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Sample records for histone binding specificities

  1. A histone-mimicking interdomain linker in a multidomain protein modulates multivalent histone binding.

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    Kostrhon, Sebastian; Kontaxis, Georg; Kaufmann, Tanja; Schirghuber, Erika; Kubicek, Stefan; Konrat, Robert; Slade, Dea

    2017-10-27

    N-terminal histone tails are subject to many posttranslational modifications that are recognized by and interact with designated reader domains in histone-binding proteins. BROMO domain adjacent to zinc finger 2B (BAZ2B) is a multidomain histone-binding protein that contains two histone reader modules, a plant homeodomain (PHD) and a bromodomain (BRD), linked by a largely disordered linker. Although previous studies have reported specificity of the PHD domain for the unmodified N terminus of histone H3 and of the BRD domain for H3 acetylated at Lys14 (H3K14ac), the exact mode of H3 binding by BAZ2B and its regulation are underexplored. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy, we report that acidic residues in the BAZ2B PHD domain are essential for H3 binding and that BAZ2B PHD-BRD establishes a polyvalent interaction with H3K14ac. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the disordered interdomain linker modulates the histone-binding affinity by interacting with the PHD domain. In particular, lysine-rich stretches in the linker, which resemble the positively charged N terminus of histone H3, reduce the binding affinity of the PHD finger toward the histone substrate. Phosphorylation, acetylation, or poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of the linker residues may therefore act as a cellular mechanism to transiently tune BAZ2B histone-binding affinity. Our findings further support the concept of interdomain linkers serving a dual role in substrate binding by appropriately positioning the adjacent domains and by electrostatically modulating substrate binding. Moreover, inhibition of histone binding by a histone-mimicking interdomain linker represents another example of regulation of protein-protein interactions by intramolecular mimicry. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. The Histone-H3K4-Specific Demethylase KDM5B Binds to Its Substrate and Product through Distinct PHD Fingers

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    Brianna J. Klein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The histone lysine demethylase KDM5B regulates gene transcription and cell differentiation and is implicated in carcinogenesis. It contains multiple conserved chromatin-associated domains, including three PHD fingers of unknown function. Here, we show that the first and third, but not the second, PHD fingers of KDM5B possess histone binding activities. The PHD1 finger is highly specific for unmodified histone H3 (H3K4me0, whereas the PHD3 finger shows preference for the trimethylated histone mark H3K4me3. RNA-seq analysis indicates that KDM5B functions as a transcriptional repressor for genes involved in inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. Biochemical analysis reveals that KDM5B associates with components of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD complex and may cooperate with the histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1 in gene repression. KDM5B is downregulated in triple-negative breast cancer relative to estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. Overexpression of KDM5B in the MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasion, and the PHD1-H3K4me0 interaction is essential for inhibiting migration. These findings highlight tumor-suppressive functions of KDM5B in triple-negative breast cancer cells and suggest a multivalent mechanism for KDM5B-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  3. Promoter- and cell-specific epigenetic regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN by Methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone modifications

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    Schwarzenbach Heidi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study was to analyze the involvement of methyl-CpG binding proteins (MBDs and histone modifications on the regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN in different cellular contexts such as the prostate cancer cells DU145 and LNCaP, and the breast cancer cells MCF-7. Since global chromatin changes have been shown to occur in tumours and regions of tumour-associated genes are affected by epigenetic modifications, these may constitute important regulatory mechanisms for the pathogenesis of malignant transformation. Methods In DU145, LNCaP and MCF-7 cells mRNA expression levels of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN were determined by quantitative RT-PCR at the basal status as well as after treatment with demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A. Furthermore, genomic DNA was bisulfite-converted and sequenced. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed with the stimulated and unstimulated cells using antibodies for MBD1, MBD2 and MeCP2 as well as 17 different histone antibodies. Results Comparison of the different promoters showed that MeCP2 and MBD2a repressed promoter-specifically Cyclin D2 in all cell lines, whereas in MCF-7 cells MeCP2 repressed cell-specifically all methylated promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that all methylated promoters associated with at least one MBD. Treatment of the cells by the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR caused dissociation of the MBDs from the promoters. Only MBD1v1 bound and repressed methylation-independently all promoters. Real-time amplification of DNA immunoprecipitated by 17 different antibodies showed a preferential enrichment for methylated lysine of histone H3 (H3K4me1, H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 at the particular promoters. Notably, the silent promoters were associated with unmodified histones which were acetylated following treatment by 5-aza-CdR. Conclusions This study is one

  4. Inhibition of histone binding by supramolecular hosts

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    Allen, Hillary F.; Daze, Kevin D.; Shimbo, Takashi; Lai, Anne; Musselman, Catherine A.; Sims, Jennifer K.; Wade, Paul A.; Hof†, Fraser; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2015-01-01

    The tandem PHD (plant homeodomain) fingers of the CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4) ATPase are epigenetic readers that bind either unmodified histone H3 tails or H3K9me3 (histone H3 trimethylated at Lys9). This dual function is necessary for the transcriptional and chromatin remodelling activities of the NuRD (nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase) complex. In the present paper, we show that calixarene-based supramolecular hosts disrupt binding of the CHD4 PHD2 finger to H3K9me3, but do not affect the interaction of this protein with the H3K9me0 (unmodified histone H3) tail. A similar inhibitory effect, observed for the association of chromodomain of HP1γ (heterochromatin protein 1γ) with H3K9me3, points to a general mechanism of methyl-lysine caging by calixarenes and suggests a high potential for these compounds in biochemical applications. Immunofluorescence analysis reveals that the supramolecular agents induce changes in chromatin organization that are consistent with their binding to and disruption of H3K9me3 sites in living cells. The results of the present study suggest that the aromatic macrocyclic hosts can be used as a powerful new tool for characterizing methylation-driven epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24576085

  5. Germline-specific H1 variants: the "sexy" linker histones.

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    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Azorín, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packed into chromatin, a nucleoprotein complex mainly formed by the interaction of DNA with the abundant basic histone proteins. The fundamental structural and functional subunit of chromatin is the nucleosome core particle, which is composed by 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octameric protein complex formed by two copies of each core histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In addition, although not an intrinsic component of the nucleosome core particle, linker histone H1 directly interacts with it in a monomeric form. Histone H1 binds nucleosomes near the exit/entry sites of linker DNA, determines nucleosome repeat length and stabilizes higher-order organization of nucleosomes into the ∼30 nm chromatin fiber. In comparison to core histones, histone H1 is less well conserved through evolution. Furthermore, histone H1 composition in metazoans is generally complex with most species containing multiple variants that play redundant as well as specific functions. In this regard, a characteristic feature is the presence of specific H1 variants that replace somatic H1s in the germline and during early embryogenesis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about their structural and functional properties.

  6. No need to be HAMLET or BAMLET to interact with histones: binding of monomeric alpha-lactalbumin to histones and basic poly-amino acids.

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    Permyakov, Serge E; Pershikova, Irina V; Khokhlova, Tatyana I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2004-05-18

    The ability of a specific complex of human alpha-lactalbumin with oleic acid (HAMLET) to induce cell death with selectivity for tumor and undifferentiated cells was shown recently to be mediated by interaction of HAMLET with histone proteins irreversibly disrupting chromatin structure [Duringer, C., et al. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 42131-42135]. Here we show that monomeric alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) in the absence of fatty acids is also able to bind efficiently to the primary target of HAMLET, histone HIII, regardless of Ca(2+) content. Thus, the modification of alpha-LA by oleic acid is not required for binding to histones. We suggest that interaction of negatively charged alpha-LA with the basic histone stabilizes apo-alpha-LA and destabilizes the Ca(2+)-bound protein due to compensation for excess negative charge of alpha-LA's Ca(2+)-binding loop by positively charged residues of the histone. Spectrofluorimetric curves of titration of alpha-LA by histone H3 were well approximated by a scheme of cooperative binding of four alpha-LA molecules per molecule of histone, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 1.0 microM. Such a stoichiometry of binding implies that the binding process is not site-specific with respect to histone and likely is driven by just electrostatic interactions. Co-incubation of positively charged poly-amino acids (poly-Lys and poly-Arg) with alpha-LA resulted in effects which were similar to those caused by histone HIII, confirming the electrostatic nature of the alpha-LA-histone interaction. In all cases that were studied, the binding was accompanied by aggregation. The data indicate that alpha-lactalbumin can be used as a basis for the design of antitumor agents, acting through disorganization of chromatin structure due to interaction between alpha-LA and histone proteins.

  7. Histone modification profiles characterize function-specific gene regulation.

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    Jung, Inkyung; Kim, Dongsup

    2012-10-07

    Chromatin modification is ubiquitous in gene regulation. Despite much effort, a systematic investigation is needed to understand whether each modification has a unique property depending on the function of its associated genes. Here, we show that consideration of function-specific histone modification profiles is important for accurate prediction of gene expression levels, and is maintained across cell types. The performance improvement is thought to originate from the association between modifications and gene expression levels for each biological function. The varying relationship between histone modifications and gene expression levels can be partly explained by considering function-specific PolII recruitment mechanisms, and is supported by more accurate predictions of PolII occupancies with function-specific modification profiles. We suggest that the function-specific binding of transcription factors and chromatin regulators may explain similar gene regulatory mechanisms, such as function-specific PolII recruitment, in each functional gene set. Our study demonstrates that each histone modification has a different characteristic according to the function of its associated genes; thus, different combinations of histone modification profiles characterize function-specific gene regulation. The current analysis is available on our web server (biodb.kaist.ac.kr/impohis). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biochemical profiling of histone binding selectivity of the yeast bromodomain family.

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    Qiang Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that molecular interactions between site-specific chemical modifications such as acetylation and methylation on DNA-packing histones and conserved structural modules present in transcriptional proteins are closely associated with chromatin structural changes and gene activation. Unlike methyl-lysine that can interact with different protein modules including chromodomains, Tudor and MBT domains, as well as PHD fingers, acetyl-lysine (Kac is known thus far to be recognized only by bromodomains. While histone lysine acetylation plays a crucial role in regulation of chromatin-mediated gene transcription, a high degree of sequence variation of the acetyl-lysine binding site in the bromodomains has limited our understanding of histone binding selectivity of the bromodomain family. Here, we report a systematic family-wide analysis of 14 yeast bromodomains binding to 32 lysine-acetylated peptides derived from known major acetylation sites in four core histones that are conserved in eukaryotes.The histone binding selectivity of purified recombinant yeast bromodomains was assessed by using the native core histones in an overlay assay, as well as N-terminally biotinylated lysine-acetylated histone peptides spotted on streptavidin-coated nitrocellulose membrane in a dot blot assay. NMR binding analysis further validated the interactions between histones and selected bromodomain. Structural models of all yeast bromodomains were built using comparative modeling to provide insights into the molecular basis of their histone binding selectivity.Our study reveals that while not all members of the bromodomain family are privileged to interact with acetylated-lysine, identifiable sequence features from those that bind histone emerge. These include an asparagine residue at the C-terminus of the third helix in the 4-helix bundle, negatively charged residues around the ZA loop, and preponderance of aromatic amino acid residues in the binding pocket

  9. Specificity of antibodies raised against triacetylated histone H4.

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    Muller, S; Isabey, A; Couppez, M; Plaue, S; Sommermeyer, G; Van Regenmortel, M H

    1987-07-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were obtained by immunizing animals with triacetylated histone H4 from cuttle-fish. The fine specificity of these antibodies was studied using various populations of acetylated H4, (H3H4)2 tetramers and histone octamers as well as with acetylated and nonacetylated peptides of H4. None of these mAbs were found to recognize triacetylated H4. Only five of them bound to diacetylated, monoacetylated and nonacetylated H4. One antibody was specific for H4 associated in the form of histone octamers and did not bind to any nonacetylated or acetylated form of H4 monomers. Eight of the antibodies were specific for residues situated in the region 9-23 of H4. None of the mAbs was completely specific for acetylated forms of H4. In contrast, antisera raised in rabbits against triacetylated H4 reacted strongly with tri and diacetylated H4, weakly with monoacetylated H4 and barely or not at all with nonacetylated H4.

  10. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

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    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  11. Nucleosome Binding Alters the Substrate Bonding Environment of Histone H3 Lysine 36 Methyltransferase NSD2.

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    Poulin, Myles B; Schneck, Jessica L; Matico, Rosalie E; Hou, Wangfang; McDevitt, Patrick J; Holbert, Marc; Schramm, Vern L

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 2 (NSD2) is a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36)-specific methyltransferase enzyme that is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including multiple myeloma. NSD2 binds to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) and nucleosome substrates to catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from SAM to the ε-amino group of histone H3K36. Equilibrium binding isotope effects and density functional theory calculations indicate that the SAM methyl group is sterically constrained in complex with NSD2, and that this steric constraint is released upon nucleosome binding. Together, these results show that nucleosome binding to NSD2 induces a significant change in the chemical environment of enzyme-bound SAM.

  12. In vitro targeting reveals intrinsic histone tail specificity of the Sin3/histone deacetylase and N-CoR/SMRT corepressor complexes.

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    Vermeulen, M.; Carrozza, MJ; Lasonder, E.; Workman, JL; Logie, C.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2004-01-01

    The histone code is among others established via differential acetylation catalyzed by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). To unambiguously determine the histone tail specificity of HDAC-containing complexes, we have established an in vitro system consisting of

  13. Histone acetylation characterizes chromatin presetting by NF1 and Oct1 and enhances glucocorticoid receptor binding to the MMTV promoter

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    Astrand, Carolina, E-mail: ca340@cam.ac.uk [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Belikov, Sergey, E-mail: Sergey.Belikov@ki.se [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Wrange, Orjan, E-mail: Orjan.Wrange@ki.se [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-10

    Transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is induced by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). This switch was reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. Previously, we showed that Nuclear Factor 1 (NF1) and Octamer Transcription Factor 1 (Oct1) bind constitutively to the MMTV promoter and thereby induce translational nucleosome positioning representing an intermediary, i.e. preset, state of nucleosome organization. Here we further characterize this NF1 and Oct1 induced preset chromatin in relation to the inactive and the hormone-activated state. The preset chromatin exhibits increased histone acetylation but does not cause dissociation of histone H1 as oppose to the hormone-activated state. Furthermore, upon hormone induction the preset MMTV chromatin displays an enhanced and prolonged GR binding capacity and transcription during an intrinsic and time-dependent silencing of the injected template. The silencing process correlates with a reduced histone acetylation. However, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), does not counteract silencing in spite of its distinct stimulation of GR-DNA binding. The latter indicates the importance of histone acetylation to maintain DNA access for inducible factor binding. We discuss how constitutively bound factors such as NF1 and Oct1 may participate in the maintenance of tissue specificity of hormone responsive genes.

  14. Characterization of structural variability sheds light on the specificity determinants of the interaction between effector domains and histone tails.

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    Lois, Sergi; Akizu, Naiara; de Xaxars, Gemma Mas; Vázquez, Iago; Martínez-Balbás, Marian; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2010-02-16

    Structural characterization of the interaction between histone tails and effector modules (bromodomains, chromodomains, PHD fingers, etc.) is fundamental to understand the mechanistic aspects of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In recent years many researchers have applied this approach to specific systems, thus providing a valuable but fragmentary view of the histone-effector interaction. In our work we use this information to characterize the structural features of the two main components of this interaction, histone peptides and the binding site of effector domains (focusing on those which target modified lysines), and increase our knowledge on its specificity determinants. Our results show that the binding sites of effectors are structurally variable, but some clear trends allow their classification in three main groups: flat-groove, narrow-groove and cavity-insertion. In addition, we found that even within these classes binding site variability is substantial. These results in context with the work from other researchers indicate that the there are at least two determinants of binding specificity in the binding site of effector modules. Finally, our analysis of the histone peptides sheds light on the structural transition experienced by histone tails upon effector binding, showing that it may vary depending on the local properties of the sequence stretch considered, thus allowing us to identify an additional specificity determinant for this interaction. Overall, the results of our analysis contribute to clarify the origins of specificity: different regions of the binding site and, in particular, differences in the disorder-order transitions experienced by different histone sequence stretches upon binding.

  15. Distinct site specificity of two pea histone deacetylase complexes.

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    Clemente, S; Franco, L; López-Rodas, G

    2001-09-04

    We report on the site specificity of two intact pea histone deacetylase complexes. HD1 deacetylates lysines 5 and 16 of H4 in the order K16 > K5, while in the case of H3 the preferred order is K4 > K18 approximately K9. The specificity of the HD2 complex is markedly different. The preferred residues in H4 are K8 approximately K5 > K16, while in H3 deacetylation, the complex HD2 prefers sites 4 and 18. To obtain these results, we have used a novel procedure based on the SPOT technique, a method to synthesize peptides on membrane supports. Different sets of membranes with sequentially overlapping histone peptides containing acetylated lysines in the sites corresponding to all in vivo acetylatable residues were incubated with the complexes. The acetyl groups removed by the deacetylase activity were then replaced by radioactive acetate by treating the membranes with labeled acetic anhydride. The subsequent counting of the membranes allows the quantification of the acetate removal in the histone deacetylase reaction in a way that circumvents some of the inconveniences of other available procedures.

  16. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3-H4 at replication forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase...... for MCM2-7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3-H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling...... histones genome wide during DNA replication....

  17. Substrate Specificity Profiling of Histone-Modifying Enzymes by Peptide Microarray.

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    Cornett, E M; Dickson, B M; Vaughan, R M; Krishnan, S; Trievel, R C; Strahl, B D; Rothbart, S B

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic addition and removal of covalent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on histone proteins serves as a major mechanism regulating chromatin-templated biological processes in eukaryotic genomes. Histone PTMs and their combinations function by directly altering the physical structure of chromatin and as rheostats for effector protein interactions. In this chapter, we detail microarray-based methods for analyzing the substrate specificity of lysine methyltransferase and demethylase enzymes on immobilized synthetic histone peptides. Consistent with the "histone code" hypothesis, we reveal a strong influence of adjacent and, surprisingly, distant histone PTMs on the ability of histone-modifying enzymes to methylate or demethylate their substrates. This platform will greatly facilitate future investigations into histone substrate specificity and mechanisms of PTM signaling that regulate the catalytic properties of histone-modifying enzymes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lamin B receptor recognizes specific modifications of histone H4 in heterochromatin formation.

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    Hirano, Yasuhiro; Hizume, Kohji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2012-12-14

    Inner nuclear membrane proteins provide a structural framework for chromatin, modulating transcription beneath the nuclear envelope. Lamin B receptor (LBR) is a classical inner nuclear membrane protein that associates with heterochromatin, and its mutations are known to cause Pelger-Huët anomaly in humans. However, the mechanisms by which LBR organizes heterochromatin remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that LBR represses transcription by binding to chromatin regions that are marked by specific histone modifications. The tudor domain (residues 1-62) of LBR primarily recognizes histone H4 lysine 20 dimethylation and is essential for chromatin compaction, whereas the whole nucleoplasmic region (residues 1-211) is required for transcriptional repression. We propose a model in which the nucleoplasmic domain of LBR tethers epigenetically marked chromatin to the nuclear envelope and transcriptional repressors are loaded onto the chromatin through their interaction with LBR.

  19. Inhibition of mitotic-specific histone phophorylation by sodium arsenite

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    Cobo, J.M. [Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Valdez, J.G.; Gurley, L.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Synchronized cultures of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) were used to measure the effects of 10{mu}M sodium arsenite on histone phosphorylation. This treatment caused cell proliferation to be temporarily arrested, after which the cells spontaneously resumed cell proliferation in a radiomimetric manner. Immediately following treatment, it was found that sodium arsenite affected only mitotic-specific HI and H3 phosphorylations. Neither interphase, nor mitotic, H2A and H4 phosphorylations were affected, nor was interphase HI Phosphorylation affected. The phosphorylation of HI was inhibited only in mitosis, reducing HI phosphorylation to 38.1% of control levels, which was the level of interphase HI phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of both H3 variants was inhibited in mitosis, the less hydrophobic H3 to 19% and the more hydrophobic H3 to 24% of control levels. These results suggest that sodium arsenite may inhibite cell proliferation by interfering with the cyclin B/p34{sup cdc2} histone kinase activity which is thought to play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. It has been proposed by our laboratory that HI and H3 phosphorylations play a role in restructuring interphase chromatin into metaphase chromosomes. Interference of this process by sodium arsenite may lead to structurally damaged chromosomes resulting in the increased cancer risks known to be produced by arsenic exposure from the environment.

  20. The Cac2 subunit is essential for productive histone binding and nucleosome assembly in CAF-1

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    Mattiroli, Francesca; Gu, Yajie; Balsbaugh, Jeremy L.; Ahn, Natalie G.; Luger, Karolin

    2017-04-18

    Nucleosome assembly following DNA replication controls epigenome maintenance and genome integrity. Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) is the histone chaperone responsible for histone (H3-H4)2 deposition following DNA synthesis. Structural and functional details for this chaperone complex and its interaction with histones are slowly emerging. Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry, combined with in vitro and in vivo mutagenesis studies, we identified the regions involved in the direct interaction between the yeast CAF-1 subunits, and mapped the CAF-1 domains responsible for H3-H4 binding. The large subunit, Cac1 organizes the assembly of CAF-1. Strikingly, H3-H4 binding is mediated by a composite interface, shaped by Cac1-bound Cac2 and the Cac1 acidic region. Cac2 is indispensable for productive histone binding, while deletion of Cac3 has only moderate effects on H3-H4 binding and nucleosome assembly. These results define direct structural roles for yeast CAF-1 subunits and uncover a previously unknown critical function of the middle subunit in CAF-1.

  1. The ATAD2 bromodomain binds different acetylation marks on the histone H4 in similar fuzzy complexes.

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    Langini, Cassiano; Caflisch, Amedeo; Vitalis, Andreas

    2017-10-06

    Bromodomains are protein modules adopting conserved helix bundle folds. Some bromodomain-containing proteins, such as ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 2 (ATAD2), isoform A, have attracted much interest because they are overexpressed in many types of cancer. Bromodomains bind to acetylated lysine residues on histone tails and thereby facilitate the reading of the histone code. Epigenetic regulators in general have been implicated as indicators, mediators, or causes of a large number of diseases and disorders. To interfere with or modulate these processes, it is therefore of fundamental interest to understand the molecular mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation occurs. Here, we present results from molecular dynamics simulations of a doubly acetylated histone H4 peptide bound to the bromodomain of ATAD2 (hereafter referred to as ATAD2A). These simulations revealed how the flexibility of ATAD2A's major loop, the so-called ZA loop, creates an adaptable interface that preserves the disorder of both peptide and loop in the bound state. We further demonstrate that the binding involves an almost identical average pattern of interactions irrespective of which acetyl mark is inserted into the pocket. In conjunction with a likely mechanism of electrostatically driven recruitment, our simulation results highlight how the bromodomain is built toward promiscuous binding with low specificity. In conclusion, the simulations indicate that disorder and electrostatic steering function jointly to recruit ATAD2A to the histone core and that these fuzzy interactions may promote cooperativity between nearby epigenetic marks. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Binding of histone H1 to DNA is differentially modulated by redox state of HMGB1.

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    Eva Polanská

    Full Text Available HMGB1 is an architectural protein in chromatin, acting also as a signaling molecule outside the cell. Recent reports from several laboratories provided evidence that a number of both the intracellular and extracellular functions of HMGB1 may depend on redox-sensitive cysteine residues of the protein. In this study we demonstrate that redox state of HMGB1 can significantly modulate the ability of the protein to bind and bend DNA, as well as to promote DNA end-joining. We also report a high affinity binding of histone H1 to hemicatenated DNA loops and DNA minicircles. Finally, we show that reduced HMGB1 can readily displace histone H1 from DNA, while oxidized HMGB1 has limited capacity for H1 displacement. Our results suggested a novel mechanism for the HMGB1-mediated modulation of histone H1 binding to DNA. Possible biological consequences of linker histones H1 replacement by HMGB1 for the functioning of chromatin are discussed.

  3. Single-molecule kinetic analysis of HP1-chromatin binding reveals a dynamic network of histone modification and DNA interactions.

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    Bryan, Louise C; Weilandt, Daniel R; Bachmann, Andreas L; Kilic, Sinan; Lechner, Carolin C; Odermatt, Pascal D; Fantner, Georg E; Georgeon, Sandrine; Hantschel, Oliver; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Fierz, Beat

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin recruitment of effector proteins involved in gene regulation depends on multivalent interaction with histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) and structural features of the chromatin fiber. Due to the complex interactions involved, it is currently not understood how effectors dynamically sample the chromatin landscape. Here, we dissect the dynamic chromatin interactions of a family of multivalent effectors, heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) proteins, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging and computational modeling. We show that the three human HP1 isoforms are recruited and retained on chromatin by a dynamic exchange between histone PTM and DNA bound states. These interactions depend on local chromatin structure, the HP1 isoforms as well as on PTMs on HP1 itself. Of the HP1 isoforms, HP1α exhibits the longest residence times and fastest binding rates due to DNA interactions in addition to PTM binding. HP1α phosphorylation further increases chromatin retention through strengthening of multivalency while reducing DNA binding. As DNA binding in combination with specific PTM recognition is found in many chromatin effectors, we propose a general dynamic capture mechanism for effector recruitment. Multiple weak protein and DNA interactions result in a multivalent interaction network that targets effectors to a specific chromatin modification state, where their activity is required. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The histone chaperone sNASP binds a conserved peptide motif within the globular core of histone H3 through its TPR repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Andrew; Lercher, Lukas; Singh, Hari R.; Zinne, Daria; Timinszky, Gyula; Carlomagno, Teresa; Ladurner, Andreas G.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex yet dynamic structure, which is regulated in part by the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Key to this process is a group of proteins termed histone chaperones that guide the thermodynamic assembly of nucleosomes by interacting with soluble histones. Here we investigate the interaction between the histone chaperone sNASP and its histone H3 substrate. We find that sNASP binds with nanomolar affinity to a conserved heptapeptide motif in the globular domain of H3, close to the C-terminus. Through functional analysis of sNASP homologues we identified point mutations in surface residues within the TPR domain of sNASP that disrupt H3 peptide interaction, but do not completely disrupt binding to full length H3 in cells, suggesting that sNASP interacts with H3 through additional contacts. Furthermore, chemical shift perturbations from 1H-15N HSQC experiments show that H3 peptide binding maps to the helical groove formed by the stacked TPR motifs of sNASP. Our findings reveal a new mode of interaction between a TPR repeat domain and an evolutionarily conserved peptide motif found in canonical H3 and in all histone H3 variants, including CenpA and have implications for the mechanism of histone chaperoning within the cell. PMID:26673727

  5. RPA binds histone H3-H4 and functions in DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaofeng; Xu, Zhiyun; Leng, He; Zheng, Pu; Yang, Jiayi; Chen, Kaifu; Feng, Jianxun; Li, Qing

    2017-01-27

    DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is essential to maintain genome integrity and retain epigenetic information. Multiple involved histone chaperones have been identified, but how nucleosome assembly is coupled to DNA replication remains elusive. Here we show that replication protein A (RPA), an essential replisome component that binds single-stranded DNA, has a role in replication-coupled nucleosome assembly. RPA directly binds free H3-H4. Assays using a synthetic sequence that mimics freshly unwound single-stranded DNA at replication fork showed that RPA promotes DNA-(H3-H4) complex formation immediately adjacent to double-stranded DNA. Further, an RPA mutant defective in H3-H4 binding exhibited attenuated nucleosome assembly on nascent chromatin. Thus, we propose that RPA functions as a platform for targeting histone deposition to replication fork, through which RPA couples nucleosome assembly with ongoing DNA replication. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Hippocampal Focal Knockout of CBP Affects Specific Histone Modifications, Long-Term Potentiation, and Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Ruth M; Malvaez, Melissa; Kramar, Eniko; Matheos, Dina P; Arrizon, Abraham; Cabrera, Sara M; Lynch, Gary; Greene, Robert W; Wood, Marcelo A

    2011-01-01

    To identify the role of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CREB-binding protein (CBP) in neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus during memory formation, we examine the effects of a focal homozygous knockout of CBP on histone modifications, gene expression, synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We show that CBP is critical for the in vivo acetylation of lysines on histones H2B, H3, and H4. CBP's homolog p300 was unable to compensate for the loss of CBP. Neurons lacking CBP maintained phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB, yet failed to activate CREB:CBP-mediated gene expression. Loss of CBP in dorsal CA1 of the hippocampus resulted in selective impairments to long-term potentiation and long-term memory for contextual fear and object recognition. Together, these results suggest a necessary role for specific chromatin modifications, selectively mediated by CBP in the consolidation of memories. PMID:21508930

  7. Formation of AR-SMRT binding in prostate cancer cells treated with natural histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtková, Kateřina; Pašková, Lenka; Matiješčuková, Natálie; Kolář, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Signaling through the androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression. The AR is a classical nuclear receptor (NR) providing a link between signaling molecule and transcription response. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) have antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on prostate cancer cells and their implication in silence AR signaling may have potential therapeutic use. We aimed to study the inhibitory effects of the corepressor SMRT (Silencing Mediator for Retinoid and Thyroid hormone receptors) which forms a complex together with nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) and with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) on AR activity. The androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line LNCaP and androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell line C4-2 both AR-positive, and androgen-insensitive DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines were treated with two HDACIs, sodium butyrate (NaB) and/or trichostatin A (TSA). We amplified immunoprecipitated DNA by conventional PCR and in the following step we used the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis coupled with quantitative PCR for monitoring NaB induced formation of AR-SMRT/N-CoR complex binding on the PSA promoter. The co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed increase in AR-SMRT formation in NaB treated cells. Simultaneously, the Western blot analysis showed a significant decrease in AR protein expression. Furthermore, we estimated the reduced presence of HDAC2 and HDAC3 proteins by NaB and TSA treatment in AR-negative DU145 cell line. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect of NaB on AR gene expression seems to be specific and unique for prostate cancer AR-positive cell lines and corresponds with its ability to stimulate AR-SMRT complex formation. We suggest that AR and SMRT/N-CoR corepressors may form a stable complex in vitro and NaB may facilitate the interaction between AR nuclear steroid receptor and SMRT corepressor protein.

  8. A c-Myb mutant causes deregulated differentiation due to impaired histone binding and abrogated pioneer factor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglerud, Bettina M; Lemma, Roza B; Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Sundaram, Arvind Y M; Eskeland, Ragnhild; Gabrielsen, Odd S

    2017-07-27

    The transcription factor c-Myb is involved in early differentiation and proliferation of haematopoietic cells, where it operates as a regulator of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation. Deregulated c-Myb plays critical roles in leukaemias and other human cancers. Due to its role as a master regulator, we hypothesized it might function as a pioneer transcription factor. Our approach to test this was to analyse a mutant of c-Myb, D152V, previously reported to cause haematopoietic defects in mice by an unknown mechanism. Our transcriptome data from K562 cells indicates that this mutation specifically affects c-Myb's ability to regulate genes involved in differentiation, causing failure in c-Myb's ability to block differentiation. Furthermore, we see a major effect of this mutation in assays where chromatin opening is involved. We show that each repeat in the minimal DNA-binding domain of c-Myb binds to histones and that D152V disrupts histone binding of the third repeat. ATAC-seq data indicates this mutation impairs the ability of c-Myb to cause chromatin opening at specific sites. Taken together, our findings support that c-Myb acts as a pioneer factor and show that D152V impairs this function. The D152V mutant is the first mutant of a transcription factor specifically destroying pioneer factor function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Histone Crosstalk between H3S10ph and H4K16ac Generates a Histone Code that Mediates Transcription Elongation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zippo, Alessio; Serafini, Riccardo; Rocchigiani, Marina; Pennacchini, Susanna; Krepelova, Anna; Oliviero, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    .... This model is based on the histone code hypothesis, where specific histone modifications, acting alone or in combination, can promote or inhibit the binding of a protein (the “reader”) to the nucleosome ( Strahl and Allis, 2000 ). The reader can promote a second histone modification, determining a histone crosstalk which generates a different binding platform ...

  10. Stage-specific histone modification profiles reveal global transitions in the Xenopus embryonic epigenome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias D Schneider

    Full Text Available Vertebrate embryos are derived from a transitory pool of pluripotent cells. By the process of embryonic induction, these precursor cells are assigned to specific fates and differentiation programs. Histone post-translational modifications are thought to play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of stable gene expression patterns underlying these processes. While on gene level histone modifications are known to change during differentiation, very little is known about the quantitative fluctuations in bulk histone modifications during development. To investigate this issue we analysed histones isolated from four different developmental stages of Xenopus laevis by mass spectrometry. In toto, we quantified 59 modification states on core histones H3 and H4 from blastula to tadpole stages. During this developmental period, we observed in general an increase in the unmodified states, and a shift from histone modifications associated with transcriptional activity to transcriptionally repressive histone marks. We also compared these naturally occurring patterns with the histone modifications of murine ES cells, detecting large differences in the methylation patterns of histone H3 lysines 27 and 36 between pluripotent ES cells and pluripotent cells from Xenopus blastulae. By combining all detected modification transitions we could cluster their patterns according to their embryonic origin, defining specific histone modification profiles (HMPs for each developmental stage. To our knowledge, this data set represents the first compendium of covalent histone modifications and their quantitative flux during normogenesis in a vertebrate model organism. The HMPs indicate a stepwise maturation of the embryonic epigenome, which may be causal to the progressing restriction of cellular potency during development.

  11. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophorou, Maria A; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate...

  12. Mislocalization of the Drosophila centromere-specific histone CIDpromotes formation of functional ectopic kinetochores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heun, Patrick; Erhardt, Sylvia; Blower, Michael D.; Weiss,Samara; Skora, Andrew D.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2006-01-30

    The centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation and chromosome segregation. Here, we show that overexpressed CID is mislocalized into normally non-centromeric regions in Drosophila tissue culture cells and animals. Analysis of mitoses in living and fixed cells reveals that mitotic delays, anaphase bridges, chromosome fragmentation, and cell and organismal lethality are all direct consequences of CID mislocalization. In addition, proteins that are normally restricted to endogenous kinetochores assemble at a subset of ectopic CID incorporation regions. The presence of microtubule motors and binding proteins, spindle attachments, and aberrant chromosome morphologies demonstrate that these ectopic kinetochores are functional. We conclude that CID mislocalization promotes formation of ectopic centromeres and multicentric chromosomes, which causes chromosome missegregation, aneuploidy, and growth defects. Thus, CENP-A mislocalization is one possible mechanism for genome instability during cancer progression, as well as centromere plasticity during evolution.

  13. Residues in the Nucleosome Acidic Patch Regulate Histone Occupancy and Are Important for FACT Binding in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Amelia J; Gloss, Lisa M; Wyrick, John J

    2017-07-01

    The essential histone chaperone FACT plays a critical role in DNA replication, repair, and transcription, primarily by binding to histone H2A-H2B dimers and regulating their assembly into nucleosomes. While FACT histone chaperone activity has been extensively studied, the exact nature of the H2A and H2B residues important for FACT binding remains controversial. In this study, we characterized the functions of residues in the histone H2A and H2B acidic patch, which is important for binding many chromatin-associated factors. We found that mutations in essential acidic patch residues cause a defect in histone occupancy in yeast, even though most of these histone mutants are expressed normally in yeast and form stable nucleosomes in vitro Instead, we show that two acidic patch residues, H2B L109 and H2A E57, are important for histone binding to FACT in vivo We systematically screened mutants in other H2A and H2B residues previously suspected to be important for FACT binding and confirmed the importance of H2B M62 using an in-vivo FACT-binding assay. Furthermore, we show that, like deletion mutants in FACT subunits, an H2A E57 and H2B M62 double mutant is lethal in yeast. In summary, we show that residues in the nucleosome acidic patch promote histone occupancy and are important for FACT binding to H2A-H2B dimers in yeast. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  14. Dot1 binding induces chromatin rearrangements by histone methylation-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stulemeijer Iris JE

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation of histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79 by Dot1 is highly conserved among species and has been associated with both gene repression and activation. To eliminate indirect effects and examine the direct consequences of Dot1 binding and H3K79 methylation, we investigated the effects of targeting Dot1 to different positions in the yeast genome. Results Targeting Dot1 did not activate transcription at a euchromatic locus. However, chromatin-bound Dot1 derepressed heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing over a considerable distance. Unexpectedly, Dot1-mediated derepression was established by both a H3K79 methylation-dependent and a methylation-independent mechanism; the latter required the histone acetyltransferase Gcn5. By monitoring the localization of a fluorescently tagged telomere in living cells, we found that the targeting of Dot1, but not its methylation activity, led to the release of a telomere from the repressive environment at the nuclear periphery. This probably contributes to the activity-independent derepression effect of Dot1. Conclusions Targeting of Dot1 promoted gene expression by antagonizing gene repression through both histone methylation and chromatin relocalization. Our findings show that binding of Dot1 to chromatin can positively affect local gene expression by chromatin rearrangements over a considerable distance.

  15. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3–H4 at replication forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia; Hödl, Martina; Strandsby, Anne; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Chen, Shoudeng; Groth, Anja; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase, chaperones histones H3–H4. Our first structure shows an H3–H4 tetramer bound by two MCM2 histone-binding domains (HBDs), which hijack interaction sites used by nucleosomal DNA. Our second structure reveals MCM2 and ASF1 cochaperoning an H3–H4 dimer. Mutational analyses show that the MCM2 HBD is required for MCM2–7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3–H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling histones genome wide during DNA replication. PMID:26167883

  16. Modeling the relative relationship of transcription factor binding and histone modifications to gene expression levels in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao; Gerstein, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding and histone modification (HM) are important for the precise control of gene expression. Hence, we constructed statistical models to relate these to gene expression levels in mouse embryonic stem cells. While both TF binding and HMs are highly 'predictive' of gene expression levels (in a statistical, but perhaps not strictly mechanistic, sense), we find they show distinct differences in the spatial patterning of their predictive strength: TF binding achieved the highest predictive power in a small DNA region centered at the transcription start sites of genes, while the HMs exhibited high predictive powers across a wide region around genes. Intriguingly, our results suggest that TF binding and HMs are redundant in strict statistical sense for predicting gene expression. We also show that our TF and HM models are cell line specific; specifically, TF binding and HM are more predictive of gene expression in the same cell line, and the differential gene expression between cell lines is predictable by differential HMs. Finally, we found that the models trained solely on protein-coding genes are predictive of expression levels of microRNAs, suggesting that their regulation by TFs and HMs may share a similar mechanism to that for protein-coding genes.

  17. Binding of DNA-bending non-histone proteins destabilizes regular 30-nm chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Gaurav; Jain, Ishutesh; Inamdar, Mandar M; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2017-01-01

    Why most of the in vivo experiments do not find the 30-nm chromatin fiber, well studied in vitro, is a puzzle. Two basic physical inputs that are crucial for understanding the structure of the 30-nm fiber are the stiffness of the linker DNA and the relative orientations of the DNA entering/exiting nucleosomes. Based on these inputs we simulate chromatin structure and show that the presence of non-histone proteins, which bind and locally bend linker DNA, destroys any regular higher order structures (e.g., zig-zag). Accounting for the bending geometry of proteins like nhp6 and HMG-B, our theory predicts phase-diagram for the chromatin structure as a function of DNA-bending non-histone protein density and mean linker DNA length. For a wide range of linker lengths, we show that as we vary one parameter, that is, the fraction of bent linker region due to non-histone proteins, the steady-state structure will show a transition from zig-zag to an irregular structure-a structure that is reminiscent of what is observed in experiments recently. Our theory can explain the recent in vivo observation of irregular chromatin having co-existence of finite fraction of the next-neighbor (i + 2) and neighbor (i + 1) nucleosome interactions.

  18. Non-histone chromosomal proteins. Their isolation and role in determining specificity of transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüthmann, H; Mrozek, S; Gierer, A

    1975-10-15

    We describe a method for fractionation of chromatin components by selective dissociation with salt in buffers containing 5 M urea in combination with cromatography on hydroxyapatite at 4 degrees C. This results in two histone and four non-histone fractions which are recovered in high yield and with minimal proteolytic contamination. Template capacity measurements of the isolated chromatins and pre-saturation competition hybridization experiments support the idea that a group of non-histone proteins activate the transcription of specific DNA sequences which were not transcribed from purified DNA to the same extent. In reconstitution experiments a non-histone protein fraction, NH4, prepared from lymphocyte chromatin by hydroxyapatite chromatography is shown to cause transcription in vitro of lymphocyte-specific RNA sequences. A subfraction with a molecular weight of 30 000 comprising 40% of the NH4 fraction protein is characteristic for this tissue and not found in liver chromatin.

  19. Sgf29 binds histone H3K4me2/3 and is required for SAGA complex recruitment and histone H3 acetylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Chuanbing; Xu, Chao; Ruan, Jianbin; Lee, Kenneth K.; Burke, Tara L.; Tempel, Wolfram; Barsyte, Dalia; Li, Jing; Wu, Minhao; Zhou, Bo O.; Fleharty, Brian E.; Paulson, Ariel; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Zhou, Jin-Qiu; Mer, Georges; Grant, Patrick A.; Workman, Jerry L.; Zang, Jianye; Min, Jinrong (Toronto); (Stowers); (UST - China); (UV); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (MCCM)

    2011-09-28

    The SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase) complex is an important chromatin modifying complex that can both acetylate and deubiquitinate histones. Sgf29 is a novel component of the SAGA complex. Here, we report the crystal structures of the tandem Tudor domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human Sgf29 and their complexes with H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 peptides, respectively, and show that Sgf29 selectively binds H3K4me2/3 marks. Our crystal structures reveal that Sgf29 harbours unique tandem Tudor domains in its C-terminus. The tandem Tudor domains in Sgf29 tightly pack against each other face-to-face with each Tudor domain harbouring a negatively charged pocket accommodating the first residue alanine and methylated K4 residue of histone H3, respectively. The H3A1 and K4me3 binding pockets and the limited binding cleft length between these two binding pockets are the structural determinants in conferring the ability of Sgf29 to selectively recognize H3K4me2/3. Our in vitro and in vivo functional assays show that Sgf29 recognizes methylated H3K4 to recruit the SAGA complex to its targets sites and mediates histone H3 acetylation, underscoring the importance of Sgf29 in gene regulation.

  20. Chromatin accessibility, p300, and histone acetylation define PML-RARα and AML1-ETO binding sites in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sadia; Logie, Colin; Francoijs, Kees-Jan; Frigè, Gianmaria; Romanenghi, Mauro; Nielsen, Fiona G; Raats, Lianne; Shahhoseini, Maryam; Huynen, Martijn; Altucci, Lucia; Minucci, Saverio; Martens, Joost H A; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G

    2012-10-11

    Chromatin accessibility plays a key role in regulating cell type specific gene expression during hematopoiesis but has also been suggested to be aberrantly regulated during leukemogenesis. To understand the leukemogenic chromatin signature, we analyzed acute promyelocytic leukemia, a subtype of leukemia characterized by the expression of RARα-fusion proteins, such as PML-RARα. We used nuclease accessibility sequencing in cell lines as well as patient blasts to identify accessible DNA elements and identified > 100 000 accessible regions in each case. Using ChIP-seq, we identified H2A.Z as a histone modification generally associated with these accessible regions, whereas unsupervised clustering analysis of other chromatin features, including DNA methylation, H2A.Zac, H3ac, H3K9me3, H3K27me3, and the regulatory factor p300, distinguished 6 distinct clusters of accessible sites, each with a characteristic functional makeup. Of these, PML-RARα binding was found specifically at accessible chromatin regions characterized by p300 binding and hypoacetylated histones. Identifying regions with a similar epigenetic make up in t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, another subtype of AMLs, revealed that these regions are occupied by the oncofusion protein AML1-ETO. Together, our results suggest that oncofusion proteins localize to accessible regions and that chromatin accessibility together with p300 binding and histone acetylation characterize AML1-ETO and PML-RARα binding sites.

  1. Structural and dynamic properties of linker histone H1 binding to DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Dootz, Rolf; Pfohl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Found in all eukaryotic cells, linker histones H1 are known to bind to and rearrange nucleosomal linker DNA. In vitro, the fundamental nature of H1/DNA interactions has attracted wide interest among research communities - for biologists from a chromatin organization deciphering point of view, and for physicists from the study of polyelectrolyte interactions point of view. Hence, H1/DNA binding processes, structural and dynamical information about these self-assemblies is of broad importance. Targeting a quantitative understanding of H1 induced DNA compaction mechanisms our strategy is based on using small angle X-ray microdiffraction in combination with microfluidics. The usage of microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing devices facilitate a microscale control of these self-assembly processes. In addition, the method enables time-resolved access to structure formation in situ, in particular to transient intermediate states. The observed time dependent structure evolution shows that the interaction of H1 with DNA ca...

  2. Meiosis-Specific Loading of the Centromere-Specific Histone CENH3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Shibata, Fukashi; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Chen, Changbin; Murata, Minoru; Chan, Simon W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Centromere behavior is specialized in meiosis I, so that sister chromatids of homologous chromosomes are pulled toward the same side of the spindle (through kinetochore mono-orientation) and chromosome number is reduced. Factors required for mono-orientation have been identified in yeast. However, comparatively little is known about how meiotic centromere behavior is specialized in animals and plants that typically have large tandem repeat centromeres. Kinetochores are nucleated by the centromere-specific histone CENH3. Unlike conventional histone H3s, CENH3 is rapidly evolving, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. Here we describe chimeric variants of CENH3 with alterations in the N-terminal tail that are specifically defective in meiosis. Arabidopsis thaliana cenh3 mutants expressing a GFP-tagged chimeric protein containing the H3 N-terminal tail and the CENH3 C-terminus (termed GFP-tailswap) are sterile because of random meiotic chromosome segregation. These defects result from the specific depletion of GFP-tailswap protein from meiotic kinetochores, which contrasts with its normal localization in mitotic cells. Loss of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant in meiosis affects recruitment of the essential kinetochore protein MIS12. Our findings suggest that CENH3 loading dynamics might be regulated differently in mitosis and meiosis. As further support for our hypothesis, we show that GFP-tailswap protein is recruited back to centromeres in a subset of pollen grains in GFP-tailswap once they resume haploid mitosis. Meiotic recruitment of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant is not restored by removal of the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit REC8. Our results reveal the existence of a specialized loading pathway for CENH3 during meiosis that is likely to involve the hypervariable N-terminal tail. Meiosis-specific CENH3 dynamics may play a role in modulating meiotic centromere behavior. PMID:21695238

  3. Long non-coding RNA ROR decoys gene-specific histone methylation to promote tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiayan; Xing, Yue; Wen, Xuyang; Jia, Renbin; Ni, Hongyan; He, Jie; Ding, Xia; Pan, Hui; Qian, Guanxiang; Ge, Shengfang; Hoffman, Andrew R; Zhang, He; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-07-14

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are not translated into proteins and were initially considered to be part of the 'dark matter' of the genome. Recently, it has been shown that lncRNAs play a role in the recruitment of chromatin modifying complexes and can influence gene expression. However, it is unknown if lncRNAs function in a similar way in cancer. Here, we show that the lncRNA ROR occupies and activates the TESC promoter by repelling the histone G9A methyltransferase and promoting the release of histone H3K9 methylation. Suppression of ROR in tumors results in silencing of TESC expression, and G9A-mediated histone H3K9 methylation in the TESC promoter is restored, which significantly reduces tumor growth and metastasis. Without ROR silencing, TESC knockdown presents consistent and significant reductions in tumor progression. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which ROR may serve as a decoy oncoRNA that blocks binding surfaces, preventing the recruitment of histone modifying enzymes, thereby specifying a new pattern of histone modifications that promote tumorigenesis.

  4. Middle-Down and Chemical Proteomic Approaches to Reveal Histone H4 Modification Dynamics in Cell Cycle: Label-Free Semi-Quantification of Histone Tail Peptide Modifications Including Phosphorylation and Highly Sensitive Capture of Histone PTM Binding Proteins Using Photo-Reactive Crosslinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazuki; Chikaoka, Yoko; Hayashi, Gosuke; Sakamoto, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Sugiyama, Akira; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Kawamura, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric proteomics is an effective approach for identifying and quantifying histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) and their binding proteins, especially in the cases of methylation and acetylation. However, another vital PTM, phosphorylation, tends to be poorly quantified because it is easily lost and inefficiently ionized. In addition, PTM binding proteins for phosphorylation are sometimes resistant to identification because of their variable binding affinities. Here, we present our efforts to improve the sensitivity of detection of histone H4 tail peptide phosphorylated at serine 1 (H4S1ph) and our successful identification of an H4S1ph binder candidate by means of a chemical proteomics approach. Our nanoLC-MS/MS system permitted semi-quantitative label-free analysis of histone H4 PTM dynamics of cell cycle-synchronized HeLa S3 cells, including phosphorylation, methylation, and acetylation. We show that H4S1ph abundance on nascent histone H4 unmethylated at lysine 20 (H4K20me0) peaks from late S-phase to M-phase. We also attempted to characterize effects of phosphorylation at H4S1 on protein-protein interactions. Specially synthesized photoaffinity bait peptides specifically captured 14-3-3 proteins as novel H4S1ph binding partners, whose interaction was otherwise undetectable by conventional peptide pull-down experiments. This is the first report that analyzes dynamics of PTM pattern on the whole histone H4 tail during cell cycle and enables the identification of PTM binders with low affinities using high-resolution mass spectrometry and photo-affinity bait peptides.

  5. Arsenic Induces Polyadenylation of Canonical Histone mRNA by Down-regulating Stem-Loop-binding Protein Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, Jason; Fang, Lei; Chervona, Yana; Chen, Danqi; Kiok, Kathrin; Sun, Hong; Tseng, Hsiang-Chi; Xu, Dazhong; Shamy, Magdy; Jin, Chunyuan; Costa, Max

    2014-01-01

    The replication-dependent histone genes are the only metazoan genes whose messenger RNA (mRNA) does not terminate with a poly(A) tail at the 3′-end. Instead, the histone mRNAs display a stem-loop structure at their 3′-end. Stem-loop-binding protein (SLBP) binds the stem-loop and regulates canonical histone mRNA metabolism. Here we report that exposure to arsenic, a carcinogenic metal, decreased cellular levels of SLBP by inducing its proteasomal degradation and inhibiting SLBP transcription via epigenetic mechanisms. Notably, arsenic exposure dramatically increased polyadenylation of canonical histone H3.1 mRNA possibly through down-regulation of SLBP expression. The polyadenylated H3.1 mRNA induced by arsenic was not susceptible to normal degradation that occurs at the end of S phase, resulting in continued presence into mitosis, increased total H3.1 mRNA, and increased H3 protein levels. Excess expression of canonical histones have been shown to increase sensitivity to DNA damage as well as increase the frequency of missing chromosomes and induce genomic instability. Thus, polyadenylation of canonical histone mRNA following arsenic exposure may contribute to arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25266719

  6. Mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein mediates collagen-dependent cytoadherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Alves Dias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When grown in the presence of exogenous collagen I, Mycobacterium bovis BCG was shown to form clumps. Scanning electron microscopy examination of these clumps revealed the presence of collagen fibres cross-linking the bacilli. Since collagen is a major constituent of the eukaryotic extracellular matrices, we assayed BCG cytoadherence in the presence of exogenous collagen I. Collagen increased the interaction of the bacilli with A549 type II pneumocytes or U937 macrophages, suggesting that BCG is able to recruit collagen to facilitate its attachment to host cells. Using an affinity chromatography approach, we have isolated a BCG collagen-binding protein corresponding to the previously described mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein (LBP/Hlp, a highly conserved protein associated with the mycobacterial cell wall. Moreover, Mycobacterium leprae LBP/Hlp, a well-characterized adhesin, was also able to bind collagen I. Finally, using recombinant fragments of M. leprae LBP/Hlp, we mapped the collagen-binding activity within the C-terminal domain of the adhesin. Since this protein was already shown to be involved in the recognition of laminin and heparan sulphate-containing proteoglycans, the present observations reinforce the adhesive activities of LBP/Hlp, which can be therefore considered as a multifaceted mycobacterial adhesin, playing an important role in both leprosy and tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  7. The specification and global reprogramming of histone epigenetic marks during gamete formation and early embryo development in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Samson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the DNA contributed by sperm and oocytes, embryos receive parent-specific epigenetic information that can include histone variants, histone post-translational modifications (PTMs, and DNA methylation. However, a global view of how such marks are erased or retained during gamete formation and reprogrammed after fertilization is lacking. To focus on features conveyed by histones, we conducted a large-scale proteomic identification of histone variants and PTMs in sperm and mixed-stage embryo chromatin from C. elegans, a species that lacks conserved DNA methylation pathways. The fate of these histone marks was then tracked using immunostaining. Proteomic analysis found that sperm harbor ∼2.4 fold lower levels of histone PTMs than embryos and revealed differences in classes of PTMs between sperm and embryos. Sperm chromatin repackaging involves the incorporation of the sperm-specific histone H2A variant HTAS-1, a widespread erasure of histone acetylation, and the retention of histone methylation at sites that mark the transcriptional history of chromatin domains during spermatogenesis. After fertilization, we show HTAS-1 and 6 histone PTM marks distinguish sperm and oocyte chromatin in the new embryo and characterize distinct paternal and maternal histone remodeling events during the oocyte-to-embryo transition. These include the exchange of histone H2A that is marked by ubiquitination, retention of HTAS-1, removal of the H2A variant HTZ-1, and differential reprogramming of histone PTMs. This work identifies novel and conserved features of paternal chromatin that are specified during spermatogenesis and processed in the embryo. Furthermore, our results show that different species, even those with diverged DNA packaging and imprinting strategies, use conserved histone modification and removal mechanisms to reprogram epigenetic information.

  8. Distinct factors control histone variant H3.3 localization at specific genomic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Aaron D.; Banaszynski, Laura A.; Noh, Kyung-Min; Lewis, Peter W.; Elsaesser, Simon J.; Stadler, Sonja; Dewell, Scott; Law, Martin; Guo, Xingyi; Li, Xuan; Wen, Duancheng; Chapgier, Ariane; DeKelver, Russell C.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Lee, Ya-Li; Boydston, Elizabeth A.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Greally, John M.; Rafii, Shahin; Yang, Chingwen; Scambler, Peter J.; Garrick, David; Gibbons, Richard J.; Higgs, Douglas R.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Zheng, Deyou; Allis, C. David

    2010-01-01

    Summary The incorporation of histone H3 variants has been implicated in the epigenetic memory of cellular state. Using genome editing with zinc finger nucleases to tag endogenous H3.3, we report genome-wide profiles of H3 variants in mammalian embryonic stem (ES) cells and neuronal precursor cells. Genome-wide patterns of H3.3 are dependent on amino acid sequence, and change with cellular differentiation at developmentally regulated loci. The H3.3 chaperone Hira is required for H3.3 enrichment at active and repressed genes. Strikingly, Hira is not essential for localization of H3.3 at telomeres and many transcription factor binding sites. Immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry reveal that the proteins Atrx and Daxx associate with H3.3 in a Hira-independent manner. Atrx is required for Hira-independent localization of H3.3 at telomeres, and for the repression of telomeric RNA. Our data demonstrate that multiple and distinct factors are responsible for H3.3 localization at specific genomic locations in mammalian cells. PMID:20211137

  9. Proteins that bind regulatory regions identified by histone modification chromatin immunoprecipitations and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Erik; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Moen, Maaike J.; Signorile, Luca; Dekkers, Dick H. W.; Demmers, Jeroen; Kockx, Christel E. M.; Ozgür, Zehila; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; van den Berg, Debbie L. C.; Poot, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    The locations of transcriptional enhancers and promoters were recently mapped in many mammalian cell types. Proteins that bind those regulatory regions can determine cell identity but have not been systematically identified. Here we purify native enhancers, promoters or heterochromatin from embryonic stem cells by chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP) for characteristic histone modifications and identify associated proteins using mass spectrometry (MS). 239 factors are identified and predicted to bind enhancers or promoters with different levels of activity, or heterochromatin. Published genome-wide data indicate a high accuracy of location prediction by ChIP-MS. A quarter of the identified factors are important for pluripotency and includes Oct4, Esrrb, Klf5, Mycn and Dppa2, factors that drive reprogramming to pluripotent stem cells. We determined the genome-wide binding sites of Dppa2 and find that Dppa2 operates outside the classical pluripotency network. Our ChIP-MS method provides a detailed read-out of the transcriptional landscape representative of the investigated cell type. PMID:25990348

  10. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  11. Intrinsic Dynamics of the Binding Rail and Its Allosteric Effect in the Class I Histone Deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingwei; Huang, Yue; Cheng, Chunyan; Wang, Kai; Wu, Ruibo

    2017-09-25

    The development of novel isoform/class-selective inhibitors is still of great biological and medical significance to conquer the continuously reported side effects for the histone deacetylase (HDAC) drugs. The first potent HDAC allosteric inhibitor was discovered last year, and this allosteric inhibitor design is thought to be a promising strategy to overcome the current challenges in HDAC inhibitor design. However, the detailed allosteric mechanism and its remote regulatory effects on the catalytic/inhibitor activity of HDAC are still unclear. In this work, on the basis of microsecond-time-scale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and picosecond-time-scale density functional theory/molecular mechanics MD simulations on HDAC8, we propose that the allostery is achieved by the intrinsic conformational flexibility of the binding rail (constituted by a highly conserved X-D residue dyad), which steers the loop-loop motion and creates the diverse shapes of the allosteric sites in different HDAC isoforms. Additionally, the rotatability of the binding rail is an inherent structural feature that regulates the hydrophobicity of the linker binding channel and thus further affects the HDAC enzyme inhibitory/catalytic activity by utilizing the promiscuity of X-D dyad. Since the plastic X residue is different among class I HDACs, these new findings provide a deeper understanding of the allostery, which is guidable for the design of new allosteric inhibitors toward the allosteric site and structure modifications on the conventional inhibitors binding into the active pocket by exploiting the intrinsic dynamic features of the conserved X-D dyad.

  12. HU histone-like DNA-binding protein from Thermus thermophilus: structural and evolutionary analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Anna C; Adam, Panagiotis S; Stavros, Philemon; Nounesis, George; Meijers, Rob; Petratos, Kyriacos; Vorgias, Constantinos E

    2016-09-01

    The histone-like DNA-binding proteins (HU) serve as model molecules for protein thermostability studies, as they function in different bacteria that grow in a wide range of temperatures and show sequence diversity under a common fold. In this work, we report the cloning of the hutth gene from Thermus thermophilus, the purification and crystallization of the recombinant HUTth protein, as well as its X-ray structure determination at 1.7 Å. Detailed structural and thermodynamic analyses were performed towards the understanding of the thermostability mechanism. The interaction of HUTth protein with plasmid DNA in solution has been determined for the first time with MST. Sequence conservation of an exclusively thermophilic order like Thermales, when compared to a predominantly mesophilic order (Deinococcales), should be subject, to some extent, to thermostability-related evolutionary pressure. This hypothesis was used to guide our bioinformatics and evolutionary studies. We discuss the impact of thermostability adaptation on the structure of HU proteins, based on the detailed evolutionary analysis of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum, where HUTth belongs. Furthermore, we propose a novel method of engineering thermostable proteins, by combining consensus-based design with ancestral sequence reconstruction. Finally, through the structure of HUTth, we are able to examine the validity of these predictions. Our approach represents a significant advancement, as it explores for the first time the potential of ancestral sequence reconstruction in the divergence between a thermophilic and a mainly mesophilic taxon, combined with consensus-based engineering.

  13. Binding of NF-κB to nucleosomes: effect of translational positioning, nucleosome remodeling and linker histone H1.

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    Imtiaz Nisar Lone

    Full Text Available NF-κB is a key transcription factor regulating the expression of inflammatory responsive genes. How NF-κB binds to naked DNA templates is well documented, but how it interacts with chromatin is far from being clear. Here we used a combination of UV laser footprinting, hydroxyl footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to investigate the binding of NF-κB to nucleosomal templates. We show that NF-κB p50 homodimer is able to bind to its recognition sequence, when it is localized at the edge of the core particle, but not when the recognition sequence is at the interior of the nucleosome. Remodeling of the nucleosome by the chromatin remodeling machine RSC was not sufficient to allow binding of NF-κB to its recognition sequence located in the vicinity of the nucleosome dyad, but RSC-induced histone octamer sliding allowed clearly detectable binding of NF-κB with the slid particle. Importantly, nucleosome dilution-driven removal of H2A-H2B dimer led to complete accessibility of the site located close to the dyad to NF-κB. Finally, we found that NF-κB was able to displace histone H1 and prevent its binding to nucleosome. These data provide important insight on the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of transcription of NF-κB dependent genes.

  14. Binding of NF-κB to Nucleosomes: Effect of Translational Positioning, Nucleosome Remodeling and Linker Histone H1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Imtiaz Nisar; Shukla, Manu Shubhdarshan; Charles Richard, John Lalith; Peshev, Zahary Yordanov; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB is a key transcription factor regulating the expression of inflammatory responsive genes. How NF-κB binds to naked DNA templates is well documented, but how it interacts with chromatin is far from being clear. Here we used a combination of UV laser footprinting, hydroxyl footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to investigate the binding of NF-κB to nucleosomal templates. We show that NF-κB p50 homodimer is able to bind to its recognition sequence, when it is localized at the edge of the core particle, but not when the recognition sequence is at the interior of the nucleosome. Remodeling of the nucleosome by the chromatin remodeling machine RSC was not sufficient to allow binding of NF-κB to its recognition sequence located in the vicinity of the nucleosome dyad, but RSC-induced histone octamer sliding allowed clearly detectable binding of NF-κB with the slid particle. Importantly, nucleosome dilution-driven removal of H2A–H2B dimer led to complete accessibility of the site located close to the dyad to NF-κB. Finally, we found that NF-κB was able to displace histone H1 and prevent its binding to nucleosome. These data provide important insight on the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of transcription of NF-κB dependent genes. PMID:24086160

  15. Engineering Biological C-H Functionalization Leads to Allele-Specific Regulation of Histone Demethylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breski, Megan; Dey, Debasis; Obringer, Sara; Sudhamalla, Babu; Islam, Kabirul

    2016-10-06

    Oxidative C-H hydroxylation of methyl groups, followed by their removal from DNA, RNA or histones, is an epigenetic process critical to transcriptional reprogramming and cell fate determination. This reaction is catalyzed by Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases using the essential metabolite 2-ketoglutarate (2KG) as a cofactor. Given that the human genome encodes for more than 60 2KG-dependent dioxygenases, assigning their individual functions remains a significant challenge. Here we describe a protein-ligand interface engineering approach to break the biochemical degeneracy of these enzymes. Using histone lysine demethylase 4 (KDM4) as a proof-of-concept, we show that the enzyme active site can be expanded to employ bulky 2KG analogues that do not sensitize wild type demethylases. We establish the orthogonality, substrate specificity and catalytic competency of the engineered demethylation apparatus in biochemical assays. We further demonstrate demethylation of cognate substrates in physiologically relevant settings. Our results provide a para-digm for rapid and conditional manipulation of histone deme-thylases to uncloak their isoform-specific functions.

  16. Binding specificity of Escherichia coli trigger factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Holger; Rüdiger, Stefan; Brehmer, Dirk; Kramer, Günter; Vorderwülbecke, Sonja; Schaffitzel, Elke; Waitz, Andreas; Hesterkamp, Thomas; Dong, Liying; Schneider-Mergener, Jens; Bukau, Bernd; Deuerling, Elke

    2001-01-01

    The ribosome-associated chaperone trigger factor (TF) assists the folding of newly synthesized cytosolic proteins in Escherichia coli. Here, we determined the substrate specificity of TF by examining its binding to 2842 membrane-coupled 13meric peptides. The binding motif of TF was identified as a stretch of eight amino acids, enriched in basic and aromatic residues and with a positive net charge. Fluorescence spectroscopy verified that TF exhibited a comparable substrate specificity for peptides in solution. The affinity to peptides in solution was low, indicating that TF requires ribosome association to create high local concentrations of nascent polypeptide substrates for productive interaction in vivo. Binding to membrane-coupled peptides occurred through the central peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) domain of TF, however, independently of prolyl residues. Crosslinking experiments showed that a TF fragment containing the PPIase domain linked to the ribosome via the N-terminal domain is sufficient for interaction with nascent polypeptide substrates. Homology modeling of the PPIase domain revealed a conserved FKBP(FK506-binding protein)-like binding pocket composed of exposed aromatic residues embedded in a groove with negative surface charge. The features of this groove complement well the determined substrate specificity of TF. Moreover, a mutation (E178V) in this putative substrate binding groove known to enhance PPIase activity also enhanced TF's association with a prolyl-free model peptide in solution and with nascent polypeptides. This result suggests that both prolyl-independent binding of peptide substrates and peptidyl-prolyl isomerization involve the same binding site. PMID:11724963

  17. Distinct and histone-specific modifications mediate positive versus negative transcriptional regulation of TSHalpha promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hormonally-regulated histone modifications that govern positive versus negative transcription of target genes are poorly characterized despite their importance for normal and pathological endocrine function. There have been only a few studies examining chromatin modifications on target gene promoters by nuclear hormone receptors. Moreover, these studies have focused on positively-regulated target genes. TSHalpha, a heterodimer partner for thyrotropin (TSH, is secreted by the pituitary gland. T(3 negatively regulates TSHalpha gene expression via thyroid hormone receptors (TRs which belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, whereas thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH positively regulates via the TRH receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor.We studied regulation of the TSHalpha gene by cAMP and T(3 using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays in stably-transfected rat pituitary cells containing the human TSHalpha promoter. Interestingly, cAMP selectively increased histone H4 acetylation whereas, as previously reported, T(3 induced histone H3 acetylation. In particular, cAMP increased H4K5 and H4K8 acetylation and decreased H4K20 trimethylation, modifications associated with transcriptional activation. T(3 increased H3K9 and H3K18 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation; however, it also decreased H3K27 acetylation and increased H3K27 trimethylation which are associated with transcriptional repression. Of note, cAMP recruited pCREB, CBP/p300, and PCAF to the promoter whereas T(3 caused dissociation of NCoR/SMRT and HDAC3. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant thyroid hormone receptor (TR from a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH led to less T(3-dependent negative regulation and partially blocked histone H3 modifications of the TSHalpha promoter.Our findings show that non-overlapping and specific histone modifications determine positive versus negative transcriptional regulation, and integrate opposing hormonal and

  18. Specific distribution of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae linker histone homolog HHO1p in the chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Freidkin, Ilya; Katcoff, Don J.

    2001-01-01

    In virtually all eukaryotic organisms, linker DNA between nucleosomes is associated with a histone termed linker histone or histone H1. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, HHO1 encodes a putative linker histone with very significant homology to histone H1. The encoded protein is expressed in the nucleus, but has not been shown to affect global chromatin structure, nor has its deletion shown any detectable phenotype. In vitro chromatin assembly experiments with recombinant HHO1p have shown that it is...

  19. Histone posttranslational modifications predict specific alternative exon subtypes in mammalian brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwen Hu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A compelling body of literature, based on next generation chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA sequencing of reward brain regions indicates that the regulation of the epigenetic landscape likely underlies chronic drug abuse and addiction. It is now critical to develop highly innovative computational strategies to reveal the relevant regulatory transcriptional mechanisms that may underlie neuropsychiatric disease. We have analyzed chromatin regulation of alternative splicing, which is implicated in cocaine exposure in mice. Recent literature has described chromatin-regulated alternative splicing, suggesting a novel function for drug-induced neuroepigenetic remodeling. However, the extent of the genome-wide association between particular histone modifications and alternative splicing remains unexplored. To address this, we have developed novel computational approaches to model the association between alternative splicing and histone posttranslational modifications in the nucleus accumbens (NAc, a brain reward region. Using classical statistical methods and machine learning to combine ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq data, we found that specific histone modifications are strongly associated with various aspects of differential splicing. H3K36me3 and H3K4me1 have the strongest association with splicing indicating they play a significant role in alternative splicing in brain reward tissue.

  20. The conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 and the DNA binding regulator Ume6 repress BOI1's meiotic transcript isoform during vegetative growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuchen; Stuparevic, Igor; Xie, Bingning; Becker, Emmanuelle; Law, Michael J; Primig, Michael

    2015-05-01

    BOI1 and BOI2 are paralogs important for the actin cytoskeleton and polar growth. BOI1 encodes a meiotic transcript isoform with an extended 5'-untranslated region predicted to impair protein translation. It is, however, unknown how the isoform is repressed during mitosis, and if Boi1 is present during sporulation. By interpreting microarray data from MATa cells, MATa/α cells, a starving MATα/α control, and a meiosis-impaired rrp6 mutant, we classified BOI1's extended isoform as early meiosis-specific. These results were confirmed by RNA-Sequencing, and extended by a 5'-RACE assay and Northern blotting, showing that meiotic cells induce the long isoform while the mitotic isoform remains detectable during meiosis. We provide evidence via motif predictions, an in vivo binding assay and genetic experiments that the Rpd3/Sin3/Ume6 histone deacetylase complex, which represses meiotic genes during mitosis, also prevents the induction of BOI1's 5'-extended isoform in mitosis by direct binding of Ume6 to its URS1 target. Finally, we find that Boi1 protein levels decline when cells switch from fermentation to respiration and sporulation. The histone deacetylase Rpd3 is conserved, and eukaryotic genes frequently encode transcripts with variable 5'-UTRs. Our findings are therefore relevant for regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of transcript isoforms in multi-cellular organisms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The expression of spinal methyl-CpG-binding protein 2, DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylases is modulated in persistent pain states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tochiki Keri K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA CpG methylation is carried out by DNA methyltransferases and induces chromatin remodeling and gene silencing through a transcription repressor complex comprising the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2 and a subset of histone deacetylases. Recently, we have found that MeCP2 activity had a crucial role in the pattern of gene expression seen in the superficial dorsal horn rapidly after injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA in the rat ankle joint. The aim of the present study was to analyse the changes in expression of MeCP2, DNA methyltransferases and a subset of histone deacetylases in the superficial dorsal horn during the maintenance phase of persistent pain states. In this process, the cell specific expression of MeCP2 was also investigated. Results Using immunohistochemistry, we found that neurones, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes expressed MeCP2. Microglia, oligodendrocyte precursor cells and Schwann cells never showed any positive stain for MeCP2. Quantitative analyses showed that MeCP2 expression was increased in the superficial dorsal horn 7 days following CFA injection in the ankle joint but decreased 7 days following spared nerve injury. Overall, the expression of DNA methyltransferases and a subset of histone deacetylases followed the same pattern of expression. However, there were no significant changes in the expression of the MeCP2 targets that we had previously shown are regulated in the early time points following CFA injection in the ankle joint. Finally, the expression of MeCP2 was also down regulated in damaged dorsal root ganglion neurones following spared nerve injury. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that changes in chromatin compaction, regulated by the binding of MeCP2 complexes to methylated DNA, are involved in the modulation of gene expression in the superficial dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia during the maintenance of persistent pain states.

  2. BRCA1 Is a Histone-H2A-Specific Ubiquitin Ligase

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    Reinhard Kalb

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The RING domain proteins BRCA1 and BARD1 comprise a heterodimeric ubiquitin (E3 ligase that is required for the accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates at sites of DNA damage and for silencing at DNA satellite repeat regions. Despite its links to chromatin, the substrate and underlying function of the BRCA1/BARD1 ubiquitin ligase remain unclear. Here, we show that BRCA1/BARD1 specifically ubiquitylates histone H2A in its C-terminal tail on lysines 127 and 129 in vitro and in vivo. The specificity for K127-129 is acquired only when H2A is within a nucleosomal context. Moreover, site-specific targeting of the BRCA1/BARD1 RING domains to chromatin is sufficient for H2Aub foci formation in vivo. Our data establish BRCA1/BARD1 as a histone-H2A-specific E3 ligase, helping to explain its localization and activities on chromatin in cells.

  3. Structure and Histone Binding Properties of the Vps75-Rtt109 Chaperone-Lysine Acetyltransferase Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Dan; Hu, Qi; Zhou, Hui; Thompson, James R.; Xu, Rui-Ming; Zhang, Zhiguo; Mer, Georges (Mayo); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2011-11-02

    The histone chaperone Vps75 presents the remarkable property of stimulating the Rtt109-dependent acetylation of several histone H3 lysine residues within (H3-H4){sub 2} tetramers. To investigate this activation mechanism, we determined x-ray structures of full-length Vps75 in complex with full-length Rtt109 in two crystal forms. Both structures show similar asymmetric assemblies of a Vps75 dimer bound to an Rtt109 monomer. In the Vps75-Rtt109 complexes, the catalytic site of Rtt109 is confined to an enclosed space that can accommodate the N-terminal tail of histone H3 in (H3-H4){sub 2}. Investigation of Vps75-Rtt109-(H3-H4)2 and Vps75-(H3-H4)2 complexes by NMR spectroscopy-probed hydrogen/deuterium exchange suggests that Vps75 guides histone H3 in the catalytic enclosure. These findings clarify the basis for the enhanced acetylation of histone H3 tail residues by Vps75-Rtt109.

  4. The SUVR4 histone lysine methyltransferase binds ubiquitin and converts H3K9me1 to H3K9me3 on transposon chromatin in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje V Veiseth

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure and gene expression are regulated by posttranslational modifications (PTMs on the N-terminal tails of histones. Mono-, di-, or trimethylation of lysine residues by histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTases can have activating or repressive functions depending on the position and context of the modified lysine. In Arabidopsis, trimethylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me3 is mainly associated with euchromatin and transcribed genes, although low levels of this mark are also detected at transposons and repeat sequences. Besides the evolutionarily conserved SET domain which is responsible for enzyme activity, most HKMTases also contain additional domains which enable them to respond to other PTMs or cellular signals. Here we show that the N-terminal WIYLD domain of the Arabidopsis SUVR4 HKMTase binds ubiquitin and that the SUVR4 product specificity shifts from di- to trimethylation in the presence of free ubiquitin, enabling conversion of H3K9me1 to H3K9me3 in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and immunocytological analysis showed that SUVR4 in vivo specifically converts H3K9me1 to H3K9me3 at transposons and pseudogenes and has a locus-specific repressive effect on the expression of such elements. Bisulfite sequencing indicates that this repression involves both DNA methylation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Transcribed genes with high endogenous levels of H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H2Bub1, but low H3K9me1, are generally unaffected by SUVR4 activity. Our results imply that SUVR4 is involved in the epigenetic defense mechanism by trimethylating H3K9 to suppress potentially harmful transposon activity.

  5. Structural genomics of histone tail recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghua; Mok, Man Wai; Harper, Hong; Lee, Wen Hwa; Min, Jinrong; Knapp, Stefan; Oppermann, Udo; Marsden, Brian; Schapira, Matthieu

    2010-10-15

    The structural genomics of histone tail recognition web server is an open access resource that presents within mini articles all publicly available experimental structures of histone tails in complex with human proteins. Each article is composed of interactive 3D slides that dissect the structural mechanism underlying the recognition of specific sequences and histone marks. A concise text html-linked to interactive graphics guides the reader through the main features of the interaction. This resource can be used to analyze and compare binding modes across multiple histone recognition modules, to evaluate the chemical tractability of binding sites involved in epigenetic signaling and design small molecule inhibitors. http://www.thesgc.org/resources/histone_tails/ matthieu.schapira@utoronto.ca Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Detection of histone acetylation levels in the dorsal hippocampus reveals early tagging on specific residues of H2B and H4 histones in response to learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Bousiges

    Full Text Available The recent literature provides evidence that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modification are crucial to gene transcription linked to synaptic plasticity in the mammalian brain--notably in the hippocampus--and memory formation. We measured global histone acetylation levels in the rat hippocampus at an early stage of spatial or fear memory formation. We found that H3, H4 and H2B underwent differential acetylation at specific sites depending on whether rats had been exposed to the context of a task without having to learn or had to learn about a place or fear therein: H3K9K14 acetylation was mostly responsive to any experimental conditions compared to naive animals, whereas H2B N-terminus and H4K12 acetylations were mostly associated with memory for either spatial or fear learning. Altogether, these data suggest that behavior/experience-dependent changes differently regulate specific acetylation modifications of histones in the hippocampus, depending on whether a memory trace is established or not: tagging of H3K9K14 could be associated with perception/processing of testing-related manipulations and context, thereby enhancing chromatin accessibility, while tagging of H2B N-terminus tail and H4K12 could be more closely associated with the formation of memories requiring an engagement of the hippocampus.

  7. Site-specific ADP-ribosylation of histone H2B in response to DNA double strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimova, Alina; Ura, Seiji; Hsu, Duen-Wei; Wang, Hong-Yu; Pears, Catherine J; Lakin, Nicholas D

    2017-03-02

    ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) modify proteins with single units or polymers of ADP-ribose to regulate DNA repair. However, the substrates for these enzymes are ill-defined. For example, although histones are modified by ARTs, the sites on these proteins ADP-ribosylated following DNA damage and the ARTs that catalyse these events are unknown. This, in part, is due to the lack of a eukaryotic model that contains ARTs, in addition to histone genes that can be manipulated to assess ADP-ribosylation events in vivo. Here we exploit the model Dictyostelium to identify site-specific histone ADP-ribosylation events in vivo and define the ARTs that mediate these modifications. Dictyostelium histones are modified in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in vivo by the ARTs Adprt1a and Adprt2. Adprt1a is a mono-ART that modifies H2BE18 in vitro, although disruption of this site allows ADP-ribosylation at H2BE19. Although redundancy between H2BE18 and H2BE19 ADP-ribosylation is also apparent following DSBs in vivo, by generating a strain with mutations at E18/E19 in the h2b locus we demonstrate these are the principal sites modified by Adprt1a/Adprt2. This identifies DNA damage induced histone mono-ADP-ribosylation sites by specific ARTs in vivo, providing a unique platform to assess how histone ADP-ribosylation regulates DNA repair.

  8. The Effect of Various Zinc Binding Groups on Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases 1–11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Kristensen, Helle M. E.; Lanz, Gyrithe

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have the ability to cleave the acetyl groups of ε‐N‐acetylated lysine residues in a variety of proteins. Given that human cells contain thousands of different acetylated lysine residues, HDACS may regulate a wide variety of processes including some implicated...

  9. Oligodendroglioma cells synthesize the differentiation-specific linker histone H1˚ and release it into the extracellular environment through shed vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Saladino, Patrizia; Pitti, Rosario; Savettieri, Giovanni; Proia, Patrizia; Di Liegro, Italia

    2013-12-01

    Chromatin remodelling can be involved in some of the epigenetic modifications found in tumor cells. One of the mechanisms at the basis of chromatin dynamics is likely to be synthesis and incorporation of replacement histone variants, such as the H1˚ linker histone. Regulation of the expression of this protein can thus be critical in tumorigenesis. In developing brain, H1˚ expression is mainly regulated at the post-transcriptional level and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are involved. In the past, attention mainly focused on the whole brain or isolated neurons and little information is available on H1˚ expression in other brain cells. Even less is known relating to tumor glial cells. In this study we report that, like in maturing brain and isolated neurons, H1˚ synthesis sharply increases in differentiating astrocytes growing in a serum-free medium, while the corresponding mRNA decreases. Unexpectedly, in tumor glial cells both H1˚ RNA and protein are highly expressed, in spite of the fact that H1˚ is considered a differentiation-specific histone variant. Persistence of H1˚ mRNA in oligodendroglioma cells is accompanied by high levels of H1˚ RNA-binding activities which seem to be present, at least in part, also in actively proliferating, but not in differentiating, astrocytes. Finally, we report that oligodendroglioma cells, but not astrocytes, release H1˚ protein into the culture medium by shedding extracellular vesicles. These findings suggest that deregulation of H1˚ histone expression can be linked to tumorigenesis.

  10. High Affinity Binding of Chp1 Chromodomain to K9 Methylated Histone H3 is Required to Establish Centromeric Hterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalch, T.; Job, G; Noffsinger, V; Shanker, S; Kuscu, C; Joshua-Tor, L; Partridge, J

    2009-01-01

    In fission yeast, assembly of centromeric heterochromatin requires the RITS complex, which consists of Ago1, Tas3, Chp1, and siRNAs derived from centromeric repeats. Recruitment of RITS to centromeres has been proposed to depend on siRNA-dependent targeting of Ago1 to centromeric sequences. Previously, we demonstrated that methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me) acts upstream of siRNAs during heterochromatin establishment. Our crystal structure of Chp1's chromodomain in complex with a trimethylated lysine 9 H3 peptide reveals extensive sites of contact that contribute to Chp1's high-affinity binding. We found that this high-affinity binding is critical for the efficient establishment of centromeric heterochromatin, but preassembled heterochromatin can be maintained when Chp1's affinity for H3K9me is greatly reduced.

  11. Testis-Specific Histone Variant H3t Gene Is Essential for Entry into Spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ueda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular differentiation is associated with dynamic chromatin remodeling in establishing a cell-type-specific epigenomic landscape. Here, we find that mouse testis-specific and replication-dependent histone H3 variant H3t is essential for very early stages of spermatogenesis. H3t gene deficiency leads to azoospermia because of the loss of haploid germ cells. When differentiating spermatogonia emerge in normal spermatogenesis, H3t appears and replaces the canonical H3 proteins. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that H3t-containing nucleosomes are more flexible than the canonical nucleosomes. Thus, by incorporating H3t into the genome during spermatogonial differentiation, male germ cells are able to enter meiosis and beyond.

  12. Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein peptides specifically bind to reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Marisol; Vera, Ricardo; Eduardo Rodriguez, Luis; Curtidor, Hernando; Urquiza, Mauricio; Suarez, Jorge; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Lopez, Ramsés; Trujillo, Mary; Torres, Elizabeth; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2002-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (Pv-DBP) is essential during merozoite invasion of reticulocytes. Reticulocyte binding region identification is important for understanding Pv-DBP reticulocyte recognition. Fifty 20 mer non-overlapping peptides, spanning Pv-DBP sequences, were tested in erythrocyte and reticulocyte binding assays. Ten HARBPs, mainly located in region II (Kd 50-130 nM), were High Activity Reticulocyte Binding Peptides (HARBPs); one bound to erythrocytes. Reticulocyte trypsin-, chymotrypsin- or neuraminidase- treatment affects HARBP binding differently, suggesting that these peptides have different reticulocyte-binding-sites. Some peptides bound to a Coomasie non-stainable 40 Kda band. Some HARBPs were able to block recombinant PvRII binding (Pv-DBP region II) to Duffy positive reticulocytes.

  13. The PR-Set7 binding domain of Riz1 is required for the H4K20me1-H3K9me1 trans-tail 'histone code' and Riz1 tumor suppressor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Lauren M; Sims, Jennifer K; Tuzon, Creighton T; Rice, Judd C

    2014-04-01

    PR-Set7/Set8/KMT5a is the sole histone H4 lysine 20 monomethyltransferase (H4K20me1) in metazoans and is essential for proper cell division and genomic stability. We unexpectedly discovered that normal cellular levels of monomethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me1) were also dependent on PR-Set7, but independent of its catalytic activity. This observation suggested that PR-Set7 interacts with an H3K9 monomethyltransferase to establish the previously reported H4K20me1-H3K9me1 trans-tail 'histone code'. Here we show that PR-Set7 specifically and directly binds the C-terminus of the Riz1/PRDM2/KMT8 tumor suppressor and demonstrate that the N-terminal PR/SET domain of Riz1 preferentially monomethylates H3K9. The PR-Set7 binding domain was required for Riz1 nuclear localization and maintenance of the H4K20me1-H3K9me1 trans-tail 'histone code'. Although Riz1 can function as a repressor, Riz1/H3K9me1 was dispensable for the repression of genes regulated by PR-Set7/H4K20me1. Frameshift mutations resulting in a truncated Riz1 incapable of binding PR-Set7 occur frequently in various aggressive cancers. In these cancer cells, expression of wild-type Riz1 restored tumor suppression by decreasing proliferation and increasing apoptosis. These phenotypes were not observed in cells expressing either the Riz1 PR/SET domain or PR-Set7 binding domain indicating that Riz1 methyltransferase activity and PR-Set7 binding domain are both essential for Riz1 tumor suppressor function.

  14. NMR elucidation of monomer-dimer transition and conformational heterogeneity in histone-like DNA binding protein of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Nancy; Raikwal, Nisha; Pandey, Himanshu; Agarwal, Nipanshu; Arora, Ashish; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Kumar, Dinesh

    2017-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonizes under harsh acidic/oxidative stress conditions of human gastrointestinal tract and can survive there for infinitely longer durations of host life. The bacterium expresses several harbinger proteins to facilitate its persistent colonization under such conditions. One such protein in H. pylori is histone-like DNA binding protein (Hup), which in its homo-dimeric form binds to DNA to perform various DNA dependent cellular activities. Further, it also plays an important role in protecting the genomic DNA from oxidative stress and acidic denaturation. Legitimately, if the binding of Hup to DNA is suppressed, it will directly impact on the survival of the bacterium, thus making Hup a potential therapeutic target for developing new anti-H. pylori agents. However, to inhibit the binding of Hup to DNA, it is necessary to gain detailed insights into the molecular and structural basis of Hup-dimerization and its binding mechanism to DNA. As a first step in this direction, we report here the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments and structural features of Hup at pH 6.0. The study revealed the occurrence of dynamic equilibrium between its monomer and dimer conformations. The dynamic equilibrium was found to shifting towards dimer both at low temperature and low pH; whereas DNA binding studies evidenced that the protein binds to DNA in its dimeric form. These preliminary investigations correlate very well with the diverse functionality of protein and will form the basis for future studies aiming to develop novel anti-H. pylori agents employing structure-based-rational drug discovery approach. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Molecular mechanisms for the regulation of histone mRNA stem-loop-binding protein by phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Tan, Dazhi; DeRose, Eugene F.; Perera, Lalith; Dominski, Zbigniew; Marzluff, William F.; Tong, Liang; Tanaka Hall, Traci M. [NIH; (UNC); (Columbia)

    2014-08-06

    Replication-dependent histone mRNAs end with a conserved stem loop that is recognized by stem-loop–binding protein (SLBP). The minimal RNA-processing domain of SLBP is phosphorylated at an internal threonine, and Drosophila SLBP (dSLBP) also is phosphorylated at four serines in its 18-aa C-terminal tail. We show that phosphorylation of dSLBP increases RNA-binding affinity dramatically, and we use structural and biophysical analyses of dSLBP and a crystal structure of human SLBP phosphorylated on the internal threonine to understand the striking improvement in RNA binding. Together these results suggest that, although the C-terminal tail of dSLBP does not contact the RNA, phosphorylation of the tail promotes SLBP conformations competent for RNA binding and thereby appears to reduce the entropic penalty for the association. Increased negative charge in this C-terminal tail balances positively charged residues, allowing a more compact ensemble of structures in the absence of RNA.

  16. Peptide microarrays to interrogate the "histone code".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbart, Scott B; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D; Fuchs, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) play a pivotal role in regulating the dynamics and function of chromatin. Supported by an increasing body of literature, histone PTMs such as methylation and acetylation function together in the context of a "histone code," which is read, or interpreted, by effector proteins that then drive a functional output in chromatin (e.g., gene transcription). A growing number of domains that interact with histones and/or their PTMs have been identified. While significant advances have been made in our understanding of how these domains interact with histones, a wide number of putative histone-binding motifs have yet to be characterized, and undoubtedly, novel domains will continue to be discovered. In this chapter, we provide a detailed method for the construction of combinatorially modified histone peptides, microarray fabrication using these peptides, and methods to characterize the interaction of effector proteins, antibodies, and the substrate specificity of histone-modifying enzymes. We discuss these methods in the context of other available technologies and provide a user-friendly approach to enable the exploration of histone-protein-enzyme interactions and function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical Editing of Macrocyclic Natural Products and Kinetic Profiling Reveal Slow, Tight-Binding Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Picomolar Affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitir, Betül; Maolanon, Alex R.; Ohm, Ragnhild G.

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are validated targets for treatment of certain cancer types and play numerous regulatory roles in biology, ranging from epigenetics to metabolism. Small molecules are highly important as tool compounds for probing these mechanisms as well as for the development of new...... medicines. Therefore, detailed mechanistic information and precise characterization of the chemical probes used to investigate the effects of HDAC enzymes are vital. We interrogated Nature's arsenal of macrocyclic nonribosomal peptide HDAC inhibitors by chemical synthesis and evaluation of more than 30...... natural products and analogues. This furnished surprising trends in binding affinities for the various macrocycles, which were then exploited for the design of highly potent class I and IIb HDAC inhibitors. Furthermore, thorough kinetic investigation revealed unexpected inhibitory mechanisms of important...

  18. Linking site-specific loss of histone acetylation to repression of gene expression by the mycotoxin ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbeck, Elisabeth; Vanselow, Jens T; Hofmann, Julian; Schlosser, Andreas; Mally, Angela

    2017-11-02

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a potent renal carcinogen but its mechanism has not been fully resolved. In vitro and in vivo gene expression studies consistently revealed down-regulation of gene expression as the predominant transcriptional response to OTA. Based on the importance of specific histone acetylation marks in regulating gene transcription and our recent finding that OTA inhibits histone acetyltransferases (HATs), leading to loss of acetylation of histones and non-histone proteins, we hypothesized that OTA-mediated repression of gene expression may be causally linked to HAT inhibition and loss of histone acetylation. In this study, we used a novel mass spectrometry approach employing chemical 13C-acetylation of unmodified lysine residues for quantification of post-translational acetylation sites to identify site-specific alterations in histone acetylation in human kidney epithelial cells (HK-2) exposed to OTA. These results showed OTA-mediated hypoacetylation at almost all lysine residues of core histones, including loss of acetylation at H3K9 and H3K14, which are hallmarks of gene activation. ChIP-qPCR used to establish a possible link between H3K9 or H3K14 hypoacetylation and OTA-mediated down-regulation of selected genes (AMIGO2, CLASP2, CTNND1) confirmed OTA-mediated H3K9 hypoacetylation at promoter regions of these genes. Integrated analysis of OTA-mediated genome-wide changes in H3K9 acetylation identified by ChIP-Seq with published gene expression data further demonstrated that among OTA-responsive genes almost 80% of hypoacetylated genes were down-regulated, thus confirming an association between H3K9 acetylation status and gene expression of these genes. However, only 7% of OTA repressed genes showed loss of H3K9 acetylation within promoter regions. Interestingly, however, GO analysis and functional enrichment of down-regulated genes showing loss of H3K9 acetylation at their respective promoter regions revealed enrichment of genes involved in the

  19. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic acids...

  20. Mis16 Independently Recognizes Histone H4 and the CENP-ACnp1-Specific Chaperone Scm3sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Sojin; Kim, Hanseong; Cho, Uhn-Soo (Michigan-Med)

    2015-09-04

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific histone H3 variant that is required for kinetochore assembly and accurate chromosome segregation. For it to function properly, CENP-A must be specifically localized to centromeres. In fission yeast, Scm3sp and the Mis18 complex, composed of Mis16, Eic1, and Mis18, function as a CENP-ACnp1-specific chaperone and a recruiting factor, respectively, and together ensure accurate delivery of CENP-ACnp1 to centromeres. Although how Scm3sp specifically recognizes CENP-ACnp1 has been revealed recently, the recruiting mechanism of CENP-ACnp1 via the Mis18 complex remains unknown. In this study, we have determined crystal structures of Schizosaccharomyces japonicus Mis16 alone and in complex with the helix 1 of histone H4 (H4α1). Crystal structures followed by mutant analysis and affinity pull-downs have revealed that Mis16 recognizes both H4α1 and Scm3sp independently within the CENP-ACnp1/H4:Scm3sp complex. This observation suggests that Mis16 gains CENP-ACnp1 specificity by recognizing both Scm3sp and histone H4. Our studies provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying specific recruitment of CENP-ACnp1/H4:Scm3sp into centromeres.

  1. Human-Specific Histone Methylation Signatures at Transcription Start Sites in Prefrontal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Iris; Bharadwaj, Rahul; Chou, Hsin-Jung; Houston, Isaac B.; Peter, Cyril J.; Mitchell, Amanda C.; Yao, Wei-Dong; Myers, Richard H.; Chen, Jiang-fan; Preuss, Todd M.; Rogaev, Evgeny I.; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Weng, Zhiping; Akbarian, Schahram

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive abilities and disorders unique to humans are thought to result from adaptively driven changes in brain transcriptomes, but little is known about the role of cis-regulatory changes affecting transcription start sites (TSS). Here, we mapped in human, chimpanzee, and macaque prefrontal cortex the genome-wide distribution of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3), an epigenetic mark sharply regulated at TSS, and identified 471 sequences with human-specific enrichment or depletion. Among these were 33 loci selectively methylated in neuronal but not non-neuronal chromatin from children and adults, including TSS at DPP10 (2q14.1), CNTN4 and CHL1 (3p26.3), and other neuropsychiatric susceptibility genes. Regulatory sequences at DPP10 and additional loci carried a strong footprint of hominid adaptation, including elevated nucleotide substitution rates and regulatory motifs absent in other primates (including archaic hominins), with evidence for selective pressures during more recent evolution and adaptive fixations in modern populations. Chromosome conformation capture at two neurodevelopmental disease loci, 2q14.1 and 16p11.2, revealed higher order chromatin structures resulting in physical contact of multiple human-specific H3K4me3 peaks spaced 0.5–1 Mb apart, in conjunction with a novel cis-bound antisense RNA linked to Polycomb repressor proteins and downregulated DPP10 expression. Therefore, coordinated epigenetic regulation via newly derived TSS chromatin could play an important role in the emergence of human-specific gene expression networks in brain that contribute to cognitive functions and neurological disease susceptibility in modern day humans. PMID:23185133

  2. Damaged DNA-binding protein down-regulates epigenetic mark H3K56Ac through histone deacetylase 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qianzheng; Battu, Aruna; Ray, Alo; Wani, Gulzar; Qian, Jiang; He, Jinshan; Wang, Qi-en [Department of Radiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wani, Altaf A., E-mail: wani.2@osu.edu [Department of Radiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • HDAC1 and HDAC2 co-localize with UV radiation-induced DNA damage sites. • HDAC1 translocation to chromatin is dependent on DDB2 function. • HDAC1 and HDAC2 are involved in H3K56Ac deacetylation. • H3K56Ac deacetylation requires DDB1 and DDB2 but not XPA or XPC functions. • HDAC1/2 depletion decreases XPC ubiquitination and local γH2AX accumulation. - Abstract: Acetylated histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56Ac) is one of the reversible histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) responsive to DNA damage. We previously described a biphasic decrease and increase of epigenetic mark H3K56Ac in response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA damage. Here, we report a new function of UV damaged DNA-binding protein (DDB) in deacetylation of H3K56Ac through specific histone deacetylases (HDACs). We show that simultaneous depletion of HDAC1/2 compromises the deacetylation of H3K56Ac, while depletion of HDAC1 or HDAC2 alone has no effect on H3K56Ac. The H3K56Ac deacetylation does not require functional nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors XPA and XPC, but depends on the function of upstream factors DDB1 and DDB2. UVR enhances the association of DDB2 with HDAC1 and, enforced DDB2 expression leads to translocation of HDAC1 to UVR-damaged chromatin. HDAC1 and HDAC2 are recruited to UVR-induced DNA damage spots, which are visualized by anti-XPC immunofluorescence. Dual HDAC1/2 depletion decreases XPC ubiquitination, but does not affect the recruitment of DDB2 to DNA damage. By contrast, the local accumulation of γH2AX at UVR-induced DNA damage spots was compromised upon HDAC1 as well as dual HDAC1/2 depletions. Additionally, UVR-induced ATM activation decreased in H12899 cells expressing H3K56Ac-mimicing H3K56Q. These results revealed a novel role of DDB in H3K56Ac deacetylation during early step of NER and the existence of active functional cross-talk between DDB-mediated damage recognition and H3K56Ac deacetylation.

  3. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  4. Histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein 2 regulates the expression of -smooth muscle actin and vimentin in cirrhotic livers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver cirrhosis is one of the most common diseases of Chinese patients. Herein, we report the high expression of a newly identified histone 3 lysine 4 demethylase, retinoblastoma binding protein 2 (RBP2, and its role in liver cirrhosis in humans. The siRNA knockdown of RBP2 expression in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs reduced levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and vimentin and decreased the proliferation of HSCs; and overexpression of RBP2 increased α-SMA and vimentin levels. Treatment with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β upregulated the expression of RBP2, α-SMA, and vimentin, and the siRNA knockdown of RBP2 expression attenuated TGF-β-mediated upregulation of α-SMA and vimentin expression and HSC proliferation. Furthermore, RBP2 was highly expressed in cirrhotic rat livers. Therefore, RBP2 may participate in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis by regulating the expression of α-SMA and vimentin. RBP2 may be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment of liver cirrhosis.

  5. Histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein 2 regulates the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin in cirrhotic livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q. [Department of Microbiology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of the Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Wang, L.X. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zeng, J.P. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Liu, X.J.; Liang, X.M.; Zhou, Y.B. [Department of Microbiology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of the Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2013-09-06

    Liver cirrhosis is one of the most common diseases of Chinese patients. Herein, we report the high expression of a newly identified histone 3 lysine 4 demethylase, retinoblastoma binding protein 2 (RBP2), and its role in liver cirrhosis in humans. The siRNA knockdown of RBP2 expression in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) reduced levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin and decreased the proliferation of HSCs; and overexpression of RBP2 increased α-SMA and vimentin levels. Treatment with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) upregulated the expression of RBP2, α-SMA, and vimentin, and the siRNA knockdown of RBP2 expression attenuated TGF-β-mediated upregulation of α-SMA and vimentin expression and HSC proliferation. Furthermore, RBP2 was highly expressed in cirrhotic rat livers. Therefore, RBP2 may participate in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis by regulating the expression of α-SMA and vimentin. RBP2 may be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment of liver cirrhosis.

  6. Site-specific Acetylation of Histone H3 Decreases Polymerase β Activity on Nucleosome Core Particles in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Yesenia; Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J; Smerdon, Michael J

    2016-05-20

    Histone posttranslational modifications have been associated with changes in chromatin structure necessary for transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Acetylation is one of the most studied and best characterized histone posttranslational modifications, but it is not known if histone acetylation modulates base excision repair of DNA lesions in chromatin. To address this question, we generated nucleosome core particles (NCPs) containing site-specifically acetylated H3K14 or H3K56 and measured repair of uracil and single-nucleotide gaps. We find that H3K56Ac and H3K14Ac do not significantly contribute to removal of uracils by uracil DNA glycosylase regardless of the translational or rotational position of the lesions within NCPs. In repair of single-nucleotide gaps, however, the presence of H3K56Ac or H3K14Ac in NCPs decreases the gap-filling activity of DNA polymerase β near the dyad center, with H3K14Ac exhibiting stronger inhibition. To a lesser extent, H3K56Ac induces a similar effect near the DNA ends. Moreover, using restriction enzyme accessibility, we detect no changes in NCP structure or dynamics between H3K14Ac-NCPs and WT-NCPs containing single-nucleotide gaps. Thus, acetylation at H3K56 and H3K14 in nucleosomes may promote alternative gap-filling pathways by inhibiting DNA polymerase β activity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. [Histone variants and histone exchange].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2006-04-01

    Histones, as the basic components of nucleosome, are essential to chromatin structure and function. To adapt to various states of chromatin, corresponding histone variants are incorporated in nucleosome, and certain modifications also occur on the variants' tails. These variants change the conformation and stability of nucleosome to facilitate transcriptional activation or deactivation, DNA repairing, heterochromatin formation, and others. During histone exchange, chromatin remodeling complex facilitates histone variant deposition into nucleosome, and different variants have diverse deposition pathways. Recently, research on histone variants is not only a new hotspot in epigenetics, but also a new annotation of "histone code". In addition, histone exchange reveals new changing mechanism of DNA-histone interaction.

  8. Cation specific binding with protein surface charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-08-11

    Biological organization depends on a sensitive balance of noncovalent interactions, in particular also those involving interactions between ions. Ion-pairing is qualitatively described by the law of "matching water affinities." This law predicts that cations and anions (with equal valence) form stable contact ion pairs if their sizes match. We show that this simple physical model fails to describe the interaction of cations with (molecular) anions of weak carboxylic acids, which are present on the surfaces of many intra- and extracellular proteins. We performed molecular simulations with quantitatively accurate models and observed that the order K(+) < Na(+) < Li(+) of increasing binding affinity with carboxylate ions is caused by a stronger preference for forming weak solvent-shared ion pairs. The relative insignificance of contact pair interactions with protein surfaces indicates that thermodynamic stability and interactions between proteins in alkali salt solutions is governed by interactions mediated through hydration water molecules.

  9. Archaeal chromatin proteins histone HMtB and Alba have lost DNA-binding ability in laboratory strains of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Kathleen; Louvel, Hélène; Samson, Rachel Y; Pereira, Suzette L; Reeve, John N

    2008-11-01

    Alignments of the sequences of the all members of the archaeal histone and Alba1 families of chromatin proteins identified isoleucine residues, I19 in HMtB and I39 in MtAlba, in Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, at locations predicted to be directly involved in DNA binding. In all other HMfB family members, residue 19 is an arginine (R19), and either arginine or lysine is present in almost all other Alba1 family members at the structural site equivalent to I39 in MtAlba. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that recombinant HMtB and MtAlba do not bind DNA, but variants constructed with R19 and R39, respectively, bound DNA; and whereas MtAlba(I19) did not bind RNA, MtAlba(R19) bound both single stranded RNA and tRNA. Amplification and sequencing of MT0254 (encodes HMtB) and MT1483 (encodes MtAlba) from several Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus lineages has revealed that HMtB and MtAlba had arginine residues at positions 19 and 39, respectively, in the original isolate and that spontaneous mutations must have occurred, and been fixed, in some laboratory lineages that now have HMtB(I19) and MtAlba(I39). The retention of these variants suggests some continuing functions and fusion of the HMtB(I19) sequence to HMtA2 resulted in a protein that folds to form a histone fold heterodimer that binds and compacts DNA. The loss of DNA binding by HMtB(I19) does not therefore prevent HMtB from participating in DNA interactions as one partner of an archaeal histone heterodimer.

  10. Drug-binding properties of rat alpha-foetoprotein. Specificities of the phenylbutazone-binding and warfarin-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, F; Rajkowski, K M; Martin, M T; Dessen, P; Cittanova, N

    1986-01-01

    Rat alpha-foetoprotein (alpha-FP) strongly binds the drugs warfarin and phenylbutazone, as does albumin; however, the binding sites for the two drugs seemed to be different. This possibility and the specificity of this/these drug-binding site(s) of rat alpha-FP were investigated by competitive protein-binding experiments with a variety of drugs, representing different pharmacological groups, and biomolecules that are strongly bound by the foetal protein and that are suspected to play a specific role during foetal development. The binding mechanisms were further investigated by using comparisons between computer-derived theoretical displacement curves and experimental points in order to distinguish different possible binding models. The results indicate: that warfarin and phenylbutazone are bound at two distinct sites on rat alpha-FP and that a negative modulatory effect is exerted between the two sites; that the degree of specificity of these two drug-binding sites is different, since the warfarin-binding site appears to be specific for the binding of coumarinic and anthranilic drugs whereas that for phenylbutazone is able to bind substances of very varied chemical structure and is more hydrophobic; that the phenylbutazone-binding site is the site that binds oestrogens that thyroid hormones and, probably, fatty acids and bilirubin are bound at (an)other site(s) but exert negative modulatory effects on phenylbutazone binding. The nature of the different binding areas of rat alpha-FP is compared with that of those already proposed for albumin. The potential risks of toxicity of such interactions between drugs and/or biomolecules on foetal development are also discussed. PMID:2434073

  11. Specific binding of neoglycoproteins to Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, R; de la Jarrige, P L; Mahaza, C; Cottin, J; Marot-Leblond, A; Senet, J M

    1991-01-01

    Several studies have shown that protozoa bind to glycoproteins or neoglycoproteins. Here we report that Toxoplasma gondii binds strongly to bovine serum albumin-glucosamide. The binding was rapid, time dependent, partially reversible, saturable, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed about 40,000 molecules of bovine serum albumin-glucosamide per toxoplasma cell. The apparent dissociation constant was found to be 4.46 x 10(-8) M. Images PMID:1937826

  12. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry–exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R.; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry–exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. PMID:24829456

  13. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry-exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry-exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. RNA-binding specificity of Y-box protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jinjiang; Akcakanat, Argun; Stivers, David N; Zhang, Jiexin; Kim, Doyil; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2009-01-01

    Y-box protein 1 (YB-1) is a multifunctional DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates transcription and translation. The specificity of YB-1's RNA binding and its consequences are unknown. Because expression and subcellular localization of YB-1 have been reported to be important in breast cancer, we determined the specificity and functional impact of YB-1 mRNA-binding in MCF7 breast cancer cells. We used YB-1 antibodies to immunoprecipitate YB-1 and microarray profiling to compare YB-1-bound and total poly(A) RNA. We demonstrated that YB-1 mRNA-binding was preferential. Transcript sequences significantly associated with this binding had high GC content. Selected YB-1 mRNA-binding targets were confirmed by QRT-PCR. However, downregulation of YB-1 levels by siRNA did not affect their RNA or protein expression. Thus, YB-1 has RNA-binding specificity; however, YB-1 binding does not necessarily regulate the stability or translation of its mRNA targets. Further study is needed to determine the functional consequences of selective YB-1 mRNA binding.

  15. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  16. Processing Binding Relations in Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard G.; Hestvik, Arild; Seiger-Gardner, Liat; Almodovar, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This sentence processing experiment examined the abilities of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typical language development (TD) to establish relations between pronouns or reflexives and their antecedents in real time. Method: Twenty-two children with SLI and 24 age-matched children with TD (7;3-10;11…

  17. Quantitative modeling of transcription factor binding specificities using DNA shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyin; Shen, Ning; Yang, Lin; Abe, Namiko; Horton, John; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2015-04-14

    DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) are a key component of gene regulatory processes. Underlying mechanisms that explain the highly specific binding of TFs to their genomic target sites are poorly understood. A better understanding of TF-DNA binding requires the ability to quantitatively model TF binding to accessible DNA as its basic step, before additional in vivo components can be considered. Traditionally, these models were built based on nucleotide sequence. Here, we integrated 3D DNA shape information derived with a high-throughput approach into the modeling of TF binding specificities. Using support vector regression, we trained quantitative models of TF binding specificity based on protein binding microarray (PBM) data for 68 mammalian TFs. The evaluation of our models included cross-validation on specific PBM array designs, testing across different PBM array designs, and using PBM-trained models to predict relative binding affinities derived from in vitro selection combined with deep sequencing (SELEX-seq). Our results showed that shape-augmented models compared favorably to sequence-based models. Although both k-mer and DNA shape features can encode interdependencies between nucleotide positions of the binding site, using DNA shape features reduced the dimensionality of the feature space. In addition, analyzing the feature weights of DNA shape-augmented models uncovered TF family-specific structural readout mechanisms that were not revealed by the DNA sequence. As such, this work combines knowledge from structural biology and genomics, and suggests a new path toward understanding TF binding and genome function.

  18. Histone deacetylases exert class specific roles in conditioning the brain and heart against acute ischemic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverre Erik Aune

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury comprises a significant portion of morbidity and mortality from heart and brain diseases worldwide. This enduring clinical problem has inspired myriad reports in the scientific literature of experimental interventions seeking to elucidate the pathology of IR injury. Elective cardiac surgery presents perhaps the most viable scenario for protecting the heart and brain from IR injury, due to the opportunity to condition the organs prior to insult. The physiological parameters for the preconditioning of vital organs prior to insult through mechanical and pharmacologic maneuvers have been heavily examined. These investigations have revealed new insights into how preconditioning alters cellular responses to IR injury. However, the promise of preconditioning remains unfulfilled at the clinical level, and research seeking to implicate cell signals essential to this protection continues. Recent discoveries in molecular biology have revealed that gene expression can be controlled through posttranslational modifications, without altering the chemical structure of the genetic code. In this scenario, gene expression is repressed by enzymes that cause chromatin compaction through catalytic removal of acetyl moieties from lysine residues on histones. These enzymes, called histone deacetylases (HDACs, can be inhibited pharmacologically, leading to the de-repression of protective genes. The discovery that HDACs can also alter the function of non-histone proteins through posttranslational deacetylation has expanded the potential impact of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of human disease. HDAC inhibitors have been applied in a very small number of experimental models of IR. However, the scientific literature contains an increasing number of reports demonstrating that HDACs converge on preconditioning signals in the cell. This review will describe the influence of HDACs on major preconditioning signaling pathways in the heart and

  19. Substrate- and Cofactor-independent Inhibition of Histone Demethylase KDM4C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of histone demethylases has within recent years advanced into a new strategy for treating cancer and other diseases. Targeting specific histone demethylases can be challenging as the active sites of KDM1A-B and KDM-4A-D histone demethylases, respectively, are highly conserved. Most...... inhibitors developed up-to-date target either the cofactor- or substrate-binding sites of these enzymes, resulting in a lack of selectivity and off-target effects. This study describes the discovery of the first peptide-based inhibitors of KDM4 histone demethylases that do not share the histone peptide...... sequence, or inhibit through substrate competition. Through screening of DNA-encoded peptide libraries against KDM1 and -4 histone demethylases by phage display, two cyclic peptides targeting the histone demethylase KDM4C were identified and developed as inhibitors by amino acid replacement, truncation...

  20. The UBC9 E2 SUMO conjugating enzyme binds the PR-Set7 histone methyltransferase to facilitate target gene repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spektor, Tanya M; Congdon, Lauren M; Veerappan, Chendhore S; Rice, Judd C

    2011-01-01

    PR-Set7/Set8/KMT5a is a chromatin-modifying enzyme that specifically monomethylates lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20me1). In this study we attempted to identify PR-Set7-interacting proteins reasoning that these proteins would provide important insights into the role of PR-Set7 in transcriptional regulation. Using an unbiased yeast two-hybrid approach, we discovered that PR-Set7 interacts with the UBC9 E2 SUMO conjugating enzyme. This interaction was confirmed in human cells and we demonstrated that PR-Set7 was preferentially modified with SUMO1 in vivo. Further in vitro studies revealed that UBC9 directly binds PR-Set7 proximal to the catalytic SET domain. Two putative SUMO consensus sites were identified in this region and both were capable of being SUMOylated in vitro. The absence of either or both SUMO sites did not perturb nuclear localization of PR-Set7. By employing whole genome expression arrays, we identified a panel of genes whose expression was significantly altered in the absence of PR-Set7. The vast majority of these genes displayed increased expression strongly suggesting that PR-Set7 predominantly functions as a transcriptional repressor. Importantly, the reduction of UBC9 resulted in the consistent derepression of several of these newly identified genes regulated by PR-Set7. Our findings indicate that direct interaction with UBC9 facilitates the repressive effects of PR-Set7 at specific target genes, most likely by SUMOylating PR-Set7.

  1. The UBC9 E2 SUMO conjugating enzyme binds the PR-Set7 histone methyltransferase to facilitate target gene repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya M Spektor

    Full Text Available PR-Set7/Set8/KMT5a is a chromatin-modifying enzyme that specifically monomethylates lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20me1. In this study we attempted to identify PR-Set7-interacting proteins reasoning that these proteins would provide important insights into the role of PR-Set7 in transcriptional regulation. Using an unbiased yeast two-hybrid approach, we discovered that PR-Set7 interacts with the UBC9 E2 SUMO conjugating enzyme. This interaction was confirmed in human cells and we demonstrated that PR-Set7 was preferentially modified with SUMO1 in vivo. Further in vitro studies revealed that UBC9 directly binds PR-Set7 proximal to the catalytic SET domain. Two putative SUMO consensus sites were identified in this region and both were capable of being SUMOylated in vitro. The absence of either or both SUMO sites did not perturb nuclear localization of PR-Set7. By employing whole genome expression arrays, we identified a panel of genes whose expression was significantly altered in the absence of PR-Set7. The vast majority of these genes displayed increased expression strongly suggesting that PR-Set7 predominantly functions as a transcriptional repressor. Importantly, the reduction of UBC9 resulted in the consistent derepression of several of these newly identified genes regulated by PR-Set7. Our findings indicate that direct interaction with UBC9 facilitates the repressive effects of PR-Set7 at specific target genes, most likely by SUMOylating PR-Set7.

  2. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-12-28

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of /sup 125/I-insulin was carried out at 15/sup 0/C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  3. Phase 1 study of the oral isotype specific histone deacetylase inhibitor MGCD0103 in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Assouline, Sarit; Cortes, Jorge; Estrov, Zeev; Kantarjian, Hagop; Yang, Hui; Newsome, Willie M; Miller, Wilson H; Rousseau, Caroline; Kalita, Ann; Bonfils, Claire; Dubay, Marja; Patterson, Tracy-Ann; Li, Zuomei; Besterman, Jeffrey M; Reid, Gregory; Laille, Eric; Martell, Robert E; Minden, Mark

    2008-08-15

    MGCD0103 is an isotype-selective inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) targeted to isoforms 1, 2, 3, and 11. In a phase 1 study in patients with leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), MGCD0103 was administered orally 3 times weekly without interruption. Twenty-nine patients with a median age of 62 years (range, 32-84 years) were enrolled at planned dose levels (20, 40, and 80 mg/m(2)). The majority of patients (76%) had acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). In all, 24 (83%) of 29 patients had received 1 or more prior chemotherapies (range, 0-5), and 18 (62%) of 29 patients had abnormal cytogenetics. The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 60 mg/m(2), with dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea observed at higher doses. Three patients achieved a complete bone marrow response (blasts MGCD0103 within 1 hour and an elimination half-life in plasma of 9 (+/- 2) hours. Exposure to MGCD0103 was proportional to dose up to 60 mg/m(2). Analysis of peripheral white cells demonstrated induction of histone acetylation and dose-dependent inhibition of HDAC enzyme activity. In summary, MGCD0103 was safe and had antileukemia activity that was mechanism based in patients with advanced leukemia.

  4. Detection of Histone Modifications at Specific Gene Loci in Single Cells in Histological Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Delphine; Shankman, Laura L; Nguyen, Anh T; Owens, Gary K

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays have contributed greatly to our understanding of the role of histone modifications in gene regulation. However, a major limitation is that they do not permit analysis with single cell resolution thus confounding analyses of heterogeneous cell populations. Herein we present a new method which permits visualization of histone modifications of single genomic loci with single-cell resolution in formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections based on combined use of In Situ Hybridization (ISH) and Proximity Ligation Assays (PLA). Using this method we show that H3K4dime of the MYH11 locus is restricted to the smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage in human and mouse tissue sections, and that the mark persists even in phenotypically modulated SMC within atherosclerotic lesions that show no detectable expression of SMC marker genes. This new methodology has promise for broad applications in the study of epigenetic mechanisms in complex multicellular tissues in development and disease. PMID:23314172

  5. The thermodynamic signature of ligand binding to histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolases is most sensitive to the flexibility in the L2-loop lining the active site pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyners, Christian; Krämer, Andreas; Yildiz, Özkan; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of the thermodynamic driving forces of ligand-protein binding has been suggested to be a key component for the selection and optimization of active compounds into drug candidates. The binding enthalpy as deduced from isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is usually interpreted assuming single-step binding of a ligand to one conformation of the target protein. Although successful in many cases, these assumptions are oversimplified approximations of the reality with flexible proteins and complicated binding mechanism in many if not most cases. The relationship between protein flexibility and thermodynamic signature of ligand binding is largely understudied. Directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics and ITC methods were combined to dissect the influence of loop flexibility on the thermodynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to histone deacetylase (HDAC)-like amidohydrolases. The general ligand-protein binding mechanism comprises an energetically demanding gate opening step followed by physical binding. Increased flexibility of the L2-loop in HDAC-like amidohydrolases facilitates access of ligands to the binding pocket resulting in predominantly enthalpy-driven complex formation. The study provides evidence for the great importance of flexibility adjacent to the active site channel for the mechanism and observed thermodynamic driving forces of molecular recognition in HDAC like enzymes. The flexibility or malleability in regions adjacent to binding pockets should be given more attention when designing better drug candidates. The presented case study also suggests that the observed binding enthalpy of protein-ligand systems should be interpreted with caution, since more complicated binding mechanisms may obscure the significance regarding potential drug likeness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. CaMK activation during exercise is required for histone hyperacetylation and MEF2A binding at the MEF2 site on the Glut4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A H; Kohn, Tertius A; Chetty, Ashley K; Ojuka, Edward O

    2008-09-01

    The role of CaMK II in regulating GLUT4 expression in response to intermittent exercise was investigated. Wistar rats completed 5 x 17-min bouts of swimming after receiving 5 mg/kg KN93 (a CaMK II inhibitor), KN92 (an analog of KN93 that does not inhibit CaMK II), or an equivalent volume of vehicle. Triceps muscles that were harvested at 0, 6, or 18 h postexercise were assayed for 1) CaMK II phosphorylation by Western blot, 2) acetylation of histone H3 at the Glut4 MEF2 site by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, 3) bound MEF2A at the Glut4 MEF2 cis-element by ChIP, and 4) GLUT4 expression by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared with controls, exercise caused a twofold increase in CaMK II phosphorylation. Immunohistochemical stains indicated increased CaMK II phosphorylation in nuclear and perinuclear regions of the muscle fiber. Acetylation of histone H3 in the region surrounding the MEF2 binding site on the Glut4 gene and the amount of MEF2A that bind to the site increased approximately twofold postexercise. GLUT4 mRNA and protein increased approximately 2.2- and 1.8-fold, respectively, after exercise. The exercise-induced increases in CaMK II phosphorylation, histone H3 acetylation, MEF2A binding, and GLUT4 expression were attenuated or abolished when KN93 was administered to rats prior to exercise. KN92 did not affect the increases in pCaMK II and GLUT4. These data support the hypothesis that CaMK II activation by exercise increases GLUT4 expression via increased accessibility of MEF2A to its cis-element on the gene.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum normocyte binding protein (PfNBP-1) peptides bind specifically to human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, John Jairo; Vera, Ricardo; García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Urquiza, Mauricio; Rivera, Zuly; Guzmán, Fanny; Torres, Elizabeth; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2003-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum normocyte binding protein-1 (PfNBP-1), a Plasmodium vivax RBP-1 orthologue is expressed in the apical merozoite area. PfNBP-1 binds directly to human erythrocyte membrane in a sialic acid-dependent but trypsin-resistant way. Erythrocyte binding assays were done with synthetic peptides covering the sequence reported as PfNBP-1. Two specific erythrocyte high activity binding peptides were found: 101VFINDLDTYQYEYFYEWNQ(120), peptide 26332, and 181NTKETYLKELNKKKMLQNKK(200), peptide 26336. These two peptides' binding was saturable and presenting nanomolar affinity constants. The critical binding residues (those residues underlined and highlighted in bold) were determined by competition assays with glycine-scan analogue peptides. These peptides were able to block merozoite in vitro invasion of erythrocytes.

  8. Histone Acetyltransferase p300/CREB-binding Protein-associated Factor (PCAF) Is Required for All-trans-retinoic Acid-induced Granulocytic Differentiation in Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunami, Yoshitaka; Araki, Marito; Kan, Shin; Ito, Akihiro; Hironaka, Yumi; Imai, Misa; Morishita, Soji; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2017-02-17

    Differentiation therapy with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) improves the treatment outcome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL); however, the molecular mechanism by which ATRA induces granulocytic differentiation remains unclear. We previously reported that the inhibition of the NAD-dependent histone deacetylase (HDAC) SIRT2 induces granulocytic differentiation in leukemia cells, suggesting the involvement of protein acetylation in ATRA-induced leukemia cell differentiation. Herein, we show that p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor (PCAF), a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), is a prerequisite for ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation in leukemia cells. We found that PCAF expression was markedly increased in leukemia cell lines (NB4 and HL-60) and primary APL cells during ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation. Consistent with these results, the expression of PCAF was markedly up-regulated in the bone marrow cells of APL patients who received ATRA-containing chemotherapy. The knockdown of PCAF inhibited ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation in leukemia cell lines and primary APL cells. Conversely, the overexpression of PCAF induced the expression of the granulocytic differentiation marker CD11b at the mRNA level. Acetylome analysis identified the acetylated proteins after ATRA treatment, and we found that histone H3, a known PCAF acetylation substrate, was preferentially acetylated by the ATRA treatment. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that PCAF is required for the acetylation of histone H3 on the promoter of ATRA target genes, such as CCL2 and FGR, and for the expression of these genes in ATRA-treated leukemia cells. These results strongly support our hypothesis that PCAF is induced and activated by ATRA, and the subsequent acetylation of PCAF substrates promotes granulocytic differentiation in leukemia cells. Targeting PCAF and its downstream acetylation targets could serve as a novel therapeutic strategy to overcome all subtypes of AML.

  9. Sex-specific expression of the X-linked histone demethylase gene Jarid1c in brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Jarid1c, an X-linked gene coding for a histone demethylase, plays an important role in brain development and function. Notably, JARID1C mutations cause mental retardation and increased aggression in humans. These phenotypes are consistent with the expression patterns we have identified in mouse brain where Jarid1c mRNA was detected in hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. Jarid1c expression and associated active histone marks at its 5'end are high in P19 neurons, indicating that JARID1C demethylase plays an important role in differentiated neuronal cells. We found that XX mice expressed Jarid1c more highly than XY mice, independent of their gonadal types (testes versus ovaries. This increased expression in XX mice is consistent with Jarid1c escape from X inactivation and is not compensated by expression from the Y-linked paralogue Jarid1d, which is expressed at a very low level compared to the X paralogue in P19 cells. Our observations suggest that sex-specific expression of Jarid1c may contribute to sex differences in brain function.

  10. Specific binding and mineralization of calcified surfaces by small peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Daniel K; Hagerman, Elizabeth; Eckert, Randal; He, Jian; Choi, Hyewon; Cao, Nga; Le, Karen; Hedger, Jennifer; Qi, Fengxia; Anderson, Maxwell; Rutherford, Bruce; Wu, Ben; Tetradis, Sotiris; Shi, Wenyuan

    2010-01-01

    Several small (dentin phosphoprotein, one of the major noncollagenous proteins thought to be involved in the mineralization of the dentin extracellular matrix during tooth development. These peptides, consisting of multiple repeats of the tripeptide aspartate-serine-serine (DSS), bind with high affinity to calcium phosphate compounds and, when immobilized, can recruit calcium phosphate to peptide-derivatized polystyrene beads or to demineralized human dentin surfaces. The affinity of binding to hydroxyapatite surfaces increases with the number of (DSS)(n) repeats, and though similar repeated sequences-(NTT)(n), (DTT)(n), (ETT)(n), (NSS)(n), (ESS)(n), (DAA)(n), (ASS)(n), and (NAA)(n)-also showed HA binding activity, it was generally not at the same level as the natural sequence. Binding of the (DSS)(n) peptides to sectioned human teeth was shown to be tissue-specific, with high levels of binding to the mantle dentin, lower levels of binding to the circumpulpal dentin, and little or no binding to healthy enamel. Phosphorylation of the serines of these peptides was found to affect the avidity, but not the affinity, of binding. The potential utility of these peptides in the detection of carious lesions, the delivery of therapeutic compounds to mineralized tissues, and the modulation of remineralization is discussed.

  11. A new link between transcriptional initiation and pre-mRNA splicing: The RNA binding histone variant H2A.B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A Soboleva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of histone H2A with its variant forms is critical for regulating all aspects of genome organisation and function. The histone variant H2A.B appeared late in evolution and is most highly expressed in the testis followed by the brain in mammals. This raises the question of what new function(s H2A.B might impart to chromatin in these important tissues. We have immunoprecipitated the mouse orthologue of H2A.B, H2A.B.3 (H2A.Lap1, from testis chromatin and found this variant to be associated with RNA processing factors and RNA Polymerase (Pol II. Most interestingly, many of these interactions with H2A.B.3 (Sf3b155, Spt6, DDX39A and RNA Pol II were inhibited by the presence of endogenous RNA. This histone variant can bind to RNA directly in vitro and in vivo, and associates with mRNA at intron-exon boundaries. This suggests that the ability of H2A.B to bind to RNA negatively regulates its capacity to bind to these factors (Sf3b155, Spt6, DDX39A and RNA Pol II. Unexpectedly, H2A.B.3 forms highly decompacted nuclear subdomains of active chromatin that co-localizes with splicing speckles in male germ cells. H2A.B.3 ChIP-Seq experiments revealed a unique chromatin organization at active genes being not only enriched at the transcription start site (TSS, but also at the beginning of the gene body (but being excluded from the +1 nucleosome compared to the end of the gene. We also uncover a general histone variant replacement process whereby H2A.B.3 replaces H2A.Z at intron-exon boundaries in the testis and the brain, which positively correlates with expression and exon inclusion. Taken together, we propose that a special mechanism of splicing may occur in the testis and brain whereby H2A.B.3 recruits RNA processing factors from splicing speckles to active genes following its replacement of H2A.Z.

  12. Analysis of specific lysine histone H3 and H4 acetylation and methylation status in clones of cells with a gene silenced by nickel exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Kluz, Thomas; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Hao-bin; Costa, Max

    2003-08-01

    We have previously reported that the gpt transgene in G12 Chinese hamster cells could be silenced by water-insoluble nickel compounds nickel sulfide (NiS) or nickel subsulfide (Ni(3)S(2)) and showed that the transgene was silenced by de novo DNA methylation and chromatin condensation. To further understand the nature of this silencing, we used the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to elucidate the chromatin structure in nickel-induced silenced G12 clones. We also analyzed the effects of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC) and a histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) on histone H3 and H4 acetylation and gpt gene expression in selected nickel-silenced clones. We observed that both histone H3 and H4 were hypoacetylated and a methyl DNA-binding protein MeCP2 was targeted to the gpt gene locus, resulting in a localized inactive chromatin configuration in nickel-silenced cell clones. The histone H3K9 was also found methylated in three of four nickel- silenced cell clones, whereas the histone H3K9 was deacetylated in all four cell clones, indicating that the H3K9 methylation was involved in nickel-induced gene silencing. The acetylation of the gpt gene could be increased by a combination of 5-AzaC and TSA treatment, but not by either 5-AzaC or TSA alone. The gpt transcript was studied by either Northern blot or by semiquantitative RT-PCR following treatment of the silenced clones with TSA or 5-AzaC. An increase in gpt mRNA could be detected by RT-PCR in the clones that regained acetylation of H3 and H4. These data show that gene silencing induced by nickel in the gpt transgenic cell line involved a loss of histone acetylation and an activation of histone methylation. Both H4 and H3 histone acetylation were lost in the silenced clones and these clones exhibited an increase in the methylation of the lysine 9 in histone H3.

  13. Design of sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervan, P B

    1986-04-25

    Base sequence information can be stored in the local structure of right-handed double-helical DNA (B-DNA). The question arises as to whether a set of rules for the three-dimensional readout of the B-DNA helix can be developed. This would allow the design of synthetic molecules that bind DNA of any specific sequence and site size. There are four stages of development for each new synthetic sequence-specific DNA-binding molecule: design, synthesis, testing for sequence specificity, and reevaluation of the design. This approach has produced bis(distamycin)fumaramide, a synthetic, crescent-shaped oligopeptide that binds nine contiguous adenine-thymine base pairs in the minor groove of double-helical DNA.

  14. Mocetinostat (MGCD0103): a review of an isotype-specific histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumber, Yanis; Younes, Anas; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2011-06-01

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) have the potential to restore gene expression and display antitumor effects in vitro. As single agents, HDACIs have clinical activity in lymphoma. In myeloid leukemias, combinations of DNA methylation inhibitors and HDACIs are promising. Other combinations are being studied in solid tumors. This article covers basic information and an update on preclinical and clinical experience with the oral isotype-selective HDACI MGCD0103 (mocetinostat) in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. It also examines data concerning MGCD0103 from recent conferences and articles through to November 2010, including new data regarding responses in lymphoma and toxicities. MGCD0103 is well-tolerated and exhibits favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, demonstrating target inhibition and clinical responses. It induces cell death and autophagy, synergizes with proteasomal inhibitors and affects non-histone targets, such as microtubules. In 2008, new patient enrollment in trials was temporarily suspended due to potential cardiac complications. This restriction was lifted in 2009 as no correlation between MGCD0103 exposure and pericardial effusions was found. New patient enrollment in MGCD0103 clinical trials requires the exclusion of patients diagnosed with significant cardiac abnormalities prior to enrollment. Clinical and pharmacodynamic data support a three-times-weekly administration at a 90 mg fixed dose. MGCD0103 displays promising antitumor activity in several hematological diseases.

  15. Co-regulation of histone-modifying enzymes in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul B M M K Islam

    Full Text Available Cancer is characterized by aberrant patterns of expression of multiple genes. These major shifts in gene expression are believed to be due to not only genetic but also epigenetic changes. The epigenetic changes are communicated through chemical modifications, including histone modifications. However, it is unclear whether the binding of histone-modifying proteins to genomic regions and the placing of histone modifications efficiently discriminates corresponding genes from the rest of the genes in the human genome. We performed gene expression analysis of histone demethylases (HDMs and histone methyltransferases (HMTs, their target genes and genes with relevant histone modifications in normal and tumor tissues. Surprisingly, this analysis revealed the existence of correlations in the expression levels of different HDMs and HMTs. The observed HDM/HMT gene expression signature was specific to particular normal and cancer cell types and highly correlated with target gene expression and the expression of genes with histone modifications. Notably, we observed that trimethylation at lysine 4 and lysine 27 separated preferentially expressed and underexpressed genes, which was strikingly different in cancer cells compared to normal cells. We conclude that changes in coordinated regulation of enzymes executing histone modifications may underlie global epigenetic changes occurring in cancer.

  16. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1

  17. SET DOMAIN GROUP 708, a histone H3 lysine 36-specific methyltransferase, controls flowering time in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Wei, Gang; Shi, Jinlei; Jin, Jing; Shen, Ting; Ni, Ting; Shen, Wen-Hui; Yu, Yu; Dong, Aiwu

    2016-04-01

    As a key epigenetic modification, the methylation of histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) modulates chromatin structure and is involved in diverse biological processes. To better understand the language of H3K36 methylation in rice (Oryza sativa), we chose potential histone methylation enzymes for functional exploration. In particular, we characterized rice SET DOMAIN GROUP 708 (SDG708) as an H3K36-specific methyltransferase possessing the ability to deposit up to three methyl groups on H3K36. Compared with the wild-type, SDG708-knockdown rice mutants displayed a late-flowering phenotype under both long-day and short-day conditions because of the down-regulation of the key flowering regulatory genes Heading date 3a (Hd3a), RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (RFT1), and Early heading date 1 (Ehd1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that H3K36me1, H3K36me2, and H3K36me3 levels were reduced at these loci in SDG708-deficient plants. More importantly, SDG708 was able to directly target and effect H3K36 methylation on specific flowering genes. In fact, knockdown of SDG708 led to misexpression of a set of functional genes and a genome-wide decrease in H3K36me1/2/3 levels during the early growth stages of rice. SDG708 is a methyltransferase that catalyses genome-wide deposition of all three methyl groups on H3K36 and is involved in many biological processes in addition to flowering promotion. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. A cassette of N-terminal amino acids of histone H2B are required for efficient cell survival, DNA repair and Swi/Snf binding in UV irradiated yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Ronita; Kyriss, McKenna; Smerdon, John W.; Wyrick, John J.; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The highly charged histone N-terminal domains are engaged in inter- and intra-nucleosomal interactions, and contain a host of sites used for posttranslational modification. We have studied the effect of deleting residues 30–37 from the N-terminal domain of histone H2B in yeast cells, on nucleotide excision repair (NER) following UV irradiation, as these cells are quite sensitive to UV. We find that H2B Δ30–37 cells exhibit reduced NER efficiency at three specific chromatin loci: the transcriptionally active, RPB2 locus; the transcriptionally silenced, nucleosome-loaded HML locus; and the transcriptionally repressed, non-silenced, GAL10 locus. Nuclease digestion studies indicate that H2B Δ30–37 chromatin has increased nucleosome accessibility and/or nucleosome mobility. In addition, H2B Δ30–37 mutants acquire more DNA damage, compared to wt cells, following the same dose of UV radiation. Reducing the level of damage in H2B Δ30–37 cells to match that of wt cells restores the NER rate to wt levels in the RPB2 and GAL10 loci, but NER efficiency remains low in the silenced HML locus. Interestingly, recruitment of Snf5 to the HML locus is reduced in H2B Δ30–37 cells and more transient following UV irradiation. This may reflect a lower binding affinity of the SWI/SNF complex to H2B Δ30–37 nucleosomes. PMID:20007597

  19. Describing the Peptide Binding Specificity of HLA-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Nielsen, Morten

    . We find preference for hydrophobic residues at the peptide C-terminus for all HLA-C molecules. Most molecules were found to have an additional strong anchor at P2 or P3, with auxiliary anchor observed at P1, P2, P3, and P7. The binding affinity is measured for peptides fitting the specificity matrix...

  20. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... Zinc finger proteins interact via their individual fingers to three base pair subsites on the target DNA. The four key ... [Roy S, Dutta S, Khanna K, Singla S and Sundar D 2012 Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins. J. Biosci. .... well as protection from HIV infection (Reynolds, et al. 2003).

  1. Schistosoma mansoni histones: from transcription to chromatin regulation; an in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Letícia; Pierce, Raymond J; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a human endoparasite with a complex life cycle that also infects an invertebrate mollusk intermediate host and exhibits many diverse phenotypes. Its complexity is reflected in a large genome and different transcriptome profiles specific to each life cycle stage. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression such as the post-translational modification of histones has a significant impact on phenotypes, and this information storage function resides primarily at histone tails, which results in a varied histone code. Evidence of transcription of the different histone families at all life stages of the parasite was detected by a survey of transcriptome databases; manual curation of each gene prediction at the genome sequence level showed errors in the coding sequences of three of them. The biogenesis of histones is coupled to DNA replication, and a detailed in silico analysis of the specialized machinery of histone mRNA processing in the S. mansoni genome reveals that it is as conserved as in other eukaryotes, consisting in transcription factors and stem-loop binding proteins which recognize the stem loop structure at the histone mRNA 3'UTR. Histone modifying enzymes (HMEs) such as histone acetyltransferases, methyltransferases and deacetylases (HDACs) have been described in S. mansoni, and their potential as new therapeutic targets was evidenced with the apoptotic phenotype that resulted from HDAC inhibition. However, the overall regulation of transcription coupled with gene expression profiles correlated to histone modifications has not yet been characterized. Besides the interaction of HMEs with histones, many factors involved in cellular processes are known to bind to histones, and were identified here by an in silico analysis of the S. mansoni genome. Knowledge of the histone families opens up perspectives for further studies that will lead to a better identification of their post-translational modifications, their gene regulation and to the

  2. Expressed Centromere Specific Histone 3 (CENH3 Variants in Cultivated Triploid and Wild Diploid Bananas (Musa spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariuki S. Muiruri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are specified by a centromere specific histone 3 (CENH3 protein, which exists in a complex environment, interacting with conserved proteins and rapidly evolving satellite DNA sequences. The interactions may become more challenging if multiple CENH3 versions are introduced into the zygote as this can affect post-zygotic mitosis and ultimately sexual reproduction. Here, we characterize CENH3 variant transcripts expressed in cultivated triploid and wild diploid progenitor bananas. We describe both splice- and allelic-[Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP] variants and their effects on the predicted secondary structures of protein. Expressed CENH3 transcripts from six banana genotypes were characterized and clustered into three groups (MusaCENH-1A, MusaCENH-1B, and MusaCENH-2 based on similarity. The CENH3 groups differed with SNPs as well as presence of indels resulting from retained and/or skipped exons. The CENH3 transcripts from different banana genotypes were spliced in either 7/6, 5/4 or 6/5 exons/introns. The 7/6 and the 5/4 exon/intron structures were found in both diploids and triploids, however, 7/6 was most predominant. The 6/5 exon/introns structure was a result of failure of the 7/6 to splice correctly. The various transcripts obtained were predicted to encode highly variable N-terminal tails and a relatively conserved C-terminal histone fold domain (HFD. The SNPs were predicted in some cases to affect the secondary structure of protein by lengthening or shorting the affected domains. Sequencing of banana CENH3 transcripts predicts SNP variations that affect amino acid sequences and alternatively spliced transcripts. Most of these changes affect the N-terminal tail of CENH3.

  3. Combinatorial complexity in chromatin structure and function: revisiting the histone code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, Oliver J

    2012-04-01

    Covalent modifications of histone proteins play key roles in transcription, DNA repair, recombination, and other such processes. Over a hundred histone modifications have been described, and a popular idea in the field is that the function of a single histone mark cannot be understood without understanding its combinatorial co-occurrence with other marks, an idea generally called the 'histone code hypothesis.' This idea is hotly debated, with increasing biochemical evidence for chromatin regulatory factors that bind to specific histone modification combinations, but functional and localization studies finding minimal combinatorial complexity in histone modification patterns. This review will focus on these contrasting results, and will briefly touch on possible ways to reconcile these conflicting views. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  5. Quantification of specific bindings of biomolecules by magnetorelaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhoff Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The binding reaction of the biomolecules streptavidin and anti-biotin antibody, both labelled by magnetic nanoparticles (MNP, to biotin coated on agarose beads, was quantified by magnetorelaxometry (MRX. Highly sensitive SQUID-based MRX revealed the immobilization of the MNP caused by the biotin-streptavidin coupling. We found that about 85% of streptavidin-functionalised MNP bound specifically to biotin-agarose beads. On the other hand only 20% of antibiotin-antibody functionalised MNP were specifically bound. Variation of the suspension medium revealed in comparison to phosphate buffer with 0.1% bovine serum albumin a slight change of the binding behaviour in human serum, probably due to the presence of functioning (non heated serum proteins. Furthermore, in human serum an additional non-specific binding occurs, being independent from the serum protein functionality. The presented homogeneous bead based assay is applicable in simple, uncoated vials and it enables the assessment of the binding kinetics in a volume without liquid flow. The estimated association rate constant for the MNP-labelled streptavidin is by about two orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported for free streptavidin. This is probably due to the relatively large size of the magnetic markers which reduces the diffusion of streptavidin. Furthermore, long time non-exponential kinetics were observed and interpreted as agglutination of the agarose beads.

  6. Site-specific quantification of lysine acetylation in the N-terminal tail of histone H4 using a double-labelling, targeted UHPLC MS/MS approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Urzo, Annalisa; Boichenko, Alexander P.; van den Bosch, Thea; Hermans, Jos; Dekker, Frank; Andrisano, Vincenza; Bischoff, Rainer

    We developed a targeted liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the site-specific quantification of lysine acetylation in the N-terminal region of histone H4 by combining chemical derivatization at the protein and peptide levels with digestion using chymotrypsin and

  7. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  8. RNA Bind-n-Seq: quantitative assessment of the sequence and structural binding specificity of RNA binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nicole; Robertson, Alex; Jangi, Mohini; McGeary, Sean; Sharp, Phillip A.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Specific protein-RNA interactions guide post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here we describe RNA Bind-n-Seq (RBNS), a method that comprehensively characterizes sequence and structural specificity of RNA binding proteins (RBPs), and its application to the developmental alternative splicing factors RBFOX2, CELF1/CUGBP1 and MBNL1. For each factor, we recovered both canonical motifs and additional near-optimal binding motifs. RNA secondary structure inhibits binding of RBFOX2 and CELF1, while MBNL1 favors unpaired Us but tolerates C/G pairing in motifs containing UGC and/or GCU. Dissociation constants calculated from RBNS data using a novel algorithm correlated highly with values measured by surface plasmon resonance. Motifs identified by RBNS were conserved, were bound and active in vivo, and distinguished the subset of motifs enriched by CLIP-Seq that had regulatory activity. Together, our data demonstrate that RBNS complements crosslinking-based methods and show that in vivo binding and activity of these splicing factors is driven largely by intrinsic RNA affinity. PMID:24837674

  9. Immobilized sialyloligo-macroligand and its protein binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-05-14

    We report a chemoenzymatic synthesis of chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers with different linkages and their oriented immobilization for glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor applications. Specifically, O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were synthesized by enzymatic α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation of a lactose-containing glycopolymer that was synthesized by cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization. (1)H NMR showed almost quantitative α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation. The O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were printed onto amine-functionalized glass slides via isourea bond formation for glycoarray formation. Specific protein binding activity of the arrays was confirmed with α2,3- and α2,6-sialyl specific binding lectins together with inhibition assays. Further, immobilizing O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers onto amine-modified SPR chip via isourea bond formation afforded SPR-based glyco-biosensor, which showed specific binding activity for lectins and influenza viral hemagglutinins (HA). These sialyloligo-macroligand derived glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor are closely to mimic 3D nature presentation of sialyloligosaccharides and will provide important high-throughput tools for virus diagnosis and potential antiviral drug candidates screening applications.

  10. Epigenetic therapy of cancer with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Lakshmaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is the study of heritable alterations in gene expression that are not accompanied by the corresponding change in DNA sequence. Three interlinked epigenetic processes regulate gene expression at the level of chromatin, namely DNA methylation, nucleosomal remodeling and histone covalent modifications. Post-translational modifications that occur on certain amino acid residues of the tails of histone proteins modify chromatin structure and form the basis for "histone code". The enzymes Histone Acetyl Transferase (HAT and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC control the level of acetylation of histones and thereby alter gene expression. In many cancers, the balance between HAT and HDAC is altered. HDAC enzymes are grouped into four different classes namely Class I (HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, and HDAC8, Class II (HDAC4, HDAC5, HDAC6, HDAC7, HDAC9, and HDAC10, Class III HDAC and Class IV (HDAC11. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACI exert anticancer activity by promoting acetylation of histones as well as by promoting acetylation of non-histone protein substrates. The effects of HDACI on gene transcription are complex. They cause cell cycle arrest, inhibit DNA repair, induce apoptosis and acetylate non histone proteins causing downstream alterations in gene expression. HDACI are a diverse group of compounds, which vary in structure, biological activity, and specificity. In general, HDACIs contain a zinc-binding domain, a capping group, and a straight chain linker connecting the two. They are classified into four classes namely short chain fatty acids, hydroxamic acids, cyclic peptides and synthetic benzamides. This review describes the clinical utility of HDACI as monotherapy as well as combination therapy with other treatment modalities such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Adverse effects and shortcomings of treatment with HDACI are also discussed in detail.

  11. Utilizing Targeted Mass Spectrometry to Demonstrate Asf1-Dependent Increases in Residue Specificity for Rtt109-Vps75 Mediated Histone Acetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yin-Ming; Henry, Ryan A.; Huang, Liangqun; Chen, Xu; Stargell, Laurie A.; Andrews, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rtt109, a lysine acetyltransferase (KAT), associates with a histone chaperone, either Vps75 or Asf1. It has been proposed that these chaperones alter the selectivity of Rtt109 or which residues it preferentially acetylates. In the present study, we utilized a label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based method to determine the steady-state kinetic parameters of acetylation catalyzed by Rtt109-Vps75 on H3 monomer, H3/H4 tetramer, and H3/H4-Asf1 complex. These results show that among these histone conformations, only H3K9 and H3K23 are significantly acetylated under steady-state conditions and that Asf1 promotes H3/H4 acetylation by Rtt109-Vps75. Asf1 equally increases the Rtt109-Vps75 specificity for both of these residues with a maximum stoichiometry of 1:1 (Asf1 to H3/H4), but does not alter the selectivity between these two residues. These data suggest that the H3/H4-Asf1 complex is a substrate for Rtt109-Vps75 without altering selectivity between residues. The deletion of either Rtt109 or Asf1 in vivo results in the same reduction of H3K9 acetylation, suggesting that Asf1 is required for efficient H3K9 acetylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we found that the acetylation preference of Rtt109-Vps75 could be directed to H3K56 when those histones already possess modifications, such as those found on histones purified from chicken erythrocytes. Taken together, Vps75 and Asf1 both enhance Rtt109 acetylation for H3/H4, although via different mechanisms, but have little impact on the residue selectivity. Importantly, these results provide evidence that histone chaperones can work together via interactions with either the enzyme or the substrate to more efficiently acetylate histones. PMID:25781956

  12. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availabili...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  13. Binding of histone H1e-c variants to CpG-rich DNA correlates with the inhibitory effect on enzymic DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, R; D'Erme, M; Mastrantonio, S; Reale, A; Marenzi, S; Saluz, H P; Strom, R; Caiafa, P

    1995-01-01

    Within the H1 histone family, only some fractions enriched in the H1e-c variants are effective in causing a marked inhibition, in vitro, of enzymic DNA methylation and, in gel retardation and Southwestern blot experiments, in binding double-stranded (ds) CpG-rich oligonucleotides. Both the 6-CpG ds-oligonucleotide and the DNA purified from chromatin fractions enriched in 'CpG islands' are good competitors for the binding of H1e-c to 6-meCpG ds-oligonucleotide. Because of their ability to bind any DNA sequence and to suppress the enzymic methylation in any sequence containing CpG dinucleotides, these particular H1 variants could play some role in maintaining linker DNA at low methylation levels and even in preserving the unmethylated state of the CpG-rich islands which characterize the promoter regions of housekeeping genes. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7848272

  14. The histone chaperone complex HIR maintains nucleosome occupancy and counterbalances impaired histone deposition in CAF-1 complex mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Céline; Benoit, Matthias; Le Goff, Samuel; Simon, Lauriane; Poulet, Axel; Cotterell, Sylviane; Tatout, Christophe; Probst, Aline V

    2015-03-01

    Chromatin organization is essential for coordinated gene expression, genome stability, and inheritance of epigenetic information. The main components involved in chromatin assembly are specific complexes such as Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) and Histone Regulator (HIR), which deposit histones in a DNA synthesis-dependent or -independent manner, respectively. Here, we characterize the role of the plant orthologs Histone Regulator A (HIRA), Ubinuclein (UBN) and Calcineurin Binding protein 1 (CABIN1), which constitute the HIR complex. Arabidopsis loss-of-function mutants for the various subunits of the complex are viable, but hira mutants show reduced fertility. We show that loss of HIRA reduces extractable histone H3 protein levels and decreases nucleosome occupancy at both actively transcribed genes and heterochromatic regions. Concomitantly, HIRA contributes to maintenance of silencing of pericentromeric repeats and certain transposons. A genetic analysis based on crosses between mutants deficient in subunits of the CAF-1 and HIR complexes showed that simultaneous loss of both the CAF-1 and HIR histone H3 chaperone complexes severely affects plant survival, growth and reproductive development. Our results suggest that HIRA partially rescues impaired histone deposition in fas mutants to preserve nucleosome occupancy, implying plasticity in histone variant interaction and deposition. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Plant-specific Histone Deacetylases HDT½ Regulate GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE 2 Expression to Control Arabidopsis Root Meristem Cell Number

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huchen

    2017-08-31

    Root growth is modulated by environmental factors and depends on cell production in the root meristem (RM). New cells in the meristem are generated by stem cells and transit-amplifying cells, which together determine RM cell number. Transcription factors and chromatin-remodelling factors have been implicated in regulating the switch from stem cells to transit-amplifying cells. Here we show that two Arabidopsis thaliana paralogs encoding plant-specific histone deacetylases, HDT1 and HDT2, regulate a second switch from transit-amplifying cells to expanding cells. Knockdown of HDT½ (hdt1,2i) results in an earlier switch and causes a reduced RM cell number. Our data show that HDT½ negatively regulate the acetylation level of the C19-GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE 2 (GA2ox2) locus and repress the expression of GA2ox2 in the RM and elongation zone. Overexpression of GA2ox2 in the RM phenocopies the hdt1,2i phenotype. Conversely, knockout of GA2ox2 partially rescues the root growth defect of hdt1,2i. These results suggest that by repressing the expression of GA2ox2, HDT½ likely fine-tune gibberellin metabolism and they are crucial for regulating the switch from cell division to expansion to determine RM cell number. We propose that HDT½ function as part of a mechanism that modulates root growth in response to environmental factors.

  16. DNA-Binding Properties of African Swine Fever Virus pA104R, a Histone-Like Protein Involved in Viral Replication and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouco, Gonçalo; Freitas, Ferdinando B; Coelho, João; Leitão, Alexandre; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2017-06-15

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) codes for a putative histone-like protein (pA104R) with extensive sequence homology to bacterial proteins that are implicated in genome replication and packaging. Functional characterization of purified recombinant pA104R revealed that it binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over a wide range of temperatures, pH values, and salt concentrations and in an ATP-independent manner, with an estimated binding site size of about 14 to 16 nucleotides. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the arginine located in pA104R's DNA-binding domain, at position 69, was found to be relevant for efficient DNA-binding activity. Together, pA104R and ASFV topoisomerase II (pP1192R) display DNA-supercoiling activity, although none of the proteins by themselves do, indicating that the two cooperate in this process. In ASFV-infected cells, A104R transcripts were detected from 2 h postinfection (hpi) onward, reaching a maximum concentration around 16 hpi. pA104R was detected from 12 hpi onward, localizing with viral DNA replication sites and being found exclusively in the Triton-insoluble fraction. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown experiments revealed that pA104R plays a critical role in viral DNA replication and gene expression, with transfected cells showing lower viral progeny numbers (up to a reduction of 82.0%), lower copy numbers of viral genomes (-78.3%), and reduced transcription of a late viral gene (-47.6%). Taken together, our results strongly suggest that pA104R participates in the modulation of viral DNA topology, probably being involved in viral DNA replication, transcription, and packaging, emphasizing that ASFV mutants lacking the A104R gene could be used as a strategy to develop a vaccine against ASFV.IMPORTANCE Recently reintroduced in Europe, African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a fatal disease in domestic pigs, causing high economic losses in affected countries, as no vaccine or treatment is currently

  17. Delphinidin, a specific inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase, suppresses inflammatory signaling via prevention of NF-{kappa}B acetylation in fibroblast-like synoviocyte MH7A cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Ah-Reum; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, KyungChul [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Chronic Metabolic Disease Research, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mee-Hee [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Chronic Metabolic Disease Research, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoo-Hyun [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, The University of Suwon, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeongmin [Department of Medical Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Woojin [Department of Food and Nutrition, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunoh, E-mail: sunoh@korea.ac.kr [Jeollanamdo Institute of Natural Resources Research, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho-Geun, E-mail: yhgeun@yuhs.ac [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Chronic Metabolic Disease Research, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Delphinidin is a novel inhibitor of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase. {yields} Delphinidin prevents the hyperacetylation of p65 by inhibiting the HAT activity of p300/CBP. {yields} Delphinidin efficiently suppresses the expression of inflammatory cytokines in MH7A cells via hypoacetylation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} Delphinidin inhibits cytokine release in the Jurkat T lymphocyte cell line. -- Abstract: Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors (HATi) isolated from dietary compounds have been shown to suppress inflammatory signaling, which contributes to rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we identified a novel HATi in Punica granatum L. known as delphinidin (DP). DP did not affect the activity of other epigenetic enzymes (histone deacetylase, histone methyltransferase, or sirtuin1). DP specifically inhibited the HAT activities of p300/CBP. It also inhibited p65 acetylation in MH7A cells, a human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cell line. DP-induced hypoacetylation was accompanied by cytosolic accumulation of p65 and nuclear localization of IKB{alpha}. Accordingly, DP treatment inhibited TNF{alpha}-stimulated increases in NF-{kappa}B function and expression of NF-{kappa}B target genes in these cells. Importantly, DP suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Jurkat T lymphocytes, demonstrating that HATi efficiently suppresses cytokine-mediated immune responses. Together, these results show that the HATi activity of DP counters anti-inflammatory signaling by blocking p65 acetylation and that this compound may be useful in preventing inflammatory arthritis.

  18. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2017-07-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  19. Runx1 Phosphorylation by Src Increases Trans-activation via Augmented Stability, Reduced Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Binding, and Increased DNA Affinity, and Activated Runx1 Favors Granulopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Wan Yee; Guo, Hong; Ma, Ou; Huang, Hui; Cantor, Alan B; Friedman, Alan D

    2016-01-08

    Src phosphorylates Runx1 on one central and four C-terminal tyrosines. We find that activated Src synergizes with Runx1 to activate a Runx1 luciferase reporter. Mutation of the four Runx1 C-terminal tyrosines to aspartate or glutamate to mimic phosphorylation increases trans-activation of the reporter in 293T cells and allows induction of Cebpa or Pu.1 mRNAs in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells, whereas mutation of these residues to phenylalanine to prevent phosphorylation obviates these effects. Three mechanisms contribute to increased Runx1 activity upon tyrosine modification as follows: increased stability, reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC) interaction, and increased DNA binding. Mutation of the five modified Runx1 tyrosines to aspartate markedly reduced co-immunoprecipitation with HDAC1 and HDAC3, markedly increased stability in cycloheximide or in the presence of co-expressed Cdh1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase coactivator, with reduced ubiquitination, and allowed DNA-binding in gel shift assay similar to wild-type Runx1. In contrast, mutation of these residues to phenylalanine modestly increased HDAC interaction, modestly reduced stability, and markedly reduced DNA binding in gel shift assays and as assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation with the -14-kb Pu.1 or +37-kb Cebpa enhancers after stable expression in 32Dcl3 cells. Affinity for CBFβ, the Runx1 DNA-binding partner, was not affected by these tyrosine modifications, and in vitro translated CBFβ markedly increased DNA affinity of both the translated phenylalanine and aspartate Runx1 variants. Finally, further supporting a positive role for Runx1 tyrosine phosphorylation during granulopoiesis, mutation of the five Src-modified residues to aspartate but not phenylalanine allows Runx1 to increase Cebpa and granulocyte colony formation by Runx1-deleted murine marrow. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The nucleosome (histone-DNA complex is the TLR9-specific immunostimulatory component of Plasmodium falciparum that activates DCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj M Gowda

    Full Text Available The systemic clinical symptoms of Plasmodium falciparum infection such as fever and chills correspond to the proinflammatory cytokines produced in response to the parasite components released during the synchronized rupture of schizonts. We recently demonstrated that, among the schizont-released products, merozoites are the predominant components that activate dendritic cells (DCs by TLR9-specific recognition to induce the maturation of cells and to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We also demonstrated that DNA is the active constituent and that formation of a DNA-protein complex is essential for the entry of parasite DNA into cells for recognition by TLR9. However, the nature of endogenous protein-DNA complex in the parasite is not known. In this study, we show that parasite nucleosome constitute the major protein-DNA complex involved in the activation of DCs by parasite nuclear material. The parasite components were fractionated into the nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The nuclear material was further fractionated into chromatin and the proteins loosely bound to chromatin. Polynucleosomes and oligonucleosomes were prepared from the chromatin. These were tested for their ability to activate DCs obtained by the FLT3 ligand differentiation of bone marrow cells from the wild type, and TLR2(-/-, TLR9(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice. DCs stimulated with the nuclear material and polynucleosomes as well as mono- and oligonucleosomes efficiently induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines in a TLR9-dependent manner, demonstrating that nucleosomes (histone-DNA complex represent the major TLR9-specific DC-immunostimulatory component of the malaria parasite nuclear material. Thus, our data provide a significant insight into the activation of DCs by malaria parasites and have important implications for malaria vaccine development.

  1. Mapping of post-translational modifications of spermatid-specific linker histone H1-like protein, HILS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Laxmi N; Gupta, Nikhil; Rao, Satyanarayana M R

    2015-10-14

    In mammalian spermiogenesis, haploid round spermatids undergo dramatic biochemical and morphological changes and transform into motile mature spermatozoa. A majority of the histones are replaced by transition proteins during mid-spermiogenesis and later replaced by protamines, which occupy the sperm chromatin. In mammals, 11 linker histone H1 subtypes have been reported. Among them, H1t, HILS1, and H1T2 are uniquely expressed in testis, with the expression of HILS1 and H1T2 restricted to spermiogenesis. However, there is a lack of knowledge about linker histone role in the nuclear reorganization during mammalian spermiogenesis. Here, we report a method for separation of endogenous HILS1 protein from other rat testis linker histones by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and identification of 15 novel post-translational modifications of HILS1, which include lysine acetylation and serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation sites. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrate the presence of linker histone HILS1 and HILS1Y78p during different steps of spermiogenesis from early elongating to condensing spermatids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Binding of AR to SMRT/N-CoR complex and its co-operation with PSA promoter in prostate cancer cells treated with natural histone deacetylase inhibitor NaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtkova, K; Paskova, L; Matijescukova, N; Strnad, M; Kolar, Z

    2010-01-01

    Signaling through the androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression. The AR is a classical nuclear receptor (NR) providing a link between signaling molecule and transcription response. Histone deacetylase inhibitors- (HDACI) have antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on prostate cancer cells and their implication in silence AR signaling may have potential therapeutic use. We aimed to study the inhibitory effects of the corepressor SMRT (Silencing Mediator for Retinoid and Thyroid -hormone receptors) which forms a complex together with nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) and with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) on AR activity.The androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line LNCaP and androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell line C4-2 both AR-positive, and androgen-insensitive DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines were treated with two HDACIs, sodium butyrate (NaB) and/or trichostatin A (TSA). We amplified immunoprecipitated DNA by conventional PCR and in the -following step we used the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis coupled with quantitative PCR for monitoring NaB induced formation of AR-SMRT/N-CoR complex binding on the PSA promoter. The co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed increase in AR-SMRT formation in NaB treated cells. Simultaneously, the Western blot analysis showed a significant decrease in AR protein expression. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect of NaB on AR gene expression seems to be specific and unique for prostate cancer AR-positive cell lines and corresponds with its ability to stimulate AR-SMRT complex formation. We suggest that AR and SMRT/N-CoR corepressors may form a stable complex in vitro and NaB may facilitate the interaction between AR nuclear steroid receptor and SMRT corepressor prote.

  3. A combinatorial H4 tail library for exploring the histone code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garske, Adam L; Craciun, Gheorghe; Denu, John M

    2008-08-05

    Histone modifications modulate chromatin structure and function. A posttranslational modification-randomized, combinatorial library based on the first 21 residues of histone H4 was designed for systematic examination of proteins that interpret a histone code. The 800-member library represented all permutations of most known modifications within the N-terminal tail of histone H4. To determine its utility in a protein binding assay, the on-bead library was screened with an antibody directed against phosphoserine 1 of H4. Among the hits, 59 of 60 sequences were phosphorylated at S1, while 30 of 30 of those selected from the nonhits were unphosphorylated. A 512-member version of the library was then used to determine the binding specificity of the double tudor domain of hJMJD2A, a histone demethylase involved in transcriptional repression. Global linear least-squares fitting of modifications from the identified peptides (40 hits and 34 nonhits) indicated that methylation of K20 was the primary determinant for binding, but that phosphorylation and acetylation of neighboring sites attenuated the interaction. To validate the on-bead screen, isothermal titration calorimetry was performed with 13 H4 peptides. Dissociation constants ranged from 1 mM to 1 microM and corroborated the screening results. The general approach should be useful for probing the specificity of any histone-binding protein.

  4. Structural insight into histone recognition by the ING PHD fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Karen S; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2009-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) tumor suppressors are implicated in oncogenesis, control of DNA damage repair, cellular senescence and apoptosis. All members of the ING family contain unique amino-terminal regions and a carboxy-terminal plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. While the amino-terminal domains associate with a number of protein effectors including distinct components of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, the PHD finger binds strongly and specifically to histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). In this review we describe the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 recognition by the ING1-5 PHD fingers, analyze the determinants of the histone specificity and compare the biological activities and structures within subsets of PHD fingers. The atomic-resolution structures of the ING PHD fingers in complex with a H3K4me3 peptide reveal that the histone tail is bound in a large and deep binding site encompassing nearly one-third of the protein surface. An extensive network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and cation-pi contacts, and complementary surface interactions coordinate the first six residues of the H3K4me3 peptide. The trimethylated Lys4 occupies an elongated groove, formed by the highly conserved aromatic and hydrophobic residues of the PHD finger, whereas the adjacent groove accommodates Arg2. The two grooves are connected by a narrow channel, the small size of which defines the PHD finger's specificity, excluding interactions with other modified histone peptides. Binding of the ING PHD fingers to H3K4me3 plays a critical role in regulating chromatin acetylation. The ING proteins function as tethering molecules that physically link the HDAC and HAT enzymatic complexes to chromatin. In this review we also highlight progress recently made in understanding the molecular basis underlying biological and tumorigenic activities of the ING tumor suppressors.

  5. Spermatid nucleus of Megaselia scalaris Loew (Insecta, Diptera, Phoridae): a study using anti-histone antibodies, scanning electron microscopy, and a centromere-specific oligonucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, K W; Jeppesen, P; Mitchell, A

    1993-07-01

    The structure of elongated spermatid nuclei was examined in the fly Megaselia scalaris using indirect immunofluorescence with anti-histone antibodies, scanning electron microscopy, and in situ hybridization with a centromere-specific oligonucleotide. The immunofluorescence experiments showed that, in keeping with the situation in most animals, histones are hyperacetylated prior to their displacement from the nucleus in the course of spermiogenesis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that grooves run parallel to the long axis of the spermatid nuclei. The chromatin is segmented into blocks lateral to the grooves. This finding most probably indicates that the chromatin is not yet maximally condensed at this stage. The retarded chromatin condensation may be correlated with the export of somatic histones from the nucleus. The location of the centromeres could not be identified using scanning electron microscopy, but in situ hybridization showed that a centromere-specific oligonucleotide mapped to the central or close to the central areas within the spermatid nucleus. Possibly, the chromosomes are extended and arranged parallel to the long axis of the spermatid nucleus.

  6. Responsiveness of genes to manipulation of transcription factors in ES cells is associated with histone modifications and tissue specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to determining static states of gene expression (high vs. low), it is important to characterize their dynamic status. For example, genes with H3K27me3 chromatin marks are not only suppressed but also poised for activation. However, the responsiveness of genes to perturbations has never been studied systematically. To distinguish gene responses to specific factors from responsiveness in general, it is necessary to analyze gene expression profiles of cells responding to a large variety of disturbances, and such databases did not exist before. Results We estimated the responsiveness of all genes in mouse ES cells using our recently published database on expression change after controlled induction of 53 transcription factors (TFs) and other genes. Responsive genes (N = 4746), which were readily upregulated or downregulated depending on the kind of perturbation, mostly have regulatory functions and a propensity to become tissue-specific upon differentiation. Tissue-specific expression was evaluated on the basis of published (GNF) and our new data for 15 organs and tissues. Non-responsive genes (N = 9562), which did not change their expression much following any perturbation, were enriched in housekeeping functions. We found that TF-responsiveness in ES cells is the best predictor known for tissue-specificity in gene expression. Among genes with CpG islands, high responsiveness is associated with H3K27me3 chromatin marks, and low responsiveness is associated with H3K36me3 chromatin, stronger tri-methylation of H3K4, binding of E2F1, and GABP binding motifs in promoters. Conclusions We thus propose the responsiveness of expression to perturbations as a new way to define the dynamic status of genes, which brings new insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and tissue specificity. PMID:21306619

  7. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by histone lysine methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublitz, Philip; Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-01-01

    . In this report, we review the recent literature to deduce mechanisms underlying Polycomb and H3K9 methylation mediated repression, and describe the functional interplay with activating H3K4 methylation. We summarize recent data that indicate a close relationship between GC density of promoter sequences......, transcription factor binding and the antagonizing activities of distinct epigenetic regulators such as histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and histone demethylases (HDMs). Subsequently, we compare chromatin signatures associated with different types of transcriptional outcomes from stable repression to highly...... dynamic regulated genes, strongly suggesting that the interplay of different epigenetic pathways is essential in defining specific types of heritable chromatin and associated transcriptional states....

  8. A role for CARM1-mediated histone H3 arginine methylation in protecting histone acetylation by releasing corepressors from chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    Full Text Available Arginine methylation broadly occurs in histones and has been linked to transcriptional regulation, cell cycle regulation and DNA repair. While numerous proteins (histone code effectors that specifically recognize or read the methylated lysine residues in core histones have been identified, little is known for effectors specific for methylated arginines in histones. In this study, we attempted to identify effector(s recognizing asymmetrically methylated R17 and R26 in H3, which are catalyzed by CARM1/PRMT4, through an unbiased biochemical approach. Although we have yet to identify such effector using this approach, we find that these modifications function cooperatively with histone acetylation to inhibit the binding of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex (NuRD and TIF1 family corepressors to H3 tail in vitro. In support of this finding, we show that overexpression of CARM1 in 293 T cells leads to reduced association of NuRD with chromatin, whereas knockdown of CARM1 in HeLa cells leads to increased association of NuRD with chromatin and decreased level of histone acetylation. Furthermore, in the Carm1-/- MEF cells there is an increased association of NuRD and TIF1β with chromatin and a global decrease in histone acetylation. By chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we show that overexpression of CARM1 results in reduced association of NuRD complex and TIF1β with an episomal reporter and that CARM1 is required in MEF cells for LPS-induced dissociation of NuRD from a NF-κb target gene. Taking together, our study provides evidence for a role of CARM1-mediated arginine methylation in regulation of histone acetylation and transcription: facilitating transcription by discharging corepressors from chromatin.

  9. Histone locus regulation by the Drosophila dosage compensation adaptor protein CLAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Leila E; Koreski, Kaitlin P; Boltz, Kara A; Kuzu, Guray; Urban, Jennifer A; Bowman, Sarah K; Zeidman, Anna; Jordan, William T; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Marzluff, William F; Duronio, Robert J; Larschan, Erica N

    2017-07-15

    The conserved histone locus body (HLB) assembles prior to zygotic gene activation early during development and concentrates factors into a nuclear domain of coordinated histone gene regulation. Although HLBs form specifically at replication-dependent histone loci, the cis and trans factors that target HLB components to histone genes remained unknown. Here we report that conserved GA repeat cis elements within the bidirectional histone3-histone4 promoter direct HLB formation in Drosophila In addition, the CLAMP (chromatin-linked adaptor for male-specific lethal [MSL] proteins) zinc finger protein binds these GA repeat motifs, increases chromatin accessibility, enhances histone gene transcription, and promotes HLB formation. We demonstrated previously that CLAMP also promotes the formation of another domain of coordinated gene regulation: the dosage-compensated male X chromosome. Therefore, CLAMP binding to GA repeat motifs promotes the formation of two distinct domains of coordinated gene activation located at different places in the genome. © 2017 Rieder et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. The histone acetyltransferase domains of CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300/CBP-associated factor are not necessary for cooperativity with the class II transactivator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harton, J A; Zika, E; Ting, J P

    2001-10-19

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is a transcriptional co-activator regulating the constitutive and interferon-gamma-inducible expression of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and related genes. Promoter remodeling occurs following CIITA induction, suggesting the involvement of chromatin remodeling factors. Transcription of numerous genes requires the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activities of CREB-binding protein (CBP), p300, and/or p300/CBP-associated factor (pCAF). These co-activators cooperate with CIITA and are hypothesized to promote class II major histocompatibility complex transcription through their HAT activity. To directly test this, we used HAT-defective CBP and pCAF. We demonstrate that cooperation between CIITA and CBP is independent of CBP HAT activity. Further, although pCAF enhances CIITA-mediated transcription, pCAF HAT domain dependence appears contingent upon the concentration of available CIITA. When HAT-defective CBP and pCAF are both present, cooperativity with CIITA is maintained. Consistent with a recent report, we show that nuclear localization of CIITA is enhanced by lysine 144, an in vitro target of pCAF-mediated HAT. Yet we find that neither mutation of lysine 144 nor deletion of residues 132-209 affects transcriptional cooperation with CBP or pCAF. Thus, acetylation of this residue may not be the primary mechanism for pCAF/CBP cooperation with CIITA. In conclusion, the HAT activities of the co-activators are not necessary for cooperation with CIITA.

  11. DNA binding specificity and cleavage activity of Pacmmar transposase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaurière, Laurence; Chénais, Benoît; Pradier, Elisabeth; Hardivillier, Yann; Renault, Sylvaine; Casse, Nathalie

    2009-08-04

    Mariner-like elements (MLEs) are members of the Tc1/mariner superfamily of transposable elements which transpose by a "cut and paste" mechanism. Most of the MLEs characterized to date are transpositionally inactive due to the accumulation of mutations in their transposase gene. Here, we report the biochemical study of two copies of the Pacmmar element (Pacmmar1.1 and Pacmmar1.2), isolated from the coastal crab Pachygrapsus marmoratus. These two copies present an open reading frame encoding a putative active transposase. Using an in vitro transposition assay, we show that Pacmmar transposases are unable to perform by themselves the transposition reaction. However, we demonstrate by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay that both transposases bind specifically to the inverted terminal repeat of the Pacmmar element. Moreover, an in vitro cleavage assay showed that both transposases have the capacity to cleave the transposon. The in vitro cleavage activity of Pacmmar transposases appears imprecise, suggesting the requirement of specific host factors or the presence of mutations which have modified the cleavage specificity of the enzyme.

  12. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; González, D.; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-p...

  13. Cancer associated epigenetic transitions identified by genome-wide histone methylation binding profiles in human colorectal cancer samples and paired normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enroth, Stefan; Rada-Iglesisas, Alvaro; Andersson, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Despite their well-established functional roles, histone modifications have received less attention than DNA methylation in the cancer field. In order to evaluate their importance in colorectal cancer (CRC), we generated the first genome-wide histone modification profiles in paired normal colon...

  14. Cardiomyocyte-specific conditional knockout of the histone chaperone HIRA in mice results in hypertrophy, sarcolemmal damage and focal replacement fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Valenzuela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available HIRA is the histone chaperone responsible for replication-independent incorporation of histone variant H3.3 within gene bodies and regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes, and within the bivalent promoter regions of developmentally regulated genes. The HIRA gene lies within the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome critical region; individuals with this syndrome have multiple congenital heart defects. Because terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have exited the cell cycle, histone variants should be utilized for the bulk of chromatin remodeling. Thus, HIRA is likely to play an important role in epigenetically defining the cardiac gene expression program. In this study, we determined the consequence of HIRA deficiency in cardiomyocytes in vivo by studying the phenotype of cardiomyocyte-specific Hira conditional-knockout mice. Loss of HIRA did not perturb heart development, but instead resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and susceptibility to sarcolemmal damage. Cardiomyocyte degeneration gave way to focal replacement fibrosis and impaired cardiac function. Gene expression was widely altered in Hira conditional-knockout hearts. Significantly affected pathways included responses to cellular stress, DNA repair and transcription. Consistent with heart failure, fetal cardiac genes were re-expressed in the Hira conditional knockout. Our results suggest that transcriptional regulation by HIRA is crucial for cardiomyocyte homeostasis.

  15. Electrical detection of specific versus non-specific binding events in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benjamin C.; Clark, Michael; Burkhead, Thomas; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rai, Shesh; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-10-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM antibodies causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines were tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s caused significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes with wide variety of markers.

  16. Novel insights into the plant histone code: lessons from ORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, María de la Paz; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2009-05-16

    Gene expression control depends on the combinatorial presence of various posttranslational modifications of the N-terminal tail of histones, among which acetylation and methylation of lysine residues are the most conspicuous. Effector proteins have been identified that recognize specific histone modifications and transduce the information of the histone code into different degrees of chromatin compaction in either facultative or constitutive heterochromatin. In addition, they also impinge on transcriptional control, either activation or repression, of euchromatic genes. However, a large variety of effector proteins lead to different gene expression readouts. This is complicated by accumulating evidence showing that the consequences of various histone modifications differ among animals and plants. Given the conservation of histone marks, and histone modification enzymes, this has evolutionary implications as to how they are interpreted differently in different organisms. One example that illustrates such diversity of the histone code is the large subunit of the origin recognition complex, ORC1. In plants, but not in yeast and animal cells, ORC1 functions as a transcriptional activator of a subset of target genes and is a plant homeodomain (PHD)-containing protein that binds to histone H3K4me3 residues.

  17. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, S; Lokhande, N; González, D; Cassill, A; Renthal, R

    2013-02-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins, using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila odorant-binding protein that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in Escherichia coli was assessed by measuring N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) binding and Förster resonance energy transfer between LUSH tryptophan 123 (W123) and NPN. Binding of cVA was measured from quenching of W123 fluorescence as a function of cVA concentration. The equilibrium constant for transfer of cVA between β-cyclodextrin and LUSH was determined from a linked equilibria model. This constant, multiplied by the β-cyclodextrin-cVA dissociation constant, gives the LUSH-cVA dissociation constant: ∼100 nM. It was also found that other ligands quench W123 fluorescence. The LUSH-ligand dissociation constants were determined to be ∼200 nM for the silk moth pheromone bombykol and ∼90 nM for methyl oleate. The results indicate that the ligand-binding cavity of LUSH can accommodate a variety ligands with strong binding interactions. Implications of this for the Laughlin, Ha, Jones and Smith model of pheromone reception are discussed. © 2012 Royal Entomological Society.

  18. Histone methyltransferase MMSET/NSD2 alters EZH2 binding and reprograms the myeloma epigenome through global and focal changes in H3K36 and H3K27 methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relja Popovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the histone methyltransferase MMSET in t(4;14+ multiple myeloma patients is believed to be the driving factor in the pathogenesis of this subtype of myeloma. MMSET catalyzes dimethylation of lysine 36 on histone H3 (H3K36me2, and its overexpression causes a global increase in H3K36me2, redistributing this mark in a broad, elevated level across the genome. Here, we demonstrate that an increased level of MMSET also induces a global reduction of lysine 27 trimethylation on histone H3 (H3K27me3. Despite the net decrease in H3K27 methylation, specific genomic loci exhibit enhanced recruitment of the EZH2 histone methyltransferase and become hypermethylated on this residue. These effects likely contribute to the myeloma phenotype since MMSET-overexpressing cells displayed increased sensitivity to EZH2 inhibition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such MMSET-mediated epigenetic changes require a number of functional domains within the protein, including PHD domains that mediate MMSET recruitment to chromatin. In vivo, targeting of MMSET by an inducible shRNA reversed histone methylation changes and led to regression of established tumors in athymic mice. Together, our work elucidates previously unrecognized interplay between MMSET and EZH2 in myeloma oncogenesis and identifies domains to be considered when designing inhibitors of MMSET function.

  19. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  20. Thermodynamics of sequence-specific binding of PNA to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratilainen, T; Holmén, A; Tuite, E

    2000-01-01

    For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes) and seq......For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes...... relative to that of the perfectly matched sequence with a corresponding free energy penalty of about 15 kJ mol(-1) bp(-1). The average cost of a single mismatch is therefore estimated to be on the order of or larger than the gain of two matched base pairs, resulting in an apparent binding constant of only...

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of SET domain family reveals the origin, expansion, and putative function of the arthropod-specific SmydA genes as histone modifiers in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Qing; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Huimin; Song, Tianqi; Yang, Meiling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The SET domain is an evolutionarily conserved motif present in histone lysine methyltransferases, which are important in the regulation of chromatin and gene expression in animals. In this study, we searched for SET domain–containing genes (SET genes) in all of the 147 arthropod genomes sequenced at the time of carrying out this experiment to understand the evolutionary history by which SET domains have evolved in insects. Phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis revealed an arthropod-specific SET gene family, named SmydA, that is ancestral to arthropod animals and specifically diversified during insect evolution. Considering that pseudogenization is the most probable fate of the new emerging gene copies, we provided experimental and evolutionary evidence to demonstrate their essential functions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and in vitro methyltransferase activity assays showed that the SmydA-2 gene was transcriptionally active and retained the original histone methylation activity. Expression knockdown by RNA interference significantly increased mortality, implying that the SmydA genes may be essential for insect survival. We further showed predominantly strong purifying selection on the SmydA gene family and a potential association between the regulation of gene expression and insect phenotypic plasticity by transcriptome analysis. Overall, these data suggest that the SmydA gene family retains essential functions that may possibly define novel regulatory pathways in insects. This work provides insights into the roles of lineage-specific domain duplication in insect evolution. PMID:28444351

  2. Absence of Rtt109p, a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase, results in improved acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Bai, Fengwu

    2016-03-01

    RTT109 is a histone acetyltransferase for the acetylation of histone H3. It is still not clear whether RTT109 plays a role in regulation of gene expression under environmental stresses. In this study, the involvement of RTT109 in acetic acid stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. It was revealed that the absence of RTT109 enhanced resistance to 5.5 g L(-1) acetic acid, which was indicated by improved growth of RTT109Δ mutant compared with that of the wild-type BY4741 strain. Meanwhile, the lag phase was shortened for 48 h and glucose consumption completed 36 h in advance for RTT109Δ mutant compared to the wild-type strain, with ethanol production rate increased from 0.39 to 0.60 g L(-1) h(-1). Significantly, elevated transcription levels of HSP12, CTT1 and GSH1, as well as increased activities of antioxidant enzymes were observed in RTT109Δ under acetic acid stress. Improved flocculation of RTT109Δ compared to that of the control strain BY4741 under the acetic acid stress was also observed. These results suggest that the absence of RTT109 not only activates transcription of stress responsive genes, but also improves resistance to oxidative stress, which ultimately contributes to improved acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Diversity and Divergence of Dinoflagellate Histone Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Georgi K; Lynch, Michael

    2015-12-08

    Histone proteins and the nucleosomal organization of chromatin are near-universal eukaroytic features, with the exception of dinoflagellates. Previous studies have suggested that histones do not play a major role in the packaging of dinoflagellate genomes, although several genomic and transcriptomic surveys have detected a full set of core histone genes. Here, transcriptomic and genomic sequence data from multiple dinoflagellate lineages are analyzed, and the diversity of histone proteins and their variants characterized, with particular focus on their potential post-translational modifications and the conservation of the histone code. In addition, the set of putative epigenetic mark readers and writers, chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones are examined. Dinoflagellates clearly express the most derived set of histones among all autonomous eukaryote nuclei, consistent with a combination of relaxation of sequence constraints imposed by the histone code and the presence of numerous specialized histone variants. The histone code itself appears to have diverged significantly in some of its components, yet others are conserved, implying conservation of the associated biochemical processes. Specifically, and with major implications for the function of histones in dinoflagellates, the results presented here strongly suggest that transcription through nucleosomal arrays happens in dinoflagellates. Finally, the plausible roles of histones in dinoflagellate nuclei are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Marinov and Lynch.

  4. Diversity and Divergence of Dinoflagellate Histone Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi K. Marinov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Histone proteins and the nucleosomal organization of chromatin are near-universal eukaroytic features, with the exception of dinoflagellates. Previous studies have suggested that histones do not play a major role in the packaging of dinoflagellate genomes, although several genomic and transcriptomic surveys have detected a full set of core histone genes. Here, transcriptomic and genomic sequence data from multiple dinoflagellate lineages are analyzed, and the diversity of histone proteins and their variants characterized, with particular focus on their potential post-translational modifications and the conservation of the histone code. In addition, the set of putative epigenetic mark readers and writers, chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones are examined. Dinoflagellates clearly express the most derived set of histones among all autonomous eukaryote nuclei, consistent with a combination of relaxation of sequence constraints imposed by the histone code and the presence of numerous specialized histone variants. The histone code itself appears to have diverged significantly in some of its components, yet others are conserved, implying conservation of the associated biochemical processes. Specifically, and with major implications for the function of histones in dinoflagellates, the results presented here strongly suggest that transcription through nucleosomal arrays happens in dinoflagellates. Finally, the plausible roles of histones in dinoflagellate nuclei are discussed.

  5. Structural Insights into Selective Histone H3 Recognition by the Human Polybromo bromodomain 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlop-Powers, Z.; Zeng, L; Zhang, Q; Zhou, M

    2010-01-01

    The Polybromo (PB) protein functions as a key component of the human PBAF chromatin remodeling complex in regulation of gene transcription. PB is made up of modular domains including six bromodomains that are known as acetyl-lysine binding domains. However, histone-binding specificity of the bromodomains of PB has remained elusive. In this study, we report biochemical characterization of all six PB bromodomains' binding to a suite of lysine-acetylated peptides derived from known acetylation sites on human core histones. We demonstrate that bromodomain 2 of PB preferentially recognizes acetylated lysine 14 of histone H3 (H3K14ac), a post-translational mark known for gene transcriptional activation. We further describe the molecular basis of the selective H3K14ac recognition of bromodomain 2 by solving the protein structures in both the free and bound forms using X-ray crystallography and NMR, respectively.

  6. Drug Addiction and Histone Code Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Dae; Call, Tanessa; Magazu, Samantha; Ferguson, Deveroux

    2017-01-01

    Acute and prolonged exposure to drugs of abuse induces changes in gene expression, synaptic function, and neural plasticity in brain regions involved in reward. Numerous genes are involved in this process, and persistent changes in gene expression coincide with epigenetic histone modifications and DNA methylation. Histone modifications are attractive regulatory mechanisms, which can encode complex environmental signals in the genome of postmitotic cells, like neurons. Recently, it has been demonstrated that specific histone modifications are involved in addiction-related gene regulatory mechanisms, by a diverse set of histone-modifying enzymes and readers. These histone modifiers and readers may prove to be valuable pharmacological targets for effective treatments for drug addiction.

  7. Developmentally Regulated Post-translational Modification of Nucleoplasmin Controls Histone Sequestration and Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Onikubo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoplasmin (Npm is an abundant histone chaperone in vertebrate oocytes and embryos. During embryogenesis, regulation of Npm histone binding is critical for its function in storing and releasing maternal histones to establish and maintain the zygotic epigenome. Here, we demonstrate that Xenopus laevis Npm post-translational modifications (PTMs specific to the oocyte and egg promote either histone deposition or sequestration, respectively. Mass spectrometry and Npm phosphomimetic mutations used in chromatin assembly assays identified hyperphosphorylation on the N-terminal tail as a critical regulator for sequestration. C-terminal tail phosphorylation and PRMT5-catalyzed arginine methylation enhance nucleosome assembly by promoting histone interaction with the second acidic tract of Npm. Electron microscopy reconstructions of Npm and TTLL4 activity toward the C-terminal tail demonstrate that oocyte- and egg-specific PTMs cause Npm conformational changes. Our results reveal that PTMs regulate Npm chaperoning activity by modulating Npm conformation and Npm-histone interaction, leading to histone sequestration in the egg.

  8. Phenotypic effect of substitution of allelic variants for a histone H1 subtype specific for growing tissues in the garden pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, Vera S; Kosterin, Oleg E; Berdnikov, Vladimir A

    2007-05-01

    In pea, subtype H1-7 of histone H1 is specific for young actively growing tissues and disappears from chromatin of mature tissues. We sequenced the alleles coding for three main variants, numbered according to the increase of the electrophoretic mobility. Allele 1 differs from the most common allele 2 by eight nucleotide substitutions, two of them associated with amino acid replacements, His->Tyr in the globular domain and Ala->Val in the C-terminal domain. Allele 3 differs from alleles 1 and 2 by a 24-bp deletion in the part coding for the C-terminal domain. In three greenhouse experiments, we compared quantitative traits in nearly isogenic lines differing by these H1-7 variants. In experiment 1, three lines bearing either of the three allelic variants were compared, the other experiments involved pairs of lines bearing variants 1 and 3. In all experiments, statistically significant differences between the lines were registered, mostly related to the plant size. The most prominent effect was associated with plant growth dynamics. Plants of line 3, carrying the 8-amino acid deletion in histone H1-7, on average grew slower. In two experiments, the differences of the mean stem length persisted throughout plant growth while in experiment 2 differences disappeared upon maturity. The H1-7 subtype is supposed to be related to maintenance of chromatin state characteristic for cell growth and division.

  9. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  10. Molecular mechanisms and potential functions of histone demethylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne Marije; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Histone modifications are thought to regulate chromatin structure, transcription and other nuclear processes. Histone methylation was originally believed to be an irreversible modification that could only be removed by histone eviction or by dilution during DNA replication. However, the isolation...... of two families of enzymes that can demethylate histones has changed this notion. The biochemical activities of these histone demethylases towards specific Lys residues on histones, and in some cases non-histone substrates, have highlighted their importance in developmental control, cell-fate decisions...

  11. Identification and Interrogation of Combinatorial Histone Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly R Karch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone proteins are dynamically modified to mediate a variety of cellular processes including gene transcription, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis. Regulation of these processes occurs through the recruitment of non-histone proteins to chromatin by specific combinations of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs. Mass spectrometry has emerged as an essential tool to discover and quantify histone PTMs both within and between samples in an unbiased manner. Developments in mass spectrometry that allow for characterization of large histone peptides or intact protein has made it possible to determine which modifications occur simultaneously on a single histone polypeptide. A variety of techniques from biochemistry, biophysics, and chemical biology have been employed to determine the biological relevance of discovered combinatorial codes. This review first describes advancements in the field of mass spectrometry that have facilitated histone PTM analysis and then covers notable approaches to probe the biological relevance of these modifications in their nucleosomal context.

  12. TRIM24 Links a Non-canonical Histone Signature to Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Tsai; Z Wang; T Yiu; K Akdemir; W Xia; S Winter; C Tsai; X Shi; D Schwarzer; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Recognition of modified histone species by distinct structural domains within 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of gene expression. Readers that simultaneously recognize histones with multiple marks allow transduction of complex chromatin modification patterns into specific biological outcomes. Here we report that chromatin regulator tripartite motif-containing 24 (TRIM24) functions in humans as a reader of dual histone marks by means of tandem plant homeodomain (PHD) and bromodomain (Bromo) regions. The three-dimensional structure of the PHD-Bromo region of TRIM24 revealed a single functional unit for combinatorial recognition of unmodified H3K4 (that is, histone H3 unmodified at lysine 4, H3K4me0) and acetylated H3K23 (histone H3 acetylated at lysine 23, H3K23ac) within the same histone tail. TRIM24 binds chromatin and oestrogen receptor to activate oestrogen-dependent genes associated with cellular proliferation and tumour development. Aberrant expression of TRIM24 negatively correlates with survival of breast cancer patients. The PHD-Bromo of TRIM24 provides a structural rationale for chromatin activation through a non-canonical histone signature, establishing a new route by which chromatin readers may influence cancer pathogenesis.

  13. Protein phosphatase 1 regulates the histone code for long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshibu, Kyoko; Gräff, Johannes; Beullens, Monique; Heitz, Fabrice D; Berchtold, Dominik; Russig, Holger; Farinelli, Mélissa; Bollen, Mathieu; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2009-10-14

    Chromatin remodeling through histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and DNA methylation has recently been implicated in cognitive functions, but the mechanisms involved in such epigenetic regulation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a critical regulator of chromatin remodeling in the mammalian brain that controls histone PTMs and gene transcription associated with long-term memory. Our data show that PP1 is present at the chromatin in brain cells and interacts with enzymes of the epigenetic machinery including HDAC1 (histone deacetylase 1) and histone demethylase JMJD2A (jumonji domain-containing protein 2A). The selective inhibition of the nuclear pool of PP1 in forebrain neurons in transgenic mice is shown to induce several histone PTMs that include not only phosphorylation but also acetylation and methylation. These PTMs are residue-specific and occur at the promoter of genes important for memory formation like CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) and NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB). These histone PTMs further co-occur with selective binding of RNA polymerase II and altered gene transcription, and are associated with improved long-term memory for objects and space. Together, these findings reveal a novel mechanism for the epigenetic control of gene transcription and long-term memory in the adult brain that depends on PP1.

  14. Specific binding of nerve growth factor to normal and denervated canine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D J; Strehlo, B L; Kaye, M P

    1981-11-01

    Preparations of membranes from normal and surgically denervated canine heart were tested for binding of radiolabeled nerve growth factor. Specific binding was detected in both normal and denervated hearts. Binding was nonsaturable and complex for normal atria and ventricles and denervated atria but appeared to be saturable for denervated ventricles. Nerve growth factor bound per microgram of protein was lower in denervated ventricles than normal ventricles, whereas slightly higher binding to denervated atria than normal atria was observed. This binding could not be displaced by cytochrome c, insulin, or epidermal growth factor. The data indicate that a large part of binding to normal ventricles could be due to nerve terminals attached to the heart, but specific binding detected in the denervated ventricles may be an intrinsic property of the tissue itself. These sites may serve as storage or uptake sites to direct sympathetic innervation in the developing or reinnervating myocardium.

  15. Chromatin binding of SRp20 and ASF/SF2 and dissociation from mitotic chromosomes is modulated by histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Rebecca J; Naoe, Yoshinori; Parker, J Brandon; Savic, Velibor; Bozovsky, Matthew R; Macfarlan, Todd; Manley, James L; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2009-02-27

    Histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation is a hallmark of mitotic chromosomes, but its full function remains to be elucidated. We report here that two SR protein splicing factors, SRp20 and ASF/SF2, associate with interphase chromatin, are released from hyperphosphorylated mitotic chromosomes, but reassociate with chromatin late in M-phase. Inhibition of Aurora B kinase diminished histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation and increased SRp20 and ASF/SF2 retention on mitotic chromosomes. Unexpectedly, we also found that HP1 proteins interact with ASF/SF2 in mitotic cells. Strikingly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ASF/SF2 caused retention of HP1 proteins on mitotic chromatin. Finally, ASF/SF2-depleted cells released from a mitotic block displayed delayed G0/G1 entry, suggesting a functional consequence of these interactions. These findings underscore the evolving role of histone H3 phosphorylation and demonstrate a direct, functional, and histone-modification-regulated association of SRp20 and ASF/SF2 with chromatin.

  16. An Improved Method for Identifying Specific DNA-Protein-Binding Sites In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangyan; Lu, Huizhi; Wang, Yunguang; Yang, Su; Xu, Hong; Cheng, Kaiying; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2017-03-01

    Binding of proteins to specific DNA sequences is essential for a variety of cellular processes such as DNA replication, transcription and responses to external stimuli. Chromatin immunoprecipitation is widely used for determining intracellular DNA fragments bound by a specific protein. However, the subsequent specific or accurate DNA-protein-binding sequence is usually determined by DNA footprinting. Here, we report an alternative method for identifying specific sites of DNA-protein-binding (designated SSDP) in vitro. This technique is mainly dependent on antibody-antigen immunity, simple and convenient, while radioactive isotope labeling and optimization of partial degradation by deoxyribonuclease (DNase) are avoided. As an example, the specific binding sequence of a target promoter by DdrO (a DNA damage response protein from Deinococcus radiodurans) in vitro was determined by the developed method. The central sequence of the binding site could be easily located using this technique.

  17. Gene expression-signature of belinostat in cell lines is specific for histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment, with a corresponding signature in xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monks, A.; Hose, C.D.; Pezzoli, P.

    2009-01-01

    Belinostat is a hydroxamate-type histone deactylase inhibitor (HDACi), which has recently entered phase I and II clinical trials. Microarray-based analysis of belinostat-treated cell lines showed an impact on genes associated with the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and downregulation of the aurora...... kinase pathway. Expression of 25 dysregulated genes was measured in eight differentially sensitive cell lines using a novel high-throughput assay that combines multiplex reverse transcriptase-PCR and fluorescence capillary electrophoresis. Sensitivity to belinostat and the magnitude of changes in overall...... gene modulation were significantly correlated. A belinostat-gene profile was specific for HDACi in three cell lines when compared with equipotent concentrations of four mechanistically different chemotherapeutic agents: 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, paclitaxel, and thiotepa. Belinostat- and trichostatin...

  18. Cancer associated epigenetic transitions identified by genome-wide histone methylation binding profiles in human colorectal cancer samples and paired normal mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallerman Ola

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite their well-established functional roles, histone modifications have received less attention than DNA methylation in the cancer field. In order to evaluate their importance in colorectal cancer (CRC, we generated the first genome-wide histone modification profiles in paired normal colon mucosa and tumor samples. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation and microarray hybridization (ChIP-chip was used to identify promoters enriched for histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me3 and lysine 27 (H3K27me3 in paired normal colon mucosa and tumor samples from two CRC patients and for the CRC cell line HT29. Results By comparing histone modification patterns in normal mucosa and tumors, we found that alterations predicted to have major functional consequences were quite rare. Furthermore, when normal or tumor tissue samples were compared to HT29, high similarities were observed for H3K4me3. However, the differences found for H3K27me3, which is important in determining cellular identity, indicates that cell lines do not represent optimal tissue models. Finally, using public expression data, we uncovered previously unknown changes in CRC expression patterns. Genes positive for H3K4me3 in normal and/or tumor samples, which are typically already active in normal mucosa, became hyperactivated in tumors, while genes with H3K27me3 in normal and/or tumor samples and which are expressed at low levels in normal mucosa, became hypersilenced in tumors. Conclusions Genome wide histone modification profiles can be used to find epigenetic aberrations in genes associated with cancer. This strategy gives further insights into the epigenetic contribution to the oncogenic process and may identify new biomarkers.

  19. Association between fertilin beta, protamines 1 and 2 and spermatid-specific linker histone H1-like protein mRNA levels, fertilization ability of human spermatozoa, and quality of preimplantation embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Kempisty

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization involves a series of cellular interactions culminating in the fusion of gamete membranes, creating a zygote and then an embryo. During the process of human fertilization in vivo or in conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF, sperm must be capable of undergoing the acrosome reaction, binding to the zona pellucida (ZP, and penetrating the ZP to fuse with the oolema. The key role in this process is played by fertilin beta. Protamines and histones are the proteins that bind to sperm chromatin and contribute in chromatin remodeling during early spermiogenesis. It has been suggested that these proteins may also participate in successful fertilization and embryo development. Using reverse transcription and real-time quantitative PCR reaction (QR-PCR methods and zygote and embryo scoring, we compared fertilin beta, protamine 1 (PRM1, protamine 2 (PRM2, spermatid-specific linker histone 1 (HILS1 mRNAs levels, in vitro fertilization ability of mature spermatozoa, and quality of embryos obtained from in vitro fertilization (IVF. We found significantly lower contents of fertilin beta transcript in spermatozoa from patients in which IVF fertilization failed (p<0.001. We also noticed a correlation between high levels of fertilin beta and increased quality of embryos (p<0.05. We observed an increase in PRM1 and PRM2 mRNA levels in spermatozoa obtained from patients with successful in vitro fertilization versus compared to the number of these transcripts isolated from spermatozoa of patients in which in vitro fertilization failed (P<0.001, (P<0.001, respectively. We found direct correlation between PRM1 and PRM2 mRNA levels to the quality of embryos (r=0.31, P=0.012, (r=0.31, P=0.011, respectively. The differences in HILS1 mRNA contents between these two groups were not statistically significant (P>0,05. We did not observe an association between HILS1 transcript contents and quality of embryos (r=0.22, P=0.076. We suggest that fertilin beta and

  20. TRF2 Protein Interacts with Core Histones to Stabilize Chromosome Ends*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by a specialized nucleoprotein complex called telomeres. Both shelterin, a telomere-specific multi-protein complex, and higher order telomeric chromatin structures combine to stabilize the chromosome ends. Here, we showed that TRF2, a component of shelterin, binds to core histones to protect chromosome ends from inappropriate DNA damage response and loss of telomeric DNA. The N-terminal Gly/Arg-rich domain (GAR domain) of TRF2 directly binds to the globular domain of core histones. The conserved arginine residues in the GAR domain of TRF2 are required for this interaction. A TRF2 mutant with these arginine residues substituted by alanine lost the ability to protect telomeres and induced rapid telomere shortening caused by the cleavage of a loop structure of the telomeric chromatin. These findings showed a previously unnoticed interaction between the shelterin complex and nucleosomal histones to stabilize the chromosome ends. PMID:27514743

  1. Identification and polymorphism of Plasmodium vivax RBP-1 peptides which bind specifically to reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Marí, Viviana; Ocampo, Marisol; Suarez, Jorge; Lopez, Ramses; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; García, Javier; Rodríuez, Luis E; Vera, Ricardo; Torres, Angela; Laverde, Marilu; Robles, Ana P; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2002-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax merozoite preferentially invades reticulocytes probably using PvRBP-1 as ligand. One hundred and ninety-five, 15-mer peptides has been synthesised from PvRBP-1 sequence; tested in reticulocyte- or erythrocyte-binding assays. Twenty-five peptides (K(d)=76-380 nM) specifically defined four reticulocyte-binding regions. It has been reported that a highly conserved Region-I recombinant fragment binds specifically to reticulocytes. HABP-critical residues for reticulocyte-binding were highly conserved in 20 Colombian P. vivax clinical isolates, suggesting an important biological function. There were six overlapping reticulocyte-binding sites for these peptides according to enzyme sensitivity and mutual competition-binding assays; located on 26- and 41-kDa reticulocyte membrane surface proteins.

  2. The Role of Histone Tails in the Nucleosome: A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Jochen; Zhang, Ruihan; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Histone tails play an important role in gene transcription and expression. We present here a systematic computational study of the role of histone tails in the nucleosome, using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations with an implicit solvent model and different well-established force fields. We performed simulations for all four histone tails, H4, H3, H2A, and H2B, isolated and with inclusion of the nucleosome. The results confirm predictions of previous theoretical studies for the secondary structure of the isolated tails but show a strong dependence on the force field used. In the presence of the entire nucleosome for all force fields, the secondary structure of the histone tails is destabilized. Specific contacts are found between charged lysine and arginine residues and DNA phosphate groups and other binding sites in the minor and major DNA grooves. Using cluster analysis, we found a single dominant configuration of binding to DNA for the H4 and H2A histone tails, whereas H3 and H2B show multiple binding configurations with an equal probability. The leading stabilizing contribution for those binding configurations is the attractive interaction between the positively charged lysine and arginine residues and the negatively charged phosphate groups, and thus the resulting charge neutralization. Finally, we present results of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to confirm our conclusions. Results from both implicit and explicit solvent models show that large portions of the histone tails are not bound to DNA, supporting the complex role of these tails in gene transcription and expression and making them possible candidates for binding sites of transcription factors, enzymes, and other proteins. PMID:25517156

  3. Epigenetic histone code and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieker, Jürgen; Muller, Sylviane

    2010-08-01

    The multiple inter-dependent post-translational modifications of histones represent fine regulators of chromatin dynamics. These covalent modifications, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, deimination, and methylation, affect therefore the numerous processes involving chromatin, such as replication, repair, transcription, genome stability, and cell death. Specific enzymes introducing modified residues in histones are precisely regulated, and a single amino acid residue can be subjected to a single or several, independent modifications. Disruption of histone post-translational modifications perturbs the pattern of gene expression, which may result in disease manifestations. It has become evident in recent years that apoptosis-modified histones exert a central role in the induction of autoimmunity, for example in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Certain histone post-translational modifications are linked to cell death (apoptotic and non-apoptotic cell death) and might be involved in lupus in the activation of normally tolerant lymphocyte subpopulations. In this review, we discuss how these modifications can affect the antigenicity and immunogenicity of histones with potential consequences in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  4. Systematic evaluation of the impact of ChIP-seq read designs on genome coverage, peak identification, and allele-specific binding detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Zeng, Xin; Younkin, Sam; Kawli, Trupti; Snyder, Michael P; Keleş, Sündüz

    2016-02-24

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments revolutionized genome-wide profiling of transcription factors and histone modifications. Although maturing sequencing technologies allow these experiments to be carried out with short (36-50 bps), long (75-100 bps), single-end, or paired-end reads, the impact of these read parameters on the downstream data analysis are not well understood. In this paper, we evaluate the effects of different read parameters on genome sequence alignment, coverage of different classes of genomic features, peak identification, and allele-specific binding detection. We generated 101 bps paired-end ChIP-seq data for many transcription factors from human GM12878 and MCF7 cell lines. Systematic evaluations using in silico variations of these data as well as fully simulated data, revealed complex interplay between the sequencing parameters and analysis tools, and indicated clear advantages of paired-end designs in several aspects such as alignment accuracy, peak resolution, and most notably, allele-specific binding detection. Our work elucidates the effect of design on the downstream analysis and provides insights to investigators in deciding sequencing parameters in ChIP-seq experiments. We present the first systematic evaluation of the impact of ChIP-seq designs on allele-specific binding detection and highlights the power of pair-end designs in such studies.

  5. Detection and comparison of specific hemin binding by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tompkins, G R; Wood, D P; Birchmeier, K R

    1997-01-01

    A radioligand assay was designed to detect and compare specific hemin binding by the periodontal anaerobic black-pigmenting bacteria (BPB) Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia. The assay included physiological concentrations of the hemin-binding protein rabbit serum albumin (RSA) to prevent self-aggregation and nonspecific interaction of hemin with cellular components. Under these conditions, heme-starved P. intermedia cells (two strains) expressed a single binding site species ...

  6. CTCF induces histone variant incorporation, erases the H3K27me3 histone mark and opens chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Weth (Oliver); C. Paprotka (Christine); K. Günther (Katharina); A. Schulte (Astrid); M. Baierl (Manuel); J. Leers (Joerg); N.J. Galjart (Niels); R. Renkawitz (Rainer)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInsulators functionally separate active chromatin domains frominactive ones. The insulator factor, CTCF, has been found to bind to boundaries and to mediate insulator function. CTCF binding sites are depleted for the histone modification H3K27me3 and are enriched for the histone variant

  7. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.

  8. Replicative senescence is associated with nuclear reorganization and with DNA methylation at specific transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänzelmann, Sonja; Beier, Fabian; Gusmao, Eduardo G; Koch, Carmen M; Hummel, Sebastian; Charapitsa, Iryna; Joussen, Sylvia; Benes, Vladimir; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Reid, George; Costa, Ivan G; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Primary cells enter replicative senescence after a limited number of cell divisions. This process needs to be considered in cell culture experiments, and it is particularly important for regenerative medicine. Replicative senescence is associated with reproducible changes in DNA methylation (DNAm) at specific sites in the genome. The mechanism that drives senescence-associated DNAm changes remains unknown - it may involve stochastic DNAm drift due to imperfect maintenance of epigenetic marks or it is directly regulated at specific sites in the genome. In this study, we analyzed the reorganization of nuclear architecture and DNAm changes during long-term culture of human fibroblasts and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We demonstrate that telomeres shorten and shift towards the nuclear center at later passages. In addition, DNAm profiles, either analyzed by MethylCap-seq or by 450k IlluminaBeadChip technology, revealed consistent senescence-associated hypermethylation in regions associated with H3K27me3, H3K4me3, and H3K4me1 histone marks, whereas hypomethylation was associated with chromatin containing H3K9me3 and lamina-associated domains (LADs). DNA hypermethylation was significantly enriched in the vicinity of genes that are either up- or downregulated at later passages. Furthermore, specific transcription factor binding motifs (e.g. EGR1, TFAP2A, and ETS1) were significantly enriched in differentially methylated regions and in the promoters of differentially expressed genes. Senescence-associated DNA hypermethylation occurs at specific sites in the genome and reflects functional changes in the course of replicative senescence. These results indicate that tightly regulated epigenetic modifications during long-term culture contribute to changes in nuclear organization and gene expression.

  9. Binding of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator to its receptor: residues involved in species specificity and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quax, P H; Grimbergen, J M; Lansink, M; Bakker, A H; Blatter, M C; Belin, D; van Hinsbergh, V W; Verheijen, J H

    1998-05-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (UPA), particularly when bound to its receptor (UPAR), is thought to play a major role in local proteolytic processes, thus facilitating cell migration as may occur during angiogenesis, neointima and atherosclerotic plaque formation, and tumor cell invasion. To facilitate understanding of the need and function of the UPA/UPAR interaction in cell migration and vascular remodeling, we changed several amino acid residues in UPA so as to interfere with its interaction with its receptor. The receptor-binding domain of UPA has been localized to a region in the growth factor domain between residues 20 and 32. Since the binding of UPA to UPAR appears to be species specific, we used the differences in amino acid sequences in the growth factor domain of UPA between various species to construct a human UPA variant that does not bind to the human UPAR. We substituted Asn22 for its mouse equivalent Tyr by site-directed mutagenesis. This mutant UPA had similar plasminogen activator characteristics as wild-type UPA, including its specific activity and interaction with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. However, no UPA/UPAR complexes could be observed in cross-linking experiments using DFP-treated 125I-labeled mutant UPA and lysates of various cells, including U937 histiocytic lymphoma cells, phorbol myristate acetate-treated human ECs, and mouse LB6 cells transfected with human UPAR cDNA. In direct binding experiments, DFP-treated 125I-labeled mutant UPA could not bind to phorbol myristate acetate-treated ECs, whereas wild-type UPA did bind. Furthermore, a 25-fold excess of wild-type UPA completely prevented the binding of DFP-treated 125I-labeled wild-type UPA to the human receptor on transfected LB6 cells, whereas an equal amount of mutant UPA had only a very small effect. In ligand blotting assays, very weak binding of mutant UPA to human UPAR could be observed. Changing Asn22 into the other amino acid residues alanine or glutamine had no

  10. Target-specific binding of immunoliposomes in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, E.; Maruyama, K.; Kennel, S.; Klibanov, A.; Torchilin, V.; Ryan, U.; Huang, L.

    1989-01-01

    Our group at the University of Tennessee has been concentrating on using monoclonal antibody for targeting of a liposomal drug carrier system. This paper discusses our initial effort to target these liposomes using an organ-specific monoclonal antibody. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Characterization and DNA-binding specificities of Ralstonia TAL-like effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lixin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from Xanthomonas sp. have been used as customizable DNA-binding modules for genome-engineering applications. Ralstonia solanacearum TALE-like proteins (RTLs) exhibit similar structural features to TALEs, including a central DNA-binding domain composed of 35 amino acid-long repeats. Here, we characterize the RTLs and show that they localize in the plant cell nucleus, mediate DNA binding, and might function as transcriptional activators. RTLs have a unique DNA-binding architecture and are enriched in repeat variable di-residues (RVDs), which determine repeat DNA-binding specificities. We determined the DNA-binding specificities for the RVD sequences ND, HN, NP, and NT. The RVD ND mediates highly specific interactions with C nucleotide, HN interacts specifically with A and G nucleotides, and NP binds to C, A, and G nucleotides. Moreover, we developed a highly efficient repeat assembly approach for engineering RTL effectors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that RTLs are unique DNA-targeting modules that are excellent alternatives to be tailored to bind to user-selected DNA sequences for targeted genomic and epigenomic modifications. These findings will facilitate research concerning RTL molecular biology and RTL roles in the pathogenicity of Ralstonia spp. © 2013 The Author.

  12. Glutamine methylation in histone H2A is an RNA-polymerase-I-dedicated modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarz, Peter; Santos-Rosa, Helena; Robson, Sam C.; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B.; Nelson, Christopher J.; Nielsen, Michael L.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are decorated with numerous post-translational modifications capable of influencing many DNA processes. Here we describe a new class of histone modification, methylation of glutamine, occurring on yeast histone H2A at position 105 (Q105) and human H2A at Q104. We identify Nop1 as the methyltransferase in yeast and demonstrate that fibrillarin is the orthologue enzyme in human cells. Glutamine methylation of H2A is restricted to the nucleolus. Global analysis in yeast, using an H2AQ105me-specific antibody, shows that this modification is exclusively enriched over the 35S ribosomal DNA transcriptional unit. We show that the Q105 residue is part of the binding site for the histone chaperone FACT (facilitator of chromatin transcription) complex. Methylation of Q105 or its substitution to alanine disrupts binding to FACT in vitro. A yeast strain mutated at Q105 shows reduced histone incorporation and increased transcription at the ribosomal DNA locus. These features are phenocopied by mutations in FACT complex components. Together these data identify glutamine methylation of H2A as the first histone epigenetic mark dedicated to a specific RNA polymerase and define its function as a regulator of FACT interaction with nucleosomes.

  13. A genome-wide screen in human embryonic stem cells reveals novel sites of allele-specific histone modification associated with known disease loci

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prendergast, James G D

    2012-05-19

    AbstractBackgroundChromatin structure at a given site can differ between chromosome copies in a cell, and such imbalances in chromatin structure have been shown to be important in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling several disease loci. Human genetic variation, DNA methylation, and disease have been intensely studied, uncovering many sites of allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM). However, little is known about the genome-wide occurrence of sites of allele-specific histone modification (ASHM) and their relationship to human disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and characteristics of sites of ASHM in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).ResultsUsing a statistically rigorous protocol, we investigated the genomic distribution of ASHM in hESCs, and their relationship to sites of allele-specific expression (ASE) and DNA methylation. We found that, although they were rare, sites of ASHM were substantially enriched at loci displaying ASE. Many were also found at known imprinted regions, hence sites of ASHM are likely to be better markers of imprinted regions than sites of ASM. We also found that sites of ASHM and ASE in hESCs colocalize at risk loci for developmental syndromes mediated by deletions, providing insights into the etiology of these disorders.ConclusionThese results demonstrate the potential importance of ASHM patterns in the interpretation of disease loci, and the protocol described provides a basis for similar studies of ASHM in other cell types to further our understanding of human disease susceptibility.

  14. Specificity and commonality of the phosphoinositide-binding proteome analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungmichel, Stephanie; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) play key roles in signaling and disease. Using high-resolution quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified PIP-interacting proteins and profiled their binding specificities toward all seven PIP variants. This analysis revealed 405 PIP-binding proteins, which is greater...... than the total number of phospho- or ubiquitin-binding domains. Translocation and inhibitor assays of identified PIP-binding proteins confirmed that our methodology targets direct interactors. The PIP interactome encompasses proteins from diverse cellular compartments, prominently including the nucleus...

  15. Elucidating the evolutionary conserved DNA-binding specificities of WRKY transcription factors by molecular dynamics and in vitro binding assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Luise H.; Fischer, Nina M.; Harter, Klaus; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Wanke, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors constitute a large protein family in plants that is involved in the regulation of developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stimuli. The question arises how stimulus-specific responses are mediated given that the highly conserved WRKY DNA-binding domain (DBD) exclusively recognizes the ‘TTGACY’ W-box consensus. We speculated that the W-box consensus might be more degenerate and yet undetected differences in the W-box consensus of WRKYs of different evolutionary descent exist. The phylogenetic analysis of WRKY DBDs suggests that they evolved from an ancestral group IIc-like WRKY early in the eukaryote lineage. A direct descent of group IIc WRKYs supports a monophyletic origin of all other group II and III WRKYs from group I by loss of an N-terminal DBD. Group I WRKYs are of paraphyletic descent and evolved multiple times independently. By homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro DNA–protein interaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with AtWRKY50 (IIc), AtWRKY33 (I) and AtWRKY11 (IId) DBDs, we revealed differences in DNA-binding specificities. Our data imply that other components are essentially required besides the W-box-specific binding to DNA to facilitate a stimulus-specific WRKY function. PMID:23975197

  16. Reading RNA methylation codes through methyl-specific binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; He, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    N (6)-methyladenosine (m (6)A) is a prevalent modification of eukaryotic mRNAs. It regulates yeast cell fate and is essential to the development and fertility of metazoans. Although its presence in mRNA has been known since the early 1970s, the function of m (6)A remained a mystery until the spate of discoveries in the past three years. Here, we focus on the discovery of m (6)A "readers" (proteins that specifically recognize m (6)A), and their functions in tuning mRNA stability, as well as the broader significance of such m (6)A-dependent regulation of gene expression.

  17. Cross-modal working memory binding and word recognition skills: how specific is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shinmin; Allen, Richard J

    2017-10-04

    Recent research has suggested that the creation of temporary bound representations of information from different sources within working memory uniquely relates to word recognition abilities in school-age children. However, it is unclear to what extent this link is attributable specifically to the binding ability for cross-modal information. This study examined the performance of Grade 3 (8-9 years old) children on binding tasks requiring either temporary association formation of two visual items (i.e., within-modal binding) or pairs of visually presented abstract shapes and auditorily presented nonwords (i.e., cross-modal binding). Children's word recognition skills were related to performance on the cross-modal binding task but not on the within-modal binding task. Further regression models showed that cross-modal binding memory was a significant predictor of word recognition when memory for its constituent elements, general abilities, and crucially, within-modal binding memory were taken into account. These findings may suggest a specific link between the ability to bind information across modalities within working memory and word recognition skills.

  18. Pharmacological specificity of some psychotomimetic and antipsychotic agents for the sigma and PCP binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itzhak, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacological specificity of representative psychotomimetic agents such a phencyclidine (PCP) analogs, opiate benzomorphans and several antipsychotic agents was assessed for the sigma and PCP binding sites. In a series of binding experiments, in rat brain membranes, sigma and PCP binding sites were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-1-(1-(3-hydroxyphenyl) cyclohexyl) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH), (+)(/sup 3/H)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047) and (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-(3-hydroxy-phenyl)-N-(1-propyl) piperidine and ((+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP). PCP analogs inhibit potently high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding and (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 binding, moderately the low affinity binding component of (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and very weakly (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding. (+)SKF 10047 and cyclazocine are potent to moderate inhibitors of (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047, high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PCP-3-OH binding. The antipsychotic agents display high affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding sites, moderate affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 sites and have no effect on either the high or low affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity, Sequence Specificity and Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of naturally......-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain C1-C8 alkylamine side chains. Methods of enhancing the solubility, binding affinity and sequence specificity of PNAs are provided....

  20. Preferential recruitment of the maternal centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) in oat (Avena sativa L.) × pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) hybrid embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takayoshi; Sunamura, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Ayaka; Eltayeb, Amin Elsadig; Tsujimoto, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Chromosome elimination occurs frequently in interspecific hybrids between distantly related species in Poaceae. However, chromosomes from both parents behave stably in a hybrid of female oat (Avena sativa L.) pollinated by pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.). To analyze the chromosome behavior in this hybrid, we cloned the centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) genes of oat and pearl millet and produced a pearl millet-specific anti-CENH3 antibody. Application of this antibody together with a grass species common anti-CENH3 antibody revealed the dynamic CENH3 composition of the hybrid cells before and after fertilization. Despite co-expression of CENH3 genes encoded by oat and pearl millet, only an oat-type CENH3 was incorporated into the centromeres of both species in the hybrid embryo. Oat CENH3 enables a functional centromere in pearl millet chromosomes in an oat genetic background. Comparison of CENH3 genes among Poaceae species that show chromosome elimination in interspecific hybrids revealed that the loop 1 regions of oat and pearl millet CENH3 exhibit exceptionally high similarity.

  1. Genome-wide localization of protein-DNA binding and histone modification by a Bayesian change-point method with ChIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Haipeng; Mo, Yifan; Liao, Will; Zhang, Michael Q

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have matured considerably since their introduction and a focus has been placed on developing sophisticated analytical tools to deal with the amassing volumes of data. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), a major application of NGS, is a widely adopted technique for examining protein-DNA interactions and is commonly used to investigate epigenetic signatures of diffuse histone marks. These datasets have notoriously high variance and subtle levels of enrichment across large expanses, making them exceedingly difficult to define. Windows-based, heuristic models and finite-state hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been used with some success in analyzing ChIP-seq data but with lingering limitations. To improve the ability to detect broad regions of enrichment, we developed a stochastic Bayesian Change-Point (BCP) method, which addresses some of these unresolved issues. BCP makes use of recent advances in infinite-state HMMs by obtaining explicit formulas for posterior means of read densities. These posterior means can be used to categorize the genome into enriched and unenriched segments, as is customarily done, or examined for more detailed relationships since the underlying subpeaks are preserved rather than simplified into a binary classification. BCP performs a near exhaustive search of all possible change points between different posterior means at high-resolution to minimize the subjectivity of window sizes and is computationally efficient, due to a speed-up algorithm and the explicit formulas it employs. In the absence of a well-established "gold standard" for diffuse histone mark enrichment, we corroborated BCP's island detection accuracy and reproducibility using various forms of empirical evidence. We show that BCP is especially suited for analysis of diffuse histone ChIP-seq data but also effective in analyzing punctate transcription factor ChIP datasets, making it widely applicable for numerous

  2. Genome-wide localization of protein-DNA binding and histone modification by a Bayesian change-point method with ChIP-seq data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haipeng Xing

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have matured considerably since their introduction and a focus has been placed on developing sophisticated analytical tools to deal with the amassing volumes of data. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq, a major application of NGS, is a widely adopted technique for examining protein-DNA interactions and is commonly used to investigate epigenetic signatures of diffuse histone marks. These datasets have notoriously high variance and subtle levels of enrichment across large expanses, making them exceedingly difficult to define. Windows-based, heuristic models and finite-state hidden Markov models (HMMs have been used with some success in analyzing ChIP-seq data but with lingering limitations. To improve the ability to detect broad regions of enrichment, we developed a stochastic Bayesian Change-Point (BCP method, which addresses some of these unresolved issues. BCP makes use of recent advances in infinite-state HMMs by obtaining explicit formulas for posterior means of read densities. These posterior means can be used to categorize the genome into enriched and unenriched segments, as is customarily done, or examined for more detailed relationships since the underlying subpeaks are preserved rather than simplified into a binary classification. BCP performs a near exhaustive search of all possible change points between different posterior means at high-resolution to minimize the subjectivity of window sizes and is computationally efficient, due to a speed-up algorithm and the explicit formulas it employs. In the absence of a well-established "gold standard" for diffuse histone mark enrichment, we corroborated BCP's island detection accuracy and reproducibility using various forms of empirical evidence. We show that BCP is especially suited for analysis of diffuse histone ChIP-seq data but also effective in analyzing punctate transcription factor ChIP datasets, making it widely applicable for

  3. Histone acetyl transferases as emerging drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J.; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational modifications, such as acetylation or phosphorylation, play a crucial role in the regulation of gene transcription in eukaryotes. Different subtypes of histone acetyl transferases (HATs) catalyze the acetylation of histones on specific lysine residues. A potential role of HATs in

  4. Physicochemical characteristics of structurally determined metabolite-protein and drug-protein binding events with respect to binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To better understand and ultimately predict both the metabolic activities as well as the signaling functions of metabolites, a detailed understanding of the physical interactions of metabolites with proteins is highly desirable. Focusing in particular on protein binding specificity vs. promiscuity, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the physicochemical properties of compound-protein binding events as reported in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We compared the molecular and structural characteristics obtained for metabolites to those of the well-studied interactions of drug compounds with proteins. Promiscuously binding metabolites and drugs are characterized by low molecular weight and high structural flexibility. Unlike reported for drug compounds, low rather than high hydrophobicity appears associated, albeit weakly, with promiscuous binding for the metabolite set investigated in this study. Across several physicochemical properties, drug compounds exhibit characteristic binding propensities that are distinguishable from those associated with metabolites. Prediction of target diversity and compound promiscuity using physicochemical properties was possible at modest accuracy levels only, but was consistently better for drugs than for metabolites. Compound properties capturing structural flexibility and hydrogen-bond formation descriptors proved most informative in PLS-based prediction models. With regard to diversity of enzymatic activities of the respective metabolite target enzymes, the metabolites benzylsuccinate, hypoxanthine, trimethylamine N-oxide, oleoylglycerol, and resorcinol showed very narrow process involvement, while glycine, imidazole, tryptophan, succinate, and glutathione were identified to possess broad enzymatic reaction scopes. Promiscuous metabolites were found to mainly serve as general energy currency compounds, but were identified to also be involved in signaling processes and to appear in diverse organismal systems (digestive and nervous

  5. Physicochemical characteristics of structurally determined metabolite-protein and drug-protein binding events with respect to binding specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkuć, Paula; Walther, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To better understand and ultimately predict both the metabolic activities as well as the signaling functions of metabolites, a detailed understanding of the physical interactions of metabolites with proteins is highly desirable. Focusing in particular on protein binding specificity vs. promiscuity, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the physicochemical properties of compound-protein binding events as reported in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We compared the molecular and structural characteristics obtained for metabolites to those of the well-studied interactions of drug compounds with proteins. Promiscuously binding metabolites and drugs are characterized by low molecular weight and high structural flexibility. Unlike reported for drug compounds, low rather than high hydrophobicity appears associated, albeit weakly, with promiscuous binding for the metabolite set investigated in this study. Across several physicochemical properties, drug compounds exhibit characteristic binding propensities that are distinguishable from those associated with metabolites. Prediction of target diversity and compound promiscuity using physicochemical properties was possible at modest accuracy levels only, but was consistently better for drugs than for metabolites. Compound properties capturing structural flexibility and hydrogen-bond formation descriptors proved most informative in PLS-based prediction models. With regard to diversity of enzymatic activities of the respective metabolite target enzymes, the metabolites benzylsuccinate, hypoxanthine, trimethylamine N-oxide, oleoylglycerol, and resorcinol showed very narrow process involvement, while glycine, imidazole, tryptophan, succinate, and glutathione were identified to possess broad enzymatic reaction scopes. Promiscuous metabolites were found to mainly serve as general energy currency compounds, but were identified to also be involved in signaling processes and to appear in diverse organismal systems (digestive and nervous

  6. Chromatin Affinity Purification and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Defining the Interactome of Histone Modification Patterns*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, Miroslav; Stützer, Alexandra; Mosch, Kerstin; Krasauskas, Andrius; Soeroes, Szabolcs; Stark, Holger; Urlaub, Henning; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    DNA and histone modifications direct the functional state of chromatin and thereby the readout of the genome. Candidate approaches and histone peptide affinity purification experiments have identified several proteins that bind to chromatin marks. However, the complement of factors that is recruited by individual and combinations of DNA and histone modifications has not yet been defined. Here, we present a strategy based on recombinant, uniformly modified chromatin templates used in affinity purification experiments in conjunction with SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry for this purpose. On the prototypic H3K4me3 and H3K9me3 histone modification marks we compare our method with a histone N-terminal peptide affinity purification approach. Our analysis shows that only some factors associate with both, chromatin and peptide matrices but that a surprisingly large number of proteins differ in their association with these templates. Global analysis of the proteins identified implies specific domains mediating recruitment to the chromatin marks. Our proof-of-principle studies show that chromatin templates with defined modification patterns can be used to decipher how the histone code is read and translated. PMID:21836164

  7. Tandem Affinity Purification Approach Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Post-translational Modifications of Histones Associated with Chromatin-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Sophie; Robin, Philippe; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane

    2017-01-01

    Protein purification by tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tag coupled to mass spectrometry analysis is usually used to reveal protein complex composition. Here we describe a TAP-tag purification of chromatin-bound proteins along with associated nucleosomes, which allow exhaustive identification of protein partners. Moreover, this method allows exhaustive identification of the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of the associated histones. Thus, in addition to partner characterization, this approach reveals the associated epigenetic landscape that can shed light on the function and properties of the studied chromatin-bound protein.

  8. Corecognition of DNA and a methylated histone tail by the MSL3 chromodomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daesung; Blus, Bartlomiej J.; Chandra, Vikas; Huang, Pengxiang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh (UVHS)

    2010-11-12

    MSL3 resides in the MSL (male-specific lethal) complex, which upregulates transcription by spreading the histone H4 Lys16 (H4K16) acetyl mark. We discovered a DNA-dependent interaction of MSL3 chromodomain with the H4K20 monomethyl mark. The structure of a ternary complex shows that the DNA minor groove accommodates the histone H4 tail, and monomethyllysine inserts in a four-residue aromatic cage in MSL3. H4K16 acetylation antagonizes MSL3 binding, suggesting that MSL function is regulated by a combination of post-translational modifications.

  9. Resolving Heart Regeneration by Replacement Histone Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Joseph Aaron; Kuzu, Guray; Lee, Nutishia; Karasik, Jaclyn; Gemberling, Matthew; Foglia, Matthew J; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L; Sun, Fei; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Poss, Kenneth D

    2017-02-27

    Chromatin regulation is a principal mechanism governing animal development, yet it is unclear to what extent structural changes in chromatin underlie tissue regeneration. Non-mammalian vertebrates such as zebrafish activate cardiomyocyte (CM) division after tissue damage to regenerate lost heart muscle. Here, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing a biotinylatable H3.3 histone variant in CMs and derived cell-type-specific profiles of histone replacement. We identified an emerging program of putative enhancers that revise H3.3 occupancy during regeneration, overlaid upon a genome-wide reduction of H3.3 from promoters. In transgenic reporter lines, H3.3-enriched elements directed gene expression in subpopulations of CMs. Other elements increased H3.3 enrichment and displayed enhancer activity in settings of injury- and/or Neuregulin1-elicited CM proliferation. Dozens of consensus sequence motifs containing predicted transcription factor binding sites were enriched in genomic regions with regeneration-responsive H3.3 occupancy. Thus, cell-type-specific regulatory programs of tissue regeneration can be revealed by genome-wide H3.3 profiling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein implicated in specific binding to human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Luis; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Lopez, Ramses; Valbuena, John; Cortes, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Barrero, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    The gene encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (as assayed by PCR) and transcribed (as determined by RT-PCR) in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. bovis BCG, and M. africanum strains. Rabbits immunized with synthetic polymer peptides from this protein produced antibodies specifically recognizing a 25-kDa band in mycobacterial sonicate. U937 and A549 cells were used in binding assays involving 20-amino-acid-long synthetic peptides covering the whole Rv2536 protein sequence. Peptide 11207 (161DVFSAVRADDSPTGEMQVAQY180) presented high specific binding to both types of cells; the binding was saturable and presented nanomolar affinity constants. Cross-linking assays revealed that this peptide specifically binds to 50 kDa U937 cell membrane and 45 kDa A549 cell membrane proteins. PMID:16131654

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein implicated in specific binding to human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Luis; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Lopez, Ramses; Valbuena, John; Cortes, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Barrero, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-09-01

    The gene encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (as assayed by PCR) and transcribed (as determined by RT-PCR) in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. bovis BCG, and M. africanum strains. Rabbits immunized with synthetic polymer peptides from this protein produced antibodies specifically recognizing a 25-kDa band in mycobacterial sonicate. U937 and A549 cells were used in binding assays involving 20-amino-acid-long synthetic peptides covering the whole Rv2536 protein sequence. Peptide 11207 (161DVFSAVRADDSPTGEMQVAQY180) presented high specific binding to both types of cells; the binding was saturable and presented nanomolar affinity constants. Cross-linking assays revealed that this peptide specifically binds to 50 kDa U937 cell membrane and 45 kDa A549 cell membrane proteins.

  12. SOCS3 binds specific receptor-JAK complexes to control cytokine signaling by direct kinase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Nadia J; Murphy, James M; Liau, Nicholas P D; Varghese, Leila N; Laktyushin, Artem; Whitlock, Eden L; Lucet, Isabelle S; Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2013-04-01

    The inhibitory protein SOCS3 plays a key part in the immune and hematopoietic systems by regulating signaling induced by specific cytokines. SOCS3 functions by inhibiting the catalytic activity of Janus kinases (JAKs) that initiate signaling within the cell. We determined the crystal structure of a ternary complex between mouse SOCS3, JAK2 (kinase domain) and a fragment of the interleukin-6 receptor β-chain. The structure shows that SOCS3 binds JAK2 and receptor simultaneously, using two opposing surfaces. While the phosphotyrosine-binding groove on the SOCS3 SH2 domain is occupied by receptor, JAK2 binds in a phosphoindependent manner to a noncanonical surface. The kinase-inhibitory region of SOCS3 occludes the substrate-binding groove on JAK2, and biochemical studies show that it blocks substrate association. These studies reveal that SOCS3 targets specific JAK-cytokine receptor pairs and explains the mechanism and specificity of SOCS action.

  13. Bookmarking by specific and nonspecific binding of FoxA1 pioneer factor to mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Donahue, Greg; Becker, Justin S; He, Ximiao; Vinson, Charles; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2013-02-01

    While most transcription factors exit the chromatin during mitosis and the genome becomes silent, a subset of factors remains and "bookmarks" genes for rapid reactivation as cells progress through the cell cycle. However, it is unknown whether such bookmarking factors bind to chromatin similarly in mitosis and how different binding capacities among them relate to function. We compared a diverse set of transcription factors involved in liver differentiation and found markedly different extents of mitotic chromosome binding. Among them, the pioneer factor FoxA1 exhibits the greatest extent of mitotic chromosome binding. Genomically, ~15% of the FoxA1 interphase target sites are bound in mitosis, including at genes that are important for liver differentiation. Biophysical, genome mapping, and mutagenesis studies of FoxA1 reveals two different modes of binding to mitotic chromatin. Specific binding in mitosis occurs at sites that continue to be bound from interphase. Nonspecific binding in mitosis occurs across the chromosome due to the intrinsic chromatin affinity of FoxA1. Both specific and nonspecific binding contribute to timely reactivation of target genes post-mitosis. These studies reveal an unexpected diversity in the mechanisms by which transcription factors help retain cell identity during mitosis.

  14. Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2015-10-12

    In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC.

  15. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  16. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellis Manolis

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Results Here we analyse the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikatae to study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artefacts of computational motif finding algorithms. Conclusion As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will

  17. Histone H1 Differentially Inhibits DNA Bending by Reduced and Oxidized HMGB1 Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Štros

    Full Text Available HMGB1 protein and linker histone H1 have overlapping binding sites in the nucleosome. HMGB1 has been implicated in many DNA-dependent processes in chromatin involving binding of specific proteins, including transcription factors, to DNA sites pre-bent by HMGB1. HMGB1 can also act as an extracellular signaling molecule by promoting inflammation, tumor growth a metastasis. Many of the intra- and extracellular functions of HMGB1 depend on redox-sensitive cysteine residues of the protein. Here we report that mild oxidization of HMGB1 (and much less mutation of cysteines involved in disulphide bond formation can severely compromise the functioning of the protein as a DNA chaperone by inhibiting its ability to unwind or bend DNA. Histone H1 (via the highly basic C-terminal domain significantly inhibits DNA bending by the full-length HMGB1, and the inhibition is further enhanced upon oxidization of HMGB1. Interestingly, DNA bending by HMGB1 lacking the acidic C-tail (HMGB1ΔC is much less affected by histone H1, but oxidization rendered DNA bending by HMGB1ΔC and HMGB1 equally prone for inhibition by histone H1. Possible consequences of histone H1-mediated inhibition of DNA bending by HMGB1 of different redox state for the functioning of chromatin are discussed.

  18. The cancer-associated CTCFL/BORIS protein targets multiple classes of genomic repeats, with a distinct binding and functional preference for humanoid-specific SVA transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, Elena M; Teplyakov, Evgeny; Wu, Qiongfang; Li, Jingjing; Chen, Cheng; Meng, Chengcheng; Liu, Jian; Robinson, Susan; Loukinov, Dmitry; Boukaba, Abdelhalim; Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Lobanenkov, Victor; Strunnikov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A common aberration in cancer is the activation of germline-specific proteins. The DNA-binding proteins among them could generate novel chromatin states, not found in normal cells. The germline-specific transcription factor BORIS/CTCFL, a paralog of chromatin architecture protein CTCF, is often erroneously activated in cancers and rewires the epigenome for the germline-like transcription program. Another common feature of malignancies is the changed expression and epigenetic states of genomic repeats, which could alter the transcription of neighboring genes and cause somatic mutations upon transposition. The role of BORIS in transposable elements and other repeats has never been assessed. The investigation of BORIS and CTCF binding to DNA repeats in the K562 cancer cells dependent on BORIS for self-renewal by ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq revealed three classes of occupancy by these proteins: elements cohabited by BORIS and CTCF, CTCF-only bound, or BORIS-only bound. The CTCF-only enrichment is characteristic for evolutionary old and inactive repeat classes, while BORIS and CTCF co-binding predominately occurs at uncharacterized tandem repeats. These repeats form staggered cluster binding sites, which are a prerequisite for CTCF and BORIS co-binding. At the same time, BORIS preferentially occupies a specific subset of the evolutionary young, transcribed, and mobile genomic repeat family, SVA. Unlike CTCF, BORIS prominently binds to the VNTR region of the SVA repeats in vivo. This suggests a role of BORIS in SVA expression regulation. RNA-seq analysis indicates that BORIS largely serves as a repressor of SVA expression, alongside DNA and histone methylation, with the exception of promoter capture by SVA. Thus, BORIS directly binds to, and regulates SVA repeats, which are essentially movable CpG islands, via clusters of BORIS binding sites. This finding uncovers a new function of the global germline-specific transcriptional regulator BORIS in regulating and repressing the

  19. Caffeine induces hyperacetylation of histones at the MEF2 site on the Glut4 promoter and increases MEF2A binding to the site via a CaMK-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukwevho, Emmanuel; Kohn, Tertius A; Lang, Dirk; Nyatia, Edward; Smith, James; Ojuka, Edward O

    2008-03-01

    This study was conducted to explore the mechanism by which caffeine increases GLUT4 expression in C(2)C(12) myotubes. Myoblasts were differentiated in DMEM containing 2% horse serum for 13 days and the resultant myotubes exposed to 10 mM caffeine in the presence or absence of 25 microM KN93 or 10 mM dantrolene for 2 h. After the treatment, cells were kept in serum-free medium and harvested between 0 and 6 h later, depending on the assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that caffeine treatment caused hyperacetylation of histone H3 at the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) site on the Glut4 promoter (P CaMK II), attenuated all the above caffeine-induced changes. These data indicate that caffeine increases GLUT4 expression by acetylating the MEF2 site to increase MEF2A binding via a mechanism that involves CaMK II.

  20. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers duri...

  1. New fluorescent reagents specific for Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Lemelson, Daniela [Department of Life Sciences and the NIBN, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Israelson, Adrian [Department of Physiology, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda, E-mail: vardasb@bgu.ac.il [Department of Life Sciences and the NIBN, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New reagents specifically inhibit the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru allow for mechanism-independent probing of Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes in reagents fluorescence allow characterization of protein Ca{sup 2+}-binding properties. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} carries information pivotal to cell life and death via its interactions with specific binding sites in a protein. We previously developed a novel photoreactive reagent, azido ruthenium (AzRu), which strongly inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities. Here, we synthesized new fluorescent ruthenium-based reagents containing FITC or EITC, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru. These reagents were purified, characterized and found to specifically interact with and markedly inhibit Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities but not the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-independent reactions. In contrast to many reagents that serve as probes for Ca{sup 2+}, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru are the first fluorescent divalent cation analogs to be synthesized and characterized that specifically bind to Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and inhibit their activity. Such reagents will assist in characterizing Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins, thereby facilitating better understanding of the function of Ca{sup 2+} as a key bio-regulator.

  2. Dicarbonyl Induced Structural Perturbations Make Histone H1 Highly Immunogenic and Generate an Auto-Immune Response in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions, through the interaction of AGEs with RAGE receptors and via activation of interleukin mediated transcription signalling, has been reported in cancer. Proteins modifications are being explored for their roles in the development and progression of cancer and autoantibody response against them is gaining interest as a probe for early detection of the disease. This study has analysed the changes in histone H1 upon modification by methylglyoxal (MG and its implications in auto-immunopathogenesis of cancer. Modified histone showed modifications in the aromatic residues, changed tyrosine microenvironment, intermolecular cross linking and generation of AGEs. It showed masking of hydrophobic patches and a hypsochromic shift in the in ANS specific fluorescence. MG aggressively oxidized histone H1 leading to the accumulation of reactive carbonyls. Far UV CD measurements showed di-carbonyl induced enhancement of the alpha structure and the induction of beta sheet conformation; and thermal denaturation (Tm studies confirmed the thermal stability of the modified histone. FTIR analysis showed amide I band shift, generation of a carboxyethyl group and N-Cα vibrations in the modified histone. LCMS analysis confirmed the formation of Nε-(carboxyethyllysine and electron microscopic studies revealed the amorphous aggregate formation. The modified histone showed altered cooperative binding with DNA. Modified H1 induced high titre antibodies in rabbits and the IgG isolated form sera of rabbits immunized with modified H1 exhibited specific binding with its immunogen in Western Blot analysis. IgG isolated from the sera of patients with lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer and cancer of head and neck region showed better recognition for neo-epitopes on the modified histone, reflecting the presence of circulating autoantibodies in cancer. Since reports suggest a link between AGE-RAGE axis and

  3. Plasmodium vivax MSP-1 peptides have high specific binding activity to human reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis Eduardo; Urquiza, Mauricio; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Suárez, Jorge; García, Javier; Vera, Ricardo; Puentes, Alvaro; López, Ramses; Pinto, Martha; Rivera, Zuly; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2002-01-31

    Plasmodium vivax merozoites have high preferential ability to interact with and invade reticulocytes, although these cells correspond to only 2% of the red blood cells (RBC) population. P. vivax merozoite surface protein-1 (Pv-MSP-1) is believed to have an important role in attachment and invasion process. Using 88 non-overlapping 20-mer peptides, covering the entire Pv-MSP-1 Belem strain sequence, RBC and reticulocyte binding assays were performed. Fourteen sequences were identified with high specific binding activity to reticulocytes, but only three had high specific binding activity to mature erythrocytes. These peptides showed affinity constant values between 20 and 150nM, indicating a strong interaction between these sequences and reticulocyte receptors. Critical residues in binding to reticulocytes for these peptides were determined by competition binding assays with glycine scanning analogues. All high binding peptides bind to reticulocyte surface proteins having a molecular mass of around 18-20kDa which are not present in mature RBC. Interestingly, some high activity binding peptides (HABPs) are located close to the hypothesised 42 and 19kDa fragment cleavage sites for this protein, suggesting that these sequences have an important role in target cell attachment and invasion process by Pv-MSP-1.HABPs may be clustered in two regions, with region I being located between amino acids 280-719, and region II between amino acids 1060-1599 with higher than 25% identity level. A P. falciparum MSP-1 antigenic domain binds to RBCs and inhibits parasite invasion. Peptides 1721 and 1724 bind with high activity to reticulocytes in homologous Pv-MSP-1, suggesting similar functions for these two sequences.

  4. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  5. PR-Set7 establishes a repressive trans-tail histone code that regulates differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Jennifer K; Rice, Judd C

    2008-07-01

    Posttranslational modifications of the DNA-associated histone proteins play fundamental roles in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation. We previously discovered a novel trans-tail histone code involving monomethylated histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20) and H3 lysine 9 (H3K9); however, the mechanisms that establish this code and its function in transcription were unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that H3K9 monomethylation is dependent upon the PR-Set7 H4K20 monomethyltransferase but independent of its catalytic function, indicating that PR-Set7 recruits an H3K9 monomethyltransferase to establish the trans-tail histone code. We determined that this histone code is involved in a transcriptional regulatory pathway in vivo whereby monomethylated H4K20 binds the L3MBTL1 repressor protein to repress specific genes, including RUNX1, a critical regulator of hematopoietic differentiation. The selective loss of monomethylated H4K20 at the RUNX1 promoter resulted in the displacement of L3MBTL1 and a concomitant increase in RUNX1 transcription. Importantly, the lack of monomethylated H4K20 in the human K562 multipotent cell line was specifically associated with spontaneous megakaryocytic differentiation, in part, by activating RUNX1. Our findings demonstrate that this newly described repression pathway is required for regulating proper megakaryopoiesis and suggests that it is likely to function similarly in other multipotent cell types to regulate specific differentiation pathways.

  6. A PSHaver for centromeric histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folco, H Diego; Desai, Arshad

    2010-11-12

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Hewawasam et al. (2010) and Ranjitkar et al. (2010) identify and characterize Psh1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that specifically targets the centromeric histone Cse4 in budding yeast and limits its misincorporation at noncentromeric regions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An analysis of the sequence requirements of EDEN-BP for specific RNA binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnet-Corven, Sylvie; Audic, Yann; Omilli, Francis; Osborne, Howard Beverley

    2002-01-01

    International audience; EDEN-BP (embryo deadenylation element-binding protein) binds specifically to the EDEN motif in the 3'-untranslated regions of maternal mRNAs and targets these mRNAs for deadenylation and translational repression in Xenopus laevis embryos. EDEN-BP contains three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and is related to the elav family of RNA-binding proteins. In the present study we show that the two N-terminal RRMs of EDEN-BP are necessary for the interaction with EDEN as well a...

  8. Oncogenic RAS alters the global and gene-specific histone modification pattern during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, Ignacio Mazón; Kalogeropoulou, Margarita; Ferraro, Angelo; Voulgari, Angeliki; Pankotai, Tibor; Boros, Imre; Pintzas, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    The presence of different forms of histone covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation in localized promoter regions are markers for chromatin packing and transcription. Activation of RAS signalling pathways through oncogenic RAS mutations is a hallmark of colorectal cancer. Overexpression of Harvey-Ras oncogene induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Caco-2 cells. We focused on the role of epigenetic modifications of histone H3 and its dependence on RAS signal transduction pathways and oncogenic transformation. Using cell lines stably overexpressing oncogenic Harvey-RAS with EMT phenotype, we studied the acquired changes in the H3 histone modification patterns. Two genes show inverse protein expression patterns after Ha-RAS overexpression: Cyclin D1, a cell cycle-related gene, and the EMT marker-gene E-cadherin. We report that these two genes demonstrate matching inverse histone repression patterns on their promoter, while histone markers associated with an active state of genes were affected by the RAS-activated signalling pathway MEK-ERK-MSK1. Furthermore, we show that though the level of methyltransferases enzymes was increased, the status of H3 three-methylation at lysine 27 (H3K27me(3)), associated with gene repression on the promoter of Cyclin D1, was lower. Together, these results suggest that histone covalent modifications can be affected by oncogenic RAS pathways to regulate the expression of target genes like Cyclin D1 or E-cadherin and that the dynamic balance of opposing histone-modifying enzymes is critical for the regulation of cell proliferation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cadherin-mediated cell sorting not determined by binding or adhesion specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Niessen, Carien M; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    Cadherin adhesion molecules play important roles in the establishment of tissue boundaries. Cells expressing different cadherins sort out from each other in cell aggregation assays. To determine the contribution of cadherin binding and adhesion specificity to the sorting process, we examined the adhesion of cells to different purified cadherin proteins. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing one of four different cadherins were allowed to bind to the purified cadherin extracellular domai...

  10. Binding specificity of the G1/S transcriptional regulators in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Harris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: G1/S transcriptional regulation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on three main transcriptional components, Swi4, Swi6 and Mbp1. These proteins constitute two transcription factor complexes that regulate over 300 G1/S transcripts, namely SBF (Swi4-Swi6 and MBF (Mbp1-Swi6. SBF and MBF are involved in regulating largely non-overlapping sets of G1/S genes via clearly distinct mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we establish and confirm protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions using specific polyclonal antisera to whole Swi6 and to the C-terminal domains of related proteins Swi4 and Mbp1. Our data confirm the protein-protein binding specificity of Swi4 and Mbp1 to Swi6 but not to each other, and support the binding specificity of the transcriptional inhibitor Whi5 to SBF and of the corepressor Nrm1 to MBF. We also show the DNA binding preference of Swi4 to the CLN2 promoter and Mbp1 to the RNR1 promoter, while Swi6 binds both promoters. Finally, we establish the binding dynamics of Swi4 and Whi5 to the CLN2 promoter during the cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data confirm the binding specificity of the G1/S transcriptional regulators. Whereas previous observations were made using tagged Swi4, Swi6 and Mbp1, here we use specific polyclonal antisera to reestablish the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions of these G1/S transcriptional components. Our data also reveal the dynamic changes in promoter binding of Swi4 during the cell cycle, which suggests a possible positive feedback loop involving Swi4.

  11. LinkNMF: identification of histone modification modules in the human genome using nonnegative matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Inkyung; Kim, Dongsup

    2013-04-10

    Histone modifications are ubiquitous processes involved in various cellular mechanisms. Systemic analysis of multiple chromatin modifications has been used to characterize various chromatin states associated with functional DNA elements, gene expression, and specific biological functions. However, identification of modular modification patterns is still required to understand the functional associations between histone modification patterns and specific chromatin/DNA binding factors. To recognize modular modification patterns, we developed a novel algorithm that combines nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and a clique-detection algorithm. We applied it, called LinkNMF, to generate a comprehensive modification map in human CD4+ T cell promoter regions. Initially, we identified 11 modules not recognized by conventional approaches. The modules were grouped into two major classes: gene activation and repression. We found that genes targeted by each module were enriched with distinguishable biological functions, suggesting that each modular pattern plays a unique functional role. To explain the formation of modular patterns, we investigated the module-specific binding patterns of chromatin regulators. Application of LinkNMF to histone modification maps of diverse cells and developmental stages will be helpful for understanding how histone modifications regulate gene expression. The algorithm is available on our website at biodb.kaist.ac.kr/LinkNMF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Achieving peptide binding specificity and promiscuity by loops: case of the forkhead-associated domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; Chang, Chia-En A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of a series of cellular events requires specific protein-protein interactions, which are usually mediated by modular domains to precisely select a particular sequence from diverse partners. However, most signaling domains can bind to more than one peptide sequence. How do proteins create promiscuity from precision? Moreover, these complex interactions typically occur at the interface of a well-defined secondary structure, α helix and β sheet. However, the molecular recognition primarily controlled by loop architecture is not fully understood. To gain a deep understanding of binding selectivity and promiscuity by the conformation of loops, we chose the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain as our model system. The domain can bind to diverse peptides via various loops but only interact with sequences containing phosphothreonine (pThr). We applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for multiple free and bound FHA domains to study the changes in conformations and dynamics. Generally, FHA domains share a similar folding structure whereby the backbone holds the overall geometry and the variety of sidechain atoms of multiple loops creates a binding surface to target a specific partner. FHA domains determine the specificity of pThr by well-organized binding loops, which are rigid to define a phospho recognition site. The broad range of peptide recognition can be attributed to different arrangements of the loop interaction network. The moderate flexibility of the loop conformation can help access or exclude binding partners. Our work provides insights into molecular recognition in terms of binding specificity and promiscuity and helpful clues for further peptide design.

  13. A PHD in histone language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Sundaravelpandian, Kalaipandian; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histones are important for various DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. We recently reported that the ALFIN LIKE 6 (AL6) gene, identified in a forward genetic screen, is critical for phosphate deficiency-induced root hair formation and several other processes associated with the regulation of cellular phosphate homeostasis. AL6 contains a Plant Homeo Domain (PHD) finger that can bind to trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3). Homozygous mutants defective in AL6 expression form very short root hairs under phosphate-deficient conditions, presumably caused by altered expression of putative primary and secondary down-stream targets of AL6. In this Addendum, we speculate about possible roles of AL6, H3K4 trimethylation and other chromatin modifications in the adaptation of plants to low phosphate availability. PMID:23531693

  14. Specific binding of 15 HETE to lymphocytes. Effects on the fluidity of plasmatic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexmain, S; Gualde, N; Aldigier, J C; Motta, C; Chable-Rabinovitch, H; Rigaud, M

    1984-01-01

    Specific binding of mouse lymphocytes for 15 HETE was examined by incubating cells with [14C]-15 HETE, 1 X 10(-8) to 1 X 10(-10)M. It was observed that the specific binding of radiolabeled 15 HETE is a function of time, of temperature and is modified by Ca2+ and dithiothreitol. When a fluorescent probe was embedded in the phospholipid core of the lymphocyte membrane and its motion analysed by fluorescence polarization, it was observed that 15 HETE increases the viscosity of the plasmatic membrane.

  15. DNA binding by the plant-specific NAC transcription factors in crystal and solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Ditte Hededam; Lindemose, Søren; Grossmann, J. Günter

    2012-01-01

    angle X-ray scattering on complexes with oligonucleotides, mutagenesis and (DNase I and uranyl photo-) footprinting, is combined to form a structural view of DNA-binding, and for the first time provide experimental evidence for the speculated relationship between plant-specific NAC proteins, WRKY....... The structure of the DNA-binding NAC domain of ANAC019 has previously been determined by X-ray crystallography, revealing a dimeric and predominantly ß-fold structure, but the mode of binding to cognate DNA has remained elusive. In the present study, information from low resolution X-ray structures and small...... transcription factors and the mammalian GCM (Glial cell missing) transcription factors, which all use a ß-strand motif for DNA-binding. The structure shows that the NAC domain inserts the edge of its core ß-sheet into the major groove, while leaving the DNA largely undistorted. The structure of the NAC-DNA...

  16. Factors influencing the specificity of inhibitor binding to the human and malaria parasite dihydroorotate dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedingfield, Paul T P; Cowen, Deborah; Acklam, Paul; Cunningham, Fraser; Parsons, Mark R; McConkey, Glenn A; Fishwick, Colin W G; Johnson, A Peter

    2012-06-28

    The de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase is an emerging drug target for the treatment of malaria. In this context a key property of Plasmodium falciparum DHODH (PfDHODH) is that it can be selectively inhibited over its human homologue (HsDHODH). However, HsDHODH is also a validated drug target for autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. Here a series of novel inhibitors is described that includes compounds that switch specificity between the two enzymes as a result of small alterations in chemical structure. Structure-activity relationship (SAR), crystallography, docking, and mutagenesis studies are used to examine the binding modes of the compounds within the two enzymes and to reveal structural changes induced by inhibitor binding. Within this series, compounds with therapeutically relevant HsDHODH activity are described and their binding modes characterized using X-ray crystallography, which reveals a novel conformational shift within the inhibitor binding site.

  17. Specific binding of lactoferrin to Escherichia coli isolated from human intestinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, S.S.; Erdei, J.; Forsgren, A.; Naidu, A.S. (Departments of Medical Microbiology, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Czirok, E.; Gado, I. (National Institute of Hygiene, Budapest (Hungary)); Kalfas, S. (School of Dentistry, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Thoren, A. (Infectious Diseases, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    The degrees of human lactoferrin (HLf) and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) binding in 169 Escherichia coli strains isolated from human intestinal infections, and in an additional 68 strains isolated from healthy individuals, were examined in a {sup 125}I-labelled protein binding assay. The binding was expressed as a percentage calculated from the total labelled ligand added to bacteria. The HLf and BLf binding to E. coli was in the range 3.7 to 73.4% and 4.8 to 61.6%, respectively. Enterotoxigenic strains demonstrated a significantly higher HLf binding (median = 19%) than enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, enterohaemorrhagic strains or normal intestinal E. coli isolates (medians 6 to 9). Enteropathogenic strains belonging to serotypes O44 and O127 demonstrated significantly higher HLf binding compared to O26, O55, O111, O119 and O126. No significant differences in the degree of HLf or BLf binding were found between aerobactin-producing and non-producing strains. The interaction was further characterized in a high Lf-binging EPEC strain, E34663 (serotype O127). The binding was stable in the pH range 4.0 to 7.5, did not dissociate in the presence of 2M NaCl or 2M urea, and reached saturation within two h. Unlabelled HLf and BLf displaced the {sup 125}I-HLf binding to E34663 in a dose-dependent manner. Apo- and iron-saturated forms of Lf demonstrated similar binding to E34663. Among various unlabelled subephithelial matrix proteins and carbohydrates tested (in 10{sup 4}-fold excess) only fibronectin and fibrinogen caused a moderate inhibition of {sup 125}I-HLf binding. According to Scatchard plot analysis, 5,400 HLf-binding sites/cell, with an affinity constant (K{sub a}) of 1.4 x 10{sup -7} M, were estimated in strain E34663. These data establish the presence of a specific Lf-binding mechanism in E. coli. (au).

  18. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  19. Mechanism of sequence-specific template binding by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seung-Joo

    2010-03-28

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of the oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Biochemical studies have elucidated the mechanism for the sequence-specific synthesis of primers. However, the physical interactions of the primase with the DNA template to explain the basis of specificity have not been demonstrated. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and biochemical assays, we show that T7 DNA primase has only a slightly higher affinity for DNA containing the primase recognition sequence (5\\'-TGGTC-3\\') than for DNA lacking the recognition site. However, this binding is drastically enhanced by the presence of the cognate Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Cytosine triphosphate (CTP) that are incorporated into the primer, pppACCA. Formation of the dimer, pppAC, the initial step of sequence-specific primer synthesis, is not sufficient for the stable binding. Preformed primers exhibit significantly less selective binding than that observed with ATP and CTP. Alterations in subdomains of the primase result in loss of selective DNA binding. We present a model in which conformational changes induced during primer synthesis facilitate contact between the zinc-binding domain and the polymerase domain. The Author(s) 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Cadherin-mediated cell sorting not determined by binding or adhesion specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    Cadherin adhesion molecules play important roles in the establishment of tissue boundaries. Cells expressing different cadherins sort out from each other in cell aggregation assays. To determine the contribution of cadherin binding and adhesion specificity to the sorting process, we examined the adhesion of cells to different purified cadherin proteins. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing one of four different cadherins were allowed to bind to the purified cadherin extracellular domains of either human E-cadherin or Xenopus C-cadherin, and the specificity of adhesion was compared with cell-sorting assays. None of the different cadherin-expressing cells exhibited any adhesive specificity toward either of the two purified cadherin substrates, even though these cadherins differ considerably in their primary sequence. In addition, all cells exhibited similar strengthening of adhesion on both substrates. However, this lack of adhesive specificity did not determine whether different cadherin-expressing cells would sort from each other, and the tendency to sort was not predictable by the extent of sequence diversity in their extracellular domains. These results show that cadherins are far more promiscuous in their adhesive-binding capacity than had been expected and that the ability to sort out must be determined by mechanisms other than simple adhesive-binding specificity. PMID:11790800

  1. Specific and Modular Binding Code for Cytosine Recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R.; Li, Chunhua; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wang, Zefeng (NIH); (Beijing U); (UNC)

    2011-10-28

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  2. Receptor binding specificity of recent human H3N2 influenza viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings Richard D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human influenza viruses are known to bind to sialic acid linked α2-6 to galactose, but the binding specificity beyond that linkage has not been systematically examined. H3N2 human influenza isolates lost binding to chicken red cells in the 1990s but viruses isolated since 2003 have re-acquired the ability to agglutinate chicken erythrocytes. We have investigated specificity of binding, changes in hemagglutinin sequence of the recent viruses and the role of sialic acid in productive infection. Results Viruses that agglutinate, or do not agglutinate, chicken red cells show identical binding to a Glycan Array of 264 oligosaccharides, binding exclusively to a subset of α2-6-sialylsaccharides. We identified an amino acid change in hemagglutinin that seemed to correlate with chicken red cell binding but when tested by mutagenesis there was no effect. Recombinant hemagglutinins expressed on Sf-9 cells bound chicken red cells but the released recombinant baculoviruses agglutinated only human red cells. Similarly, an isolate that does not agglutinate chicken red cells show hemadsorption of chicken red cells to infected MDCK cells. We suggest that binding of chicken red cells to cell surface hemagglutinin but not to virions is due to a more favorable hemagglutinin density on the cell surface. We investigated whether a virus specific for α2-6 sialyloligosaccharides shows differential entry into cells that have varying proportions of α2-6 and α2-3 sialic acids, including human A549 and HeLa cells with high levels of α2-6 sialic acid, and CHO cells that have only α2-3 sialic acid. We found that the virus enters all cell types tested and synthesizes viral nucleoprotein, localized in the nucleus, and hemagglutinin, transported to the cell surface, but infectious progeny viruses were released only from MDCK cells. Conclusion Agglutination of chicken red cells does not correlate with altered binding to any oligosaccharide on the Glycan

  3. Specific histone modifications play critical roles in the control of encystation and antigenic variation in the early-branching eukaryote Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Pedro G; Gargantini, Pablo R; Prucca, César G; Torri, Alessandro; Saura, Alicia; Svärd, Staffan; Lujan, Hugo D

    2016-12-01

    During evolution, parasitic microorganisms have faced the challenges of adapting to different environments to colonize a variety of hosts. Giardia lamblia, a common cause of intestinal disease, has developed fascinating strategies to adapt both outside and inside its host's intestine, such as trophozoite differentiation into cyst and the switching of its major surface antigens. How gene expression is regulated during these adaptive processes remains undefined. Giardia lacks some typical eukaryotic features, like canonical transcription factors, linker histone H1, and complex promoter regions; suggesting that post-transcriptional and translational control of gene expression is essential for parasite survival. However, epigenetic factors may also play critical roles at the transcriptional level. Here, we describe the most common post-translational histone modifications; characterize enzymes involved in these reactions, and analyze their association with the Giardia's differentiation processes. We present evidence that NAD+-dependent and NAD+-independent histone deacetylases regulate encystation; however, a unique NAD+-independent histone deacetylase modulate antigenic switching. The rates of acetylation of H4K8 and H4K16 are critical for encystation, whereas a decrease in acetylation of H4K8 and methylation of H3K9 occur preferentially during antigenic variation. These results show the complexity of the mechanisms regulating gene expression in this minimalistic protozoan parasite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The binding problem in population neurodynamics: a network model for stimulus-specific coherent oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlásek, J

    1998-12-01

    A hypothesis is presented that coherent oscillatory discharges of spatially distributed neuronal groups (the supposed binding mechanism) are the result of the convergence of stimulus-dependent activity in modality-specific afferent pathways with oscillatory activity generated in unspecific sensory systems. This view is supported by simulation experiments on model networks.

  5. Specific Binding of Liposomal Nanoparticles through Inverse Electron-Demand Diels-Alder Click Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Christian; Iacono, Pasquale; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Kircher, Moritz F.; Reiner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a method to specifically bind liposomal radiopharmaceuticals to a CoCrMo alloy, which can be used in arterial stents, via an irreversible inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction. Inspired by recent accomplishments in pre-targeted imaging using tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene click

  6. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...... a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These data...

  7. Griffonia simplicifolia lectins bind specifically to endothelial cells and some epithelial cells in mouse tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, L

    1987-04-01

    The binding of Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I (GSA-I) and the isolectins GSA-I-AB3 and GSA-I-B4, having affinity for some alpha-D-galactosyl and N-acetyl galactosaminyl residues was studied in different mouse tissues. In brain, cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle, the GSA-I-lectin conjugates showed prominent binding only to blood vessel endothelia. Similarly, in the liver and kidney cortex the GSA-I-conjugates selectively reacted with endothelial cells of the sinusoids and with intertubular and glomerular capillaries, respectively. However, a strong reactivity with the GSA-I-conjugates was additionally seen in the acinar cells of the pancreas, in the stratified squamous epithelia of skin and tongue, and in transitional epithelium. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis combined with the lectin-blotting technique indicated that a similar set of glycoproteins are responsible for the GSA-I binding, even in different tissues. Another lectin with specificity for alpha-D-galactose, the Maclura pomifera agglutinin, displayed a distinctly different distribution of binding sites, mainly in the basement membranes, of all mouse tissues studied. The results suggest that some alpha-D-galactosyl residues, recognized by the binding of GSA-I lectins, are preferentially expressed in endothelial cells of mouse tissues, and also provide further evidence that endothelial cells can present a highly specific surface glycosylation pattern.

  8. RNA-binding specificity landscape of the pentatricopeptide repeat protein PPR10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Rafael G; Rojas, Margarita; Montgomery, Michael P; Gribbin, Kyle P; Barkan, Alice

    2017-04-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins comprise a large family of helical repeat proteins that influence gene expression in mitochondria and chloroplasts. PPR tracts can bind RNA via a modular one repeat-one nucleotide mechanism in which the nucleotide is specified by the identities of several amino acids in each repeat. This mode of recognition, the so-called PPR code, offers opportunities for the prediction of native PPR binding sites and the design of proteins to bind specified RNAs. However, a deep understanding of the parameters that dictate the affinity and specificity of PPR-RNA interactions is necessary to realize these goals. We report a comprehensive analysis of the sequence specificity of PPR10, a protein that binds similar RNA sequences of ∼18 nucleotides (nt) near the chloroplast atpH and psaJ genes in maize. We assessed the contribution of each nucleotide in the atpH binding site to PPR10 affinity in vitro by analyzing the effects of single-nucleotide changes at each position. In a complementary approach, the RNAs bound by PPR10 from partially randomized RNA pools were analyzed by deep sequencing. The results revealed three patches in which nucleotide identity has a major impact on binding affinity. These include 5 nt for which protein contacts were not observed in a PPR10-RNA crystal structure and 4 nt that are not explained by current views of the PPR code. These findings highlight aspects of PPR-RNA interactions that pose challenges for binding site prediction and design. © 2017 Miranda et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  9. Cell- and stage-specific chromatin structure across the Complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) promoter coincide with CBF1 and C/EBP-beta binding in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Mark N; Fenwick, Emily; Karimi, Mahdad; Abraham, Lawrence J; Ulgiati, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    Stringent developmental transcription requires multiple transcription factor (TF) binding sites, cell-specific expression of signaling molecules, TFs and co-regulators and appropriate chromatin structure. During B-lymphopoiesis, human Complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) is detected on immature and mature B cells but not on B cell precursors and plasma cells. We examined cell- and stage-specific human CR2 gene regulation using cell lines modeling B-lymphopoiesis. Chromatin accessibility assays revealed a region between -409 and -262 with enhanced accessibility in mature B cells and pre-B cells, compared to either non-lymphoid or plasma cell-types, however, accessibility near the transcription start site (TSS) was elevated only in CR2-expressing B cells. A correlation between histone acetylation and CR2 expression was observed, while histone H3K4 dimethylation was enriched near the TSS in both CR2-expressing B cells and non-expressing pre-B cells. Candidate sites within the CR2 promoter were identified which could regulate chromatin, including a matrix attachment region associated with CDP, SATB1/BRIGHT and CEBP-beta sites as well as two CBF1 sites. ChIP assays verified that both CBF1 and C/EBP-beta bind the CR2 promoter in B cells raising the possibility that these factors facilitate or respond to alterations in chromatin structure to control the timing and/or level of CR2 transcription.

  10. Deep convolutional neural networks for pan-specific peptide-MHC class I binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngmahn; Kim, Dongsup

    2017-12-28

    Computational scanning of peptide candidates that bind to a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) can speed up the peptide-based vaccine development process and therefore various methods are being actively developed. Recently, machine-learning-based methods have generated successful results by training large amounts of experimental data. However, many machine learning-based methods are generally less sensitive in recognizing locally-clustered interactions, which can synergistically stabilize peptide binding. Deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) is a deep learning method inspired by visual recognition process of animal brain and it is known to be able to capture meaningful local patterns from 2D images. Once the peptide-MHC interactions can be encoded into image-like array(ILA) data, DCNN can be employed to build a predictive model for peptide-MHC binding prediction. In this study, we demonstrated that DCNN is able to not only reliably predict peptide-MHC binding, but also sensitively detect locally-clustered interactions. Nonapeptide-HLA-A and -B binding data were encoded into ILA data. A DCNN, as a pan-specific prediction model, was trained on the ILA data. The DCNN showed higher performance than other prediction tools for the latest benchmark datasets, which consist of 43 datasets for 15 HLA-A alleles and 25 datasets for 10 HLA-B alleles. In particular, the DCNN outperformed other tools for alleles belonging to the HLA-A3 supertype. The F1 scores of the DCNN were 0.86, 0.94, and 0.67 for HLA-A*31:01, HLA-A*03:01, and HLA-A*68:01 alleles, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of other tools. We found that the DCNN was able to recognize locally-clustered interactions that could synergistically stabilize peptide binding. We developed ConvMHC, a web server to provide user-friendly web interfaces for peptide-MHC class I binding predictions using the DCNN. ConvMHC web server can be accessible via http://jumong.kaist.ac.kr:8080/convmhc

  11. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Paramelle

    Full Text Available Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the

  12. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. (Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37{degree}C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M{sub r}, 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with {sup 125}I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4{degree}C but did occur at 22 and 37{degree}C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37{degree}C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M{sub r}, 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M{sub r}, 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M{sub r}-120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-{alpha}-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate.

  13. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A.J.; Buard, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed an exten......In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed...

  14. Histone H1 couples initiation and amplification of ubiquitin signalling after DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorslund, Tina; Ripplinger, Anita; Hoffmann, Saskia; Wild, Thomas; Uckelmann, Michael; Villumsen, Bine; Narita, Takeo; Sixma, Titia K; Choudhary, Chunaram; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2015-11-19

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions that trigger non-proteolytic ubiquitylation of adjacent chromatin areas to generate binding sites for DNA repair factors. This depends on the sequential actions of the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168 (refs 1-6), and UBC13 (also known as UBE2N), an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme that specifically generates K63-linked ubiquitin chains. Whereas RNF168 is known to catalyse ubiquitylation of H2A-type histones, leading to the recruitment of repair factors such as 53BP1 (refs 8-10), the critical substrates of RNF8 and K63-linked ubiquitylation remain elusive. Here we elucidate how RNF8 and UBC13 promote recruitment of RNF168 and downstream factors to DSB sites in human cells. We establish that UBC13-dependent K63-linked ubiquitylation at DSB sites is predominantly mediated by RNF8 but not RNF168, and that H1-type linker histones, but not core histones, represent major chromatin-associated targets of this modification. The RNF168 module (UDM1) recognizing RNF8-generated ubiquitylations is a high-affinity reader of K63-ubiquitylated H1, mechanistically explaining the essential roles of RNF8 and UBC13 in recruiting RNF168 to DSBs. Consistently, reduced expression or chromatin association of linker histones impair accumulation of K63-linked ubiquitin conjugates and repair factors at DSB-flanking chromatin. These results identify histone H1 as a key target of RNF8-UBC13 in DSB signalling and expand the concept of the histone code by showing that posttranslational modifications of linker histones can serve as important marks for recognition by factors involved in genome stability maintenance, and possibly beyond.

  15. Expanding the Reader Landscape of Histone Acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abid; Bridgers, Joseph B; Strahl, Brian D

    2017-04-04

    In this issue of Structure,Klein et al. (2017) expand our understanding of what reader domains bind to by showing that MORF, a double PHD domain containing lysine acetyltransferase, is a preferential reader of histone lysine acylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Specific /sup 3/H-DMCM binding to a non-benzodiazepine binding site after silver ion treatment of rat brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honore, T.; Nielsen, M.; Braestrup, C.

    1984-11-26

    Specific binding of the BZ-receptor ligand /sup 3/H-DMCM to rat cortical membranes was dramatically enhanced by preincubation of the homogenate with 0.1 mM silver (Ag/sup +/) nitrate. The binding was completely inhibited by midazolam. Nevertheless, the pharmacological specificity of the Ag/sup +/-enhanced /sup 3/H-DMCM binding was different from that of BZ-receptors. Furthermore, the B/sub max/ value, the regional distribution and the molecular target size determined by radiation inactivation analysis of the Ag/sup +/-enhanced binding site were different from those of BZ-receptors. The results indicate that Ag/sup +/-enhanced /sup 3/H-DMCM binding represent a high affinity metal complex formation between /sup 3/H-DMCM and an unknown brain specific protein of approximately 100,000 daltons molecular weight. 11 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  17. The PickPocket method for predicting binding specificities for receptors based on receptor pocket similarities: application to MHC-peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    exist, making determination of the binding specificity for each variant experimentally infeasible. Here, we present a method that can extrapolate from variants with known binding specificity to those where no experimental data are available. Results: For each position in the peptide ligand, we extracted...... of the specificities of MHC molecules in this library weighted by the similarity of their pocket-residues to the query. This PickPocket method is demonstrated to accurately predict MHC-peptide binding for a broad range of MHC alleles, including human and non-human species. In contrast to neural network-based pan......-specific methods, PickPocket was shown to be robust both when data is scarce and when the similarity to MHC molecules with characterized binding specificity is low. A consensus method combining the PickPocket and NetMHCpan methods was shown to achieve superior predictive performance. This study demonstrates how...

  18. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-05-31

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1 and -2, respectively), and their receptors (IR and IGF-1R) are the key elements of a complex hormonal system that is essential for the development and functioning of humans. The C and D domains of IGFs (absent in insulin) likely play important roles in the differential binding of IGF-1 and -2 to IGF-1R and to the isoforms of IR (IR-A and IR-B) and specific activation of these receptors. Here, we attempted to probe the impact of IGF-1 and IGF-2 D domains (DI and DII, respectively) and the IGF-2 C domain (CII) on the receptor specificity of these hormones. For this, we made two types of insulin hybrid analogues: (i) with the C-terminus of the insulin A chain extended by the amino acids from the DI and DII domains and (ii) with the C-terminus of the insulin B chain extended by some amino acids derived from the CII domain. The receptor binding affinities of these analogues and their receptor autophosphorylation potentials were characterized. Our results indicate that the DI domain has a more negative impact than the DII domain does on binding to IR, and that the DI domain Pro-Leu-Lys residues are important factors for a different IR-A versus IR-B binding affinity of IGF-1. We also showed that the additions of amino acids that partially "mimic" the CII domain, to the C-terminus of the insulin B chain, change the binding and autophosphorylation specificity of insulin in favor of the "metabolic" IR-B isoform. This opens new venues for rational enhancement of insulin IR-B specificity by modifications beyond the C-terminus of its B chain.

  19. Histone variants and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghesan, Michela; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Oben, Jude; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    Within nucleosomes, canonical histones package the genome, but they can be opportunely replaced with histone variants. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome is a chief cellular strategy to regulate transcription and cellular metabolism. In pathological terms, cellular steatosis

  20. The chromodomain-containing histone acetyltransferase TIP60 acts as a code reader, recognizing the epigenetic codes for initiating transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong; Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Seo, Sang-Beom; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    TIP60 can act as a transcriptional activator or a repressor depending on the cellular context. However, little is known about the role of the chromodomain in the functional regulation of TIP60. In this study, we found that TIP60 interacted with H3K4me3 in response to TNF-α signaling. TIP60 bound to H3K4me3 at the promoters of the NF-κB target genes IL6 and IL8. Unlike the wild-type protein, a TIP60 chromodomain mutant did not localize to chromatin regions. Because TIP60 binds to histones with specific modifications and transcriptional regulators, we used a histone peptide assay to identify histone codes recognized by TIP60. TIP60 preferentially interacted with methylated or acetylated histone H3 and H4 peptides. Phosphorylation near a lysine residue significantly reduced the affinity of TIP60 for the modified histone peptides. Our findings suggest that TIP60 acts as a functional link between the histone code and transcriptional regulators.

  1. Measurement of specific [3H]-ouabain binding to different types of human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boon, Arnold; Oh, V M; Taylor, John E.

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the specific binding of [3H]-ouabain to intact mononuclear leucocytes (82% lymphocytes) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes. In both types of cells [3H]-ouabain binding was saturable, confined to a single site of high affinity, slow to reach equilibrium, slow to reverse, temperature...... were expressed per square micron of cell surface area the difference between the two cell types was proportionately greater (83 and 186 sites per micron 2 respectively). We conclude that the [3H]-ouabain binding sites on mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leucocytes are similar in nature, but different...... in both number and density on the cell surface. Measurements of Bmax in mixed cell populations should therefore take account of cell type as well as cell size and number....

  2. Displacement of specific serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide binding by Ergalgin, a new antiserotonin drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelszner, W

    1980-01-01

    [3H]-serotonin and [3H]-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) bind with a high affinity, KD = 12 nM and 6 nM, respectively, to distinct receptors of rat caudate membranes in vitro. Displacement experiments with unlabeled serotonin and LSD support the hypothesis of serotonin receptors existing in an agonist and antagonist state. Methysergide and Ergalgin display quite similar potencies in displacing [3H]-serotonin and [3H]-LSD from their specific binding sites (Ki = 46,7 and 53,4 nM; 22,3 and 36,5 nM, respectively). Contrary to pharmacological findings these binding results are in favour of mixed agonist/antagonist properties of these compounds.

  3. Enhancement of damage-specific DNA binding of XPA by interaction with the ERCC1 DNA repair protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nagai; M. Saijo (Masafumi); I. Kuraoka; T. Matsuda (Toshiro); N. Kodo (Naohiko); Y. Nakatsu (Yoshimichi); T. Mimaki; M. Mino; M. Biggerstaff (Maureen); R.D. Wood (Richard); A.M. Sijbers (Anneke); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Tanaka (Kiyoji)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe human XPA and ERCC1 proteins, which are involved in early steps of nucleotide excision repair of DNA, specifically interacted in an in vitro binding assay and a yeast two-hybrid assay. A stretch of consecutive glutamic acid residues in XPA was needed for binding to ERCC1. Binding of

  4. Repeated methamphetamine and modafinil induce differential cognitive effects and specific histone acetylation and DNA methylation profiles in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Betina; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Gomez, Natalia; Torres, Oscar V; Sosa, Máximo H; Bernardi, Alejandra; Urbano, Francisco J; García-Rill, Edgar; Cadet, Jean-Lud; Bisagno, Verónica

    2017-12-13

    Methamphetamine (METH) and modafinil are psychostimulants with different long-term cognitive profiles: METH is addictive and leads to cognitive decline, whereas modafinil has little abuse liability and is a cognitive enhancer. Increasing evidence implicates epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation behind the lasting changes that drugs of abuse and other psychotropic compounds induce in the brain, like the control of gene expression by histones 3 and 4 tails acetylation (H3ac and H4ac) and DNA cytosine methylation (5-mC). Mice were treated with a seven-day repeated METH, modafinil or vehicle protocol and evaluated in the novel object recognition (NOR) test or sacrificed 4days after last injection for molecular assays. We evaluated total H3ac, H4ac and 5-mC levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), H3ac and H4ac promotor enrichment (ChIP) and mRNA expression (RT-PCR) of neurotransmitter systems involved in arousal, wakefulness and cognitive control, like dopaminergic (Drd1 and Drd2), α-adrenergic (Adra1a and Adra1b), orexinergic (Hcrtr1 and Hcrtr2), histaminergic (Hrh1 and Hrh3) and glutamatergic (AMPA Gria1 and NMDA Grin1) receptors. Repeated METH and modafinil treatment elicited different cognitive outcomes in the NOR test, where modafinil-treated mice performed as controls and METH-treated mice showed impaired recognition memory. METH-treated mice also showed i) decreased levels of total H3ac and H4ac, and increased levels of 5-mC, ii) decreased H3ac enrichment at promoters of Drd2, Hcrtr1/2, Hrh1 and Grin1, and increased H4ac enrichment at Drd1, Hrh1 and Grin1, iii) increased mRNA of Drd1a, Grin1 and Gria1. Modafinil-treated mice shared none of these effects and showed increased H3ac enrichment and mRNA expression at Adra1b. Modafinil and METH showed similar effects linked to decreased H3ac in Hrh3, increased H4ac in Hcrtr1, and decreased mRNA expression of Hcrtr2. The specific METH-induced epigenetic and transcriptional changes described here may be

  5. Histone deacetylases (HDACs and brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude-Henry Volmar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of gene expression is a constant and necessary event for mammalian brain function. An important way of regulating gene expression is through the remodeling of chromatin, the complex of DNA, and histone proteins around which DNA wraps. The “histone code hypothesis” places histone post-translational modifications as a significant part of chromatin remodeling to regulate transcriptional activity. Acetylation of histones by histone acetyl transferases and deacetylation by histone deacetylases (HDACs at lysine residues are the most studied histone post-translational modifications in cognition and neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we review the literature regarding the role of HDACs in brain function. Among the roles of HDACs in the brain, studies show that they participate in glial lineage development, learning and memory, neuropsychiatric diseases, and even rare neurologic diseases. Most HDACs can be targeted with small molecules. However, additional brain-penetrant specific inhibitors with high central nervous system exposure are needed to determine the cause-and-effect relationship between individual HDACs and brain-associated diseases.

  6. Histone H3.3 Mutations: A Variant Path to Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, Benjamin T.K.; Knoepfler, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    A host of cancer types exhibit aberrant histone modifications. Recently, distinct and recurrent mutations in a specific histone variant, histone H3.3, have been implicated in a high proportion of malignant pediatric brain cancers. The presence of mutant H3.3 histone disrupts epigenetic post-translational modifications near genes involved in cancer processes and in brain function. Here, we propose several possible mechanisms by which mutant H3.3 histones may act to promote tumorigenesis. Furth...

  7. The fine specificity of mannose-binding and galactose-binding lectins revealed using outlier motif analysis of glycan array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Kevin A; Liden, Daniel; Haab, Brian B

    2012-01-01

    Glycan-binding proteins are commonly used as analytical reagents to detect the levels of specific glycan structures in biological samples. A detailed knowledge of the specificities of glycan-binding proteins is required for properly interpreting their binding data. A powerful technology for characterizing glycan-binding specificity is the glycan array. However, the interpretation of glycan-array data can be difficult due to the complex fine specificities of certain glycan-binding proteins. We developed a systematic approach, called outlier-motif analysis, for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data, and we applied the method to the study of four commonly used lectins: two mannose binders (concanavalin A and Lens culinaris) and two galactose binders (Bauhinia purpurea and peanut agglutinin). The study confirmed the known, primary specificity of each lectin and also revealed new insights into their binding preferences. Lens culinaris's main specificity may be non-terminal, α-linked mannose with a single linkage at its 2' carbon, which is more restricted than previous definitions. We found broader specificity for bauhinea purpurea (BPL) than previously reported, showing that BPL can bind terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and penultimate β-linked galactose under certain limitations. Peanut agglutinin may bind terminal Galβ1,3Gal, a glycolipid motif, in addition to terminal Galβ1,3GalNAc, a common O-linked glycoprotein motif. These results could be used to more accurately interpret data obtained using these well-studied lectins. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a systematic and general approach for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data.

  8. SnapShot: histone modifications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, He; Sabari, Benjamin R; Garcia, Benjamin A; Allis, C David; Zhao, Yingming

    2014-01-01

    Histone proteins are decorated by a variety of protein posttranslational modifications called histone marks that modulate chromatin structure and function, contributing to the cellular gene expression program...

  9. Development of recombinant Aleuria aurantia lectins with altered binding specificities to fucosylated glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Patrick R; Mackay, Andrew; Vong, Minh; DeSa, Johann; Lamontagne, Anne; Comunale, Mary Ann; Hafner, Julie; Block, Timothy; Lec, Ryszard; Mehta, Anand

    2011-10-14

    Changes in glycosylation have long been associated with disease. While there are many methods to detect changes in glycosylation, plant derived lectins are often used to determine changes on specific proteins or molecules of interest. One change in glycosylation that has been observed by us and by others is a disease or antigen associated increase in fucosylation on N-linked glycans. To measure this change, the fucose binding Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) is often utilized in plate and solution based assays. AAL is a mushroom derived lectin that contains five fucose binding sites that preferentially bind fucose linked (α-1,3, α-1,2, α-,4, and α-1,6) to N-acetyllactosamine related structures. Recently, several reports by us and by others have indicated that specific fucose linkages found on certain serum biomarker glycoprotein's are more associated with disease than others. Taking a site-directed mutagenesis approach, we have created a set of recombinant AAL proteins that display altered binding affinities to different analytes containing various fucose linkages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Binding of angiogenesis inhibitor kringle 5 to its specific ligands by frontal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liujiao; Li, Qian; Ji, Xu

    2015-07-03

    The interactions between angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 and its five specific ligands were investigated by frontal affinity chromatography in combination with fluorescence spectra and site-directed molecular docking. The binding constants of trans-4-(aminomethyl) cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCHA), epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA), benzylamine, 7-aminoheptanoic acid (7-AHA) and L-lysine to Kringle 5 were 19.0×10(3), 7.97×10(3), 6.45×10(3), 6.07×10(3) and 4.04×10(3) L/mol, respectively. The five ligands bound to Kringle 5 on the lysine binding site in equimolar amounts, which was pushed mainly by hydrogen bond and Van der Waals force. This binding affinity was believed to be dependent on the functional group and flexible feature in ligands. This study will provide an important insight into the binding mechanism of angiogenesis inhibitor Kringle 5 to its specific ligands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of sequence variation underlying tissue-specific transcription factor binding and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Karen M; De Gobbi, Marco; Hughes, Jim R; Derry, Christopher J; Ayyub, Helena; Sloane-Stanley, Jacqueline A; Vernimmen, Douglas; Garrick, David; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R

    2013-08-01

    Although mutations causing monogenic disorders most frequently lie within the affected gene, sequence variation in complex disorders is more commonly found in noncoding regions. Furthermore, recent genome- wide studies have shown that common DNA sequence variants in noncoding regions are associated with "normal" variation in gene expression resulting in cell-specific and/or allele-specific differences. The mechanism by which such sequence variation causes changes in gene expression is largely unknown. We have addressed this by studying natural variation in the binding of key transcription factors (TFs) in the well-defined, purified cell system of erythropoiesis. We have shown that common polymorphisms frequently directly perturb the binding sites of key TFs, and detailed analysis shows how this causes considerable (~10-fold) changes in expression from a single allele in a tissue-specific manner. We also show how a SNP, located at some distance from the recognized TF binding site, may affect the recruitment of a large multiprotein complex and alter the associated chromatin modification of the variant regulatory element. This study illustrates the principles by which common sequence variation may cause changes in tissue-specific gene expression, and suggests that such variation may underlie an individual's propensity to develop complex human genetic diseases. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  12. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G

    2015-12-09

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1.

  13. A quantitative investigation of linker histone interactions with nucleosomes and chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alison E.; Hieb, Aaron R.; Luger, Karolin

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones such as H1 are abundant basic proteins that bind tightly to nucleosomes, thereby acting as key organizers of chromatin structure. The molecular details of linker histone interactions with the nucleosome, and in particular the contributions of linker DNA and of the basic C-terminal tail of H1, are controversial. Here we combine rigorous solution-state binding assays with native gel electrophoresis and Atomic Force Microscopy, to quantify the interaction of H1 with chromatin. We find that H1 binds nucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays with very tight affinity by recognizing a specific DNA geometry minimally consisting of a solitary nucleosome with a single ~18 base pair DNA linker arm. The association of H1 alters the conformation of trinucleosomes so that only one H1 can bind to the two available linker DNA regions. Neither incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z, nor the presence of neighboring nucleosomes affects H1 affinity. Our data provide a comprehensive thermodynamic framework for this ubiquitous chromatin architectural protein. PMID:26750377

  14. EO-199, a specific antagonist of antiarrhythmic drugs: Assessment by binding experiments and in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, E.; Harel, G.; Lipinsky, D.; Sarne, Y. (Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1991-01-01

    EO-199, a demethylated analog of the novel class I antiarrhythmic drug EO-122 was found to antagonize the antiarrhythmic activity of EO-122 and that of procainamide (Class I{sub A}). EO-199 did not block significantly the activity of a class I{sub B} antiarrhythmic agent, lidocaine. EO-199 also displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)EO-122 to rate heart membranes similarly to procainamide whereas lidocaine did not. The correlation between binding experiments and pharmacological effects points to a possible subclassification of these drugs; the two chemical analogs EO-199 and EO-122, as well as procainamide (I{sub A}) but not lidocaine (I{sub B}), compete at the same site or the same state of the sodium channel. The availability of a specific antagonist might be useful for studying the mechanism of action of antiarrhythmic drugs as well as an antidote in cases of antiarrhythmics overdose intoxication.

  15. Accurate pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC class II binding affinity with improved binding core identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    by T helper lymphocytes. NetMHCIIpan is a state-of-the-art method for the quantitative prediction of peptide binding to any human or mouse MHC class II molecule of known sequence. In this paper, we describe an updated version of the method with improved peptide binding register identification. Binding...... with known binding registers, the new method NetMHCIIpan-3.1 significantly outperformed the earlier 3.0 version. We illustrate the impact of accurate binding core identification for the interpretation of T cell cross-reactivity using tetramer double staining with a CMV epitope and its variants mapped...... to the epitope binding core. NetMHCIIpan is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.1....

  16. Identification of Specific Hydroxyapatite {001} Binding Heptapeptide by Phage Display and Its Nucleation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Mao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With recent developments of molecular biomimetics that combine genetic engineering and nanotechnology, peptides can be genetically engineered to bind specifically to inorganic components and execute the task of collagen matrix proteins. In this study, using biogenous tooth enamel as binding substrate, we identified a new heptapeptide (enamel high-affinity binding peptide, EHBP from linear 7-mer peptide phage display library. Through the output/input affinity test, it was found that EHBP has the highest affinity to enamel with an output/input ratio of 14.814 × 10−7, while a random peptide (RP displayed much lower output/input ratio of 0.00035 × 10−7. This binding affinity was also verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis. It was found that EHBP absorbing onto the enamel surface exhibits highest normalized fluorescence intensity (5.6 ± 1.2, comparing to the intensity of EHBP to enamel longitudinal section (1.5 ± 0.9 (p < 0.05 as well as to the intensity of a low-affinity binding peptide (ELBP to enamel (1.5 ± 0.5 (p < 0.05. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Attenuated total Reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD studies further confirmed that crystallized hydroxyapatite were precipitated in the mineralization solution containing EHBP. To better understand the nucleation effect of EHBP, EHBP was further investigated on its interaction with calcium phosphate clusters through in vitro mineralization model. The calcium and phosphate ion consumption as well as zeta potential survey revealed that EHBP might previously adsorb to phosphate (PO43− groups and then initiate the precipitation of calcium and phosphate groups. This study not only proved the electrostatic interaction of phosphate group and the genetically engineering solid-binding peptide, but also provided a novel nucleation motif for potential applications in guided hard tissue biomineralization and

  17. Structure-Based Design of a New Scaffold for Cell-Penetrating Peptidic Inhibitors of the Histone Demethylase PHF8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorosz, Jerzy; Olsen, Lars; Seger, Signe Teuber

    2017-01-01

    The histone demethylase PHF8 catalyzes demethylation of mono- and di-methylated Lys9 on histone H3 (H3K9me1/2), and is a transcriptional activator involved in the development and cancer. Affinity and specificity of PHF8 towards H3K9me2 is affected by interaction with both the catalytic domain...... and a PHD reader domain. The latter specifically recognizes tri-methylated Ly4 on histone H3. A fragment of the histone H3 tail with tri-methylated Lys4 was used as a template for the structure-based design of a cyclic, cell-penetrating peptide that exhibits micromolar binding affinity to PHF8...... in biochemical assays. The inhibitor has significantly lower affinity towards KDM2 enzymes (the phylogenetically closest subfamily), and to KDM3 and KDM6 subfamilies. Selectivity is only marginal towards an enzyme from the KDM4 family, which shares histone tail specificity with PHF8. It is a substrate of KDM5B...

  18. Subfamily-specific adaptations in the structures of two penicillin-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil M Prigozhin

    Full Text Available Beta-lactam antibiotics target penicillin-binding proteins including several enzyme classes essential for bacterial cell-wall homeostasis. To better understand the functional and inhibitor-binding specificities of penicillin-binding proteins from the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we carried out structural and phylogenetic analysis of two predicted D,D-carboxypeptidases, Rv2911 and Rv3330. Optimization of Rv2911 for crystallization using directed evolution and the GFP folding reporter method yielded a soluble quadruple mutant. Structures of optimized Rv2911 bound to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Rv3330 bound to meropenem show that, in contrast to the nonspecific inhibitor, meropenem forms an extended interaction with the enzyme along a conserved surface. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Rv2911 and Rv3330 belong to different clades that emerged in Actinobacteria and are not represented in model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Clade-specific adaptations allow these enzymes to fulfill distinct physiological roles despite strict conservation of core catalytic residues. The characteristic differences include potential protein-protein interaction surfaces and specificity-determining residues surrounding the catalytic site. Overall, these structural insights lay the groundwork to develop improved beta-lactam therapeutics for tuberculosis.

  19. DNA-binding specificities of plant transcription factors and their potential to define target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; López-Vidriero, Irene; Carrasco, José L; Godoy, Marta; Vera, Pablo; Solano, Roberto

    2014-02-11

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression through binding to cis-regulatory specific sequences in the promoters of their target genes. In contrast to the genetic code, the transcriptional regulatory code is far from being deciphered and is determined by sequence specificity of TFs, combinatorial cooperation between TFs and chromatin competence. Here we addressed one of these determinants by characterizing the target sequence specificity of 63 plant TFs representing 25 families, using protein-binding microarrays. Remarkably, almost half of these TFs recognized secondary motifs, which in some cases were completely unrelated to the primary element. Analyses of coregulated genes and transcriptomic data from TFs mutants showed the functional significance of over 80% of all identified sequences and of at least one target sequence per TF. Moreover, combining the target sequence information with coexpression analysis we could predict the function of a TF as activator or repressor through a particular DNA sequence. Our data support the correlation between cis-regulatory elements and the sequence determined in vitro using the protein-binding microarray and provides a framework to explore regulatory networks in plants.

  20. The emerging functions of histone demethylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Karl; Christensen, Jesper; Cloos, Paul Ac

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic information refers to heritable changes in gene function that are stable between cell divisions but which is not a result of changes in the DNA sequence. Part of the epigenetic mechanism has been ascribed to modifications of histones or DNA that affects the transcription of specific...... genes. In this context, post-translational modifications of histone tails, in particular methylation of lysines, are regarded as important for the storage of epigenetic information. Regulation of this information plays an important role during cellular differentiation where cells with different....... The recent identification of proteins with histone demethylase activity has shown that the methylated mark is much more dynamic than previously anticipated, thereby potentially challenging the concept of histone-methylation in stable epigenetic programming....

  1. Cooperative and specific binding of Vif to the 5' region of HIV-1 genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Simon; Richer, Delphine; Bernacchi, Serena; Decroly, Etienne; Vigne, Robert; Ehresmann, Bernard; Ehresmann, Chantal; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2005-11-18

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is essential for viral replication in vivo. Packaging of Vif into viral particles is mediated by an interaction with viral genomic RNA and association with viral nucleoprotein complexes. Despite recent findings on the RNA-binding properties of Vif suggesting that Vif could be involved in retroviral assembly, no RNA sequence or structure specificity has been determined so far. To gain further insight into the mechanisms by which Vif might regulate viral replication, we studied the interactions of Vif with HIV-1 genomic RNA in vitro. Using extensive biochemical analysis, we have measured the affinity of recombinant Vif proteins for synthetic RNAs corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. We found that recombinant Vif proteins bind specifically to HIV-1 viral RNA fragments corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), gag and the 5' part of pol (K(d) between 45 nM and 65 nM). RNA encompassing nucleotides 1-497 or 499-996 of the HIV-1 genomic RNA bind 9+/-2 and 21+/-3 Vif molecules, respectively, and at least some of these proteins bind in a cooperative manner (Hill constant alpha(H) = 2.3). In contrast, RNAs corresponding to other parts of the HIV-1 genome or heterologous RNAs showed poor binding capacity and weak cooperativity (K(d) > 200 nM). Moreover, RNase T1 footprinting revealed a hierarchical binding of Vif, pointing to TAR and the poly(A) stem-loop structures as primary strong affinity targets, and downstream structures as secondary sites with moderate affinity. Taken together, our findings suggest that Vif may assist other proteins to maintain a correct folding of the genomic RNA in order to facilitate its packaging and further steps such as reverse transcription. Interestingly, our results suggest also that Vif could bind the viral RNA in order to protect it from the action of the antiviral factor APOBEC-3G/3F.

  2. Crucial Roles of Single Residues in Binding Affinity, Specificity, and Promiscuity in the Cellulosomal Cohesin-Dockerin Interface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutzki, Michal; Reshef, Dan; Barak, Yoav; Haimovitz, Rachel; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cohesin and dockerin modules play a crucial role in the assembly of multienzyme cellulosome complexes. Although intraspecies cohesin and dockerin modules bind in general with high affinity but indiscriminately, cross-species binding is rare. Here, we combined ELISA-based experiments with Rosetta-based computational design to evaluate the contribution of distinct residues at the Clostridium thermocellum cohesin-dockerin interface to binding affinity, specificity, and promiscuity. We found that single mutations can show distinct and significant effects on binding affinity and specificity. In particular, mutations at cohesin position Asn37 show dramatic variability in their effect on dockerin binding affinity and specificity: the N37A mutant binds promiscuously both to cognate (C. thermocellum) as well as to non-cognate Clostridium cellulolyticum dockerin. N37L in turn switches binding specificity: compared with the wild-type C. thermocellum cohesin, this mutant shows significantly increased preference for C. cellulolyticum dockerin combined with strongly reduced binding to its cognate C. thermocellum dockerin. The observation that a single mutation can overcome the naturally observed specificity barrier provides insights into the evolutionary dynamics of this system that allows rapid modulation of binding specificity within a high affinity background. PMID:25833947

  3. Specific binding sites for alcohols and anesthetics on ligand-gated ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Maria Paola; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2000-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels are a target for inhaled anesthetics and alcohols in the central nervous system. The inhibitory strychnine-sensitive glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors are positively modulated by anesthetics and alcohols, and site-directed mutagenesis techniques have identified amino acid residues important for the action of volatile anesthetics and alcohols in these receptors. A key question is whether these amino acids are part of an alcohol/anesthetic-binding site. In the present study, we used an alkanethiol anesthetic to covalently label its binding site by mutating selected amino acids to cysteine. We demonstrated that the anesthetic propanethiol, or alternatively, propyl methanethiosulfonate, covalently binds to cysteine residues introduced into a specific second transmembrane site in glycine receptor and γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor subunits and irreversibly enhances receptor function. Moreover, upon permanent occupation of the site by propyl disulfide, the usual ability of octanol, enflurane, and isoflurane to potentiate the function of the ion channels was lost. This approach provides strong evidence that the actions of anesthetics in these receptors are due to binding at a single site. PMID:10908659

  4. Structure of P-Glycoprotein Reveals a Molecular Basis for Poly-Specific Drug Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Stephen G.; Yu, Jodie; Ward, Andrew; Weng, Yue; Chittaboina, Srinivas; Zhuo, Rupeng; Harrell, Patina M.; Trinh, Yenphuong T.; Zhang, Qinghai; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Chang, Geoffrey; (Scripps); (TTU)

    2009-04-22

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) detoxifies cells by exporting hundreds of chemically unrelated toxins but has been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR) in the treatment of cancers. Substrate promiscuity is a hallmark of P-gp activity, thus a structural description of poly-specific drug-binding is important for the rational design of anticancer drugs and MDR inhibitors. The x-ray structure of apo P-gp at 3.8 angstroms reveals an internal cavity of -6000 angstroms cubed with a 30 angstrom separation of the two nucleotide-binding domains. Two additional P-gp structures with cyclic peptide inhibitors demonstrate distinct drug-binding sites in the internal cavity capable of stereoselectivity that is based on hydrophobic and aromatic interactions. Apo and drug-bound P-gp structures have portals open to the cytoplasm and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer for drug entry. The inward-facing conformation represents an initial stage of the transport cycle that is competent for drug binding.

  5. Tb3+-cleavage assays reveal specific Mg2+ binding sites necessary to pre-fold the btuB riboswitch for AdoCbl binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Pallavi K.; Gallo, Sofia; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2017-03-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that bind specific metabolites in order to regulate the gene expression involved in controlling the cellular concentration of the respective molecule or ion. Ligand recognition is mostly facilitated by Mg2+ mediated pre-organization of the riboswitch to an active tertiary fold. To predict these specific Mg2+ induced tertiary interactions of the btuB riboswitch from E. coli, we here report Mg2+ binding pockets in its aptameric part in both, the ligand-free and the ligand-bound form. An ensemble of weak and strong metal ion binding sites distributed over the entire aptamer was detected by terbium(III) cleavage assays, Tb3+ being an established Mg2+ mimic. Interestingly many of the Mn+ (n = 2 or 3) binding sites involve conserved bases within the class of coenzyme B12-binding riboswitches. Comparison with the published crystal structure of the coenzyme B12 riboswitch of S. thermophilum aided in identifying a common set of Mn+ binding sites that might be crucial for tertiary interactions involved in the organization of the aptamer. Our results suggest that Mn+ binding at strategic locations of the btuB riboswitch indeed facilitates the assembly of the binding pocket needed for ligand recognition. Binding of the specific ligand, coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl), to the btuB aptamer does however not lead to drastic alterations of these Mn+ binding cores, indicating the lack of a major rearrangement within the three-dimensional structure of the RNA. This finding is strengthened by Tb3+ mediated footprints of the riboswitch's structure in its ligand-free and ligand-bound state indicating that AdoCbl indeed induces local changes rather than a global structural rearrangement.

  6. Identification of fluorescent compounds with non-specific binding property via high throughput live cell microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Nath

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. METHOD: Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. RESULTS: The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. CONCLUSION: We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented.

  7. Role of Histone Acetylation in Cell Cycle Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprinarova, Miglena; Schnekenburger, Michael; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Core histone acetylation is a key prerequisite for chromatin decondensation and plays a pivotal role in regulation of chromatin structure, function and dynamics. The addition of acetyl groups disturbs histone/DNA interactions in the nucleosome and alters histone/histone interactions in the same or adjacent nucleosomes. Acetyl groups can also provide binding sites for recruitment of bromodomain (BRD)-containing non-histone readers and regulatory complexes to chromatin allowing them to perform distinct downstream functions. The presence of a particular acetylation pattern influences appearance of other histone modifications in the immediate vicinity forming the "histone code". Although the roles of the acetylation of particular lysine residues for the ongoing chromatin functions is largely studied, the epigenetic inheritance of histone acetylation is a debated issue. The dynamics of local or global histone acetylation is associated with fundamental cellular processes such as gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair or chromatin condensation. Therefore, it is an essential part of the epigenetic cell response to processes related to internal and external signals.

  8. Mutations in the substrate binding site of human heat-shock protein 70 indicate specific interaction with HLA-DR outside the peptide binding groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Karin M; Haug, Markus; Schwörer, Daniela; Kalbacher, Hubert; Holzer, Ursula

    2014-06-01

    Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70)-peptide complexes are involved in MHC class I- and II-restricted antigen presentation, enabling enhanced activation of T cells. As shown previously, mammalian cytosolic Hsp70 (Hsc70) molecules interact specifically with HLA-DR molecules. This interaction might be of significance as Hsp70 molecules could transfer bound antigenic peptides in a ternary complex into the binding groove of HLA-DR molecules. The present study provides new insights into the distinct interaction of Hsp70 with HLA-DR molecules. Using a quantitative binding assay, it could be demonstrated that a point mutation of amino acids alanine 406 and valine 438 in the substrate binding pocket led to reduced peptide binding compared with the wild-type Hsp70 whereas HLA-DR binding remains unaffected. The removal of the C-terminal lid neither altered the substrate binding capacity nor the Hsp70 binding characteristics to HLA-DR. A truncated variant lacking the nucleotide binding domain showed no binding interactions with HLA-DR. Furthermore, the truncated ATPase subunit of constitutively expressed Hsc70 revealed similar binding affinities to HLA-DR compared with the complete Hsc70. Hence, it can be assumed that the Hsp70-HLA-DR interaction takes place outside the peptide binding groove and is attributed to the ATPase domain of HSP70 molecules. The Hsp70-chaperoned peptides might thereby be directly transferred into the binding groove of HLA-DR, so enabling enhanced presentation of the peptide on antigen-presenting cells and leading to an improved proliferation of responding T cells as shown previously. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Chromatin accessibility, p300, and histone acetylation define PML-RARalpha and AML1-ETO binding sites in acute myeloid leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, S.; Logie, C.; Francoijs, K.J.; Frige, G.; Romanenghi, M.; Nielsen, F.G.G.; Raats, L.; Shahhoseini, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Altucci, L.; Minucci, S.; Martens, J.H.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility plays a key role in regulating cell type specific gene expression during hematopoiesis but has also been suggested to be aberrantly regulated during leukemogenesis. To understand the leukemogenic chromatin signature, we analyzed acute promyelocytic leukemia, a subtype of

  10. Determination of histone acetylation status by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, Luciano; Moon, John; Vancura, Ales

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation is the most studied posttranslation modification of nucleosomes. Understanding the mechanisms involved in global and promoter-specific histone acetylation will shed light on the control of transcriptional regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation is a powerful technique to study protein-DNA interactions in vivo. Proteins and DNA are cross-linked with formaldehyde, cells are lysed, and DNA is sheared by sonication. Protein-DNA complexes are immunoprecipitated with antibodies specific for total and acetylated histones and the relative occupancy of acetylated and total histones at selected loci is assessed by real-time PCR of the purified DNA.

  11. Production and Purification of Antibodies Against Histone Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, Benoit; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wurtele, Hugo; Verreault, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies that recognize specific histone modifications are invaluable tools to study chromatin structure and function. There are numerous commercially available antibodies that recognize a remarkable diversity of histone modifications. Unfortunately, many of them fail to work in certain applications or lack the high degree of specificity required of these reagents. The production of affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against histone modifications demands a little effort but, in return, provides extremely valuable tools that overcome many of the concerns and limitations of commercial antibodies. We present a series of protocols and guidelines for the production and use of large amounts of polyclonal antibodies that recognize modifications of canonical histones. Our protocols can be applied to obtain antibodies that occur in histone variants and proteins other than histones. In addition, some of our protocols are compatible with the production of monoclonal or recombinant antibodies.

  12. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kold, David; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne K; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Turkenburg, Johan P; Nielsen, Anders D; Koldsø, Heidi; Petersen, Evamaria; Schiøtt, Birgit; De Maria, Leonardo; Wilson, Keith S; Svendsen, Allan; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds a single SDS molecule under nondenaturing concentrations. Protein interaction with SDS was investigated by NMR, ITC and molecular dynamics simulations. The NMR resonances of the protein were assigned, with large stretches of the protein molecule not showing any detectable resonances. SDS is shown to specifically interact with the loops surrounding the catalytic triad with medium affinity (Ka ≈ 105 M−1). The mode of binding is closely similar to that seen previously for binding of amphiphilic molecules and substrate analogues to cutinases, and hence SDS acts as a substrate mimic. In addition, the structure of the enzyme has been solved by X-ray crystallography in its apo form and after cocrystallization with diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DNPP) leading to a complex with monoethylphosphate (MEP) esterified to the catalytically active serine. The enzyme has the same fold as reported for other cutinases but, unexpectedly, esterification of the active site serine is accompanied by the ethylation of the active site histidine which flips out from its usual position in the triad. PMID:24832484

  13. Halenaquinone, a chemical compound that specifically inhibits the secondary DNA binding of RAD51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Motoki; Kainuma, Takashi; Ishida-Takaku, Takako; Ishigami, Shintaro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tashiro, Satoshi; van Soest, Rob W M; Nakao, Yoichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-04-01

    Mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms affecting RAD51 gene function have been identified in several tumors, suggesting that the inappropriate expression of RAD51 activity may cause tumorigenesis. RAD51 is an essential enzyme for the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) of DNA double-strand breaks. In the HRR pathway, RAD51 catalyzes the homologous pairing between single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which is the central step of the HRR pathway. To identify a chemical compound that regulates the homologous-pairing activity of RAD51, in the present study, we screened crude extract fractions from marine sponges by the RAD51-mediated homologous-pairing assay. Halenaquinone was identified as an inhibitor of the RAD51 homologous-pairing activity. A surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that halenaquinone directly bound to RAD51. Intriguingly, halenaquinone specifically inhibited dsDNA binding by RAD51 alone or the RAD51-ssDNA complex, but only weakly affected the RAD51-ssDNA binding. In vivo, halenaquinone significantly inhibited the retention of RAD51 at double-strand break sites. Therefore, halenaquinone is a novel type of RAD51 inhibitor that specifically inhibits the RAD51-dsDNA binding. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Biochemical Analysis Reveals the Multifactorial Mechanism of Histone H3 Clipping by Chicken Liver Histone H3 Protease

    KAUST Repository

    Chauhan, Sakshi

    2016-09-02

    Proteolytic clipping of histone H3 has been identified in many organisms. Despite several studies, the mechanism of clipping, the substrate specificity, and the significance of this poorly understood epigenetic mechanism are not clear. We have previously reported histone H3 specific proteolytic clipping and a protein inhibitor in chicken liver. However, the sites of clipping are still not known very well. In this study, we attempt to identify clipping sites in histone H3 and to determine the mechanism of inhibition by stefin B protein, a cysteine protease inhibitor. By employing site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro biochemical assays, we have identified three distinct clipping sites in recombinant human histone H3 and its variants (H3.1, H3.3, and H3t). However, post-translationally modified histones isolated from chicken liver and Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells showed different clipping patterns. Clipping of histone H3 N-terminal tail at three sites occurs in a sequential manner. We have further observed that clipping sites are regulated by the structure of the N-terminal tail as well as the globular domain of histone H3. We also have identified the QVVAG region of stefin B protein to be very crucial for inhibition of the protease activity. Altogether, our comprehensive biochemical studies have revealed three distinct clipping sites in histone H3 and their regulation by the structure of histone H3, histone modifications marks, and stefin B.

  15. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J. (SAIC); (NCI)

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  16. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus.

  17. Specific detection of avidin-biotin binding using liquid crystal droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mashooq; Park, Soo-Young

    2015-03-01

    Poly(acrylicacid-b-4-cynobiphenyl-4'-undecylacrylate) (PAA-b-LCP)-functionalized 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) droplets were made by using microfluidic technique. The PAA chains on the 5CB droplets, were biotinylated, and used to specifically detect avidin-biotin binding at the 5CB/aqueous interface. The avidin-biotin binding was characterized by the configurational change (from radial to bipolar) of the 5CB droplets, as observed through a polarized optical microscope. The maximum biotinylation was obtained by injecting a >100 μg/mL biotin aqueous solution, which enabled a limit of detection of 0.5 μg/mL avidin. This droplet biosensor could specifically detect avidin against other proteins such as bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, hemoglobin, and chymotrypsinogen solutions. Avidin detection with 5CBPAA-biotin droplets having high sensitivity, specificity, and stability demonstrates new applications of the functionalized liquid crystal droplets that can detect specific proteins or other analytes through a ligand/receptor model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro selection of zinc fingers with altered DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, A C; Kim, S H; Wells, J A

    1994-05-17

    We have used random mutagenesis and phage display to alter the DNA-binding specificity of Zif268, a transcription factor that contains three zinc finger domains. Four residues in the helix of finger 1 of Zif268 that potentially mediate DNA binding were identified from an X-ray structure of the Zif268-DNA complex. A library was constructed in which these residues were randomly mutated and the Zif268 variants were fused to a truncated version of the gene III coat protein on the surface of M13 filamentous phage particles. The phage displayed the mutant proteins in a monovalent fashion and were sorted by repeated binding and elution from affinity matrices containing different DNA sequences. When the matrix contained the natural nine base pair operator sequence 5'-GCG-TGG-GCG-3', native-like zinc fingers were isolated. New finger 1 variants were found by sorting with two different operators in which the singly modified triplets, GTG and TCG, replaced the native finger 1 triplet, GCG. Overall, the selected finger 1 variants contained a preponderance of polar residues at the four sites. Interestingly, the net charge of the four residues in any selected finger never derived more that one unit from neutrality despite the fact that about half the variants contained three or four charged residues over the four sites. Measurements of the dissociation constants for two of these purified finger 1 variants by gel-shift assay showed their specificities to vary over a 10-fold range, with the greatest affinity being for the DNA binding site for which they were sorted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Cytotoxic protein from the mushroom Coprinus comatus possesses a unique mode for glycan binding and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peilan; Li, Kunhua; Yang, Guang; Xia, Changqing; Polston, Jane E; Li, Gengnan; Li, Shiwu; Lin, Zhao; Yang, Li-Jun; Bruner, Steven D; Ding, Yousong

    2017-08-22

    Glycans possess significant chemical diversity; glycan binding proteins (GBPs) recognize specific glycans to translate their structures to functions in various physiological and pathological processes. Therefore, the discovery and characterization of novel GBPs and characterization of glycan-GBP interactions are significant to provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention of many diseases. Here, we report the biochemical, functional, and structural characterization of a 130-amino-acid protein, Y3, from the mushroom Coprinus comatus Biochemical studies of recombinant Y3 from a yeast expression system demonstrated the protein is a unique GBP. Additionally, we show that Y3 exhibits selective and potent cytotoxicity toward human T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells compared with a panel of cancer cell lines via inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis. Screening of a glycan array demonstrated GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LDNF) as a specific Y3-binding ligand. To provide a structural basis for function, the crystal structure was solved to a resolution of 1.2 Å, revealing a single-domain αβα-sandwich motif. Two monomers were dimerized to form a large 10-stranded, antiparallel β-sheet flanked by α-helices on each side, representing a unique oligomerization mode among GBPs. A large glycan binding pocket extends into the dimeric interface, and docking of LDNF identified key residues for glycan interactions. Disruption of residues predicted to be involved in LDNF/Y3 interactions resulted in the significant loss of binding to Jurkat T-cells and severely impaired their cytotoxicity. Collectively, these results demonstrate Y3 to be a GBP with selective cytotoxicity toward human T-cell leukemia cells and indicate its potential use in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Med5(Nut1 and Med17(Srb4 are direct targets of mediator histone H4 tail interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongle Liu

    Full Text Available The Mediator complex transmits activation signals from DNA bound transcription factors to the core transcription machinery. In addition to its canonical role in transcriptional activation, recent studies have demonstrated that S. cerevisiae Mediator can interact directly with nucleosomes, and their histone tails. Mutations in Mediator subunits have shown that Mediator and certain chromatin structures mutually impact each other structurally and functionally in vivo. We have taken a UV photo cross-linking approach to further delineate the molecular basis of Mediator chromatin interactions and help determine whether the impact of certain Mediator mutants on chromatin is direct. Specifically, by using histone tail peptides substituted with an amino acid analog that is a UV activatible crosslinker, we have identified specific subunits within Mediator that participate in histone tail interactions. Using Mediator purified from mutant yeast strains we have evaluated the impact of these subunits on histone tail binding. This analysis has identified the Med5 subunit of Mediator as a target for histone tail interactions and suggests that the previously observed effect of med5 mutations on telomeric heterochromatin and silencing is direct.

  1. Histone H3 tail clipping regulates gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Santos-Rosa, Helena; Kirmizis, Antonis; Nelson, Christopher; Bartke, Till; Saksouk, Nehme; Cote, Jacques; Kouzarides, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Induction of gene expression in yeast and human cells involves changes in histone modifications associated with promoters. Here we identify a histone H3 endopeptidase activity in S. cerevisiae that may regulate these events. The endopeptidase cleaves H3 after alanine 21, generating a histone lacking the first 21 residues and displays a preference for H3 tails carrying repressive modifications. In vivo, the H3 N-terminus is clipped, specifically within the promoter of genes following the induc...

  2. Identifying novel transcription factors involved in the inflammatory response by using binding site motif scanning in genomic regions defined by histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askovich, Peter S; Ramsey, Stephen A; Diercks, Alan H; Kennedy, Kathleen A; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Aderem, Alan

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune response to pathogenic challenge is a complex, multi-staged process involving thousands of genes. While numerous transcription factors that act as master regulators of this response have been identified, the temporal complexity of gene expression changes in response to pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor stimulation strongly suggest that additional layers of regulation remain to be uncovered. The evolved pathogen response program in mammalian innate immune cells is understood to reflect a compromise between the probability of clearing the infection and the extent of tissue damage and inflammatory sequelae it causes. Because of that, a key challenge to delineating the regulators that control the temporal inflammatory response is that an innate immune regulator that may confer a selective advantage in the wild may be dispensable in the lab setting. In order to better understand the complete transcriptional response of primary macrophages to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we designed a method that integrates temporally resolved gene expression and chromatin-accessibility measurements from mouse macrophages. By correlating changes in transcription factor binding site motif enrichment scores, calculated within regions of accessible chromatin, with the average temporal expression profile of a gene cluster, we screened for transcriptional factors that regulate the cluster. We have validated our predictions of LPS-stimulated transcriptional regulators using ChIP-seq data for three transcription factors with experimentally confirmed functions in innate immunity. In addition, we predict a role in the macrophage LPS response for several novel transcription factors that have not previously been implicated in immune responses. This method is applicable to any experimental situation where temporal gene expression and chromatin-accessibility data are available.

  3. Nucleosome assembly protein-1 is a linker histone chaperone in Xenopus eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintomi, Keishi; Iwabuchi, Mari; Saeki, Hideaki; Ura, Kiyoe; Kishimoto, Takeo; Ohsumi, Keita

    2005-06-07

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is primarily packaged into nucleosomes through sequential ordered binding of the core and linker histone proteins. The acidic proteins termed histone chaperones are known to bind to core histones to neutralize their positive charges, thereby facilitating their proper deposition onto DNA to assemble the core of nucleosomes. For linker histones, however, little has been known about the regulatory mechanism for deposition of linker histones onto the linker DNA. Here we report that, in Xenopus eggs, the linker histone is associated with the Xenopus homologue of nucleosome assembly protein-1 (NAP-1), which is known to be a chaperone for the core histones H2A and H2B in Drosophila and mammalian cells [Ito, T., Bulger, M., Kobayashi, R. & Kadonaga, J. T. (1996) Mol. Cell Biol. 16, 3112-3124; Chang, L., Loranger, S. S., Mizzen, C., Ernst, S. G., Allis, C. D. & Annunziato, A. T. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 469-480]. We show that NAP-1 acts as the chaperone for the linker histone in both sperm chromatin remodeling into nucleosomes and linker histone binding to nucleosome core dimers. In the presence of NAP-1, the linker histone is properly deposited onto linker DNA at physiological ionic strength, without formation of nonspecific aggregates. These results strongly suggest that NAP-1 functions as a chaperone for the linker histone in Xenopus eggs.

  4. Synthetic histone code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischle, Wolfgang; Mootz, Henning D; Schwarzer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic cells. This complex of DNA and histone proteins not only packages and organizes genomes but also regulates gene expression. A multitude of posttranslational histone modifications and their combinations are thought to constitute a code for directing distinct structural and functional states of chromatin. Methods of protein chemistry, including protein semisynthesis, amber suppression technology, and cysteine bioconjugation, have enabled the generation of so-called designer chromatin containing histones in defined and homogeneous modification states. Several of these approaches have matured from proof-of-concept studies into efficient tools and technologies for studying the biochemistry of chromatin regulation and for interrogating the histone code. We summarize pioneering experiments and recent developments in this exciting field of chemical biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  6. GmPHD5 acts as an important regulator for crosstalk between histone H3K4 di-methylation and H3K14 acetylation in response to salinity stress in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Tao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulated evidence suggest that specific patterns of histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs and their crosstalks may determine transcriptional outcomes. However, the regulatory mechanisms of these "histone codes" in plants remain largely unknown. Results In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that a salinity stress inducible PHD (plant homeodomain finger domain containing protein GmPHD5 can read the "histone code" underlying the methylated H3K4. GmPHD5 interacts with other DNA binding proteins, including GmGNAT1 (an acetyl transferase, GmElongin A (a transcription elongation factor and GmISWI (a chromatin remodeling protein. Our results suggest that GmPHD5 can recognize specific histone methylated H3K4, with preference to di-methylated H3K4. Here, we illustrate that the interaction between GmPHD5 and GmGNAT1 is regulated by the self-acetylation of GmGNAT1, which can also acetylate histone H3. GmGNAT1 exhibits a preference toward acetylated histone H3K14. These results suggest a histone crosstalk between methylated H3K4 and acetylated H3K14. Consistent to its putative roles in gene regulation under salinity stress, we showed that GmPHD5 can bind to the promoters of some confirmed salinity inducible genes in soybean. Conclusion Here, we propose a model suggesting that the nuclear protein GmPHD5 is capable of regulating the crosstalk between histone methylation and histone acetylation of different lysine residues. Nevertheless, GmPHD5 could also recruit chromatin remodeling factors and transcription factors of salt stress inducible genes to regulate their expression in response to salinity stress.

  7. Identification of calconectin, a calcium-binding protein specifically expressed by the mantle of Pinctada margaritifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat, D; Puisségur, M; Bédouet, L; Rousseau, M; Boulzaguet, H; Milet, C; Sellos, D; Van Wormhoudt, A; Lopez, E

    2006-05-01

    Nacre or mother-of-pearl in the shell of Pinctada margaritifera is composed of 95-99% calcium carbonate and 1-5% organic matrix. In this study, we developed an original technique to characterize the genes differentially expressed in nacre-forming cells (NFC) by combining suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), to establish a cDNA subtractive library, with rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR. Seventy-two specific cDNA sequences have been obtained so far. These include a protein containing two EF-hand Ca2+-binding domains which was completely sequenced after amplification by RACE-PCR. Its specific expression as well as the specificity of the SSH method was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR on NFC and mantle cells.

  8. Receptor specificity and erythrocyte binding preferences of avian influenza viruses isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Shailesh D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemagglutination (HA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays are conventionally used for detection and identification of influenza viruses. HI assay is also used for detection of antibodies against influenza viruses. Primarily turkey or chicken erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs] are used in these assays, as they are large, nucleated, and sediment fast, which makes it easy to determine the titer. Human influenza viruses agglutinate RBCs from chicken, human, and guinea pig, but not from horse. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially to sialic acid (SA linked to galactose (Gal by α 2, 6 linkage (SA α 2, 6-Gal, whereas avian influenza (AI viruses bind preferentially to SA α 2, 3-Gal linkages. With this background, the present study was undertaken to study erythrocyte binding preferences and receptor specificities of AI viruses isolated from India. Materials and methods A total of nine AI virus isolates (four subtypes from India and three reference AI strains (three subtypes were tested in HA and HI assays against mammalian and avian erythrocytes. The erythrocytes from turkey, chicken, goose, guinea pig and horse were used in the study. The receptor specificity determination assays were performed using goose and turkey RBCs. The amino acids present at 190 helix, 130 and 220 loops of the receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin protein were analyzed to correlate amino acid changes with the receptor specificity. Results All tested highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses reacted with all five types of RBCs in the HA assay; AI H9N2 and H5N2 viruses did not react with horse RBCs. For H5N1 viruses guinea pig and goose RBCs were best for both HA and HI assays. For H9N2 viruses, guinea pig, fowl and turkey RBCs were suitable. For other tested AI subtypes, avian and guinea pig RBCs were better. Eight isolates of H5N1, one H4N6 and one H7N1 virus showed preference to avian sialic acid receptors. Importantly

  9. Detection of histone modifications in plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskiewicz, Michal; Peterhansel, Christoph; Conrath, Uwe

    2011-09-23

    Chromatin structure is important for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. In this process, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, and covalent modifications on the amino-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 play essential roles(1-2). H3 and H4 histone modifications include methylation of lysine and arginine, acetylation of lysine, and phosphorylation of serine residues(1-2). These modifications are associated either with gene activation, repression, or a primed state of gene that supports more rapid and robust activation of expression after perception of appropriate signals (microbe-associated molecular patterns, light, hormones, etc.)(3-7). Here, we present a method for the reliable and sensitive detection of specific chromatin modifications on selected plant genes. The technique is based on the crosslinking of (modified) histones and DNA with formaldehyde(8,9), extraction and sonication of chromatin, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with modification-specific antibodies(9,10), de-crosslinking of histone-DNA complexes, and gene-specific real-time quantitative PCR. The approach has proven useful for detecting specific histone modifications associated with C(4;) photosynthesis in maize(5,11) and systemic immunity in Arabidopsis(3).

  10. Structural Mechanisms of Nucleosome Recognition by Linker Histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing-Rui; Jiang, Jiansheng; Feng, Hanqiao; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Xiao, T Sam; Bai, Yawen

    2015-08-20

    Linker histones bind to the nucleosome and regulate the structure of chromatin and gene expression. Despite more than three decades of effort, the structural basis of nucleosome recognition by linker histones remains elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of the globular domain of chicken linker histone H5 in complex with the nucleosome at 3.5 Å resolution, which is validated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The globular domain sits on the dyad of the nucleosome and interacts with both DNA linkers. Our structure integrates results from mutation analyses and previous cross-linking and fluorescence recovery after photobleach experiments, and it helps resolve the long debate on structural mechanisms of nucleosome recognition by linker histones. The on-dyad binding mode of the H5 globular domain is different from the recently reported off-dyad binding mode of Drosophila linker histone H1. We demonstrate that linker histones with different binding modes could fold chromatin to form distinct higher-order structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prothrombin requires two sequential metal-dependent conformational transitions to bind phospholipid. Conformation-specific antibodies directed against the phospholipid-binding site on prothrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowski, M.; Furie, B.C.; Bauminger, S.; Furie, B.

    1986-11-15

    Prothrombin is a gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein that binds to phospholipid vesicles in the presence of calcium ions after undergoing a metal ion-induced conformational transition. To integrate recent data into a scheme that is compatible with our knowledge of prothrombin-metal interaction, we have proposed a new model of prothrombin structure. In this model prothrombin undergoes two metal-dependent conformational transitions: PT----PT'----PT*. The first transition is not cation-specific, but the second transition is metal-selective for Ca(II), Sr(II), or Ba(II). Only the PT* conformer binds to phospholipid surfaces. To test this model, anti-prothrombin antibodies that only bind to prothrombin in the presence of Ca(II) but not Mg(II) (PT*-specific) were isolated, and termed anti-prothrombin X Ca(II)-specific. Half-maximal binding of antibody to prothrombin was observed at 0.1 mM CaCl/sub 2/ or 1 mM SrCl/sub 2/, but no binding was observed with Mg(II), Mn(II), or Ba(II). However, prothrombin in the presence of both Mg(II)/Ba(II) or Mn(II)/Ba(II) demonstrated significant interaction with the antibody. Prothrombin binding to phospholipid vesicles was inhibited by the anti-prothrombin X Ca(II)-specific antibody or its Fab fragment, but was not inhibited by anti-prothrombin X Mg(II) antibody or its Fab fragment directed at the PT' conformer. These results support this three-state model for prothrombin. The metal specificity characteristic of prothrombin-phospholipid interaction is a property required for the expression of the phospholipid-binding site in the binary prothrombin-metal complex.

  12. Mechanism of selective VEGF-A binding by neuropilin-1 reveals a basis for specific ligand inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Parker

    Full Text Available Neuropilin (Nrp receptors function as essential cell surface receptors for the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF family of proangiogenic cytokines and the semaphorin 3 (Sema3 family of axon guidance molecules. There are two Nrp homologues, Nrp1 and Nrp2, which bind to both overlapping and distinct members of the VEGF and Sema3 family of molecules. Nrp1 specifically binds the VEGF-A(164/5 isoform, which is essential for developmental angiogenesis. We demonstrate that VEGF-A specific binding is governed by Nrp1 residues in the b1 coagulation factor domain surrounding the invariant Nrp C-terminal arginine binding pocket. Further, we show that Sema3F does not display the Nrp-specific binding to the b1 domain seen with VEGF-A. Engineered soluble Nrp receptor fragments that selectively sequester ligands from the active signaling complex are an attractive modality for selectively blocking the angiogenic and chemorepulsive functions of Nrp ligands. Utilizing the information on Nrp ligand binding specificity, we demonstrate Nrp constructs that specifically sequester Sema3 in the presence of VEGF-A. This establishes that unique mechanisms are used by Nrp receptors to mediate specific ligand binding and that these differences can be exploited to engineer soluble Nrp receptors with specificity for Sema3.

  13. Transcriptional repression of Aurora-A gene by wild-type p53 through directly binding to its promoter with histone deacetylase 1 and mSin3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsung-Ying; Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Lin, Tsung-Chieh Chester; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Wu, Chun-Chi

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we firstly showed that p53 transcriptionally represses Aurora-A gene expression through directly binding to its promoter. DNA affinity precipitation assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that p53 physically bound to the Aurora-A promoter. Moreover, the in vitro and in vivo assays showed that p53 directly bound to the Aurora-A promoter together with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and mSin3a as corepressors. Furthermore, we identified that the nucleotides -360 to -354 (CCTGCCC), upstream of the Aurora-A transcriptional start site, was responsible for the p53-mediated repression. Mutation within this site disrupted its interaction with p53, mSin3a and HDAC1, as well as attenuated the repressive effect of p53 on Aurora-A promoter activity. Treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a HDAC1 inhibitor, disrupted the interaction of p53-HDAC1-mSin3a complex with the nucleotides -365∼-345 region, and enhanced the Aurora-A promoter activity and gene expression. Additionally, knockdown of p53 or mSin3a also drastically blocked the formation of p53-HDAC1-mSin3a repressive complex onto this promoter region and elevated the Aurora-A promoter activity and gene expression. Moreover, the p53-HDAC1-mSin3a repressive complex also involved in the inhibition of Aurora-A gene expression upon cisplatin treatment. Finally, the clinical investigation showed that Aurora-A and p53 exhibited an inverse correlation in both the expression level and prognostic status, and the low p53/high Aurora-A showed the poorest prognosis of NSCLC patients. Our findings showed novel regulatory mechanisms of p53 in regulating Aurora-A gene expression in NSCLC cells. © 2017 UICC.

  14. ADP-ribosylation of histones by ARTD1: an additional module of the histone code?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottiger, Michael O

    2011-06-06

    ADP-ribosylation is a covalent post-translational protein modification catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases and is involved in important processes such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, replication or transcription. Histones are ADP-ribosylated by ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 at specific amino acid residues, in particular lysines, of the histones tails. Specific ADP-ribosyl hydrolases and poly-ADP-ribose glucohydrolases degrade the ADP-ribose polymers. The ADP-ribose modification is read by zinc finger motifs or macrodomains, which then regulate chromatin structure and transcription. Thus, histone ADP-ribosylation may be considered an additional component of the histone code. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Task-Specific Scoring Functions for Predicting Ligand Binding Poses and Affinity and for Screening Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtawy, Hossam; Mahapatra, Nihar Ranjan

    2017-11-30

    Molecular docking, scoring, and virtual screening play an increasingly important role in computer-aided drug discovery. Scoring functions (SFs) are typically employed to predict the binding conformation (docking task), binding affinity (scoring task), and binary activity level (screening task) of ligands against a critical protein target in a disease's pathway. In most molecular docking software packages available today, a generic binding affinity-based (BA-based) SF is invoked for all three tasks to solve three different, but related, prediction problems. The limited predictive accuracies of such SFs in these three tasks has been a major roadblock toward cost-effective drug discovery. Therefore, in this work, we develop BT-Score, an ensemble machine-learning (ML) SF of boosted decision trees and thousands of predictive descriptors to estimate BA. BT-Score reproduced BA of out-of-sample test complexes with correlation of 0.825. Even with this high accuracy in the scoring task, we demonstrate that the docking and screening performance of BT-Score and other BA-based SFs is far from ideal. This has motivated us to build two task-specific ML SFs for the docking and screening problems. We propose BT-Dock, a boosted-tree ensemble model trained on a large number of native and computer-generated ligand conformations and optimized to predict binding poses explicitly. The model has shown an average improvement of 25% over its BA-based counterparts in different ligand pose prediction scenarios. Similar improvement has also been obtained by our screening-based SF, BT-Screen, which directly models the ligand activity labels as a classification problem. BT-Screen is trained on thousands of active and inactive protein-ligand complexes to optimize it for finding real actives from databases of ligands not seen in its training set. In addition to the three task-specific SFs, we propose a novel multi-task deep neural network (MT-Net) that is trained on data from the three tasks to

  16. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tse

    Full Text Available Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations

  17. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  18. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramzow, M; Bachmann, M; Uhlenbruck, G; Dorn, A; Müller, W E

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from the same species. After dissociation of the AF by sodium dodecyl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, followed by electrophoretical fractionation, a 47-kD protein was identified by immunoblotting which interacted with the McAbs: 5D2-D11. During this dissociation procedure, the sunburst structure of the AF was destroyed. In a second approach, the 47-kD protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation; 12 molecules of this protein species were calculated to be associated with the intact AF particle. The 47-kD AF fragment bound to dissociated Geodia cells with a high affinity (Ka of 7 X 10(8) M-1) even in the absence of Ca++ ions; the number of binding sites was approximately 4 X 10(6)/cell. This interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor to the 47-kD protein in the homologous cell system. Moreover, it was established that this binding occurs species-specifically. The 47-kD fragment of the AF was localized only extracellularly by indirect immunofluorescence staining in cryostat slices. These data suggest that the 47-kD protein is the cell binding molecule of the AF from Geodia.

  19. From spots to beads-PTM-peptide bead arrays for the characterization of anti-histone antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heubach, Yvonne; Planatscher, Hannes; Sommersdorf, Cornelia; Maisch, Daniel; Maier, Julia; Joos, Thomas O; Templin, Markus F; Poetz, Oliver

    2013-03-01

    Antibodies that recognize PTMs of histones play a central role in epigenetic proteomic research. Modification-specific antibodies are employed in chromatin immunoprecipitation, for Western blotting and during the immunoprecipitation steps for MS-based global proteomic analyses. Knowledge about the antibodies' off-target binding is essential for the interpretation of experimental data. To address this challenge we developed a fast and cost efficient system for generating peptide bead arrays. We employed this method to establish a bead-based peptide array containing 384 peptides displaying phosphorylated, acetylated, methylated, and citrullinated N-terminal regions of histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 and controls. We profiled the binding of 40 PTM-specific antibodies important for epigenetic proteomic research. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Molecular design of specific metal-binding peptide sequences from protein fragments: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozísek, Milan; Svatos, Ales; Budesínský, Milos; Muck, Alexander; Bauer, Mikael C; Kotrba, Pavel; Ruml, Tomás; Havlas, Zdenek; Linse, Sara; Rulísek, Lubomír

    2008-01-01

    A novel strategy is presented for designing peptides with specific metal-ion chelation sites, based on linking computationally predicted ion-specific combinations of amino acid side chains coordinated at the vertices of the desired coordination polyhedron into a single polypeptide chain. With this aim, a series of computer programs have been written that 1) creates a structural combinatorial library containing Zi-(X)n-Zj sequences (n=0-14; Z: amino acid that binds the metal through the side chain; X: any amino acid) from the existing protein structures in the non-redundant Protein Data Bank; 2) merges these fragments into a single Z1-(X)n1 -Z2-(X)n2 -Z3-(X)n3 -...-Zj polypeptide chain; and 3) automatically performs two simple molecular mechanics calculations that make it possible to estimate the internal strain in the newly designed peptide. The application of this procedure for the most M2+-specific combinations of amino acid side chains (M: metal; see L. Rulísek, Z. Havlas J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 2376-2385) yielded several peptide sequences (with lengths of 6-20 amino acids) with the potential for specific binding with six metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+). The gas-phase association constants of the studied metal ions with these de novo designed peptides were experimentally determined by MALDI mass spectrometry by using 3,4,5-trihydroxyacetophenone as a matrix, whereas the thermodynamic parameters of the metal-ion coordination in the condensed phase were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), chelatometry and NMR spectroscopy methods. The data indicate that some of the computationally predicted peptides are potential M2+-specific metal-ion chelators.

  1. Structural and Functional Coordination of DNA and Histone Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in the control of gene expression in mammals is how epigenetic methylation patterns of DNA and histones are established, erased, and recognized. This central process in controlling gene expression includes coordinated covalent modifications of DNA and its associated histones. This article focuses on structural aspects of enzymatic activities of histone (arginine and lysine) methylation and demethylation and functional links between the methylation status of the DNA and histones. An interconnected network of methyltransferases, demethylases, and accessory proteins is responsible for changing or maintaining the modification status of specific regions of chromatin. PMID:25085914

  2. Enriching Peptide Libraries for Binding Affinity and Specificity Through Computationally Directed Library Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model.

  3. Enriching peptide libraries for binding affinity and specificity through computationally directed library design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T. Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model. PMID:28236241

  4. Specific IgE and IgG antibody-binding patterns to recombinant cockroach allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satinover, Shama M; Reefer, Amanda J; Pomes, Anna; Chapman, Martin D; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2005-04-01

    The specificity of serum antibody responses to different cockroach allergens has not been studied. We sought to quantitate serum IgE and IgG antibodies to a panel of purified cockroach allergens among cockroach-sensitized subjects. IgE antibodies to recombinant cockroach allergens (rBla g 1, rBla g 2, rBla g 4, rBla g 5, and rPer a 7) were measured in sera containing IgE antibodies to Blattella germanica extract (n = 118) by using a streptavidin CAP assay and a multiplex flow cytometric assay. Specific IgG antibodies were determined by using radioimmunoprecipitation techniques. Specific IgE antibodies measured by means of CAP assay and multiplex assay were strongly correlated ( r = 0.8, P < .001). The sum of IgE antibodies (in international units per milliliter) against all 5 allergens equated to IgE antibodies to cockroach extract. Although the prevalence of IgE antibodies was highest for rBla g 2 (54.4%) and rBla g 5 (37.4%), patterns of IgE antibody binding were unique to each subject. Surprisingly, only 16% of cockroach-sensitized subjects with IgE antibodies to house dust mite exhibited IgE antibody binding to cockroach tropomyosin (rPer a 7). Specific IgE antibodies were associated with increased IgG antibody levels, although detection of IgG in the absence of IgE was not uncommon. The techniques described offer a new approach for defining the hierarchy of purified allergens. IgE antibodies directed against 5 allergens constitute the majority of the IgE antibody repertoire for cockroach. Such distinct patterns of IgE-IgG responsiveness to different cockroach allergens highlight the complexity of B-cell responses to environmental allergens.

  5. Binding of the mannose-specific lectin, Griffithsin, to HIV-1 gp120 exposes the CD4-binding site

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The glycans on HIV-1 gp120 play an important role in shielding neutralization-sensitive epitopes from antibody recognition. They also serve as targets for lectins that bind mannose-rich glycans. In this study, the authors investigated...

  6. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans--A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Olszewski

    Full Text Available SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis.This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein. This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity. The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7 ± 1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100 °C and melting temperature (T(m is 100.2 °C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis.NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids.

  7. Analysis of the sugar-binding specificity of mannose-binding-type Jacalin-related lectins by frontal affinity chromatography--an approach to functional classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Uchiyama, Noboru; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M; Totani, Kiichiro; Ito, Yukishige; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-03-01

    The Jacalin-related lectin (JRL) family comprises galactose-binding-type (gJRLs) and mannose-binding-type (mJRLs) lectins. Although the documented occurrence of gJRLs is confined to the family Moraceae, mJRLs are widespread in the plant kingdom. A detailed comparison of sugar-binding specificity was made by frontal affinity chromatography to corroborate the structure-function relationships of the extended mJRL subfamily. Eight mJRLs covering a broad taxonomic range were used: Artocarpin from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit, Moraceae), BanLec from Musa acuminata (banana, Musaceae), Calsepa from Calystegia sepium (hedge bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CCA from Castanea crenata (Japanese chestnut, Fagaceae), Conarva from Convolvulus arvensis (bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CRLL from Cycas revoluta (King Sago palm tree, Cycadaceae), Heltuba from Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke, Asteraceae) and MornigaM from Morus nigra (black mulberry, Moraceae). The result using 103 pyridylaminated glycans clearly divided the mJRLs into two major groups, each of which was further divided into two subgroups based on the preference for high-mannose-type N-glycans. This criterion also applied to the binding preference for complex-type N-glycans. Notably, the result of cluster analysis of the amino acid sequences clearly corresponded to the above specificity classification. Thus, marked correlation between the sugar-binding specificity of mJRLs and their phylogeny should shed light on the functional significance of JRLs.

  8. Effect of receptor binding specificity on the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of influenza virus A H1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Cao, Weiping; Pappas, Claudia; Liu, Feng; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2014-09-01

    The biological basis for the poor immunogenicity of unadjuvanted avian influenza A virus vaccines in mammals is not well understood. Here, we mutated the hemagglutinin (HA) of two H1N1 virus vaccines to determine whether virus receptor binding specificity contributes to the low immunogenicity of avian influenza virus vaccines. Mutations were introduced into the HA of an avian influenza virus, A/Duck/New York/15024-21/96 (Dk/96) which switched the binding preference from α2,3- to α2,6-linked sialic acid (SA). A switch in receptor specificity of the human A/South Carolina/1/18 (SC/18) virus generated a mutant virus with α2,3 SA (avian) binding preference. Inactivated vaccines were generated and administered to mice and ferrets intramuscularly. We found that the vaccines with human receptor binding preference induced slightly higher antibody titers and cell-mediated immune responses compared to their isogenic viruses with avian receptor binding specificity. Upon challenge with DK/96 or SC18 virus, differences in lung virus titers between the vaccine groups with different receptor-binding specificities were minimal. Overall, our data suggest that receptor binding specificity contributes only marginally to the immunogenicity of avian influenza vaccines and that other factors may also be involved. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Molecular and Functional Characterization of ssDNA Aptamers that Specifically Bind Leishmania infantum PABP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Ramos, Edurne; García-Hernández, Marta; Pinto, Celia; Soto, Manuel; Martín, M. Elena; González, Víctor M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A poly (A)-binding protein from Leishmania infantum (LiPABP) has been recently cloned and characterized in our laboratory. Although this protein shows a very high homology with PABPs from other eukaryotic organisms including mammals and other parasites, exist divergences along the sequence that convert them in potential diagnostic markers and/or therapeutics targets. Aptamers are oligonucleotide ligands that are selected in vitro by their affinity and specificity for the target as a consequence of the particular tertiary structure that they are able to acquire depending on their sequence. Development of high-affinity molecules with the ability to recognize specifically Leishmania proteins is essential for the progress of this kind of study. Results We have selected a ssDNA aptamer population against a recombinant 6xHIS–LiPABP protein (rLiPABP) that is able to recognize the target with a low Kd. Cloning, sequencing and in silico analysis of the aptamers obtained from the population yielded three aptamers (ApPABP#3, ApPABP#7 and ApPABP#11) that significantly bound to PABP with higher affinity than the naïve population. These aptamers were analyzed by ELONA and slot blot to establish affinity and specificity for rLiPABP. Results demonstrated that the three aptamers have high affinity and specificity for the target and that they are able to detect an endogenous LiPABP (eLiPABP) protein amount corresponding to 2500 L. infantum promastigotes in a significant manner. The functional analysis of the aptamers also revealed that ApPABP#11 disrupts the binding of both Myc-LiPABP and eLiPABP to poly (A) in vitro. On the other hand, these aptamers are able to bind and purify LiPABP from complex mixes. Conclusion Results presented here demonstrate that aptamers represent new reagents for characterization of LiPABP and that they can affect LiPABP activity. At this respect, the use of these aptamers as therapeutic tool affecting the physiological role of PABP has to be

  10. The Fork in the Road: Histone Partitioning During DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony T. Annunziato

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the following discussion the distribution of histones at the replication fork is examined, with specific attention paid to the question of H3/H4 tetramer "splitting." After a presentation of early experiments surrounding this topic, more recent contributions are detailed. The implications of these findings with respect to the transmission of histone modifications and epigenetic models are also addressed.

  11. Genus-specific protein binding to the large clusters of DNA repeats (short regularly spaced repeats) present in Sulfolobus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Shen, Biao

    2003-01-01

    that are identical in sequence to one of the repeat variants in the S. solfataricus chromosome. Repeats from the pNOB8 cluster were amplified and tested for protein binding with cell extracts from S. solfataricus. A 17.5-kDa SRSR-binding protein was purified from the cell extracts and sequenced. The protein is N...... terminally modified and corresponds to SSO454, an open reading frame of previously unassigned function. It binds specifically to DNA fragments carrying double and single repeat sequences, binding on one side of the repeat structure, and producing an opening of the opposite side of the DNA structure. It also...... with a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. Although this putative motif is shared by other archaeal proteins, orthologs of SSO454 were only detected in species within the Sulfolobus genus and in the closely related Acidianus genus. We infer that the genus-specific protein induces an opening of the structure...

  12. Stage-specific adhesion of Leishmania promastigotes to sand fly midguts assessed using an improved comparative binding assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wilson

    2010-09-01

    and metacyclic forms. Further they show that although gut binding may be necessary for parasite establishment, in several vector-parasite pairs the specificity of such in vitro binding alone is insufficient to explain overall vector specificity. Other significant barriers to development must exist in certain refractory Leishmania parasite-sand fly vector combinations. A re-appraisal of the specificity of the Leishmania-sand fly relationship is required.

  13. Conformational and physicochemical DNA features specific for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, J V; Ponomarenko, M P; Frolov, A S; Vorobyev, D G; Overton, G C; Kolchanov, N A

    1999-01-01

    A reliable recognition of transcription factor binding sites is essential for analysis of regulatory genomic sequences. The experimental data make evident an important role of DNA conformational features for site functioning. However, Internet-available tools for revealing conformational and physicochemical DNA features significant for the site functioning and subsequent use of these features for site recognition have not been developed up to now. We suggest an approach for revealing significant conformational and physicochemical properties of functional sites implemented in the database B-DNA-VIDEO. This database is designed to study the sets of various transcription factor binding sites, providing evidence that transcription factor binding sites are characterized by specific sets of significant conformational and physicochemical DNA properties. For a fixed site, by using the B-DNA features selected for this site recognition, the C-program recognizing this site may be generated, control tested and stored in the database B-DNA-VIDEO. Each B-DNA-VIDEO entry links to the Web-applet recognizing the site, whose significant B-DNA features are stored in this entry as the 'site recognition programs'. The pairwise linked entry-applet pairs are compiled within the B-DNA-VIDEO system, which is simultaneously the database and the program tools package applicable immediately for recognizing the sites stored in the database. Indeed, this is the novelty. Hence, B-DNA-VIDEO is the Web resource of both 'searching for static data' and 'active computation' type, that is why it was called an 'activated database'. B-DNA-VIDEO is available at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc.ru/systems/BDNAVideo/ and the mirror site at http://www.cbil.upenn.edu/mgs/systems/c onsfreq/.

  14. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binds to a specific receptor and releases microsomal calcium in the arterior pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemette, G.; Balla, T.; Baukal, A.J.; Catt, K.J.

    1987-12-01

    The properties of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP/sub 3/) receptor sites in the anterior pituitary were evaluated by binding studies with InsP/sub 3/ labeled with /sup 32/P to high specific radioactivity. Specific binding of Ins(/sup 32/P)P/sub 3/ was demonstrable in pituitary membrane preparations and was linearly proportional to the amount of membrane added over the range 0.5-2 mg of protein. Kinetic studies showed that specific InsP/sub 3/ binding was half-maximal in about 40 sec and reached a plateau after 15 min at 0/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data was consistent with a single set of high affinity sites. The specificity of Ins(/sup 32/P)P/sub 3/ binding to these sites was illustrated by the much weaker affinity for structural analogs such as inositol 1-phosphate, phytic acid, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. To assess the functional relevance of the InsP/sub 3/ binding sites, the Ca/sup 2 +/-releasing activity of InsP/sub 3/ was measured in pituitary membrane preparations. Under physiological conditions within the cytosol, the high-affinity InsP/sub 3/ binding sites characterized in pituitary membranes could serve as the putative receptors through which InsP/sub 3/ triggers Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in the anterior pituitary gland.

  15. De novo peptide design and experimental validation of histone methyltransferase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Smadbeck

    Full Text Available Histones are small proteins critical to the efficient packaging of DNA in the nucleus. DNA-protein complexes, known as nucleosomes, are formed when the DNA winds itself around the surface of the histones. The methylation of histone residues by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 maintains gene repression over successive cell generations. Overexpression of EZH2 can silence important tumor suppressor genes leading to increased invasiveness of many types of cancers. This makes the inhibition of EZH2 an important target in the development of cancer therapeutics. We employed a three-stage computational de novo peptide design method to design inhibitory peptides of EZH2. The method consists of a sequence selection stage and two validation stages for fold specificity and approximate binding affinity. The sequence selection stage consists of an integer linear optimization model that was solved to produce a rank-ordered list of amino acid sequences with increased stability in the bound peptide-EZH2 structure. These sequences were validated through the calculation of the fold specificity and approximate binding affinity of the designed peptides. Here we report the discovery of novel EZH2 inhibitory peptides using the de novo peptide design method. The computationally discovered peptides were experimentally validated in vitro using dose titrations and mechanism of action enzymatic assays. The peptide with the highest in vitro response, SQ037, was validated in nucleo using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This peptide had an IC50 of 13.5 [Formula: see text]M, demonstrated greater potency as an inhibitor when compared to the native and K27A mutant control peptides, and demonstrated competitive inhibition versus the peptide substrate. Additionally, this peptide demonstrated high specificity to the EZH2 target in comparison to other histone methyltransferases. The validated peptides are the first computationally designed peptides that directly

  16. De novo peptide design and experimental validation of histone methyltransferase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Smadbeck

    Full Text Available Histones are small proteins critical to the efficient packaging of DNA in the nucleus. DNA–protein complexes, known as nucleosomes, are formed when the DNA winds itself around the surface of the histones. The methylation of histone residues by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2 maintains gene repression over successive cell generations. Overexpression of EZH2 can silence important tumor suppressor genes leading to increased invasiveness of many types of cancers. This makes the inhibition of EZH2 an important target in the development of cancer therapeutics. We employed a three-stage computational de novo peptide design method to design inhibitory peptides of EZH2. The method consists of a sequence selection stage and two validation stages for fold specificity and approximate binding affinity. The sequence selection stage consists of an integer linear optimization model that was solved to produce a rank-ordered list of amino acid sequences with increased stability in the bound peptide-EZH2 structure. These sequences were validated through the calculation of the fold specificity and approximate binding affinity of the designed peptides. Here we report the discovery of novel EZH2 inhibitory peptides using the de novo peptide design method. The computationally discovered peptides were experimentally validated in vitro using dose titrations and mechanism of action enzymatic assays. The peptide with the highest in vitro response, SQ037, was validated in nucleo using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This peptide had an IC50 of 13.5 mM, demonstrated greater potency as an inhibitor when compared to the native and K27A mutant control peptides, and demonstrated competitive inhibition versus the peptide substrate. Additionally, this peptide demonstrated high specificity to the EZH2 target in comparison to other histone methyltransferases. The validated peptides are the first computationally designed peptides that directly inhibit EZH2

  17. Carbohydrate-binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.) bulb lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, H; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Goldstein, I J

    1990-06-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus; NPA) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.; HHA) lectins, isolated from extracts of their bulbs by affinity chromatography on immobilized mannose, was studied by quantitative precipitation, sugar hapten inhibition, and affinity chromatography on the immobilized lectins. These lectins gave strong precipitation reactions with several yeast mannans, but did not precipitate with alpha-D-glucans (e.g., dextrans and glycogen). Interestingly, both lectins reacted strongly with yeast galactomannans having multiple nonreducing terminal alpha-D-galactosyl groups, a synthetic linear alpha-1,6-mannan, and an alpha-1,3-mannan (DP = 30). Treatment of the linear alpha-1,3-mannan with periodate, resulting in oxidation of the terminal, nonreducing mannosyl group, did not reduce its reactivity with NPA or HHA. Taken together, these observations suggest that NPA and HHA react not only with terminal but also with internal alpha-D-mannosyl residues. Sugar hapten inhibition studies showed these lectins to possess the greatest specific activity for alpha-D-mannosyl units whereas D-Glc and D-GlcNAc did not inhibit either lectin precipitation system. Of the oligosaccharides tested, the best inhibitor of NPA interaction was alpha-1,6-linked mannotriose, which was twice as good an inhibitor as Man alpha 1,6Man alpha-O-Me and 10 times better than methyl alpha-D-mannoside. On the other hand, oligosaccharides containing either 1,3- or 1,6-linked mannosyl units were good inhibitors of the HHA-mannan precipitation system (6- to 20-fold more active than D-Man). These results indicate that both lectins appear to possess an extended binding site(s) complementary to at least three 1,6-linked alpha-mannosyl units. Various glycosylasparagine glycopeptides which contain alpha-1,6-Man units were retarded on the immobilized NPA column. On the other hand, those containing either alpha-1,3- or alpha-1,6-mannosyl residues were

  18. Histone profiles in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Simone S; Neff, Tobias; Bernt, Kathrin M

    2015-10-01

    While DNA abnormalities have long been recognized as the cause of cancer, the contribution of chromatin is a relatively recent discovery. Excitement in the field of cancer epigenetics is driven by 3 key elements: 1. Chromatin may play an active and often critical role in controlling gene expression, DNA stability and cell identity. 2. Chromatin modifiers are frequent targets of DNA aberrations, in some cancers reaching near 100%. Particularly in cancers with low rates of DNA mutations, the key "driver" of malignancy is often a chromatin modifier. 3. Cancer-associated aberrant chromatin is amenable to pharmacologic modulation. This has sparked the rapidly expanding development of small molecules targeting chromatin modifiers or reader domains, several of which have shown promise in clinical trials. In parallel, technical advances have greatly enhanced our ability to perform comprehensive chromatin/histone profiling. Despite the discovery that distinct histone profiles are associated with prognostic subgroups, and in some instances may point towards an underlying aberration that can be targeted, histone profiling has not entered clinical diagnostics. Even eligibility for clinical trials targeting chromatin hinges on traditional histologic or DNA-based molecular criteria rather than chromatin profiles. This review will give an overview of the philosophical debate around the role of histones in controlling or modulating gene expression and discuss the most common techniques for histone profiling. In addition, we will provide prominent examples of aberrantly expressed or mutated chromatin modifiers that result in either globally or locally aberrant histone profiles, and that may be promising therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Highly specific sites of prolactin binding in benign and malignant breast tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, P K; Tandon, S; Agrawal, A K; Kumar, S

    1989-12-01

    An immunocytochemical method involving the application of polyclonal antisera to human prolactin (PRL) followed by a highly sensitive and a modified version of dinitrophenyl (DNP) hapten sandwich staining procedure using anti-DNP IgM monoclonal antibody has been used to detect PRL binding in benign and malignant breast tissue. The technique was applied to 5 microns thick sections of paraffin embedded formalin fixed tissue. Out of 107 breast biopsies 40 were carcinomas, 41 were fibroadenomas, 18 were benign cystic disease and 8 were gynaecomastia. In cases of carcinoma positive staining was observed in 82.5% cases whereas in fibroadenoma the positivity was in 57% cases only. The positive reaction in fibroadenoma was mainly due to the presence of apocrine metaplasia associated with the tumour. Also PRL was present in greater proportion in post menopausal patients as compared to premenopausal cancer patients. These findings suggest the presence of specific PRL binding sites in breast tissue. The staining was restricted to epithelial cells and background staining of the stroma was minimally seen in these cases. Positively stained breast carcinoma may represent an apocrine subset of the carcinoma.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus protease: a probe of exposed, non-basic histone sequences in nucleosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rill, R.L.; Oosterhof, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    The digestion of histones in chicken erythrocyte nucleosome cores and chromatin by Staphylococcus aureus protease was examined. This protease cleaves specifically at acidic residues and prefers glu-X bonds under the conditions used. Only 1 of 24 glutamic and 2 of 13 aspartic acids among all four core histones are located in basic, amino-terminal tails, hence staph. protease is a highly specific probe of exposed non-basic sequences. Staph. protease readily degraded H1, H5, and H3; moderately degraded H2b, and only slightly degraded H2a and H4 in nucleosomes and nucleosome cores. Electrophoresis of core histone fragments from limited digests showed that most glutamic acids were inaccessible, but at least five sites in non-basic sequences were readily cleaved. Tentative assignments of these fragments based on comparisons with products from limited digests of pure histones suggested that most accessible sites in nucleosome cores occur in H3. The most probable sites of H3 cutting are glutamic acids at positions 51, 60, 73, 94, and 97. At least one site in H2b, probably the equivalent of glu-105 in the calf H2b sequence, was accessible. No sites in H2a and H4 appeared highly accessible. H5 was readily cleaved at a site near the amino-terminus. These data substantiate the other evidence that non-basic core histone sequences are located primarily in the nucleosome interior, but that H3 binds to the ends of core DNA and thereby is partly exposed as the upper and lower surfaces of the disk-shaped core.

  1. Replication-independent histone deposition by the HIR complex and Asf1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Erin M; Antczak, Andrew J; Bailey, Aaron O; Franco, Alexa A; Wu, Kevin J; Yates, John R; Kaufman, Paul D

    2005-11-22

    The orderly deposition of histones onto DNA is mediated by conserved assembly complexes, including chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) and the Hir proteins . CAF-1 and the Hir proteins operate in distinct but functionally overlapping histone deposition pathways in vivo . The Hir proteins and CAF-1 share a common partner, the highly conserved histone H3/H4 binding protein Asf1, which binds the middle subunit of CAF-1 as well as to Hir proteins . Asf1 binds to newly synthesized histones H3/H4 , and this complex stimulates histone deposition by CAF-1 . In yeast, Asf1 is required for the contribution of the Hir proteins to gene silencing . Here, we demonstrate that Hir1, Hir2, Hir3, and Hpc2 comprise the HIR complex, which copurifies with the histone deposition protein Asf1. Together, the HIR complex and Asf1 deposit histones onto DNA in a replication-independent manner. Histone deposition by the HIR complex and Asf1 is impaired by a mutation in Asf1 that inhibits HIR binding. These data indicate that the HIR complex and Asf1 proteins function together as a conserved eukaryotic pathway for histone replacement throughout the cell cycle.

  2. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in Vitro between Pigs and Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm–oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm–oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle.

  3. Specific deficit of colour-colour short-term memory binding in sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mario A; Sala, Sergio Della; Abrahams, Sharon; Logie, Robert H; Méndez, Luis Guillermo; Lopera, Francisco

    2011-06-01

    Short-term memory binding of visual features which are processed across different dimensions (shape-colour) is impaired in sporadic Alzheimer's disease, familial Alzheimer's disease, and in asymptomatic carriers of familial Alzheimer's disease. This study investigated whether Alzheimer's disease also impacts on within-dimension binding processes. The study specifically explored whether visual short-term memory binding of features of the same type (colour-colour) is sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. We used a neuropsychological battery and a short-term memory binding task to assess patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (Experiment 1), familial Alzheimer's disease (Experiment 2) due to the mutation E280A of the Presenilin-1 gene and asymptomatic carriers of the mutation. The binding task assessed change detection within arrays of unicoloured objects (Colour Only) or bicoloured objects the colours of which had to be remembered separately (Unbound Colours) or together (Bound Colours). Performance on the Bound Colours condition (1) explained the largest proportion of variance between patients (sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease), (2) combined more sensitivity and specificity for the disease than other more traditional neuropsychological tasks, (3) identified asymptomatic carriers of the mutation even when traditional neuropsychological measures and other measures of short-term memory did not and, (4) contrary to shape-colour binding, correlated with measures of hippocampal functions. Colour-colour binding and shape-colour binding both appear to be sensitive to AD even though they seem to rely on different brain mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediateschromosome-specific meiotic synapsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton,Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregationof the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Herewe show that loss of him-8function causes profound X-chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairingand synapsis.him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that is expressedduring meiosis andconcentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as themeiotic Pairing Center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supportedby genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations.HIM-8-bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE)throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 thatretains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilizepairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate thatstabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which thetethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is notsufficient.

  5. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Daniel; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds...... a single SDS molecule under nondenaturing concentrations. Protein interaction with SDS was investigated by NMR, ITC and molecular dynamics simulations. The NMR resonances of the protein were assigned, with large stretches of the protein molecule not showing any detectable resonances. SDS is shown...... of the enzyme has been solved by X-ray crystallography in its apo form and after cocrystallization with diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DNPP) leading to a complex with monoethylphosphate (MEP) esterified to the catalytically active serine. The enzyme has the same fold as reported for other cutinases but...

  6. Knockdown of selenocysteine-specific elongation factor in Amblyomma maculatum alters the pathogen burden of Rickettsia parkeri with epigenetic control by the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven W Adamson

    Full Text Available Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF. The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

  7. The hydrophobic core of twin-arginine signal sequences orchestrates specific binding to Tat-pathway related chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Shanmugham

    Full Text Available Redox enzyme maturation proteins (REMPs bind pre-proteins destined for translocation across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane via the twin-arginine translocation system and enable the enzymatic incorporation of complex cofactors. Most REMPs recognize one specific pre-protein. The recognition site usually resides in the N-terminal signal sequence. REMP binding protects signal peptides against degradation by proteases. REMPs are also believed to prevent binding of immature pre-proteins to the translocon. The main aim of this work was to better understand the interaction between REMPs and substrate signal sequences. Two REMPs were investigated: DmsD (specific for dimethylsulfoxide reductase, DmsA and TorD (specific for trimethylamine N-oxide reductase, TorA. Green fluorescent protein (GFP was genetically fused behind the signal sequences of TorA and DmsA. This ensures native behavior of the respective signal sequence and excludes any effects mediated by the mature domain of the pre-protein. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that these chimeric pre-proteins specifically bind to the cognate REMP. Furthermore, the region of the signal sequence that is responsible for specific binding to the corresponding REMP was identified by creating region-swapped chimeric signal sequences, containing parts of both the TorA and DmsA signal sequences. Surprisingly, specificity is not encoded in the highly variable positively charged N-terminal region of the signal sequence, but in the more similar hydrophobic C-terminal parts. Interestingly, binding of DmsD to its model substrate reduced membrane binding of the pre-protein. This property could link REMP-signal peptide binding to its reported proofreading function.

  8. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misri, S; Pandita, S; Kumar, R; Pandita, T K

    2008-01-01

    Genomic stability is maintained by telomeres, the end terminal structures that protect chromosomes from fusion or degradation. Shortening or loss of telomeric repeats or altered telomere chromatin structure is correlated with telomere dysfunction such as chromosome end-to-end associations that could lead to genomic instability and gene amplification. The structure at the end of telomeres is such that its DNA differs from DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to avoid nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is accomplished by forming a unique higher order nucleoprotein structure. Telomeres are attached to the nuclear matrix and have a unique chromatin structure. Whether this special structure is maintained by specific chromatin changes is yet to be thoroughly investigated. Chromatin modifications implicated in transcriptional regulation are thought to be the result of a code on the histone proteins (histone code). This code, involving phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and sumoylation of histones, is believed to regulate chromatin accessibility either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by recruiting non-histone proteins to chromatin. The histone code in which distinct histone tail-protein interactions promote engagement may be the deciding factor for choosing specific DSB repair pathways. Recent evidence suggests that such mechanisms are involved in DNA damage detection and repair. Altered telomere chromatin structure has been linked to defective DNA damage response (DDR), and eukaryotic cells have evolved DDR mechanisms utilizing proficient DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints in order to maintain genomic stability. Recent studies suggest that chromatin modifying factors play a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability. This review will summarize the role of DNA damage repair proteins specifically ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and its effectors and the telomere complex in maintaining genome stability. Copyright 2008 S. Karger

  9. Exquisite binding specificity of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin toward TF-related O-linked mucin-type glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Yu, Lu-Gang; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Swamy, Bale M

    2011-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL), a secretory protein from the soil borne phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii, has shown in our previous studies to bind strongly to the oncofetal Thomson-Friedenreich carbohydrate (Galβ1-3GalNAc-ser/thr, T or TF) antigen. TF antigen is widely expressed in many types of human cancers and the strong binding of SRL toward such a cancer-associated carbohydrate structure led us to characterize the carbohydrate binding specificity of SRL. Glycan array analysis, which included 285 glycans, shows exclusive binding of SRL to the O-linked mucin type but not N-linked glycans and amongst the mucin type O-glycans, lectin recognizes only mucin core 1, core 2 and weakly core 8 but not to other mucin core structures. It binds with high specificity to "α-anomers" but not the "β-anomers" of the TF structure. The axial C4-OH group of GalNAc and C2-OH group of Gal is both essential for SRL interaction with TF disaccharide, and substitution on C3 of galactose by sulfate or sialic acid or N-acetylglucosamine, significantly enhances the avidity of the lectin. SRL differs in its binding to TF structures compared to other known TF-binding lectins such as the Arachis hypogea (peanut) agglutinin, Agaricus bisporus (mushroom) lectin, Jackfruit, Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin) and Amaranthus caudatus (Amaranthin) lectin. Thus, SRL has unique carbohydrate-binding specificity toward TF-related O-linked carbohydrate structures. Such a binding specificity will make this lectin a very useful tool in future structural as well as functional analysis of the cellular glycans in cancer studies.

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew A; Chabner, Bruce A

    2009-11-10

    Epigenetic processes are implicated in cancer causation and progression. The acetylation status of histones regulates access of transcription factors to DNA and influences levels of gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity diminishes acetylation of histones, causing compaction of the DNA/histone complex. This compaction blocks gene transcription and inhibits differentiation, providing a rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors. In this review, we explore the biology of the HDAC enzymes, summarize the pharmacologic properties of HDAC inhibitors, and examine results of selected clinical trials. We consider the potential of these inhibitors in combination therapy with targeted drugs and with cytotoxic chemotherapy. HDAC inhibitors promote growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis of tumor cells, with minimal effects on normal tissue. In addition to decompaction of the histone/DNA complex, HDAC inhibition also affects acetylation status and function of nonhistone proteins. HDAC inhibitors have demonstrated antitumor activity in clinical trials, and one drug of this class, vorinostat, is US Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Other inhibitors in advanced stages of clinical development, including depsipeptide and MGCD0103, differ from vorinostat in structure and isoenzyme specificity, and have shown activity against lymphoma, leukemia, and solid tumors. Promising preclinical activity in combination with cytotoxics, inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, and inhibitors of proteasome function have led to combination therapy trials. HDAC inhibitors are an important emerging therapy with single-agent activity against multiple cancers, and have significant potential in combination use.

  11. TRF2 Protein Interacts with Core Histones to Stabilize Chromosome Ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Akimitsu; Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-09-23

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by a specialized nucleoprotein complex called telomeres. Both shelterin, a telomere-specific multi-protein complex, and higher order telomeric chromatin structures combine to stabilize the chromosome ends. Here, we showed that TRF2, a component of shelterin, binds to core histones to protect chromosome ends from inappropriate DNA damage response and loss of telomeric DNA. The N-terminal Gly/Arg-rich domain (GAR domain) of TRF2 directly binds to the globular domain of core histones. The conserved arginine residues in the GAR domain of TRF2 are required for this interaction. A TRF2 mutant with these arginine residues substituted by alanine lost the ability to protect telomeres and induced rapid telomere shortening caused by the cleavage of a loop structure of the telomeric chromatin. These findings showed a previously unnoticed interaction between the shelterin complex and nucleosomal histones to stabilize the chromosome ends. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Species-specific chitin-binding module 18 expansion in the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramyan, John; Stajich, Jason E

    2012-01-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is the causative agent of chytridiomycosis, which is considered one of the driving forces behind the worldwide decline in populations of amphibians. As a member of the phylum Chytridiomycota, B. dendrobatidis has diverged significantly to emerge as the only pathogen of adult vertebrates. Such shifts in lifestyle are generally accompanied by various degrees of genomic modifications, yet neither its mode of pathogenicity nor any factors associated with it have ever been identified. Presented here is the identification and characterization of a unique expansion of the carbohydrate-binding module family 18 (CBM18), specific to B. dendrobatidis. CBM (chitin-binding module) expansions have been likened to the evolution of pathogenicity in a variety of fungus species, making this expanded group a prime candidate for the identification of potential pathogenicity factors. Furthermore, the CBM18 expansions are confined to three categories of genes, each having been previously implicated in host-pathogen interactions. These correlations highlight this specific domain expansion as a potential key player in the mode of pathogenicity in this unique fungus. The expansion of CBM18 in B. dendrobatidis is exceptional in its size and diversity compared to other pathogenic species of fungi, making this genomic feature unique in an evolutionary context as well as in pathogenicity. Amphibian populations are declining worldwide at an unprecedented rate. Although various factors are thought to contribute to this phenomenon, chytridiomycosis has been identified as one of the leading causes. This deadly fungal disease is cause by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a chytrid fungus species unique in its pathogenicity and, furthermore, its specificity to amphibians. Despite more than two decades of research, the biology of this fungus species and its deadly interaction with amphibians had been notoriously difficult to unravel. Due to the alarming rate of worldwide

  13. Binding proteins enhance specific uptake rate by increasing the substrate-transporter encounter rate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosdriesz, E.; Magnúsdóttir, S.; Bruggeman, F.J.; Teusink, B.; Molenaar, D.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms rely on binding-protein assisted, active transport systems to scavenge for scarce nutrients. Several advantages of using binding proteins in such uptake systems have been proposed. However, a systematic, rigorous and quantitative analysis of the function of binding proteins is

  14. Histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase KMT2D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froimchuk, Eugene; Jang, Younghoon; Ge, Kai

    2017-09-05

    Histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D), also known as MLL4 and MLL2 in humans and Mll4 in mice, belongs to a family of mammalian histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases. It is a large protein over 5500 amino acids in size and is partially functionally redundant with KMT2C. KMT2D is widely expressed in adult tissues and is essential for early embryonic development. The C-terminal SET domain is responsible for its H3K4 methyltransferase activity and is necessary for maintaining KMT2D protein stability in cells. KMT2D associates with WRAD (WDR5, RbBP5, ASH2L, and DPY30), NCOA6, PTIP, PA1, and H3K27 demethylase UTX in one protein complex. It acts as a scaffold protein within the complex and is responsible for maintaining the stability of UTX. KMT2D is a major mammalian H3K4 mono-methyltransferase and co-localizes with lineage determining transcription factors on transcriptional enhancers. It is required for the binding of histone H3K27 acetyltransferases CBP and p300 on enhancers, enhancer activation and cell-type specific gene expression during differentiation. KMT2D plays critical roles in regulating development, differentiation, metabolism, and tumor suppression. It is frequently mutated in developmental diseases, such as Kabuki syndrome and congenital heart disease, and various forms of cancer. Further understanding of the mechanism through which KMT2D regulates gene expression will reveal why KMT2D mutations are so harmful and may help generate novel therapeutic approaches. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Endometriosis is characterized by a distinct pattern of histone 3 and histone 4 lysine modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Janice B; Colón-Díaz, Maricarmen; García, Miosotis; Gutierrez, Sylvia; Colón, Mariano; Seto, Edward; Laboy, Joaquín; Flores, Idhaliz

    2014-03-01

    The histone modification patterns in endometriosis have not been fully characterized. This gap in knowledge results in a poor understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms (and potential therapeutic targets) at play. We aimed to (1) assess global acetylation status of histone 3 (H3) and histone 4 (H4), (2) measure levels of H3 and H4 lysine (K) acetylation and methylation, and (3) to identify histone acetylation patterns in promoter regions of candidate genes in tissues from patients and controls. Global and K-specific acetylation/methylation levels of histones were measured in 24 lesions, 15 endometrium from patients, and 26 endometrium from controls. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the histone acetylation status of the promoter regions of candidate genes in tissues. The lesions were globally hypoacetylated at H3 (but not H4) compared to eutopic endometrium from controls. Lesions had significantly lower levels of H3K9ac and H4K16ac compared to eutopic endometrium from patients and controls. Tissues from patients were hypermethylated at H3K4, H3K9, and H3K27 compared to endometrium from controls. The ChIP analysis showed hypoacetylation of H3/H4 within promoter regions of candidate genes known to be downregulated in endometriosis (e.g., HOXA10, ESR1, CDH1, and p21 (WAF1/Cip1) ) in lesions versus control endometrium. The stereoidogenic factor 1 (SF1) promoter region was enriched for acetylated H3 and H4 in lesions versus control tissues, correlating with its reported high expression in lesions. This study describes the histone code of lesions and endometrium from patients with endometriosis and provides support for a possible role of histone modification in modulation of gene expression in endometriosis.

  16. Disturbing the histone code in leukemia: translocations and mutations affecting histone methyl transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Martin; Bohlander, Stefan K

    2015-05-01

    Leukemia is characterized by increased numbers of blasts originating from transformed early hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Genetic alterations are widely recognized as the main drivers of oncogenic transformation. Of considerable interest are mutations affecting the writers of epigenetic marks. In this review, we focus on histone methyltransferases--enzymes that catalyze the methylation of lysine residues in core histones. Histone methylation is a tightly controlled mechanism that is responsible for both activating as well as repressing gene expression in a site-specific manner, depending on which lysine residue is methylated. Histone methyltransferases, including MLL1, DOT1L, EZH2, and SETD2 are recurrently deregulated in human leukemia, either directly by gene mutations or balanced translocations, or indirectly as components of protein complexes that are disturbed in leukemia due to alterations of the other components in these complexes. Several small molecule inhibitors of histone methyltransferases are currently being clinically evaluated for their therapeutic potential in human leukemia. These drugs reverse some of the adverse effects of aberrant histone methylation, and can induce differentiation and cell death in leukemic blasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring the specificities of glycan-binding proteins using glycan array data and the GlycoSearch software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletter, Doron; Curnutte, Bryan; Maupin, Kevin A; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    The glycan array is a powerful tool for investigating the specificities of glycan-binding proteins. By incubating a glycan-binding protein on a glycan array, the relative binding to hundreds of different oligosaccharides can be quantified in parallel. Based on these data, much information can be obtained about the preference of a glycan-binding protein for specific subcomponents of oligosaccharides or motifs. In many cases, the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data can be time consuming and imprecise if done manually. Recently we developed software, called GlycoSearch, to facilitate the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data based on the previously developed methods called Motif Segregation and Outlier Motif Analysis. Here we describe the principles behind the software, the use of the software, and an example application. The automated, objective, and precise analysis of glycan array data should enhance the value of the data for a broad range of research applications.

  18. Non-specific binding of Na+ and Mg2+ to RNA determined by force spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarro, C. V.; Alemany, A.; Ritort, F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA duplex stability depends strongly on ionic conditions, and inside cells RNAs are exposed to both monovalent and multivalent ions. Despite recent advances, we do not have general methods to quantitatively account for the effects of monovalent and multivalent ions on RNA stability, and the thermodynamic parameters for secondary structure prediction have only been derived at 1M [Na+]. Here, by mechanically unfolding and folding a 20 bp RNA hairpin using optical tweezers, we study the RNA thermodynamics and kinetics at different monovalent and mixed monovalent/Mg2+ salt conditions. We measure the unfolding and folding rupture forces and apply Kramers theory to extract accurate information about the hairpin free energy landscape under tension at a wide range of ionic conditions. We obtain non-specific corrections for the free energy of formation of the RNA hairpin and measure how the distance of the transition state to the folded state changes with force and ionic strength. We experimentally validate the Tightly Bound Ion model and obtain values for the persistence length of ssRNA. Finally, we test the approximate rule by which the non-specific binding affinity of divalent cations at a given concentration is equivalent to that of monovalent cations taken at 100-fold concentration for small molecular constructs. PMID:22492710

  19. Nitric Oxide Binds to and Modulates the Activity of a Pollen Specific Arabidopsis Diacylglycerol Kinase

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in plants. In the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, NO causes re-orientation of the growing tube and this response is mediated by 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, in plants, NO-sensors have remained somewhat elusive. Here, the findings of an NO-binding candidate, Arabidopsis thaliana DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE 4 (ATDGK4; AT5G57690) is presented. In addition to the annotated diacylglycerol kinase domain, this molecule also harbors a predicted heme-NO/oxygen (H-NOX) binding site and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain which have been identified based on the alignment of functionally conserved amino acid residues across species. A 3D model of the molecule was constructed, and from which the locations of the kinase catalytic center, the ATP-binding site, the GC and H-NOX domains were estimated. Docking of ATP to the kinase catalytic center was also modeled. The recombinant ATDGK4 demonstrated kinase activity in vitro, catalyzing the ATP-dependent conversion of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity was inhibited by the mammalian DAG kinase inhibitor R59949 and importantly also by the NO donors diethylamine NONOate (DEA NONOate) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Recombinant ATDGK4 also has GC activity in vitro, catalyzing the conversion of guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) to cGMP. The catalytic domains of ATDGK4 kinase and GC may be independently regulated since the kinase but not the GC, was inhibited by NO while Ca2+ only stimulates the GC. It is likely that the DAG kinase product, PA, causes the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores and Ca2+ in turn activates the GC domain of ATDGK4 through a feedback mechanism. Analysis of publicly available microarray data has revealed that ATDGK4 is highly expressed in the pollen. Here, the pollen tubes of mis-expressing atdgk4 recorded slower growth rates than the wild-type (Col-0) and importantly, they showed altered

  20. Specific binding of the glycosaminoglycan /sup 3/H-heparin to bull, monkey, and rabbit spermatozoa in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrow, R.R.; Boehm, S.K.; Lenz, R.W.; Robinson, J.A.; Ax, R.L.

    In Vitro binding and some binding parameters of the glycosaminoglycan heparin to viable epididymal or ejaculated bull spermatozoa, ejaculated rabbit spermatozoa, and frozen-thawed rhesus monkey spermatozoa were investigated. Nonspecific binding was affected only by the concentration of /sup 3/H-heparin, whereas specific binding was saturable, reversible, and dependent on the pH, temperature, and calcium concentration of the incubation medium. Magnesium concentration dependence was observed in the presence of calcium but could not be detected in the absence of calcium. Bound /sup 3/H-heparin was displaced by several orders of magnitude greater concentrations of chondroitin sulfate. Scatchard plot analysis suggested multiple binding affinities for /sup 3/H-heparin to spermatozoa. /sup 3/H-heparin was shown to bind to sperm heads and flagella. Fluorescein-labeled heparin bound to acrosomal, postacrosomal, and flagellar membranes. It was concluded that the specific binding of heparin involved a proteinaceous component on, or intercalated with, spermatozoal membranes. Thus, glycosaminoglycans present in the female reproductive tract may contribute to sperm capacitation and enhance the likelihood of successful fertilization in mammals.

  1. UPF201 archaeal specific family members reveal structural similarity to RNA-binding proteins but low likelihood for RNA-binding function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy N Rao

    Full Text Available We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54 to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40% and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and five alpha-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  2. Identification of specific Hep G2 cell binding regions in Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite-threonine-asparagine-rich protein (STARP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ramsés; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Vera, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Luis Eduardo; Suarez, Jorge; Urquiza, Mauricio; Rodríguez, Ana Liliana; Reyes, Claudia Alexandra; Granados, Carmen Giovana; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2003-06-02

    It has been demonstrated that Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite threonine-asparagine-rich protein (PfSTARP) is located on the sporozoite surface. This protein's non-overlapping consecutive peptides were synthesised and tested in Hep G2 cell binding assays. Twelve high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were identified in the resulting 31 peptides. Three were found in 5' non-repeat region (amino acids 41-80). Peptides 20546 (41VIKHNRFLSEYQSNFLGGGY(60)), 20547 (61SAALKLVNSKKSGTNVNVTKY(80)) and 20548 (81NSENTNTNNNIPESSSTYTN(100)) were located in the conserved amino terminal region, as well as peptide 20548 which shared the sequence with the M region (amino acids 85-134). Six HABPs were located in region 10 (Rp10) (STDNNNTKTI). HABPs 20569 (501TSDDELNKDSCDYSEEKENI(520)) and 20570 (521KSMINAYLDKLDLETVRKIH(40)) were found in 3' non-repeat region. All these HABPs showed saturable binding and presented dissociation constants between 18 and 219 nM. The number of binding sites per Hep G2 cell ranged from 45000 to 370000. High binding peptides' critical amino acids involved in Hep G2 cell binding were determined by competition binding assays. SDS-PAGE results showed that both peptides 20570 and 20547 had at least two different sets of 44 and 38 kDa HABP receptors on Hep G2 cells. Specific modification of peptide 20546 and 20570 critical binding residues rendered these peptides immunogenic in Aotus monkeys, inducing high antibody titres against sporozoites, as assessed by IFA.

  3. Quantitative predictions of peptide binding to MHC class I molecules using specificity matrices and anchor-stratified calibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauemøller, S L; Holm, A; Hilden, J

    2001-01-01

    and predictions of peptide-MHC interactions are therefore important. Quantitative matrices representing MHC class I specificity can be used to search any query protein for the presence of MHC binding peptides. Assuming that each peptide residue contributes to binding in an additive and sequence independent manner...... predictions, we have measured the MHC class I binding of a large number of peptides. In an attempt to further improve predictions and to include sequence dependency, we subdivided the panel of peptides according to whether the peptides had zero, one or two primary anchor residues. This allowed us to define...

  4. Specific triplex binding capacity of mixed base sequence duplex nucleic acids used for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daksis, Jasmine I; Erikson, Glen H

    2005-01-01

    Specific base recognition and binding between native double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) of mixed base sequence is presented. Third-strand binding, facilitated and stabilized by a DNA intercalator, YOYO-1, occurs within 5 min at room temperature. This triplex binding capability has been used to develop a homogeneous assay that accurately detects 1-, 2-, or 3-bp mutations or deletions in the dsDNA target. Every type of 1-bp mismatch can be identified. The assay can reliably distinguish homozygous from heterozygous polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic dsDNA, thus providing a highly sensitive clinical diagnostic assay.

  5. Rapid purification of recombinant histones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Klinker

    Full Text Available The development of methods to assemble nucleosomes from recombinant histones decades ago has transformed chromatin research. Nevertheless, nucleosome reconstitution remains time consuming to this day, not least because the four individual histones must be purified first. Here, we present a streamlined purification protocol of recombinant histones from bacteria. We termed this method "rapid histone purification" (RHP as it circumvents isolation of inclusion bodies and thereby cuts out the most time-consuming step of traditional purification protocols. Instead of inclusion body isolation, whole cell extracts are prepared under strongly denaturing conditions that directly solubilize inclusion bodies. By ion exchange chromatography, the histones are purified from the extracts. The protocol has been successfully applied to all four canonical Drosophila and human histones. RHP histones and histones that were purified from isolated inclusion bodies had similar purities. The different purification strategies also did not impact the quality of octamers reconstituted from these histones. We expect that the RHP protocol can be readily applied to the purification of canonical histones from other species as well as the numerous histone variants.

  6. Biochemical Analysis of Histone Succinylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yokoyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modification (PTM of proteins is used to regulate protein activity and stability. Histone PTMs are regarded as some of the most important, as they can directly regulate gene expression through chromatin reorganization. Recently, histone proteins were found to undergo succinylation, adding to other well-known PTMs such as acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. However, there is little information regarding the enzyme which catalyzes histone lysine succinylation. In fact, it is unclear whether this reaction is enzymatic. In this study, we tested histone succinylation activity in vitro using cell nuclear extracts of HepG2 cells. Although whole nuclear extracts did not show histone succinylation activity, we found that an SP 1.0 M KCl fraction of nuclear extracts indeed had such activity. These data offer the first direct evidence that histone succinylation is an enzymatic PTM as are other histone codes in the nucleus.

  7. Comprehensive Identification and Annotation of Cell Type-Specific and Ubiquitous CTCF-Binding Sites in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Wenjie; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA elements that regulate the level of gene expression either by preventing gene silencing through the maintenance of heterochromatin boundaries or by preventing gene activation by blocking interactions between enhancers and promoters. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), a ubiquitously expressed 11-zinc-finger DNA-binding protein, is the only protein implicated in the establishment of insulators in vertebrates. While CTCF has been implicated in diverse regulatory functions, CTCF has only been studied in a limited number of cell types across human genome. Thus, it is not clear whether the identified cell type-specific differences in CTCF-binding sites are functionally significant. Here, we identify and characterize cell type-specific and ubiquitous CTCF-binding sites in the human genome across 38 cell types designated by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) consortium. These cell type-specific and ubiquitous CTCF-binding sites show uniquely versatile transcriptional functions and characteristic chromatin features. In addition, we confirm the insulator barrier function of CTCF-binding and explore the novel function of CTCF in DNA replication. These results represent a critical step toward the comprehensive and systematic understanding of CTCF-dependent insulators and their versatile roles in the human genome. PMID:22829947

  8. A time-series analysis of altered histone H3 acetylation and gene expression during the course of MMAIII-induced malignant transformation of urinary bladder cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinqiu; Wang, Jie; Chen, Xushen; Tsompana, Maria; Gaile, Daniel; Buck, Michael; Ren, Xuefeng

    2017-04-01

    Our previous studies have shown that chronic exposure to low doses of monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) causes global histone acetylation dysregulation in urothelial cells (UROtsa cells) during the course of malignant transformation. To reveal the relationship between altered histone acetylation patterns and aberrant gene expression, more specifically, the carcinogenic relevance of these alterations, we performed a time-course analysis of the binding patterns of histone 3 lysine 18 acetylation (H3K18ac) across the genome and generated global gene-expression profiles from this UROtsa cell malignant transformation model. We showed that H3K18ac, one of the most significantly upregulated histone acetylation sites following MMAIII exposure, was enriched at gene promoter-specific regions across the genome and that MMAIII-induced upregulation of H3K18ac led to an altered binding pattern in a large number of genes that was most significant during the critical window for MMAIII-induced UROtsa cells' malignant transformation. Some genes identified as having a differential binding pattern with H3K18ac, acted as upstream regulators of critical gene networks with known functions in tumor development and progression. The altered H3K18ac binding patterns not only led to changes in expression of these directly affected upstream regulators but also resulted in gene-expression changes in their regulated networks. Collectively, our data suggest that MMAIII-induced alteration of histone acetylation patterns in UROtsa cells led to a time- and malignant stage-dependent aberrant gene-expression pattern, and that some gene regulatory networks were altered in accordance with their roles in carcinogenesis, probably contributing to MMAIII-induced urothelial cell malignant transformation and carcinogenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Hurwitz

    Full Text Available Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs-named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3-that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Amy M; Huang, Wanzhi; Kou, Baijun; Estes, Mary K; Atmar, Robert L; Palzkill, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs)-named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3-that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs) through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD) values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics.

  11. Identification of specific binding sites for glucagon-like peptide-1 on the posterior lobe of the rat pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, R; Larsen, P J; Mikkelsen, J D; Sheikh, S P

    1995-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) immunoreactivity has been found in autonomic and neuroendocrine brain regions, whereas only limited data are available regarding the characterization and localization of brain GLP-1 receptors. In the present study, using quantitative in vitro autoradiography, a high density of specific binding sites for GLP-1 was characterized on sections of the posterior pituitary lobe of the rat. Low specific binding of radiolabeled GLP-1 was found in the anterior lobe and no specific binding in the intermediate lobe. To examine the specificity of GLP-1 binding sites, sections of the posterior lobe were incubated with radiolabeled GLP-1 in the presence of various peptides. Radiolabeled [Tyr39]exendin-4, a specific GLP-1 agonist, bound to these receptor sites with the same affinity as GLP-1, while glucagon and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were unable to displace 125I-GLP-1. Both unlabeled exendin-4 and GLP-1 inhibited this binding with equally high affinity. Using 125I-[Tyr39]exendin-4 as radiolabel, the concentration of biding sites was found to be 7.8 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg tissue. Further analysis of the binding data from experiments with tissue slices revealed the presence of high and low affinity binding sites. In experiments with unlabeled [Tyr39]exendin-4, the KdS were 6.2 +/- 1.4 x 10(-12) and 9.3 +/- 1.5 x 10(-10) M, respectively, and in experiments with unlabeled GLP-1, 3.4 +/- 1.8 x 10(-12) and 5.9 +/- 1.5 x 10(-10) M, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Replication-Independent Histone Deposition by the HIR Complex and Asf1

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Erin M; Antczak, Andrew J.; Bailey, Aaron O.; Franco, Alexa A; Wu, Kevin J.; Yates 3rd, John R.; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    The orderly deposition of histones onto DNA is mediated by conserved assembly complexes, including Chromatin Assembly Factor-1 (CAF-1) and the Hir proteins [1–4]. CAF-1 and the Hir proteins operate in distinct but functionally overlapping histone deposition pathways in vivo [5, 6]. The Hir proteins and CAF-1 share a common partner, the highly conserved histone H3/H4-binding protein Asf1, which binds the middle subunit of CAF-1 as well as to Hir proteins [7–11]. Asf1 binds to newly synthesized...

  13. Examination of a Method to Determine the Reference Region for Calculating the Specific Binding Ratio in Dopamine Transporter Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ayumi; Inoue, Yusuke; Asano, Yuji; Kikuchi, Kei; Miyatake, Hiroki; Tokushige, Takanobu

    2017-01-01

    The specific binding ratio (SBR) was first reported by Tossici-Bolt et al. for quantitative indicators for dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging. It is defined as the ratio of the specific binding concentration of the striatum to the non-specific binding concentration of the whole brain other than the striatum. The non-specific binding concentration is calculated based on the region of interest (ROI), which is set 20 mm inside the outer contour, defined by a threshold technique. Tossici-Bolt et al. used a 50% threshold, but sometimes we couldn't define the ROI of non-specific binding concentration (reference region) and calculate SBR appropriately with a 50% threshold. Therefore, we sought a new method for determining the reference region when calculating SBR. We used data from 20 patients who had undergone DAT imaging in our hospital, to calculate the non-specific binding concentration by the following methods, the threshold to define a reference region was fixed at some specific values (the fixing method) and reference region was visually optimized by an examiner at every examination (the visual optimization method). First, we assessed the reference region of each method visually, and afterward, we quantitatively compared SBR calculated based on each method. In the visual assessment, the scores of the fixing method at 30% and visual optimization method were higher than the scores of the fixing method at other values, with or without scatter correction. In the quantitative assessment, the SBR obtained by visual optimization of the reference region, based on consensus of three radiological technologists, was used as a baseline (the standard method). The values of SBR showed good agreement between the standard method and both the fixing method at 30% and the visual optimization method, with or without scatter correction. Therefore, the fixing method at 30% and the visual optimization method were equally suitable for determining the reference region.

  14. Recombinant thrombomodulin protects mice against histone-induced lethal thromboembolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Nakahara

    thromboembolism associated with consumptive coagulopathy, which is diagnostically indistinguishable from DIC. rTM binds to histones and neutralizes the prothrombotic action of histones. This may contribute to the effectiveness of rTM against DIC.

  15. The Histone H3 Acetylase dGcn5 Is a Key Player in Drosophila melanogaster Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Clément; Szymczak, Dimitri; Pidoux, Josette; Antoniewski, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Although it has been well established that histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are involved in the modulation of chromatin structure and gene transcription, there is only little information on their developmental role in higher organisms. Gcn5 was the first transcription factor with HAT activity identified in eukaryotes. Here we report the isolation and characterization of Drosophila melanogaster dGcn5 mutants. Null dGcn5 alleles block the onset of both oogenesis and metamorphosis, while hypomorphic dGcn5 alleles impair the formation of adult appendages and cuticle. Strikingly, the dramatic loss of acetylation of the K9 and K14 lysine residues of histone H3 in dGcn5 mutants has no noticeable effect on larval tissues. In contrast, strong cell proliferation defects in imaginal tissues are observed. In vivo complementation experiments revealed that dGcn5 integrates specific functions in addition to chromosome binding and acetylation. Surprisingly, a dGcn5 variant protein with a deletion of the bromodomain, which has been shown to recognize acetylated histones, appears to be fully functional. Our results establish dGcn5 as a major histone H3 acetylase in Drosophila which plays a key role in the control of specific morphogenetic cascades during developmental transitions. PMID:16135811

  16. A Peek into the Complex Realm of Histone Phosphorylation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Taraswi; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Although discovered long ago, posttranslational phosphorylation of histones has been in the spotlight only recently. Information is accumulating almost daily on phosphorylation of histones and their roles in cellular physiology and human diseases. An extensive cross talk exists between phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications, which together regulate various biological processes, including gene transcription, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Recent research on histone phosphorylation has demonstrated that nearly all histone types are phosphorylated at specific residues and that these modifications act as a critical intermediate step in chromosome condensation during cell division, transcriptional regulation, and DNA damage repair. As with all young fields, apparently conflicting and sometimes controversial observations about histone phosphorylations and their true functions in different species are found in the literature. Accumulating evidence suggests that instead of functioning strictly as part of a general code, histone phosphorylation probably functions by establishing cross talk with other histone modifications and serving as a platform for recruitment or release of effector proteins, leading to a downstream cascade of events. Here we extensively review published information on the complexities of histone phosphorylation, the roles of proteins recognizing these modifications and the resuting physiological outcome, and, importantly, future challenges and opportunities in this fast-moving field. PMID:22006017

  17. Evidence for sequence biases associated with patterns of histone methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combinations of histone variants and modifications, conceptually representing a histone code, have been proposed to play a significant role in gene regulation and developmental processes in complex organisms. While various mechanisms have been implicated in establishing and maintaining epigenetic patterns at specific locations in the genome, they are generally believed to be independent of primary DNA sequence on a more global scale. Results To address this systematically in the case of the human genome, we have analyzed primary DNA sequences underlying patterns of 19 different methylated histones in human primary T-cells and patterns of three methylated histones across additional human cell lines. We report strong sequence biases associated with most of these histone marks genome-wide in each cell type. Furthermore, the sequence characteristics for such association are distinct for different groups of histone marks. Conclusions These findings provide evidence of an influence of genomic sequence on patterns of histone modification associated with gene expression and chromatin programming, and they suggest that the mechanisms responsible for global histone modifications may interpret genomic sequence in various ways.

  18. Acidic domains differentially read histone H3 lysine 4 methylation status and are widely present in chromatin-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng; Wei, Wei; Chen, Jiwei; Cong, Rong; Shi, Tieliu; Bouvet, Philippe; Li, Jiwen; Wong, Jiemin; Du, James X

    2017-02-01

    Histone methylation is believed to provide binding sites for specific reader proteins, which translate histone code into biological function. Here we show that a family of acidic domain-containing proteins including nucleophosmin (NPM1), pp32, SET/TAF1β, nucleolin (NCL) and upstream binding factor (UBF) are novel H3K4me2-binding proteins. These proteins exhibit a unique pattern of interaction with methylated H3K4, as their binding is stimulated by H3K4me2 and inhibited by H3K4me1 and H3K4me3. These proteins contain one or more acidic domains consisting mainly of aspartic and/or glutamic residues that are necessary for preferential binding of H3K4me2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the acidic domain with sufficient length alone is capable of binding H3K4me2 in vitro and in vivo. NPM1, NCL and UBF require their acidic domains for association with and transcriptional activation of rDNA genes. Interestingly, by defining acidic domain as a sequence with at least 20 acidic residues in 50 continuous amino acids, we identified 655 acidic domain-containing protein coding genes in the human genome and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed that many of the acidic domain proteins have chromatin-related functions. Our data suggest that acidic domain is a novel histone binding motif that can differentially read the status of H3K4 methylation and is broadly present in chromatin-associated proteins.

  19. Finding combinatorial histone code by semi-supervised biclustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combinatorial histone modification is an important epigenetic mechanism for regulating chromatin state and gene expression. Given the rapid accumulation of genome-wide histone modification maps, there is a pressing need for computational methods capable of joint analysis of multiple maps to reveal combinatorial modification patterns. Results We present the Semi-Supervised Coherent and Shifted Bicluster Identification algorithm (SS-CoSBI. It uses prior knowledge of combinatorial histone modifications to guide the biclustering process. Specifically, co-occurrence frequencies of histone modifications characterized by mass spectrometry are used as probabilistic priors to adjust the similarity measure in the biclustering process. Using a high-quality set of transcriptional enhancers and associated histone marks, we demonstrate that SS-CoSBI outperforms its predecessor by finding histone modification and genomic locus biclusters with higher enrichment of enhancers. We apply SS-CoSBI to identify multiple cell-type-specific combinatorial histone modification states associated with human enhancers. We show enhancer histone modification states are correlated with the expression of nearby genes. Further, we find that enhancers with the histone mark H3K4me1 have higher levels of DNA methylation and decreased expression of nearby genes, suggesting a functional interplay between H3K4me1 and DNA methylation that can modulate enhancer activities. Conclusions The analysis presented here provides a systematic characterization of combinatorial histone codes of enhancers across three human cell types using a novel semi-supervised biclustering algorithm. As epigenomic maps accumulate, SS-CoSBI will become increasingly useful for understanding combinatorial chromatin modifications by taking advantage of existing knowledge. Availability and implementation SS-CoSBI is implemented in C. The source code is freely available at http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/labs/tan/SS-CoSBI.gz.

  20. Finding combinatorial histone code by semi-supervised biclustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Li; Tan, Kai

    2012-07-03

    Combinatorial histone modification is an important epigenetic mechanism for regulating chromatin state and gene expression. Given the rapid accumulation of genome-wide histone modification maps, there is a pressing need for computational methods capable of joint analysis of multiple maps to reveal combinatorial modification patterns. We present the Semi-Supervised Coherent and Shifted Bicluster Identification algorithm (SS-CoSBI). It uses prior knowledge of combinatorial histone modifications to guide the biclustering process. Specifically, co-occurrence frequencies of histone modifications characterized by mass spectrometry are used as probabilistic priors to adjust the similarity measure in the biclustering process. Using a high-quality set of transcriptional enhancers and associated histone marks, we demonstrate that SS-CoSBI outperforms its predecessor by finding histone modification and genomic locus biclusters with higher enrichment of enhancers. We apply SS-CoSBI to identify multiple cell-type-specific combinatorial histone modification states associated with human enhancers. We show enhancer histone modification states are correlated with the expression of nearby genes. Further, we find that enhancers with the histone mark H3K4me1 have higher levels of DNA methylation and decreased expression of nearby genes, suggesting a functional interplay between H3K4me1 and DNA methylation that can modulate enhancer activities. The analysis presented here provides a systematic characterization of combinatorial histone codes of enhancers across three human cell types using a novel semi-supervised biclustering algorithm. As epigenomic maps accumulate, SS-CoSBI will become increasingly useful for understanding combinatorial chromatin modifications by taking advantage of existing knowledge. SS-CoSBI is implemented in C. The source code is freely available at http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/labs/tan/SS-CoSBI.gz.

  1. The putative oncogene GASC1 demethylates tri- and dimethylated lysine 9 on histone H3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cloos, Paul A C; Christensen, Jesper; Agger, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Methylation of lysine and arginine residues on histone tails affects chromatin structure and gene transcription. Tri- and dimethylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me3/me2) is required for the binding of the repressive protein HP1 and is associated with heterochromatin formation and transcript...

  2. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianwei; Yao, Peng; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Qunye

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs. Methods and Results Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye) could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela) and suspended cells (K562) even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein) to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it. Conclusions These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results. PMID

  3. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Lu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs.Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela and suspended cells (K562 even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it.These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  4. Functional redundancy of division specific penicillin-binding proteins in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassine, Jad; Xu, Meizhu; Sidiq, Karzan R; Emmins, Robyn; Errington, Jeff; Daniel, Richard A

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial cell division involves the dynamic assembly of a diverse set of proteins that coordinate the invagination of the cell membrane and synthesis of cell wall material to create the new cell poles of the separated daughter cells. Penicillin-binding protein PBP 2B is a key cell division protein in Bacillus subtilis proposed to have a specific catalytic role in septal wall synthesis. Unexpectedly, we find that a catalytically inactive mutant of PBP 2B supports cell division, but in this background the normally dispensable PBP 3 becomes essential. Phenotypic analysis of pbpC mutants (encoding PBP 3) shows that PBP 2B has a crucial structural role in assembly of the division complex, independent of catalysis, and that its biochemical activity in septum formation can be provided by PBP 3. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a close sequence relationship between PBP 3 and Staphylococcus aureus PBP 2A, which is responsible for methicillin resistance. These findings suggest that mechanisms for rescuing cell division when the biochemical activity of PBP 2B is perturbed evolved prior to the clinical use of β-lactams. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Simplified immunoassay for rapid Dengue serotype diagnosis, revealing insensitivity to non-specific binding interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C.C.L. Loureiro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proof of concept of an immunoassay, which is easy to implement, for rapid Dengue virus (DENV serotype diagnosis, in the early infection stage, is reported. The four-layer assay is immobilized onto a thin gold film and relies on a low cost, disposable polymer biochip for optical surface plasmon resonance sensing and detection. The protocol comprises Neutravidin-Biotin mediated monoclonal antibody (MAB attachment as the functionalized sensing element. Formation of the MAB-DENV complex results in a pronounced thickness change that is optically recorded in real time, employing a microfluidic set-up. Virus presence is confirmed by atomic force microscopy from the same sample. Serum samples were collected from a patient in acute febrile state. Simultaneous serological analysis by means of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, independently, confirmed presence of DENV2 and DENV3. The protocol proved applicable in presence of strong non-specific binding interference that originates from, and is caused by, various blood, serum and other body fluid constituents. False positive indications for both, negative serum and blood control samples were not observed. The achievable limit of detection was estimated to be 2×104 particles/ml. Eventually, the method can be modified towards detection of other viruses by using the same protocol.

  6. Noc protein binds to specific DNA sequences to coordinate cell division with chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling Juan; Ishikawa, Shu; Kawai, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake; Errington, Jeff

    2009-07-08

    Coordination of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis is crucial for efficient cell proliferation. In Bacillus subtilis, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc protects the chromosomes by associating with the chromosome and preventing cell division in its vicinity. Using protein localization, ChAP-on-Chip and bioinformatics, we have identified a consensus Noc-binding DNA sequence (NBS), and have shown that Noc is targeted to about 70 discrete regions scattered around the chromosome, though absent from a large region around the replication terminus. Purified Noc bound specifically to an NBS in vitro. NBSs inserted near the replication terminus bound Noc-YFP and caused a delay in cell division. An autonomous plasmid carrying an NBS array recruited Noc-YFP and conferred a severe Noc-dependent inhibition of cell division. This shows that Noc is a potent inhibitor of division, but that its activity is strictly localized by the interaction with NBS sites in vivo. We propose that Noc serves not only as a spatial regulator of cell division to protect the nucleoid, but also as a timing device with an important role in the coordination of chromosome segregation and cell division.

  7. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeremy L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm aminopeptidase N (APN and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM, and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM, which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research.

  8. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  9. Developmental variation of the SUUR protein binding correlates with gene regulation and specific chromatin types in D. melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Daniil A; Koryakov, Dmitry E; Belyakin, Stepan N

    2014-06-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are organized in large chromatin domains that maintain proper gene activity in the cell. These domains may be permissive or repressive to the transcription of underlying genes. Based on its protein makeup, chromatin in Drosophila cell culture has been recently categorized into five color-coded states. Suppressor of Under-Replication (SUUR) protein was found to be the major component present in all three repressive chromatin states named BLACK, BLUE, and GREEN and to be depleted from the active YELLOW and RED chromatin types. Here, we addressed the question of developmental dynamics of SUUR binding as a marker of repressed chromatin types. We established genomewide SUUR binding profiles in larval salivary gland, brain, and embryos using DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) technique, performed their pairwise comparisons and comparisons with the published data from Drosophila Kc cells. SUUR binding pattern was found to vary between the samples. Increase in SUUR binding predominantly correlated with local gene repression suggesting heterochromatin formation. Reduction in SUUR binding often coincided with activation of tissue-specific genes probably reflecting the transition to permissive chromatin state and increase in accessibility to specific transcription factors. SUUR binding plasticity accompanied by the regulation of the underlying genes was mainly observed in BLACK, BLUE, and RED chromatin types. Our results provide novel insight into the developmental dynamics of repressive chromatin and reveal a link to the chromatin-guided regulation of gene expression.

  10. Binding of doa kinase to specific loci in polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováciková, Michaela; Raska, Ivan; Mateásik, Anton; Chase, Bruce A; Farkas, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Highly conserved LAMMER kinases belong to the family of dual-specific proteins phosphorylating enzymes with homologues in yeast, plants, Drosophila and mammals. SR proteins, several members of which are components of the spliceosomal complex and have been implicated in the control of alternative splicing, were identified among first targets of LAMMER kinases. The Drosophila locus Darkener of apricot (Doa) encodes best known representative of the LAMMER family of kinases, which is essential for embryonic and postembryonic development, neurogenesis, differentiation of photoreceptors, and sex determination. DOA kinase was detected on squash preparations of polythene chromosomes using anti-DOA antibodies in combination with indirect immunofluorescence. Here we provide evidence for active chromosomal presence of DOA kinase in Drosophila salivary glands, and increased abundance of DOA at eleven specific loci of polythene chromosomes where it can be involved in on-site control of splicing process. Many genes that may be found at the loci with increased abundance fall into three major groups based on their known functions. First group contains genes that code for transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins or chromatin modifying enzymes. Second group of genes encode proteins which belong to proteasomal components, lipid enzymes, stress-sensitive ER proteins and caspases which are all early/proximal components of apoptotic process. Third group of genes comprises of tRNA coding genes or genes of tRNA synthases (ligases), all involved in protein synthesis. Some of the encoded protein products are confirmed or potential substrates of DOA kinase activity. Data indicate that genes encoding proteins involved in closely related pathways are concentrated at certain loci to achieve more efficient regulation of their expression as exemplified from distribution of DOA protein on Drosophila polythene chromosomes.

  11. Carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity of legume lectins in respect to their proposed biological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Viana Ramos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The lectins, proteins which specifically recognize carbohydrate moieties, have been extensively studied in many biochemical and structural aspects in order to establish the molecular basis of this non-catalytic event. On the other hand, their clinical and agricultural potentials have been growing fast. Although lectins, mainly those from legume plants, had been investigated for biological properties, studies about the physiological functions of lectins are scarce in literature. Therefore, despite the accumulated data on lectins (as proteins, the role played by these signalizing molecules is poorly discussed. In the light of our accumulated results on legume lectins, specially those obtained from plants belonging to the Diocleinae sub-tribe and available data in literature, we discuss here the main hypothesis of their functions according to their carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity.As lectinas, proteinas que especificamente reconhecem estruturas que contém carboidratos, têm sido extensivamente estudadas em muitos aspectos bioquímicos e estruturais, objetivando estabelecer as bases moleculares deste evento não-catalítico. Por outro lado, os potenciais clínicos e agriculturais destas proteínas têm crescido rapidamente. Embora as lectinas, principalmente aquelas de legumes tenham sido bastante investigadas em suas propriedades biológicas, estudos sobre as funcões fisiológicas de lectinas são escassos na literatura. Além disto, a despeito da quantidade de dados acumulados sobre lectinas (como proteínas, o papel desempenhado por estas moléculas de sinalização é pobremente discutido. Valendo-se de nossos estudos sobre lectinas de leguminosas, principalmente da sub-tribo Diocleinae, e outros dados presentes na literatura, discutimos aqui, as principais hipóteses de suas funções com base na especificidade por carboidratos e glicanos complexos.

  12. Identification of Putative Vero Cell Protein(s) that Bind Specifically to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa plasma membrane proteins were identified as viral envelope targets. Competitive binding assay showed these proteins competing with dengue virus binding. MTT assay indicate that viability of vero cells increases in cultures pretreated with 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa proteins ...

  13. Flow Cytometry-Based Bead-Binding Assay for Measuring Receptor Ligand Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprokholt, Joris K.; Hertoghs, Nina; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a fluorescent bead-binding assay, which is an efficient and feasible method to measure interaction between ligands and receptors on cells. In principle, any ligand can be coated on fluorescent beads either directly or via antibodies. Binding between ligand-coated beads

  14. Characterization of the carbohydrate binding specificity and kinetic parameters of lectins by using surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Haseley, S.R.; Talaga, P.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    An accurate, rapid, and sensitive method for characterizing the carbohydrate binding properties of lectins using a BIAcore apparatus and the detection method of surface plasmon resonance is described. As a model study, the sialic acid binding lectins from Sambucus nigra and Maackia amurensis, which

  15. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2005-01-01

    . The ability of NAC proteins to dimerize and to bind DNAwas analysed by structure-based mutagenesis. This identified two salt bridge-forming residues essential for NAC protein dimerization. Alteration of basic residues in a loop region containing several highly conserved residues abolished DNA binding. Thus...

  16. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2?) and tungstate (WO4 2?). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across

  17. Uncovering the Peptide-Binding Specificities of HLA-C: A General Strategy To Determine the Specificity of Any MHC Class I Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette

    2014-01-01

    representing their peptide-binding motifs. The motifs prominently shared a conserved C-terminal primary anchor with hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as one or more diverse primary and auxiliary anchors at P1, P2, P3, and/or P7. Matrices were used to generate a large panel of HLA-C-specific peptide...

  18. Role of Lysine-54 in determining cofactor specificity and binding in human dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shaoming; Tan, Xuehai; Thompson, P.D.; Freisheim, J.H. (Medical College of Ohio, Todedo (USA)); Appleman, J.R.; Blakley, R.L. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA)); Sheridan, R.P.; Venkataraghavan, R. (Lederle Laboratories, Pearl River, NY (USA))

    1990-09-04

    Lysine-54 of human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) appears to be involved in the interaction with the 2{prime}-phosphate of NADPH and is conserved as a basic residue in other species. Studies have suggested that in Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase Arg-43, the homologous residue at this position, plays an important role in the binding of NADPH and in the differentiation of K{sub m} values for NADPH and NADH. A Lys-54 to Gln-54 mutant (K54Q) of hDHFR has been constructed by oligodeoxynucleotide-directed mutagenesis in order to study the role of Lys-54 in differentiating K{sub m} and k{sub cat} values for NADPH and NADH as well as in other functions of hDHFR. The purpose of this paper is to delineate in quantitative terms the magnitude of the effect of the Lys-54 to Gln-54 replacement on the various kinetic parameters of hDHFR. Such quantitative effects cannot be predicted solely on the basis of X-ray structures. The ratio of K{sub m}(NADH)/K{sub m}(NADPH) decreases from 69 in the wild-type enzyme to 4.7 in the K54Q enzyme, suggesting that Lys-54, among other interactions between protein side-chain residues and the 2{prime}-phosphate, makes a major contribution in terms of binding energy and differentiation of K{sub m} values for NADPH and NADH. Agents at concentrations that show activating effects on the wild-type enzyme such as potassium chloride and urea all inactivate the K54Q enzyme. There appear to be no gross conformational differences between wild-type and K54Q enzyme molecules as judged by competitive ELISA using peptide-specific antibodies against human dihydrofolate reductase and from protease susceptibility studies on both wild-type and K54Q mutant enzymes. The pH-rate profiles using NADPH for K54Q and wild-type enzymes show divergences at certain pH values, suggesting the possibility of alteration(s) in the steps of the catalytic pathway for the K54Q enzyme.

  19. DNA binding specificity of ATAF2, a NAC domain transcription factor targeted for degradation by Tobacco mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of the host transcriptome represents a key battleground in the interaction of plants and pathogens. Specifically, plants have evolved complex defense systems that induce profound transcriptional changes in response to pathogen attack while pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert or disable these defenses. Several NAC transcription factors such as ATAF2 have been linked to plant defense responses, including those targeting viruses. The replication protein of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV has been shown to interact with and target the degradation of ATAF2. These findings suggest that the transcriptional targets of ATAF2 are involved in defense against TMV. Results To detect potential ATAF2 transcriptional targets, a genomic pull-down assay was utilized to identify ATAF2 promoter binding sequences. Subsequent mobility shift and DNA footprinting assays identified a 30-bp ATAF2 binding sequence. An in vivo GUS reporter system confirmed the function of the identified 30-bp binding sequence as an ATAF2 specific transcriptional activator in planta. Gel filtration studies of purified ATAF2 protein and mutagenesis studies of the 30-bp binding sequence indicate ATAF2 functions as a dimer. Computational analysis of interacting promoter sequences identified a corresponding 25-bp A/T-rich consensus sequence with repeating [GC]AAA motifs. Upon ATAF2 induction real-time qRT-PCR studies confirmed the accumulation of select gene transcripts whose promoters contain this consensus sequence. Conclusion We report the identification of a cis-regulatory binding sequence for ATAF2. Different from other known NAC protein binding sequences, the A/T-rich ATAF2 binding motif represents a novel binding sequence for NAC family proteins. Combined this information represents a unique tool for the identification of ATAF2 target genes.

  20. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagaria, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and non-transport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. Typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP) and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consists of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations have been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the integral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, we report 1.9{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound to

  1. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Bagaria; D Kumaran; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    The APT-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and nontransport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport, and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP), and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consits of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations hafve been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the ingral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, they report 1.9 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound

  2. Binding of the mannose-specific lectin, griffithsin, to HIV-1 gp120 exposes the CD4-binding site

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available :359-69. 37 8. Burrer, R., S. Haessig-Einius, A. M. Aubertin, and C. Moog. 2005. 38 Neutralizing as well as non-neutralizing polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)G 39 from infected patients capture HIV-1 via antibodies directed against the 40 principal.... Moore, G. D. Tomaras, C. K. 5 Wibmer, A. Puren, A. DeCamp, P. B. Gilbert, B. Wood, D. C. Montefiori, 6 J. M. Binley, G. M. Shaw, B. F. Haynes, J. R. Mascola, and L. Morris. 7 2009. Antibody specificities associated with neutralization breadth...

  3. Highly specific off-target binding identified and eliminated during the humanization of an antibody against FGF receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Arthur E; Lin, Benjamin C; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Desnoyers, Luc; Shen, Ben-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Off-target binding can significantly affect the pharmacokinetics (PK), tissue distribution, efficacy and toxicity of a therapeutic antibody. Herein we describe the development of a humanized anti-fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) antibody as a potential therapeutic for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A chimeric anti-FGFR4 monoclonal antibody (chLD1) was previously shown to block ligand binding and to inhibit FGFR4-mediated signaling as well as tumor growth in vivo. A humanized version of chLD1, hLD1.vB, had similar binding affinity and in vitro blocking activity, but it exhibited rapid clearance, poor target tissue biodistribution and limited efficacy when compared to chLD1 in a HUH7 human HCC xenograft mouse model. These problems were traced to instability of the molecule in rodent serum. Size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography, immunoprecipitation and mass spectral sequencing identified a specific interaction between hLD1.vB and mouse complement component 3 (C3). A PK study in C3 knock-out mice further confirmed this specific interaction. Subsequently, an affinity-matured variant derived from hLD1.vB (hLD1.v22), specifically selected for its lack of binding to mouse C3 was demonstrated to have a PK profile and in vivo efficacy similar to that of chLD1 in mice. Although reports of non-specific off-target binding have been observed for other antibodies, this represents the first report identifying a specific off-target interaction that affected disposition and biological activity. Screens developed to identify general non-specific interactions are likely to miss the rare and highly specific cross-reactivity identified in this study, thus highlighting the importance of animal models as a proxy for avoiding unexpected clinical outcomes. PMID:21540647

  4. Receptor binding proteins of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophages A118 and P35 recognize serovar-specific teichoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, Regula; Habann, Matthias; Eugster, Marcel R. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lurz, Rudi [Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Calendar, Richard [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202 (United States); Klumpp, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.klumpp@hest.ethz.ch [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of a bacteriophage to the host requires recognition of a cell wall-associated receptor by a receptor binding protein (RBP). This recognition is specific, and high affinity binding is essential for efficient virus attachment. The molecular details of phage adsorption to the Gram-positive cell are poorly understood. We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. Two proteins were identified as RBPs in phage A118. Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both proteins. In phage P35, protein gp16 could be identified as RBP and the role of both rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine in phage adsorption was confirmed. Immunogold-labeling and transmission electron microscopy allowed the creation of a topological model of the A118 phage tail. - Highlights: • We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the Siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. • The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. • Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both receptor binding proteins in phage A118. • Rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine are required for adsorption of phage P35. • We preset a topological model of the A118 phage tail.

  5. /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor specific binding to placentas and fetal membranes from varoius pregnancy states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, G.E.; Siddiqi, T.A.; Rao, Ch. V.; Carman, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Specific binding of /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) to homogenates of term human placentas and fetal membranes from normal and appropriate for gestational age (N = 20), intrauterine growth retarded (N = 9), twin (N = 11), White class AB diabetic (N = 12), and large for gestational age (N = 13) pregnancies was measured. In all pregnancy states, placentas bound approximately four times more /sup 125/I-hEGF than did fetal membranes (P<0.0001). There was no significant differnce in /sup 125/I-hEGF binding to fetal membranes from the various pregnancy states (P<0.05). /sup 125/I-hEGF specific binding to placentas from intrauterine growth retarded or twin pregnancies was significantly greater compared with placentas from normal and appropriate for gestational age pregnancies (P<0.05). The binding to placentas from pregnancies complicated by White class AB diabetes or large for gestational age infants, on the other hand, was not significantly different from that to placentas from normal and appropriate for gestational age pregnancies. /sup 125/I-hEGF specific binding did not differ between placentas from intrauterine growth retarded or twin pregnancies (P<0.05). Placental and fetal membrane /sup 125/I-hEGF binding did not vary with fetal sex, maternal race, placental weight, or gestational age between 37 to 42 weeks (P<0.05). Placental but not fetal membrane /sup 125/I-hEGF binding increased with increasing infant weight when appropriate for gestational age and large for gestational age infants were included (P<0.05, r = 0.38, N = 32) but not for intrauterine growth retarded, appropriate for gestational age, or large for gestational age infants alone.

  6. Patterns and Mechanisms of Ancestral Histone Protein Inheritance in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Welsem, Tibor; Friedman, Nir; Rando, Oliver J.; van Leeuwen, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Replicating chromatin involves disruption of histone-DNA contacts and subsequent reassembly of maternal histones on the new daughter genomes. In bulk, maternal histones are randomly segregated to the two daughters, but little is known about the fine details of this process: do maternal histones re-assemble at preferred locations or close to their original loci? Here, we use a recently developed method for swapping epitope tags to measure the disposition of ancestral histone H3 across the yeast genome over six generations. We find that ancestral H3 is preferentially retained at the 5′ ends of most genes, with strongest retention at long, poorly transcribed genes. We recapitulate these observations with a quantitative model in which the majority of maternal histones are reincorporated within 400 bp of their pre-replication locus during replication, with replication-independent replacement and transcription-related retrograde nucleosome movement shaping the resulting distributions of ancestral histones. We find a key role for Topoisomerase I in retrograde histone movement during transcription, and we find that loss of Chromatin Assembly Factor-1 affects replication-independent turnover. Together, these results show that specific loci are enriched for histone proteins first synthesized several generations beforehand, and that maternal histones re-associate close to their original locations on daughter genomes after replication. Our findings further suggest that accumulation of ancestral histones could play a role in shaping histone modification patterns. PMID:21666805

  7. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    residues, H142, Q150, and T152, were demonstrated to be involved in the distinct pharmacology of the α4-α4 versus α4-β2 binding sites. To obtain insight into the three-dimensional structure of the α4-α4 binding site, a surrogate protein reproducing α4-α4 binding characteristics was constructed...... by introduction of three point mutations, R104H, L112Q, and M114T, into the binding pocket of Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine-binding protein (Ls-AChBP). Cocrystallization with two agonists possessing distinct pharmacologic profiles, NS3920 [1-(6-bromopyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane] and NS3573 [1-(5-ethoxypyridin-3......-yl)-1,4-diazepane], highlights the roles of the three residues in determining binding affinities and functional properties of ligands at the α4-α4 interface. Confirmed by mutational studies, our structures suggest a unique ligand-specific role of residue H142 on the α4 subunit. In the cocrystal...

  8. ALIX is a Lys63-specific polyubiquitin binding protein that functions in retrovirus budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlatshahi, Dara P; Sandrin, Virginie; Vivona, Sandro; Shaler, Thomas A; Kaiser, Stephen E; Melandri, Francesco; Sundquist, Wesley I; Kopito, Ron R

    2012-12-11

    The diversity of ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent signaling is attributed to the ability of this small protein to form different types of covalently linked polyUb chains and to the existence of Ub binding proteins that interpret this molecular syntax. We used affinity capture/mass spectrometry to identify ALIX, a component of the ESCRT pathway, as a Ub binding protein. We report that the V domain of ALIX binds directly and selectively to K63-linked polyUb chains, exhibiting a strong preference for chains composed of more than three Ub. Sequence analysis identified two potential Ub binding sites on a single α-helical surface within the coiled-coil region of the V domain. Mutation of these putative Ub binding sites inhibited polyUb binding to the isolated V domain in vitro and impaired budding of lentiviruses. These data reveal an important role for K63 polyUb binding by ALIX in retroviral release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Astrocytes cultured from specific brain regions differ in their expression of adrenergic binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernsberger, P; Iacovitti, L; Reis, D J

    1990-05-28

    We sought to characterize regional heterogeneity of astrocytes using adrenergic receptor sites as cellular markers. Primary cultures made from 6 regions of neonatal rat brain consisted almost exclusively of astrocytes. Membranes from astrocytes cultured 1-3 weeks were prepared for radioligand binding assays of beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic sites using the ligands [3H]dihydroalprenolol and [3H]p-aminoclonidine, respectively. Receptor expression was not affected by time in culture. Astrocytes from different brain regions varied up to 3-fold with respect to number but not affinity for both classes of adrenergic binding site with a rank order of cerebral cortex = superior colliculus greater than hippocampus = ventral midbrain greater than or equal to caudate nucleus greater than or equal to hypothalamus. Binding to beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors was positively correlated across brain regions. Astrocytic receptor binding in each region did not correspond to total receptor levels assessed by quantitative autoradiography. We conclude that: (a) astrocytes are markedly heterogeneous between major brain regions with respect to expression of adrenergic binding sites; (b) regional variations in the density of adrenergic binding sites in brain reflect, in part, local specialization of astrocytes; and (c) a substantial proportion of the adrenergic binding sites in some brain regions may be on astrocytes.

  10. Histone H3.3 mutations: a variant path to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Benjamin T K; Knoepfler, Paul S

    2013-11-11

    A host of cancer types exhibit aberrant histone modifications. Recently, distinct and recurrent mutations in a specific histone variant, histone H3.3, have been implicated in a high proportion of malignant pediatric brain cancers. The presence of mutant H3.3 histone disrupts epigenetic posttranslational modifications near genes involved in cancer processes and in brain function. Here, we review possible mechanisms by which mutant H3.3 histones may act to promote tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we discuss how perturbations in normal H3.3 chromatin-related and epigenetic functions may more broadly contribute to the formation of human cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sporozoite and liver stage antigen Plasmodium falciparum peptides bind specifically to human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Alvaro; García, Javier; Vera, Ricardo; López, Ramsés; Suarez, Jorge; Rodríguez, Luis; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Tovar, Diana; Forero, Martha; Bermudez, Adriana; Cortes, Jimena; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-03-12

    Sporozoite and Liver Stage Antigen (SALSA) sequence synthetic peptides were used in HepG2 cell binding assays to identify regions involved in parasite invasion. SALSA 20608 ( 21IWASEKKDEKEASEQGEESHY40) and 20611 ( 64KKDDGTDKVQEKVLEKSPKY83) peptides were determined as having high binding activity in HepG2 cell assays, some of them were located in immunogenic regions. Immune-fluorescence antibody test with 24276 (20608 peptide analogue, CGIWSSMKMDEKMAAMQGEESHCG) showed sporozoite and merozoite reactivity. This data suggests SALSA high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) possible role in hepatic cell invasion and merozoite invasion of erythrocytes.

  12. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  13. The conserved PA14 domain of cell wall-associated fungal adhesins governs their glycan-binding specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P.W.J.; Klis, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast cell wall-associated, lectin-like adhesins form large families that mediate flocculation and host cell recognition. The glycan specificity of individual adhesins is largely unknown. Zupancic et al. (this issue of Molecular Microbiology) used glycan microarrays to compare the glycan-binding

  14. A plasmonic multi-logic gate platform based on sequence-specific binding of estrogen receptors and gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallares, Roger M; Bosman, Michel; Thanh, Nguyen T K; Su, Xiaodi

    2016-12-08

    A hybrid system made of gold nanorods (AuNRs) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is used to build a versatile multi-logic gate platform, capable of performing six different logic operations. The sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to the DNA drives the optical response of the design.

  15. Using RNase sequence specificity to refine the identification of RNA-protein binding regions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xinguo; Li Lang; Shen Changyu; Wang Guohua; Wang Xin; Mooney Sean D; Edenberg Howard J; Sanford Jeremy R; Liu Yunlong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Massively parallel pyrosequencing is a high-throughput technology that can sequence hundreds of thousands of DNA/RNA fragments in a single experiment. Combining it with immunoprecipitation-based biochemical assays, such as cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP), provides a genome-wide method to detect the sites at which proteins bind DNA or RNA. In a CLIP-pyrosequencing experiment, the resolutions of the detected protein binding regions are partially determined by the length of the...

  16. Rationally Designed PI3Kα Mutants to Mimic ATR and Their Use to Understand Binding Specificity of ATR Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yipin; Knapp, Mark; Crawford, Kenneth; Warne, Robert; Elling, Robert; Yan, Kelly; Doyle, Michael; Pardee, Gwynn; Zhang, Li; Ma, Sylvia; Mamo, Mulugeta; Ornelas, Elizabeth; Pan, Yue; Bussiere, Dirksen; Jansen, Johanna; Zaror, Isabel; Lai, Albert; Barsanti, Paul; Sim, Janet

    2017-06-02

    ATR, a protein kinase in the PIKK family, plays a critical role in the cell DNA-damage response and is an attractive anticancer drug target. Several potent and selective inhibitors of ATR have been reported showing significant antitumor efficacy, with most advanced ones entering clinical trials. However, due to the absence of an experimental ATR structure, the determinants contributing to ATR inhibitors' potency and specificity are not well understood. Here we present the mutations in the ATP-binding site of PI3Kα to progressively transform the pocket to mimic that of ATR. The generated PI3Kα mutants exhibit significantly improved affinity for selective ATR inhibitors in multiple chemical classes. Furthermore, we obtained the X-ray structures of the PI3Kα mutants in complex with the ATR inhibitors. The crystal structures together with the analysis on the inhibitor affinity profile elucidate the roles of individual amino acid residues in the binding of ATR inhibitors, offering key insights for the binding mechanism and revealing the structure features important for the specificity of ATR inhibitors. The ability to obtain structural and binding data for these PI3Kα mutants, together with their ATR-like inhibitor binding profiles, makes these chimeric PI3Kα proteins valuable model systems for structure-based inhibitor design. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthetic Ubiquinones Specifically Bind to Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1 (VDAC1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Masatoshi; Okuda, Ayaka; Yamamoto, Takenori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2017-01-31

    The role of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) as a metabolic gate of the mitochondrial outer membrane has been firmly established; however, its involvement in the regulation of mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) remains extremely controversial. Although some low-molecular-weight chemicals have been proposed to modulate the regulatory role of VDAC in the induction of PT, direct binding between these chemicals and VDAC has not yet been demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated whether the ubiquinone molecule directly binds to VDAC in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria through a photoaffinity labeling technique using two photoreactive ubiquinones (PUQ-1 and PUQ-2). The results of the labeling experiments demonstrated that PUQ-1 and PUQ-2 specifically bind to VDAC1 and that the labeled position is located in the C-terminal region Phe221-Lys234, connecting the 15th and 16th β-strand sheets. Mutations introduced in this region (R224A, Y225A, D228A, and Y225A/D228A) hardly affected the binding affinity of PUQ-1. PUQ-1 and PUQ-2 both significantly suppressed the Ca2+-induced mitochondrial PT (monitored by mitochondrial swelling) at the one digit μM level. Thus, the results of the present study provided, for the first time to our knowledge, direct evidence indicating that the ubiquinone molecule specifically binds to VDAC1 through its quinone-head ring.

  18. Anomer-Specific Recognition and Dynamics in a Fucose-Binding Lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonik, Paweł M; Volkov, Alexander N; Broder, Ursula N; Re, Daniele Lo; van Nuland, Nico A J; Crowley, Peter B

    2016-03-01

    Sugar binding by a cell surface ∼29 kDa lectin (RSL) from the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum was characterized by NMR spectroscopy. The complexes formed with four monosaccharides and four fucosides were studied. Complete resonance assignments and backbone dynamics were determined for RSL in the sugar-free form and when bound to l-fucose or d-mannose. RSL was found to interact with both the α- and the β-anomer of l-fucose and the "fucose like" sugars d-arabinose and l-galactose. Peak splitting was observed for some resonances of the binding site residues. The assignment of the split signals to the α- or β-anomer was confirmed by comparison with the spectra of RSL bound to methyl-α-l-fucoside or methyl-β-l-fucoside. The backbone dynamics of RSL were sensitive to the presence of ligand, with the protein adopting a more compact structure upon binding to l-fucose. Taking advantage of tryptophan residues in the binding sites, we show that the indole resonance is an excellent reporter on ligand binding. Each sugar resulted in a distinct signature of chemical shift perturbations, suggesting that tryptophan signals are a sufficient probe of sugar binding.

  19. An interferon alpha2 mutant optimized by phage display for IFNAR1 binding confers specifically enhanced antitumor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalie, Eyal; Jaitin, Diego A; Abramovich, Renne; Schreiber, Gideon

    2007-04-13

    All alpha-interferons (IFNalpha) bind the IFNAR1 receptor subunit with low affinity. Increasing the binding affinity was shown to specifically increase the antiproliferative potency of IFNalpha2. Here, we constructed a phage display library by randomizing three positions on IFNalpha2 previously shown to confer weak binding to IFNAR1. The tightest binding variant selected, comprised of mutations H57Y, E58N, and Q61S (YNS), was shown to bind IFNAR1 60-fold tighter compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, and 3-fold tighter compared with IFNbeta. Binding of YNS to IFNAR2 was comparable with wild-type IFNalpha2. The YNS mutant conferred a 150-fold higher antiproliferative potency in WISH cells compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, whereas its antiviral activity was increased by only 3.5-fold. The high antiproliferative activity was related to an induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by annexin V binding assays, and to specific gene induction, particularly TRAIL. To determine the potency of the YNS mutant in a xenograft cancer model, we injected it twice a week to nude mice carrying transplanted MDA231 human breast cancer cells. After 5 weeks, no tumors remained in mice treated with YNS, whereas most mice treated with wild-type IFNalpha2 showed visible tumors. Histological analysis of these tumors showed a significant anti-angiogenic effect of YNS, compared with wild-type IFNalpha2. This work demonstrates the application of detailed biophysical understanding in the process of protein engineering, yielding an interferon variant with highly increased biological potency.

  20. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Mohideen-Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most nuclear receptors (NRs bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD with that of the estrogen receptor (ER. In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3, but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS, non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3, such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3, where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half

  1. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohideen-Abdul, Kareem; Tazibt, Karima; Bourguet, Maxime; Hazemann, Isabelle; Lebars, Isabelle; Takacs, Maria; Cianférani, Sarah; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Moras, Dino; Billas, Isabelle M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Most nuclear receptors (NRs) bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs) involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR) belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR) family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD) with that of the estrogen receptor (ER). In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3), but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs)], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS), non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3), such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3), where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half-site is

  2. Binding patterns of DTR-specific antibodies reveal a glycosylation-conditioned tumor-specific epitope of the epithelial mucin (MUC1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Uwe; Serttas, Nida; Paulsen, Hans; Danielczyk, Antje; Goletz, Steffen

    2004-08-01

    Glycosylation determines essential biological functions of epithelial mucins in health and disease. We report on the influence of glycosylation of the immunodominant DTR motif of MUC1 on its antigenicity. Sets of novel glycopeptides were synthesized that enabled us to examine sole and combined effects of peptide length (number of repeats) and O-glycosylation with GalNAc at the DTR motif on the binding patterns of 22 monoclonal antibodies recognizing this motif. In case of unglycosylated peptides almost all antibodies bound better to multiple MUC1 tandem repeats. Glycosylation at the DTR led to enhanced binding in 11 cases, whereas 10 antibodies were not influenced in binding, and one was inhibited. In nine of the former cases both length and DTR glycosylation were additive in their influence on antibody binding, suggesting that both effects are different. Improved binding to the glycosylated DTR motif was exclusively found with antibodies generated against tumor-derived MUC1. Based on these data a tumor-specific MUC1 epitope is defined comprising the ...PDTRP... sequence in a particular conformation essentially determined by O-glycosylation at its threonine with either GalNAcalpha1 or a related short glycan. The results can find application in the field of MUC1-based immunotherapy.

  3. Novel interactions of ankyrins-G at the costameres: The muscle-specific Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD) binds plectin and filamin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiweilidan, Yimingjiang; Klauza, Izabela; Kordeli, Ekaterini, E-mail: ekaterini.kordeli@inserm.fr

    2011-04-01

    Ankyrins, the adapters of the spectrin skeleton, are involved in local accumulation and stabilization of integral proteins to the appropriate membrane domains. In striated muscle, tissue-dependent alternative splicing generates unique Ank3 gene products (ankyrins-G); they share the Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD), a muscle-specific insert of the C-terminal domain which is highly conserved among ankyrin genes, and binds obscurin and titin to Ank1 gene products. We previously proposed that OTBD sequences constitute a novel domain of protein-protein interactions which confers ankyrins with specific cellular functions in muscle. Here we searched for muscle proteins binding to ankyrin-G OTBD by yeast two hybrid assay, and we found plectin and filamin C, two organizing elements of the cytoskeleton with essential roles in myogenesis, muscle cell cytoarchitecture, and muscle disease. The three proteins coimmunoprecipitate from skeletal muscle extracts and colocalize at costameres in adult muscle fibers. During in vitro myogenesis, muscle ankyrins-G are first expressed in postmitotic myocytes undergoing fusion to myotubes. In western blots of subcellular fractions from C2C12 cells, the majority of muscle ankyrins-G appear associated with membrane compartments. Occasional but not extensive co-localization at nascent costameres suggested that ankyrin-G interactions with plectin and filamin C are not involved in costamere assembly; they would rather reinforce stability and/or modulate molecular interactions in sarcolemma microdomains by establishing novel links between muscle-specific ankyrins-G and the two costameric dystrophin-associated glycoprotein and integrin-based protein complexes. These results report the first protein-protein interactions involving the ankyrin-G OTBD domain and support the hypothesis that OTBD sequences confer ankyrins with a gain of function in vertebrates, bringing further consolidation and resilience of the linkage between sarcomeres

  4. Cigarette smoke induces distinct chromatin histone modifications in lung cells: implication in pathogenesis of COPD and lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Nevid, Michael Z.; Friedman, Alan E.; Rahman, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS)-mediated oxidative stress induces several signaling cascades, including kinases, which results in chromatin modifications (histone acetylation/deacetylation and histone methylation/demethylation). We have previously reported that CS induces chromatin remodeling in pro-inflammatory gene promoters; however, the underlying site-specific histone marks formed in histones H3 and H4 during CS exposure in lungs in vivo and in lung cells in vitro, which can either drive gene expression or repression are not known. We hypothesize that CS exposure in mouse and human bronchial epithelial cells (H292) can cause site-specific posttranslational histone modifications (PTMs) that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of CS-induced chronic lung diseases. We used a bottom-up mass spectrometry approach to identify some potentially novel histone marks, including acetylation, mono-methylation and di-methylation in specific lysine and arginine residues of histones H3 and H4 in mouse lungs and H292 cells. We found that CS-induced distinct posttranslational histone modification patterns in histone H3 and histone H4 in lung cells, which may be considered as usable biomarkers for CS-induced chronic lung diseases. These identified histone marks (histone H3 and histone H4) may play an important role in epigenetic state during the pathogenesis of smoking-induced chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. PMID:24283195

  5. DNA recognition by F factor TraI36: highly sequence-specific binding of single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J C; Schildbach, J F

    2001-09-25

    The TraI protein has two essential roles in transfer of conjugative plasmid F Factor. As part of a complex of DNA-binding proteins, TraI introduces a site- and strand-specific nick at the plasmid origin of transfer (oriT), cutting the DNA strand that is transferred to the recipient cell. TraI also acts as a helicase, presumably unwinding the plasmid strands prior to transfer. As an essential feature of its nicking activity, TraI is capable of binding and cleaving single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing an oriT sequence. The specificity of TraI DNA recognition was examined by measuring the binding of oriT oligonucleotide variants to TraI36, a 36-kD amino-terminal domain of TraI that retains the sequence-specific nucleolytic activity. TraI36 recognition is highly sequence-specific for an 11-base region of oriT, with single base changes reducing affinity by as much as 8000-fold. The binding data correlate with plasmid mobilization efficiencies: plasmids containing sequences bound with lower affinities by TraI36 are transferred between cells at reduced frequencies. In addition to the requirement for high affinity binding to oriT, efficient in vitro nicking and in vivo plasmid mobilization requires a pyrimidine immediately 5' of the nick site. The high sequence specificity of TraI single-stranded DNA recognition suggests that despite its recognition of single-stranded DNA, TraI is capable of playing a major regulatory role in initiation and/or termination of plasmid transfer.

  6. Identifying determinants of cullin binding specificity among the three functionally different Drosophila melanogaster Roc proteins via domain swapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Reynolds

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cullin-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases (CDL are key regulators of protein destruction that participate in a wide range of cell biological processes. The Roc subunit of CDL contains an evolutionarily conserved RING domain that binds ubiquitin charged E2 and is essential for ubiquitylation. Drosophila melanogaster contains three highly related Roc proteins: Roc1a and Roc2, which are conserved in vertebrates, and Roc1b, which is specific to Drosophila. Our previous genetic data analyzing Roc1a and Roc1b mutants suggested that Roc proteins are functionally distinct, but the molecular basis for this distinction is not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using co-immunoprecipitation studies we show that Drosophila Roc proteins bind specific Cullins: Roc1a binds Cul1-4, Roc1b binds Cul3, and Roc2 binds Cul5. Through domain swapping experiments, we demonstrate that Cullin binding specificity is strongly influenced by the Roc NH(2-terminal domain, which forms an inter-molecular beta sheet with the Cullin. Substitution of the Roc1a RING domain with that of Roc1b results in a protein with similar Cullin binding properties to Roc1a that is active as an E3 ligase but cannot complement Roc1a mutant lethality, indicating that the identity of the RING domain can be an important determinant of CDL function. In contrast, the converse chimeric protein with a substitution of the Roc1b RING domain with that of Roc1a can rescue the male sterility of Roc1b mutants, but only when expressed from the endogenous Roc1b promoter. We also identified mutations of Roc2 and Cul5 and show that they cause no overt developmental phenotype, consistent with our finding that Roc2 and Cul5 proteins are exclusive binding partners, which others have observed in human cells as well. CONCLUSIONS: The Drosophila Roc proteins are highly similar, but have diverged during evolution to bind a distinct set of Cullins and to utilize RING domains that have overlapping, but not

  7. Specific histamine binding activity of a new lipocalin from Hyalomma asiaticum (Ixodidae) and therapeutic effects on allergic asthma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Li, Zhuang; Zhou, Yongzhi; Cao, Jie; Zhang, Houshuang; Gong, Haiyan; Zhou, Jinlin

    2016-09-17

    Lipocalin proteins are secreted by tick salivary glands as an important strategy to interfere with the immune response of hosts. A large number of lipocalins are secreted, but the functions of most of these proteins are unclear. Here, we report a new lipocalin protein with particular histamine binding capacity, which was isolated from the salivary glands of the tick Hyalomma asiaticum. The full length cDNA of the Ha24 gene was obtained by RACE, and Ha24 gene was expressed in E. coli; after protein purification and mice immunizations, specific Polyclonal antibodies (PcAb) were created in response to the recombinant protein. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), indirect immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) assay and western blot were used to detect the existence of native Ha24 in ticks. To confirm the histamine-binding capacity of rHa24, a histamine-binding assay was completed in vitro (ELISA) and in vivo by inhibition of allergic asthma in mice. Ha24 is coded by 681 bases, contains 227 amino acids, and has a molecular weight of 23.3 kDa. Abundant expression in the salivary glands of feeding ticks was confirmed by the identification of native Ha24 in ticks. The results of a histamine binding assay both in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that rHa24 binds specifically with histamine in a dose-dependent manner, and can provide relief from allergic asthma in mice. Ha24 is a new tick lipocalin with specific histamine binding activity that can provide relief from host inflammation response.

  8. Histone methyltransferases in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Mareike; Helin, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is perceived as a heterogeneous group of diseases that is characterized by aberrant patterns of gene expression. In the last decade, an increasing amount of data has pointed to a key role for epigenetic alterations in human cancer. In this review, we focus on a subclass of epigenetic...... regulators, namely histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Several HMTs have been linked to different types of cancer; however, in most cases we only have limited knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms by which the HMTs contribute to disease development. We summarize the current knowledge regarding some...

  9. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. New binding site on common molecular scaffold provides HERG channel specificity of scorpion toxin BeKm-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korolkova, Yuliya V; Bocharov, Eduard V; Angelo, Kamilla

    2002-01-01

    resolved by NMR consists of a short alpha-helix and a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. By toxin mutagenesis study we identified the residues that are important for the binding of BeKm-1 to the human ERG K+ (HERG) channel. The most critical residues (Tyr-11, Lys-18, Arg-20, Lys-23) are located...... in the alpha-helix and following loop whereas the "traditional" functional site of other short scorpion toxins is formed by residues from the beta-sheet. Thus the unique location of the binding site of BeKm-1 provides its specificity toward the HERG channel....

  11. Histone H3 Methylated at Arginine 17 Is Essential for Reprogramming the Paternal Genome in Zygotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Hatanaka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available At fertilization, the paternal genome undergoes extensive reprogramming through protamine-histone exchange and active DNA demethylation, but only a few maternal factors have been defined in these processes. We identified maternal Mettl23 as a protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT, which most likely catalyzes the asymmetric dimethylation of histone H3R17 (H3R17me2a, as indicated by in vitro assays and treatment with TBBD, an H3R17 PRMT inhibitor. Maternal histone H3.3, which is essential for paternal nucleosomal assembly, is unable to be incorporated into the male pronucleus when it lacks R17me2a. Mettl23 interacts with Tet3, a 5mC-oxidizing enzyme responsible for active DNA demethylation, by binding to another maternal factor, GSE (gonad-specific expression. Depletion of Mettl23 from oocytes resulted in impaired accumulation of GSE, Tet3, and 5hmC in the male pronucleus, suggesting that Mettl23 may recruit GSE-Tet3 to chromatin. Our findings establish H3R17me2a and its catalyzing enzyme Mettl23 as key regulators of paternal genome reprogramming.

  12. Specificity of anion-binding in the substrate-pocket ofbacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facciotti, Marc T.; Cheung, Vincent S.; Lunde, Christopher S.; Rouhani, Shahab; Baliga, Nitin S.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2003-08-30

    The structure of the D85S mutant of bacteriorhodopsin with a nitrate anion bound in the Schiff-base binding site, and the structure of the anion-free protein have been obtained in the same crystal form. Together with the previously solved structures of this anion pump, in both the anion-free state and bromide-bound state, these new structures provide insight into how this mutant of bacteriorhodopsin is able to bind a variety of different anions in the same binding pocket. The structural analysis reveals that the main structural change that accommodates different anions is the repositioning of the polar side-chain of S85. On the basis of these x-ray crystal structures, the prediction is then made that the D85S/D212N double mutant might bind similar anions and do so over a broader pH range than does the single mutant. Experimental comparison of the dissociation constants, K{sub d}, for a variety of anions confirms this prediction and demonstrates, in addition, that the binding affinity is dramatically improved by the D212N substitution.

  13. Humanization of a phosphothreonine peptide-specific chicken antibody by combinatorial library optimization of the phosphoepitope-binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Du-San; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-07-31

    Detection of protein phosphorylation at a specific residue has been achieved by using antibodies, which have usually been raised by animal immunization. However, there have been no reports of the humanization of phosphospecific non-human antibodies. Here, we report the humanization of a chicken pT231 antibody specific to a tau protein-derived peptide carrying the phosphorylated threonine at residue 231 (pT231 peptide) as a model for better understanding the phosphoepitope recognition mechanism. In the chicken antibody, the phosphate group of the pT231-peptide antigen is exclusively recognized by complementarity determining region 2 of the heavy chain variable domain (VH-CDR2). Simple grafting of six CDRs of the chicken antibody into a homologous human framework (FR) template resulted in the complete loss of pT231-peptide binding. Using a yeast surface-displayed combinatorial library with permutations of 11 FR residues potentially affecting CDR loop conformations, we identified 5 critical FR residues. The back mutation of these residues to the corresponding chicken residues completely recovered the pT231-peptide binding affinity and specificity of the humanized antibody. Importantly, the back mutation of the FR 76 residue of VH (H76) (Asn to Ser) was critical in preserving the pT231-binding motif conformation via allosteric regulation of ArgH71, which closely interacts with ThrH52 and SerH52a residues on VH-CDR2 to induce the unique phosphate-binding bowl-like conformation. Our humanization approach of CDR grafting plus permutations of FR residues by combinatorial library screening can be applied to other animal antibodies containing unique binding motifs on CDRs specific to posttranslationally modified epitopes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of the binding specificity of Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA) in comparison to Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, S E; Thiele, J; Park, Y O; Hanisch, F G; Bara, J; Fischer, R

    1996-08-01

    Using immunochemical and immunohistochemical methods, the binding site of Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA) was characterized and compared with the related fucose-specific lectin from Ulex europaeus (UEA-I). In solid-phase enzyme-linked immunoassays, the two lectins recognized Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta-HSA. AAA additionally cross-reacted with neoglycolipids bearing lacto-N-fucopentaose (LNFP) I [H type 1] and II [Le(a)] and lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) as glycan moieties. UEA-I, on the other hand, bound to a LDFT-derived neoglycolipid but not to the other neoglycolipids tested. Binding of AAA to gastric mucin was competitively neutralized by Le(a)-specific monoclonal antibodies. UEA-I binding, on the other hand, was reduced after co-incubation with H type 2- and Le(y)-specific monoclonal antibodies. According to our results, AAA reacts with fucosylated type 1 chain antigens, whereas UEA-I binds only to the alpha 1-2-fucosylated LDFT-derived neoglycolipid. In immunohistochemical studies, the reactivity of AAA and UEA-I in normal pyloric mucosa from individuals with known Lewis and secretor status was analysed. AAA showed a broad reaction in the superficial pyloric mucosa from secretors and non-secretors, but AAA reactivity was more pronounced in Le(a+b-) individuals. On the other hand, UEA-I stained the superficial pyloric mucosa only from secretor individuals. A staining of deep mucous glands by the lectins was found in all specimens. Both reacted with most human carcinomas of different origin. Slight differences in their binding pattern were observed and may be explained by the different fine-specificities of the lectins.

  15. Interpreting the language of histone and DNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothbart, Scott B; Strahl, Brian D

    2014-08-01

    A major mechanism regulating the accessibility and function of eukaryotic genomes are the covalent modifications to DNA and histone proteins that dependably package our genetic information inside the nucleus of every cell. Formally postulated over a decade ago, it is becoming increasingly clear that post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histones act singly and in combination to form a language or 'code' that is read by specialized proteins to facilitate downstream functions in chromatin. Underappreciated at the time was the level of complexity harbored both within histone PTMs and their combinations, as well as within the proteins that read and interpret the language. In addition to histone PTMs, newly-identified DNA modifications that can recruit specific effector proteins have raised further awareness that histone PTMs operate within a broader language of epigenetic modifications to orchestrate the dynamic functions associated with chromatin. Here, we highlight key recent advances in our understanding of the epigenetic language encompassing histone and DNA modifications and foreshadow challenges that lie ahead as we continue our quest to decipher the fundamental mechanisms of chromatin regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular mechanisms of histone modification function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Histone propionylation is a mark of active chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Adam F; Nieborak, Anna; Shahidian, Lara Zorro; Le Gras, Stephanie; Richter, Florian; Gómez, Diana Aguilar; Baltissen, Marijke P; Meszaros, Gergo; Magliarelli, Helena de Fatima; Taudt, Aaron; Margueron, Raphael; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Ricci, Romeo; Daujat, Sylvain; Vermeulen, Michiel; Mittler, Gerhard; Schneider, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Histones are highly covalently modified, but the functions of many of these modifications remain unknown. In particular, it is unclear how histone marks are coupled to cellular metabolism and how this coupling affects chromatin architecture. We identified histone H3 Lys14 (H3K14) as a site of propionylation and butyrylation in vivo and carried out the first systematic characterization of histone propionylation. We found that H3K14pr and H3K14bu are deposited by histone acetyltransferases, are preferentially enriched at promoters of active genes and are recognized by acylation-state-specific reader proteins. In agreement with these findings, propionyl-CoA was able to stimulate transcription in an in vitro transcription system. Notably, genome-wide H3 acylation profiles were redefined following changes to the metabolic state, and deletion of the metabolic enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase altered global histone propionylation levels. We propose that histone propionylation, acetylation and butyrylation may act in combination to promote high transcriptional output and to couple cellular metabolism with chromatin structure and function.

  17. A novel prenyl-polybasic domain code determines lipid-binding specificity of the K-Ras membrane anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Hancock, John F

    2018-01-15

    Ras proteins must localize to the plasma membrane (PM) for biological function. The membrane anchor of the K-Ras4B isoform comprises a farnesylated and methylated C-terminal cysteine together with an adjacent hexa-lysine polybasic domain (PBD). Traditionally, polybasic sequences have been thought to interact electrostatically with negatively charged membranes showing no specificity for anionic lipid head groups. By contrast we recently showed that the K-Ras membrane anchor actually exhibits a very high degree of specificity for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). The selectivity for PtdSer is determined by a combinatorial code comprising the PBD sequence plus the prenyl anchor. Lipid binding specificity is therefore altered by PBD point mutations that in turn modulate signaling output. For example, mutating Lys177 or Lys178 to glutamine switches K-Ras4B lipid affinity from PtdSer to phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Changing the lipid anchor from farnesyl to geranylgeranyl or the PBD lysines to arginines also changes lipid binding specificity. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations reveal the structural basis for these K-Ras anchor lipid-binding preferences. Here we examine the PM interactions of a series of geranylgeranylated PBD mutants and provide further evidence that the precise PBD sequence and prenyl lipid determines lipid sorting specificity of the K-Ras anchor and hence biological function.

  18. Specificity Characterization of SLA Class I Molecules Binding to Swine-Origin Viral Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitope Peptides in Vitro

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    Caixia Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA class I molecules play a crucial role in generating specific cellular immune responses against viruses and other intracellular pathogens. They mainly bind and present antigens of intracellular origin to circulating MHC I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. Binding of an appropriate epitope to an SLA class I molecule is the single most selective event in antigen presentation and the first step in the killing of infected cells by CD8+ CTLs. Moreover, the antigen epitopes are strictly restricted to specific SLA molecules. In this study, we constructed SLA class I complexes in vitro comprising viral epitope peptides, the extracellular region of the SLA-1 molecules, and β2-microglobulin (β2m using splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (SOE-PCR. The protein complexes were induced and expressed in an Escherichia coli prokaryotic expression system and subsequently purified and refolded. Specific binding of seven SLA-1 proteins to one classical swine fever virus (CSFV and four porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV epitope peptides was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-based method. The SLA-1∗13:01, SLA-1∗11:10, and SLA-1∗11:01:02 proteins were able to bind specifically to different CTL epitopes of CSFV and PRRSV and the MHC restrictions of the five epitopes were identified. The fixed combination of Asn151Val152 residues was identified as the potentially key amino acid residues influencing the binding of viral several CTL epitope peptides to SLA-1∗13:01 and SLA-1∗04:01:01 proteins. The more flexible pocket E in the SLA-1∗13:01 protein might have fewer steric limitations and therefore be able to accommodate more residues of viral CTL epitope peptides, and may thus play a critical biochemical role in determining the peptide-binding motif of SLA-1∗13:01. Characterization of the binding specificity of peptides to SLA class I molecules provides an

  19. Molecular determinants for the complex binding specificity of the PDZ domain in PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Beuming, Thijs; Niv, Masha Y

    2005-01-01

    polarization. Our results showed that the PICK1 PDZ domain binds the type II sequence presented by the human dopamine transporter (-WLKV) with an almost 15-fold and >100-fold higher affinity than the type I sequences presented by protein kinase Calpha (-QSAV) and the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (-DSLL......), respectively. Mutational analysis of Lys(83) in the alphaB1 position of the PDZ domain suggested that this residue mimics the function of hydrophobic residues present in this position in regular type II PDZ domains. The PICK1 PDZ domain was moreover found to prefer small hydrophobic residues in the C......-terminal P(0) position of the ligand. Molecular modeling predicted a rank order of (Val > Ile > Leu) that was verified experimentally with up to a approximately 16-fold difference in binding affinity between a valine and a leucine in P(0). The results define the structural basis for the unusual binding...

  20. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, O N; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    molecular weight urokinase receptor-associated protein. The tryptic peptide mixture derived from a cross-linked complex of pro-urokinase and the latter protein was analyzed by nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometric sequencing. This analysis identified the novel protein as the human homologue of a murine...... membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  1. Generation of a haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex-specific Fab antibody blocking the binding of the complex to CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Ivo R; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    During intravascular hemolysis hemoglobin (Hb) binds to haptoglobin (Hp) leading to endocytosis of the complex by the macrophage receptor, CD163. In the present study, we used a phage-display Fab antibody strategy to explore if the complex formation between Hp and Hb leads to exposure of antigenic...... was measured for non-complexed Hp or Hb. The Fab antibody completely inhibited the binding of 125I-labeled Hp-Hb complexes to CD163 and blocked their uptake in CD163-transfected cells. In conclusion, we have raised a receptor-blocking antibody specifically recognizing the Hp-Hb complex. In addition to provide...... new insight into the changes occurring when Hp and Hb bind, the present study provides a new potential tool for measuring and removal of Hp-Hb complexes from plasma/serum....

  2. Validating fragment-based drug discovery for biological RNAs: lead fragments bind and remodel the TPP riboswitch specifically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Katherine Deigan; Homan, Philip; Weeks, Kevin M; Smith, Alison G; Abell, Chris; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-05-22

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitches regulate essential genes in bacteria by changing conformation upon binding intracellular TPP. Previous studies using fragment-based approaches identified small molecule "fragments" that bind this gene-regulatory mRNA domain. Crystallographic studies now show that, despite having micromolar Kds, four different fragments bind the TPP riboswitch site-specifically, occupying the pocket that recognizes the aminopyrimidine of TPP. Unexpectedly, the unoccupied site that would recognize the pyrophosphate of TPP rearranges into a structure distinct from that of the cognate complex. This idiosyncratic fragment-induced conformation, also characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering and chemical probing, represents a possible mechanism for adventitious ligand discrimination by the riboswitch, and suggests that off-pathway conformations of RNAs can be targeted for drug development. Our structures, together with previous screening studies, demonstrate the feasibility of fragment-based drug discovery against RNA targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Crystal structure of an archaeal specific DNA-binding protein (Ape10b2) from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Sakamoto, Keiko; Gopinath, Subash C B; Shinkai, Akeo; Kumar, Penmetcha K R; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2008-05-15

    DNA binding proteins are essential in all organisms, and they play important roles in both compacting and regulating the genetic material. All thermophilic and hyperthermophilic archaea encode one or more copies of Alba or Sso10b, which is a small, abundant, basic protein that binds DNA. Here, we present the crystal structure of Ape10b2 from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.70 A. Although the overall structure resembles the known Alba protein fold, a significant conformational change was observed in the loop regions. Specifically, the L5 loop is slightly longer, as compared to those of other known proteins, and the flexibility of this loop may facilitate the interaction with double stranded DNA. In addition, we showed that Ape10b2 binds to 16 and 39 bp duplex DNAs with high affinity. On the basis of our analyses, we have created a putative protein-DNA complex model. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. A SILAC-based screen for Methyl-CpG binding proteins identifies RBP-J as a DNA methylation and sequence-specific binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie J J Bartels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Methylated DNA is specifically bound by Methyl-CpG Binding Proteins (MBPs. Three different types of MBPs have been identified so far: the Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD family proteins, three BTB/POZ-Zn-finger proteins, and UHRF1. Most of the known MBPs have been identified via homology with the MBD and Zn-finger domains as present in MeCP2 and Kaiso, respectively. It is conceivable that other proteins are capable of recognizing methylated DNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the purpose of identifying novel 'readers' we set up a methyl-CpG pull-down assay combined with stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. In a methyl-CpG pull-down with U937 nuclear extracts, we recovered several known MBPs and almost all subunits of the MBD2/NuRD complex as methylation specific binders, providing proof-of-principle. Interestingly, RBP-J, the transcription factor downstream of Notch receptors, also bound the DNA in a methylation dependent manner. Follow-up pull-downs and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs showed that RBP-J binds methylated DNA in the context of a mutated RBP-J consensus motif. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The here described SILAC/methyl-CpG pull-down constitutes a new approach to identify potential novel DNAme readers and will advance unraveling of the complete methyl-DNA interactome.

  5. Structure and function of histone acetyltransferase MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiao Yi; Costa, Max; Sun, Hong

    2015-01-01

    MOF was first identified in Drosophila melanogaster as an important component of the dosage compensation complex. As a member of MYST family of histone acetyltransferase, MOF specifically deposits the acetyl groups to histone H4 lysine 16. Throughout evolution, MOF and its mammalian ortholog have retained highly conserved substrate specificity and similar enzymatic activities. MOF plays important roles in dosage compensation, ESC self-renewal, DNA damage and repair, cell survival, and gene expression regulation. Dysregulation of MOF has been implicated in tumor formation and progression of many types of human cancers. This review will discuss the structure and activity of mammalian hMOF as well as its function in H4K16 acetylation, DNA damage response, stem cell pluripotency, and carcinogenesis.

  6. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  7. Design Principles for SuCESsFul Biosensors: Specific Fluorophore/Analyte Binding and Minimization of Fluorophore/Scaffold Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Picciotto, Seymour; Dickson, Paige M; Traxlmayr, Michael W; Marques, Bryan S; Socher, Elke; Zhao, Sixing; Cheung, Stephanie; Kiefer, Jonathan D; Wand, A Joshua; Griffith, Linda G; Imperiali, Barbara; Wittrup, K Dane

    2016-10-09

    Quantifying protein location and concentration is critical for understanding function in situ. Scaffold conjugated to environment-sensitive fluorophore (SuCESsFul) biosensors, in which a reporting fluorophore is conjugated to a binding scaffold, can, in principle, detect analytes of interest with high temporal and spatial resolution. However, their adoption has been limited due to the extensive empirical screening required for their development. We sought to establish design principles for this class of biosensor by characterizing over 400 biosensors based on various protein analytes, binding proteins, and fluorophores. We found that the brightest readouts are attained when a specific binding pocket for the fluorophore is present on the analyte. Also, interaction of the fluorophore with the binding protein it is conjugated to can raise background fluorescence, considerably limiting sensor dynamic range. Exploiting these two concepts, we designed biosensors that attain a 100-fold increase in fluorescence upon binding to analyte, an order of magnitude improvement over the previously best-reported SuCESsFul biosensor. These design principles should facilitate the development of improved SuCESsFul biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V

    2002-11-15

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15-78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins.

  9. Epigenetic control of MHC-II: interplay between CIITA and histone-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika, Eleni; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2005-02-01

    Recent advances have shown the crucial role of histone-modifying enzymes in controlling gene activation and repression. This led to the 'histone code' hypothesis, which proposes that combinations of histone modifications work in concert to affect specific gene expression. Mounting evidence suggests that the class II transactivator modulates promoter accessibility by coordinating the recruitment of chromatin modifiers in a time-dependent fashion. MHC-II expression is exquisitely controlled by these highly specific, coordinated and dynamic interactions at the promoter.

  10. Specificity of Odor Recognition: The Three-Dimensional Structure of an Odorant Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    results so far with molecular replacement with Insecto - cyanin did not look hopeful. Hence, we are proceeding with the methods that use heavy-atom...proteins -Retinol binding Protein (RBP), a-lactoglobulin and Insecto - cyanin- have known three-dimensional structures. In tracing the polypeptide chain

  11. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies. PMID:25365782

  12. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein-DNA Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kaustubh; Sangani, Sahil S; Kehr, Andrew D; Rule, Gordon S; Jen-Jacobson, Linda

    2016-11-08

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein-DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein-DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg 2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu 3+ or two La 3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu 3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1 H- 15 N amide resonances, for 1 H- 13 C Ile-δ-CH 3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH 3 and Val-γ-CH 3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex.

  13. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein–DNA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein–DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein–DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu3+ or two La3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1H–15N amide resonances, for 1H–13C Ile-δ-CH3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH3 and Val-γ-CH3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex. PMID:27786446

  14. Characterization of glycan binding specificities of influenza B viruses with correlation with hemagglutinin genotypes and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Chi, Chia-Yu; Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Su, Ih-Jen

    2012-04-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificities are different among avian and human influenza A viruses and may affect the tissue tropism and transmission of these viruses. The glycan binding biology for influenza B, however, has not been systematically characterized. Glycan binding specificities of influenza B viral isolates were analyzed and correlated to hemagglutinin (HA) genotypes and clinical manifestations. A newly developed solution glycan array was applied to characterize the receptor binding specificities of influenza B virus clinical isolates from 2001 to 2007 in Taiwan. Thirty oligosaccharides which include α-2,3 and α-2,6 linkage glycans were subjected to analysis. The glycan binding patterns of 53 influenza B isolates could be categorized into three groups and were well correlated to their HA genotypes. The Yamagata-like strains predominantly bound to α-2,6-linkage glycan (24:29, 83%) while Victoria-like strains preferentially bound to both α-2,3- and α-2,6-linkage glycans (13:24, 54%). A third group of viruses bound to sulfated glycans and these all belonged to Victoria-like strains. Based on the HA sequences, Asn-163, Glu-198, Ala-202, and Lys-203 were conserved among Victoria-like strains which may influence their carbohydrate recognition. The viruses bound to dual type glycans were more likely to be associated with the development of bronchopneumonia and gastrointestinal illness than those bound only to α-2,6 sialyl glycans (P B viruses, and will contribute to virus surveillance and vaccine strain selection. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  16. The RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin antagonizes gypsy chromatin insulator function in a tissue-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew R; Matzat, Leah H; Dale, Ryan K; Lim, Su Jun; Lei, Elissa P

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA-protein complexes that are situated throughout the genome that are proposed to contribute to higher-order organization and demarcation into distinct transcriptional domains. Mounting evidence in different species implicates RNA and RNA-binding proteins as regulators of chromatin insulator activities. Here, we identify the Drosophila hnRNP M homolog Rumpelstiltskin (Rump) as an antagonist of gypsy chromatin insulator enhancer-blocking and barrier activities. Despite ubiquitous expression of Rump, decreasing Rump levels leads to improvement of barrier activity only in tissues outside of the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, rump mutants restore insulator body localization in an insulator mutant background only in non-CNS tissues. Rump associates physically with core gypsy insulator proteins, and chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing analysis of Rump demonstrates extensive colocalization with a subset of insulator sites across the genome. The genome-wide binding profile and tissue specificity of Rump contrast with that of Shep, a recently identified RNA-binding protein that antagonizes gypsy insulator activity primarily in the CNS. Our findings indicate parallel roles for RNA-binding proteins in mediating tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator activity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. The RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin antagonizes gypsy chromatin insulator function in a tissue-specific manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew R.; Matzat, Leah H.; Dale, Ryan K.; Lim, Su Jun; Lei, Elissa P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromatin insulators are DNA–protein complexes that are situated throughout the genome that are proposed to contribute to higher-order organization and demarcation into distinct transcriptional domains. Mounting evidence in different species implicates RNA and RNA-binding proteins as regulators of chromatin insulator activities. Here, we identify the Drosophila hnRNP M homolog Rumpelstiltskin (Rump) as an antagonist of gypsy chromatin insulator enhancer-blocking and barrier activities. Despite ubiquitous expression of Rump, decreasing Rump levels leads to improvement of barrier activity only in tissues outside of the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, rump mutants restore insulator body localization in an insulator mutant background only in non-CNS tissues. Rump associates physically with core gypsy insulator proteins, and chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing analysis of Rump demonstrates extensive colocalization with a subset of insulator sites across the genome. The genome-wide binding profile and tissue specificity of Rump contrast with that of Shep, a recently identified RNA-binding protein that antagonizes gypsy insulator activity primarily in the CNS. Our findings indicate parallel roles for RNA-binding proteins in mediating tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator activity. PMID:24706949

  18. Sasquatch: predicting the impact of regulatory SNPs on transcription factor binding from cell- and tissue-specific DNase footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwessinger, Ron; Suciu, Maria C; McGowan, Simon J; Telenius, Jelena; Taylor, Stephen; Higgs, Doug R; Hughes, Jim R

    2017-10-01

    In the era of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and personalized medicine, predicting the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in regulatory elements is an important goal. Current approaches to determine the potential of regulatory SNPs depend on inadequate knowledge of cell-specific DNA binding motifs. Here, we present Sasquatch, a new computational approach that uses DNase footprint data to estimate and visualize the effects of noncoding variants on transcription factor binding. Sasquatch performs a comprehensive k -mer-based analysis of DNase footprints to determine any k -mer's potential for protein binding in a specific cell type and how this may be changed by sequence variants. Therefore, Sasquatch uses an unbiased approach, independent of known transcription factor binding sites and motifs. Sasquatch only requires a single DNase-seq data set per cell type, from any genotype, and produces consistent predictions from data generated by different experimental procedures and at different sequence depths. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Sasquatch using previously validated functional SNPs and benchmark its performance against existing approaches. Sasquatch is available as a versatile webtool incorporating publicly available data, including the human ENCODE collection. Thus, Sasquatch provides a powerful tool and repository for prioritizing likely regulatory SNPs in the noncoding genome. © 2017 Schwessinger et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins: relationships with precomplex features and contributions to specificity and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Munazah; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Ahmad, Shandar

    2014-05-01

    Both Proteins and DNA undergo conformational changes in order to form functional complexes and also to facilitate interactions with other molecules. These changes have direct implications for the stability and specificity of the complex, as well as the cooperativity of interactions between multiple entities. In this work, we have extensively analyzed conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins by superimposing DNA-bound and unbound pairs of protein structures in a curated database of 90 proteins. We manually examined each of these pairs, unified the authors' annotations, and summarized our observations by classifying conformational changes into six structural categories. We explored a relationship between conformational changes and functional classes, binding motifs, target specificity, biophysical features of unbound proteins, and stability of the complex. In addition, we have also investigated the degree to which the intrinsic flexibility can explain conformational changes in a subset of 52 proteins with high quality coordinate data. Our results indicate that conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins contribute significantly to both the stability of the complex and the specificity of targets recognized by them. We also conclude that most conformational changes occur in proteins interacting with <