, Tanessa; Magazu, Samantha; Ferguson, Deveroux

    2017-01-01

    Acute and prolonged exposure to drugs of abuse induces changes in gene expression, synaptic function, and neural plasticity in brain regions involved in reward. Numerous genes are involved in this process, and persistent changes in gene expression coincide with epigenetic histone modifications and DNA methylation. Histone modifications are attractive regulatory mechanisms, which can encode complex environmental signals in the genome of postmitotic cells, like neurons. Recently, it has been demonstrated that specific histone modifications are involved in addiction-related gene regulatory mechanisms, by a diverse set of histone-modifying enzymes and readers. These histone modifiers and readers may prove to be valuable pharmacological targets for effective treatments for drug addiction.

  14. Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. E.

    1999-05-01

    Smith College has recently established the Louise B. and Edmund J. Kahn Liberal Arts Institute to foster interdisciplinary scholarship among the faculty. In the 1999-2000 academic year, the Kahn Institute is sponsoring a project entitled "Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium." The project will explore the impact of the astronomical discoveries of Galileo and his contemporaries on the Renaissance world-view and also use Galileo's experience as a lens for examining scientific and cultural developments at the symbolic juncture represented by the year 2000. Seven faculty fellows and 10-12 student fellows will participate in a year-long colloquium pursuing these themes, aided by the participation of some five Visiting Fellows. The inaugural public event will be a symposium on the historical Galileo, with presentation by three noted scholars, each of whom will return to campus for a second meeting with the Kahn colloquium. Additional events will include an exhibit of prints, artifacts, and rare books related to Galileo and his time, an early music concert featuring music composed by Galileo's father, and a series of other events sponsored by diverse departments and programs, all related to the broad themes of the Galileo project. The culminating events will be the premiere of a new music theater work, which will encapsulate the insights of the colloquium about human reactions to novel insights about the world, and a symposium presenting the research results of faculty and student fellows. The symposium will feature a capstone lecture by an visionary scholar projecting the implication of historical and contemporary trends into the future.

  15. RNA Localization in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) localization is a mechanism by which polarized cells can regulate protein synthesis to specific subcellular compartments in a spatial and temporal manner, and plays a pivotal role in multiple physiological processes from embryonic development to cell differentiation......, regulation of the blood brain barrier and glial scar tissue formation. Despite the involvement in various CNS functions only a limited number of studies have addressed mRNA localization in astrocytes. This PhD project was initially focused on developing and implementing methods that could be used to asses mRNA...... localization in astrocyte protrusions, and following look into the subcellular localization pattern of specific mRNA species of both primary astrocytes isolated from cortical hemispheres of newborn mice, and the mouse astrocyte cell line, C8S. The Boyden chamber cell fractionation assay was optimized, in a way...

  16. Identification and Interrogation of Combinatorial Histone Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly R Karch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone proteins are dynamically modified to mediate a variety of cellular processes including gene transcription, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis. Regulation of these processes occurs through the recruitment of non-histone proteins to chromatin by specific combinations of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs. Mass spectrometry has emerged as an essential tool to discover and quantify histone PTMs both within and between samples in an unbiased manner. Developments in mass spectrometry that allow for characterization of large histone peptides or intact protein has made it possible to determine which modifications occur simultaneously on a single histone polypeptide. A variety of techniques from biochemistry, biophysics, and chemical biology have been employed to determine the biological relevance of discovered combinatorial codes. This review first describes advancements in the field of mass spectrometry that have facilitated histone PTM analysis and then covers notable approaches to probe the biological relevance of these modifications in their nucleosomal context.

  17. Non-histone chromosomal proteins. Their isolation and role in determining specificity of transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüthmann, H; Mrozek, S; Gierer, A

    1975-10-15

    We describe a method for fractionation of chromatin components by selective dissociation with salt in buffers containing 5 M urea in combination with cromatography on hydroxyapatite at 4 degrees C. This results in two histone and four non-histone fractions which are recovered in high yield and with minimal proteolytic contamination. Template capacity measurements of the isolated chromatins and pre-saturation competition hybridization experiments support the idea that a group of non-histone proteins activate the transcription of specific DNA sequences which were not transcribed from purified DNA to the same extent. In reconstitution experiments a non-histone protein fraction, NH4, prepared from lymphocyte chromatin by hydroxyapatite chromatography is shown to cause transcription in vitro of lymphocyte-specific RNA sequences. A subfraction with a molecular weight of 30 000 comprising 40% of the NH4 fraction protein is characteristic for this tissue and not found in liver chromatin.

  18. Altering histone acetylation status in donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid does not affect dog cloning efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Suh, Han Na; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Kim, Dong Hoon; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-10-15

    Although dog cloning technology has been applied to conservation of endangered canids, propagation of elite dogs, and production of transgenic dogs, the efficiency of cloning is still very low. To help overcome this problem, we evaluated the effect of treating donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on dog cloning efficiency. Relative messenger RNA expressions of the bax1/bcl2 ratio and Dnmt1 in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 μM) of SAHA and durations (0, 20, 44 hours) were compared. Treatment with 1 μM for 20 hours showed significantly lower bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcript abundance. Acetylation of H3K9 was significantly increased after SAHA treatment, but H4K5, H4K8 and H4K16 were not changed. After SCNT using control or donor cells treated with SAHA, a total of 76 and 64 cloned embryos were transferred to seven and five recipients, respectively. Three fetuses were diagnosed in both control and SAHA-treated groups by ultrasonography 29 days after the embryo transfer, but there was no significant difference in the pregnancy rate (4.2% vs. 4.3%). In conclusion, although SAHA treatment as used in this study significantly decreased bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcripts of donor nuclei, as well as increased H3 acetylation, it was not enough to increase in vivo developmental competence of cloned dog embryos. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Histone deacetylase 8 in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehme, Ina; Deubzer, Hedwig E; Wegener, Dennis; Pickert, Diana; Linke, Jan-Peter; Hero, Barbara; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Westermann, Frank; Ulrich, Scott M; von Deimling, Andreas; Fischer, Matthias; Witt, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    The effects of pan-histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on cancer cells have shown that HDACs are involved in fundamental tumor biological processes such as cell cycle control, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, because of the unselective nature of these compounds, little is known about the contribution of individual HDAC family members to tumorigenesis and progression. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of individual HDACs in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We have investigated the mRNA expression of all HDAC1-11 family members in a large cohort of primary neuroblastoma samples covering the full spectrum of the disease. HDACs associated with disease stage and survival were subsequently functionally evaluated in cell culture models. Only HDAC8 expression was significantly correlated with advanced disease and metastasis and down-regulated in stage 4S neuroblastoma associated with spontaneous regression. High HDAC8 expression was associated with poor prognostic markers and poor overall and event-free survival. The knockdown of HDAC8 resulted in the inhibition of proliferation, reduced clonogenic growth, cell cycle arrest, and differentiation in cultured neuroblastoma cells. The treatment of neuroblastoma cell lines as well as short-term-culture neuroblastoma cells with an HDAC8-selective small-molecule inhibitor inhibited cell proliferation and clone formation, induced differentiation, and thus reproduced the HDAC8 knockdown phenotype. Global histone 4 acetylation was not affected by HDAC8 knockdown or by selective inhibitor treatment. Our data point toward an important role of HDAC8 in neuroblastoma pathogenesis and identify this HDAC family member as a specific drug target for the differentiation therapy of neuroblastoma.

  20. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Modulate the Transcriptional Regulation of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription. PMID:24451378

  1. Changes in histone acetylation as potential mediators of pupal diapause in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, J A; Bautista-Jimenez, Robin; Denlinger, D L

    2016-09-01

    The growing appreciation that epigenetic processes are integral to the responses of many organisms to changes in the environment suggests a possible role for epigenetics in coordination of insect diapause. The results we present suggest that histone modification may be one type of epigenetic process that contributes to regulation of pupal diapause in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata. Reduction in total histone H3 acetylation in diapausing pupae, shifts in mRNA expression profiles of genes encoding histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) in pre-diapause, diapause and post-diapause flies compared to their nondiapause counterparts, and alterations in HDAC enzyme activity during and post-diapause lend support to the hypothesis that this specific type of histone modification is involved in regulating diapause programming, maintenance, and termination. Transcription of genes encoding HDAC1, HDAC3, HDAC6, and Sirtuin2 were all upregulated in photosensitive first instar larvae programmed to enter pupal diapause, suggesting that histone deacetylation may be linked to the early decision to enter diapause. A 50% reduction in transcription of hdac3 and a corresponding 30% reduction in HDAC activity during diapause suggest that removal of acetyl groups from histones primarily occurs prior to diapause entry and that further histone deacetylation is not necessary to maintain diapause. Transcription of the HDAC genes was quickly elevated when diapause was terminated, followed by an increase in enzyme activity after a short delay. A maternal effect operating in these flies prevents pupal diapause in progeny whose mothers experienced pupal diapause, even if the progeny are reared in strong diapause-inducing short-day conditions. Such nondiapausing pupae had HDAC transcription profiles nearly identical to the profiles seen in nondiapausing pupae generated under a long-day photoperiod. Together, these results provide consistent evidence for histone acetylation

  2. Histones and their modifications in ovarian cancer – drivers of disease and therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Joy Marsh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of the gynecological malignancies. High grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC is the most common subtype, with the majority of women presenting with advanced disease where 5 year survival is around 25%. Platinum-based chemotherapy in combination with paclitaxel remains the most effective treatment despite platinum therapies being introduced almost 40 years ago. Advances in molecular medicine are underpinning new strategies for the treatment of cancer. Major advances have been made by international initiatives to sequence cancer genomes. For SEOC, with the exception of TP53 that is mutated in virtually 100% of these tumors, there is no other gene mutated at high frequency. There is extensive copy number variation, as well as changes in methylation patterns that will influence gene expression. To date, the role of histones and their post-translational modifications in ovarian cancer is a relatively understudied field. Post-translational histone modifications play major roles in gene expression as they direct the configuration of chromatin and so access by transcription factors. Histone modifications include methylation, acetylation and monoubiquitination, with involvement of enzymes including histone methyl transferases (HMTases, histone acetyltransferases/deacetylases and ubiquitin ligases/deubiquitinases respectively. Complexes such as the Polycomb Repressive Complex also play roles in the control of histone modifications and more recently roles for long non-coding (lnc RNA and microRNAs (miRNAs are emerging. Epigenomic-based therapies targeting histone modifications are being developed and offer new approaches for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Here we discuss histone modifications and their aberrant regulation in malignancy and specifically in ovarian cancer. We review current and upcoming histone-based therapies that have the potential to inform and improve treatment strategies for

  3. A PHD in histone language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Sundaravelpandian, Kalaipandian; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histones are important for various DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. We recently reported that the ALFIN LIKE 6 (AL6) gene, identified in a forward genetic screen, is critical for phosphate deficiency-induced root hair formation and several other processes associated with the regulation of cellular phosphate homeostasis. AL6 contains a Plant Homeo Domain (PHD) finger that can bind to trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3). Homozygous mutants defective in AL6 expression form very short root hairs under phosphate-deficient conditions, presumably caused by altered expression of putative primary and secondary down-stream targets of AL6. In this Addendum, we speculate about possible roles of AL6, H3K4 trimethylation and other chromatin modifications in the adaptation of plants to low phosphate availability. PMID:23531693

  4. Role of histone deacetylase activity in the developing lateral line neuromast of zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yingzi; Mei, Honglin; Yu, Huiqian; Sun, Shan; Ni, Wenli; Li, Huawei

    2014-05-09

    Histone deacetylases are involved in many biological processes and have roles in regulating cell behaviors such as cell cycle entry, cell proliferation and apoptosis. However, the effect of histone deacetylases on the development of hair cells (HCs) has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined the influence of histone deacetylases on the early development of neuromasts in the lateral line of zebrafish. Hair cell development was evaluated by fluorescent immunostaining in the absence or presence of histone deacetylase inhibitors. Our results suggested that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases with inhibitors, including trichostatin A, valproic acid and MS-275, reduced the numbers of both HCs and supporting cells in neuromasts. We also found that the treatment of zebrafish larvae with inhibitors caused accumulation of histone acetylation and suppressed proliferation of neuromast cells. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of both p21 and p27 mRNA was increased following trichostatin A treatment and the increase in p53 mRNA was modest under the same conditions. However, the expression of p53 mRNA was significantly increased by treatment with a high concentration of trichostatin A. A high concentration of trichostatin A also led to increased cell death in neuromasts as detected in a TUNEL assay. Moreover, the nuclei of most of these pyknotic cells were immunohistochemically positive for cleaved caspase-3. These results suggest that histone deacetylase activity is involved in lateral line development in the zebrafish and might have a role in neuromast formation by altering cell proliferation through the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins.

  5. Distinct self-interaction domains promote Multi Sex Combs accumulation in and formation of the Drosophila histone locus body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzo, Esteban A.; Lyons, Shawn M.; Poulton, John S.; Temple, Brenda R. S.; Marzluff, William F.; Duronio, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear bodies (NBs) are structures that concentrate proteins, RNAs, and ribonucleoproteins that perform functions essential to gene expression. How NBs assemble is not well understood. We studied the Drosophila histone locus body (HLB), a NB that concentrates factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis at the replication-dependent histone gene locus. We coupled biochemical analysis with confocal imaging of both fixed and live tissues to demonstrate that the Drosophila Multi Sex Combs (Mxc) protein contains multiple domains necessary for HLB assembly. An important feature of this assembly process is the self-interaction of Mxc via two conserved N-terminal domains: a LisH domain and a novel self-interaction facilitator (SIF) domain immediately downstream of the LisH domain. Molecular modeling suggests that the LisH and SIF domains directly interact, and mutation of either the LisH or the SIF domain severely impairs Mxc function in vivo, resulting in reduced histone mRNA accumulation. A region of Mxc between amino acids 721 and 1481 is also necessary for HLB assembly independent of the LisH and SIF domains. Finally, the C-terminal 195 amino acids of Mxc are required for recruiting FLASH, an essential histone mRNA-processing factor, to the HLB. We conclude that multiple domains of the Mxc protein promote HLB assembly in order to concentrate factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis. PMID:25694448

  6. Distribution of introns in fungal histone genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong-Soo Yun

    Full Text Available Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina lack intron in their histone genes, except for an intron in one of histone H4 genes of Yarrowia lipolytica. On the other hand, Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina have introns in their histone genes. We compared the distributions of 81, 47, 79, and 98 introns in the fungal histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 genes, respectively. Based on the multiple alignments of the amino acid sequences of histones, we identified 19, 13, 31, and 22 intron insertion sites in the histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 genes, respectively. Surprisingly only one hot spot of introns in the histone H2A gene is shared between Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina, suggesting that most of introns of Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina were acquired independently. Our findings suggest that the common ancestor of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota maybe had a few introns in the histone genes. In the course of fungal evolution, Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina lost the histone introns; Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina acquired other introns independently. In addition, most of the introns have sequence similarity among introns of phylogenetically close species, strongly suggesting that horizontal intron transfer events between phylogenetically distant species have not occurred recently in the fungal histone genes.

  7. Distribution of introns in fungal histone genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Nishida, Hiromi

    2011-01-27

    Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina lack intron in their histone genes, except for an intron in one of histone H4 genes of Yarrowia lipolytica. On the other hand, Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina have introns in their histone genes. We compared the distributions of 81, 47, 79, and 98 introns in the fungal histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 genes, respectively. Based on the multiple alignments of the amino acid sequences of histones, we identified 19, 13, 31, and 22 intron insertion sites in the histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 genes, respectively. Surprisingly only one hot spot of introns in the histone H2A gene is shared between Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina, suggesting that most of introns of Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina were acquired independently. Our findings suggest that the common ancestor of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota maybe had a few introns in the histone genes. In the course of fungal evolution, Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina lost the histone introns; Basidiomycota and Perizomycotina acquired other introns independently. In addition, most of the introns have sequence similarity among introns of phylogenetically close species, strongly suggesting that horizontal intron transfer events between phylogenetically distant species have not occurred recently in the fungal histone genes.

  8. Histone Acetylation in Fungal Pathogens of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyun Jeon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation of histone lysine residues occurs in different organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals for the regulation of diverse cellular processes. With the identification of enzymes that create or reverse this modification, our understanding on histone acetylation has expanded at an amazing pace during the last two decades. In fungal pathogens of plants, however, the importance of such modification has only just begun to be appreciated in the recent years and there is a dearth of information on how histone acetylation is implicated in fungal pathogenesis. This review covers the current status of research related to histone acetylation in plant pathogenic fungi and considers relevant findings in the interaction between fungal pathogens and host plants. We first describe the families of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Then we provide the cases where histone acetylation was investigated in the context of fungal pathogenesis. Finally, future directions and perspectives in epigenetics of fungal pathogenesis are discussed.

  9. Basic nuclear processes affected by histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legartová, Soňa; Stixová, Lenka; Strnad, Hynek; Kozubek, Stanislav; Martinet, Nadine; Dekker, Frank J; Franek, Michal; Bártová, Eva

    AIM: The optimal balance between histone acetylation and deacetylation is important for proper gene function. Therefore, we addressed how inhibitors of histone-modifying enzymes can modulate nuclear events, including replication, transcription, splicing and DNA repair. MATERIALS & METHODS: Changes

  10. Histone displacement during nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinant, C.; Bartek, J.; Bekker-Jensen, S.

    2012-01-01

    chromatin. The condensed nature of chromatin inhibits many DNA metabolizing activities, including NER. In order to promote efficient repair, detection of a lesion not only has to activate the NER pathway but also chromatin remodeling. In general, such remodeling is thought on the one hand to precede NER...... of histone variants and histone displacement (including nucleosome sliding). Here we review current knowledge, and speculate about current unknowns, regarding those chromatin remodeling activities that physically displace histones before, during and after NER....

  11. Live Cell Imaging of Endogenous mRNA Using RNA-Based Fluorescence "Turn-On" Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wei Qiang; Citron, Y Rose; Sekine, Sayaka; Huang, Bo

    2017-01-20

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) plays a critical role in cellular growth and development. However, there have been limited methods available to visualize endogenous mRNA in living cells with ease. We have designed RNA-based fluorescence "turn-on" probes that target mRNA by fusing an unstable form of Spinach with target-complementary sequences. These probes have been demonstrated to be selective, stable, and capable of targeting various mRNAs for live E. coli imaging.

  12. Aberrant histone modification in CD19+ B cells of the patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Keshu Zhou, Qing Zhang, Yanyan Liu, Yuanyuan Xiong, Shengsheng Wu, Jingke Yang, Hu Zhou, Xinjian Liu, Xudong Wei, Yongping Song Department of Hematology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The aim of this study was to detect the alterations in histone methylation and acetylation in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Global histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4/H3K9 methylation were detected by the EpiQuik™ global histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4/H3K9 methylation assay kits. The mRNA expression of selected chromatin modifier genes was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Our results found that the global histone H3/H4 hypoacetylation in the CD19+ B cells of patients with CLL (P=0.028 and P=0.03, respectively and the global histone H3K9 methylation in patients with CLL were significantly increased compared with controls (P=0.02, while there was no significant difference in the global histone H3K4 methylation between the two groups. The level of SIRT1 and EZH2 mRNA expression was upregulated in patients with CLL (P=0.03 and P=0.02, respectively, which increased significantly with progression from Binet stage A to stage C (P=0.015 and P=0.01, respectively and Rai good to high risk stage (P=0.007 and P=0.008, respectively. The level of HDAC1 and HDAC7 mRNA expression was significantly increased (P=0.02 and P=0.008, respectively and HDAC2 and P300 mRNA expression was reduced in patients with CLL (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively. In conclusion, it is observed that the aberrant histone modification plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CLL. Keywords: histone methylation, histone acetylation, SIRT1, EZH2, CLL

  13. Peptide microarrays to interrogate the "histone code".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbart, Scott B; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D; Fuchs, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) play a pivotal role in regulating the dynamics and function of chromatin. Supported by an increasing body of literature, histone PTMs such as methylation and acetylation function together in the context of a "histone code," which is read, or interpreted, by effector proteins that then drive a functional output in chromatin (e.g., gene transcription). A growing number of domains that interact with histones and/or their PTMs have been identified. While significant advances have been made in our understanding of how these domains interact with histones, a wide number of putative histone-binding motifs have yet to be characterized, and undoubtedly, novel domains will continue to be discovered. In this chapter, we provide a detailed method for the construction of combinatorially modified histone peptides, microarray fabrication using these peptides, and methods to characterize the interaction of effector proteins, antibodies, and the substrate specificity of histone-modifying enzymes. We discuss these methods in the context of other available technologies and provide a user-friendly approach to enable the exploration of histone-protein-enzyme interactions and function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  15. Both H4K20 mono-methylation and H3K56 acetylation mark transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hanna [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chang Seob [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan, 614-822 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoonjung, E-mail: jjungii@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Daeyoup, E-mail: daeyoup@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-05

    Nucleosome dynamics facilitated by histone turnover is required for transcription as well as DNA replication and repair. Histone turnover is often associated with various histone modifications such as H3K56 acetylation (H3K56Ac), H3K36 methylation (H3K36me), and H4K20 methylation (H4K20me). In order to correlate histone modifications and transcription-dependent histone turnover, we performed genome wide analyses for euchromatic regions in G2/M-arrested fission yeast. The results show that transcription-dependent histone turnover at 5′ promoter and 3′ termination regions is directly correlated with the occurrence of H3K56Ac and H4K20 mono-methylation (H4K20me1) in actively transcribed genes. Furthermore, the increase of H3K56Ac and H4K20me1 and antisense RNA production was observed in the absence of the histone H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) that are involved in the suppression of histone turnover within the coding regions. These results together indicate that H4K20me1 as well as H3K56Ac are bona fide marks for transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast.

  16. How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshon, B.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hallau, K. G.; Solomon, S. C.; Vanhala, H.; Weir, H. M.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach (Epo) Team

    2010-12-01

    How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science In the film The Last Starfighter, an alien civilization grooms their future champion—a kid on Earth—using a video game. As he gains proficiency in the game, he masters the skills he needs to pilot a starship and save their civilization. The NASA MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team is using the same tactic to train citizen scientists to help the Science Team explore the planet Mercury. We are building a new series of games that appear to be designed primarily for fun, but that guide players through a knowledge and skill set that they will need for future science missions in support of MESSENGER mission scientists. As players score points, they gain expertise. Once they achieve a sufficiently high score, they will be invited to become participants in Mercury Zoo, a new program being designed by Zooniverse. Zooniverse created Galaxy Zoo and Moon Zoo, programs that allow interested citizens to participate in the exploration and interpretation of galaxy and lunar data. Scientists use the citizen interpretations to further refine their exploration of the same data, thereby narrowing their focus and saving precious time. Mercury Zoo will be designed with input from the MESSENGER Science Team. This project will not only support the MESSENGER mission, but it will also add to the growing cadre of informed members of the public available to help with other citizen science projects—building on the concept that engaged, informed citizens can help scientists make new discoveries. The MESSENGER EPO Team comprises individuals from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE); Center for Educational Resources (CERES) at Montana State University (MSU) - Bozeman; National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE); Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL); National Air and Space Museum (NASM); Science

  17. Protein phosphatase 1 regulates the histone code for long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshibu, Kyoko; Gräff, Johannes; Beullens, Monique; Heitz, Fabrice D; Berchtold, Dominik; Russig, Holger; Farinelli, Mélissa; Bollen, Mathieu; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2009-10-14

    Chromatin remodeling through histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and DNA methylation has recently been implicated in cognitive functions, but the mechanisms involved in such epigenetic regulation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a critical regulator of chromatin remodeling in the mammalian brain that controls histone PTMs and gene transcription associated with long-term memory. Our data show that PP1 is present at the chromatin in brain cells and interacts with enzymes of the epigenetic machinery including HDAC1 (histone deacetylase 1) and histone demethylase JMJD2A (jumonji domain-containing protein 2A). The selective inhibition of the nuclear pool of PP1 in forebrain neurons in transgenic mice is shown to induce several histone PTMs that include not only phosphorylation but also acetylation and methylation. These PTMs are residue-specific and occur at the promoter of genes important for memory formation like CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) and NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB). These histone PTMs further co-occur with selective binding of RNA polymerase II and altered gene transcription, and are associated with improved long-term memory for objects and space. Together, these findings reveal a novel mechanism for the epigenetic control of gene transcription and long-term memory in the adult brain that depends on PP1.

  18. Histone H3 gene in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793: molecular and cytogenetic characterisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Bouilly

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793 (2n = 20 is an economically important mollusc species cultured throughout the world. The most frequently used technique for molecular cytogenetic studies is fluorescence in situ hybridisation which offers new opportunities for the identification of oyster chromosomes. In oysters, it has been used to locate telomeric sequences, satellite DNA, simple sequence repeats, ribosomal RNA genes, and bacteriophage P1 clones. However, regarding chromosome identification, no study has been done with histone H3 gene. Histone H3 is among the most conserved eukaryotic proteins. Most histone H3 genes are repeatedly organised into clusters, which make them an ideal chromosomal marker. In bivalves, some data exist concerning sequence information but little knowledge is available concerning the physical mapping of histone genes. The histone H3 gene was sequenced in C. gigas and phylogenetic analysis revealed that C. gigas was more closely related to Ostrea edulis Linnaeus, 1758 and species of the genus Mytilus Linnaeus, 1758. In C. gigas, the histone H3 gene was mapped on two different pairs of chromosomes, one at an interstitial site on the long arm of chromosome pair 4, and the other on the telomeres of the smaller chromosome pair (pair 10. Polymorphism was detected on the telomeres of pair 10, once it was possible to observe single or double signals. Comparative chromosomal mapping should improve our understanding of bivalve genome organisation.

  19. Acetate supplementation modulates brain histone acetylation and decreases interleukin-1β expression in a rat model of neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman Mahmoud L

    2012-03-01

    and mRNA levels were increased by 1.3- and 10-fold, respectively, and acetate supplementation reduced this expression to control levels. Conclusion Based on these results, we conclude that dietary acetate supplementation attenuates neuroglial activation by effectively reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by a mechanism that may involve a distinct site-specific pattern of histone acetylation and histone deacetylase expression in the brain.

  20. EGO-1, a C. elegans RdRP, Modulates Gene Expression via Production of mRNA-Templated Short Antisense RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniar, Jay M.; Fire, Andrew Z.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background The development of the germline in Caenorhabditis elegans is a complex process involving the regulation of thousands of genes in a coordinated manner. Several genes required for small RNA biogenesis and function are among those required for the proper organization of the germline. EGO-1 is a putative RNA-directed RNA polymerase (RdRP) that is required for multiple aspects of C. elegans germline development and efficient RNAi of germline-expressed genes. RdRPs have been proposed to act through a variety of mechanisms including the post-transcriptional targeting of specific mRNAs as well as through a direct interaction with chromatin. Despite extensive investigation, the molecular role of EGO-1 has remained enigmatic. Results Here we use high-throughput small RNA and messenger RNA sequencing to investigate EGO-1 function. We found that EGO-1 is required to produce a distinct pool of small RNAs antisense to a number of germline-expressed mRNAs through several developmental stages. These potential mRNA targets fall into distinct classes, including genes required for kinetochore and nuclear pore assembly, histone-modifying activities and centromeric proteins. We also found several RNAi-related genes to be targets of EGO-1. Finally, we show a strong association between the loss of small RNAs and the rise of mRNA levels in ego-1(−) animals. Conclusions Our data support the conclusion that EGO-1 produces triphosphorylated small RNAs derived from mRNA templates and that these small RNAs modulate gene expression through the targeting of their cognate mRNAs. PMID:21396820

  1. Histone crosstalk between H3S10ph and H4K16ac generates a histone code that mediates transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippo, Alessio; Serafini, Riccardo; Rocchigiani, Marina; Pennacchini, Susanna; Krepelova, Anna; Oliviero, Salvatore

    2009-09-18

    The phosphorylation of the serine 10 at histone H3 has been shown to be important for transcriptional activation. Here, we report the molecular mechanism through which H3S10ph triggers transcript elongation of the FOSL1 gene. Serum stimulation induces the PIM1 kinase to phosphorylate the preacetylated histone H3 at the FOSL1 enhancer. The adaptor protein 14-3-3 binds the phosphorylated nucleosome and recruits the histone acetyltransferase MOF, which triggers the acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16ac). This histone crosstalk generates the nucleosomal recognition code composed of H3K9acS10ph/H4K16ac determining a nucleosome platform for the bromodomain protein BRD4 binding. The recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) via BRD4 induces the release of the promoter-proximal paused RNA polymerase II and the increase of its processivity. Thus, the single phosphorylation H3S10ph at the FOSL1 enhancer triggers a cascade of events which activate transcriptional elongation.

  2. Ethanol precipitation analysis of thymus histone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvoet, P.

    1957-01-01

    An analytical ethanol precipitation technique, similar to 's salting-out procedure, was used for the characterisation of whole thymus histone and the products obtained by preparative ethanol fractionation. The analysis was carried out at —5° C and pH 6.5. Whole histone prepared according to et al.,

  3. Histone acetyl transferases as emerging drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J.; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational modifications, such as acetylation or phosphorylation, play a crucial role in the regulation of gene transcription in eukaryotes. Different subtypes of histone acetyl transferases (HATs) catalyze the acetylation of histones on specific lysine residues. A potential role of HATs in

  4. POEMMA: Probe Of Extreme Multi-Messenger Astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olinto, A. V.; Adams, J. H.; Aloisio, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Probe Of Extreme Multi-Messenger Astrophysics (POEMMA) mission is being designed to establish charged-particle astronomy with ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and to observe cosmogenic tau neutrinos (CTNs). The study of UHECRs and CTNs from space will yield orders-of-magnitude increase...

  5. Structural genomics of histone tail recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghua; Mok, Man Wai; Harper, Hong; Lee, Wen Hwa; Min, Jinrong; Knapp, Stefan; Oppermann, Udo; Marsden, Brian; Schapira, Matthieu

    2010-10-15

    The structural genomics of histone tail recognition web server is an open access resource that presents within mini articles all publicly available experimental structures of histone tails in complex with human proteins. Each article is composed of interactive 3D slides that dissect the structural mechanism underlying the recognition of specific sequences and histone marks. A concise text html-linked to interactive graphics guides the reader through the main features of the interaction. This resource can be used to analyze and compare binding modes across multiple histone recognition modules, to evaluate the chemical tractability of binding sites involved in epigenetic signaling and design small molecule inhibitors. http://www.thesgc.org/resources/histone_tails/ matthieu.schapira@utoronto.ca Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis and Endometrial Adenocarcinoma Express High Levels of Myostatin and Its Receptors Messenger RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrarelli, Patrizia; Funghi, Lucia; Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Centini, Gabriele; Reis, Fernando M; Dela Cruz, Cynthia; Mattei, Alberto; Vannuccini, Silvia; Petraglia, Felice

    2017-12-01

    Myostatin is a growth factor member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, which is known to play major roles in cell proliferation and differentiation. The present study investigated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of myostatin and myostatin receptors (activin receptor-like kinase 4 [ALK4], transforming growth factor (TGF)-β type I receptor kinase [ALK5] and activin receptor type IIB [ActRIIB]) in endometrium of healthy women during menstrual cycle as well as in benign (endometriosis, polyps) and malignant (endometrial adenocarcinoma) conditions. Endometrial specimens were collected by hysteroscopy, whereas endometriotic lesions were collected by laparoscopy, and adenocarcinomas were sampled after hysterectomy. Total RNA was extracted from tissue homogenates, and gene expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Myostatin and myostatin receptors mRNAs were expressed by healthy endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle, with no differences between the proliferative and secretory phase. The highest myostatin mRNA expression was found in patients with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) and in endometrial carcinoma; expression was also found in ovarian endometrioma (OMA ) and endometrial polyps. Myostatin receptors mRNA expression was higher in DIE and adenocarcinomas compared to control endometrium. The expression of ALK5 and ActRIIB in OMA was higher than in controls, whereas polyps had an increased expression of ALK5 mRNA. In conclusion, the present data showed for the first time the expression of myostatin in healthy endometrium and a higher expression in endometriosis and endometrial cancer, suggesting myostatin involvement in human endometrial physiology and related pathologies.

  8. Histone deacetylases (HDACs and brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude-Henry Volmar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of gene expression is a constant and necessary event for mammalian brain function. An important way of regulating gene expression is through the remodeling of chromatin, the complex of DNA, and histone proteins around which DNA wraps. The “histone code hypothesis” places histone post-translational modifications as a significant part of chromatin remodeling to regulate transcriptional activity. Acetylation of histones by histone acetyl transferases and deacetylation by histone deacetylases (HDACs at lysine residues are the most studied histone post-translational modifications in cognition and neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we review the literature regarding the role of HDACs in brain function. Among the roles of HDACs in the brain, studies show that they participate in glial lineage development, learning and memory, neuropsychiatric diseases, and even rare neurologic diseases. Most HDACs can be targeted with small molecules. However, additional brain-penetrant specific inhibitors with high central nervous system exposure are needed to determine the cause-and-effect relationship between individual HDACs and brain-associated diseases.

  9. Histone demethylases in development and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Histone modifications serve as regulatory marks that are instrumental for the control of transcription and chromatin architecture. Strict regulation of gene expression patterns is crucial during development and differentiation, where diverse cell types evolve from common predecessors. Since...... the first histone lysine demethylase was discovered in 2004, a number of demethylases have been identified and implicated in the control of gene expression programmes and cell fate decisions. Histone demethylases are now emerging as important players in developmental processes and have been linked to human...

  10. Structure of the exon junction core complex with a trapped DEAD-box ATPase bound to RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Ballut, Lionel; Johansen, Jesper Sanderhoff

    2006-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, a multiprotein exon junction complex is deposited on spliced messenger RNAs. The complex is organized around a stable core, which serves as a binding platform for numerous factors that influence messenger RNA function. Here, we present the crystal structure of a tetrameric e...

  11. Intranuclear and higher-order chromatin organization of the major histone gene cluster in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Andrew J; Ghule, Prachi N; Boyd, Joseph R; Tye, Coralee E; Page, Natalie A; Hong, Deli; Shirley, David J; Weinheimer, Adam S; Barutcu, Ahmet R; Gerrard, Diana L; Frietze, Seth; van Wijnen, Andre J; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Imbalzano, Anthony N; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2018-02-01

    Alterations in nuclear morphology are common in cancer progression. However, the degree to which gross morphological abnormalities translate into compromised higher-order chromatin organization is poorly understood. To explore the functional links between gene expression and chromatin structure in breast cancer, we performed RNA-seq gene expression analysis on the basal breast cancer progression model based on human MCF10A cells. Positional gene enrichment identified the major histone gene cluster at chromosome 6p22 as one of the most significantly upregulated (and not amplified) clusters of genes from the normal-like MCF10A to premalignant MCF10AT1 and metastatic MCF10CA1a cells. This cluster is subdivided into three sub-clusters of histone genes that are organized into hierarchical topologically associating domains (TADs). Interestingly, the sub-clusters of histone genes are located at TAD boundaries and interact more frequently with each other than the regions in-between them, suggesting that the histone sub-clusters form an active chromatin hub. The anchor sites of loops within this hub are occupied by CTCF, a known chromatin organizer. These histone genes are transcribed and processed at a specific sub-nuclear microenvironment termed the major histone locus body (HLB). While the overall chromatin structure of the major HLB is maintained across breast cancer progression, we detected alterations in its structure that may relate to gene expression. Importantly, breast tumor specimens also exhibit a coordinate pattern of upregulation across the major histone gene cluster. Our results provide a novel insight into the connection between the higher-order chromatin organization of the major HLB and its regulation during breast cancer progression. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Increased phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 is involved in Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1-induced carcinogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binbin; Huang, Guoliang; Zhang, Xiangning; Li, Rong; Wang, Jian; Dong, Ziming; He, Zhiwei

    2013-03-18

    Increased histone H3 phosphorylation is an essential regulatory mechanism for neoplastic cell transformation. We aimed to explore the role of histone H3 phosphorylation at serine10 (p-H3Ser10) in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1)-induced carcinogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The expression of p-H3Ser10 was detected by the immunohistochemical analysis in NPC, chronic nasopharyngitis and normal nasopharynx tissues, and its correlation with LMP1 was analyzed in NPC tissues and cell lines. Using the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-H3 and histone H3 mutant (S10A), the effect of histone H3 Ser10 motif on LMP1-induced CNE1 cell proliferation, transformation and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation were evaluated by CCK-8, focus-forming and reporter gene assay respectively. Mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) kinase activity and phosphorylation were detected by in vitro kinase assay and western blot. Using MSK1 inhibitor H89 or siRNA-MSK1, the regulatory role of MSK1 on histone H3 phosphorylation and AP-1 activation were analyzed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of p-H3Ser10 was significantly higher in the poorly differentiated NPC tissues than that in chronic nasopharyngitis (p histone H3 suppressed LMP1-induced CNE1 cell proliferation, foci formation and AP-1 activation. In addition, LMP1 could increase MSK1 kinase activity and phosphorylation. MSK1 inhibitor H89 or knockdown of MSK1 by siRNA blocked LMP1-induced phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 and AP-1 activation. EBV-LMP1 can induce phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 via MSK1. Increased phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 is likely a crucial regulatory mechanism involved in LMP1-induced carcinogenesis of NPC.

  13. The epigenetic effects of aspirin: the modification of histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation in the prevention of colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate sodium-treated CF-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yue; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Chengyue; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Li, Wenji; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. Chronic inflammation appears to enhance the risk of CRC. Emerging evidence has suggested that epigenetic mechanisms play an important role in CRC. Aspirin [acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)] has been shown to prevent CRC; however, the epigenetic mechanisms of its action remain unknown. This study investigated the protective role of ASA in azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-promoted colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) and examined the epigenetic effects, particularly on histone 3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac), underlying the preventive effect of ASA. CF-1 mice were fed with AIN-93M diet with or without 0.02% ASA from 1 week prior to AOM initiation until the mice were killed 20 weeks after AOM injection. Our results showed that AOM/DSS + ASA significantly suppressed inflammatory colitis symptoms and tumor multiplicity. AOM/DSS + ASA reduced AOM/DSS-induced protein expression and the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and globally restored H3K27ac. Furthermore, AOM/DSS + ASA inhibited AOM/DSS-induced enrichment of H3K27ac in the promoters of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) that corresponded to the dramatic suppression of the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels. Surprisingly, no significant changes in the H3K27ac abundance in the prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (Cox-2) promoters or in the Cox-2 mRNA and protein expression were observed. Collectively, our results suggest that a potential novel epigenetic mechanism underlies the chemopreventive effects of ASA, and this mechanism attenuates CAC in AOM/DSS-induced CF-1 mice via the inhibition of HDACs and the modification of H3K27ac marks that suppress iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Molecular mechanisms and potential functions of histone demethylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne Marije; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Histone modifications are thought to regulate chromatin structure, transcription and other nuclear processes. Histone methylation was originally believed to be an irreversible modification that could only be removed by histone eviction or by dilution during DNA replication. However, the isolation...... of two families of enzymes that can demethylate histones has changed this notion. The biochemical activities of these histone demethylases towards specific Lys residues on histones, and in some cases non-histone substrates, have highlighted their importance in developmental control, cell-fate decisions...

  15. Light third-generation squarks from flavour gauge messengers

    CERN Document Server

    Brümmer, Felix; Weiler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We study models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with a gauged horizontal SU(3)_F symmetry acting on the quark superfields. If SU(3)_F is broken non-supersymmetrically by F-term vacuum expectation values, the massive gauge bosons and gauginos become messengers for SUSY breaking mediation. These gauge messenger fields induce a flavour-dependent, negative contribution to the soft masses of the squarks at one loop. In combination with the soft terms from standard gauge mediation, one obtains large and degenerate first- and second-generation squark masses, while the stops and sbottoms are light. We discuss the implications of this mechanism for the superparticle spectrum and for flavour precision observables. We also provide an explicit realization in a model with simultaneous SUSY and SU(3)_F breaking.

  16. The models evaluating courier and messenger companies in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chodakowska Ewa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA is a well-established, popular, and often used method for efficiency evaluation of units from all sector, both commercial and non-profit organisations, of any scale of operations. Network DEA models are a relatively recent approach used to examine the efficiency of decision-making units (DMUs having an internal structure of sub-processes. The article presents the concept of DEA network models in estimating the efficiency of courier and messenger companies with relations to their business clients. The considerations are supported by an example of data concerning leaders from the sector of couriers and messengers in Poland and one of the biggest and most popular online stores. The results are compared with the traditional DEA approach. In addition, to measure reliability for DEA scores, the jackknife procedure was performed. The author proves the usefulness of network DEA as a research and management tool.

  17. Mercury's exosphere: observations during MESSENGER's First Mercury flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E; Bradley, E Todd; Vervack, Ronald J; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Izenberg, Noam R; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-04

    During MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measured Mercury's exospheric emissions, including those from the antisunward sodium tail, calcium and sodium close to the planet, and hydrogen at high altitudes on the dayside. Spatial variations indicate that multiple source and loss processes generate and maintain the exosphere. Energetic processes connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric interaction with the planet likely played an important role in determining the distributions of exospheric species during the flyby.

  18. In vitro targeting reveals intrinsic histone tail specificity of the Sin3/histone deacetylase and N-CoR/SMRT corepressor complexes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.; Carrozza, MJ; Lasonder, E.; Workman, JL; Logie, C.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2004-01-01

    The histone code is among others established via differential acetylation catalyzed by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). To unambiguously determine the histone tail specificity of HDAC-containing complexes, we have established an in vitro system consisting of

  19. Function of histone deacetylase inhibitors in inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabiec, Aleksander M.; Tak, Paul P.; Reedquist, Kris A.

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) display multi-faceted roles in coordinating the interaction of intracellular signaling pathways with chromatin remodeling and transcription factor function to finely specify gene alterations and maintenance of gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation,

  20. Molecular dynamics of histone H1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raghuram, Nikhil; Carrero, Gustavo; Thng, John; Hendzel, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    .... In this review, we focus on the wealth of information gathered on the molecular kinetics of histone H1 molecules using novel imaging techniques, such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching...

  1. The emerging functions of histone demethylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Karl; Christensen, Jesper; Cloos, Paul Ac

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic information refers to heritable changes in gene function that are stable between cell divisions but which is not a result of changes in the DNA sequence. Part of the epigenetic mechanism has been ascribed to modifications of histones or DNA that affects the transcription of specific...... genes. In this context, post-translational modifications of histone tails, in particular methylation of lysines, are regarded as important for the storage of epigenetic information. Regulation of this information plays an important role during cellular differentiation where cells with different....... The recent identification of proteins with histone demethylase activity has shown that the methylated mark is much more dynamic than previously anticipated, thereby potentially challenging the concept of histone-methylation in stable epigenetic programming....

  2. The Morphology of Craters on Mercury: Results from MESSENGER Flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnouin, Oliver S.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Herrick, Robert R.; Chappelow, John E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Prockter, Louise M.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic data measured from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft were used for investigations of the relationship between depth and diameter for impact craters on Mercury. Results using data from the MESSENGER flybys of the innermost planet indicate that most of the craters measured with MLA are shallower than those previously measured by using Mariner 10 images. MDIS images of these same MLA-measured craters show that they have been modified. The use of shadow measurement techniques, which were found to be accurate relative to the MLA results, indicate that both small bowl-shaped and large complex craters that are fresh possess depth-to-diameter ratios that are in good agreement with those measured from Mariner 10 images. The preliminary data also show that the depths of modified craters are shallower relative to fresh ones, and might provide quantitative estimates of crater in-filling by subsequent volcanic or impact processes. The diameter that defines the transition from simple to complex craters on Mercury based on MESSENGER data is consistent with that reported from Mariner 10 data.

  3. Mercury's Sodium Exosphere: Observations during the MESSENGER Orbital Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Burger, Matthew H.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; McClintock, William E.; Benna, Mehdi; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered into orbit about Mercury on March 18,2011. We now have approximately five Mercury years of data from orbit. Prior to the MESSENGER mission, Mercury's surface-bounded exosphere was known to contain H, He, Na. K, and Ca. The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) began routine orbital observations of both the dayside and nightside exosphere on March 29. 2011, measuring altitude profiles for all previously detected neutral species except for He and K. We focus here on what we have learned about the sodium exosphere: its spatial, seasonal, and sporadic variation. Observations to date permit delineation of the relative roles of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and impact vaporization (IV) from seasonal and spatial effects, as well as of the roles of ions both as sputtering agents and in their possible role to enhance the efficiency of PSD. Correlations of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere with measurements from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) provide insight into the roles of ions and electrons. Models incorporating MAG observations provide a basis for identifying the location and area of the surface exposed to solar wind plasma, and EPPS observations reveal episodic populations of energetic electrons in the magnetosphere and the presence of planetary He(+), 0(+), and Na(+),

  4. Cracking the survival code: autophagy-related histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Heldring, Nina; Hermanson, Ola; Joseph, Bertrand

    2014-04-01

    Modifications of histones, the chief protein components of the chromatin, have emerged as critical regulators of life and death. While the "apoptotic histone code" came to light a few years ago, accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy, a cell survival pathway, is also heavily regulated by histone-modifying proteins. In this review we describe the emerging "autophagic histone code" and the role of histone modifications in the cellular life vs. death decision.

  5. Nucleosome Dancing at the Tempo of Histone Tail Acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Galvani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of histone acetylation on transcription was revealed over 50 years ago by Allfrey and colleagues. However, it took decades for an understanding of the fine mechanism by which this posttranslational modification affects chromatin structure and promotes transcription. Here, we review breakthroughs linking histone tail acetylation, histone dynamics, and transcription. We also discuss the histone exchange during transcription and highlight the important function of a pool of non-chromatinized histones in chromatin dynamics.

  6. Nucleosome Dancing at the Tempo of Histone Tail Acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvani, Angélique; Thiriet, Christophe

    2015-07-15

    The impact of histone acetylation on transcription was revealed over 50 years ago by Allfrey and colleagues. However, it took decades for an understanding of the fine mechanism by which this posttranslational modification affects chromatin structure and promotes transcription. Here, we review breakthroughs linking histone tail acetylation, histone dynamics, and transcription. We also discuss the histone exchange during transcription and highlight the important function of a pool of non-chromatinized histones in chromatin dynamics.

  7. Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli infection in triatomine vectors by amplification of the histone H2A/SIRE and the sno-RNA-C11 genes Detecção da infecção por Trypanosoma cruzi e Trypanosoma rangeli em vetores triatomíneos através da amplificação dos gens de histona H2A/SIRE e sno-RNA-C11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ximena Pavia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma rangeli is non pathogenic for humans but of important medical and epidemiological interest because it shares vertebrate hosts, insect vectors, reservoirs and geographic areas with T. cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. Therefore, in this work, we set up two PCR reactions, TcH2AF/R and TrFR2, to distinguish T. cruzi from T. rangeli in mixed infections of vectors based on amplification of the histone H2A/SIRE and the small nucleolar RNA Cl1 genes, respectively. Both PCRs were able to appropriately detect all T. cruzi or T. rangeli experimentally infected-triatomines, as well as the S35/S36 PCR which amplifies the variable region of minicircle kDNA of T. cruzi. In mixed infections, whereas T. cruzi DNA was amplified in 100% of samples with TcH2AF/R and S35/S36 PCRs, T. rangeli was detected in 71% with TrF/R2 and in 6% with S35/S36. In a group of Rhodnius colombiensis collected from Coyaima (Colombia, T. cruzi was identified in 100% with both PCRs and T. rangeli in 14% with TrF/R2 and 10% with S35/S36 PCR. These results show that TcH2AF/R and TrF/R2 PCRs which are capable of recognizing all T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains and lineages could be useful for diagnosis as well as for epidemiological field studies of T. cruzi and T. rangeli vector infections.Embora o Trypanosoma rangeli não seja patogênico para o homem, sua importância médica e epidemiológica reside no fato de compartilhar vetores, reservatórios e áreas geográficas com o Trypanosoma cruzi, agente causal da Doença de Chagas. Neste estudo, para distinguir T. cruzi de T. rangeli em vetores com infecções mistas, se utilizaram duas amplificações de PCR; TcH2AF/R para o gen da histona H2A/SIRE e TrFR2, para um gen repetitivo de ARN nucleolar Cl1 (sno-RNA-Cl1. Assim como a PCR S35/S36, ambas as reações foram capazes de detectar corretamente a presença de T. cruzi ou T. rangeli em triatomíneos infectados experimentalmente. Nas infecções mistas, o ADN de

  8. Histone Lysine Methylation in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-dong Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN belongs to debilitating microvascular complications of diabetes and is the leading cause of end-stage renal diseases worldwide. Furthermore, outcomes from the DCCT/EDIC study showed that DN often persists and progresses despite intensive glucose control in many diabetes patients, possibly as a result of prior episode of hyperglycemia, which is called “metabolic memory.” The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of DN remain poorly understood. Activation of multiple signaling pathways and key transcription factors can lead to aberrant expression of DN-related pathologic genes in target renal cells. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms in chromatin such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and methylation can influence the pathophysiology of DN and metabolic memory. Exciting researches from cell culture and experimental animals have shown that key histone methylation patterns and the related histone methyltransferases and histone demethylases can play important roles in the regulation of inflammatory and profibrotic genes in renal cells under diabetic conditions. Because histone methylation is dynamic and potentially reversible, it can provide a window of opportunity for the development of much-needed novel therapeutic potential for DN in the future. In this minireview, we discuss recent advances in the field of histone methylation and its roles in the pathogenesis and progression of DN.

  9. Deciphering the histone code using mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberheide, Beatrix M.; Mollah, Sahana

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, studies surrounding chromatin research have grown exponentially. A major focus of chromatin biology is centered on understanding of how histone modifications alter chromatin structure at the molecular and mechanistic levels. Discoveries are being made at a rapid pace due to the advent of new and innovative techniques. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool in the field of histone research due to its speed, sensitivity, and ease of use. This has resulted in the identification of a number of novel histone modification sites. In consequence, new roles in biological processes have been discovered and hypothetical models, such as the `histone code' have been reaffirmed or refined. One significant advantage to using mass spectrometric techniques is that the combinations of modifications on different sites can be determined which is crucial to deciphering the `histone code'. In this manuscript, the mass spectrometric approaches developed over the past decade for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are discussed.

  10. Characterization of miRNA Expression in Human Degenerative Lumbar Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohrt-Nissen, Søren; Døssing, Kristina B V; Rossing, Maria

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ∼22 nucleotide RNA sequences that regulate messengerRNA translation. miRNAs have shown to play a role in synthesis of inflammatory mediators. Since inflammation play a role in intervertebral disk (IVD) degeneration, the objective was to isolate miRNA from human lumbar...

  11. A histone-mimicking interdomain linker in a multidomain protein modulates multivalent histone binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrhon, Sebastian; Kontaxis, Georg; Kaufmann, Tanja; Schirghuber, Erika; Kubicek, Stefan; Konrat, Robert; Slade, Dea

    2017-10-27

    N-terminal histone tails are subject to many posttranslational modifications that are recognized by and interact with designated reader domains in histone-binding proteins. BROMO domain adjacent to zinc finger 2B (BAZ2B) is a multidomain histone-binding protein that contains two histone reader modules, a plant homeodomain (PHD) and a bromodomain (BRD), linked by a largely disordered linker. Although previous studies have reported specificity of the PHD domain for the unmodified N terminus of histone H3 and of the BRD domain for H3 acetylated at Lys14 (H3K14ac), the exact mode of H3 binding by BAZ2B and its regulation are underexplored. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy, we report that acidic residues in the BAZ2B PHD domain are essential for H3 binding and that BAZ2B PHD-BRD establishes a polyvalent interaction with H3K14ac. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the disordered interdomain linker modulates the histone-binding affinity by interacting with the PHD domain. In particular, lysine-rich stretches in the linker, which resemble the positively charged N terminus of histone H3, reduce the binding affinity of the PHD finger toward the histone substrate. Phosphorylation, acetylation, or poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of the linker residues may therefore act as a cellular mechanism to transiently tune BAZ2B histone-binding affinity. Our findings further support the concept of interdomain linkers serving a dual role in substrate binding by appropriately positioning the adjacent domains and by electrostatically modulating substrate binding. Moreover, inhibition of histone binding by a histone-mimicking interdomain linker represents another example of regulation of protein-protein interactions by intramolecular mimicry. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Pattern of change in histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation and histone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pattern of change in histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation and histone deacetylases in development of zebrafish embryo. Yanning Li Junxia Wang Ying Xie Shufeng Liu Ye ... Wang1 Ying Xie1 Shufeng Liu1 Ye Tian1. Hebei Key Lab of Laboratory Animal, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050017, People's Republic of China ...

  13. Replication stress interferes with histone recycling and predeposition marking of new histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasencakova, Zuzana; Scharf, Annette N D; Ask, Katrine

    2010-01-01

    To restore chromatin on new DNA during replication, recycling of histones evicted ahead of the fork is combined with new histone deposition. The Asf1 histone chaperone, which buffers excess histones under stress, is a key player in this process. Yet how histones handled by human Asf1 are modified...... remains unclear. Here we identify marks on histones H3-H4 bound to Asf1 and changes induced upon replication stress. In S phase, distinct cytosolic and nuclear Asf1b complexes show ubiquitous H4K5K12diAc and heterogeneous H3 marks, including K9me1, K14ac, K18ac, and K56ac. Upon acute replication arrest......, the predeposition mark H3K9me1 and modifications typical of chromatin accumulate in Asf1 complexes. In parallel, ssDNA is generated at replication sites, consistent with evicted histones being trapped with Asf1. During recovery, histones stored with Asf1 are rapidly used as replication resumes. This shows...

  14. Protection of specific maternal messenger RNAs by the P body protein CGH-1 (Dhh1/RCK) during Caenorhabditis elegans oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boag, Peter R.; Atalay, Arzu; Robida, Stacey; Reinke, Valerie; Blackwell, T. Keith

    2008-01-01

    During oogenesis, numerous messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are maintained in a translationally silenced state. In eukaryotic cells, various translation inhibition and mRNA degradation mechanisms congregate in cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies). The P body protein Dhh1 inhibits translation and promotes decapping-mediated mRNA decay together with Pat1 in yeast, and has been implicated in mRNA storage in metazoan oocytes. Here, we have investigated in Caenorhabditis elegans whether Dhh1 and Pat1 generally function together, and how they influence mRNA sequestration during oogenesis. We show that in somatic tissues, the Dhh1 orthologue (CGH-1) forms Pat1 (patr-1)-dependent P bodies that are involved in mRNA decapping. In contrast, during oogenesis, CGH-1 forms patr-1–independent mRNA storage bodies. CGH-1 then associates with translational regulators and a specific set of maternal mRNAs, and prevents those mRNAs from being degraded. Our results identify somatic and germ cell CGH-1 functions that are distinguished by the involvement of PATR-1, and reveal that during oogenesis, numerous translationally regulated mRNAs are specifically protected by a CGH-1–dependent mechanism. PMID:18695045

  15. N6-methyl-adenosine (m6A) in RNA: an old modification with a novel epigenetic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yamei; Zhao, Xu; Wu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Ming-Ming; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2013-02-01

    N(6)-methyl-adenosine (m(6)A) is one of the most common and abundant modifications on RNA molecules present in eukaryotes. However, the biological significance of m(6)A methylation remains largely unknown. Several independent lines of evidence suggest that the dynamic regulation of m(6)A may have a profound impact on gene expression regulation. The m(6)A modification is catalyzed by an unidentified methyltransferase complex containing at least one subunit methyltransferase like 3 (METTL3). m(6)A modification on messenger RNAs (mRNAs) mainly occurs in the exonic regions and 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) as revealed by high-throughput m(6)A-seq. One significant advance in m(6)A research is the recent discovery of the first two m(6)A RNA demethylases fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene and ALKBH5, which catalyze m(6)A demethylation in an α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)- and Fe(2+)-dependent manner. Recent studies in model organisms demonstrate that METTL3, FTO and ALKBH5 play important roles in many biological processes, ranging from development and metabolism to fertility. Moreover, perturbation of activities of these enzymes leads to the disturbed expression of thousands of genes at the cellular level, implicating a regulatory role of m(6)A in RNA metabolism. Given the vital roles of DNA and histone methylations in epigenetic regulation of basic life processes in mammals, the dynamic and reversible chemical m(6)A modification on RNA may also serve as a novel epigenetic marker of profound biological significances. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Interaction between the Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) and DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Pedersen, LB; Koehler, JF

    1993-01-01

    The gene encoding the Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) from serovar L2 was cloned into Escherichia coli by use of expression vector pET11d. In this vector, transcription of the gene is under the control of a bacteriophage T7 promoter, and T7 RNA polymerase is inducible in the h......The gene encoding the Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) from serovar L2 was cloned into Escherichia coli by use of expression vector pET11d. In this vector, transcription of the gene is under the control of a bacteriophage T7 promoter, and T7 RNA polymerase is inducible...

  17. The roles of ncRNAs and histone-modifiers in regulating breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiju Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer stem cells (CSCs, a subpopulation of cancer cells with ability of initiating tumorigenesis, exist in many kinds of tumors including breast cancer. Cancer stem cells contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. Conventional treatments only kill differentiated cancer cells, but spare CSCs. Combining conventional treatments with therapeutic drugs targeting to CSCs will eradicate cancer cells more efficiently. Studying the molecular mechanisms of CSCs regulation is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies. Growing evidences showed CSCs are regulated by non-coding RNA (ncRNA including microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, and histone-modifiers, such as let-7, miR-93, miR-100, HOTAIR, Bmi-1 and EZH2. Herein we review the roles of microRNAs, lncRNAs and histone-modifiers especially Polycomb family proteins in regulating breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs.

  18. Involvement of second messengers in regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auwerx, J.H. (Leuven Univ. (Belgium). ECHEM Labs.); Chait, A.; Wolfbauer, G.; Deeb, S.S. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA). Dept. of Medicine)

    1989-06-01

    Transcription of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene in the human monocytic leukemic cell line THP-1 and in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line Hep-G2 is regulated by second messengers of the diacylglycerol-protein kinase C (DAG-PKC), inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-Ca/sup 2+/, and cyclic AMP pathways. Exogeneous phospholipase C (which releases DAG and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate), PKC activators (phorbol esters and DAG), Ca/sup 2+/ ionophores, and a cyclic AMP analog all transiently induced accumulation of LDL-R mRNA. The effects of these three signal-transducing pathways were to a large extend additive. Furthermore, PKC stimulation effected an increase in LDL binding, which suggested that the increase in LDL-R mRNA resulted in an increase in functional cell surface receptor activity. These results suggest that uptake of cholesterol by these cells is under control of both intracellular cholesterol levels and external signals.

  19. eIF3 targets cell-proliferation messenger RNAs for translational activation or repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy S Y; Kranzusch, Philip J; Cate, Jamie H D

    2015-06-04

    Regulation of protein synthesis is fundamental for all aspects of eukaryotic biology by controlling development, homeostasis and stress responses. The 13-subunit, 800-kilodalton eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) organizes initiation factor and ribosome interactions required for productive translation. However, current understanding of eIF3 function does not explain genetic evidence correlating eIF3 deregulation with tissue-specific cancers and developmental defects. Here we report the genome-wide discovery of human transcripts that interact with eIF3 using photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP). eIF3 binds to a highly specific program of messenger RNAs involved in cell growth control processes, including cell cycling, differentiation and apoptosis, via the mRNA 5' untranslated region. Surprisingly, functional analysis of the interaction between eIF3 and two mRNAs encoding the cell proliferation regulators c-JUN and BTG1 reveals that eIF3 uses different modes of RNA stem-loop binding to exert either translational activation or repression. Our findings illuminate a new role for eIF3 in governing a specialized repertoire of gene expression and suggest that binding of eIF3 to specific mRNAs could be targeted to control carcinogenesis.

  20. Acetylation on histone H3 lysine 9 mediates a switch from transcription initiation to elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Leah A; Shi, Jiejun; Rohira, Aarti D; Feng, Qin; Zhu, Bokai; Bedford, Mark T; Sagum, Cari A; Jung, Sung Yun; Qin, Jun; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Tsai, Sophia Y; Li, Wei; Foulds, Charles E; O'Malley, Bert W

    2017-09-01

    The transition from transcription initiation to elongation is a key regulatory step in gene expression, which requires RNA polymerase II (pol II) to escape promoter proximal pausing on chromatin. Although elongation factors promote pause release leading to transcription elongation, the role of epigenetic modifications during this critical transition step is poorly understood. Two histone marks on histone H3, lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac), co-localize on active gene promoters and are associated with active transcription. H3K4me3 can promote transcription initiation, yet the functional role of H3K9ac is much less understood. We hypothesized that H3K9ac may function downstream of transcription initiation by recruiting proteins important for the next step of transcription. Here, we describe a functional role for H3K9ac in promoting pol II pause release by directly recruiting the super elongation complex (SEC) to chromatin. H3K9ac serves as a substrate for direct binding of the SEC, as does acetylation of histone H4 lysine 5 to a lesser extent. Furthermore, lysine 9 on histone H3 is necessary for maximal pol II pause release through SEC action, and loss of H3K9ac increases the pol II pausing index on a subset of genes in HeLa cells. At select gene promoters, H3K9ac loss or SEC depletion reduces gene expression and increases paused pol II occupancy. We therefore propose that an ordered histone code can promote progression through the transcription cycle, providing new mechanistic insight indicating that SEC recruitment to certain acetylated histones on a subset of genes stimulates the subsequent release of paused pol II needed for transcription elongation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The histone acetyltransferase MOF overexpression blunts cardiac hypertrophy by targeting ROS in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Weiwei; Zhang, Weili; Gai, Yusheng; Zhao, Lan; Fan, Juexin

    2014-06-13

    Imbalance between histone acetylation/deacetylation critically participates in the expression of hypertrophic fetal genes and development of cardiac hypertrophy. While histone deacetylases play dual roles in hypertrophy, current evidence reveals that histone acetyltransferase such as p300 and PCAF act as pro-hypertrophic factors. However, it remains elusive whether some histone acetyltransferases can prevent the development of hypertrophy. Males absent on the first (MOF) is a histone acetyltransferase belonging to the MYST (MOZ, Ybf2/Sas3, Sas2 and TIP60) family. Here in this study, we reported that MOF expression was down-regulated in failing human hearts and hypertrophic murine hearts at protein and mRNA levels. To evaluate the roles of MOF in cardiac hypertrophy, we generated cardiac-specific MOF transgenic mice. MOF transgenic mice did not show any differences from their wide-type littermates at baseline. However, cardiac-specific MOF overexpression protected mice from transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-induced cardiac hypertrophy, with reduced radios of heart weight (HW)/body weight (BW), lung weight/BW and HW/tibia length, decreased left ventricular wall thickness and increased fractional shortening. We also observed lower expression of hypertrophic fetal genes in TAC-challenged MOF transgenic mice compared with that of wide-type mice. Mechanically, MOF overexpression increased the expression of Catalase and MnSOD, which blocked TAC-induced ROS and ROS downstream c-Raf-MEK-ERK pathway that promotes hypertrophy. Taken together, our findings identify a novel anti-hypertrophic role of MOF, and MOF is the first reported anti-hypertrophic histone acetyltransferase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew A; Chabner, Bruce A

    2009-11-10

    Epigenetic processes are implicated in cancer causation and progression. The acetylation status of histones regulates access of transcription factors to DNA and influences levels of gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity diminishes acetylation of histones, causing compaction of the DNA/histone complex. This compaction blocks gene transcription and inhibits differentiation, providing a rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors. In this review, we explore the biology of the HDAC enzymes, summarize the pharmacologic properties of HDAC inhibitors, and examine results of selected clinical trials. We consider the potential of these inhibitors in combination therapy with targeted drugs and with cytotoxic chemotherapy. HDAC inhibitors promote growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis of tumor cells, with minimal effects on normal tissue. In addition to decompaction of the histone/DNA complex, HDAC inhibition also affects acetylation status and function of nonhistone proteins. HDAC inhibitors have demonstrated antitumor activity in clinical trials, and one drug of this class, vorinostat, is US Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Other inhibitors in advanced stages of clinical development, including depsipeptide and MGCD0103, differ from vorinostat in structure and isoenzyme specificity, and have shown activity against lymphoma, leukemia, and solid tumors. Promising preclinical activity in combination with cytotoxics, inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, and inhibitors of proteasome function have led to combination therapy trials. HDAC inhibitors are an important emerging therapy with single-agent activity against multiple cancers, and have significant potential in combination use.

  3. Detection of histone modifications in plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskiewicz, Michal; Peterhansel, Christoph; Conrath, Uwe

    2011-09-23

    Chromatin structure is important for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. In this process, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, and covalent modifications on the amino-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 play essential roles(1-2). H3 and H4 histone modifications include methylation of lysine and arginine, acetylation of lysine, and phosphorylation of serine residues(1-2). These modifications are associated either with gene activation, repression, or a primed state of gene that supports more rapid and robust activation of expression after perception of appropriate signals (microbe-associated molecular patterns, light, hormones, etc.)(3-7). Here, we present a method for the reliable and sensitive detection of specific chromatin modifications on selected plant genes. The technique is based on the crosslinking of (modified) histones and DNA with formaldehyde(8,9), extraction and sonication of chromatin, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with modification-specific antibodies(9,10), de-crosslinking of histone-DNA complexes, and gene-specific real-time quantitative PCR. The approach has proven useful for detecting specific histone modifications associated with C(4;) photosynthesis in maize(5,11) and systemic immunity in Arabidopsis(3).

  4. A Test of General Relativity with MESSENGER Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, A.; Mazarico, E.; Goossens, S. J.; Lemoine, F. G.; Neumann, G. A.; Nicholas, J. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Solomon, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft initiated collection of scientific data from the innermost planet during its first flyby of Mercury in January 2008. After two additional Mercury flybys, MESSENGER was inserted into orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011 and operated for more than four Earth years through 30 April 2015. Data acquired during the flyby and orbital phases have provided crucial information on the formation and evolution of Mercury. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and the radio science system, for example, obtained geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury, which helped constrain its surface and deep interior structure. X-band radio tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, as well as refinement of the planet's obliquity and estimation of the tidal Love number k2. These geophysical parameters are derived from the range-rate observables that measure precisely the motion of the spacecraft in orbit around the planet. However, the DSN stations acquired two other kinds of radio tracking data, range and delta-differential one-way ranging, which also provided precise measurements of Mercury's ephemeris. The proximity of Mercury's orbit to the Sun leads to a significant perihelion precession, which was used by Einstein as confirmation of general relativity (GR) because of its inconsistency with the effects predicted from classical Newtonian theory. MESSENGER data allow the estimation of the GR parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) coefficients γ and β. Furthermore, determination of Mercury's orbit also allows estimation of the gravitational parameter (GM) and the flattening (J2) of the Sun. We modified our orbit determination software, NASA GSFC's GEODYN II, to enable simultaneous orbit integration of both MESSENGER and the planet Mercury. The

  5. Mercury's complex exosphere: results from MESSENGER's third flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervack, Ronald J; McClintock, William E; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Anderson, Brian J; Burger, Matthew H; Bradley, E Todd; Mouawad, Nelly; Solomon, Sean C; Izenberg, Noam R

    2010-08-06

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer detected emission from ionized calcium concentrated 1 to 2 Mercury radii tailward of the planet. This measurement provides evidence for tailward magnetospheric convection of photoions produced inside the magnetosphere. Observations of neutral sodium, calcium, and magnesium above the planet's north and south poles reveal altitude distributions that are distinct for each species. A two-component sodium distribution and markedly different magnesium distributions above the two poles are direct indications that multiple processes control the distribution of even single species in Mercury's exosphere.

  6. Was my message read?: Privacy and Signaling on Facebook Messenger

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyle, Roberto; Das, Srijita; Kapadia, Apu; Lee, Adam J.; Vaniea, Kami

    2017-01-01

    Major online messaging services such as Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp are starting to provide users with real-time information about when people read their messages. While useful, this feature has the potential to negatively impact privacy as well as cause concern over access to self. We report on two surveys using Mechanical Turk which looked at senders' (N=402) use of and reactions to the `message seen' feature, and recipients' (N=316) privacy and signaling behaviors in the face of such v...

  7. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotnick, Edna; Sol, Asaf; Muhlrad, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III) and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  8. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Blotnick

    Full Text Available Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  9. Small molecule inhibitors of histone deacetylases and acetyltransferases as potential therapeutics in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, Thea; Leus, Niek; Timmerman, Tirza; Dekker, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis in cancer are, among others, regulated by post-translational modifications of histone proteins. The most investigated type of histone modification is lysine acetylation. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs), acetylate histone lysine residues,

  10. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misri, S; Pandita, S; Kumar, R; Pandita, T K

    2008-01-01

    Genomic stability is maintained by telomeres, the end terminal structures that protect chromosomes from fusion or degradation. Shortening or loss of telomeric repeats or altered telomere chromatin structure is correlated with telomere dysfunction such as chromosome end-to-end associations that could lead to genomic instability and gene amplification. The structure at the end of telomeres is such that its DNA differs from DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to avoid nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is accomplished by forming a unique higher order nucleoprotein structure. Telomeres are attached to the nuclear matrix and have a unique chromatin structure. Whether this special structure is maintained by specific chromatin changes is yet to be thoroughly investigated. Chromatin modifications implicated in transcriptional regulation are thought to be the result of a code on the histone proteins (histone code). This code, involving phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and sumoylation of histones, is believed to regulate chromatin accessibility either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by recruiting non-histone proteins to chromatin. The histone code in which distinct histone tail-protein interactions promote engagement may be the deciding factor for choosing specific DSB repair pathways. Recent evidence suggests that such mechanisms are involved in DNA damage detection and repair. Altered telomere chromatin structure has been linked to defective DNA damage response (DDR), and eukaryotic cells have evolved DDR mechanisms utilizing proficient DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints in order to maintain genomic stability. Recent studies suggest that chromatin modifying factors play a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability. This review will summarize the role of DNA damage repair proteins specifically ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and its effectors and the telomere complex in maintaining genome stability. Copyright 2008 S. Karger

  11. MESSENGER E/V/H/SW EPPS CALIBRATED FIPS DDR V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) calibrated observations, also known as DDRs. The system...

  12. MESSENGER E/V/H/SW EPPS CALIBRATED EPS CDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) calibrated observations, also known as CDRs. The system...

  13. MESSENGER E/V/H/SW EPPS CALIBRATED FIPS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) calibrated observations, also known as CDRs. The system...

  14. MESSENGER E/V/H/SW EPPS CALIBRATED FIPS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) calibrated observations, also known as DDRs. The system...

  15. MESSENGER E/V/H MERCURY LASER ALTIMETER 2 EDR RAW DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) uncalibrated observations, also known as Experiment Data Records, or EDRs....

  16. MESSENGER E/V/H GRNS 3 NEUTRON SPECTROMETER CDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer (NS) calibrated data records (CDRs). The NS experiment is a neutron spectrometer...

  17. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms.......Chromatin serves structural and functional roles crucial for genome stability and correct gene expression. This organization must be reproduced on daughter strands during replication to maintain proper overlay of epigenetic fabric onto genetic sequence. Nucleosomes constitute the structural...

  18. Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress Regulated by Histone Deacetylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Luo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, histone acetylation and deacetylation play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Histone acetylation levels are modulated by histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs. Recent studies indicate that HDACs play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression in plant response to environmental stress. In this review, we discussed the recent advance regarding the plant HDACs and their functions in the regulation of abiotic stress responses. The role of HDACs in autophagy was also discussed.

  19. Nucleosome Dancing at the Tempo of Histone Tail Acetylation

    OpenAIRE

    Angélique Galvani; Christophe Thiriet

    2015-01-01

    The impact of histone acetylation on transcription was revealed over 50 years ago by Allfrey and colleagues. However, it took decades for an understanding of the fine mechanism by which this posttranslational modification affects chromatin structure and promotes transcription. Here, we review breakthroughs linking histone tail acetylation, histone dynamics, and transcription. We also discuss the histone exchange during transcription and highlight the important function of a pool of non-chroma...

  20. Recent advances of histone modification in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics play important roles during development progress of tumor. The histone modifications are the most important constituted field. Recently, accumulating research focused on exploring the roles of those modifications in regulating tumorigenesis. Moreover, the dysregulation of histone modifications is supposed to have vital clinical significance. Numerous histone modifications have the potential to be prognostic biomarkers, monitoring response of therapy, early diagnostic markers. Herein, we review the recent advances of histone modifications involving development of gastric cancer.

  1. Genome-wide identification of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) histone modification gene families and their expression analysis during the fruit development and fruit-blue mold infection process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jidi; Xu, Haidan; Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Xia; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, histone acetylation and methylation have been known to be involved in regulating diverse developmental processes and plant defense. These histone modification events are controlled by a series of histone modification gene families. To date, there is no study regarding genome-wide characterization of histone modification related genes in citrus species. Based on the two recent sequenced sweet orange genome databases, a total of 136 CsHMs (Citrus sinensis histone modification genes), including 47 CsHMTs (histone methyltransferase genes), 23 CsHDMs (histone demethylase genes), 50 CsHATs (histone acetyltransferase genes), and 16 CsHDACs (histone deacetylase genes) were identified. These genes were categorized to 11 gene families. A comprehensive analysis of these 11 gene families was performed with chromosome locations, phylogenetic comparison, gene structures, and conserved domain compositions of proteins. In order to gain an insight into the potential roles of these genes in citrus fruit development, 42 CsHMs with high mRNA abundance in fruit tissues were selected to further analyze their expression profiles at six stages of fruit development. Interestingly, a numbers of genes were expressed highly in flesh of ripening fruit and some of them showed the increasing expression levels along with the fruit development. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression patterns of all 136 CsHMs response to the infection of blue mold (Penicillium digitatum), which is the most devastating pathogen in citrus post-harvest process. The results indicated that 20 of them showed the strong alterations of their expression levels during the fruit-pathogen infection. In conclusion, this study presents a comprehensive analysis of the histone modification gene families in sweet orange and further elucidates their behaviors during the fruit development and the blue mold infection responses. PMID:26300904

  2. Genome-wide identification of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis histone modification gene families and their expression analysis during the fruit development and fruit-blue mold infection process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jidi eXu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, histone acetylation and methylation have been known to be involved in regulating diverse developmental processes and plant defense. These histone modification events are controlled by a series of histone modification gene families. To date, there is no study regarding genome-wide characterization of histone modification related genes in citrus species. Based on the two recent sequenced sweet orange genome databases, a total of 136 CsHMs (Citrus sinensis histone modification genes, including 47 CsHMTs (histone methyltransferase genes, 23 CsHDMs (histone demethylase genes, 50 CsHATs (histone acetyltransferase genes, and 16 CsHDACs (histone deacetylase genes were identified. These genes were categorized to 11 gene families. A comprehensive analysis of these 11 gene families was performed with chromosome locations, phylogenetic comparison, gene structures and conserved domain compositions of proteins. In order to gain an insight into the potential roles of these genes in citrus fruit development, 42 CsHMs with high mRNA abundance in fruit tissues were selected to further analyze their expression profiles at six stages of fruit development. Interestingly, a numbers of genes were expressed highly in flesh of ripening fruit and some of them showed the increasing expression levels along with the fruit development. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression patterns of all 136 CsHMs response to the infection of blue mold (Penicillium digitatum, which is the most devastating pathogen in citrus postharvest process. The results indicated that 20 of them showed the strong alterations of their expression levels during the fruit-pathogen infection. In conclusion, this study presents a comprehensive analysis of the histone modification gene families in sweet orange and further elucidates their behaviors during the fruit development and the blue mold infection responses.

  3. NF-κB inducing kinase, NIK mediates cigarette smoke/TNFα-induced histone acetylation and inflammation through differential activation of IKKs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwoon Chung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear factor (NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK is a central player in the non-canonical NF κB pathway, which phosphorylates IκB kinase α (IKKα resulting in enhancement of target gene expression. We have recently shown that IKKα responds to a variety of stimuli including oxidants and cigarette smoke (CS regulating the histone modification in addition to its role in NF-κB activation. However, the primary signaling mechanism linking CS-mediated oxidative stress and TNFα with histone acetylation and pro-inflammatory gene transcription is not well understood. We hypothesized that CS and TNFα increase NIK levels causing phosphorylation of IKKα, which leads to histone acetylation. METHODOLOGY: To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether NIK mediates effects of CS and TNFα on histone acetylation in human lung epithelial cells in vitro and in lungs of mouse exposed to CS in vivo. CS increased the phosphorylation levels of IKKα/NIK in lung epithelial cells and mouse lungs. NIK is accumulated in the nuclear compartment, and is recruited to the promoters of pro-inflammatory genes, to induce posttranslational acetylation of histones in response to CS and TNFα. Cells in which NIK is knocked down using siRNA showed partial attenuation of CSE- and TNFα-induced acetylation of histone H3 on pro-inflammatory gene promoters. Additional study to determine the role of IKKβ/NF-κB pathway in CS-induced histone acetylation suggests that the canonical pathway does not play a role in histone acetylation particularly in response to CS in mouse lungs. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our findings provide a novel role for NIK in CS- and TNFα-induced histone acetylation, especially on histone H3K9.

  4. Cloning and Functional Analysis of Histones H3 and H4 in Nuclear Shaping during Spermatogenesis of the Chinese Mitten Crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Li Wu

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis in most animals, the basic proteins associated with DNA are continuously changing and somatic-typed histones are partly replaced by sperm-specific histones, which are then successively replaced by transition proteins and protamines. With the replacement of sperm nuclear basic proteins, nuclei progressively undergo chromatin condensation. The Chinese Mitten Crab (Eriocheir sinensis is also known as the hairy crab or river crab (phylum Arthropoda, subphylum Crustacea, order Decapoda, and family Grapsidae. The spermatozoa of this species are aflagellate, and each has a spherical acrosome surrounded by a cup-shaped nucleus, peculiar to brachyurans. An interesting characteristic of the E. sinensis sperm nucleus is its lack of electron-dense chromatin. However, its formation is not clear. In this study, sequences encoding histones H3 and H4 were cloned by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Western blotting indicated that H3 and H4 existed in the sperm nuclei. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry demonstrated that histones H3 and H4 were both present in the nuclei of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, spermatids and mature spermatozoa. The nuclear labeling density of histone H4 decreased in sperm nuclei, while histone H3 labeling was not changed significantly. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the mRNA expression levels of histones H3 and H4 were higher at mitotic and meiotic stages than in later spermiogenesis. Our study demonstrates that the mature sperm nuclei of E. sinensis contain histones H3 and H4. This is the first report that the mature sperm nucleus of E. sinensis contains histones H3 and H4. This finding extends the study of sperm histones of E. sinensis and provides some basic data for exploring how decapod crustaceans form uncondensed sperm chromatin.

  5. Histone methyltransferase 1 regulates the encystation process in the parasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salusso, Agostina; Zlocowski, Natacha; Mayol, Gonzalo F; Zamponi, Nahuel; Rópolo, Andrea S

    2017-08-01

    In eukaryotes, histone lysine methylation is associated with either active or repressed chromatin states, depending on the status of methylation. Even when the amino-terminus of Giardia lamblia histones diverges from other organisms, these regions contain lysine residues that are potential targets for methylation. When we examined the role of the histone methyltransferase 1 (HMT1) in the regulation of the encystation process by giardial histone methyltransferase 1 (GlHMT1) overexpression or downregulation, we observed an increase or a decrease in cyst production, respectively, compared to wild-type trophozoites. A time-lapse analysis of encystation showed that overexpression of GlHMT1 induced an earlier and faster process than in wild-type cells together with an upregulation of mRNA expression of cyst wall proteins. Subcellular localization studies indicated that GlHMT1-hemaglutinin was mainly associated with the nuclear and perinuclear region in both growing and encysting parasites, in agreement with bioinformatics analyses showing that GlHMT-1 possesses nuclear localization signals in addition to the classical SU(var)3-9, Enhancer-of-Zeste, Trithorax (SET), and post-SET domains. Altogether, these findings suggest that the function of HMT1 is critical for the success and timing of the encystation process, and reinforce the idea that epigenetic marks are critical for cyst formation in G. lamblia. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Histone deacetylases suppress CGG repeat-induced neurodegeneration via transcriptional silencing in models of fragile X tremor ataxia syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Todd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS is a common inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5'UTR of the fragile X syndrome (FXS gene, FMR1. The expanded CGG repeat is thought to induce toxicity as RNA, and in FXTAS patients mRNA levels for FMR1 are markedly increased. Despite the critical role of FMR1 mRNA in disease pathogenesis, the basis for the increase in FMR1 mRNA expression is unknown. Here we show that overexpressing any of three histone deacetylases (HDACs 3, 6, or 11 suppresses CGG repeat-induced neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of FXTAS. This suppression results from selective transcriptional repression of the CGG repeat-containing transgene. These findings led us to evaluate the acetylation state of histones at the human FMR1 locus. In patient-derived lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, we determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation that there is increased acetylation of histones at the FMR1 locus in pre-mutation carriers compared to control or FXS derived cell lines. These epigenetic changes correlate with elevated FMR1 mRNA expression in pre-mutation cell lines. Consistent with this finding, histone acetyltransferase (HAT inhibitors repress FMR1 mRNA expression to control levels in pre-mutation carrier cell lines and extend lifespan in CGG repeat-expressing Drosophila. These findings support a disease model whereby the CGG repeat expansion in FXTAS promotes chromatin remodeling in cis, which in turn increases expression of the toxic FMR1 mRNA. Moreover, these results provide proof of principle that HAT inhibitors or HDAC activators might be used to selectively repress transcription at the FMR1 locus.

  7. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers duri...

  8. Trichostatin A induced histone acetylation causes decondensation of interphase chromatin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); M. Frank-Stöhr (Monika); M. Stöhr (Michael); C.P. Bacher (Christian); K. Rippe (Karsten)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of trichostatin A (TSA)-induced histone acetylation on the interphase chromatin structure was visualized in vivo with a HeLa cell line stably expressing histone H2A, which was fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. The globally increased histone acetylation caused a

  9. ADP-ribosylation of histones by ARTD1: an additional module of the histone code?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottiger, Michael O

    2011-06-06

    ADP-ribosylation is a covalent post-translational protein modification catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases and is involved in important processes such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, replication or transcription. Histones are ADP-ribosylated by ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 at specific amino acid residues, in particular lysines, of the histones tails. Specific ADP-ribosyl hydrolases and poly-ADP-ribose glucohydrolases degrade the ADP-ribose polymers. The ADP-ribose modification is read by zinc finger motifs or macrodomains, which then regulate chromatin structure and transcription. Thus, histone ADP-ribosylation may be considered an additional component of the histone code. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Expanding the Reader Landscape of Histone Acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abid; Bridgers, Joseph B; Strahl, Brian D

    2017-04-04

    In this issue of Structure,Klein et al. (2017) expand our understanding of what reader domains bind to by showing that MORF, a double PHD domain containing lysine acetyltransferase, is a preferential reader of histone lysine acylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Histone deacetylases in memory and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Jay; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2014-12-09

    Over the past 30 years, lysine acetylation of histone and nonhistone proteins has become established as a key modulator of gene expression regulating numerous aspects of cell biology. Neuronal growth and plasticity are no exception; roles for lysine acetylation and deacetylation in brain function and dysfunction continue to be uncovered. Transcriptional programs coupling synaptic activity to changes in gene expression are critical to the plasticity mechanisms underlying higher brain functions. These transcriptional programs can be modulated by changes in histone acetylation, and in many cases, transcription factors and histone-modifying enzymes are recruited together to plasticity-associated genes. Lysine acetylation, catalyzed by lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), generally promotes cognitive performance, whereas the opposing process, catalyzed by histone lysine deacetylases (HDACs), appears to negatively regulate cognition in multiple brain regions. Consistently, mutation or deregulation of different KATs or HDACs contributes to neurological dysfunction and neurodegeneration. HDAC inhibitors have shown promise as a treatment to combat the cognitive decline associated with aging and neurodegenerative disease, as well as to ameliorate the symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, among others. In this review, we discuss the evidence for the roles of HDACs in cognitive function as well as in neurological disorders and disease. In particular, we focus on HDAC2, which plays a central role in coupling lysine acetylation to synaptic plasticity and mediates many of the effects of HDAC inhibition in cognition and disease. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Another twist in the histone memory code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josselyn, Sheena; Frankland, Paul W

    2015-02-01

    Transcription is a highly regulated process and several studies have examined the role of transcription factors and various epigenetic regulators in memory formation. In a recent paper in Nature, Zokvic and colleagues show an important role for a novel regulator of chromatin structure (the incorporation of histone variants) in memory formation.

  13. Single-Molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) of Circular RNA CDR1as.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocks, Christine; Boltengagen, Anastasiya; Piwecka, Monika; Rybak-Wolf, Agnieszka; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2018-01-01

    Individual mRNA molecules can be imaged in fixed cells by hybridization with multiple, singly labeled oligonucleotide probes, followed by computational identification of fluorescent signals. This approach, called single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (smRNA FISH), allows subcellular localization and absolute quantification of RNA molecules in individual cells. Here, we describe a simple smRNA FISH protocol for two-color imaging of a circular RNA, CDR1as, simultaneously with an unrelated messenger RNA. The protocol can be adapted to circRNAs that coexist with overlapping, noncircular mRNA isoforms produced from the same genetic locus.

  14. Endometriosis is characterized by a distinct pattern of histone 3 and histone 4 lysine modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Janice B; Colón-Díaz, Maricarmen; García, Miosotis; Gutierrez, Sylvia; Colón, Mariano; Seto, Edward; Laboy, Joaquín; Flores, Idhaliz

    2014-03-01

    The histone modification patterns in endometriosis have not been fully characterized. This gap in knowledge results in a poor understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms (and potential therapeutic targets) at play. We aimed to (1) assess global acetylation status of histone 3 (H3) and histone 4 (H4), (2) measure levels of H3 and H4 lysine (K) acetylation and methylation, and (3) to identify histone acetylation patterns in promoter regions of candidate genes in tissues from patients and controls. Global and K-specific acetylation/methylation levels of histones were measured in 24 lesions, 15 endometrium from patients, and 26 endometrium from controls. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the histone acetylation status of the promoter regions of candidate genes in tissues. The lesions were globally hypoacetylated at H3 (but not H4) compared to eutopic endometrium from controls. Lesions had significantly lower levels of H3K9ac and H4K16ac compared to eutopic endometrium from patients and controls. Tissues from patients were hypermethylated at H3K4, H3K9, and H3K27 compared to endometrium from controls. The ChIP analysis showed hypoacetylation of H3/H4 within promoter regions of candidate genes known to be downregulated in endometriosis (e.g., HOXA10, ESR1, CDH1, and p21 (WAF1/Cip1) ) in lesions versus control endometrium. The stereoidogenic factor 1 (SF1) promoter region was enriched for acetylated H3 and H4 in lesions versus control tissues, correlating with its reported high expression in lesions. This study describes the histone code of lesions and endometrium from patients with endometriosis and provides support for a possible role of histone modification in modulation of gene expression in endometriosis.

  15. dKDM2 couples histone H2A ubiquitylation to histone H3 demethylation during Polycomb group silencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Lagarou (Anna); A.B. Mohd Sarip; Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); G.E. Chalkley (Gillian); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTranscription regulation involves enzyme-mediated changes in chromatin structure. Here, we describe a novel mode of histone crosstalk during gene silencing, in which histone H2A monoubiquitylation is coupled to the removal of histone H3 Lys 36 dimethylation (H3K36me2). This pathway was

  16. Toward breaking the histone code: bayesian graphical models for histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Riten; Müller, Peter; Liang, Shoudan; Xu, Yanxun; Ji, Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Histones are proteins that wrap DNA around in small spherical structures called nucleosomes. Histone modifications (HMs) refer to the post-translational modifications to the histone tails. At a particular genomic locus, each of these HMs can either be present or absent, and the combinatory patterns of the presence or absence of multiple HMs, or the histone codes, are believed to coregulate important biological processes. We aim to use raw data on HM markers at different genomic loci to (1) decode the complex biological network of HMs in a single region, and (2) demonstrate how the HM networks differ in different regulatory regions. We suggest that these differences in network attributes form a significant link between histones and genomic functions. We develop a powerful graphical model under the Bayesian paradigm. Posterior inference is fully probabilistic, allowing us to compute the probabilities of distinct dependence patterns of the HMs using graphs. Furthermore, our model-based framework allows for easy but important extensions for inference on differential networks under various conditions, such as the different annotations of the genomic locations (eg, promoters versus insulators). We applied these models to ChIP-Seq data based on CD4+ T lymphocytes. The results confirmed many existing findings and provided a unified tool to generate various promising hypotheses. Differential network analyses revealed new insights on coregulation of HMs of transcriptional activities in different genomic regions. The use of Bayesian graphical models and borrowing strength across different conditions provide high power to infer histone networks and their differences.

  17. Disturbing the histone code in leukemia: translocations and mutations affecting histone methyl transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Martin; Bohlander, Stefan K

    2015-05-01

    Leukemia is characterized by increased numbers of blasts originating from transformed early hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Genetic alterations are widely recognized as the main drivers of oncogenic transformation. Of considerable interest are mutations affecting the writers of epigenetic marks. In this review, we focus on histone methyltransferases--enzymes that catalyze the methylation of lysine residues in core histones. Histone methylation is a tightly controlled mechanism that is responsible for both activating as well as repressing gene expression in a site-specific manner, depending on which lysine residue is methylated. Histone methyltransferases, including MLL1, DOT1L, EZH2, and SETD2 are recurrently deregulated in human leukemia, either directly by gene mutations or balanced translocations, or indirectly as components of protein complexes that are disturbed in leukemia due to alterations of the other components in these complexes. Several small molecule inhibitors of histone methyltransferases are currently being clinically evaluated for their therapeutic potential in human leukemia. These drugs reverse some of the adverse effects of aberrant histone methylation, and can induce differentiation and cell death in leukemic blasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reproducible pattern of microRNA in normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Line; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Gniadecki, Robert

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis via specific targeting of messenger RNA (mRNA). Aberrant mRNA expression contributes to pathological processes such as carcinogenesis. To take advantage of miRNA profiling in skin disease it is essential to investigate miRNA...... expression pattern in normal human skin. Here we investigated miRNA expression profiles from skin biopsies of 8 healthy volunteers taken from sun protected and mildly photo damaged skin using the modified protocol for miRNA extraction. We were able to show a constant pattern of miRNA expression between...... different individuals. We did not find any significant differences in miRNA expression between sun protected and mildly photodamaged skin. These results may be valuable for future design of studies on miRNA expression in skin disease....

  19. Germination Potential of Dormant and Nondormant Arabidopsis Seeds Is Driven by Distinct Recruitment of Messenger RNAs to Polysomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Bailly, Christophe; Leymarie, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy is a complex evolutionary trait that temporally prevents seed germination, thus allowing seedling growth at a favorable season. High-throughput analyses of transcriptomes have led to significant progress in understanding the molecular regulation of this process, but the role of posttranscriptional mechanisms has received little attention. In this work, we have studied the dynamics of messenger RNA association with polysomes and compared the transcriptome with the translatome in dormant and nondormant seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) during their imbibition at 25°C in darkness, a temperature preventing germination of dormant seeds only. DNA microarray analysis revealed that 4,670 and 7,028 transcripts were differentially abundant in dormant and nondormant seeds in the transcriptome and the translatome, respectively. We show that there is no correlation between transcriptome and translatome and that germination regulation is also largely translational, implying a selective and dynamic recruitment of messenger RNAs to polysomes in both dormant and nondormant seeds. The study of 5′ untranslated region features revealed that GC content and the number of upstream open reading frames could play a role in selective translation occurring during germination. Gene Ontology clustering showed that the functions of polysome-associated transcripts differed between dormant and nondormant seeds and revealed actors in seed dormancy and germination. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the essential role of selective polysome loading in this biological process. PMID:26019300

  20. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    CERN Document Server

    Good, S W

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER (MES) and Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MES data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed VEX data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MES, VEX, STEREO-A, STEREO-B ...

  1. Advanced LIGO and Multi-Messenger Transient Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawhan, Peter S.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The first Advanced LIGO observing run, which began in September 2015, is on track to extend the volume*time reach of the gravitational wave (GW) detector network by an order of magnitude by the end of the year. Searches for transient GW signals from compact binary mergers and other possible sources are a central part of the LIGO-Virgo science program. To enhance those searches and to try to place any detected signals into an astronomical context, we have undertaken an extensive program of partnering with observers to enable prompt transient survey correlations and follow-up observations at all wavelengths, from optical and radio telescopes on the ground to astroparticle detectors to space missions including Fermi and Swift. I will summarize the data collected from the first Advanced LIGO observing run, the transient searches being carried out, and the multi-messenger observing effort.

  2. Messenger in The Barn: networking in a learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Rutter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This case study describes the use of a synchronous communication application (MSN Messenger in a large academic computing environment. It draws on data from interviews, questionnaires and student marks to examine the link between use of the application and success measured through module marks. The relationship is not simple. Total abstainers and heavy users come out best, while medium level users do less well, indicating the influence of two factors. The discussion section suggests possible factors. The study also highlights the benefits of support and efficiency of communication that the application brings. Although there have been many studies of synchronous communication tool use in the office and in social life, this is one of the first to examine its informal use in an academic environment.

  3. Using an Instant Messenger to Learn a Foreign Language in a Peer-Tutoring Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Joeun; Yoo, Yungtai; Lee, Kyungsuk; Jung, Bokmoon; Baek, Youngkyun

    2017-01-01

    This study explores useful ways of using an instant messenger in a peer-tutoring environment when two students exchange their mother languages. Seven learners of Korean and seven Korean students learning English were paired randomly to conduct language exchange via an instant messenger, KakaoTalk. The pairs (five of male and female pair and two of…

  4. Insights into the Nature of Mercury's Exosphere: Early Results from the MESSENGER Orbital Mission Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft has been making routine observations of Mercury's exosphere since March 29, 2011. Correlations of the spatial distributions of Ca, Mg, and Na with MESSENGER magnetic field and energetic particle distribution data provide insight into the processes that populate the neutral exosphere

  5. Nitric Oxide: The Coming of the Second Messenger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferid Murad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available (Excerpt The concept of communications between cells or cell signaling dates back over 100 years to Pavlov. He discovered that neuronal signals, first generated by the smell of food and later by the ringing of a bell, enhanced gastric secretion. The neurons communicated with cells in the stomach. Today it is well established that cell signaling is a universal phenomenon, occurring throughout the body and even between unicellular organisms such as yeast, fungi, and bacteria. The molecules that are used for the purpose of communicating between cells are diverse and comprise amino acids, peptides, proteins, and other organic molecules. These molecules, which number in the hundreds, were initially called “first messengers” and are now called hormones, cytokines, growth factors, paracrine substances, neurotransmitters, and a variety of other names. These molecules find their target cell by identifying and binding to a receptor that is mostly located on the surface of the target cell. This binding ensures the specificity of the interaction, since only cells with specific receptors will bind to specific ligands. The binding of the ligand to the receptor initiates a biochemical cascade, resulting in the accumulation of an intracellular second messenger, which then goes on to trigger the desired effect on the cell. The first second messenger, which was discovered in 1957, was cyclic adenosine monophosphate, or cAMP. Others came along in the ensuing 10–15 years. Today, we know there are many such molecules, including cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, nitric oxide (NO, calcium, diacylglycerol, phosphatidylinositols, and more, some surely yet to be discovered. Many of these discoveries eventually led to a Nobel Prize.

  6. A comprehensive study of Mercury and MESSENGER orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; Rowlands, David D.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-10-01

    The MErcury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited the planet Mercury for more than 4 years. The probe started its science mission in orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system were the instruments dedicated to geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury. X-band radio-tracking range-rate data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2.The extensive range data acquired in orbit around Mercury during the science mission (from April 2011 to April 2015), and during the three flybys of the planet in 2008 and 2009, provide a powerful dataset for the investigation of Mercury's ephemeris. The proximity of Mercury's orbit to the Sun leads to a significant perihelion precession attributable to the gravitational flattening of the Sun (J2) and the Parameterized Post-Newtonian (PPN) coefficients γ and β, which describe the space curvature produced by a unit rest mass and the nonlinearity in superposition of gravity, respectively. Therefore, the estimation of Mercury's ephemeris can provide crucial information on the interior structure of the Sun and Einstein's general theory of relativity. However, the high correlation among J2, γ, and β complicates the combined recovery of these parameters, so additional assumptions are required, such as the Nordtvedt relationship η = 4β - γ - 3.We have modified our orbit determination software, GEODYN II, to enable the simultaneous integration of the spacecraft and central body trajectories. The combined estimation of the MESSENGER and Mercury orbits allowed us to determine a more accurate gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury, and the values of GM and J2 for the Sun, where G is the gravitational constant and M is the solar mass

  7. Peripheral lipopolysaccharide stimulation induces interleukin-1β messenger RNA in rat brain microglial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M.; Boddeke, H.

    1995-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 acts as an endogenous pyrogenin organisms affected by infectious diseases and has been shown to influence the activity of the central nervous system. Using in situ hybridization histochemistry, we have examined the cellular source of interleukin-1β in rat

  8. Correlation between mechanical strength of messenger RNA pseudoknots and ribosomal frameshifting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Møller; Reihani, S Nader S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2007-01-01

    the Infectious Bronchitis Virus were used, differing by one base pair in the first stem. In Escherichia coli, these two pseudoknots caused frameshifting frequencies that differed by a factor of two. We used optical tweezers to unfold the pseudoknots. The pseudoknot giving rise to the highest degree...

  9. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S

    2006-01-01

    enzymes. Here, we established that MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex through its PUA domain and recruits the density-regulated protein (DENR/DRP), containing the SUI1 translation initiation domain. Through the use of microarray analysis on polysome-associated mRNAs, we showed that up...

  10. Characterization of human endothelial cell urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor protein and messenger RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnathan, E S; Kuo, A; Karikó, K

    1990-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC) express receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). The immunochemical nature of this receptor and its relationship to u-PA receptors expressed by other cell types is unknown. Cross-linking active site-blocked u-PA to HUVEC...

  11. Alternate Splicing of CD44 Messenger RNA in Prostate Cancer Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    University of Colorado Health Science Center); to the physical necessities of the move; and to the need to recruit by advertising ; and to administrative...Chien J, Wong E, Nikes E, Noble MJ, Pantazis CG, Shah GV. Constitutive activation of stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein (Gsα-QL)-medicated...for cyclic AMP- dependent protein kinase A in calcitonin action. Int J Cancer 2005, 117:551-560. 17. Chien J, Wong E, Nikes E, Noble MJ, Pantazis CG

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta messenger RNA and protein in murine colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiting, C V; Williams, A M; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2001-01-01

    -beta1 showed that all cells produced perinuclear latent TGF-beta1. The epithelial cell basal latent protein resulted in only low levels of subepithelial active protein, which co-localized with collagen IV and laminin in diseased and control tissue. Infiltrating cells expressed very low levels of active...

  13. Translation of maternal histone mRNAs in sea urchin embryos: a test of control by 5' cap methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showman, R M; Leaf, D S; Anstrom, J A; Raff, R A

    1987-05-01

    Recent results have demonstrated the occurrence of mRNA cap methylation in the sea urchin embryo following fertilization. It has been suggested that this methylation event is responsible for the translational activation of maternal histone mRNAs in these embryos. We have used aphidicolin, an effective inhibitor of both DNA synthesis and cap methylation in cleavage stage sea urchin embryos, to examine the relationship between cap methylation and translation. At 5 micrograms/ml, a dose which rapidly abolishes DNA replication and blocks cleavage, we note no effect on recruitment or translation of maternal alpha-subtype histone mRNAs. This suggests that a postfertilization cap methylation event is not critical to the process of regulation of the translation of stored alpha-subtype histone mRNAs.

  14. Histone posttranslational modifications predict specific alternative exon subtypes in mammalian brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwen Hu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A compelling body of literature, based on next generation chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA sequencing of reward brain regions indicates that the regulation of the epigenetic landscape likely underlies chronic drug abuse and addiction. It is now critical to develop highly innovative computational strategies to reveal the relevant regulatory transcriptional mechanisms that may underlie neuropsychiatric disease. We have analyzed chromatin regulation of alternative splicing, which is implicated in cocaine exposure in mice. Recent literature has described chromatin-regulated alternative splicing, suggesting a novel function for drug-induced neuroepigenetic remodeling. However, the extent of the genome-wide association between particular histone modifications and alternative splicing remains unexplored. To address this, we have developed novel computational approaches to model the association between alternative splicing and histone posttranslational modifications in the nucleus accumbens (NAc, a brain reward region. Using classical statistical methods and machine learning to combine ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq data, we found that specific histone modifications are strongly associated with various aspects of differential splicing. H3K36me3 and H3K4me1 have the strongest association with splicing indicating they play a significant role in alternative splicing in brain reward tissue.

  15. Who Watches the Watchmen: Roles of RNA Modifications in the RNA Interference Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Samantha B; Reinsborough, Calder; Xhemalce, Blerta

    2016-07-01

    RNA levels are widely thought to be predictive of RNA function. However, the existence of more than a hundred chemically distinct modifications of RNA alone is a major indication that these moieties may impart distinct functions to subgroups of RNA molecules that share a primary sequence but display distinct RNA "epigenetic" marks. RNAs can be modified on many sites, including 5' and 3' ends, the sugar phosphate backbone, or internal bases, which collectively provide many opportunities for posttranscriptional regulation through a variety of mechanisms. Here, we will focus on how modifications on messenger and microRNAs may affect the process of RNA interference in mammalian cells. We believe that taking RNA modifications into account will not only advance our understanding of this crucial pathway in disease and cancer but will also open the path to exploiting the enzymes that "write" and "erase" them as targets for therapeutic drug development.

  16. Histone phosphorylation: a chromatin modification involved in diverse nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes.

  17. The histone chaperone HJURP is a new independent prognostic marker for luminal A breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Rocío; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Berger, Frédérique; Rehman, Haniya; Martel, Elise; Corpet, Armelle; de Koning, Leanne; Vassias, Isabelle; Wilson, Laurence O W; Meseure, Didier; Reyal, Fabien; Savignoni, Alexia; Asselain, Bernard; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with different molecular subtypes that have varying responses to therapy. An ongoing challenge in breast cancer research is to distinguish high-risk patients from good prognosis patients. This is particularly difficult in the low-grade, ER-positive luminal A tumors, where robust diagnostic tools to aid clinical treatment decisions are lacking. Recent data implicating chromatin regulators in cancer initiation and progression offers a promising avenue to develop new tools to help guide clinical decisions. Here we exploit a published transcriptome dataset and an independent validation cohort to correlate the mRNA expression of selected chromatin regulators with respect to the four intrinsic breast cancer molecular subtypes. We then perform univariate and multivariate analyses to compare the prognostic value of a panel of chromatin regulators to Ki67, a currently utilized proliferation marker. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed a gene cluster containing several histone chaperones and histone variants highly-expressed in the proliferative subtypes (basal-like, HER2-positive, luminal B) but not in the luminal A subtype. Several chromatin regulators, including the histone chaperones CAF-1 (subunits p150 and p60), ASF1b, and HJURP, and the centromeric histone variant CENP-A, associated with local and metastatic relapse and poor patient outcome. Importantly, we find that HJURP can discriminate favorable and unfavorable outcome within the luminal A subtype, outperforming the currently utilized proliferation marker Ki67, as an independent prognostic marker for luminal A patients. The integration of chromatin regulators as clinical biomarkers, in particular the histone chaperone HJURP, will help guide patient substratification and treatment options for low-risk luminal A breast carcinoma patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Independent regulation of gene expression level and noise by histone modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohuan Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The inherent stochasticity generates substantial gene expression variation among isogenic cells under identical conditions, which is frequently referred to as gene expression noise or cell-to-cell expression variability. Similar to (average expression level, expression noise is also subject to natural selection. Yet it has been observed that noise is negatively correlated with expression level, which manifests as a potential constraint for simultaneous optimization of both. Here, we studied expression noise in human embryonic cells with computational analysis on single-cell RNA-seq data and in yeast with flow cytometry experiments. We showed that this coupling is overcome, to a certain degree, by a histone modification strategy in multiple embryonic developmental stages in human, as well as in yeast. Importantly, this epigenetic strategy could fit into a burst-like gene expression model: promoter-localized histone modifications (such as H3K4 methylation are associated with both burst size and burst frequency, which together influence expression level, while gene-body-localized ones (such as H3K79 methylation are more associated with burst frequency, which influences both expression level and noise. We further knocked out the only "writer" of H3K79 methylation in yeast, and observed that expression noise is indeed increased. Consistently, dosage sensitive genes, such as genes in the Wnt signaling pathway, tend to be marked with gene-body-localized histone modifications, while stress responding genes, such as genes regulating autophagy, tend to be marked with promoter-localized ones. Our findings elucidate that the "division of labor" among histone modifications facilitates the independent regulation of expression level and noise, extend the "histone code" hypothesis to include expression noise, and shed light on the optimization of transcriptome in evolution.

  19. Mapping dynamic histone acetylation patterns to gene expression in nanog-depleted murine embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Markowetz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESC have the potential to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into any of the three germ layers. The molecular mechanisms for self-renewal, maintenance of pluripotency and lineage specification are poorly understood, but recent results point to a key role for epigenetic mechanisms. In this study, we focus on quantifying the impact of histone 3 acetylation (H3K9,14ac on gene expression in murine embryonic stem cells. We analyze genome-wide histone acetylation patterns and gene expression profiles measured over the first five days of cell differentiation triggered by silencing Nanog, a key transcription factor in ESC regulation. We explore the temporal and spatial dynamics of histone acetylation data and its correlation with gene expression using supervised and unsupervised statistical models. On a genome-wide scale, changes in acetylation are significantly correlated to changes in mRNA expression and, surprisingly, this coherence increases over time. We quantify the predictive power of histone acetylation for gene expression changes in a balanced cross-validation procedure. In an in-depth study we focus on genes central to the regulatory network of Mouse ESC, including those identified in a recent genome-wide RNAi screen and in the PluriNet, a computationally derived stem cell signature. We find that compared to the rest of the genome, ESC-specific genes show significantly more acetylation signal and a much stronger decrease in acetylation over time, which is often not reflected in a concordant expression change. These results shed light on the complexity of the relationship between histone acetylation and gene expression and are a step forward to dissect the multilayer regulatory mechanisms that determine stem cell fate.

  20. Independent regulation of gene expression level and noise by histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohuan; Li, Ke; Li, Yingshu; Zhao, Tong; Li, Ting; Yang, Yu-Fei; Qian, Wenfeng

    2017-06-01

    The inherent stochasticity generates substantial gene expression variation among isogenic cells under identical conditions, which is frequently referred to as gene expression noise or cell-to-cell expression variability. Similar to (average) expression level, expression noise is also subject to natural selection. Yet it has been observed that noise is negatively correlated with expression level, which manifests as a potential constraint for simultaneous optimization of both. Here, we studied expression noise in human embryonic cells with computational analysis on single-cell RNA-seq data and in yeast with flow cytometry experiments. We showed that this coupling is overcome, to a certain degree, by a histone modification strategy in multiple embryonic developmental stages in human, as well as in yeast. Importantly, this epigenetic strategy could fit into a burst-like gene expression model: promoter-localized histone modifications (such as H3K4 methylation) are associated with both burst size and burst frequency, which together influence expression level, while gene-body-localized ones (such as H3K79 methylation) are more associated with burst frequency, which influences both expression level and noise. We further knocked out the only "writer" of H3K79 methylation in yeast, and observed that expression noise is indeed increased. Consistently, dosage sensitive genes, such as genes in the Wnt signaling pathway, tend to be marked with gene-body-localized histone modifications, while stress responding genes, such as genes regulating autophagy, tend to be marked with promoter-localized ones. Our findings elucidate that the "division of labor" among histone modifications facilitates the independent regulation of expression level and noise, extend the "histone code" hypothesis to include expression noise, and shed light on the optimization of transcriptome in evolution.

  1. Inhibition of histone deacetylase activity by valproic acid blocks adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagace, Diane C; Nachtigal, Mark W

    2004-04-30

    Adipogenesis is dependent on the sequential activation of transcription factors including the CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), and steroid regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). We show that the mood stabilizing drug valproic acid (VPA; 0.5-2 mm) inhibits mouse 3T3 L1 and human preadipocyte differentiation, likely through its histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitory properties. The HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) also inhibited adipogenesis, whereas the VPA analog valpromide, which does not possess HDAC inhibitory effects, did not prevent adipogenesis. Acute or chronic VPA treatment inhibited differentiation yet did not affect mitotic clonal expansion. VPA (1 mm) inhibited PPARgamma induced differentiation but does not activate a PPARgamma reporter gene, suggesting that it is not a PPARgamma ligand. VPA or TSA treatment reduced mRNA and protein levels of PPARgamma and SREBP1a. TSA reduced C/EBPalpha mRNA and protein levels, whereas VPA only produced a decrease in C/EBPalpha protein expression. Overall our results highlight a role for HDAC activity in adipogenesis that can be blocked by treatment with VPA.

  2. Histone methyltransferase Setdb1 is indispensable for Meckel's cartilage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiro, Kohei; Higashihori, Norihisa; Moriyama, Keiji

    2017-01-22

    The histone methyltransferase Setdb1 represses gene expression by catalyzing lysine 9 of histone H3 trimethylation. Given that the conventional knockout of Setdb1 is embryo-lethal at the implantation stage, its role in craniofacial development is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of Setdb1, using conditional knockout mice-in which Setdb1 was deleted in the Meckel's cartilage (Setdb1 CKO)-and the mouse chondrogenic cell line ATDC5-in which Setdb1 was inhibited by siRNA. Deletion of Setdb1 in Meckel's cartilage, the supportive tissue in the embryonic mandible, led to its enlargement, instead of the degeneration that normally occurs. Chondrocytes from the Meckel's cartilage of Setdb1 CKO mice showed increased size. Furthermore, at embryonic days 16.5 and 18.5, part of the perichondrium was disrupted and mineralization was observed in the Meckel's cartilage. Proliferation analysis showed that inhibition of Setdb1 caused increased proliferation in chondrocytes in the Meckel's cartilage as well as in ATDC5 cells. Quantitative RT-PCR showed decreased expression of chondrogenic genes, such as Sox9, Mmp13, Collagen II, and Aggrecan, as a result of Setdb1 inhibition in ATDC5 cells. Along with these phenomenons, SMAD-dependent BMP signaling was significantly increased by the loss of Setdb1 in both the Meckel's cartilage of Setdb1 CKO mice and ATDC5 cells. Therefore, the abnormal development of Meckel's cartilage in Setdb1 CKO mice is partly due to the enhanced SMAD-dependent BMP signaling. Overall, to our knowledge, the present study is the first to show that epigenetic regulation by Setdb1 is indispensable for the embryonic development of Meckel's cartilage. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Intercistronic as well as terminal sequences are required for efficient amplification of brome mosaic virus RNA3.

    OpenAIRE

    French, R; Ahlquist, P

    1987-01-01

    The genome of brome mosaic virus (BMV) is divided among messenger polarity RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 (3.2, 2.9, and 2.1 kilobases, respectively). cis-Acting sequences required for BMV RNA amplification were investigated with RNA3. By using expressible cDNA clones, deletions were constructed throughout RNA3 and tested in barley protoplasts coinoculated with RNA1 and RNA2. In contrast to requirements for 5'- and 3'-terminal noncoding sequences, either of the two RNA3 coding regions can be deleted in...

  4. Zyflamend, a polyherbal mixture, down regulates class I and class II histone deacetylases and increases p21 levels in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, E-Chu; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Guoxun; Baek, Seung Joon; McEntee, Michael F; Minkin, Steven; Biggerstaff, John P; Whelan, Jay

    2014-02-21

    Zyflamend, a mixture containing extracts of ten herbs, has shown promise in a variety of preclinical cancer models, including prostate cancer. The current experiments were designed to investigate the effects of Zyflamend on the expression of class I and II histone deacetylases, a family of enzymes known to be over expressed in a variety of cancers. CWR22Rv1 cells, a castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell line, were treated with Zyflamend and the expression of class I and II histone deacetylases, along with their downstream target the tumor suppressor gene p21, was investigated. Involvement of p21 was confirmed with siRNA knockdown and over expression experiments. Zyflamend down-regulated the expression of all class I and II histone deacetylases where Chinese goldthread and baikal skullcap (two of its components) appear to be primarily responsible for these results. In addition, Zyflamend up regulated the histone acetyl transferase complex CBP/p300, potentially contributing to the increase in histone 3 acetylation. Expression of the tumor suppressor gene p21, a known downstream target of histone deacetylases and CBP/p300, was increased by Zyflamend treatment and the effect on p21 was, in part, mediated through Erk1/2. Knockdown of p21 with siRNA technology attenuated Zyflamend-induced growth inhibition. Over expression of p21 inhibited cell growth and concomitant treatment with Zyflamend enhanced this effect. Our results suggest that the extracts of this polyherbal combination increase histone 3 acetylation, inhibit the expression of class I and class II histone deacetylases, increase the activation of CBP/p300 and inhibit cell proliferation, in part, by up regulating p21 expression.

  5. SMN Is Essential for the Biogenesis of U7 Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein and 3′-End Formation of Histone mRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Tisdale

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a deficiency in the survival motor neuron (SMN protein. SMN mediates the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs and possibly other RNPs. Here, we investigated SMN requirement for the biogenesis and function of U7—an snRNP specialized in the 3′-end formation of replication-dependent histone mRNAs that normally are not polyadenylated. We show that SMN deficiency impairs U7 snRNP assembly and decreases U7 levels in mammalian cells. The SMN-dependent U7 reduction affects endonucleolytic cleavage of histone mRNAs leading to abnormal accumulation of 3′-extended and polyadenylated transcripts followed by downstream changes in histone gene expression. Importantly, SMN deficiency induces defects of histone mRNA 3′-end formation in both SMA mice and human patients. These findings demonstrate that SMN is essential for U7 biogenesis and histone mRNA processing in vivo and identify an additional RNA pathway disrupted in SMA.

  6. Inhibition of histone deacetylation in 293GPG packaging cell line improves the production of self-inactivating MLV-derived retroviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crosato Milena

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-inactivating retroviral vectors (SIN are often associated with very low titers. Promoter elements embedded within SIN designs may suppress transcription of packageable retroviral RNA which in turn results in titer reduction. We tested whether this dominant-negative effect involves histone acetylation state. We designed an MLV-derived SIN vector using the cytomegalovirus immediate early enhancer-promoter (CMVIE as an embedded internal promoter (SINCMV and transfected the pantropic 293GPG packaging cell line. Results The SINCMV retroviral producer had uniformly very low titers (~10,000 infectious retroparticles per ml. Northern blot showed low levels of expression of retroviral mRNA in producer cells in particular that of packageable RNA transcript. Treatment of the producers with the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors sodium butyrate and trichostatin A reversed transcriptional suppression and resulted in an average 106.3 ± 4.6 – fold (P = 0.002 and 15.5 ± 1.3 – fold increase in titer (P = 0.008, respectively. A histone gel assay confirmed increased histone acetylation in treated producer cells. Conclusion These results show that SIN retrovectors incorporating strong internal promoters such as CMVIE, are susceptible to transcriptional silencing and that treatment of the producer cells with HDAC inhibitors can overcome this blockade suggesting that histone deacetylation is implicated in the mechanism of transcriptional suppression.

  7. Alcohol Exposure Causes Overexpression of Heart Development-Related Genes by Affecting the Histone H3 Acetylation via BMP Signaling Pathway in Cardiomyoblast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jin; Zhao, Weian; Pan, Bo; Zheng, Min; Si, Lina; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Lingjuan; Tian, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Abusive alcohol utilization of pregnant woman may cause congenital heart disease (CHD) of fetus, where alcohol ignites histone H3 hyperacetylation leading to abnormal development of heart morphogenesis and associated genes. Knowledge about the regularized upstream genes is little, but bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling may actively and prominently take part in alteration in acetylation of histone H3. The supreme objective of this study was to unearth the involvement of BMP signaling pathway in alcohol-driven hyperacetylation of histone H3 in cardiomyoblast cells. Cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2 cells) were addicted with alcohol (100 mM) for 24 hours. Dorsomorphin (5 μM) was used for the inhibition of BMP signaling pathway. We detected the phosphorylation activity of SMAD1/5/8, mRNA expression, histone acetyltransferases (HAT)/histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, and acetylation of histone H3. Following alcohol exposure, phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 and HAT activities was increased to a significant extent, while histone H3 acetylation and expression of heart development-related genes were also increased. The said phenomenon influenced by alcohol was reverted upon dorsomorphin treatment to the cells without effecting HDAC activity. The data clearly identified that BMP-mediated histone H3 acetylation of heart development-related genes might be one of the possible cellular mechanisms to control alcohol-induced expression of heart development-related genes. Dorsomorphin, on the other hand, may modulate alcohol-induced hyperacetylation of histone H3 through BMP targeting, which could be a potential way to block CHD. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  8. Reference genes for real-time PCR quantification of messenger RNAs and microRNAs in mouse model of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušková, Petra; Bártíková, Hana; Boušová, Iva; Hanušová, Veronika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing health problem worldwide. Among other ways, nutritional intervention using phytochemicals is important method for treatment and prevention of this disease. Recent studies have shown that certain phytochemicals could alter the expression of specific genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) that play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of obesity. For study of the obesity and its treatment, monosodium glutamate (MSG)-injected mice with developed central obesity, insulin resistance and liver lipid accumulation are frequently used animal models. To understand the mechanism of phytochemicals action in obese animals, the study of selected genes expression together with miRNA quantification is extremely important. For this purpose, real-time quantitative PCR is a sensitive and reproducible method, but it depends on proper normalization entirely. The aim of present study was to identify the appropriate reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in MSG mice treated with green tea catechins, potential anti-obesity phytochemicals. Two sets of reference genes were tested: first set contained seven commonly used genes for normalization of messenger RNA, the second set of candidate reference genes included ten small RNAs for normalization of miRNA. The expression stability of these reference genes were tested upon treatment of mice with catechins using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. Selected normalizers for mRNA quantification were tested and validated on expression of quinone oxidoreductase, biotransformation enzyme known to be modified by catechins. The effect of selected normalizers for miRNA quantification was tested on two obesity- and diabetes- related miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-29b, respectively. Finally, the combinations of B2M/18S/HPRT1 and miR-16/sno234 were validated as optimal reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in liver and 18S/RPlP0/HPRT1 and sno234/miR-186 in small intestine of MSG mice. These

  9. Inhibition of histone-mediated gene transfer in eucaryotic cells by anti-histone IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselmayer, O; Demirhan, I; Chandra, A; Bayer, M; Müller, R; Chandra, P

    2001-01-01

    In our laboratory, the gene transfer efficiency of some lipofection reagents (lipofectine, lipofectamine, DOTAP and Dosper) and histones H3 and H4 was compared to that of DEAE-Dextran (64). The histones H3 and H4 were found to have the highest transfection efficiency of all the agents tested. In the present study we have analyzed other parameters important for gene delivery by the histones H3 and H4. We transferred the HIV-1 tat gene to Jurkat cells and measured the transactivation of HIV-1-LTR by the transactivator protein, expressed in Jurkat cells. The expression of CAT as a reporter gene hybridized to LTR was a direct measure of transactivation potential. In order to investigate whether the transfection was only due to the positive ionic character of the histones H3 and H4 we tested other histones (H1 and H2A) and polylysine in our system. Under our experimental conditions, neither polylysine, nor the histones H1 and H2A were able to promote gene transfer in Jurkat cells. The inability of these reagents to promote gene transfer was not dependent on DNA condensation; in EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay) all these reagents exhibited a strong retardation of DNA. In the presence of anti-histone-IgG the transfection potential of histones H3 and H4 was diminished in a concentration - dependent manner. To investigate whether the histone antibodies inhibited the condensation of DNA by histones we carried out gel retardation assays (EMSA) in the absence and in the presence of histone antibodies. Anti-histone-IgG had no effect on the retardation of histone-DNA complexes; on the contrary, retardation was increased. This observation has led us to postulate two models for the possible mechanism by which the histones H3 and H4 catalyze gene transfer in eucaryotic cells.

  10. Structure and function of histone acetyltransferase MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiao Yi; Costa, Max; Sun, Hong

    2015-01-01

    MOF was first identified in Drosophila melanogaster as an important component of the dosage compensation complex. As a member of MYST family of histone acetyltransferase, MOF specifically deposits the acetyl groups to histone H4 lysine 16. Throughout evolution, MOF and its mammalian ortholog have retained highly conserved substrate specificity and similar enzymatic activities. MOF plays important roles in dosage compensation, ESC self-renewal, DNA damage and repair, cell survival, and gene expression regulation. Dysregulation of MOF has been implicated in tumor formation and progression of many types of human cancers. This review will discuss the structure and activity of mammalian hMOF as well as its function in H4K16 acetylation, DNA damage response, stem cell pluripotency, and carcinogenesis.

  11. Topoisomerase I and II Inhibitors Control Caspase-2 Pre-Messenger RNA Splicing in Human Cells11This work was supported by the INSERM, the Conseil Régional de Bourgogne, the Ligue Nationale Française Contre le Cancer (E. Solary and C. Bailly). S. Solier was financed by the University Hôpital du Bocage (Dijon). E. Logette was recipient of a fellowship from the French Ministry of Education and Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stéphanie Solier; Amélie Lansiaux; Emmanuelle Logette; Jane Wu; Johann Soret; Jamal Tazi; Christian Bailly; Lydie Desoche; Eric Solary; Laurent Corcos

    2004-01-01

    .... In this study, we analyzed the effects of several representative molecules of various classes of cytotoxic agents on caspase-2 pre-mRNA splicing in both U937 leukemic cells and in HeLa cervix carcinoma cells...

  12. RNA topology

    OpenAIRE

    Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D.

    2013-01-01

    A new variety on non-coding RNA has been discovered by several groups: circular RNA (circRNA). This discovery raises intriguing questions about the possibility of the existence of knotted RNA molecules and the existence of a new class of enzymes changing RNA topology, RNA topoisomerases.

  13. Inhibition of histone binding by supramolecular hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Hillary F.; Daze, Kevin D.; Shimbo, Takashi; Lai, Anne; Musselman, Catherine A.; Sims, Jennifer K.; Wade, Paul A.; Hof†, Fraser; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2015-01-01

    The tandem PHD (plant homeodomain) fingers of the CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4) ATPase are epigenetic readers that bind either unmodified histone H3 tails or H3K9me3 (histone H3 trimethylated at Lys9). This dual function is necessary for the transcriptional and chromatin remodelling activities of the NuRD (nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase) complex. In the present paper, we show that calixarene-based supramolecular hosts disrupt binding of the CHD4 PHD2 finger to H3K9me3, but do not affect the interaction of this protein with the H3K9me0 (unmodified histone H3) tail. A similar inhibitory effect, observed for the association of chromodomain of HP1γ (heterochromatin protein 1γ) with H3K9me3, points to a general mechanism of methyl-lysine caging by calixarenes and suggests a high potential for these compounds in biochemical applications. Immunofluorescence analysis reveals that the supramolecular agents induce changes in chromatin organization that are consistent with their binding to and disruption of H3K9me3 sites in living cells. The results of the present study suggest that the aromatic macrocyclic hosts can be used as a powerful new tool for characterizing methylation-driven epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24576085

  14. On the origin of the histone fold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söding Johannes

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histones organize the genomic DNA of eukaryotes into chromatin. The four core histone subunits consist of two consecutive helix-strand-helix motifs and are interleaved into heterodimers with a unique fold. We have searched for the evolutionary origin of this fold using sequence and structure comparisons, based on the hypothesis that folded proteins evolved by combination of an ancestral set of peptides, the antecedent domain segments. Results Our results suggest that an antecedent domain segment, corresponding to one helix-strand-helix motif, gave rise divergently to the N-terminal substrate recognition domain of Clp/Hsp100 proteins and to the helical part of the extended ATPase domain found in AAA+ proteins. The histone fold arose subsequently from the latter through a 3D domain-swapping event. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a genetically fixed 3D domain swap that led to the emergence of a protein family with novel properties, establishing domain swapping as a mechanism for protein evolution. Conclusion The helix-strand-helix motif common to these three folds provides support for our theory of an 'ancient peptide world' by demonstrating how an ancestral fragment can give rise to 3 different folds.

  15. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Eckschlager

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis cannot be explained only by genetic alterations, but also involves epigenetic processes. Modification of histones by acetylation plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and is controlled by the balance between histone deacetylases (HDAC and histone acetyltransferases (HAT. HDAC inhibitors induce cancer cell cycle arrest, differentiation and cell death, reduce angiogenesis and modulate immune response. Mechanisms of anticancer effects of HDAC inhibitors are not uniform; they may be different and depend on the cancer type, HDAC inhibitors, doses, etc. HDAC inhibitors seem to be promising anti-cancer drugs particularly in the combination with other anti-cancer drugs and/or radiotherapy. HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, romidepsin and belinostat have been approved for some T-cell lymphoma and panobinostat for multiple myeloma. Other HDAC inhibitors are in clinical trials for the treatment of hematological and solid malignancies. The results of such studies are promising but further larger studies are needed. Because of the reversibility of epigenetic changes during cancer development, the potency of epigenetic therapies seems to be of great importance. Here, we summarize the data on different classes of HDAC inhibitors, mechanisms of their actions and discuss novel results of preclinical and clinical studies, including the combination with other therapeutic modalities.

  16. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckschlager, Tomas; Plch, Johana; Stiborova, Marie; Hrabeta, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Carcinogenesis cannot be explained only by genetic alterations, but also involves epigenetic processes. Modification of histones by acetylation plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and is controlled by the balance between histone deacetylases (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferases (HAT). HDAC inhibitors induce cancer cell cycle arrest, differentiation and cell death, reduce angiogenesis and modulate immune response. Mechanisms of anticancer effects of HDAC inhibitors are not uniform; they may be different and depend on the cancer type, HDAC inhibitors, doses, etc. HDAC inhibitors seem to be promising anti-cancer drugs particularly in the combination with other anti-cancer drugs and/or radiotherapy. HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, romidepsin and belinostat have been approved for some T-cell lymphoma and panobinostat for multiple myeloma. Other HDAC inhibitors are in clinical trials for the treatment of hematological and solid malignancies. The results of such studies are promising but further larger studies are needed. Because of the reversibility of epigenetic changes during cancer development, the potency of epigenetic therapies seems to be of great importance. Here, we summarize the data on different classes of HDAC inhibitors, mechanisms of their actions and discuss novel results of preclinical and clinical studies, including the combination with other therapeutic modalities.

  17. Results and prospects in multi-messenger particle astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    In high-energy particle astrophysics the old days were certainly not better than these. Our field has thrived in the past decade with experiments covering thousands of square kilometers to measure the suppression in the flux of the highest energy cosmic rays ever observed, instrumenting a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice to discover astrophysical neutrinos, and measuring a change in arm length as small as 10-19 m for the ground-breaking direct observation of gravitational waves. Additionally, the current generation of space-borne and ground-based gamma-ray experiments have revealed a plethora of gamma-ray sources, including pulsars, compact binaries, the galactic center, and extragalactic sources such as starburst galaxies and radio galaxies. Before the next generation of instruments bring us yet another order of magnitude in sensitivity, we can combine current observations to probe physics beyond the standard model, and to extend the high-energy frontier well above the energies accessible to laboratory accelerators. One example of this potential is the search for dark-matter annihilation and decay products. To use the multi-messenger approach effectively for probing dark-matter signatures and physics beyond the LHC energy requires understanding the origin (or acceleration mechanism) and the propagation processes. High energy protons and nuclei, neutrinos, gamma-rays, X-rays, and gravitational waves bring new and complementary views of the astrophysical sources. By comparing observations through different windows, we can use the sites of violent phenomena as a laboratory to probe the physical processes under extreme conditions throughout the Universe, and to test the fundamental laws of particle physics and gravitation. As a community we need to engage in a bold synergistic approach to understanding the violent processes that give rise to the high-energy cosmic phenomena in the Universe. In this invited talk, I will present on-going multi-messenger studies to

  18. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding the core histones and histone variants of Neurospora crassa.

    OpenAIRE

    Hays, Shan M; Swanson, Johanna; Eric U Selker

    2002-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the complete complement of genes encoding the core histones of Neurospora crassa. In addition to the previously identified pair of genes that encode histones H3 and H4 (hH3 and hH4-1), we identified a second histone H4 gene (hH4-2), a divergently transcribed pair of genes that encode H2A and H2B (hH2A and hH2B), a homolog of the F/Z family of H2A variants (hH2Az), a homolog of the H3 variant CSE4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (hH3v), and a highly diverged ...

  19. Biochemical Analysis Reveals the Multifactorial Mechanism of Histone H3 Clipping by Chicken Liver Histone H3 Protease

    KAUST Repository

    Chauhan, Sakshi

    2016-09-02

    Proteolytic clipping of histone H3 has been identified in many organisms. Despite several studies, the mechanism of clipping, the substrate specificity, and the significance of this poorly understood epigenetic mechanism are not clear. We have previously reported histone H3 specific proteolytic clipping and a protein inhibitor in chicken liver. However, the sites of clipping are still not known very well. In this study, we attempt to identify clipping sites in histone H3 and to determine the mechanism of inhibition by stefin B protein, a cysteine protease inhibitor. By employing site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro biochemical assays, we have identified three distinct clipping sites in recombinant human histone H3 and its variants (H3.1, H3.3, and H3t). However, post-translationally modified histones isolated from chicken liver and Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells showed different clipping patterns. Clipping of histone H3 N-terminal tail at three sites occurs in a sequential manner. We have further observed that clipping sites are regulated by the structure of the N-terminal tail as well as the globular domain of histone H3. We also have identified the QVVAG region of stefin B protein to be very crucial for inhibition of the protease activity. Altogether, our comprehensive biochemical studies have revealed three distinct clipping sites in histone H3 and their regulation by the structure of histone H3, histone modifications marks, and stefin B.

  20. Nonthermal electromagnetic fields: from first messenger to therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Arthur A

    2013-06-01

    Nonthermal pulsed electromagnetic fields, from low frequency to pulse-modulated radio frequency, have been successfully employed as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of delayed and non-union fractures, fresh fractures and chronic wounds. Recent increased understanding of the mechanism of action of electromagnetic fields (EMF) has permitted technologic advances allowing the development of EMF devices which are portable and disposable, can be incorporated into dressings, supports and casts, and can be used over clothing. This broadens the use of non-pharmacological, non-invasive EMF therapy to the treatment of postoperative pain and edema to enhance surgical recovery. EMF therapy is rapidly becoming a standard part of surgical care, and new, more significant, clinical applications for osteoarthritis, brain and cardiac ischemia and traumatic brain injury are in the pipeline. This study reviews recent evidence which suggests that calmodulin (CaM)-dependent nitric oxide signaling is involved in cell and tissue response to weak nonthermal EMF signals. There is abundant evidence that EMF signals can be configured a priori to increase the rate of CaM activation, which, in turn, can modulate the biochemical cascades living cells and tissues employ in response to external insult. Successful applications in pilot clinical trials, coupled with evidence at the cellular and animal levels, provide support that EMF is a first messenger that can modulate the response of challenged biological systems.

  1. Internet messenger based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umam, K.; Mardi, S. N. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Internet messenger (IM) has become an important educational technology component in college education, IM makes it possible for students to engage in learning and collaborating at smart virtual class learning (SVCL) using ubiquitous computing. However, the model of IM-based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing and empirical evidence that would favor a broad application to improve engagement and behavior are still limited. In addition, the expectation that IM based SVCL using ubiquitous computing could improve engagement and behavior on smart class cannot be confirmed because the majority of the reviewed studies followed instructions paradigms. This article aims to present the model of IM-based SVCL using ubiquitous computing and showing learners’ experiences in improved engagement and behavior for learner-learner and learner-lecturer interactions. The method applied in this paper includes design process and quantitative analysis techniques, with the purpose of identifying scenarios of ubiquitous computing and realize the impressions of learners and lecturers about engagement and behavior aspect and its contribution to learning

  2. Topicality and impact in social media: diverse messages, focused messengers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Weng

    Full Text Available We have a limited understanding of the factors that make people influential and topics popular in social media. Are users who comment on a variety of matters more likely to achieve high influence than those who stay focused? Do general subjects tend to be more popular than specific ones? Questions like these demand a way to detect the topics hidden behind messages associated with an individual or a keyword, and a gauge of similarity among these topics. Here we develop such an approach to identify clusters of similar hashtags in Twitter by detecting communities in the hashtag co-occurrence network. Then the topical diversity of a user's interests is quantified by the entropy of her hashtags across different topic clusters. A similar measure is applied to hashtags, based on co-occurring tags. We find that high topical diversity of early adopters or co-occurring tags implies high future popularity of hashtags. In contrast, low diversity helps an individual accumulate social influence. In short, diverse messages and focused messengers are more likely to gain impact.

  3. Topicality and impact in social media: diverse messages, focused messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    We have a limited understanding of the factors that make people influential and topics popular in social media. Are users who comment on a variety of matters more likely to achieve high influence than those who stay focused? Do general subjects tend to be more popular than specific ones? Questions like these demand a way to detect the topics hidden behind messages associated with an individual or a keyword, and a gauge of similarity among these topics. Here we develop such an approach to identify clusters of similar hashtags in Twitter by detecting communities in the hashtag co-occurrence network. Then the topical diversity of a user's interests is quantified by the entropy of her hashtags across different topic clusters. A similar measure is applied to hashtags, based on co-occurring tags. We find that high topical diversity of early adopters or co-occurring tags implies high future popularity of hashtags. In contrast, low diversity helps an individual accumulate social influence. In short, diverse messages and focused messengers are more likely to gain impact.

  4. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  5. Production and Purification of Antibodies Against Histone Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, Benoit; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wurtele, Hugo; Verreault, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies that recognize specific histone modifications are invaluable tools to study chromatin structure and function. There are numerous commercially available antibodies that recognize a remarkable diversity of histone modifications. Unfortunately, many of them fail to work in certain applications or lack the high degree of specificity required of these reagents. The production of affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against histone modifications demands a little effort but, in return, provides extremely valuable tools that overcome many of the concerns and limitations of commercial antibodies. We present a series of protocols and guidelines for the production and use of large amounts of polyclonal antibodies that recognize modifications of canonical histones. Our protocols can be applied to obtain antibodies that occur in histone variants and proteins other than histones. In addition, some of our protocols are compatible with the production of monoclonal or recombinant antibodies.

  6. Inferring data-specific micro-RNA function through the joint ranking of micro-RNA and pathways from matched micro-RNA and gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Ellis; Buckley, Michael; Müller, Samuel; Lin, David M; Yang, Jean Y H

    2015-09-01

    In practice, identifying and interpreting the functional impacts of the regulatory relationships between micro-RNA and messenger-RNA is non-trivial. The sheer scale of possible micro-RNA and messenger-RNA interactions can make the interpretation of results difficult. We propose a supervised framework, pMim, built upon concepts of significance combination, for jointly ranking regulatory micro-RNA and their potential functional impacts with respect to a condition of interest. Here, pMim directly tests if a micro-RNA is differentially expressed and if its predicted targets, which lie in a common biological pathway, have changed in the opposite direction. We leverage the information within existing micro-RNA target and pathway databases to stabilize the estimation and annotation of micro-RNA regulation making our approach suitable for datasets with small sample sizes. In addition to outputting meaningful and interpretable results, we demonstrate in a variety of datasets that the micro-RNA identified by pMim, in comparison to simpler existing approaches, are also more concordant with what is described in the literature. This framework is implemented as an R function, pMim, in the package sydSeq available from http://www.ellispatrick.com/r-packages. jean.yang@sydney.edu.au Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Evolution of microRNA in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreight, Jennifer C; Schneider, Sean E; Wilburn, Damien B; Swanson, Willie J

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of most transcripts in the human genome, but their evolution across the primate lineage is largely uncharacterized. A particular miRNA can have one to thousands of messenger RNA targets, establishing the potential for a small change in sequence or overall miRNA structure to have profound phenotypic effects. However, the majority of non-human primate miRNA is predicted solely by homology to the human genome and lacks experimental validation. In the present study, we sequenced thirteen species representing a wide range of the primate phylogeny. Hundreds of miRNA were validated, and the number of species with experimentally validated miRNA was tripled. These species include a sister taxon to humans (bonobo) and basal primates (aye-aye, mouse lemur, galago). Consistent with previous studies, we found the seed region and mature miRNA to be highly conserved across primates, with overall structural conservation of the pre-miRNA hairpin. However, there were a number of interesting exceptions, including a seed shift due to structural changes in miR-501. We also identified an increase in the number of miR-320 paralogs throughout primate evolution. Many of these non-conserved miRNA appear to regulate neuronal processes, illustrating the importance of investigating miRNA to learn more about human evolution.

  8. Evolution of microRNA in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C McCreight

    Full Text Available MicroRNA play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of most transcripts in the human genome, but their evolution across the primate lineage is largely uncharacterized. A particular miRNA can have one to thousands of messenger RNA targets, establishing the potential for a small change in sequence or overall miRNA structure to have profound phenotypic effects. However, the majority of non-human primate miRNA is predicted solely by homology to the human genome and lacks experimental validation. In the present study, we sequenced thirteen species representing a wide range of the primate phylogeny. Hundreds of miRNA were validated, and the number of species with experimentally validated miRNA was tripled. These species include a sister taxon to humans (bonobo and basal primates (aye-aye, mouse lemur, galago. Consistent with previous studies, we found the seed region and mature miRNA to be highly conserved across primates, with overall structural conservation of the pre-miRNA hairpin. However, there were a number of interesting exceptions, including a seed shift due to structural changes in miR-501. We also identified an increase in the number of miR-320 paralogs throughout primate evolution. Many of these non-conserved miRNA appear to regulate neuronal processes, illustrating the importance of investigating miRNA to learn more about human evolution.

  9. Histone H3 tail clipping regulates gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Santos-Rosa, Helena; Kirmizis, Antonis; Nelson, Christopher; Bartke, Till; Saksouk, Nehme; Cote, Jacques; Kouzarides, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Induction of gene expression in yeast and human cells involves changes in histone modifications associated with promoters. Here we identify a histone H3 endopeptidase activity in S. cerevisiae that may regulate these events. The endopeptidase cleaves H3 after alanine 21, generating a histone lacking the first 21 residues and displays a preference for H3 tails carrying repressive modifications. In vivo, the H3 N-terminus is clipped, specifically within the promoter of genes following the induc...

  10. Genome-Wide Profiling of Histone Modifications (H3K9me2 and H4K12ac) and Gene Expression in Rust (Uromyces appendiculatus) Inoculated Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayyappan, Vasudevan; Kalavacharla, Venu; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Bhide, Ketaki P; Sripathi, Venkateswara R; Smolinski, Tomasz G; Manoharan, Muthusamy; Thurston, Yaqoob; Todd, Antonette; Kingham, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    ...) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). ChIP-Seq analysis revealed 1,235 and 556 histone methylation and acetylation responsive genes from common bean leaves treated with the rust pathogen at 0, 12 and 84 hour-after-inoculation (hai...

  11. Genome-Wide Profiling of Histone Modifications (H3K9me2 and H4K12ac) and Gene Expression in Rust (Uromyces appendiculatus) Inoculated Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): e0132176

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vasudevan Ayyappan; Venu Kalavacharla; Jyothi Thimmapuram; Ketaki P Bhide; Venkateswara R Sripathi; Tomasz G Smolinski; Muthusamy Manoharan; Yaqoob Thurston; Antonette Todd; Bruce Kingham

    2015-01-01

    ...) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). ChIP-Seq analysis revealed 1,235 and 556 histone methylation and acetylation responsive genes from common bean leaves treated with the rust pathogen at 0, 12 and 84 hour-after-inoculation (hai...

  12. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation. © 2014 Gu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. Determination of histone acetylation status by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, Luciano; Moon, John; Vancura, Ales

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation is the most studied posttranslation modification of nucleosomes. Understanding the mechanisms involved in global and promoter-specific histone acetylation will shed light on the control of transcriptional regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation is a powerful technique to study protein-DNA interactions in vivo. Proteins and DNA are cross-linked with formaldehyde, cells are lysed, and DNA is sheared by sonication. Protein-DNA complexes are immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific for total and acetylated histones and the relative occupancy of acetylated and total histones at selected loci is assessed by real-time PCR of the purified DNA.

  14. Structural and Functional Coordination of DNA and Histone Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in the control of gene expression in mammals is how epigenetic methylation patterns of DNA and histones are established, erased, and recognized. This central process in controlling gene expression includes coordinated covalent modifications of DNA and its associated histones. This article focuses on structural aspects of enzymatic activities of histone (arginine and lysine) methylation and demethylation and functional links between the methylation status of the DNA and histones. An interconnected network of methyltransferases, demethylases, and accessory proteins is responsible for changing or maintaining the modification status of specific regions of chromatin. PMID:25085914

  15. Cracking the death code: apoptosis-related histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllgrabe, J; Hajji, N; Joseph, B

    2010-08-01

    The degradation and compaction of chromatin are long-standing hallmark features of apoptosis. The histones, chief protein components of chromatin, are subjected to a wide range of post-translational modifications. An increasing body of evidence suggests that combinations of epigenetic histone modifications influence the overall chromatin structure and have clear functional consequences in cellular processes including apoptosis. This review describes the work to date on the post-translational modification of histones during apoptosis, their regulation by enzymatic complexes and discusses the existence of the apoptotic histone code.

  16. Role of Histone Acetylation in Cell Cycle Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprinarova, Miglena; Schnekenburger, Michael; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Core histone acetylation is a key prerequisite for chromatin decondensation and plays a pivotal role in regulation of chromatin structure, function and dynamics. The addition of acetyl groups disturbs histone/DNA interactions in the nucleosome and alters histone/histone interactions in the same or adjacent nucleosomes. Acetyl groups can also provide binding sites for recruitment of bromodomain (BRD)-containing non-histone readers and regulatory complexes to chromatin allowing them to perform distinct downstream functions. The presence of a particular acetylation pattern influences appearance of other histone modifications in the immediate vicinity forming the "histone code". Although the roles of the acetylation of particular lysine residues for the ongoing chromatin functions is largely studied, the epigenetic inheritance of histone acetylation is a debated issue. The dynamics of local or global histone acetylation is associated with fundamental cellular processes such as gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair or chromatin condensation. Therefore, it is an essential part of the epigenetic cell response to processes related to internal and external signals.

  17. tRNA--the golden standard in molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barciszewska, Mirosława Z; Perrigue, Patrick M; Barciszewski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) represent a major class of RNA molecules. Their primary function is to help decode a messenger RNA (mRNA) sequence in order to synthesize protein and thus ensures the precise translation of genetic information that is imprinted in DNA. The discovery of tRNA in the late 1950's provided critical insight into a genetic machinery when little was known about the central dogma of molecular biology. In 1965, Robert Holley determined the first nucleotide sequence of alanine transfer RNA (tRNA(Ala)) which earned him the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Today, tRNA is one of the best described and characterized biological molecules. Here we review some of the key historical events in tRNA research which led to breakthrough discoveries and new developments in molecular biology.

  18. The emerging role of RNA editing in plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Joshua J. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT All true metazoans modify their RNAs by converting specific adenosine residues to inosine. Because inosine binds to cytosine, it is a biological mimic for guanosine. This subtle change, termed RNA editing, can have diverse effects on various RNA-mediated cellular pathways, including RNA interference, innate immunity, retrotransposon defense and messenger RNA recoding. Because RNA editing can be regulated, it is an ideal tool for increasing genetic diversity, adaptation and environmental acclimation. This review will cover the following themes related to RNA editing: (1) how it is used to modify different cellular RNAs, (2) how frequently it is used by different organisms to recode mRNA, (3) how specific recoding events regulate protein function, (4) how it is used in adaptation and (5) emerging evidence that it can be used for acclimation. Organismal biologists with an interest in adaptation and acclimation, but with little knowledge of RNA editing, are the intended audience. PMID:26085659

  19. De regreso al origen? La escritura simbolica y el lenguaje escrito en los usuarios del Messenger

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valencia-Cerino, Yaditzy; Garcia-Martinez, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    El presente estudio es el resultado de un trabajo de tesis de comunicacion en el que se aborda el tema de la utilizacion del lenguaje en el Messenger y sus posibles repercusiones en los manuscritos...

  20. MESSENGER E/V/H MASCS 5 VIRS DERIVED ANALYSIS DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER MASCS VIRS derived analysis product, also known as the DAP. The DAP is a 500 meter per pixel mosaic map of...

  1. MESSENGER E/V/H MASCS 2 VIRS UNCALIBRATED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER MASCS VIRS uncalibrated observations, also known as EDRs. The MASCS VIRS experiment is a fixed concave...

  2. MESSENGER V/H RADIO SCIENCE SUBSYSTEM 1 EDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains archival raw, partially processed, and ancillary/supporting radio science data acquired during the MESSENGER mission. The radio observations...

  3. MESSENGER H XRS 5 REDUCED DATA RECORD (RDR) FOOTPRINTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER XRS reduced data record (RDR) footprints which are derived from the navigational meta-data for each...

  4. MESSENGER E/V/H MASCS 3 UVVS CALIBRATED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER MASCS UVVS calibrated observations, also known as CDRs. The MASCS UVVS experiment is a scanning grating...

  5. MESSENGER E/V/H XRS CALIBRATED (CDR) SPECTRA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER XRS calibrated observations, also known as CDRs. Each XRS observation results in four X-ray spectra. When...

  6. MESSENGER E/V/H MASCS 3 VIRS CALIBRATED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER MASCS VIRS calibrated observations, also known as CDRs. The MASCS VIRS experiment is a fixed concave...

  7. MESSENGER E/V/H/SW EPPS CALIBRATED EPS DDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) advanced data products, also known as DDR/DAPs. The...

  8. MESSENGER E/V/H GRNS 3 GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER CALIBDATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER GRS calibrated observations (CDRs) and the reduced data product (RDR). The GRS experiment is a gamma ray...

  9. MESSENGER E/V/H GRNS 2 GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER RAW DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER GRS uncalibrated observations, also known as EDRs. The GRS experiment is a gamma ray spectrometer designed...

  10. The Histone Acetyltransferase MOF Promotes Induces Generation of Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xupeng; Yan, Shaohua; Fu, Changhao; Wei, Anhui

    2015-08-01

    Histone modification plays an important role in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). The histone acetyltransferase MOF is a key regulator of ESCs; however, the role of MOF in the process of reprogramming back to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the function of MOF on the generation of iPSCs. We show that iPSCs contain high levels of MOF mRNA, and the expression level of MOF protein is dramatically upregulated following reprogramming. Most importantly, overexpression of MOF improves reprogramming efficiency and facilitates the formation of iPSCs, whereas small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of MOF impairs iPSCs generation during reprogramming. Further investigation reveals that MOF interacts with the H3K4 methyltransferase Wdr5 to promote endogenous Oct4 expression during the reprogramming process. Knockdown of MOF reduces H4K16ac and H3K4me3 modification at the Oct4 promoter. In conclusion, our data indicate that MOF is an important epigenetic regulator that is critical for efficient reprogramming.

  11. CDK inhibitors selectively diminish cell cycle controlled activation of the histone H4 gene promoter by p220NPAT and HiNF-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Partha; Ghule, Prachi N.; van der Deen, Margaretha; Medina, Ricardo; Xie, Rong-lin; Holmes, William F.; Ye, Xin; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Harper, J. Wade; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2010-01-01

    Cell cycle progression into S phase requires the induction of histone gene expression to package newly synthesized DNA as chromatin. Cyclin E stimulation of CDK2 at the Restriction point late in G1 controls both histone gene expression by the p220NPAT/HiNF-P pathway and initiation of DNA replication through the pRB/E2F pathway. The three CDK inhibitors (CKIs) p21CIP1/WAF1, p27KIP1 and p57KIP2 attenuate CDK2 activity. Here we find that γ-irradiation induces p21CIP1/WAF1 but not the other two CKIs, while reducing histone H4 mRNA levels but not histone H4 gene promoter activation by the p220NPAT/HiNF-P complex. We also show that p21CIP1/WAF1 is less effective than p27KIP1 and p57KIP2 in inhibiting the CDK2 dependent phosphorylation of p220NPAT at subnuclear foci and transcriptional activation of histone H4 genes. The greater effectiveness of p57KIP2 in blocking the p220NPAT/HiNF-P pathway is attributable in part to its ability to form a specific complex with p220NPAT that may suppress CDK2/cyclin E phosphorylation through direct substrate inhibition. We conclude that CKIs selectively control stimulation of the histone H4 gene promoter by the p220NPAT/HiNF-P complex. PMID:19170105

  12. Crosstalk between secondary messengers, hormones and MAPK modules during abiotic stress signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smékalová, Veronika; Doskočilová, Anna; Komis, George; Samaj, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    The crosstalk between second messengers, hormones and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in plant signalling systems facilitates adaptation and survival in the face of diverse environmental stresses. This review focuses on the transduction of second messenger and hormone signals by MAPK modules in plant abiotic stress responses. We discuss how this crosstalk regulates gene expression (e.g. by controlling transcription factor activity) and other cellular and physiological responses to enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stresses. © 2013.

  13. Rapid divergence of histones in Hydrozoa (Cnidaria) and evolution of a novel histone involved in DNA damage response in hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Puli Chandramouli; Ubhe, Suyog; Sirwani, Neha; Lohokare, Rasika; Galande, Sanjeev

    2017-08-01

    Histones are fundamental components of chromatin in all eukaryotes. Hydra, an emerging model system belonging to the basal metazoan phylum Cnidaria, provides an ideal platform to understand the evolution of core histone components at the base of eumetazoan phyla. Hydra exhibits peculiar properties such as tremendous regenerative capacity, lack of organismal senescence and rarity of malignancy. In light of the role of histone modifications and histone variants in these processes it is important to understand the nature of histones themselves and their variants in hydra. Here, we report identification of the complete repertoire of histone-coding genes in the Hydra magnipapillata genome. Hydra histones were classified based on their copy numbers, gene structure and other characteristic features. Genomic organization of canonical histone genes revealed the presence of H2A-H2B and H3-H4 paired clusters in high frequency and also a cluster with all core histones along with H1. Phylogenetic analysis of identified members of H2A and H2B histones suggested rapid expansion of these groups in Hydrozoa resulting in the appearance of unique subtypes. Amino acid sequence level comparisons of H2A and H2B forms with bilaterian counterparts suggest the possibility of a highly mobile nature of nucleosomes in hydra. Absolute quantitation of transcripts confirmed the high copy number of histones and supported the canonical nature of H2A. Furthermore, functional characterization of H2A.X.1 and a unique variant H2A.X.2 in the gastric region suggest their role in the maintenance of genome integrity and differentiation processes. These findings provide insights into the evolution of histones and their variants in hydra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutual relationships between transcription and pre-mRNA processing in the synthesis of mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenasi, Tina; Barboric, Matjaz

    2013-01-01

    The generation of messenger RNA (mRNA) in eukaryotes is achieved by transcription from the DNA template and pre-mRNA processing reactions of capping, splicing, and polyadenylation. Although RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) catalyzes the synthesis of pre-mRNA, it also serves as a principal coordinator of the processing reactions in the course of transcription. In this review, we focus on the interplay between transcription and cotranscriptional pre-mRNA maturation events, mediated by the recruitment of RNA processing factors to differentially phosphorylated C-terminal domain of Rbp1, the largest subunit of RNAPII. Furthermore, we highlight the bidirectional nature of the interplay by discussing the impact of RNAPII kinetics on pre-mRNA processing as well as how the processing events reach back to different phases of gene transcription. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Genome-wide mRNA and miRNA expression profiling reveal multiple regulatory networks in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vishnubalaji, R; Hamam, R; Abdulla, M-H

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in cancer management, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer and a major health-care problem worldwide. MicroRNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of cancer development and progression by targeting multiple cancer-related genes; however......, such regulatory networks are not well characterized in CRC. Thus, the aim of this study was to perform global messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA expression profiling in the same CRC samples and adjacent normal tissues and to identify potential miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks. Our data revealed 1273 significantly...... in cell proliferation, and migration in vitro. Concordantly, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of EZH2 led to similar effects on CRC cell growth in vitro. Therefore, our data have revealed several hundred potential miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks in CRC and suggest targeting relevant networks...

  16. Engineering Biological C-H Functionalization Leads to Allele-Specific Regulation of Histone Demethylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breski, Megan; Dey, Debasis; Obringer, Sara; Sudhamalla, Babu; Islam, Kabirul

    2016-10-06

    Oxidative C-H hydroxylation of methyl groups, followed by their removal from DNA, RNA or histones, is an epigenetic process critical to transcriptional reprogramming and cell fate determination. This reaction is catalyzed by Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases using the essential metabolite 2-ketoglutarate (2KG) as a cofactor. Given that the human genome encodes for more than 60 2KG-dependent dioxygenases, assigning their individual functions remains a significant challenge. Here we describe a protein-ligand interface engineering approach to break the biochemical degeneracy of these enzymes. Using histone lysine demethylase 4 (KDM4) as a proof-of-concept, we show that the enzyme active site can be expanded to employ bulky 2KG analogues that do not sensitize wild type demethylases. We establish the orthogonality, substrate specificity and catalytic competency of the engineered demethylation apparatus in biochemical assays. We further demonstrate demethylation of cognate substrates in physiologically relevant settings. Our results provide a para-digm for rapid and conditional manipulation of histone deme-thylases to uncloak their isoform-specific functions.

  17. Synergetic effects of DNA methylation and histone modification during mouse induced pluripotent stem cell generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiying; Weng, Rong; Lan, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xudong; Liu, Qidong; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lu, Chenqi; Kang, Jiuhong

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone methylation (H3K27me3) have been reported as major barriers to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) generation using four core transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, termed OSKM). Here, to illustrate the possibility of deriving iPSCs via demethylation, as well as the exact effects of DNA methylation and histone modification on gene expression regulation, we performed RNA sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of ES cells and iPSCs derived by demethylation with miR-29b or shDnmt3a, and carried out integrated analyses. Results showed that OSKM + miR-29b-iPSC was more close to ES cells than the others, and up-regulated genes typically presented with methylated CpG-dense promoters and H3K27me3-enriched regions. The differentially expressed genes caused by introduction of DNA demethylation during somatic cell reprogramming mainly focus on stem cell associated GO terms and KEGG signaling pathways, which may decrease the tumorigenesis risk of iPSCs. These findings indicated that DNA methylation and histone methylation have synergetic effects on regulating gene expression during iPSC generation, and demethylation by miR-29b is better than shDnmt3a for iPSC quality. Furthermore, integrated analyses are superior for exploration of slight differences as missed by individual analysis. PMID:28155862

  18. Mechanism of retinoic acid-induced transcription: histone code, DNA oxidation and formation of chromatin loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchegna, Candida; Aceto, Fabiana; Bertoni, Alessandra; Romano, Antonella; Perillo, Bruno; Laccetti, Paolo; Gottesman, Max E; Avvedimento, Enrico V; Porcellini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Histone methylation changes and formation of chromatin loops involving enhancers, promoters and 3' end regions of genes have been variously associated with active transcription in eukaryotes. We have studied the effect of activation of the retinoic A receptor, at the RARE-promoter chromatin of CASP9 and CYP26A1 genes, 15 and 45 min following RA exposure, and we found that histone H3 lysines 4 and 9 are demethylated by the lysine-specific demethylase, LSD1 and by the JMJ-domain containing demethylase, D2A. The action of the oxidase (LSD1) and a dioxygenase (JMJD2A) in the presence of Fe++ elicits an oxidation wave that locally modifies the DNA and recruits the enzymes involved in base and nucleotide excision repair (BER and NER). These events are essential for the formation of chromatin loop(s) that juxtapose the RARE element with the 5' transcription start site and the 3' end of the genes. The RARE bound-receptor governs the 5' and 3' end selection and directs the productive transcription cycle of RNA polymerase. These data mechanistically link chromatin loops, histone methylation changes and localized DNA repair with transcription. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. The Candida albicans Histone Acetyltransferase Hat1 Regulates Stress Resistance and Virulence via Distinct Chromatin Assembly Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tscherner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human fungal pathogens like Candida albicans respond to host immune surveillance by rapidly adapting their transcriptional programs. Chromatin assembly factors are involved in the regulation of stress genes by modulating the histone density at these loci. Here, we report a novel role for the chromatin assembly-associated histone acetyltransferase complex NuB4 in regulating oxidative stress resistance, antifungal drug tolerance and virulence in C. albicans. Strikingly, depletion of the NuB4 catalytic subunit, the histone acetyltransferase Hat1, markedly increases resistance to oxidative stress and tolerance to azole antifungals. Hydrogen peroxide resistance in cells lacking Hat1 results from higher induction rates of oxidative stress gene expression, accompanied by reduced histone density as well as subsequent increased RNA polymerase recruitment. Furthermore, hat1Δ/Δ cells, despite showing growth defects in vitro, display reduced susceptibility to reactive oxygen-mediated killing by innate immune cells. Thus, clearance from infected mice is delayed although cells lacking Hat1 are severely compromised in killing the host. Interestingly, increased oxidative stress resistance and azole tolerance are phenocopied by the loss of histone chaperone complexes CAF-1 and HIR, respectively, suggesting a central role for NuB4 in the delivery of histones destined for chromatin assembly via distinct pathways. Remarkably, the oxidative stress phenotype of hat1Δ/Δ cells is a species-specific trait only found in C. albicans and members of the CTG clade. The reduced azole susceptibility appears to be conserved in a wider range of fungi. Thus, our work demonstrates how highly conserved chromatin assembly pathways can acquire new functions in pathogenic fungi during coevolution with the host.

  20. Micro-RNA speciation in fetal, adult and Alzheimer's disease hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukiw, Walter J

    2007-02-12

    Micro-RNAs constitute a family of small noncoding ribonucleic acids that are posttranscriptional regulators of messenger RNA activity. Although micro-RNAs are known to be dynamically regulated during neural development, the role of micro-RNAs in brain aging and neurodegeneration is not known. This study examined micro-RNA abundance in the hippocampal region of fetal, adult and Alzheimer's disease brain. The data indicate that micro-RNAs encoding miR-9, miR-124a, miR-125b, miR-128, miR-132 and miR-219 are abundantly represented in fetal hippocampus, are differentially regulated in aged brain, and an alteration in specific micro-RNA complexity occurs in Alzheimer hippocampus. These data are consistent with the idea that altered micro-RNA-mediated processing of messenger RNA populations may contribute to atypical mRNA abundance and neural dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease brain.

  1. Translatability of a plant-mRNA strongly influences its accumulation in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancanneyt, G; Rosahl, S; Willmitzer, L

    1990-05-25

    Current knowledge of parameters affecting RNA stability is very restricted in plants. Here we investigated factors which might contribute to the stability of a particular plant messenger RNA. To this end, insertion and deletion mutants were made in two different exons and an intron of the transcribed region of a well characterised patatin gene (pgT5). Mutant genes were expressed under the control of a strong leaf-stem specific promoter (ST-LS1) and analysed in vivo in transgenic tobacco plants. Northern analysis revealed the importance of the translatability of the mature messenger RNA with respect to its accumulation in transgenic plants. Enlargement of the 3' non-translated region by several hundred base-pairs reduced the steady state mRNA level slightly; the introduction of a stop codon leading to premature termination of translation of the RNA led to a dramatic decrease of the steady state mRNA level.

  2. Role of EZH2 histone methyltrasferase in melanoma progression and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Fade; Shields, Bradley; Makhoul, Issam; Hutchins, Laura F; Shalin, Sara C; Tackett, Alan J

    2016-06-02

    There is accumulating evidence that the histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), the main component of the polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is involved in melanoma progression and metastasis. Novel drugs that target and reverse such epigenetic changes may find a way into the management of patients with advanced melanoma. We provide a comprehensive up-to-date review of the role and biology of EZH2 on gene transcription, senescence/apoptosis, melanoma microenvironment, melanocyte stem cells, the immune system, and micro RNA. Furthermore, we discuss EZH2 inhibitors as potential anti-cancer therapy.

  3. Histone hyperacetylation and exon skipping: a calcium-mediated dynamic regulation in cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Nguyen, Hieu; Cai, Lu; Lou, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to cell type-specific pre-mRNA alternative splicing, mechanisms controlling activity-dependent alternative splicing is under-studied and not well understood. In a recent study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of calcium-mediated mechanism that regulates alternative exon skipping in mouse cardiomyocytes. Our results reveal a strong link between histone hyperacetylation and skipping of cassette exons, and provide support to the kinetic coupling model of the epigenetic regulation of alternative splicing at the chromatin level. PMID:26325491

  4. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  5. In-Flight performance of MESSENGER's Mercury dual imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, S.E.; Murchie, S.L.; Becker, K.J.; Selby, C.M.; Turner, F.S.; Noble, M.W.; Chabot, N.L.; Choo, T.H.; Darlington, E.H.; Denevi, B.W.; Domingue, D.L.; Ernst, C.M.; Holsclaw, G.M.; Laslo, N.R.; Mcclintock, W.E.; Prockter, L.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Solomon, S.C.; Sterner, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 and planned for insertion into orbit around Mercury in 2011, has already completed two flybys of the innermost planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired nearly 2500 images from the first two flybys and viewed portions of Mercury's surface not viewed by Mariner 10 in 1974-1975. Mercury's proximity to the Sun and its slow rotation present challenges to the thermal design for a camera on an orbital mission around Mercury. In addition, strict limitations on spacecraft pointing and the highly elliptical orbit create challenges in attaining coverage at desired geometries and relatively uniform spatial resolution. The instrument designed to meet these challenges consists of dual imagers, a monochrome narrow-angle camera (NAC) with a 1.5?? field of view (FOV) and a multispectral wide-angle camera (WAC) with a 10.5?? FOV, co-aligned on a pivoting platform. The focal-plane electronics of each camera are identical and use a 1024??1024 charge-coupled device detector. The cameras are passively cooled but use diode heat pipes and phase-change-material thermal reservoirs to maintain the thermal configuration during the hot portions of the orbit. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and how the design meets its technical challenges. We also review results from the first two flybys, discuss the quality of MDIS data from the initial periods of data acquisition and how that compares with requirements, and summarize how in-flight tests are being used to improve the quality of the instrument calibration. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  6. histoneHMM : Differential analysis of histone modifications with broad genomic footprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinig, Matthias; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Taudt, Aaron; Rintisch, Carola; Schafer, Sebastian; Pravenec, Michal; Hubner, Norbert; Vingron, Martin; Johannes, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background: ChIP-seq has become a routine method for interrogating the genome-wide distribution of various histone modifications. An important experimental goal is to compare the ChIP-seq profiles between an experimental sample and a reference sample, and to identify regions that show differential

  7. Histone Crosstalk between H3S10ph and H4K16ac Generates a Histone Code that Mediates Transcription Elongation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zippo, Alessio; Serafini, Riccardo; Rocchigiani, Marina; Pennacchini, Susanna; Krepelova, Anna; Oliviero, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    .... This model is based on the histone code hypothesis, where specific histone modifications, acting alone or in combination, can promote or inhibit the binding of a protein (the “reader”) to the nucleosome ( Strahl and Allis, 2000 ). The reader can promote a second histone modification, determining a histone crosstalk which generates a different binding platform ...

  8. Chemical Probes of Histone Lysine Methyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that histone methyltransferases (HMTs, also known as protein methyltransferases (PMTs)) play an important role in diverse biological processes and human diseases by regulating gene expression and the chromatin state. Therefore, HMTs have been increasingly recognized by the biomedical community as a class of potential therapeutic targets. High quality chemical probes of HMTs, as tools for deciphering their physiological functions and roles in human diseases and testing therapeutic hypotheses, are critical for advancing this promising field. In this review, we focus on the discovery, characterization, and biological applications of chemical probes for HMTs. PMID:25423077

  9. Histone Deacetylase: Therapeutic Targets in Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Conor; Yin, Jun; Kennedy, Breandán N

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies report that retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) valproic acid (VPA) present with improved visual fields and delayed vision loss. However, other studies report poor efficacy and safety of HDACi in other cohorts of retinal degeneration patients. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms by which HDACi can improve visual function is unknown, albeit HDACi can attenuate pro-apoptotic stimuli and induce expression of neuroprotective factors. Thus, further analysis of HDACi is warranted in pre-clinical models of retinal degeneration including zebrafish. Analysis of HDAC expression in developing zebrafish reveals diverse temporal expression patterns during development and maturation of visual function.

  10. Autophagy induction by histone deacetylase inhibitors inhibits HIV type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Grant R; Bruckman, Rachel S; Chu, Yen-Lin; Spector, Stephen A

    2015-02-20

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being evaluated in a "shock-and-kill" therapeutic approach to reverse human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) latency from CD4(+) T cells. Using this approach, HDACi have induced HIV RNA synthesis in latently infected cells from some patients. The hope is that the increase in viral production will lead to killing of the infected cell either by the virus itself or by the patient's immune system, a "sterilizing cure." Although administered within the context of combination antiretroviral therapy, the infection of bystander cells remains a concern. In this study, we investigated the effect of HDACi (belinostat, givinostat, panobinostat, romidepsin, and vorinostat) on the productive infection of macrophages. We demonstrate that the HDACi tested do not alter the initial susceptibility of macrophages to HIV infection. However, we demonstrate that HDACi decrease HIV release from macrophages in a dose-dependent manner (belinostat the canonical autophagy pathway. This mechanism involves unc-51-like autophagy-activating kinase 1 (ULK1) and the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin and requires the formation of autophagosomes and their maturation into autolysosomes in the absence of increased cell death. These data provide further evidence in support of a role for autophagy in the control of HIV infection and suggest that careful consideration of off-target effects will be essential if HDACi are to be a component of a multipronged approach to eliminate latently infected cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Neuroprotective Functions for the Histone Deacetylase SIRT6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Kaluski

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The histone deacetylase SIRT6 promotes DNA repair, but its activity declines with age with a concomitant accumulation of DNA damage. Furthermore, SIRT6 knockout mice exhibit an accelerated aging phenotype and die prematurely. Here, we report that brain-specific SIRT6-deficient mice survive but present behavioral defects with major learning impairments by 4 months of age. Moreover, the brains of these mice show increased signs of DNA damage, cell death, and hyperphosphorylated Tau—a critical mark in several neurodegenerative diseases. Mechanistically, SIRT6 regulates Tau protein stability and phosphorylation through increased activation of the kinase GSK3α/β. Finally, SIRT6 mRNA and protein levels are reduced in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Taken together, our results suggest that SIRT6 is critical to maintain genomic stability in the brain and that its loss leads to toxic Tau stability and phosphorylation. Therefore, SIRT6 and its downstream signaling could be targeted in Alzheimer’s disease and age-related neurodegeneration.

  12. Histone modifications and regeneration in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Sofia M C; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea has emerged as a powerful model system for studying regeneration and adult stem cell (ASC) biology. This is largely due to the developmental plasticity of these organisms and the abundant distribution and experimental accessibility of their ASCs. Techniques such as whole mount in situ hybridization, dsRNA-mediated interference, halogenated thymidine analogs for defining cell lineages, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting among other methods, have allowed researchers to interrogate the biology and attendant pluripotent stem cells of these animals in great detail. Therefore, it has now become possible to interrogate and define the roles that epigenetic states may play in regulating ASCs, and by extension, regeneration proper. Here, we provide a primer on the types and number of histone families found in S. mediterranea, known as epigenetic marks of these molecules and a survey of epigenetic modifying enzymes encoded by the planarian genome. We also review experimental evidence indicating that such modifications may in fact play key roles in determining the activities of planarian stem cells. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Abnormal Histone Methylation is Responsible for Increased VEGF165a Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells in Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Rachel L.; John, Alison E.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Knox, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), a key angiogenic molecule, is aberrantly expressed in several diseases including asthma where it contributes to bronchial vascular remodelling and chronic inflammation. Asthmatic human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells hypersecrete VEGF but the mechanism is unclear. Here we defined the mechanism in HASM cells from non-asthmatic (NA) and asthmatic (A) patients. We found that asthmatic cells lacked a repression complex at the VEGF promoter which was present in non-asthmatic cells. Recruitment of G9A, trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) and a resultant decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) at the VEGF promoter was critical to repression of VEGF secretion in non-asthmatic cells. At the asthmatic promoter H3K9me3 was absent due to failed recruitment of G9a; RNA pol II binding, in association with TAF1, was increased, H3K4me3 was present and Sp1 binding was exaggerated and sustained. In contrast DNA methylation and histone acetylation were similar in A and NA cells. This is the first study to show that airway cells in asthma have altered epigenetic regulation of remodelling gene(s). Histone methylation at genes such as VEGF may be an important new therapeutic target. PMID:22689881

  14. FASTKD2 is an RNA-binding protein required for mitochondrial RNA processing and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popow, Johannes; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Curk, Tomaz; Schwarzl, Thomas; Sauer, Sven; Hentze, Matthias W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial RNA processing is an essential step for the synthesis of the components of the electron transport chain in all eukaryotic organisms, yet several aspects of mitochondrial RNA biogenesis and regulation are not sufficiently understood. RNA interactome capture identified several disease-relevant RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) with noncanonical RNA-binding architectures, including all six members of the FASTK (FAS-activated serine/threonine kinase) family of proteins. A mutation within one of these newly assigned FASTK RBPs, FASTKD2, causes a rare form of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. To investigate whether RNA binding of FASTKD2 contributes to the disease phenotype, we identified the RNA targets of FASTKD2 by iCLIP. FASTKD2 interacts with a defined set of mitochondrial transcripts including 16S ribosomal RNA (RNR2) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) messenger RNA. CRISPR-mediated deletion of FASTKD2 leads to aberrant processing and expression of RNR2 and ND6 mRNA that encodes a subunit of the respiratory complex I. Metabolic phenotyping of FASTKD2-deficient cells reveals impaired cellular respiration with reduced activities of all respiratory complexes. This work identifies key aspects of the molecular network of a previously uncharacterized, disease-relevant RNA-binding protein, FASTKD2, by a combination of genomic, molecular, and metabolic analyses. © 2015 Popow et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Spirulina platensis Extract via the Modulation of Histone Deacetylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tho X. Pham

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that the organic extract of Spirulina platensis (SPE, an edible blue-green alga, possesses potent anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated if the regulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs play a role in the anti-inflammatory effect of SPE in macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with SPE rapidly and dose-dependently reduced HDAC2, 3, and 4 proteins which preceded decreases in their mRNA levels. Degradation of HDAC4 protein was attenuated in the presence of inhibitors of calpain proteases, lysosomal acidification, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, respectively, but not a proteasome inhibitor. Acetylated histone H3 was increased in SPE-treated macrophages to a similar level as macrophages treated with a pan-HDAC inhibitor, with concomitant inhibition of inflammatory gene expression upon LPS stimulation. Knockdown of HDAC3 increased basal and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression, while HDAC4 knockdown increased basal expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β, but attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that SPE decreased p65 binding and H3K9/K14 acetylation at the Il-1β and tumor necrosis factor α (Tnfα promoters. Our results suggest that SPE increased global histone H3 acetylation by facilitating HDAC protein degradation, but decreases histone H3K9/K14 acetylation and p65 binding at the promoters of Il-1β and Tnfα to exert its anti-inflammatory effect.

  16. An mRNA is capped by a 2', 5' lariat catalyzed by a group I-like ribozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Westhof, Eric; Johansen, Steinar

    2005-01-01

    Twin-ribozyme introns are formed by two ribozymes belonging to the group I family and occur in some ribosomal RNA transcripts. The group I-like ribozyme, GIR1, liberates the 5' end of a homing endonuclease messenger RNA in the slime mold Didymium iridis. We demonstrate that this cleavage occurs...

  17. RNA-interference-based gene therapy approaches to HIV type-1 treatment: tackling the hurdles from bench to bedside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Eije, Karin J.; Berkhout, Ben

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular mechanism that can be induced by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to mediate sequence-specific gene silencing by cleavage of the targeted messenger RNA. RNAi can be used as an antiviral approach to silence HIV type-1 (HIV-1) through stable expression of

  18. Intragraft interleukin 2 mRNA expression during acute cellular rejection and left ventricular total wall thickness after heart transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot-Kruseman, H A; Baan, C C; Hagman, E M; Mol, W M; Niesters, H G; Maat, A P; Zondervan, P E; Weimar, W; Balk, A H

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether diastolic graft function is influenced by intragraft interleukin 2 (IL-2) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in rejecting cardiac allografts. DESIGN: 16 recipients of cardiac allografts were monitored during the first three months after transplantation. The presence of IL-2

  19. Resolving Heart Regeneration by Replacement Histone Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Joseph Aaron; Kuzu, Guray; Lee, Nutishia; Karasik, Jaclyn; Gemberling, Matthew; Foglia, Matthew J; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L; Sun, Fei; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Poss, Kenneth D

    2017-02-27

    Chromatin regulation is a principal mechanism governing animal development, yet it is unclear to what extent structural changes in chromatin underlie tissue regeneration. Non-mammalian vertebrates such as zebrafish activate cardiomyocyte (CM) division after tissue damage to regenerate lost heart muscle. Here, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing a biotinylatable H3.3 histone variant in CMs and derived cell-type-specific profiles of histone replacement. We identified an emerging program of putative enhancers that revise H3.3 occupancy during regeneration, overlaid upon a genome-wide reduction of H3.3 from promoters. In transgenic reporter lines, H3.3-enriched elements directed gene expression in subpopulations of CMs. Other elements increased H3.3 enrichment and displayed enhancer activity in settings of injury- and/or Neuregulin1-elicited CM proliferation. Dozens of consensus sequence motifs containing predicted transcription factor binding sites were enriched in genomic regions with regeneration-responsive H3.3 occupancy. Thus, cell-type-specific regulatory programs of tissue regeneration can be revealed by genome-wide H3.3 profiling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Histone Methylation and Epigenetic Silencing in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    methylation of histone H1 or nucleosomal histone H3, Mol. Cell 14 (2004) 183–193. [64] C. Martin , R. Cao, Y. Zhang, Substrate preferences of the EZH2...101] N.A. Lobo , Y. Shimono, D. Qian, M.F. Clarke, The biology of cancer stem cells, Annu. Rev. Cell Dev. Biol. 23 (2007) 675–699. [102] J. Stingl, C

  1. A Peek into the Complex Realm of Histone Phosphorylation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Taraswi; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Although discovered long ago, posttranslational phosphorylation of histones has been in the spotlight only recently. Information is accumulating almost daily on phosphorylation of histones and their roles in cellular physiology and human diseases. An extensive cross talk exists between phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications, which together regulate various biological processes, including gene transcription, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Recent research on histone phosphorylation has demonstrated that nearly all histone types are phosphorylated at specific residues and that these modifications act as a critical intermediate step in chromosome condensation during cell division, transcriptional regulation, and DNA damage repair. As with all young fields, apparently conflicting and sometimes controversial observations about histone phosphorylations and their true functions in different species are found in the literature. Accumulating evidence suggests that instead of functioning strictly as part of a general code, histone phosphorylation probably functions by establishing cross talk with other histone modifications and serving as a platform for recruitment or release of effector proteins, leading to a downstream cascade of events. Here we extensively review published information on the complexities of histone phosphorylation, the roles of proteins recognizing these modifications and the resuting physiological outcome, and, importantly, future challenges and opportunities in this fast-moving field. PMID:22006017

  2. Evidence for sequence biases associated with patterns of histone methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combinations of histone variants and modifications, conceptually representing a histone code, have been proposed to play a significant role in gene regulation and developmental processes in complex organisms. While various mechanisms have been implicated in establishing and maintaining epigenetic patterns at specific locations in the genome, they are generally believed to be independent of primary DNA sequence on a more global scale. Results To address this systematically in the case of the human genome, we have analyzed primary DNA sequences underlying patterns of 19 different methylated histones in human primary T-cells and patterns of three methylated histones across additional human cell lines. We report strong sequence biases associated with most of these histone marks genome-wide in each cell type. Furthermore, the sequence characteristics for such association are distinct for different groups of histone marks. Conclusions These findings provide evidence of an influence of genomic sequence on patterns of histone modification associated with gene expression and chromatin programming, and they suggest that the mechanisms responsible for global histone modifications may interpret genomic sequence in various ways.

  3. Histone methylation and aging: Lessons learned from model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Brenna S.; Dang, Weiwei

    2014-01-01

    Aging induces myriad cellular and, ultimately, physiological changes that cause a decline in an organism's functional capabilities. Although the aging process and pathways that regulate it have been extensively studied, only in the last decade have we begun to appreciate that dynamic histone methylation may contribute to this process. In this review, we discuss recent work implicating histone methylation in aging. Loss of certain histone methyltransferases and demethylases changes lifespan in invertebrates, and alterations in histone methylation in aged organisms regulate lifespan and aging phenotypes, including oxidative stress-induced hormesis in yeast, insulin signaling in Caenorhabiditis elegans and mammals, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype in mammals. In all cases where histone methylation has been shown to impact aging and aging phenotypes, it does so by regulating transcription, suggesting that this is a major mechanism of its action in this context. Histone methylation additionally regulates or is regulated by other cellular pathways that contribute to or combat aging. Given the numerous processes that regulate aging and histone methylation, and are in turn regulated by them, the role of histone methylation in aging is almost certainly underappreciated. PMID:24859460

  4. Co-regulation of histone-modifying enzymes in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul B M M K Islam

    Full Text Available Cancer is characterized by aberrant patterns of expression of multiple genes. These major shifts in gene expression are believed to be due to not only genetic but also epigenetic changes. The epigenetic changes are communicated through chemical modifications, including histone modifications. However, it is unclear whether the binding of histone-modifying proteins to genomic regions and the placing of histone modifications efficiently discriminates corresponding genes from the rest of the genes in the human genome. We performed gene expression analysis of histone demethylases (HDMs and histone methyltransferases (HMTs, their target genes and genes with relevant histone modifications in normal and tumor tissues. Surprisingly, this analysis revealed the existence of correlations in the expression levels of different HDMs and HMTs. The observed HDM/HMT gene expression signature was specific to particular normal and cancer cell types and highly correlated with target gene expression and the expression of genes with histone modifications. Notably, we observed that trimethylation at lysine 4 and lysine 27 separated preferentially expressed and underexpressed genes, which was strikingly different in cancer cells compared to normal cells. We conclude that changes in coordinated regulation of enzymes executing histone modifications may underlie global epigenetic changes occurring in cancer.

  5. The Fork in the Road: Histone Partitioning During DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony T. Annunziato

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the following discussion the distribution of histones at the replication fork is examined, with specific attention paid to the question of H3/H4 tetramer "splitting." After a presentation of early experiments surrounding this topic, more recent contributions are detailed. The implications of these findings with respect to the transmission of histone modifications and epigenetic models are also addressed.

  6. Erasing the methyl mark: histone demethylases at the center of cellular differentiation and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cloos, Paul A C; Christensen, Jesper; Agger, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The enzymes catalyzing lysine and arginine methylation of histones are essential for maintaining transcriptional programs and determining cell fate and identity. Until recently, histone methylation was regarded irreversible. However, within the last few years, several families of histone...... demethylases erasing methyl marks associated with gene repression or activation have been identified, underscoring the plasticity and dynamic nature of histone methylation. Recent discoveries have revealed that histone demethylases take part in large multiprotein complexes synergizing with histone deacetylases......, histone methyltransferases, and nuclear receptors to control developmental and transcriptional programs. Here we review the emerging biochemical and biological functions of the histone demethylases and discuss their potential involvement in human diseases, including cancer....

  7. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase regulates global histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, Luciano; Vancura, Ales

    2012-07-06

    Histone acetylation depends on intermediary metabolism for supplying acetyl-CoA in the nucleocytosolic compartment. However, because nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA is also used for de novo synthesis of fatty acids, histone acetylation and synthesis of fatty acids compete for the same acetyl-CoA pool. The first and rate-limiting reaction in de novo synthesis of fatty acids is carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA, catalyzed by acetyl-CoA carboxylase. In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, acetyl-CoA carboxylase is encoded by the ACC1 gene. In this study, we show that attenuated expression of ACC1 results in increased acetylation of bulk histones, globally increased acetylation of chromatin histones, and altered transcriptional regulation. Together, our data indicate that Acc1p activity regulates the availability of acetyl-CoA for histone acetyltransferases, thus representing a link between intermediary metabolism and epigenetic mechanisms of transcriptional regulation.

  8. The premelting of nucleoprotein: role of non-histone proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, F.Xavier; De Murcia, Gilbert M.; Daune, Michel P.

    1974-01-01

    In native nucleoprotein, the premelting structural changes of DNA are not observed by circular dichroism measurements. In order to determine which protein fraction of chromatin is responsible for the absence of premelting we have examined a series of nucleoproteins depleted of different protein fractions by treatment with sodium chloride or sodium deoxycholate. The premelting reappears as soon as non-histone proteins are removed or in residual complexes from which the two slightly lysine-rich histone fractions (F2a2+F2b) have been removed. On the other hand, it is shown that histone F1 alone is not able to suppress the premelting phenomenon. It is thus concluded that the absence of premelting is a property of native nucleoprotein where interactions between the different proteins complexed with DNA can occur and especially between the non-histone proteins and the two slightly lysine-rich histone fractions. PMID:10793734

  9. Epigenetic regulation of motivated behaviors by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvir, Lindsay; Duclot, Florian; Wang, Zuoxin; Kabbaj, Mohamed

    2017-10-08

    Growing evidence has begun to elucidate the contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in the modulation and maintenance of gene expression and behavior. Histone acetylation is one such epigenetic mechanism, which has been shown to profoundly alter gene expression and behaviors. In this review, we begin with an overview of the major epigenetic mechanisms including histones acetylation. We next focus on recent evidence about the influence of environmental stimuli on various motivated behaviors through histone acetylation and highlight how histone deacetylase inhibitors can correct some of the pathologies linked to motivated behaviors including substance abuse, feeding and social attachments. Particularly, we emphasize that the effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors on motivated behaviors are time and context-dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Squamocin modulates histone H3 phosphorylation levels and induces G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Chih; Lin, Yi-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Lin, Pei-Chin; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2011-02-08

    Histone modifications in tumorigenesis are increasingly recognized as important epigenetic factors leading to cancer. Increased phosphorylation levels of histone H3 as a result of aurora B and pMSK1 overexpression were observed in various tumors. We selected aurora B and MSK1 as representatives for testing various compounds and drugs, and found that squamocin, a bis-tetrahydrofuran annonaceous acetogenin, exerted a potent effect on histone H3 phosphorylation. GBM8401, Huh-7, and SW620 cells were incubated with 15, 30, and 60 μM squamocin for 24 h. The expressions of mRNA and proteins were analyzed by qRT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The cell viability was determined by an MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptotic cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results showed that squamocin inhibited the proliferation of GBM8401, Huh-7, and SW620 cells, arrested the cell cycle at the G1 phase, and activated both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrated that squamocin had the ability to modulate the phosphorylation levels of H3S10 (H3S10p) and H3S28 (H3S28p) in association with the downregulation of aurora B and pMSK1 expressions. This study is the first to show that squamocin affects epigenetic alterations by modulating histone H3 phosphorylation at S10 and S28, providing a novel view of the antitumor mechanism of squamocin.

  11. Epigenetic therapy of cancer with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Lakshmaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is the study of heritable alterations in gene expression that are not accompanied by the corresponding change in DNA sequence. Three interlinked epigenetic processes regulate gene expression at the level of chromatin, namely DNA methylation, nucleosomal remodeling and histone covalent modifications. Post-translational modifications that occur on certain amino acid residues of the tails of histone proteins modify chromatin structure and form the basis for "histone code". The enzymes Histone Acetyl Transferase (HAT and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC control the level of acetylation of histones and thereby alter gene expression. In many cancers, the balance between HAT and HDAC is altered. HDAC enzymes are grouped into four different classes namely Class I (HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, and HDAC8, Class II (HDAC4, HDAC5, HDAC6, HDAC7, HDAC9, and HDAC10, Class III HDAC and Class IV (HDAC11. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACI exert anticancer activity by promoting acetylation of histones as well as by promoting acetylation of non-histone protein substrates. The effects of HDACI on gene transcription are complex. They cause cell cycle arrest, inhibit DNA repair, induce apoptosis and acetylate non histone proteins causing downstream alterations in gene expression. HDACI are a diverse group of compounds, which vary in structure, biological activity, and specificity. In general, HDACIs contain a zinc-binding domain, a capping group, and a straight chain linker connecting the two. They are classified into four classes namely short chain fatty acids, hydroxamic acids, cyclic peptides and synthetic benzamides. This review describes the clinical utility of HDACI as monotherapy as well as combination therapy with other treatment modalities such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Adverse effects and shortcomings of treatment with HDACI are also discussed in detail.

  12. Finding combinatorial histone code by semi-supervised biclustering

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    Teng Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combinatorial histone modification is an important epigenetic mechanism for regulating chromatin state and gene expression. Given the rapid accumulation of genome-wide histone modification maps, there is a pressing need for computational methods capable of joint analysis of multiple maps to reveal combinatorial modification patterns. Results We present the Semi-Supervised Coherent and Shifted Bicluster Identification algorithm (SS-CoSBI. It uses prior knowledge of combinatorial histone modifications to guide the biclustering process. Specifically, co-occurrence frequencies of histone modifications characterized by mass spectrometry are used as probabilistic priors to adjust the similarity measure in the biclustering process. Using a high-quality set of transcriptional enhancers and associated histone marks, we demonstrate that SS-CoSBI outperforms its predecessor by finding histone modification and genomic locus biclusters with higher enrichment of enhancers. We apply SS-CoSBI to identify multiple cell-type-specific combinatorial histone modification states associated with human enhancers. We show enhancer histone modification states are correlated with the expression of nearby genes. Further, we find that enhancers with the histone mark H3K4me1 have higher levels of DNA methylation and decreased expression of nearby genes, suggesting a functional interplay between H3K4me1 and DNA methylation that can modulate enhancer activities. Conclusions The analysis presented here provides a systematic characterization of combinatorial histone codes of enhancers across three human cell types using a novel semi-supervised biclustering algorithm. As epigenomic maps accumulate, SS-CoSBI will become increasingly useful for understanding combinatorial chromatin modifications by taking advantage of existing knowledge. Availability and implementation SS-CoSBI is implemented in C. The source code is freely available at http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/labs/tan/SS-CoSBI.gz.

  13. Finding combinatorial histone code by semi-supervised biclustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Li; Tan, Kai

    2012-07-03

    Combinatorial histone modification is an important epigenetic mechanism for regulating chromatin state and gene expression. Given the rapid accumulation of genome-wide histone modification maps, there is a pressing need for computational methods capable of joint analysis of multiple maps to reveal combinatorial modification patterns. We present the Semi-Supervised Coherent and Shifted Bicluster Identification algorithm (SS-CoSBI). It uses prior knowledge of combinatorial histone modifications to guide the biclustering process. Specifically, co-occurrence frequencies of histone modifications characterized by mass spectrometry are used as probabilistic priors to adjust the similarity measure in the biclustering process. Using a high-quality set of transcriptional enhancers and associated histone marks, we demonstrate that SS-CoSBI outperforms its predecessor by finding histone modification and genomic locus biclusters with higher enrichment of enhancers. We apply SS-CoSBI to identify multiple cell-type-specific combinatorial histone modification states associated with human enhancers. We show enhancer histone modification states are correlated with the expression of nearby genes. Further, we find that enhancers with the histone mark H3K4me1 have higher levels of DNA methylation and decreased expression of nearby genes, suggesting a functional interplay between H3K4me1 and DNA methylation that can modulate enhancer activities. The analysis presented here provides a systematic characterization of combinatorial histone codes of enhancers across three human cell types using a novel semi-supervised biclustering algorithm. As epigenomic maps accumulate, SS-CoSBI will become increasingly useful for understanding combinatorial chromatin modifications by taking advantage of existing knowledge. SS-CoSBI is implemented in C. The source code is freely available at http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/labs/tan/SS-CoSBI.gz.

  14. CTCF induces histone variant incorporation, erases the H3K27me3 histone mark and opens chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Weth (Oliver); C. Paprotka (Christine); K. Günther (Katharina); A. Schulte (Astrid); M. Baierl (Manuel); J. Leers (Joerg); N.J. Galjart (Niels); R. Renkawitz (Rainer)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInsulators functionally separate active chromatin domains frominactive ones. The insulator factor, CTCF, has been found to bind to boundaries and to mediate insulator function. CTCF binding sites are depleted for the histone modification H3K27me3 and are enriched for the histone variant

  15. Experimental study on inhibitory effects of histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 and TSA on bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Kang, Yin-Dong; Zhou, Mei-Sheng; Fu, Li-Li; Hua, Zhen-Hao; Wang, Li-Ming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (MS-275 and TSA) on T24 human bladder cancer cells in vitro, and explore the possible mechanism. The MTT assay was employed to evaluate the inhibitory effect of MS-275 and TSA on T24 cell growth. FCM was used to analyze the variation of T24 cell cycle distribution and the apoptotic ratio after T24 cells were treated with MS-275 and TSA. Histone acetylation level was detected by Western blot. mRNA expression of p21 WAF1/CIP1, cyclin A, and cyclin E was measured by FQ-PCR. Dynamic changes of Bcl-2 and bax expression were detected by FCM. MS-275 and TSA inhibited T24 cell growth in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Treatment with 4 μmol/l MS-275 or 0.4 μmol/l TSA blocked cell cycling in the G0/G1 phase and induced a significant increase in cell apoptosis. MS-275 and TSA significantly increased the level of histone acetylation, induced p21CIP1WAF1 mRNA expression, and inhibited cyclin A mRNA expression, though no significant effect was observed on cyclin E. Bcl-2 expression was down-regulated, while bax expression was up-regulated. HDAC inhibitors can block bladder cancer cell cycle in vitro and induce apoptosis. The molecular mechanism may be associated with increased level of histone acetylation, down-regulation of p21WAF1/CIP1 expression, up-regulation of cyclin A expression, and dynamic change of bcl-2 and bax expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases 1 and 2 Induces Fetal Hemoglobin through Activation of GATA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearstone, Jeffrey R; Golonzhka, Olga; Chonkar, Apurva; Tamang, David; van Duzer, John H; Jones, Simon S; Jarpe, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention aimed at reactivation of fetal hemoglobin protein (HbF) is a promising approach for ameliorating sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia. Previous studies showed genetic knockdown of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 or 2 is sufficient to induce HbF. Here we show that ACY-957, a selective chemical inhibitor of HDAC1 and 2 (HDAC1/2), elicits a dose and time dependent induction of γ-globin mRNA (HBG) and HbF in cultured primary cells derived from healthy individuals and sickle cell patients. Gene expression profiling of erythroid progenitors treated with ACY-957 identified global changes in gene expression that were significantly enriched in genes previously shown to be affected by HDAC1 or 2 knockdown. These genes included GATA2, which was induced greater than 3-fold. Lentiviral overexpression of GATA2 in primary erythroid progenitors increased HBG, and reduced adult β-globin mRNA (HBB). Furthermore, knockdown of GATA2 attenuated HBG induction by ACY-957. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-Seq) of primary erythroid progenitors demonstrated that HDAC1 and 2 occupancy was highly correlated throughout the GATA2 locus and that HDAC1/2 inhibition led to elevated histone acetylation at well-known GATA2 autoregulatory regions. The GATA2 protein itself also showed increased binding at these regions in response to ACY-957 treatment. These data show that chemical inhibition of HDAC1/2 induces HBG and suggest that this effect is mediated, at least in part, by histone acetylation-induced activation of the GATA2 gene.

  17. Chemical Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases 1 and 2 Induces Fetal Hemoglobin through Activation of GATA2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Shearstone

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention aimed at reactivation of fetal hemoglobin protein (HbF is a promising approach for ameliorating sickle cell disease (SCD and β-thalassemia. Previous studies showed genetic knockdown of histone deacetylase (HDAC 1 or 2 is sufficient to induce HbF. Here we show that ACY-957, a selective chemical inhibitor of HDAC1 and 2 (HDAC1/2, elicits a dose and time dependent induction of γ-globin mRNA (HBG and HbF in cultured primary cells derived from healthy individuals and sickle cell patients. Gene expression profiling of erythroid progenitors treated with ACY-957 identified global changes in gene expression that were significantly enriched in genes previously shown to be affected by HDAC1 or 2 knockdown. These genes included GATA2, which was induced greater than 3-fold. Lentiviral overexpression of GATA2 in primary erythroid progenitors increased HBG, and reduced adult β-globin mRNA (HBB. Furthermore, knockdown of GATA2 attenuated HBG induction by ACY-957. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-Seq of primary erythroid progenitors demonstrated that HDAC1 and 2 occupancy was highly correlated throughout the GATA2 locus and that HDAC1/2 inhibition led to elevated histone acetylation at well-known GATA2 autoregulatory regions. The GATA2 protein itself also showed increased binding at these regions in response to ACY-957 treatment. These data show that chemical inhibition of HDAC1/2 induces HBG and suggest that this effect is mediated, at least in part, by histone acetylation-induced activation of the GATA2 gene.

  18. Insulin-induced inhibition of gluconeogenesis genes, including glutamic pyruvic transaminase 2, is associated with reduced histone acetylation in a human liver cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Kazue; Kamikubo, Michiko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2017-06-01

    Hepatic glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT; also known as alanine aminotransferase) is a gluconeogenesis enzyme that catalyzes conversions between alanine and pyruvic acid. It is also used as a blood biomarker for hepatic damage. In this study, we investigated whether insulin regulates GPT expression, as it does for other gluconeogenesis genes, and if this involves the epigenetic modification of histone acetylation. Human liver-derived HepG2 cells were cultured with 0.5-100nM insulin for 8h, and the mRNA expression of GPT, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), PCK1, G6PC and FBP1 was measured. We also investigated the extent of histone acetylation around these genes. Insulin suppressed the mRNA expression of gluconeogenesis genes (GPT2, GOT1, GOT2, GGT1, GGT2, G6PC, and PCK1) in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA levels of GPT2, but not GPT1, were decreased by insulin. Histone acetylation was also reduced around GPT2, G6PC, and PCK1 in response to insulin. The expression of GPT2 and other gluconeogenesis genes such as G6PC and PCK1 was suppressed by insulin, in association with decreases in histone H3 and H4 acetylation surrounding these genes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Recombinant thrombomodulin protects mice against histone-induced lethal thromboembolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Nakahara

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have shown that histones, the chief protein component of chromatin, are released into the extracellular space during sepsis, trauma, and ischemia-reperfusion injury, and act as major mediators of the death of an organism. This study was designed to elucidate the cellular and molecular basis of histone-induced lethality and to assess the protective effects of recombinant thrombomodulin (rTM. rTM has been approved for the treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in Japan, and is currently undergoing a phase III clinical trial in the United States. METHODS: Histone H3 levels in plasma of healthy volunteers and patients with sepsis and DIC were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Male C57BL/6 mice were injected intravenously with purified histones, and pathological examinations were performed. The protective effects of rTM against histone toxicity were analyzed both in vitro and in mice. RESULTS: Histone H3 was not detectable in plasma of healthy volunteers, but significant levels were observed in patients with sepsis and DIC. These levels were higher in non-survivors than in survivors. Extracellular histones triggered platelet aggregation, leading to thrombotic occlusion of pulmonary capillaries and subsequent right-sided heart failure in mice. These mice displayed symptoms of DIC, including thrombocytopenia, prolonged prothrombin time, decreased fibrinogen, fibrin deposition in capillaries, and bleeding. Platelet depletion protected mice from histone-induced death in the first 30 minutes, suggesting that vessel occlusion by platelet-rich thrombi might be responsible for death during the early phase. Furthermore, rTM bound to extracellular histones, suppressed histone-induced platelet aggregation, thrombotic occlusion of pulmonary capillaries, and dilatation of the right ventricle, and rescued mice from lethal thromboembolism. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular histones cause massive

  20. The Role of Sulforaphane in Epigenetic Mechanisms, Including Interdependence between Histone Modification and DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Majewski, Grzegorz; Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2015-12-12

    Carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression result from genetic and epigenetic changes of the genome that leads to dysregulation of transcriptional activity of genes. Epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells comprise (i) post-translation histone modification (i.e., deacetylation and methylation); (ii) DNA global hypomethylation; (iii) promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes and genes important for cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and (iv) posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by noncoding microRNA. These epigenetic aberrations can be readily reversible and responsive to both synthetic agents and natural components of diet. A source of one of such diet components are cruciferous vegetables, which contain high levels of a number of glucosinolates and deliver, after enzymatic hydrolysis, sulforaphane and other bioactive isothiocyanates, that are involved in effective up-regulation of transcriptional activity of certain genes and also in restoration of active chromatin structure. Thus a consumption of cruciferous vegetables, treated as a source of isothiocyanates, seems to be potentially useful as an effective cancer preventive factor or as a source of nutrients improving efficacy of standard chemotherapies. In this review an attempt is made to elucidate the role of sulforaphane in regulation of gene promoter activity through a direct down-regulation of histone deacetylase activity and alteration of gene promoter methylation in indirect ways, but the sulforaphane influence on non-coding micro-RNA will not be a subject of this review.

  1. The Role of Sulforaphane in Epigenetic Mechanisms, Including Interdependence between Histone Modification and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kaufman-Szymczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression result from genetic and epigenetic changes of the genome that leads to dysregulation of transcriptional activity of genes. Epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells comprise (i post-translation histone modification (i.e., deacetylation and methylation; (ii DNA global hypomethylation; (iii promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes and genes important for cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and (iv posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by noncoding microRNA. These epigenetic aberrations can be readily reversible and responsive to both synthetic agents and natural components of diet. A source of one of such diet components are cruciferous vegetables, which contain high levels of a number of glucosinolates and deliver, after enzymatic hydrolysis, sulforaphane and other bioactive isothiocyanates, that are involved in effective up-regulation of transcriptional activity of certain genes and also in restoration of active chromatin structure. Thus a consumption of cruciferous vegetables, treated as a source of isothiocyanates, seems to be potentially useful as an effective cancer preventive factor or as a source of nutrients improving efficacy of standard chemotherapies. In this review an attempt is made to elucidate the role of sulforaphane in regulation of gene promoter activity through a direct down-regulation of histone deacetylase activity and alteration of gene promoter methylation in indirect ways, but the sulforaphane influence on non-coding micro-RNA will not be a subject of this review.

  2. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor regulates histone deacetylase 8 expression to repress tumor suppressive activity in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Ting; Chiou, Shyh-Shin; Chai, Chee-Yin; Hsi, Edward; Wang, Shen-Nien; Huang, Shau-Ku; Hsu, Shih-Hsien

    2017-01-31

    Histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8), a unique member of class I histone deacetylases, shows remarkable correlation with advanced disease stage and multiple malignant tumors However, little is known about the contribution of HDAC8 to the tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The present study investigated the expression of HDAC8 regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in HCC cell lines and tissues, and the roles of HDAC8 overexpression in cell proliferation, including potentially underlying mechanisms. We assessed the correlation between the clinic-pathological parameters and the expression of AHR and HDAC8. Further, we analyzed the AHR siRNA transfection and HDAC8 inhibitors to explore the functions of HDAC8 in HCC progression in vitro and in vivo. In a panel of 289 HCC patients, HDAC8 was shown to be highly correlated with AHR expression at both mRNA and protein levels. HCC patients with high AHR expression showed a shorter survival time than that with low AHR expression. We then found that the expression of both AHR and HDAC8 was significantly upregulated in both HCC cell lines and tumor tissues compared to human normal hepatocytes and matched non-tumor tissues. Furthermore, HDAC8 inhibition remarkably inhibited hepatoma cell proliferation and transformation activity via upregulation of RB1 in vitro and in vivo. Our data revealed an important role of the AHR-HDAC8 axis in promoting HCC tumorigenesis, thus identifying HDAC8 as a potential therapeutic target for HCC treatment.

  3. Global histone modification of histone H3 in colorectal cancer and its precursor lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Tadao; Kondo, Tetsuo; Ma, Defu; Niu, Dongfeng; Mochizuki, Kunio; Kawasaki, Tomonori; Yamane, Tetsu; Iino, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki; Katoh, Ryohei

    2012-06-01

    Chromatin remodeling through histone modification is an important mechanism of epigenetic gene dysregulation in human cancers. However, little is known about global alteration of histone status during tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Histone H3 status was examined in benign and malignant colorectal tumors by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. For immunohistochemical evaluation, 4 anti-histone H3 antibodies, specific to dimethylation at lysine 4 (H3K4me2), acetylation at lysine 9 (H3K9ac), dimethylation at lysine 9 (H3K9me2), and trimethylation at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), were used. On immunohistochemistry, H3K4me2, H3K9ac, and H3K27me3 showed no significant changes between normal and colorectal tumors. On the other hand, the global level of H3K9me2 was distinctly higher in neoplastic cells (adenoma and adenocarcinoma) than in normal glandular cells. In addition, it was significantly higher in adenocarcinoma than in adenoma. Correspondingly, Western blotting confirmed that H3K9me2 expression was significantly higher in adenocarcinomas than in normal colorectal mucosa. No alteration of H3K9me2 was observed with tumor differentiation and with the histological subtypes of colorectal cancers. These results suggest that aberration of the global H3K9me2 level is an important epigenetic event in colorectal tumorigenesis and carcinogenesis involved with gene regulation in neoplastic cells through chromatin remodeling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting histone modifications--epigenetics in cancer.

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    Waldmann, Tanja; Schneider, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Cancer is one of the most common human diseases. It is long known that mutations in key regulator genes are hallmarks of all cancer types. Apart from these classical genetic pathways there is more and more evidence that also epigenetic alterations are crucially involved in tumourigenesis. In this review we discuss and summarise recent findings of mechanisms responsible for cancer formation apart from the classic genetic mutations. Furthermore, we show how epigenetic and genetic mechanisms could depend on each other and contribute together to cancer formation. We focus mainly on post-translational histone modifications since they are one of the major epigenetic mechanisms regulating gene expression and when they are imbalanced this can result in cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Centromere domain organization and histone modifications

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    P. Bjerling

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Centromere function requires the proper coordination of several subfunctions, such as kinetochore assembly, sister chromatid cohesion, binding of kinetochore microtubules, orientation of sister kinetochores to opposite spindle poles, and their movement towards the spindle poles. Centromere structure appears to be organized in different, separable domains in order to accomplish these functions. Despite the conserved nature of centromere functions, the molecular genetic definition of the DNA sequences that form a centromere in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and in humans has revealed little conservation at the level of centromere DNA sequences. Also at the protein level few centromere proteins are conserved in all of these four organisms and many are unique to the different organisms. The recent analysis of the centromere structure in the yeast S. pombe by electron microscopy and detailed immunofluorescence microscopy of Drosophila centromeres have brought to light striking similarities at the overall structural level between these centromeres and the human centromere. The structural organization of the centromere is generally multilayered with a heterochromatin domain and a central core/inner plate region, which harbors the outer plate structures of the kinetochore. It is becoming increasingly clear that the key factors for assembly and function of the centromere structure are the specialized histones and modified histones which are present in the centromeric heterochromatin and in the chromatin of the central core. Thus, despite the differences in the DNA sequences and the proteins that define a centromere, there is an overall structural similarity between centromeres in evolutionarily diverse eukaryotes.

  6. Chromatin structure and pre-mRNA processing work together.

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    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Reyes, José C

    2016-05-26

    Chromatin is the natural context for transcription elongation. However, the elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is forced to pause by the positioned nucleosomes present in gene bodies. Here, we briefly discuss the current results suggesting that those pauses could serve as a mechanism to coordinate transcription elongation with pre-mRNA processing. Further, histone post-translational modifications have been found to regulate the recruitment of factors involved in pre-mRNA processing. This view highlights the important regulatory role of the chromatin context in the whole process of the mature mRNA synthesis.

  7. Histone variants of the insect Plodia interpunctella during metamorphosis.

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    Pataryas, T A; Sekeri-Pataryas, K T; Bonner, W M; Marinou, V A

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of histone variants from the meal moth Plodia interpunctella was compared to the mouse histone variant pattern. Plodia contains histones which comigrate on two dimensional gels with H3.2, H3.3, H4 and H2A.Z in mouse. Plodia H2A.1 and H2B.1 migrate somewhat differently from the respective mouse histones. Comparison of the iodinated tryptic peptides of H2A.1 and H2A.Z from mouse and Plodia showed that the H2A.Z proteins have two iodinated peptides that comigrate in the two species and three more that are different. The H2A.1 proteins in the two species have one iodinated peptide which comigrates and two more which migrate very close to each other. The histone variants from three developmental stages, larval, pupal and adult of Plodia interpunctella were also identified and compared. The same histone variant pattern is found through all stages of development. It is concluded that histone gene expression does not change during metamorphosis in Plodia .

  8. Interpreting the language of histone and DNA modifications.

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    Rothbart, Scott B; Strahl, Brian D

    2014-08-01

    A major mechanism regulating the accessibility and function of eukaryotic genomes are the covalent modifications to DNA and histone proteins that dependably package our genetic information inside the nucleus of every cell. Formally postulated over a decade ago, it is becoming increasingly clear that post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histones act singly and in combination to form a language or 'code' that is read by specialized proteins to facilitate downstream functions in chromatin. Underappreciated at the time was the level of complexity harbored both within histone PTMs and their combinations, as well as within the proteins that read and interpret the language. In addition to histone PTMs, newly-identified DNA modifications that can recruit specific effector proteins have raised further awareness that histone PTMs operate within a broader language of epigenetic modifications to orchestrate the dynamic functions associated with chromatin. Here, we highlight key recent advances in our understanding of the epigenetic language encompassing histone and DNA modifications and foreshadow challenges that lie ahead as we continue our quest to decipher the fundamental mechanisms of chromatin regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular mechanisms of histone modification function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Histone propionylation is a mark of active chromatin.

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    Kebede, Adam F; Nieborak, Anna; Shahidian, Lara Zorro; Le Gras, Stephanie; Richter, Florian; Gómez, Diana Aguilar; Baltissen, Marijke P; Meszaros, Gergo; Magliarelli, Helena de Fatima; Taudt, Aaron; Margueron, Raphael; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Ricci, Romeo; Daujat, Sylvain; Vermeulen, Michiel; Mittler, Gerhard; Schneider, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Histones are highly covalently modified, but the functions of many of these modifications remain unknown. In particular, it is unclear how histone marks are coupled to cellular metabolism and how this coupling affects chromatin architecture. We identified histone H3 Lys14 (H3K14) as a site of propionylation and butyrylation in vivo and carried out the first systematic characterization of histone propionylation. We found that H3K14pr and H3K14bu are deposited by histone acetyltransferases, are preferentially enriched at promoters of active genes and are recognized by acylation-state-specific reader proteins. In agreement with these findings, propionyl-CoA was able to stimulate transcription in an in vitro transcription system. Notably, genome-wide H3 acylation profiles were redefined following changes to the metabolic state, and deletion of the metabolic enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase altered global histone propionylation levels. We propose that histone propionylation, acetylation and butyrylation may act in combination to promote high transcriptional output and to couple cellular metabolism with chromatin structure and function.

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote the tumoricidal effect of HAMLET.

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    Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gustafsson, Lotta; Duringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Svanborg, Catharina

    2007-12-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) and HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interact with histones, modify the structure of chromatin, and trigger tumor cell death. This study investigated how the combination of HDIs and HAMLET influences cell viability, histone acetylation, and DNA integrity. The pretreatment of tumor cells with HDIs was shown to enhance the lethal effect of HAMLET and the histone hyperacetylation response to HDIs increased even further after HAMLET treatment. HDIs and HAMLET were shown to target different histone domains as HAMLET bound tailless core histones, whereas HDIs modify the acetylation of the histone tail. DNA damage in response to HAMLET was increased by HDIs. The DNA repair response (p21WAFI expression) was induced by both agonists but abolished when the two agonists were combined. The results suggest that the synergy of HDIs and HAMLET is based on different but converging death pathways, both involving chromatin alterations. We speculate that HAMLET and HDIs might be combined to promote tumor cell death in vivo.

  11. Dysregulation of Histone Acetyltransferases and Deacetylases in Cardiovascular Diseases

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    Yonggang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide despite advances in its prevention and management. A comprehensive understanding of factors which contribute to CVD is required in order to develop more effective treatment options. Dysregulation of epigenetic posttranscriptional modifications of histones in chromatin is thought to be associated with the pathology of many disease models, including CVD. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs and deacetylases (HDACs are regulators of histone lysine acetylation. Recent studies have implicated a fundamental role of reversible protein acetylation in the regulation of CVDs such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, diabetic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, and heart failure. This reversible acetylation is governed by enzymes that HATs add or HDACs remove acetyl groups respectively. New evidence has revealed that histone acetylation regulators blunt cardiovascular and related disease states in certain cellular processes including myocyte hypertrophy, apoptosis, fibrosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. The accumulating evidence of the detrimental role of histone acetylation in cardiac disease combined with the cardioprotective role of histone acetylation regulators suggests that the use of histone acetylation regulators may serve as a novel approach to treating the millions of patients afflicted by cardiac diseases worldwide.

  12. Germline-specific H1 variants: the "sexy" linker histones.

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    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Azorín, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packed into chromatin, a nucleoprotein complex mainly formed by the interaction of DNA with the abundant basic histone proteins. The fundamental structural and functional subunit of chromatin is the nucleosome core particle, which is composed by 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octameric protein complex formed by two copies of each core histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In addition, although not an intrinsic component of the nucleosome core particle, linker histone H1 directly interacts with it in a monomeric form. Histone H1 binds nucleosomes near the exit/entry sites of linker DNA, determines nucleosome repeat length and stabilizes higher-order organization of nucleosomes into the ∼30 nm chromatin fiber. In comparison to core histones, histone H1 is less well conserved through evolution. Furthermore, histone H1 composition in metazoans is generally complex with most species containing multiple variants that play redundant as well as specific functions. In this regard, a characteristic feature is the presence of specific H1 variants that replace somatic H1s in the germline and during early embryogenesis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about their structural and functional properties.

  13. PTEN Interacts with Histone H1 and Controls Chromatin Condensation

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    Chen, Zhu Hong; Zhu, Minglu; Yang, Jingyi; Liang, Hui; He, Jinxue; He, Shiming; Wang, Pan; Kang, Xi; McNutt, Michael A.; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromatin organization and dynamics are integral to global gene transcription. Histone modification influences chromatin status and gene expression. PTEN plays multiple roles in tumor suppression, development and metabolism. Here we report on the interplay of PTEN, histone H1 and chromatin. We show that loss of PTEN leads to dissociation of histone H1 from chromatin and decondensation of chromatin. PTEN deletion also results in elevation of histone H4 acetylation at lysine 16, an epigenetic marker for chromatin activation. We found that PTEN and histone H1 physically interact through their C-terminal domains. Disruption of the PTEN C-terminus promotes the chromatin association of MOF acetyltransferase and induces H4K16 acetylation. Hyperacetylation of H4K16 impairs the association of PTEN with histone H1, which constitutes regulatory feedback that may deteriorate chromatin stability. Our results demonstrate that PTEN controls chromatin condensation, thus influencing gene expression. We propose that PTEN regulates global gene transcription profiling through histones and chromatin remodeling. PMID:25199838

  14. Phloem-mobile messenger RNAs and root development

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    David J. Hannapel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous signal molecules move through the phloem to regulate development, including proteins, secondary metabolites, small RNAs and full-length transcripts. Several full-length mRNAs have been identified that move long distances in a shootward or rootward direction through the plant vasculature to modulate both floral and vegetative processes of growth. Here we discuss two recently discovered examples of long-distance transport of full-length mRNAs into roots and the potential target genes and pathways for these mobile signals. In both cases, the mobile RNAs regulate root growth. Previously, RNA movement assays demonstrated that transcripts of StBEL5, a transcription factor from the three-amino-loop-extension superclass, move through the phloem to stolon tips to enhance tuber formation in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.. StBEL5 mRNA originates in the leaf and its movement to stolons is induced by a short-day photoperiod. Movement of StBEL5 RNA to roots correlated with increased growth and the accumulation of several transcripts associated with hormone metabolism, including GA2-oxidase1, YUCCA1a and -c, several Aux/IAA types, and PIN1, -2, and -4 was observed. In another example, heterografting techniques were used to identify phloem-mobile Aux/IAA transcripts in Arabidopsis. Movement assays confirmed that these Aux/IAA transcripts are transported into the root system where they suppress lateral root formation. Phloem transport of both StBEL5 and Aux/IAA RNAs are linked to hormone metabolism and both target auxin synthesis genes or auxin signaling processes. The mechanisms of transport for these mobile RNAs, the impact they have on controlling root growth, and a potential transcriptional connection between the BEL1/KNOX complex and Aux/IAA genes are discussed.

  15. Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy on M1-Related Cytokine Expression in Monocytes via Histone Modification

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    Chia-Hsin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy (LLLT has been used in the treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis and allergic rhinitis. However, the effects of LLLT on human monocyte polarization into M1 macrophages are unknown. To evaluate the effects of LLLT on M1-related cytokine and chemokine production and elucidate the mechanism, the human monocyte cell line THP-1 was treated with different doses of LLLT. The expression of M1-related cytokines and chemokines (CCL2, CXCL10, and TNF-α was determined by ELISA and real-time PCR. LLLT-associated histone modifications were examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays. Mitochondrial involvement in the LLLT-induced M1-related cytokine expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell surface markers for monocyte polarization. The results showed that LLLT (660 nm significantly enhanced M1-related cytokine and chemokine expression in mRNA and protein levels. Mitochondrial copy number and mRNA levels of complex I-V protein were increased by LLLT (1 J/cm2. Activation of M1 polarization was concomitant with histone modification at TNF-α gene locus and IP-10 gene promoter area. This study indicates that LLLT (660 nm enhanced M1-related cytokine and chemokine expression via mitochondrial biogenesis and histone modification, which may be a potent immune-enhancing agent for the treatment of allergic diseases.

  16. Effects of low-level laser therapy on M1-related cytokine expression in monocytes via histone modification.

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    Chen, Chia-Hsin; Wang, Chau-Zen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Liao, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yi-Jen; Kuo, Chang-Hung; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in the treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis and allergic rhinitis. However, the effects of LLLT on human monocyte polarization into M1 macrophages are unknown. To evaluate the effects of LLLT on M1-related cytokine and chemokine production and elucidate the mechanism, the human monocyte cell line THP-1 was treated with different doses of LLLT. The expression of M1-related cytokines and chemokines (CCL2, CXCL10, and TNF-α) was determined by ELISA and real-time PCR. LLLT-associated histone modifications were examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Mitochondrial involvement in the LLLT-induced M1-related cytokine expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell surface markers for monocyte polarization. The results showed that LLLT (660 nm) significantly enhanced M1-related cytokine and chemokine expression in mRNA and protein levels. Mitochondrial copy number and mRNA levels of complex I-V protein were increased by LLLT (1 J/cm(2)). Activation of M1 polarization was concomitant with histone modification at TNF-α gene locus and IP-10 gene promoter area. This study indicates that LLLT (660 nm) enhanced M1-related cytokine and chemokine expression via mitochondrial biogenesis and histone modification, which may be a potent immune-enhancing agent for the treatment of allergic diseases.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of GATA4 expression by histone modification in AFP-producing gastric adenocarcinoma.

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    Yamamura, Nobuhisa; Kishimoto, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    AFP-producing adenocarcinoma is a variant of adenocarcinoma with high malignancy. Production of AFP suggests enteroblastic or hepatoid differentiation of cancer cells. GATA4 is a key molecule involved in the prenatal development of the stomach and liver. GATA4 is epigenetically silenced by hypermethylation of primer region in many types of cancers including gastric cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and epigenetic regulation of GATA4 in AFP-producing adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that GATA4 was positive in 3/8 cases of AFP-producing gastric adenocarcinomas and in 28/30 cases of common type adenocarcinomas. Epigenetic modification of GATA4 promoter region was investigated with 3 AFP-producing and 4 common-type gastric cancer cell lines. GATA4 mRNA was detected in 1/3 of AFP-producing and 2/4 of common-type gastric cancer cell lines by RT-PCR. Methylation-specific PCR revealed no GATA4 methylation in any of the AFP-producing gastric cancers, whereas methylation was consistent with GATA4 expression in the common-type gastric cancers. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay for AFP-producing gastric cancers revealed that histones H3 and H4 were hypoacetylated in the GATA4-negative cells, while they were hyperacetylated in the GATA4-positive cells. Treatment with trichostain A, an inhibitor for histone deacetylase, induced acetylation of histones H3 and H4, and tri-methylation of lysine 4 of histone H3, which was associated with the active transcription of GATA4 in GATA4-negative AFP-producing cells. These results indicated that histone deacetylation is a silencing mechanism for GATA4 expression in AFP-producing gastric cancer cells. Differences between AFP-producing gastric cancer and common-type gastric cancer in terms of the mechanism of GATA4 regulation may be reflected in the phenotypic deviation of AFP-producing gastric cancer from common-type gastric cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Micro-RNA quantification using DNA polymerase and pyrophosphate quantification.

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    Yu, Hsiang-Ping; Hsiao, Yi-Ling; Pan, Hung-Yin; Huang, Chih-Hung; Hou, Shao-Yi

    2011-12-15

    A rapid quantification method for micro-RNA based on DNA polymerase activity and pyrophosphate quantification has been developed. The tested micro-RNA serves as the primer, unlike the DNA primer in all DNA sequencing methods, and the DNA probe serves as the template for DNA replication. After the DNA synthesis, the pyrophosphate detection and quantification indicate the existence and quantity of the tested miRNA. Five femtomoles of the synthetic RNA could be detected. In 20-100 μg RNA samples purified from SiHa cells, the measurement was done using the proposed assay in which hsa-miR-16 and hsa-miR-21 are 0.34 fmol/μg RNA and 0.71 fmol/μg RNA, respectively. This simple and inexpensive assay takes less than 5 min after total RNA purification and preparation. The quantification is not affected by the pre-miRNA which cannot serve as the primer for the DNA synthesis in this assay. This assay is general for the detection of the target RNA or DNA with a known matched DNA template probe, which could be widely used for detection of small RNA, messenger RNA, RNA viruses, and DNA. Therefore, the method could be widely used in RNA and DNA assays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Dual Role of Calcium as Messenger and Stressor in Cell Damage, Death, and Survival

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    Claudia Cerella

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ is an important second messenger participating in many cellular activities; when physicochemical insults deregulate its delicate homeostasis, it acts as an intrinsic stressor, producing/increasing cell damage. Damage elicits both repair and death responses; intriguingly, in those responses Ca2+ also participates as second messenger. This delineates a dual role for Ca2+ in cell stress, making difficult to separate the different and multiple mechanisms required for Ca2+-mediated control of cell survival and apoptosis. Here we attempt to disentangle the two scenarios, examining on the one side, the events implicated in deregulated Ca2+ toxicity and the mechanisms through which this elicits reparative or death pathways; on the other, reviewing the role of Ca2+ as a messenger in the transduction of these same signaling events.

  20. The effect of addiction to mobile messenger software and mental health among physical education students

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    Mostafa Bagherianfar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of the present study is to the effect of addiction to mobile messenger software on mental health among physical education university students of Torbat-e-Heydarieh city.  Materials and Methods: The statistical population of this descriptive-correlational study included all physical education university students of Torbat-e-Heydarieh city. 169 students out of 302 were chosen as the sample of study, for which stratified sampling method was applied. In order to collect data, Goldberg general health questionnaire and addiction to mobile messenger software inventory were used. Data were analyzed using descriptive and illative statistics.  Results: The research findings showed that there is a statistically significant relationship between addiction to mobile messenger software's and mental health among the students of physical education (P