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Sample records for histocompatibility complex-restricted self-recognition

  1. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E

    1996-01-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might ...

  2. Non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic activity of blood mononuclear cells stimulated with secreted mycobacterial proteins and other mycobacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Pedersen, B K

    1994-01-01

    Several observations indicate that non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity, mediated for example by natural killer cells and lymphokine-activated killer cells, may serve as an important antimicrobial defense mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to investigate......+ cells proliferated and expressed interleukin-2 receptors following stimulation with mycobacterial antigens. Depletion studies after antigen stimulation showed that the cytotoxic effector cells were CD16+ CD56+ and CD4-; the CD4+ cells alone did not mediate non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity. To evaluate...... activity was reduced. This reduction was abolished by interleukin-2 but not by gamma interferon. We conclude that several mycobacterial antigens are able to induce non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity. This study indicates that non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity following stimulation with mycobacterial antigens...

  3. Self-recognition in everyday life

    OpenAIRE

    Brédart, Serge; Young, A. W.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A sample of everyday difficulties was collected, encompassing errors and unusual experiences participants had encountered when recognising their own faces in everyday life, with the aim of characterising similarities and differences between the reported difficulties and the major forms of self-recognition impairments described in the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric literatures (prosopagnosia, mirrored-self misidentification, and Capgras delusion). METHOD: A total of 70 p...

  4. Social awareness and early self-recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Philippe; Broesch, Tanya; Jayne, Katherine

    2012-09-01

    Self-recognition by 86 children (14-52 months) was assessed using the mirror mark test in two different social contexts. In the classic mirror task condition, only the child was marked prior to mirror exposure (Classic condition). In the social norm condition, the child, experimenter, and accompanying parent were marked prior to the child's mirror exposure (Norm condition). Results indicate that in both conditions children pass the test in comparable proportion, with the same increase as a function of age. However, in the Norm condition, children displayed significantly more hesitation while removing the mark, often touching it without removing it or, if so, promptly putting the mark back onto their forehead. In the Classic condition, only one child showed such hesitation. These results suggest that from the outset, mirror self-recognition can refer to social awareness. This link is interpreted as the trademark of human self-consciousness, a deeply rooted "looking glass" self-awareness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mirror self-recognition: a review and critique of attempts to promote and engineer self-recognition in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R; Gallup, Gordon G

    2015-10-01

    We review research on reactions to mirrors and self-recognition in nonhuman primates, focusing on methodological issues. Starting with the initial demonstration in chimpanzees in 1970 and subsequent attempts to extend this to other species, self-recognition in great apes is discussed with emphasis on spontaneous manifestations of mirror-guided self-exploration as well as spontaneous use of the mirror to investigate foreign marks on otherwise nonvisible body parts-the mark test. Attempts to show self-recognition in other primates are examined with particular reference to the lack of convincing examples of spontaneous mirror-guided self-exploration, and efforts to engineer positive mark test responses by modifying the test or using conditioning techniques. Despite intensive efforts to demonstrate self-recognition in other primates, we conclude that to date there is no compelling evidence that prosimians, monkeys, or lesser apes-gibbons and siamangs-are capable of mirror self-recognition.

  6. Self-recognition in an Asian elephant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnik, Joshua M.; de Waal, Frans B. M.; Reiss, Diana

    2006-01-01

    Considered an indicator of self-awareness, mirror self-recognition (MSR) has long seemed limited to humans and apes. In both phylogeny and human ontogeny, MSR is thought to correlate with higher forms of empathy and altruistic behavior. Apart from humans and apes, dolphins and elephants are also known for such capacities. After the recent discovery of MSR in dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), elephants thus were the next logical candidate species. We exposed three Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) to a large mirror to investigate their responses. Animals that possess MSR typically progress through four stages of behavior when facing a mirror: (i) social responses, (ii) physical inspection (e.g., looking behind the mirror), (iii) repetitive mirror-testing behavior, and (iv) realization of seeing themselves. Visible marks and invisible sham-marks were applied to the elephants' heads to test whether they would pass the litmus “mark test” for MSR in which an individual spontaneously uses a mirror to touch an otherwise imperceptible mark on its own body. Here, we report a successful MSR elephant study and report striking parallels in the progression of responses to mirrors among apes, dolphins, and elephants. These parallels suggest convergent cognitive evolution most likely related to complex sociality and cooperation. PMID:17075063

  7. Self-recognition in an Asian elephant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnik, Joshua M; de Waal, Frans B M; Reiss, Diana

    2006-11-07

    Considered an indicator of self-awareness, mirror self-recognition (MSR) has long seemed limited to humans and apes. In both phylogeny and human ontogeny, MSR is thought to correlate with higher forms of empathy and altruistic behavior. Apart from humans and apes, dolphins and elephants are also known for such capacities. After the recent discovery of MSR in dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), elephants thus were the next logical candidate species. We exposed three Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) to a large mirror to investigate their responses. Animals that possess MSR typically progress through four stages of behavior when facing a mirror: (i) social responses, (ii) physical inspection (e.g., looking behind the mirror), (iii) repetitive mirror-testing behavior, and (iv) realization of seeing themselves. Visible marks and invisible sham-marks were applied to the elephants' heads to test whether they would pass the litmus "mark test" for MSR in which an individual spontaneously uses a mirror to touch an otherwise imperceptible mark on its own body. Here, we report a successful MSR elephant study and report striking parallels in the progression of responses to mirrors among apes, dolphins, and elephants. These parallels suggest convergent cognitive evolution most likely related to complex sociality and cooperation.

  8. Self-recognition in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Serge; Young, Andrew W

    2004-08-01

    A sample of everyday difficulties was collected, encompassing errors and unusual experiences participants had encountered when recognising their own faces in everyday life, with the aim of characterising similarities and differences between the reported difficulties and the major forms of self-recognition impairments described in the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric literatures (prosopagnosia, mirrored-self misidentification, and Capgras delusion). A total of 70 participants recalled experiences from memory. Incidents (n = 51) were recorded on questionnaire sheets that were filled out at home. Reports of three categories of incidents were analysed: misidentifications (the participant misidentified her/his own face as being that of another familiar person; n = 5), recognition failures (the participant judged that his/her own face was that of an unfamiliar person; n = 20) and perception of unusual aspects (the participant confidently recognised his/her own face but found that the seen face did not fit well the representation she/he had of his/her own face; n = 26). In the reported incidents, experiences showing some similarities to those of patients with prosopagnosia, Capgras delusion or mirrored-self misidentification were noted. However, across the whole study, no incident involved a failure of reality testing; in contrast to pathological forms of error, in all of the reported incidents from our study the participant realised that a mistake had been made. The importance of decision processes in pathological forms of own-face misrecognition is discussed.

  9. Self-recognition in pigeons revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Emiko; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2014-11-01

    Recognition of a self-image in a mirror is investigated using the mark test during which a mark is placed onto a point on the body that is not directly visible, and the presence or absence of self-directed behaviors is evaluated for the mirror-observing subjects. Great apes, dolphins, possibly elephants, and magpies have all passed the mark test, that is, displayed self-directed behaviors, whereas monkeys, crows, and other animals have failed the test even though they were able to use a mirror to find a not-directly-visible object. Self-directed behavior and mirror use are prerequisites of a successful mark test, and the absence of these behaviors may lead to false negative results. Epstein, Lanza, and Skinner (1981) reported self-directed behavior of pigeons in front of a mirror after explicit training of self-directed pecking and of pecking an object with the aid of a mirror, but certain other researchers could not confirm the results. The aim of the present study was to conduct the mark test with two pigeons that had received extensive training of the prerequisite behaviors. Crucial points of the training were identical topography (pecking) and the same reinforcement (food) in the prerequisite behaviors as well as sufficient training of these behaviors. After training for the prerequisite behaviors, both pigeons spontaneously integrated the learned self-directed and mirror-use behavior and displayed self-directed behavior in a mark test. This indicates that pigeons display mirror self-recognition after training of suitable ontogenetic contingency. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  10. Graded Mirror Self-Recognition by Clark’s Nutcrackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Dawson; Kelly, Debbie M.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional ‘mark test’ has shown some large-brained species are capable of mirror self-recognition. During this test a mark is inconspicuously placed on an animal’s body where it can only be seen with the aid of a mirror. If the animal increases the number of actions directed to the mark region when presented with a mirror, the animal is presumed to have recognized the mirror image as its reflection. However, the pass/fail nature of the mark test presupposes self-recognition exists in entirety or not at all. We developed a novel mirror-recognition task, to supplement the mark test, which revealed gradation in the self-recognition of Clark’s nutcrackers, a large-brained corvid. To do so, nutcrackers cached food alone, observed by another nutcracker, or with a regular or blurry mirror. The nutcrackers suppressed caching with a regular mirror, a behavioural response to prevent cache theft by conspecifics, but did not suppress caching with a blurry mirror. Likewise, during the mark test, most nutcrackers made more self-directed actions to the mark with a blurry mirror than a regular mirror. Both results suggest self-recognition was more readily achieved with the blurry mirror and that self-recognition may be more broadly present among animals than currently thought. PMID:27811974

  11. Definitions of histocompatibility typing terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eduardo; Heslop, Helen; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Taves, Cynthia; Wagenknecht, Dawn R; Eisenbrey, A Bradley; Fischer, Gottfried; Poulton, Kay; Wacker, Kara; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich; Noreen, Harriet; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2011-12-01

    Histocompatibility testing for stem cell and solid organ transplantation has become increasingly complex as newly discovered HLA alleles are described. HLA typing assignments reported by laboratories are used by physicians and donor registries for matching donors and recipients. To communicate effectively, a common language for histocompatibility terms should be established. In early 2010, representatives from Clinical, Registry, and Histocompatibility organizations joined together as the Harmonization of Histocompatibility Typing Terms Working Group to define a consensual language for laboratories, physicians, and registries to communicate histocompatibility typing information. The Working Group defined terms for HLA typing resolution, HLA matching, and a format for reporting HLA assignments. In addition, definitions of verification typing and extended typing were addressed. The original draft of the Definitions of Histocompatibility Typing Terms was disseminated to colleagues from each organization to gain feedback and create a collaborative document. Commentary gathered during this 90-day review period were discussed and implemented for preparation of this report. Histocompatibility testing continues to evolve; thus, the definitions agreed on today probably will require refinement and perhaps additional terminology in the future.

  12. Giant pandas failed to show mirror self-recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaozan; Jin, Yuan; Luo, Bo; Zhang, Guiquan; Wei, Rongping; Liu, Dingzhen

    2015-05-01

    Mirror self-recognition (MSR), i.e., the ability to recognize oneself in a mirror, is considered a potential index of self-recognition and the foundation of individual development. A wealth of literature on MSR is available for social animals, such as chimpanzees, Asian elephants and dolphins, yet little is known about MSR in solitary mammalian species. We aimed to evaluate whether the giant panda can recognize itself in the mirror, and whether this capacity varies with age. Thirty-four captive giant pandas (F:M = 18:16; juveniles, sub-adults and adults) were subjected to four mirror tests: covered mirror tests, open mirror tests, water mark control tests, and mark tests. The results showed that, though adult, sub-adult and juvenile pandas exposed to mirrors spent similar amounts of time in social mirror-directed behaviors (χ(2) = 0.719, P = 0.698), none of them used the mirror to touch the mark on their head, a self-directed behavior suggesting MSR. Individuals of all age groups initially displayed attacking, threatening, foot scraping and backwards walking behaviors when exposed to their self-images in the mirror. Our data indicate that, regardless of age, the giant pandas did not recognize their self-image in the mirror, but instead considered the image to be a conspecific. Our results add to the available information on mirror self-recognition in large mammals, provide new information on a solitary species, and will be useful for enclosure design and captive animal management.

  13. Delayed hypersensitivity to aminopenicillins is related to major histocompatibility complex genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, A; De Santis, A; Romito, A; Di Fonso, M; Venuti, A; Gasbarrini, G B; Manna, R

    1998-05-01

    Although in some cases delayed hypersensitivity may be observed, beta-lactam antibiotics frequently induce immediate allergic IgE-mediated reactions with the specificity localized in the acyl-side chain structure. Generally, delayed immunologic reactions are related to sensitized T lymphocytes and major histocompatibility complex restricted. To investigate the prevalence of HLA class I and II antigens in patients with delayed hypersensitivity to aminopenicillins in order to evaluate a relationship between major histocompatibility complex immune response genes and aminopenicillins hypersensitivity. We assessed 24 patients with history of delayed hypersensitivity to aminopenicillins using (1) skin test with penicilloyl polylysine, minor determinant mixture, benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, and ampicillin; (2) patch tests with benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, and ampicillin; (3) RAST for penicilloyls G and V; and (4) oral challenges with amoxicillin, ampicillin, and penicillin V in 18/24 patients. All patients were typed by microlymphotoxicity standard test for HLA class I and II antigens. Statistical analysis by chi2 test 2 x 2 contingency tables, according to Svejgaard, were used for comparison between patients and random Italian population (522 subjects). In the patients group we found higher prevalence of HLA A2 (12/24 = 50%, RR = 6.76 P mechanisms involved in adverse reactions to aminopenicillins in vivo are related to genetic markers of immune response and confirms that the presentation of penicillin-hapten determinants to lymphocyte is major histocompatibility complex restricted.

  14. DMPD: Infectious non-self recognition in invertebrates: lessons from Drosophila andother insect models. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15476918 Infectious non-self recognition in invertebrates: lessons from Drosophila andother insect...fectious non-self recognition in invertebrates: lessons from Drosophila andother insect models. PubmedID 154...76918 Title Infectious non-self recognition in invertebrates: lessons from Drosophila andother insect

  15. Cultural differences in self-recognition: the early development of autonomous and related selves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Josephine; Yilmaz, Mandy; Dale, Rachel; Cassidy, Rose; Yildirim, Iraz; Suzanne Zeedyk, M

    2017-05-01

    Fifteen- to 18-month-old infants from three nationalities were observed interacting with their mothers and during two self-recognition tasks. Scottish interactions were characterized by distal contact, Zambian interactions by proximal contact, and Turkish interactions by a mixture of contact strategies. These culturally distinct experiences may scaffold different perspectives on self. In support, Scottish infants performed best in a task requiring recognition of the self in an individualistic context (mirror self-recognition), whereas Zambian infants performed best in a task requiring recognition of the self in a less individualistic context (body-as-obstacle task). Turkish infants performed similarly to Zambian infants on the body-as-obstacle task, but outperformed Zambians on the mirror self-recognition task. Verbal contact (a distal strategy) was positively related to mirror self-recognition and negatively related to passing the body-as-obstacle task. Directive action and speech (proximal strategies) were negatively related to mirror self-recognition. Self-awareness performance was best predicted by cultural context; autonomous settings predicted success in mirror self-recognition, and related settings predicted success in the body-as-obstacle task. These novel data substantiate the idea that cultural factors may play a role in the early expression of self-awareness. More broadly, the results highlight the importance of moving beyond the mark test, and designing culturally sensitive tests of self-awareness. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic activity of blood mononuclear cells stimulated with secreted mycobacterial proteins and other mycobacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Pedersen, B K

    1994-01-01

    with tuberculin purified protein derivative, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), short- and long-term culture filtrates of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and 30-31-kDa secreted mycobacterial protein. These antigens also induced proliferation and production of gamma interferon. The CD4...

  17. Non-self recognition and programmed cell death in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, N Louise; Dementhon, Karine

    2006-12-01

    Non-self recognition resulting in programmed cell death is a ubiquitous phenomenon in filamentous ascomycete fungi and is termed heterokaryon incompatibility (HI). Recent analyses show that genes containing predicted HET domains are often involved in HI; however, the function of the HET domain is unknown. Autophagy is induced as a consequence of HI, whereas the presence of a predicted transcription factor, VIB-1, is required for HI. Morphological features associated with apoptosis in filamentous fungi are induced by various stresses and drugs, and also during HI. Future analyses will reveal whether common or different genetic mechanisms trigger death by non-self recognition and death by various environmental onslaughts.

  18. Delayed Video Self-Recognition in Children with High Vo Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Cheryl; Shembrey, Joh; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Two studies are reported which investigate delayed video self-recognition (DSR) in children with autistic disorder and Asperger's disorder relative to one another and to their typically developing peers. A secondary aim was to establish whether DSR ability is dependent on metarepresentational ability. Children's verbal and affective responses to…

  19. The free-energy self: a predictive coding account of self-recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Matthew A J; Tsakiris, Manos

    2014-04-01

    Recognising and representing one's self as distinct from others is a fundamental component of self-awareness. However, current theories of self-recognition are not embedded within global theories of cortical function and therefore fail to provide a compelling explanation of how the self is processed. We present a theoretical account of the neural and computational basis of self-recognition that is embedded within the free-energy account of cortical function. In this account one's body is processed in a Bayesian manner as the most likely to be "me". Such probabilistic representation arises through the integration of information from hierarchically organised unimodal systems in higher-level multimodal areas. This information takes the form of bottom-up "surprise" signals from unimodal sensory systems that are explained away by top-down processes that minimise the level of surprise across the brain. We present evidence that this theoretical perspective may account for the findings of psychological and neuroimaging investigations into self-recognition and particularly evidence that representations of the self are malleable, rather than fixed as previous accounts of self-recognition might suggest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Virus-mediated suppression of host non-self recognition facilitates horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songsong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Daohong; Ghabrial, Said A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-self recognition is a common phenomenon among organisms; it often leads to innate immunity to prevent the invasion of parasites and maintain the genetic polymorphism of organisms. Fungal vegetative incompatibility is a type of non-self recognition which often induces programmed cell death (PCD) and restricts the spread of molecular parasites. It is not clearly known whether virus infection could attenuate non-self recognition among host individuals to facilitate its spread. Here, we report that a hypovirulence-associated mycoreovirus, named Sclerotinia sclerotiorum mycoreovirus 4 (SsMYRV4), could suppress host non-self recognition and facilitate horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses. We found that cell death in intermingled colony regions between SsMYRV4-infected Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strain and other tested vegetatively incompatible strains was markedly reduced and inhibition barrage lines were not clearly observed. Vegetative incompatibility, which involves Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) signaling pathway, is controlled by specific loci termed het (heterokaryon incompatibility) loci. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in vegetative incompatibility-mediated PCD. The expression of G protein subunit genes, het genes, and ROS-related genes were significantly down-regulated, and cellular production of ROS was suppressed in the presence of SsMYRV4. Furthermore, SsMYRV4-infected strain could easily accept other viruses through hyphal contact and these viruses could be efficiently transmitted from SsMYRV4-infected strain to other vegetatively incompatible individuals. Thus, we concluded that SsMYRV4 is capable of suppressing host non-self recognition and facilitating heterologous viruses transmission among host individuals. These findings may enhance our understanding of virus ecology, and provide a potential strategy to utilize hypovirulence-associated mycoviruses to control fungal diseases. PMID:28334041

  1. Virus-mediated suppression of host non-self recognition facilitates horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songsong Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-self recognition is a common phenomenon among organisms; it often leads to innate immunity to prevent the invasion of parasites and maintain the genetic polymorphism of organisms. Fungal vegetative incompatibility is a type of non-self recognition which often induces programmed cell death (PCD and restricts the spread of molecular parasites. It is not clearly known whether virus infection could attenuate non-self recognition among host individuals to facilitate its spread. Here, we report that a hypovirulence-associated mycoreovirus, named Sclerotinia sclerotiorum mycoreovirus 4 (SsMYRV4, could suppress host non-self recognition and facilitate horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses. We found that cell death in intermingled colony regions between SsMYRV4-infected Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strain and other tested vegetatively incompatible strains was markedly reduced and inhibition barrage lines were not clearly observed. Vegetative incompatibility, which involves Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins signaling pathway, is controlled by specific loci termed het (heterokaryon incompatibility loci. Reactive oxygen species (ROS plays a key role in vegetative incompatibility-mediated PCD. The expression of G protein subunit genes, het genes, and ROS-related genes were significantly down-regulated, and cellular production of ROS was suppressed in the presence of SsMYRV4. Furthermore, SsMYRV4-infected strain could easily accept other viruses through hyphal contact and these viruses could be efficiently transmitted from SsMYRV4-infected strain to other vegetatively incompatible individuals. Thus, we concluded that SsMYRV4 is capable of suppressing host non-self recognition and facilitating heterologous viruses transmission among host individuals. These findings may enhance our understanding of virus ecology, and provide a potential strategy to utilize hypovirulence-associated mycoviruses to control fungal diseases.

  2. Definitions of histocompatibility typing terms: Harmonization of Histocompatibility Typing Terms Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eduardo; Heslop, Helen; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Taves, Cynthia; Wagenknecht, Dawn R; Eisenbrey, A Bradley; Fischer, Gottfried; Poulton, Kay; Wacker, Kara; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich; Noreen, Harriet; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2011-12-01

    Histocompatibility testing for stem cell and solid organ transplantation has become increasingly complex as newly discovered human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are described. HLA typing assignments reported by laboratories are used by physicians and donor registries for matching donors and recipients. To communicate effectively, a common language for histocompatibility terms should be established. In early 2010, representatives from clinical, registry, and histocompatibility organizations joined together as the Harmonization of Histocompatibility Typing Terms Working Group to define a consensual language for laboratories, physicians and registries to communicate histocompatibility typing information. The Working Group defined terms for HLA typing resolution, HLA matching and a format for reporting HLA assignments. In addition, definitions of verification typing and extended typing were addressed. The original draft of the Definitions of Histocompatibility Typing Terms was disseminated to colleagues from each organization to gain feedback and create a collaborative document. Commentary gathered during this 90-day review period were discussed and implemented for preparation of this report. Histocompatibility testing continues to evolve thus, the definitions agreed upon today, likely will require refinement and perhaps additional terminology in the future. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spontaneous expression of mirror self-recognition in monkeys after learning precise visual-proprioceptive association for mirror images

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Liangtang; Zhang, Shikun; Poo, Mu-ming; Gong, Neng

    2017-01-01

    Self-awareness is a higher intelligence that can be revealed by mirror self-recognition (MSR) in humans. Testing MSR has become the main approach to examining the existence of self-recognition in animals, and only a few species have passed the test. However, it remains controversial whether failing the MSR test is a result of the lack of an animal’s self-recognition ability or the inadequacy of the mirror test. We found that MSR spontaneously appeared in rhesus monkeys after training for prec...

  4. Mirror self-recognition in the bottlenose dolphin: a case of cognitive convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, D; Marino, L

    2001-05-08

    The ability to recognize oneself in a mirror is an exceedingly rare capacity in the animal kingdom. To date, only humans and great apes have shown convincing evidence of mirror self-recognition. Two dolphins were exposed to reflective surfaces, and both demonstrated responses consistent with the use of the mirror to investigate marked parts of the body. This ability to use a mirror to inspect parts of the body is a striking example of evolutionary convergence with great apes and humans.

  5. Mirror-induced behavior in the magpie (Pica pica: evidence of self-recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Prior

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies suggest that at least some bird species have evolved mental skills similar to those found in humans and apes. This is indicated by feats such as tool use, episodic-like memory, and the ability to use one's own experience in predicting the behavior of conspecifics. It is, however, not yet clear whether these skills are accompanied by an understanding of the self. In apes, self-directed behavior in response to a mirror has been taken as evidence of self-recognition. We investigated mirror-induced behavior in the magpie, a songbird species from the crow family. As in apes, some individuals behaved in front of the mirror as if they were testing behavioral contingencies. When provided with a mark, magpies showed spontaneous mark-directed behavior. Our findings provide the first evidence of mirror self-recognition in a non-mammalian species. They suggest that essential components of human self-recognition have evolved independently in different vertebrate classes with a separate evolutionary history.

  6. Face-specific and domain-general characteristics of cortical responses during self-recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Motoaki; Sassa, Yuko; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2008-08-01

    The ability of visual self-recognition in animals and infants is considered a hallmark of the domain-general cognitive representation of the self, which also underpins higher social ability. Cortical regions activated during self-face recognition in human adults have been accordingly expected to play the domain-general role in self-processing. However, there is no evidence of the involvement of this network in non-face domains. We compared cortical responses during face and name recognition of self, a friend, and an unfamiliar person, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Recognition of the self-face activated the right inferior frontal, precentral, supramarginal, and bilateral ventral occipitotemporal regions, consistent with previous findings, whereas these regions did not show self-specific activation during name recognition. During both face and name recognitions, increased activation for the friend and unfamiliar person than for the self was observed in the bilateral temporoparietal regions, and higher activation for the self and friend than for the unfamiliar person was observed in the medial cortical structures. These results suggest that the role of the self-specific networks during face recognition is not domain-general, but rather face-specific, and that the medial cortical structures, which are also implicated in self-referential processes, are not relevant to self-other distinction during face or name recognition. Instead, the reduced temporoparietal activation is a domain-general characteristic of the cortical response during self-recognition, which may reflect suppression of an automatic preparatory process for social interaction, possibly paralleling the disappearance of social behavior to the mirrored self-image at the emergence of self-recognition in animals and infants.

  7. Are horses capable of mirror self-recognition? A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Baragli

    Full Text Available Mirror Self-Recognition (MSR unveils complex cognitive, social and emotional skills and it has been found only in humans and few other species, such as great apes, dolphins, elephants and magpies. In this pilot study, we tested if horses show the capacity of MSR. Four subjects living socially under naturalistic conditions were selected for the experiment. We adopted the classical mark test, which consists in placing a coloured mark on an out-of-view body part, visible only through mirror inspection. If the animal considers the image as its own, it will use its reflection to detect the mark and will try to explore it. We enhanced the classical paradigm by introducing a double-check control. Only in the presence of the reflecting surface, animals performed tactile and olfactory exploration of the mirror and looked behind it. These behaviors suggest that subjects were trying to associate multiple sensory cues (visual, tactile and olfactory to the image in the mirror. The lack of correspondence between the collected stimuli in front of the mirror and the response to the colored mark lead us to affirm that horses are able to perceive that the reflected image is incongruent when compared with the memorized information of a real horse. However, without replication of data, the self-directed behavior towards the colored marks showed by our horses cannot be sufficient per se to affirm that horses are capable of self-recognition.

  8. Delayed video self-recognition in children with high functioning autism and Asperger's disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Cheryl; Shembrey, Joh; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Two studies are reported which investigate delayed video self-recognition (DSR) in children with autistic disorder and Asperger's disorder relative to one another and to their typically developing peers. A secondary aim was to establish whether DSR ability is dependent on metarepresentational ability. Children's verbal and affective responses to their image were also measured. Three groups of male children between 5 and 9 years, comprising 15 with high-functioning autistic disorder (HFA), 12 with Asperger's disorder (AspD), and 15 typically developing (TD) children, participated in Study 1. Study 2 included two groups of younger children (18 HFA; 18 TD) aged 4 to 7 years. Participant groups in each study were equally able to recognize themselves using delayed video feedback, and responded to their marked image with positive affect. This was so even amongst children with HFA who were impaired in their performance on false belief tasks, casting doubt on a metarepresentational basis of DSR.

  9. Self-recognition mechanism between skin and suckers prevents octopus arms from interfering with each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesher, Nir; Levy, Guy; Grasso, Frank W; Hochner, Binyamin

    2014-06-02

    Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to stick to almost any object they contact [6-9]. The existence of this reflex could pose significant problems with unplanned interactions between the arms if not appropriately managed. This problem is likely to be accentuated because it is accepted that octopuses are "not aware of their arms" [10-14]. Here we report of a self-recognition mechanism that has a novel role in motor control, restraining the arms from interfering with each other. We show that the suckers of amputated arms never attach to octopus skin because a chemical in the skin inhibits the attachment reflex of the suckers. The peripheral mechanism appears to be overridden by central control because, in contrast to amputated arms, behaving octopuses sometime grab amputated arms. Surprisingly, octopuses seem to identify their own amputated arms, as they treat arms of other octopuses like food more often than their own. This self-recognition mechanism is a novel peripheral component in the embodied organization of the adaptive interactions between the octopus's brain, body, and environment [15, 16]. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Body schema and corporeal self-recognition in the alien hand syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgiati, Elena; Maravita, Angelo; Spandri, Viviana; Casati, Roberta; Ferraro, Francesco; Tedesco, Lucia; Agostoni, Elio Clemente; Bolognini, Nadia

    2017-07-01

    The alien hand syndrome (AHS) is a rare neuropsychological disorder characterized by involuntary, yet purposeful, hand movements. Patients with the AHS typically complain about a loss of agency associated with a feeling of estrangement for actions performed by the affected limb. The present study explores the integrity of the body representation in AHS, focusing on 2 main processes: multisensory integration and visual self-recognition of body parts. Three patients affected by AHS following a right-hemisphere stroke, with clinical symptoms akin to the posterior variant of AHS, were tested and their performance was compared with that of 18 age-matched healthy controls. AHS patients and controls underwent 2 experimental tasks: a same-different visual matching task for body postures, which assessed the ability of using your own body schema for encoding others' body postural changes (Experiment 1), and an explicit self-hand recognition task, which assessed the ability to visually recognize your own hands (Experiment 2). As compared to controls, all AHS patients were unable to access a reliable multisensory representation of their alien hand and use it for decoding others' postural changes; however, they could rely on an efficient multisensory representation of their intact (ipsilesional) hand. Two AHS patients also presented with a specific impairment in the visual self-recognition of their alien hand, but normal recognition of their intact hand. This evidence suggests that the AHS following a right-hemisphere stroke may involve a disruption of the multisensory representation of the alien limb; instead, self-hand recognition mechanisms may be spared. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Histocompatibility testing after fifty years of transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Hooi Sian; Leffell, Mary S

    2011-06-30

    Histocompatibility testing has been used in support of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for over fifty years and transplantation has clearly served as a major stimulus for interest in the human major histocompatibility complex, the HLA system. Until the 1990s, typing and definition of antibodies to HLA antigens was performed primarily by serologic techniques using cell-based assays. Two major technological advances have greatly increased knowledge of HLA alleles and HLA-specific antibodies, namely the introduction of DNA based molecular typing and solid phase immunoassays using purified HLA antigens as targets. By virtue of these advances, the number of recognized HLA alleles has increased from a few hundred to greater than 6000 and definition of the specificities of antibodies to HLA antigens is now possible at the level of individual epitopes. The technological advancements have also raised new challenges. The vast and ever increasing number of HLA alleles has resulted in ambiguities in allele assignments which confound matching for hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Similarly, the ability to detect extremely low levels of HLA-specific antibodies has raised questions about whether such low levels are clinically relevant. Next generation DNA sequencing methods likely will offer the solution to many of the HLA typing ambiguities and future studies on the nature of both HLA and non-HLA-specific antibodies will clarify their impact on transplant outcomes. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Different neural processes accompany self-recognition in photographs across the lifespan: an ERP study using dizygotic twins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Butler

    Full Text Available Our appearance changes over time, yet we can recognize ourselves in photographs from across the lifespan. Researchers have extensively studied self-recognition in photographs and have proposed that specific neural correlates are involved, but few studies have examined self-recognition using images from different periods of life. Here we compared ERP responses to photographs of participants when they were 5-15, 16-25, and 26-45 years old. We found marked differences between the responses to photographs from these time periods in terms of the neural markers generally assumed to reflect (i the configural processing of faces (i.e., the N170, (ii the matching of the currently perceived face to a representation already stored in memory (i.e., the P250, and (iii the retrieval of information about the person being recognized (i.e., the N400. There was no uniform neural signature of visual self-recognition. To test whether there was anything specific to self-recognition in these brain responses, we also asked participants to identify photographs of their dizygotic twins taken from the same time periods. Critically, this allowed us to minimize the confounding effects of exposure, for it is likely that participants have been similarly exposed to each other's faces over the lifespan. The same pattern of neural response emerged with only one exception: the neural marker reflecting the retrieval of mnemonic information (N400 differed across the lifespan for self but not for twin. These results, as well as our novel approach using twins and photographs from across the lifespan, have wide-ranging consequences for the study of self-recognition and the nature of our personal identity through time.

  13. Self-recognition of highly skilled actions: a study of orchestral conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllner, Clemens

    2012-09-01

    The influence of movement skill on action representations and identification of agency was investigated. Point-light displays were created of highly skilled gestures of thirteen orchestral conductors in visual, auditory, and audiovisual versions and compared to two control conditions (static images and gait cycles of the same participants). In subsequent experimental sessions, participants indicated whether displays presented them or other conductors, whether the soundtrack contained their or others' musical interpretations, and rated the quality and emotional content of the gestures. Self-recognition was more accurate in conditions presenting highly skilled conducting movements as compared to other displays. Participants judged the quality of their own movements to be better than those of others, independently of whether or not they recognized movement agency. Emotional content was perceived accurately across conditions both for own and others' actions. These results point to the influence of dynamical characteristics of motor skill, rather than merely type of movement or emotional content, on action representations and self-other identification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Near-wall Behavior of a Scale Self-Recognition Mixed SGS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Mizuki; Minamoto, Yuki; Naka, Yoshitsugu; Fukushima, Naoya; Shimura, Masayasu; Tanahashi, Mamoru

    2016-11-01

    A Scale Self-Recognition Mixed SGS Model was developed in terms of GS-SGS energy transfer in homogenius isotropic turbulence by Fukushima et al. (2015). In the present research, the near-wall characteristics of the Smagorinsky coefficient, CS are investigated in terms of GS-SGS energy transfer by analyzing DNS data of turbulent channel flows at Reτ = 400, 800 and 1270. CS is dependent on grid anisotropy, and this cause dependences of CS on Reτ . It is revealed that CS obtained directly from the DNS data is independent of Reτ and dependent on only dimensionless wall distance, y+ and filter-width to Kolmogorov scale ratio corrected by f, f . Δ / η , when the grid anisotropy is isolated from CS by using the correction function f proposed by Scotti et al. (1993). The contributions of Leonard, cross and Reynolds terms to total energy transfer are also independent of Reτ and dependent on only y+ and f . Δ / η in the near-wall region. These results suggest that CS can be determined dynamically from f . Δ / η in the wall turbulence if η is sufficiently predicted from the grid scale quantities.

  15. Self-recognition of eating-disordered behavior in college women: further evidence of poor eating disorders "mental health literacy"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratwick-Sarll, Kassandra; Mond, Jonathan; Hay, Phillipa

    2013-01-01

    Self-recognition of eating-disordered behavior was examined among female college students (n = 94) with a high level of bulimic-type eating disorder symptoms. A vignette was presented describing a fictional young woman with bulimia nervosa. Participants were asked whether they might currently have a problem such as the one described, while also completing self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms, general psychological distress, and functional impairment. Less than half (47.9%) of participants believed that they currently had a problem with their eating. In both bivariate and multivariable analysis, the variables most strongly associated with self-recognition were overall levels of eating disorder psychopathology, prior treatment for an eating problem, and the use of self-induced vomiting as a means of controlling weight or shape. No other eating disorder behaviors were independently associated with self-recognition. The findings support the hypothesis that young women with eating disorder symptoms may be unlikely, or at least less likely, to recognize a problem with their eating behavior when that behavior does not entail self-induced vomiting. Health promotion and early intervention programs for eating disorders may need to address the perception that, among young women of normal or above-average body weight, only problems with eating that involve self-induced vomiting are pathological.

  16. Reproductive failure and the major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, K; Ho, H N; Speed, T P; Gill, T J

    1995-06-01

    The association between HLA sharing and recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) was tested in 123 couples and the association between HLA sharing, and the outcome of treatment for unexplained infertility by in vitro fertilization (IVF) was tested in 76 couples, by using a new shared-allele test in order to identify more precisely the region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influencing these reproductive defects. The shared-allele test circumvents the problem of rare alleles at HLA loci and at the same time provides a substantial gain in power over the simple chi 2 test. Two statistical methods, a corrected homogeneity test and a bootstrap approach, were developed to compare the allele frequencies at each of the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DR, and HLA-DQ loci; they were not statistically different among the three patient groups and the control group. There was a significant excess of HLA-DR sharing in couples with RSA and a significant excess of HLA-DQ sharing in couples with unexplained infertility who failed treatment by IVF. These findings indicate that genes located in different parts of the class II region of the MHC affect different aspects of reproduction and strongly suggest that the sharing of HLA antigens per se is not the mechanism involved in the reproductive defects. The segment of the MHC that has genes affecting reproduction also has genes associated with different autoimmune diseases, and this juxtaposition may explain the association between reproductive defects and autoimmune diseases.

  17. Innate immune 'self' recognition: a role for CD47-SIRP alpha interactions in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Timo K.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen

    2008-01-01

    Self-nonself discrimination is a central property of the immune system. This paradigm was originally established in the context of tissue transplantation, leading to the discovery of major histocompatibility complex molecules as signals of 'self'. However, accumulating evidence has shown that innate

  18. Pituitary transplantation: cyclosporine enables transplantation across a minor histocompatibility barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipan, N B; Huang, S; Allen, G S

    1986-03-01

    Pituitary glands from neonatal donors were transplanted to the median eminence of hypophysectomized adult rats. Rats with transplants were then treated for 2 weeks with the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine. For 5 weeks thereafter, blood was drawn at regular intervals for determination of serum thyroxine, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone. Cyclosporine-treated recipients of grafts with minor histocompatibility differences had normal levels of thyroxine and prolactin, whereas untreated animals did not. In addition, the treated animals responded to oophorectomy with a marked elevation in serum luteinizing hormone. This evidence indicates that cyclosporine enables successful transplantation across a minor histocompatibility barrier. It also suggests that these grafts interact with the hypothalamus. Transplantation across a major histocompatibility barrier was unsuccessful even in the presence of cyclosporine.

  19. Poor self-recognition of disordered eating among girls with bulimic-type eating disorders: cause for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratwick-Sarll, Kassandra; Bentley, Caroline; Harrison, Carmel; Mond, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Bulimic-type eating disorders are common among young women and associated with high levels of distress and disability and low uptake of mental health care. We examined self-recognition of disordered eating and factors associated with this among female adolescents with bulimic-type eating disorders (n = 139) recruited from a large, population-based sample. A vignette of a fictional character with bulimia nervosa was presented, followed by a series of questions addressing the nature and treatment of the problem described. One of these questions required participants to indicate whether they currently had a problem such as the one described. Self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms, general psychological distress and quality of life were also completed. More than half of participants (58%) did not believe that they currently had a problem with their eating. In multivariable analysis, impairment in emotional well-being and self-induced vomiting were the only variables independently associated with self-recognition. Participants who recognized a problem with their eating were more likely to have sought treatment for an eating problem than those who did not. Recognition of disordered eating among adolescents with bulimic-type eating disorders may be poor and this may be a factor in low uptake of mental health care. Health promotion efforts may need to address the misconception that only bulimic-type disorders involving self-induced vomiting are pathological. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. New strategies in identification and quantification of minor histocompatibility antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Chopie

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of Minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) in the graft versus tumor is described about three decades ago. Nowadays, there are many evidences that, after HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) MiHA specific T cells mediate both graft versus leukemia

  1. Cyto- and histocompatibility of multilayered DNA-coatings on titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beucken, J. van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Vos, M.R.J.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA-containing biomaterial coatings offer potential beneficial effects for both soft and hard tissue implants because of the structural properties of DNA. In the current study, the aim was to assess the in vitro cyto- and in vivo histocompatibility of multilayered DNA-coatings generated using the

  2. Cyto- and histocompatibility of multilayered DNA-coatings on titanium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Vos, M.R-J.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA-containing biomaterial coatings offer potential beneficial effects for both soft and hard tissue implants because of the structural properties of DNA. In the current study, the aim was to assess the in vitro cyto- and in vivo histocompatibility of multilayered DNA-coatings generated using the

  3. Major Histocompatibility complex-DMB allelic diversity in old and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major Histocompatibility complex-DMB allelic diversity in old and new world nonhuman primates: Intraspecies pattern of evolution. ... directing DR molecules towards the endosomal/ lysosomal class II compartment and sending inhibitory signals to cells in order to stop synthesis of unnecessary MHC-DR molecules.

  4. Evolutionary Analysis of Minor Histocompatibility Genes In Hydra

    KAUST Repository

    Aalismail, Nojood

    2016-05-01

    Hydra is a simple freshwater solitary polyp used as a model system to study evolutionary aspects. The immune response of this organism has not been studied extensively and the immune response genes have not been identified and characterized. On the other hand, immune response has been investigated and genetic analysis has been initiated in other lower invertebrates. In the present study we took initiative to study the self/nonself recognition in hydra and its relation to the immune response. Moreover, performing phylogenetic analysis to look for annotated immune genes in hydra gave us a potential to analyze the expression of minor histocompatibility genes that have been shown to play a major role in grafting and transplantation in mammals. Here we obtained the cDNA library that shows expression of minor histocompatibility genes and confirmed that the annotated sequences in databases are actually present. In addition, grafting experiments suggested, although still preliminary, that homograft showed less rejection response than in heterograft. Involvement of possible minor histocompatibility gene orthologous in immune response was examined by qPCR.

  5. No evidence for self-recognition in a small passerine, the great tit (Parus major) judged from the mark/mirror test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Fanny-Linn; Forštová, Tereza; Utku Urhan, A; Exnerová, Alice; Brodin, Anders

    2017-11-01

    Self-recognition is a trait presumed to be associated with high levels of cognition and something previously considered to be exclusive to humans and possibly apes. The most common test of self-recognition is the mark/mirror test of whether an animal can understand that it sees its own reflection in a mirror. The usual design is that an animal is marked with a colour spot somewhere on the body where the spot can only be seen by the animal by using a mirror. Very few species have passed this test, and among birds, only magpies have been affirmatively demonstrated to pass it. In this study, we tested great tits (Parus major), small passerines, that are known for their innovative foraging skills and good problem-solving abilities, in the mirror self-recognition test. We found no indication that they have any ability of this kind and believe that they are unlikely to be capable of this type of self-recognition.

  6. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... and functioning, MHC-I molecules might be of importance for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis not only within the immune system, but also in the interplay between the immune system and other organ systems....

  7. Depression, Help-Seeking and Self-Recognition of Depression among Dominican, Ecuadorian and Colombian Immigrant Primary Care Patients in the Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Susan; Buyske, Steven

    2015-08-27

    Latinos, the largest minority group in the United States, experience mental health disparities, which include decreased access to care, lower quality of care and diminished treatment engagement. The purpose of this cross-sectional study of 177 Latino immigrants in primary care is to identify demographic factors, attitudes and beliefs, such as stigma, perceived stress, and ethnic identity that are associated with depression, help-seeking and self-recognition of depression. Results indicated that 45 participants (25%) had depression by Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) criteria. Factors most likely to be associated with depression were: poverty; difficulty in functioning; greater somatic symptoms, perceived stress and stigma; number of chronic illnesses; and poor or fair self-rated mental health. Fifty-four people endorsed help-seeking. Factors associated with help-seeking were: female gender, difficulty in functioning, greater somatic symptoms, severity of depression, having someone else tell you that you have an emotional problem, and poor or fair self-rated mental health. Factors most likely to be associated with self-recognition were the same, but also included greater perceived stress. This manuscript contributes to the literature by examining attitudinal factors that may be associated with depression, help-seeking and self-recognition among subethnic groups of Latinos that are underrepresented in research studies.

  8. Depression, Help-Seeking and Self-Recognition of Depression among Dominican, Ecuadorian and Colombian Immigrant Primary Care Patients in the Northeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Caplan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Latinos, the largest minority group in the United States, experience mental health disparities, which include decreased access to care, lower quality of care and diminished treatment engagement. The purpose of this cross-sectional study of 177 Latino immigrants in primary care is to identify demographic factors, attitudes and beliefs, such as stigma, perceived stress, and ethnic identity that are associated with depression, help-seeking and self-recognition of depression. Results indicated that 45 participants (25% had depression by Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 criteria. Factors most likely to be associated with depression were: poverty; difficulty in functioning; greater somatic symptoms, perceived stress and stigma; number of chronic illnesses; and poor or fair self-rated mental health. Fifty-four people endorsed help-seeking. Factors associated with help-seeking were: female gender, difficulty in functioning, greater somatic symptoms, severity of depression, having someone else tell you that you have an emotional problem, and poor or fair self-rated mental health. Factors most likely to be associated with self-recognition were the same, but also included greater perceived stress. This manuscript contributes to the literature by examining attitudinal factors that may be associated with depression, help-seeking and self-recognition among subethnic groups of Latinos that are underrepresented in research studies.

  9. Minor Histocompatibility Antigens and the Maternal Immune Response to the Fetus During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscheid, Caitlin; Petroff, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    The tolerance of the semiallogeneic fetus by the maternal immune system is an important area of research for understanding how the maternal and fetal systems interact during pregnancy to ensure a successful outcome. Several lines of research reveal that the maternal immune system can recognize and respond to fetal minor histocompatibility antigens during pregnancy. Reactions to these antigens arise because of allelic differences between the mother and fetus, and have been shown more broadly to play an important role in mediating transplantation outcomes. This review outlines the discovery of minor histocompatibility antigens and their importance in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, maternal T-cell responses to minor histocompatibility antigens during pregnancy, expression of minor histocompatibility antigens in the human placenta, and the potential involvement of minor histocompatibility antigens in the development and manifestation of pregnancy complications. PMID:23398025

  10. Identification of a Novel UTY‐Encoded Minor Histocompatibility Antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B. K.; Rasmussen, A. H.; Larsen, Malene Erup

    2012-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) encoded by the Y‐chromosome (H‐Y‐mHags) are known to play a pivotal role in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) involving female donors and male recipients. We present a new H‐Y‐mHag, YYNAFHWAI (UTY139–147), encoded by the UTY gene...... and presented by HLA‐A*24:02. Briefly, short peptide stretches encompassing multiple putative H‐Y‐mHags were designed using a bioinformatics predictor of peptide‐HLA binding, NetMHCpan. These peptides were used to screen for peptide‐specific HLA‐restricted T cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells...... obtained post‐HCT from male recipients of female donor grafts. In one of these recipients, a CD8+ T cell response was observed against a peptide stretch encoded by the UTY gene. Another bioinformatics tool, HLArestrictor, was used to identify the optimal peptide and HLA‐restriction element. Using peptide...

  11. Uridine composition of the poly-U/UC tract of HCV RNA defines non-self recognition by RIG-I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretja Schnell

    Full Text Available Viral infection of mammalian cells triggers the innate immune response through non-self recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs in viral nucleic acid. Accurate PAMP discrimination is essential to avoid self recognition that can generate autoimmunity, and therefore should be facilitated by the presence of multiple motifs in a PAMP that mark it as non-self. Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA is recognized as non-self by RIG-I through the presence of a 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp on the viral RNA in association with a 3' poly-U/UC tract. Here we define the HCV PAMP and the criteria for RIG-I non-self discrimination of HCV by examining the RNA structure-function attributes that impart PAMP function to the poly-U/UC tract. We found that the 34 nucleotide poly-uridine "core" of this sequence tract was essential for RIG-I activation, and that interspersed ribocytosine nucleotides between poly-U sequences in the RNA were required to achieve optimal RIG-I signal induction. 5'-ppp poly-U/UC RNA variants that stimulated strong RIG-I activation efficiently bound purified RIG-I protein in vitro, and RNA interaction with both the repressor domain and helicase domain of RIG-I was required to activate signaling. When appended to 5'-ppp RNA that lacks PAMP activity, the poly-U/UC U-core sequence conferred non-self recognition of the RNA and innate immune signaling by RIG-I. Importantly, HCV poly-U/UC RNA variants that strongly activated RIG-I signaling triggered potent anti-HCV responses in vitro and hepatic innate immune responses in vivo using a mouse model of PAMP signaling. These studies define a multi-motif PAMP signature of non-self recognition by RIG-I that incorporates a 5'-ppp with poly-uridine sequence composition and length. This HCV PAMP motif drives potent RIG-I signaling to induce the innate immune response to infection. Our studies define a basis of non-self discrimination by RIG-I and offer insights into the antiviral therapeutic

  12. HapMap scanning of novel human minor histocompatibility antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Michi; Nannya, Yasuhito; Torikai, Hiroki; Kawase, Takakazu; Taura, Kenjiro; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Taro; Yazaki, Makoto; Morishima, Satoko; Tsujimura, Kunio; Miyamura, Koichi; Ito, Tetsuya; Togari, Hajime; Riddell, Stanley R; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Morishima, Yasuo; Takahashi, Toshitada; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Ogawa, Seishi; Akatsuka, Yoshiki

    2009-05-21

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) are molecular targets of allo-immunity associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and involved in graft-versus-host disease, but they also have beneficial antitumor activity. mHags are typically defined by host SNPs that are not shared by the donor and are immunologically recognized by cytotoxic T cells isolated from post-HSCT patients. However, the number of molecularly identified mHags is still too small to allow prospective studies of their clinical importance in transplantation medicine, mostly due to the lack of an efficient method for isolation. Here we show that when combined with conventional immunologic assays, the large data set from the International HapMap Project can be directly used for genetic mapping of novel mHags. Based on the immunologically determined mHag status in HapMap panels, a target mHag locus can be uniquely mapped through whole genome association scanning taking advantage of the unprecedented resolution and power obtained with more than 3 000 000 markers. The feasibility of our approach could be supported by extensive simulations and further confirmed by actually isolating 2 novel mHags as well as 1 previously identified example. The HapMap data set represents an invaluable resource for investigating human variation, with obvious applications in genetic mapping of clinically relevant human traits.

  13. Molecular Genotype Identification of Different Chickens: Major Histocompatibility Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chicken is a main poultry in China. Molecular breeding for disease resistance plays an important role in the control of diseases, especially infectious diseases. Choice of genes for disease resistance is the key technology of molecular breeding. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is of great interest to poultry breeding scientists for its extraordinary polymorphism and close relation with traits of resistance against infectious diseases. The MHC-B haplotype plays an important role in the study of disease resistance in chicken. The traditional chicken MHC-B haplotype is commonly defined by serologic reactions of erythrocytes and the majority of studies have been conducted in Leghorn and broiler but study about other chicken breeds is little. In this study, firstly, the microsatellite marker LEI0258 which is located within the MHC was sequenced by using target sequence capture assay in different chicken breeds, and then according to the number of repeated structures and polymorphic sequences in microsatellite, sequence information for the region defined by LEI0258 was obtained for different haplotypes. Afterwards, we identified the relation between MHC-B haplotypes and disease resistance. Collectively, these observed results provided the reference data for disease-resistant breeding association with blood type and for further study of MHC gene function in poultry.

  14. CD1 and major histocompatibility complex II molecules follow a different course during dendritic cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, Nicole N.; Sugita, Masahiko; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Cao, Xaiochun; Schreibelt, Gerty; Brenner, Michael B.; Peters, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells is accompanied by the redistribution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules from the lysosomal MHC class IT compartment to the plasma membrane to mediate presentation of peptide antigens. Besides MHC molecules, dendritic cells also express CD1

  15. Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci with the B (MHC) and C histocompatibility loci in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachý, J; Korec, E; Hlozánek, I; Zdĕnková, E

    1985-01-01

    Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci and histocompatibility loci B (MHC) and C has been demonstrated serologically in backcross progeny of inbred lines of chickens. The endogenous viral locus linked to the B complex is the first case of the localization of an endogenous viral gene to the microchromosomes in chickens.

  16. Natural selection acts on Atlantic salmon major histocompatibility (MH) variability in the wild

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyto, de E.; McGinnity, P.; Consuegra, S.; Coughlan, J.; Tufto, J.; Farrell, K.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Jordan, W.; Cross, T.; Stet, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Pathogen-driven balancing selection is thought to maintain polymorphism in major histocompatibility (MH) genes. However, there have been few empirical demonstrations of selection acting on MH loci in natural populations. To determine whether natural selection on MH genes has fitness consequences for

  17. Correlation in chicken between the marker LEI0258 alleles and Major Histocompatibility Complex sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chazara, Olympe; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl; Chang, Chi-Seng

    Background The LEI0258 marker is located within the B region of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), and is surprisingly well associated with serology. Therefore, the correlation between the LEI0258 alleles and the MHC class I and the class II alleles at the level of sequences is w...

  18. Pathogen burden, co-infection and major histocompatibility complex variability in the European badger (Meles meles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Yung Wa; Annavi, Geetha; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Newman, Chris; Burke, Terry; MacDonald, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen-mediated selection is thought to maintain the extreme diversity in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, operating through the heterozygote advantage, rare-allele advantage and fluctuating selection mechanisms. Heterozygote advantage (i.e. recognizing and binding a wider range

  19. The influence of AVPR1A genotype on individual differences in behaviors during a mirror self-recognition task in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahovetz, L M; Young, L J; Hopkins, W D

    2016-06-01

    The mark/rouge test has been used to assess mirror self-recognition (MSR) in many species. Despite consistent evidence of MSR in great apes, genetic or non-genetic factors may account for the individual differences in behavioral responses that have been reported. We examined whether vasopressin receptor gene (AVPR1A) polymorphisms are associated with MSR-related behaviors in chimpanzees since vasopressin has been implicated in the development and evolution of complex social relations and cognition and chimpanzees are polymorphic for the presence of the RS3-containing DupB region. We compared a sample of DupB+/- and DupB-/- chimpanzees on a mark test to assess its role on social behavior toward a mirror. Chimpanzees were administered two, 10-min sessions where frequencies of mirror-guided self-directed behaviors, contingent actions and other social behaviors were recorded. Approximately one-third showed evidence of MSR and these individuals exhibited more mirror-guided self-exploratory behaviors and mouth contingent actions than chimpanzees not classified as passers. Moreover, DupB+/- males exhibited more scratching and agonistic behaviors than other male and female cohorts. Our findings support previous studies demonstrating individual differences in MSR abilities in chimpanzees and suggest that AVPR1A partly explains individual differences in MSR by influencing the behavioral reactions of chimpanzees in front of a mirror. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  20. F-Type Lectins: A Highly Diversified Family of Fucose-Binding Proteins with a Unique Sequence Motif and Structural Fold, Involved in Self/Non-Self-Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo R. Vasta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The F-type lectin (FTL family is one of the most recent to be identified and structurally characterized. Members of the FTL family are characterized by a fucose recognition domain [F-type lectin domain (FTLD] that displays a novel jellyroll fold (“F-type” fold and unique carbohydrate- and calcium-binding sequence motifs. This novel lectin family comprises widely distributed proteins exhibiting single, double, or greater multiples of the FTLD, either tandemly arrayed or combined with other structurally and functionally distinct domains, yielding lectin subunits of pleiotropic properties even within a single species. Furthermore, the extraordinary variability of FTL sequences (isoforms that are expressed in a single individual has revealed genetic mechanisms of diversification in ligand recognition that are unique to FTLs. Functions of FTLs in self/non-self-recognition include innate immunity, fertilization, microbial adhesion, and pathogenesis, among others. In addition, although the F-type fold is distinctive for FTLs, a structure-based search revealed apparently unrelated proteins with minor sequence similarity to FTLs that displayed the FTLD fold. In general, the phylogenetic analysis of FTLD sequences from viruses to mammals reveals clades that are consistent with the currently accepted taxonomy of extant species. However, the surprisingly discontinuous distribution of FTLDs within each taxonomic category suggests not only an extensive structural/functional diversification of the FTLs along evolutionary lineages but also that this intriguing lectin family has been subject to frequent gene duplication, secondary loss, lateral transfer, and functional co-option.

  1. Restriction fragment polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex of diabetic BB rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastern, W.; Dyrberg, T.; Scholler, J.

    1984-01-01

    DNA isolated from diabetic BB (BB/Hagedorn) rats was examined for restriction fragment length differences within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as compared with nondiabetic (W-subline) BB rats. Polymorphisms were detected using a mouse class I MHC gene as probe. Specifically, a 2-kb Bam......) or a human DC-beta (class II antigen light chain) gene as probes. These results indicate that the BB rat diabetic syndrome may be linked to differences in class I MHC genes....

  2. IFN-induced modulation of histocompatibility antigens on human cells. Background, mechanisms and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Basse, P; Justesen, J

    1989-01-01

    IFN proteins are a family of lymphokines with anti-viral effects. Several other effects of IFNs have also been described, including enhancement of natural killer (NK) cell activity, enhancement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity, and enhancement of the expression of major histocompatibility complex...... to the classical anti-viral mechanism. This concept proposes that the MHC-enhancing effect of IFNs is a vital part of the immunological defense against virus infections and an integral part of the anti-viral effects of IFN proteins. Udgivelsesdato: 1988-Nov...

  3. Oriented coupling of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to sensor surfaces using light assisted immobilisation technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snabe, Torben; Røder, Gustav Andreas; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2005-01-01

    histocompatibility complex (MHC class I) to a sensor surface is presented. The coupling was performed using light assisted immobilisation--a novel immobilisation technology which allows specific opening of particular disulphide bridges in proteins which then is used for covalent bonding to thiol-derivatised surfaces...... procedure can be used for covalent immobilisation of MHC class II complexes. The results open for the development of efficient T cell sensors, sensors for recognition of peptides of pathogenic origin, as well as other applications that may benefit from oriented immobilisation of MHC proteins....

  4. Passive Immunotherapy for Retroviral Disease: Influence of Major Histocompatibility Complex Type and T-Cell Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Brooks, Diane M.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1995-11-01

    Administration of virus-specific antibodies is known to be an effective early treatment for some viral infections. Such immunotherapy probably acts by antibody-mediated neutralization of viral infectivity and is often thought to function independently of T-cell-mediated immune responses. In the present experiments, we studied passive antibody therapy using Friend murine leukemia virus complex as a model for an immunosuppressive retroviral disease in adult mice. The results showed that antibody therapy could induce recovery from a well-established retroviral infection. However, the success of therapy was dependent on the presence of both CD4^+ and CD8^+ T lymphocytes. Thus, cell-mediated responses were required for recovery from infection even in the presence of therapeutic levels of antibody. The major histocompatibility type of the mice was also an important factor determining the relative success of antibody therapy in this system, but it was less critical for low-dose than for high-dose infections. Our results imply that limited T-cell responsiveness as dictated by major histocompatibility genes and/or stage of disease may have contributed to previous immunotherapy failures in AIDS patients. Possible strategies to improve the efficacy of future therapies are discussed.

  5. MH(2)c: Characterization of major histocompatibility α-helices - an information criterion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischenhuber, B; Frommlet, F; Schreiner, W; Knapp, B

    2012-07-01

    Major histocompatibility proteins share a common overall structure or peptide binding groove. Two binding groove domains, on the same chain for major histocompatibility class I or on two different chains for major histocompatibility class II, contribute to that structure that consists of two α-helices ("wall") and a sheet of eight anti-parallel beta strands ("floor"). Apart from the peptide presented in the groove, the major histocompatibility α-helices play a central role for the interaction with the T cell receptor. This study presents a generalized mathematical approach for the characterization of these helices. We employed polynomials of degree 1 to 7 and splines with 1 to 2 nodes based on polynomials of degree 1 to 7 on the α-helices projected on their principal components. We evaluated all models with a corrected Akaike Information Criterion to determine which model represents the α-helices in the best way without overfitting the data. This method is applicable for both the stationary and the dynamic characterization of α-helices. By deriving differential geometric parameters from these models one obtains a reliable method to characterize and compare α-helices for a broad range of applications. Program title: MH(2)c (MH helix curves) Catalogue identifier: AELX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 327 565 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 433 656 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab Computer: Personal computer architectures Operating system: Windows, Linux, Mac (all systems on which Matlab can be installed) RAM: Depends on the trajectory size, min. 1 GB (Matlab) Classification: 2.1, 4.9, 4.14 External routines: Curve Fitting

  6. MH2c: Characterization of major histocompatibility α-helices - an information criterion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischenhuber, B.; Frommlet, F.; Schreiner, W.; Knapp, B.

    2012-07-01

    Major histocompatibility proteins share a common overall structure or peptide binding groove. Two binding groove domains, on the same chain for major histocompatibility class I or on two different chains for major histocompatibility class II, contribute to that structure that consists of two α-helices (“wall”) and a sheet of eight anti-parallel beta strands (“floor”). Apart from the peptide presented in the groove, the major histocompatibility α-helices play a central role for the interaction with the T cell receptor. This study presents a generalized mathematical approach for the characterization of these helices. We employed polynomials of degree 1 to 7 and splines with 1 to 2 nodes based on polynomials of degree 1 to 7 on the α-helices projected on their principal components. We evaluated all models with a corrected Akaike Information Criterion to determine which model represents the α-helices in the best way without overfitting the data. This method is applicable for both the stationary and the dynamic characterization of α-helices. By deriving differential geometric parameters from these models one obtains a reliable method to characterize and compare α-helices for a broad range of applications. Catalogue identifier: AELX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 327 565 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 433 656 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab Computer: Personal computer architectures Operating system: Windows, Linux, Mac (all systems on which Matlab can be installed) RAM: Depends on the trajectory size, min. 1 GB (Matlab) Classification: 2.1, 4.9, 4.14 External routines: Curve Fitting Toolbox and Statistic Toolbox of

  7. Female-versus-male alloreactivity as a model for minor histocompatibility antigens in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stern, M.; Brand, R.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Sureda, A.; Rocha, V.; Passweg, J.; Baldomero, H.; Niederwieser, D.; Gratwohl, A.

    2008-01-01

    H-Y encoded gene products were the first to be recognized as clinically relevant minor histocompatibility antigens. Compared to other gender combinations, female donor/male recipient (FDMR) transplants are associated with increased graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), increased transplant-related

  8. 76 FR 22711 - Announcement of the Re-Approval of the American Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (ASHI) as an Accreditation Organization Under the...), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the application of the American Society for... specific and detailed than the CLIA language for requirements for control procedures. Sections 493.1256(c...

  9. Regulation of delayed type hypersensitivity : cellular and genetic requirements, with emphases on the response to histocompatibility antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.T.J. Bianchi (Andre Thomas Johan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe failure of successful exchange of tissues and organs between individuals of the same species is mainly due to the expression of histocompatibility (H) antigens on the cell surface of the transplanted tissues. Every individual has a unique set of genetically determined

  10. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide-MHC c...

  11. Major histocompatibility (MH) class II ß gene polymorphism influences disease resistance of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakus, K.L.; Wiegertjes, G.F.; Jurecka, P.M.; Walker, P.D.; Pilarczyk, A.; Irnazarow, I.

    2009-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are crucial elements of adaptive immunity. High polymorphism renders the MHC genes highly suitable for studies on association with disease resistance. In common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), there are two paralogous groups of MH class II B genes,

  12. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are a key element of the cellular immune response. Encoded by the MHC they are a family of highly polymorphic peptide receptors presenting peptide antigens for the surveillance by T cells. We have shown that certain organic compounds can amplify im...

  13. IPD-MHC 2.0 : an improved inter-species database for the study of the major histocompatibility complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Robinson, James; Ballingall, Keith; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Grimholt, Unni; Kaufman, Jim; Ho, Chak-Sum; de Groot, Natasja G; Flicek, Paul; Bontrop, Ronald E; Hammond, John A; Marsh, Steven G E

    2017-01-01

    The IPD-MHC Database project (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/mhc/) collects and expertly curates sequences of the major histocompatibility complex from non-human species and provides the infrastructure and tools to enable accurate analysis. Since the first release of the database in 2003, IPD-MHC has

  14. Major histocompatibility complex-controlled protective influences on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are peptide specific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Kjellén, P; Olsson, T

    1997-01-01

    The myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide 63-88-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and its associated T cell cytokine profile are influenced by the rat major histocompatibility complex (MHC). There is an allele-specific protective influence of the MHC class I region, whereas...... the MHC class II region display either disease-protective or -promoting effects. To investigate if the MHC-associated protection is dependent on certain combinations of MBP peptide and MHC molecules, we have now used another peptide (MBP 89-101). A broader and different set of rat MHC alleles were......-101 peptide, except in LEW.1N (RT1 pi) rats which were relatively resistant. Only this strain responded with additional Th2-like and transforming growth factor-beta responses to the peptide in vitro. In vivo depletion of CD8+ cells aggravated the disease in this strain. We conclude that both MHC...

  15. Characterisation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I in the Australian Cane Toad, Rhinella marina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Mette; Shine, Richard; Belov, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I is a highly variable gene family that encodes cell-surface receptors vital for recognition of intracellular pathogens and initiation of immune responses. The MHC class I has yet to be characterised in bufonid toads (Order: Anura; Suborder: Neobatrachia; Family: Bufonidae), a large and diverse family of anurans. Here we describe the characterisation of a classical MHC class I gene in the Australian cane toad, Rhinella marina. From 25 individuals sampled from the Australian population, we found only 3 alleles at this classical class I locus. We also found large number of class I alpha 1 alleles, implying an expansion of class I loci in this species. The low classical class I genetic diversity is likely the result of repeated bottleneck events, which arose as a result of the cane toad's complex history of introductions as a biocontrol agent and its subsequent invasion across Australia. PMID:25093458

  16. Major histocompatibility alleles associated with local resistance to malaria in a passerine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneaud, Camille; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Federici, Pierre; Chastel, Olivier; Sorci, Gabriele

    2006-02-01

    Malaria parasites are a major cause of human mortality in tropical countries and a potential threat for wildlife, as witnessed by the malaria-induced extinction of naive Hawaiian avifauna. Identifying resistance mechanisms is therefore crucial both for human health and wildlife conservation. Patterns of malaria resistance are known to be highly polygenic in both humans and mice, with marked contributions attributed to major histocompatibility (Mhc) genes. Here we show that specific Mhc variants are linked to both increased resistance and susceptibility to malaria infection in a wild passerine species, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). In addition, links between host immunogenetics and resistance to malaria involved population-specific alleles, suggesting local adaptation in this host-parasite interaction. This is the first evidence for a population-specific genetic control of resistance to malaria in a wild species.

  17. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules in oral carcinomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel-Dorrego, Mariana; Speight, Paul M; Barrett, A William

    2005-01-01

    Recognition in the 1980 s that keratinocytes can express class II molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) first raised the possibility that these cells might have an immunological function, and may even act as antigen presenting cells (APC). For effective T lymphocyte activation, APC require, in addition to MHC II, appropriate costimulatory signals. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 in keratinocytes derived from healthy oral mucosa and oral carcinomas. Using flow cytometry, it was confirmed that oral keratinocytes, switch on, expression of MHC class II molecules after stimulation with IFNgamma in vitro. All keratinocyte lines expressed CD40 constitutively; by contrast, CD80 and CD86 were universally absent. Loss of CD80 and CD86 may be one means whereby tumours escape immunological surveillance.

  18. Characterisation of four major histocompatibility complex class II genes of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Quintin; Jobbins, Sarah E; Belov, Katherine; Higgins, Damien P

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules have an integral role in the adaptive immune response, as they bind and present antigenic peptides to T helper lymphocytes. In this study of koalas, species-specific primers were designed to amplify exon 2 of the MHC class II DA and DB genes, which contain much of the peptide-binding regions of the α and β chains. A total of two DA α1 domain variants and eight DA β1 (DAB), three DB α1 and five DB β1 variants were amplified from 20 koalas from two free-living populations from South East Queensland and the Port Macquarie region in northern New South Wales. We detected greater variation in the β1 than in the α1 domains as well as evidence of positive selection in DAB. The present study provides a springboard to future investigation of the role of MHC in disease susceptibility in koalas.

  19. The major histocompatibility complex: a paradigm for studies of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcock, Richard J N

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6 is one of the most intensively studied regions of the human genome and has many features which make it unique. It is the source of much research interest because of its role in autoimmune and infectious disease susceptibility, and of diagnostic interest because of its role in transplantation and rejection. It is the most gene-dense and SNP-rich region of the genome, with large number of complex haplotypes and other features which must be taken into account when analysing the MHC in the laboratory. This article provides a brief overview of the MHC highlighting some of the issues that must be considered when developing new methods and assays.

  20. Humans with chimpanzee-like major histocompatibility complex-specificities control HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Kesmir, Can; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Background: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules allow immune surveillance by presenting a snapshot of the intracellular state of a cell to circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The MHC class I alleles of an HIV-1 infected individual strongly influence the level of viremia...... and the progression rate to AIDS. Chimpanzees control HIV-1 viral replication and develop a chronic infection without progressing to AIDS. A similar course of disease is observed in human long-term non-progressors. Objective: To investigate if long-term non-progressors and chimpanzees have functional similarities...... in their MHC class I repertoire. Methods: We compared the specificity of groups of human MHC molecules associated with different levels of viremia in HIV-1 infected individuals with those of chimpanzee. Results and conclusion: We demonstrate that human MHC with control of HIV-1 viral load share binding motifs...

  1. Canine parvovirus enteritis, canine distemper, and major histocompatibility complex genetic variation in Mexican wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Philip W; Lee, Rhonda N; Buchanan, Colleen

    2003-10-01

    The endangered Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) was recently reintroduced into Arizona and New Mexico (USA). In 1999 and 2000, pups from three litters that were part of the reintroduction program died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. Overall, half (seven of 14) of the pups died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. The parents and their litters were analyzed for variation at the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene DRB1. Similar MHC genes are related to disease resistance in other species. All six of the surviving pups genotyped for the MHC gene were heterozygous while five of the pups that died were heterozygous and one was homozygous. Resistance to pathogens is an important aspect of the management and long-term survival of endangered taxa, such as the Mexican wolf.

  2. Major and minor histocompatibility antigens to NIMA: Prediction of a tolerogenic NIMA effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Masahiro; Azuma, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    The immunologic effects of developmental exposure to non-inherited maternal antigens (NIMA) are heterogeneous, either tolerogenic or immunogenic. The role of minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) in NIMA effects is unknown. We have recently reported that the NIMA effect can be classified into two distinct reactivities, low and high responder, to NIMA in utero and during nursing depending on the degree of maternal microchimerism (MMc) and Foxp3 expression of peripheral blood CD4(+)CD25(+) cells after graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) induction. These reactivities were predictable before transplantation, using an MLR-ELISPOT (mixed lymphocyte reaction; enzyme-linked immunospot) assay by comparing the number of IFNγ-producing cells stimulated with NIMA. Moreover, this assay was also applicable in both major and minor NIMA-mismatched setting. These observations are clinically relevant and suggest that it is possible to predict the immunological tolerance to NIMA.

  3. Kinetics of antigenic peptide binding to the class II major histocompatibility molecule I-Ad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampé, R; McConnell, H M

    1991-06-01

    Using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy, we investigated the kinetics of fluorescent peptide reactions with detergent-solubilized I-Ad, a class II molecule of the mouse major histocompatibility complex. At pH 7.0 and 37 degrees C the half-time for the binding of a fluorescein-labeled synthetic peptide representing ovalbumin amino acids 323-339 [FOva-(323-339)Y] to I-Ad was 32 hr, independent of added fluorescent peptide concentration in the range 5-200 microM. Peptide exchange experiments were also carried out, where it was found that the half-time of FOva-(323-339)Y binding was equal to the half-time of dissociation of the Texas Red-labeled peptide TROva-(323-339)Y. These experiments show that slow peptide binding to class II major histocompatibility molecules may be limited by the slow dissociation of prebound peptides. Paradoxically, however, this kinetic behavior--a peptide concentration-insensitive on-reaction with a half-time for peptide binding approximately equal to the half-time for dissociation--can be modeled in more than one way. Models involving a kinetic intermediate are particularly attractive. The kinetics were significantly different at pH 5.0. The half-times for peptide binding and dissociation were approximately 7 times shorter than at pH 7.0. In addition the complex of the I-Ad alpha/beta heterodimer with FOva-(323-339)Y was unstable and dissociated into separate alpha and beta chains with a half-time of approximately 7 hr.

  4. Chronic spontaneous urticaria: epidemiological characteristics focusing on the histocompatibility profile and presence of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Zamir; Pelá Calamita, Andrea Bronhara

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the etiopathogenesis of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) remains a challenge. The clinical and laboratory characteristics relating to its histocompatibility profile and autoimmunity are constant research topics. To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with CSU by means of a cross-sectional study, focusing on the histocompatibility profile, presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and presence of antithyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). Sixty-seven adults with CSU were analyzed. The autologous serum skin test (ASST), ANA and anti-TPO were performed in all cases and MHC classes I and II (loci A, B and DR) were evaluated in 49 patients. The factors that worsened urticaria included use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, emotional stress and physical stimuli, reported by 27%, 16% and 15% of these patients, respectively. The ASST test was positive in 49 patients (73%) and anti-TPO and ANA were present in 15 (22.4%) and 7 (10.5%), respectively. The OR (with 95% CI) for the association between ANA and anti-TPO was 5.94 (1.16-30.42), and thus statistically significant. There was a favorable association (with statistical significance) between HLA B*50 and patients with CSU, with OR (95% CI) of 2.96 (1.17- 7.48). A significant favorable association was found between these patients and HLA B*50, and between the presence of anti-TPO and ANA. The greater prevalence of HLA B*50 in these patients and the association between ANA and anti-TPO reinforce the possibility that an immunogenic mechanism may be the triggering factor for CSU.

  5. Allogeneic major histocompatibility complex-mismatched equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are targeted for death by cytotoxic anti-major histocompatibility complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, A K; Schnabel, L V

    2017-07-01

    Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising cell source for treating musculoskeletal injuries in horses. Controversy exists, however, over whether major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched MSCs are recognised by the recipient immune system and targeted for death by a cytotoxic antibody response. To determine if cytotoxic anti-MHC antibodies generated in vivo following MHC-mismatched MSC injections are capable of initiating complement-dependent cytotoxicity of MSCs. Experimental controlled study. Antisera previously collected at Days 0, 7, 14 and 21 post-injection from 4 horses injected with donor MHC-mismatched equine leucocyte antigen (ELA)-A2 haplotype MSCs and one control horse injected with donor MHC-matched ELA-A2 MSCs were utilised in this study. Antisera were incubated with ELA-A2 MSCs before adding complement in microcytotoxicity assays and cell death was analysed via eosin dye exclusion. ELA-A2 peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) were used in the assays as a positive control. Antisera from all 4 horses injected with MHC-mismatched MSCs contained antibodies that caused the death of ELA-A2 haplotype MSCs in the microcytotoxicity assays. In 2 of the 4 horses, antibodies were present as early as Day 7 post-injection. MSC death was consistently equivalent to that of ELA-A2 haplotype PBL death at all time points and antisera dilutions. Antisera from the control horse that was injected with MHC-matched MSCs did not contain cytotoxic ELA-A2 antibodies at any of the time points examined. This study examined MSC death in vitro only and utilized antisera from a small number of horses. The cytotoxic antibody response induced in recipient horses following injection with donor MHC-mismatched MSCs is capable of killing donor MSCs in vitro. These results suggest that the use of allogeneic MHC-mismatched MSCs must be cautioned against, not only for potential adverse events, but also for reduced therapeutic efficacy due to targeted MSC death. © 2016 The

  6. Stable isotope tagging of epitopes: a highly selective strategy for the identification of major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides induced upon viral infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiring, Hugo D; Soethout, Ernst C; Poelen, Martien C M; Mooibroek, Dennis; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald; Timmermans, Hans; Boog, Claire J; Heck, Albert J R; Jong, Ad P J M de; Els, Cécile A C M van

    2006-01-01

    Identification of peptides presented in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules after viral infection is of strategic importance for vaccine development. Until recently, mass spectrometric identification of virus-induced peptides was based on comparative analysis of peptide pools

  7. [Histocompatibility of porous hydroxyapatite coating NiTi shape memory alloy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Shuanke; Zhao, Bin

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the histocompatibility of porous hydroxyapatite (HAP) coating NiTi shape memory alloy and to provide a theoretical basis for its clinical application in bone defect repair. Twenty-four Chinchilla rabbits weighing 2.0-2.5 kg were randomized into experimental group and control group (n=12). HAP coating NiTi shape memory alloy was implanted into the distal part of left femur of 12 rabbits in the experimental group, while holes without alloy implantation were performed on the control group. At 7, 14, 28 and 56 days after implantation, the animals were killed (3 rabbits in each group at a time). Gross observation, histology observation, BMP-2 immunohistochemistry observation and image grey scale analysis were performed. And the histology observation was evaluated by GB/T16886.6-1997 in terms of inflammation, capsule wall of fibrous tissue, materials degradation and the response of peripheral tissue. All of the animals survived until being killed. The implants reached a peak embedded in bone tissue wholly, without loosening and bone absorption. The inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrous hyperplasia were at 7 days after implantation, with the formation of cyst wall of fibrous tissue and the implant wrapped by the cyst wall. The response of connective tissue proliferation was still obvious in partial samples of experimental group at 56 days after implantation, which was wrose than the control group but consistent with the in vivo implantation standard of GB/T16886.6-1997. Immunohistochemistry observation displayed the endogenous BMP-2 were in the cytoplasm of MSCs and osteoblast. The result of image analysis showed the expression of BMP-2 were staged in line with the repair of bone defect, two groups witnessed the peak expression of the BMP-2 at 14 days after implantation. There were no significant differences among different time points in the staining gray scale of BMP-2 (P > 0.05). HAP coating NiTi shape memory alloy, as a biomedical material, has

  8. Identification of IκBL as the Second Major Histocompatibility Complex–Linked Susceptibility Locus for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Koichi; Makino, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Takaki, Asumi; Nagatsuka, Yumie; Ota, Masao; Tamiya, Gen; Kimura, Akinori; Bahram, Seiamak; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2002-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease with a complex etiology in which environmental factors within a genetically susceptible host maneuver the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system toward recognition of autoantigens. This ultimately leads to joint destruction and clinical symptomatology. Despite the identification of a number of disease-susceptibility regions across the genome, RA’s major genetic linkage remains with the major histocompatibility complex (M...

  9. Spatial variation and low diversity in the major histocompatibility complex in walrus (Odobenus rosmarus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Fales, Krystal; Jay, Chadwick V.; Sage, George K.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Increased global temperature and associated changes to Arctic habitats will likely result in the northward advance of species, including an influx of pathogens novel to the Arctic. How species respond to these immunological challenges will depend in part on the adaptive potential of their immune response system. We compared levels of genetic diversity at a gene associated with adaptive immune response [Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC), DQB exon 2] between populations of walrus (Odobenus rosmarus), a sea ice-dependent Arctic species. Walrus was represented by only five MHC DQB alleles, with frequency differences observed between Pacific and Atlantic populations. MHC DQB alleles appear to be under balancing selection, and most (80 %; n = 4/5) of the alleles were observed in walruses from both oceans, suggesting broad scale differences in the frequency of exposure and diversity of pathogens may be influencing levels of heterozygosity at DQB in walruses. Limited genetic diversity at MHC, however, suggests that walrus may have a reduced capacity to respond to novel immunological challenges associated with shifts in ecological communities and environmental stressors predicted for changing climates. This is particularly pertinent for walrus, since reductions in summer sea ice may facilitate both northward expansion of marine species and associated pathogens from more temperate regions, and exchange of marine mammals and associated pathogens through the recently opened Northwest Passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in the Canadian high Arctic.

  10. Structure and polymorphisms of the major histocompatibility complex in the Oriental stork, Ciconia boyciana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroki; Taniguchi, Yukio; Ishizuka, Shintaro; Matsuda, Hirokazu; Yamada, Takahisa; Naito, Kazuaki; Iwaisaki, Hiroaki

    2017-02-17

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is highly polymorphic and plays a central role in the vertebrate immune system. Despite its functional consistency, the MHC genomic structure differs substantially among organisms. In birds, the MHCs of Galliformes and the Japanese crested ibis (Pelecaniformes) are well-characterized, but information about other avian MHCs remains scarce. The Oriental stork (Ciconia boyciana, order Ciconiiformes) is a large endangered migrant. The current Japanese population of this bird originates from a few founders; thus, understanding the genetic diversity among them is critical for effective population management. We report the structure and polymorphisms in C. boyciana MHC. One contig (approximately 128 kb) was assembled by screening of lambda phage genomic library and its complete sequence was determined, revealing a gene order of COL11A2, two copies of MHC-IIA/IIB pairs, BRD2, DMA/B1/B2, MHC-I, TAP1/2, and two copies each of pseudo MHC-I and TNXB. This structure was highly similar to that of the Japanese crested ibis, but largely different from that of Galliformes, at both the terminal regions. Genotyping of the MHC-II region detected 10 haplotypes among the six founders. These results provide valuable insights for future studies on the evolution of the avian MHCs and for conservation of C. boyciana.

  11. Subtle conformational changes induced in major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervonsky, A V; Medzhitov, R M; Denzin, L K; Barlow, A K; Rudensky, A Y; Janeway, C A

    1998-08-18

    Intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is characterized by passage through specialized endocytic compartment(s) where antigenic peptides replace invariant chain fragments in the presence of the DM protein. These changes are accompanied by structural transitions of the MHC molecules that can be visualized by formation of compact SDS-resistant dimers, by changes in binding of mAbs, and by changes in T cell responses. We have observed that a mAb (25-9-17) that is capable of staining I-Ab on the surface of normal B cells failed to interact with I-Ab complexes with a peptide derived from the Ealpha chain of the I-E molecule but bound a similar covalent complex of I-Ab with the class II binding fragment (class II-associated invariant chain peptides) of the invariant chain. Moreover, 25-9-17 blocked activation of several I-Ab-reactive T cell hybridomas but failed to block others, suggesting that numerous I-Ab-peptide complexes acquire the 25-9-17(+) or 25-9-17(-) conformation. Alloreactive T cells were also able to discriminate peptide-dependent variants of MHC class II molecules. Thus, peptides impose subtle structural transitions upon MHC class II molecules that affect T cell recognition and may thus be critical for T cell selection and autiommunity.

  12. Major histocompatibility complex genes partly explain early survival in house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasch, B; Westerdahl, H; Strandh, M; Knauer, F; Winkler, H; Moodley, Y; Hoi, H

    2017-07-26

    Environmental factors and genetic incompatibilities between parents have been suggested as important determinants for embryonic mortality and survival. The genetic set-up of the immune system, specifically the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may also influence individual resistance to infections. MHC proteins are important for an appropriate adaptive immune response and enable T-cells to separate 'self' from 'non-self'. Here we investigate the importance of MHC functional diversity for early development in birds, more specifically, if offspring survival and body mass or size depends on number of different functional MHC alleles, specific functional MHC alleles or similarity of MHC alleles in the parents. Unhatched eggs are common in clutches of many bird species. In house sparrows (Passer domesticus), embryo and nestling mortality can exceed 50%. To control for environmental factors, our study was carried out on an aviary population. We found that one specific functional MHC allele was associated with reduced nestling survival, which was additionally supported by lower body mass and a smaller tarsus when nestlings have been 6 days old. Another allele was positively associated with tarsus length at a later nestling stage (nestlings 12 days old). These results indicate that MHC alleles might influence pathogen resistance or susceptibility.

  13. Systemic minor histocompatibility antigen expression in blood endothelial cells prevents T cell-mediated vascular immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviezel-Firner, Sonja; Engeler, Daniel; Bolinger, Beatrice; Onder, Lucas; Scandella, Elke; Yu, Meimei; Kroczek, Richard A; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2013-12-01

    Attenuation of T cell-mediated damage of blood endothelial cells (BECs) in transplanted organs is important to prevent transplant vasculopathy (TV) and chronic rejection. Here, we assessed the importance of minor histocompatibility antigen (mHA) distribution and different coinhibitory molecules for T cell-BEC interaction. A transgenic mHA was directed specifically to BECs using the Tie2 promoter and cellular interactions were assessed in graft-versus-host disease-like and heterotopic heart transplantation settings. We found that cognate CD4(+) T-cell help was critical for the activation of BEC-specific CD8(+) T cells. However, systemic mHA expression on BECs efficiently attenuated adoptively transferred, BEC-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and hence prevented tissue damage, whereas restriction of mHA expression to heart BECs precipitated the development of TV. Importantly, the lack of the coinhibitory molecules programmed death-1 (PD-1) and B and T lymphocyte attenuator fostered the initial activation of BEC-specific CD4(+) T cells, but did not affect development of TV. In contrast, TV was significantly augmented in the absence of PD-1 on BEC-specific CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that antigen distribution in the vascular bed determines the impact of coinhibition and, as a consequence, critically impinges on T cell-mediated vascular immunopathology. © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Jan Ejsmond

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process. Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  15. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejsmond, Maciej Jan; Radwan, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens) of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS) are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process). Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  16. Chicken major histocompatibility complex class II molecules of the B haplotype present self and foreign peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberbatch, J A; Brewer, D; Vidavsky, I; Sharif, S

    2006-08-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC), or B-complex, mediates genetic resistance and susceptibility to infectious disease. For example, the B19 haplotype is associated with susceptibility to Marek's disease. Here, we describe the sequencing and analysis of peptides presented by B19 MHC class II molecules. A B19/B19 B-cell line was used for the immunoaffinity purification of MHC class II molecules, which was followed by acid elution of the bound peptides. The eluted peptides were then analysed using tandem mass spectrometry. Thirty peptide sequences were obtained, ranging from 11 to 25 amino acids in length. Source protein cellular localization included the plasma membrane, cytosol and endosomal pathway. In addition, five peptides from the envelope glycoprotein of chicken syncytial virus (CSV) were identified. Chicken syncytial virus had been used as a helper virus along with reticuloendotheliosis virus strain T for transformation of B19/B19B cells. Alignment and analysis of the peptide sequence pool provided a putative peptide-binding motif for the B19 MHC class II.

  17. Biological effects of genes in the Grc and EC region of the rat major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X J; McCarthy, B D; Salgar, S K; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1999-07-01

    To study the mechanism of action of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked genes affecting reproduction, growth, and susceptibility to chemical carcinogens. Tumors derived from rat embryonic fibroblasts were transfected with cosmids from the Grc and its linked regions, the unrelated A region, and a nonMHC region, or with genes from the Grc, Grc-linked, and nonMHC regions, to determine whether they could suppress tumor growth as determined by in vitro (soft agar) and in vivo assays. Tumor fibroblasts transfected with cosmids from the Grc or from the EC region decreased tumor growth in both the in vitro and in vivo assays. Transfection with individual genes from the Grc had no effect on tumor growth in either assay. The effects of the Grc on reproduction, growth, and tumorigenesis are mediated by extended genetic effects, i.e., by the conformation of the DNA in this region. Similar effects were seen following transfection with cosmids from the Grc-linked EC region, and this finding strengthens the hypothesis that the conformation of the DNA in this general region is critical for its function. A similar effect has been described for the locus control region (LCR) in the beta-globin gene family in the human.

  18. Orientation of loci within the human major histocompatibility complex by chromosomal in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, C C; Kirsch, I R; Nance, W E; Evans, G A; Korman, A J; Strominger, J L

    1984-05-01

    We have determined the localization and orientation of two genetic probes within the human major histocompatibility complex by chromosomal in situ hybridization. Our data indicate that a cloned genomic probe cross-hybridizing to HLA-A, -B, and -C heavy chain loci is homologous to sequences located on chromosome 6 at band p21.3 while a subclone of the genomic HLA-DR alpha-chain gene corresponding to the nonpolymorphic p34 protein is homologous to sequences in band 6p21.1. Our data suggest that this technique may permit the estimation of map distances between linked gene loci, assuming a uniform frequency of map units in the human genome. The relative positions of these genes was confirmed in a mother and son carrying a chromosome rearrangement involving 6p and 14p in which the sequences hybridizing to a DR alpha-chain genomic clone were found at the distal end of the 6p--chromosome [der(6)] while the sequences hybridizing to the HLA-A, -B, -C alpha-chain probe were found in the 14p+ chromosome [der(14)].

  19. Recombination and selection in the major histocompatibility complex of the endangered forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ruibo; Shafer, Aaron B A; Laguardia, Alice; Lin, Zhenzhen; Liu, Shuqiang; Hu, Defu

    2015-11-25

    The forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii) is a high elevation species distributed across western China and northern Vietnam. Once abundant, habitat loss and poaching has led to a dramatic decrease in population numbers prompting the IUCN to list the species as endangered. Here, we characterized the genetic diversity of a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus and teased apart driving factors shaping its variation. Seven DRB exon 2 alleles were identified among a group of randomly sampled forest musk deer from a captive population in the Sichuan province of China. Compared to other endangered or captive ungulates, forest musk deer have relatively low levels of MHC genetic diversity. Non-synonymous substitutions primarily occurred in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), with analyses suggesting that recombination and selection has shaped the genetic diversity across the locus. Specifically, inter-allelic recombination generated novel allelic combinations, with evidence for both positive selection acting on the PBR and negative selection on the non-PBR. An improved understanding of functional genetic variability of the MHC will facilitate better design and management of captive breeding programs for this endangered species.

  20. High-throughput identification of potential minor histocompatibility antigens by MHC tetramer-based screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hombrink, Pleun; Hadrup, Sine R; Bakker, Arne

    2011-01-01

    T-cell recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) plays an important role in the graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, the number of MiHA identified to date remains limited, making clinical application of MiHA reactive T......-cell infusion difficult. This study represents the first attempt of genome-wide prediction of MiHA, coupled to the isolation of T-cell populations that react with these antigens. In this unbiased high-throughput MiHA screen, both the possibilities and pitfalls of this approach were investigated. First, 973......MHC-tetramer-based enrichment and multi-color flow cytometry. Using this approach, 71 peptide-reactive T-cell populations were generated. The isolation of a T-cell line specifically recognizing target cells expressing the MAP4K1(IMA) antigen demonstrates that identification of MiHA through this approach is in principle...

  1. Adaptive tolerance to a pathogenic fungus drives major histocompatibility complex evolution in natural amphibian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Anna E; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2016-03-30

    Amphibians have been affected globally by the disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and we are just now beginning to understand how immunogenetic variability contributes to disease susceptibility. Lineages of an expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II locus involved in acquired immunity are associated with chytridiomycosis susceptibility in controlled laboratory challenge assays. Here, we extend these findings to natural populations that vary both in exposure and response to Bd We find that MHC alleles and supertypes associated with Bd survival in the field show a molecular signal of positive selection, while those associated with susceptibility do not, supporting the hypothesis that heritable Bd tolerance is rapidly evolving. We compare MHC supertypes to neutral loci to demonstrate where selection versus demography is shaping MHC variability. One population with Bd tolerance in nature shows a significant signal of directional selection for the same allele (allele Q) that was significantly associated with survival in an earlier laboratory study. Our findings indicate that selective pressure for Bd survival drives rapid immunogenetic adaptation in some natural populations, despite differences in environment and demography. Our field-based analysis of immunogenetic variation confirms that natural amphibian populations have the evolutionary potential to adapt to chytridiomycosis. © 2016 The Authors.

  2. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Beyond the Classical HLA Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Bertaina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT represents a curative treatment for many patients with hematological malignant or non-malignant disorders. Evaluation of potential donors for HSCT includes a rigorous assessment of the human leukocyte antigens (HLA match status of family members, and the identification of suitable unrelated donors. Genes encoding transplantation antigens are placed both within and outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The human MHC is located on the short arm of chromosome 6 and contains a series of genes encoding two distinct types of highly polymorphic cell surface glycoproteins. Donors for HSCT are routinely selected based on the level of matching for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 loci. However, disease relapse, graft-versus-host-disease, and infection remain significant risk factors of morbidity and mortality. In the same breath, in high-risk patients, graft-versus-leukemia effects inherent in HLA mismatching play a substantial immunological role to limit the recurrence of post-transplant disease. The definition of a suitable donor is ever changing, shaped not only by current typing technology, but also by the specific transplant procedure. Indeed, a more complete understanding of permissible HLA mismatches and the role of Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors’ genes increases the availability of HLA-haploidentical and unrelated donors.

  3. The human Major Histocompatibility Complex as a paradigm in genomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandiedonck, Claire; Knight, Julian C

    2009-09-01

    Since its discovery more than 50 years ago, the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) on chromosome 6p21.3 has been at the forefront of human genetic research. Here, we review from a historical perspective the major advances in our understanding of the nature and consequences of genetic variation which have involved the MHC, as well as highlighting likely future directions. As a consequence of its particular genomic structure, its remarkable polymorphism and its early implication in numerous diseases, the MHC has been considered as a model region for genomics, being the first substantial region to be sequenced and establishing fundamental concepts of linkage disequilibrium, haplotypic structure and meiotic recombination. Recently, the MHC became the first genomic region to be entirely re-sequenced for common haplotypes, while studies mapping gene expression phenotypes across the genome have strongly implicated variation in the MHC. This review shows how the MHC continues to provide new insights and remains in the vanguard of contemporary research in human genomics.

  4. Linkage mapping and physical localization of the major histocompatibility complex region of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, N; Deakin, J E; Miska, K B; Miller, R D; Kammerer, C M; Graves, J A M; VandeBerg, J L; Samollow, P B

    2006-01-01

    We used genetic linkage mapping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to conduct the first analysis of genic organization and chromosome localization of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of a marsupial, the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica. Family based linkage analyses of two M. domestica MHC Class I genes (UA1, UG) and three MHC Class II genes (DAB, DMA, and DMB) revealed that these genes were tightly linked and positioned in the central region of linkage group 3 (LG3). This cluster of MHC genes was physically mapped to the centromeric region of chromosome 2q by FISH using a BAC clone containing the UA1 gene. An interesting finding from the linkage analyses is that sex-specific recombination rates were virtually identical within the MHC region. This stands in stark contrast to the genome-wide situation, wherein males exhibit approximately twice as much recombination as females, and could have evolutionary implications for maintaining equality between males and females in the ability to generate haplotype diversity in this region. These analyses also showed that three non-MHC genes that flank the MHC region on human chromosome 6, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), and prolactin (PRL), are split among two separate linkage groups (chromosomes) in M. domestica. Comparative analysis with eight other vertebrate species suggests strong conservation of the BMP6-PRL synteny among birds and mammals, although the BMP6-PRL-MHC-ME1 synteny is not conserved. 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Genetic variation of major histocompatibility complex genes in the endangered red-crowned crane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Nishida, Chizuko; Onuma, Manabu; Momose, Kunikazu; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2017-07-01

    Populations that have drastically decreased in the past often have low genetic variation, which may increase the risk of extinction. The genes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play an important role in the adaptive immune response of jawed vertebrates. Maintenance of adaptive genetic diversity such as that of MHC genes is important for wildlife conservation. Here, we determined genotypes of exon 3 of MHC class IA genes (MHCIA) and exon 2 of MHC class IIB genes (MHCIIB) to evaluate genetic variation of the endangered red-crowned crane population on Hokkaido Island, Japan, which experienced severe population decline in the past. We identified 16 and 6 alleles of MHCIA and MHCIIB, respectively, from 152 individuals. We found evidence of a positive selection at the antigen-binding sites in MHCIA exon 3 and MHCIIB exon 2. The phylogenetic analyses indicated evidence of trans-species polymorphism among the crane MHC genes. The genetic variability in both classes of MHC genes at the population level was low. No geographic structure was found based on the genetic diversity of microsatellite and MHC genes. Our study provides useful data for the optimal management of the red-crowned crane population in Hokkaido and can contribute to future studies on MHC genes of the continental populations of the red-crowned crane and other crane species.

  6. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-presenting cells. Purpose: The aim of the study was to elucidate the alteration in the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in human dental pulp as carious lesions progressed toward the pulp. Methods: Fifteen third molars with caries at the occlusal site at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted and used in this study. Before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4, all the samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition three-dimensionally. The specimens were then processed for cryosection and immunohistochemistry using an anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibody. Results: Class II MHC antigen-expressing cells were found both in normal and carious specimens. In normal tooth, the class II MHC-immunopositive cells were observed mainly at the periphery of the pulp tissue. In teeth with caries, class II MHC-immunopositive cells were located predominantly subjacent to the carious lesions. As the caries progressed, the number of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells was increased. Conclusion: The depth of carious lesions affects the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp.Latar belakang: Karies merupakan penyakit infeksi bakteri yang mengakibatkan destruksi jaringan keras gigi. Dentin yang terbuka akibat karies akan menginduksi respon imun seluler pada pulpa. Kompleks histokompatibilitas utama (MHC merupakan sekumpulan gen yang mengkode histokompatibilitas

  7. Major Histocompatibility Complex class IIb polymorphism influences gut microbiota composition and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Daniel I; Snowberg, Lisa K; Caporaso, J Gregory; Lauber, Chris; Knight, Rob; Stutz, William E

    2014-10-01

    Animals harbour diverse communities of symbiotic bacteria, which differ dramatically among host individuals. This heterogeneity poses an immunological challenge: distinguishing between mutualistic and pathogenic members of diverse and host-specific microbial communities. We propose that Major Histocompatibility class II (MHC) genotypes contribute to recognition and regulation of gut microbes, and thus, MHC polymorphism contributes to microbial variation among hosts. Here, we show that MHC IIb polymorphism is associated with among-individual variation in gut microbiota within a single wild vertebrate population of a small fish, the threespine stickleback. We sampled stickleback from Cedar Lake, on Vancouver Island, and used next-generation sequencing to genotype the sticklebacks' gut microbiota (16S sequencing) and their MHC class IIb exon 2 sequences. The presence of certain MHC motifs was associated with altered relative abundance (increase or decrease) of some microbial Families. The effect sizes are modest and entail a minority of microbial taxa, but these results represent the first indication that MHC genotype may affect gut microbiota composition in natural populations (MHC-microbe associations have also been found in a few studies of lab mice). Surprisingly, these MHC effects were frequently sex-dependent. Finally, hosts with more diverse MHC motifs had less diverse gut microbiota. One implication is that MHC might influence the efficacy of therapeutic strategies to treat dysbiosis-associated disease, including the outcome of microbial transplants between healthy and diseased patients. We also speculate that macroparasite-driven selection on MHC has the potential to indirectly alter the host gut microbiota, and vice versa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Fine mapping major histocompatibility complex associations in psoriasis and its clinical subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yukinori; Han, Buhm; Tsoi, Lam C; Stuart, Philip E; Ellinghaus, Eva; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Chandran, Vinod; Pellett, Fawnda; Pollock, Remy; Bowcock, Anne M; Krueger, Gerald G; Weichenthal, Michael; Voorhees, John J; Rahman, Proton; Gregersen, Peter K; Franke, Andre; Nair, Rajan P; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Gladman, Dafna D; Elder, James T; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-08-07

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) risk is strongly associated with variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, but its genetic architecture has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we conducted a large-scale fine-mapping study of PsV risk in the MHC region in 9,247 PsV-affected individuals and 13,589 controls of European descent by imputing class I and II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes from SNP genotype data. In addition, we imputed sequence variants for MICA, an MHC HLA-like gene that has been associated with PsV, to evaluate association at that locus as well. We observed that HLA-C(∗)06:02 demonstrated the lowest p value for overall PsV risk (p = 1.7 × 10(-364)). Stepwise analysis revealed multiple HLA-C(∗)06:02-independent risk variants in both class I and class II HLA genes for PsV susceptibility (HLA-C(∗)12:03, HLA-B amino acid positions 67 and 9, HLA-A amino acid position 95, and HLA-DQα1 amino acid position 53; p PsV, psoriatic arthritis (PsA; n = 3,038) and cutaneous psoriasis (PsC; n = 3,098). We found that risk heterogeneity between PsA and PsC might be driven by HLA-B amino acid position 45 (Pomnibus = 2.2 × 10(-11)), indicating that different genetic factors underlie the overall risk of PsV and the risk of specific PsV subphenotypes. Our study illustrates the value of high-resolution HLA and MICA imputation for fine mapping causal variants in the MHC. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Low major histocompatibility complex class II DQA diversity in the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Xiang-Dong

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca is one of the most endangered animals due to habitat fragmentation and loss. Although the captive breeding program for this species is now nearly two decades old, researches on the genetic background of such captive populations, especially on adaptive molecular polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC, are still limited. In this study, we characterized adaptive variation of the giant panda's MHC DQA gene by PCR amplification of its antigen-recognizing region (i.e. the exon 2 and subsequent single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP and sequence analyses. Results The results revealed a low level of DQA exon 2 diversity in this rare animal, presenting 6 alleles from 61 giant panda individuals. The observed polymorphism was restricted to 9 amino acid substitutions, all of which occurred at and adjacent to positions forming the functionally important antigen-binding sites. All the samples were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. A significantly higher rate of non-synonymous than synonymous substitutions at the antigen-binding sites indicated positive selection for diversity in the locus. Conclusion The DQA allelic diversity of giant pandas was low relative to other vertebrates. Nonetheless, the pandas exhibited more alleles in DQA than those in DRB, suggesting the alpha chain genes would play a leading role when coping with certain pathogens and thus should be included in conservation genetic investigation. The microsatellite and MHC loci might predict long-term persistence potential and short-term survival ability, respectively. Consequently, it is recommended to utilize multiple suites of microsatellite markers and multiple MHC loci to detect overall genetic variation in order to design unbiased conservation strategies.

  10. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell's own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors-tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II-contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity.

  11. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T.; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell’s own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors—tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II—contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity. PMID:28367149

  12. Introgression from domestic goat generated variation at the major histocompatibility complex of Alpine ibex.

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    Christine Grossen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a crucial component of the vertebrate immune system and shows extremely high levels of genetic polymorphism. The extraordinary genetic variation is thought to be ancient polymorphisms maintained by balancing selection. However, introgression from related species was recently proposed as an additional mechanism. Here we provide evidence for introgression at the MHC in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex ibex. At a usually very polymorphic MHC exon involved in pathogen recognition (DRB exon 2, Alpine ibex carried only two alleles. We found that one of these DRB alleles is identical to a DRB allele of domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus. We sequenced 2489 bp of the coding and non-coding regions of the DRB gene and found that Alpine ibex homozygous for the goat-type DRB exon 2 allele showed nearly identical sequences (99.8% to a breed of domestic goats. Using Sanger and RAD sequencing, microsatellite and SNP chip data, we show that the chromosomal region containing the goat-type DRB allele has a signature of recent introgression in Alpine ibex. A region of approximately 750 kb including the DRB locus showed high rates of heterozygosity in individuals carrying one copy of the goat-type DRB allele. These individuals shared SNP alleles both with domestic goats and other Alpine ibex. In a survey of four Alpine ibex populations, we found that the region surrounding the DRB allele shows strong linkage disequilibria, strong sequence clustering and low diversity among haplotypes carrying the goat-type allele. Introgression at the MHC is likely adaptive and introgression critically increased MHC DRB diversity in the genetically impoverished Alpine ibex. Our finding contradicts the long-standing view that genetic variability at the MHC is solely a consequence of ancient trans-species polymorphism. Introgression is likely an underappreciated source of genetic diversity at the MHC and other loci under balancing selection.

  13. Physical mapping of the E/C and grc regions of the rat major histocompatibility complex.

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    Yuan, X J; Salgar, S K; Hassett, A L; McHugh, K P; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1996-01-01

    Alignment of class I-hybridizing cosmids from an R21 (AlBlDlEugrc+) genomic DNA library gave two contigs: one [150 kilobases (kb)] encompassed the E/C region, or a large part thereof, and the other (110 kb) contained the grc region which has genes influencing resistance to chemical carcinogens (rcc), fertility (ft), and growth (dw-3). Amplification of gene sequences in the four cosmids in the E/C region using Eu-specific and LW2 (RT1.C)-specific primers showed that each cosmid contained both Eu-like and C-like genes. They are clearly different but closely associated, and they show some variation from the prototypic E (Eu) and C (LW2) genes, respectively. Comparison of DNA from grc+ and grc- strains of rats showed that the deletion in the grc- strains was approximately 50 kb, and that it was located on two of the three cosmids in the grc-region contig. The use of specific class I probes showed that the grc region contained tandemly duplicated RT1.O-RT1.N genes and that the RT.BM1 loci lay outside of the grc region. Neither contig reacted with probes specific for class II, TNFA, Hsp70, or RT1.M genes. The data presented here and the previous data in the literature (summarized in Gill et al. 1995) suggest that the gene order in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and MHC-linked region of the rat is: A-E/C-grc-M.

  14. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation in the endangered Mexican wolf and related canids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, P W; Lee, R N; Parker, K M

    2000-12-01

    We have examined in Mexican wolves and related canids the amount of genetic variation for a class II gene in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), thought to be part of the most important genetic basis for pathogen resistance in vertebrates. In Mexican wolves, descended from only seven founders over three lineages, there were five different alleles. These were in three phylogenetic groups, only one of which was shared between lineages. Using single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), we found that in samples of animals from the two polymorphic lineages, the observed heterozygosity was 0.74 and the genotypes were not different statistically from Hardy-Weinberg proportions. The Ghost Ranch lineage of Mexican wolves was monomorphic for the locus, consistent with the lower level of variation found previously for microsatellite loci and predicted from pedigree analysis. Samples of grey wolves, red wolves, and coyotes had 16 additional alleles. One Mexican wolf allele was also found in grey wolves and another allele was shared between grey and red wolves. Most of the nucleotide variation resulted in amino acid variation and there were five different amino acids found at two different positions. Only two of the 21 variable amino acid positions had solely synonymous nucleotide variation. The average heterozygosity for eight individual amino acid positions in the Mexican wolves was greater than 0.4. The estimated rate of nonsynonymous substitution was 2.5 times higher than that for synonymous substitution for the putative antigen binding site positions, indicative of positive selection acting on these positions. Examination of the known dog sequences for this locus showed that one of the Mexican wolf alleles was found in dogs and that the allele found in both grey and red wolves is also found in dogs.

  15. Major histocompatibility complex variation in red wolves: evidence for common ancestry with coyotes and balancing selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, P W; Lee, R N; Garrigan, D

    2002-10-01

    We examined variation at a class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene (DRB1) in the captive red wolf population and samples of coyotes from Texas and North Carolina. We found 4 alleles in the 48 red wolves, 8 alleles in the 10 coyotes from Texas and 15 alleles in the 29 coyotes from North Carolina. Two of the four alleles found in red wolves, Caru-2 and Caru-4, were found in both the Texas and North Carolina coyote samples. Allele Caru-1, previously found in gray wolves, was also found in the North Carolina sample. The most frequent red wolf allele, Caru-3, was not found in any of the coyote samples. However, an allele found in both the Texas and North Carolina coyote samples is only one nucleotide (one amino acid) different from this red wolf allele. Overall, it appears from examination of this MHC gene that red wolves are more closely related to coyotes than to gray wolves. There were a number of different types of evidence supporting the action of balancing selection in red wolves. Namely, there was: (i) an excess of heterozygotes compared with expectations; (ii) a higher rate of nonsynonymous than synonymous substitution for the functionally important antigen-binding site positions; (iii) an eight times higher average heterozygosity of individual amino acids at the positions identified as part of the antigen-binding site than those not associated with it; (iv) the amino acid divergence of four red wolf alleles was greater than that expected from a simulation of genetic drift; and (v) the distribution of alleles, and the distributions of amino acids at many positions were more even than expected from neutrality. Examination of the level and pattern of linkage disequilibria between pairs of sites suggest that the heterozygosity, substitution and frequencies at individual amino acids are not highly dependent upon each other.

  16. The tammar wallaby major histocompatibility complex shows evidence of past genomic instability

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    Harrow Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes with a variety of roles in the innate and adaptive immune responses. MHC genes form a genetically linked cluster in eutherian mammals, an organization that is thought to confer functional and evolutionary advantages to the immune system. The tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii, an Australian marsupial, provides a unique model for understanding MHC gene evolution, as many of its antigen presenting genes are not linked to the MHC, but are scattered around the genome. Results Here we describe the 'core' tammar wallaby MHC region on chromosome 2q by ordering and sequencing 33 BAC clones, covering over 4.5 MB and containing 129 genes. When compared to the MHC region of the South American opossum, eutherian mammals and non-mammals, the wallaby MHC has a novel gene organization. The wallaby has undergone an expansion of MHC class II genes, which are separated into two clusters by the class III genes. The antigen processing genes have undergone duplication, resulting in two copies of TAP1 and three copies of TAP2. Notably, Kangaroo Endogenous Retroviral Elements are present within the region and may have contributed to the genomic instability. Conclusions The wallaby MHC has been extensively remodeled since the American and Australian marsupials last shared a common ancestor. The instability is characterized by the movement of antigen presenting genes away from the core MHC, most likely via the presence and activity of retroviral elements. We propose that the movement of class II genes away from the ancestral class II region has allowed this gene family to expand and diversify in the wallaby. The duplication of TAP genes in the wallaby MHC makes this species a unique model organism for studying the relationship between MHC gene organization and function.

  17. 454 sequencing reveals extreme complexity of the class II Major Histocompatibility Complex in the collared flycatcher

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    Gustafsson Lars

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of their functional significance, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I and II genes have been the subject of continuous interest in the fields of ecology, evolution and conservation. In some vertebrate groups MHC consists of multiple loci with similar alleles; therefore, the multiple loci must be genotyped simultaneously. In such complex systems, understanding of the evolutionary patterns and their causes has been limited due to challenges posed by genotyping. Results Here we used 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize MHC class IIB exon 2 variation in the collared flycatcher, an important organism in evolutionary and immuno-ecological studies. On the basis of over 152,000 sequencing reads we identified 194 putative alleles in 237 individuals. We found an extreme complexity of the MHC class IIB in the collared flycatchers, with our estimates pointing to the presence of at least nine expressed loci and a large, though difficult to estimate precisely, number of pseudogene loci. Many similar alleles occurred in the pseudogenes indicating either a series of recent duplications or extensive concerted evolution. The expressed alleles showed unambiguous signals of historical selection and the occurrence of apparent interlocus exchange of alleles. Placing the collared flycatcher's MHC sequences in the context of passerine diversity revealed transspecific MHC class II evolution within the Muscicapidae family. Conclusions 454 amplicon sequencing is an effective tool for advancing our understanding of the MHC class II structure and evolutionary patterns in Passeriformes. We found a highly dynamic pattern of evolution of MHC class IIB genes with strong signals of selection and pronounced sequence divergence in expressed genes, in contrast to the apparent sequence homogenization in pseudogenes. We show that next generation sequencing offers a universal, affordable method for the characterization and, in perspective

  18. Cohesin regulates major histocompatibility complex class II genes through interactions with MHC-II insulators1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    Cohesin is a multiprotein ringed complex that is most well known for its role in stabilizing the association of sister chromatids between S phase and M. More recently cohesin was found to be associated with transcriptional insulators, elements that are associated with the organization of chromatin into regulatory domains. The human major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) locuscontains ten intergenic elements, termed MHC-II insulators, which bind the transcriptional insulator protein CCCTC transcription factor (CTCF). MHC-II insulators interact with each other forming a base architecture of discrete loops and potential regulatory domains. When MHC-II genes are expressed, their proximal promoter regulatory regions reorganize to the foci established by the interacting MHC-II insulators. MHC-II insulators also bind cohesin, but the functional role of cohesin in regulating this system is not known. Here we show that the binding of cohesin to MHC-II insulators occurred irrespective of MHC-II expression but was required for optimal expression of the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ genes. In a DNA dependent manner, cohesin subunits interacted with CTCF and the MHC-II specific transcription factors RFX and CIITA. Intriguingly, cohesin subunits were important for DNA looping interactions between the HLA-DRA promoter region and a 5’ MHC-II insulator but were not required for interactions between the MHC-II insulators themselves. This latter observation introduces cohesin as a regulator of MHC-II expression by initiating or stabilizing MHC-II promoter regulatory element interactions with the MHC-II insulator elements; events which are required for maximal MHC-II transcription. PMID:21911605

  19. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuduk, Katarzyna; Babik, Wiesław; Bojarska, Katarzyna; Sliwińska, Ewa B; Kindberg, Jonas; Taberlet, Pierre; Swenson, Jon E; Radwan, Jacek

    2012-10-02

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South-north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  20. Evidence against suppressor cell involvement in naturally acquired tolerance of a minor histocompatibility antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.L. (Trudeau Institute, Inc., Saranac Lake, New York (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The hypothesis was investigated that suppressor cells may be responsible for maintenance of immunologic tolerance of a minor H3 antigen in mice that express the antigen naturally. Lymphoid cell populations from B6.C-H-24c (HW54) mice, a congenic-resistant strain histoincompatible with H-24b-expressing C57BL/6 (B6) mice only with respect to the H-24 locus, were examined in cell-transfer experiments to see if they contained naturally arising H-24c-specific suppressor cells. The H-24 antigen was chosen for these studies because, unlike most other minor and major histocompatibility (H) antigens, it is not detectable on mature lymphoid cells by any of several functional criteria. Thus transfer of HW54 lymphoid cells to B6 hosts could be done without the complication of inducing hyporesponsiveness de novo in the host, as occurs with other minor H antigens that are expressed on lymphocytes. B6 hosts were given HW54 skin grafts along with HW54 lymphoid cells to assess their tolerance of the H-24c-encoded antigen. The hosts were either (1) normal, nonimmune B6 mice; (2) B6 mice rendered immunodeficient by thymectomy and irradiation (TxB) and repopulated with H-24c-immune B6 lymphocytes; or (3) TxB B6 hosts repopulated with nonimmune B6 lymphocytes. In each case it was found that the additionally infused HW54 lymphoid cells did not suppress the ability of these hosts to reject HW54 skin grafts. In other words, HW54 lymphoid cells appear not to possess suppressive activity specific for the H-24c antigen that might maintain antigen-specific natural tolerance. Additional experiments were performed to determine whether HW54 lymphoid cells can inhibit the ability of sublethally irradiated B6 mice to regain the capacity to reject HW54 skin.

  1. Gene organization of the quail major histocompatibility complex (MhcCoja) class I gene region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, T; Shimizu, C; Oka, A; Teraoka, Y; Imanishi, T; Gojobori, T; Hanzawa, K; Watanabe, S; Inoko, H

    1999-05-01

    Class I genomic clones of the quail (Coturnix japonica) major histocompatibility complex (MhcCoja) were isolated and characterized. Two clusters spanning the 90.8 kilobase (kb) and 78.2 kb class I gene regions were defined by overlapping cosmid clones and found to contain at least twelve class I loci. However, unlike in the chicken Mhc, no evidence for the existence of any Coja class II gene was obtained in these two clusters. Based on comparative analysis of the genomic sequences with those of the cDNA clones, Coja-A, Coja-B, Coja-C, and Coja-D (Shiina et al. 1999), these twelve loci were assigned to represent one Coja-A gene, two Coja-B genes (Coja-B1 and -B2), four Coja-C genes (Coja-C1-C4), four Coja-D genes (Coja-D1-D4), and one new Coja-E gene. A class I gene-rich segment of 24.6 kb in which five of these genes (Coja-B1, -B2, -D1, -D2 and -E) are densely packed were sequenced by the shotgun strategy. All of these five class I genes are very compact in size [2089 base pairs (bp)-2732 bp] and contain no apparent genetic defect for functional expression. A transporter associated with the antigen processing (TAP) gene was identified in this class I gene-rich segment. These results suggest that the quail class I region is physically separated from the class II region and characterized by a large number of the expressible class I loci (at least seven) in contrast to the chicken Mhc, where the class I and class II regions are not clearly differentiated and only at most three expressed class I loci so far have been recognized.

  2. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex highlight interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system

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    Barbara Lukasch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background A well-functioning immune defence is crucial for fitness, but our knowledge about the immune system and its complex interactions is still limited. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules are involved in T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses, but MHC is also highly upregulated during the initial innate immune response. The aim of our study was therefore to determine to what extent the highly polymorphic MHC is involved in interactions of the innate and adaptive immune defence and if specific functional MHC alleles (FA or heterozygosity at the MHC are more important. Methods To do this we used captive house sparrows (Passer domesticus to survey MHC diversity and immune function controlling for several environmental factors. MHC class I alleles were identified using parallel amplicon sequencing and to mirror immune function, several immunological tests that correspond to the innate and adaptive immunity were conducted. Results Our results reveal that MHC was linked to all immune tests, highlighting its importance for the immune defence. While all innate responses were associated with one single FA, adaptive responses (cell-mediated and humoral were associated with several different alleles. Discussion We found that repeated injections of an antibody in nestlings and adults were linked to different FA and hence might affect different areas of the immune system. Also, individuals with a higher number of different FA produced a smaller secondary response, indicating a disadvantage of having numerous MHC alleles. These results demonstrate the complexity of the immune system in relation to the MHC and lay the foundation for other studies to further investigate this topic.

  3. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in the Barn owl (Aves: Tyto alba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Reto; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène; Roulin, Alexandre; Fumagalli, Luca

    2008-09-01

    We isolated major histocompatibility complex class II B (MHCIIB) genes in the Barn owl (Tyto alba). A PCR-based approach combined with primer walking on genomic and complementary DNA as well as Southern blot analyses revealed the presence of two MHCIIB genes, both being expressed in spleen, liver, and blood. Characteristic structural features of MHCIIB genes as well as their expression and high non-synonymous substitution rates in the region involved in antigen binding suggest that both genes are functional. MHC organization in the Barn owl is simple compared to passerine species that show multiple duplications, and resembles the minimal essential MHC of chicken.

  4. Biochemical characterization and crystalization of human Zn-α2-glycoprotein, a soluble class I major histocompatibility complex homolog

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Luis M; López-Otín, Carlos; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    1997-01-01

    Zn-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG) is a 41-kDa soluble protein that is present in most bodily fluids. In addition, ZAG accumulates in fluids from breast cysts and in 40% of breast carcinomas, which suggests that ZAG plays a role in the development of breast diseases. However, the function of ZAG under physiological and cancerous conditions remains unknown. Because ZAG shares 30–40% sequence identity with the heavy chains of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins, we compared the bioche...

  5. Gene duplication and fragmentation in the zebra finch major histocompatibility complex

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    Burt David W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to its high polymorphism and importance for disease resistance, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC has been an important focus of many vertebrate genome projects. Avian MHC organization is of particular interest because the chicken Gallus gallus, the avian species with the best characterized MHC, possesses a highly streamlined minimal essential MHC, which is linked to resistance against specific pathogens. It remains unclear the extent to which this organization describes the situation in other birds and whether it represents a derived or ancestral condition. The sequencing of the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata genome, in combination with targeted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC sequencing, has allowed us to characterize an MHC from a highly divergent and diverse avian lineage, the passerines. Results The zebra finch MHC exhibits a complex structure and history involving gene duplication and fragmentation. The zebra finch MHC includes multiple Class I and Class II genes, some of which appear to be pseudogenes, and spans a much more extensive genomic region than the chicken MHC, as evidenced by the presence of MHC genes on each of seven BACs spanning 739 kb. Cytogenetic (FISH evidence and the genome assembly itself place core MHC genes on as many as four chromosomes with TAP and Class I genes mapping to different chromosomes. MHC Class II regions are further characterized by high endogenous retroviral content. Lastly, we find strong evidence of selection acting on sites within passerine MHC Class I and Class II genes. Conclusion The zebra finch MHC differs markedly from that of the chicken, the only other bird species with a complete genome sequence. The apparent lack of synteny between TAP and the expressed MHC Class I locus is in fact reminiscent of a pattern seen in some mammalian lineages and may represent convergent evolution. Our analyses of the zebra finch MHC suggest a complex history involving

  6. Zika Virus Escapes NK Cell Detection by Upregulating Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner, Ariella; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Weisblum, Yiska; Diab, Mohammad; Panet, Amos; Wolf, Dana G; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2017-11-15

    NK cells are innate lymphocytes that participate in many immune processes encompassing cancer, bacterial and fungal infection, autoimmunity, and even pregnancy and that specialize in antiviral defense. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors and kill their targets when activating signals overpower inhibitory signals. The NK cell inhibitory receptors include a uniquely diverse array of proteins named killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), the CD94 family, and the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LIR) family. The NK cell inhibitory receptors recognize mostly major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) proteins. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat due to its association with birth defects and its pandemic potential. How Zika virus interacts with the immune system, and especially with NK cells, is unclear. Here we show that Zika virus infection is barely sensed by NK cells, since little or no increase in the expression of activating NK cell ligands was observed following Zika infection. In contrast, we demonstrate that Zika virus infection leads to the upregulation of MHC class I proteins and consequently to the inhibition of NK cell killing. Mechanistically, we show that MHC class I proteins are upregulated via the RIGI-IRF3 pathway and that this upregulation is mediated via beta interferon (IFN-β). Potentially, countering MHC class I upregulation during Zika virus infection could be used as a prophylactic treatment against Zika virus. IMPORTANCE NK cells are innate lymphocytes that recognize and eliminate various pathogens and are known mostly for their role in controlling viral infections. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors, and they kill or spare their targets based on the integration of inhibitory and activating signals. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat to humans due to its pandemic potential and its association with birth defects. The role of NK cells in Zika virus

  7. [Uveitis in spondyloarthritis patients and its association with HLA-B27 histocompatibility antigen: prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, I Yu; Godzenko, A A; Vorob'eva, O K; Guseva, I A

    2016-01-01

    to perform a prospective study of clinical presentation and course of uveitis in spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients as well as its association with the HLA-B27 histocompatibility antigen. The study included 219 patients with uveitis, all tested for HLA-B27 antigen and various infections (viral, bacterial, and parasitic) as well as examined for locomotive system involvement. The presence of the HLA-B27 antigen was determined in 142 (64.8%) out of 219 patients, of them 87 were diagnosed with an entity of the SpA group. The remaining 77 (35.2%) patients appeared to be HLA-B27-negative, but 13 were still diagnosed with an entity of the SpA group. There were 10 (4.6%) patients with 2 or more diseases from the SpA group («clinical decussation»). When comparing the two groups of HLA-B27-positive and negative patients having both SpA and uveitis, no statistically significant difference was found as to the age of onset, site, frequency of attacks, and uni- or bilateral involvement (p>0.05). We also performed a comparison of HLA-B27-positive and negative patients with no account to their SpA status and revealed a higher complication rate in those that were «negative» (puveitis of different origin notable for long attacks and short remissions. Assessing the site and course of uveitis as well as HLA-B27 testing of uveitis patients has proved important for etiological diagnosis. Diseases of the SpA group have been shown to be 6.7 times more common in HLA-B27-positive patients as compared to HLA-B27-negative ones. Clinical presentation of uveitis in the presence of SpA in both HLA-B27-positive and negative patients resembles that of idiopathic uveitis - an independent HLA-B27-associated syndrome (р>0.05). Cases of «decussation» between entities of the SpA group are usually more severe in terms of clinical presentation and course of uveitis and are associated with a worse prognosis. Complications of uveitis are more likely to be found in non-SpA HLA-B27-negative patients (

  8. The major histocompatibility complex in Old World camelids and low polymorphism of its class II genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasil, Martin; Mohandesan, Elmira; Fitak, Robert R; Musilova, Petra; Kubickova, Svatava; Burger, Pamela A; Horin, Petr

    2016-03-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is a genomic region containing genes with crucial roles in immune responses. MHC class I and class II genes encode antigen-presenting molecules expressed on the cell surface. To counteract the high variability of pathogens, the MHC evolved into a region of considerable heterogeneity in its organization, number and extent of polymorphism. Studies of MHCs in different model species contribute to our understanding of mechanisms of immunity, diseases and their evolution. Camels are economically important domestic animals and interesting biomodels. Three species of Old World camels have been recognized: the dromedary (Camelus dromedarius), Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) and the wild camel (Camelus ferus). Despite their importance, little is known about the MHC genomic region, its organization and diversity in camels. The objectives of this study were to identify, map and characterize the MHC region of Old World camelids, with special attention to genetic variation at selected class MHC II loci. Physical mapping located the MHC region to the chromosome 20 in Camelus dromedarius. Cytogenetic and comparative analyses of whole genome sequences showed that the order of the three major sub-regions is "Centromere - Class II - Class III - Class I". DRA, DRB, DQA and DQB exon 2 sequences encoding the antigen binding site of the corresponding class II antigen presenting molecules showed high degree of sequence similarity and extensive allele sharing across the three species. Unexpectedly low extent of polymorphism with low numbers of alleles and haplotypes was observed in all species, despite different geographic origins of the camels analyzed. The DRA locus was found to be polymorphic, with three alleles shared by all three species. DRA and DQA sequences retrieved from ancient DNA samples of Camelus dromedarius suggested that additional polymorphism might exist. This study provided evidence that camels possess an MHC comparable to

  9. DNA methylation profiling of the human major histocompatibility complex: a pilot study for the human epigenome project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardhman K Rakyan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine-guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will significantly improve our understanding of genome biology and our ability to diagnose disease. Here, we report the results of the pilot study for the Human Epigenome Project entailing the methylation analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex. This study involved the development of an integrated pipeline for high-throughput methylation analysis using bisulphite DNA sequencing, discovery of methylation variable positions, epigenotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, and development of an integrated public database available at http://www.epigenome.org. Our analysis of DNA methylation levels within the major histocompatibility complex, including regulatory exonic and intronic regions associated with 90 genes in multiple tissues and individuals, reveals a bimodal distribution of methylation profiles (i.e., the vast majority of the analysed regions were either hypo- or hypermethylated, tissue specificity, inter-individual variation, and correlation with independent gene expression data.

  10. DNA Methylation Profiling of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex: A Pilot Study for the Human Epigenome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hildmann, Thomas; Novik, Karen L; Lewin, Jörn; Tost, Jörg; Cox, Antony V; Andrews, T. Dan; Howe, Kevin L; Otto, Thomas; Olek, Alexander; Fischer, Judith; Gut, Ivo G; Berlin, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine–guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will significantly improve our understanding of genome biology and our ability to diagnose disease. Here, we report the results of the pilot study for the Human Epigenome Project entailing the methylation analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex. This study involved the development of an integrated pipeline for high-throughput methylation analysis using bisulphite DNA sequencing, discovery of methylation variable positions, epigenotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, and development of an integrated public database available at http://www.epigenome.org. Our analysis of DNA methylation levels within the major histocompatibility complex, including regulatory exonic and intronic regions associated with 90 genes in multiple tissues and individuals, reveals a bimodal distribution of methylation profiles (i.e., the vast majority of the analysed regions were either hypo- or hypermethylated), tissue specificity, inter-individual variation, and correlation with independent gene expression data. PMID:15550986

  11. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djidjik Réda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26. Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  12. Immune Regulation by Self-Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2015-01-01

    Circulating T cells that specifically target normal self-proteins expressed by regulatory immune cells were first described in patients with cancer, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. The adaptive immune system is distinguished for its ability to differentiate between self......-antigens and foreign antigens. Thus, it was remarkable to discover T cells that apparently lacked tolerance to important self-proteins, eg, IDO, PD-L1, and FoxP3, expressed in regulatory immune cells. The ability of self-reactive T cells to react to and eliminate regulatory immune cells can influence general immune...... reactions. This suggests that they may be involved in immune homeostasis. It is here proposed that these T cells should be termed antiregulatory T cells (anti-Tregs). The role of anti-Tregs in immune-regulatory networks may be diverse. For example, pro-inflammatory self-reactive T cells that react...

  13. Predicting binding affinities of protein ligands from three-dimensional models: application to peptide binding to class I major histocompatibility proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Lauemoller, S L; Holm, A

    1999-01-01

    A simple and fast free energy scoring function (Fresno) has been developed to predict the binding free energy of peptides to class I major histocompatibility (MHC) proteins. It differs from existing scoring functions mainly by the explicit treatment of ligand desolvation and of unfavorable protein...

  14. The T-Cell Receptor Can Bind to the Peptide-Bound Major Histocompatibility Complex and Uncomplexed β2-Microglobulin through Distinct Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkle, Patrick S; Irving, Melita; Hongjian, Song

    2017-01-01

    T-Cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of the peptide-bound major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) initiates an adaptive immune response against antigen-presenting target cells. The recognition events take place at the TCR-pMHC interface, and their effects on TCR conformation and dynamics...

  15. N-myc suppresses Major Histocompatibility Complex class I gene expression through down-regulation of the p50 subunit of NF-kappaB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, L.J. van 't; Beijersbergen, R.L.; Bernards, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In neuroblastoma, N-myc suppresses the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I antigens by reducing the binding of a nuclear factor to the enhancer-A element in the MHC Class I gene promoter. We show here that the p50 subunit of NF-kappaB is part of this complex and that

  16. The "adjuvant effect" of the polymorphic B-G antigens of the chicken major histocompatibility complex analyzed using purified molecules incorporated in liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Eriksson, H; Skjødt, K

    1991-01-01

    The polymorphic B-G region of the chicken major histocompatibility complex has previously been shown to mediate an "adjuvant effect" on the humoral response to other erythrocyte alloantigens. We demonstrate here that B-G molecules purified with monoclonal antibodies exert this adjuvant effect...... for the generation of B cell diversity, in the immune systems of birds and other animals. Udgivelsesdato: 1991-Mar...

  17. A quantitative assay to measure the interaction between immunogenic peptides and purified class I major histocompatibility complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, A C; Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S

    1994-01-01

    A direct and sensitive biochemical assay to measure the interaction in solution between peptides and affinity-purified major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has been generated. Specific binding reflecting the known class I restriction of cytotoxic T cell responses was obtained....... Adding an excess of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) significantly increased the rate of peptide association, but it did not affect the rate of dissociation. Binding was complicated by a rapid and apparently irreversible loss of functional MHC class I at 37 degrees C which might limit the life span...... of empty MHC class I thereby preventing the inadvertent exchange of peptides at the target cell surface. All class I molecules tested bound peptides of the canonical octa- to nona-meric length. However, one class I molecule, Kk, also bound peptides, which were much longer suggesting that the preference...

  18. First report of major histocompatibility complex class II loci from the Amazon pink river dolphin (genus Inia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Agüero, M; Flores-Ramírez, S; Ruiz-García, M

    2006-07-31

    We report the first major histocompatibility complex (MHC) DQB1 sequences for the two species of pink river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis and Inia boliviensis) inhabiting the Amazon and Orinoco River basins. These sequences were found to be polymorphic within the Inia genus and showed shared homology with cetacean DQB-1 sequences, especially, those of the Monodontidae and Phocoenidae. On the other hand, these sequences were shown to be divergent from those described for other riverine dolphin species, such as Lipotes vexillifer, the Chinese river dolphin. Two main conclusions can be drawn from our results: 1) the Mhc DQB1 sequences seem to evolve more rapidly than other nuclear sequences in cetaceans, and 2) differential positive selective pressures acting on these genes cause concomitant divergent evolutionary histories that derive phylogenetic reconstructions that could be inconsistent with widely accepted intertaxa evolutionary relationships elucidated with other molecular markers subjected to a neutral dynamics.

  19. Preformed purified peptide/major histocompatibility class I complexes are potent stimulators of class I-restricted T cell hybridomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Ortiz-Navarrete, V

    1994-01-01

    A panel of antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted T cell hybridomas has been generated to examine the capacity of peptide/class I complexes to stimulate T cells at the molecular level. Peptide/class I complexes were generated in detergent solution, purified...... and quantitated. Latex particles were subsequently coated with known amounts of preformed complexes and used to stimulate the T cell hybridomas. Stimulation was specific, i.e. only the appropriate peptide/class I combination were stimulatory, and quite sensitive, i.e. as little as 300 complexes per bead could...... expression, suggesting that antigen-specific stimulation of class I-restricted T cell hybridomas, as assessed by IL-2 release, does not depend on CD8....

  20. Major histocompatibility complex genes in a Mexican family with deficiency of the second component of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melín-Aldana, H; Reyes, P; Vargas-Alarcón, G; Yamamoto-Furusho, J K; Granados, J

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the second component of the complement system is an uncommon condition that has been reported so far mostly in Caucasians. We describe a Mexican patient with undetectable C2 levels and absence of complement hemolytic activity. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in his family showed that the proband had the MHC haplotypes HLA-A25, B18, DR2, DQ1, SQ042/HLA-A24, B18, DR2, DQ1, SQ042. A strong genetic linkage of the deficiency of the second component of the complement gene and the HLA antigens A25, B18, and DR2, is well established in Caucasian populations. This suggests that the probable origin of the deficiency in our patient was admixture with Caucasian ancestors.

  1. Expression of class II major histocompatibility complex antigens (HLA-DR) and lymphocyte subset immunotyping in chronic pulmonary transplant rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, S; Ockner, D M; Ritter, J H; Patterson, G A; Trulock, E P; Cooper, J D; Wick, M R

    1995-05-01

    Currently, the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) of chronic airway rejection represents the most significant obstacle to the long-term function of isolated pulmonary allografts in humans. Between 20% and 30% of recipients are affected by this condition. To define the possible pathogenetic role of altered expression of class II major histocompatibility complex antigens (ie, HLA-DR) in BOS, the authors studied well-characterized examples of this process immunohistologically. Eleven BOS specimens were compared with seven controls, represented by allografts with no pathologic abnormalities taken from patients with normal posttransplant respiratory function, as well as 14 biopsies showing acute rejection. In addition, immunophenotypic subtyping of lymphocytes in all specimens was undertaken. Control tissues exhibited variable but weak expression of HLA-DR in bronchiolar epithelium and alveolar pneumocytes. In comparison, immunostaining for class II major histocompatibility complex antigens in BOS showed no statistically significant differences, whereas the 14 examples of acute rejection manifested intense HLA-DR expression in epithelia and endothelial cells. The numbers of intrabronchiolar and peribronchiolar lymphocytes were clearly higher in both acute rejection and BOS than in controls, but these cells differed in lineage in the two rejection states. Acute rejection showed an obvious preponderance of CD43-positive T lymphocytes, whereas lymphoid cells in BOS were a relatively equal mixture of CD20-positive B cells and CD43-positive T cells. Moreover, incipient peribronchiolar B-cell follicles were observed in BOS. Natural killer (CD57-positive) lymphocytes were rare in all specimens. These data suggest that alterations in HLA-DR expression probably do not play a central role in the genesis of BOS, as they do in acute rejection. In contrast, the results of lymphocyte immunophenotyping and correlative histologic findings in BOS suggest that both T cells and B

  2. Facial Nerve Recovery in KbDb and C1q Knockout Mice: A Role for Histocompatibility Complex 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdagli, Seden; Williams, Ryan A.; Kim, Hyun J.; Yan, Yuling; Mustapha, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding the mechanisms in nerve damage can lead to better outcomes for neuronal rehabilitation. The purpose of our study was to assess the effect of major histocompatibility complex I deficiency and inhibition of the classical complement pathway (C1q) on functional recovery and cell survival in the facial motor nucleus (FMN) after crush injury in adult and juvenile mice. Methods: A prospective blinded analysis of functional recovery and cell survival in the FMN after a unilateral facial nerve crush injury in juvenile and adult mice was undertaken between wild-type, C1q knockout (C1q−/−), and KbDb knockout (KbDb−/−) groups. Whisker function was quantified to assess functional recovery. Neuron counts were performed to determine neuron survival in the FMN after recovery. Results: After facial nerve injury, all adult wild-type mice fully recovered. Juvenile mice recovered incompletely corresponding to a greater neuron loss in the FMN of juveniles compared with adults. The C1q−/− juvenile and adult groups did not differ from wild type. The KbDb−/− adults demonstrated 50% recovery of whisker movement and decreased cell survival in FMN. The KbDb−/− juvenile group did not demonstrate any difference from control group. Conclusion: Histocompatibility complex I plays a role for neuroprotection and enhanced facial nerve recovery in adult mice. Inhibition of the classical complement pathway alone does not affect functional recovery or neuronal survival. The alternative and mannose binding pathways pose alternative means for activating the final components of the pathway that may lead to acute nerve damage. PMID:28293529

  3. The Stepwise Reaction of Rhodium and Iridium Complexes of Formula [MCl2 (κ4 C,N,N',P-L)] with Silver Cations: A Case of trans-Influence and Chiral Self-Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, María; Tejedor, Leyre; Rodríguez, Ricardo; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Lahoz, Fernando J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Carmona, Daniel

    2017-10-17

    Acetonitrile suspensions of the dichlorido complexes [MCl2 (κ4 C,N,N',P-L)] [M=Rh (1), Ir (2)] react with AgSbF6 in a 1:2 molar ratio affording the bis-acetonitrile complexes [M(κ4 C,N,N',P-L)(NCMe)2 ][SbF6 ]2 (3 and 4). The reaction takes place in a sequential manner and the intermediates can be isolated varying the M:Ag molar ratio. In a 2:1 molar ratio, it affords the dimetallic monochlorido-bridged compounds [{MCl(κ4 C,N,N',P-L)}2 (μ-Cl)][SbF6 ] (5 and 6). In a 1:1 molar ratio, the monosubstituted solvato-complexes [MCl(κ4 C,N,N',P-L)(Solv)][SbF6 ] (Solv=H2 O, MeCN, 7-10) were obtained. Finally, in a 2:3 molar ratio, it gives complexes 11 and 12 of formula [{M(κ4 C,N,N',P-L)(NCMe)(μ-Cl)}2 Ag][SbF6 ]3 in which a silver cation joints two cationic monosubstituted acetonitrile-complexes [MCl(κ4 C,N,N',P-L)(NCMe)]+ through the remaining chlorido ligands and two Ag⋅⋅⋅C interactions with one of the phenyl rings of each PPh2 group. In all the complexes, the aminic nitrogen and the central metal atom are stereogenic centers. In the trimetallic complexes 11 and 12, the silver atom is also a stereogenic center. The formation of the cation of the dimetallic complexes 5 and 6, as well as that of the trimetallic complexes 11 and 12, takes place with chiral molecular self-recognition. Experimental data and DFT calculations provide plausible explanations for the observed molecular recognition. The new complexes have been characterized by analytical, spectroscopic means and by X-ray diffraction methods. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A temporal analysis shows major histocompatibility complex loci in the Scandinavian wolf population are consistent with neutral evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, J. M.; Ellegren, H.

    2004-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has an integral role in the immune system, and hence diversity at its genes may be of particular importance for the health of populations. In large populations, balancing selection maintains diversity in MHC genes, but theoretical expectations indicate that this form of selection is absent or inefficient in small populations. We examine the level of diversity at three MHC class II loci in the wolf population of Scandinavia, a population naturally recolonized with a genetic contribution from as few as three founders, and in four neighbouring wolf populations. In the Scandinavian wolf population, two alleles were found for each locus and the distribution of alleles is compatible with their linkage into two haplotypes. Changes in the level of heterozygosity over time since recolonization demonstrate the effects of the proposed arrival of an immigrant wolf. The maintenance of diversity is shown to be compatible with a neutral, random allocation of alleles, in conjunction with crossing between packs. A total of 15 DRB1, seven DQA and 10 DQB1 alleles are found in four neighbouring wolf populations, with substantial sharing across populations. Even in these larger populations, bottlenecks and fragmentation with consequent genetic drift are likely to have resulted in few indicators for balancing selection and significant differentiation of populations. PMID:15539354

  5. Identification and expression analysis of major histocompatibility complex IIB gene in orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D Q; Yi, S B; Yao, M; Li, Y W; Liu, X C; Zhang, Y; Lin, H R

    2012-07-01

    In this study, complementary DNA (cDNA) and DNA sequences of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IIB genes (mhcIIB) were cloned from orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides. The gene structure of E. coioides mhcIIB consists of five exons and four introns, and its deduced amino acid sequence length is 249 amino acids, including a signal peptide, a peptide-binding region, an IGC1 domain, a transmembrane region and a cytoplasmic tail. A phylogenetic study showed that E. coioides mhcIIB shared 32.0-79.1% identity with those of other teleosts and mammals. Real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR was performed to detect the class IIB gene expression in eight different tissues. To characterize the relationship between E. coioides mhcIIB gene and pathogens, in vivo and in vitro studies were performed. Challenge of Cryptocaryon irritans revealed that class IIB genes were down-regulated after 24 and 48 h of challenge, and their expression was later restored at 72 h. Stimulation of isolated E. coioides leukocytes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) significantly increased peripheral blood and spleen mhcIIB expression, while head kidney mhcIIB expression remained constant. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Major histocompatibility complex and other allergy-related candidate genes associated with insect bite hypersensitivity in Icelandic horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumplerova, Marie; Vychodilova, Leona; Bobrova, Olga; Cvanova, Michaela; Futas, Jan; Janova, Eva; Vyskocil, Mirko; Vrtkova, Irena; Putnova, Lenka; Dusek, Ladislav; Marti, Eliane; Horin, Petr

    2013-04-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of horses caused by bites of insects. IBH is a multifactorial disease with contribution of genetic and environmental factors. Candidate gene association analysis of IBH was performed in a group of 89 Icelandic horses all born in Iceland and imported to Europe. Horses were classified in IBH-affected and non-affected based on clinical signs and history of recurrent dermatitis, and on the results of an in vitro sulfidoleukotriene (sLT)-release assay with Culicoides nubeculosus and Simulium vittatum extract. Different genetic markers were tested for association with IBH by the Fisher's exact test. The effect of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene region was studied by genotyping five microsatellites spanning the MHC region (COR112, COR113, COR114, UM011 and UMN-JH34-2), and exon 2 polymorphisms of the class II Eqca-DRA gene. Associations with Eqca-DRA and COR113 were identified (p initial screen, no marker from the panel was significantly (p studies.

  7. Major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency complicated by Mycobacterium avium complex in a boy of mixed ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Dimana; Ong, Peck Y; O'Gorman, Maurice R G; Church, Joseph A

    2014-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) deficiency represents a rare form of severe immunodeficiency associated with increased susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens and commonly leads to failure to thrive and early death. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in MHCII transcription regulator genes, resulting in impaired expression of MHCII, and it is usually seen in consanguineous populations. Our patient presented at age 15 months with a history of developmental delay, multiple respiratory infections and skin abscesses, and recently, at 5 years of age, he was found to have disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex. His mother is Mexican-American, and his father is Persian. Laboratory investigations showed hypogammaglobulinemia, modest T-lymphopenia, borderline mitogen responses, absent tetanus toxoid and candida antigen lymphoproliferative assays, and absent tetanus toxoid and Haemophilus influenzae type b antibody levels. Flow cytometry demonstrated absent HLA-DR antigen on monocytes and B-cells, and a diagnosis of MHCII deficiency was made. Genetic analysis yielded a homozygous pathogenic class II transactivator (CIITA) mutation. The same mutation was found in both parents. Coincidently, an Xq28 microduplication was identified and likely was the cause of the patient's developmental delay. This patient demonstrated some of the typical features of MHCII deficiency with the addition of several unique findings: disseminated M. avium complex, homozygosity in a CIITA mutation despite remarkably diverse parental ethnicity, and coincident Xq28 microdeletion with mild intellectual disability.

  8. Assembly and function of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I peptide-loading complex are conserved across higher vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Andreas; Jedamzick, Johanna; Herbring, Valentina; Fischbach, Hanna; Hartmann, Jessica; Parcej, David; Koch, Joachim; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-28

    Antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes via major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules depends on the heterodimeric transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). For efficient antigen supply to MHC I molecules in the ER, TAP assembles a macromolecular peptide-loading complex (PLC) by recruiting tapasin. In evolution, TAP appeared together with effector cells of adaptive immunity at the transition from jawless to jawed vertebrates and diversified further within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we compared TAP function and interaction with tapasin of a range of species within two classes of jawed vertebrates. We found that avian and mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 form heterodimeric complexes across taxa. Moreover, the extra N-terminal domain TMD0 of mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 as well as avian TAP2 recruits tapasin. Strikingly, however, only TAP1 and TAP2 from the same taxon can form a functional heterodimeric translocation complex. These data demonstrate that the dimerization interface between TAP1 and TAP2 and the tapasin docking sites for PLC assembly are conserved in evolution, whereas elements of antigen translocation diverged later in evolution and are thus taxon specific. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. A complex alloantigen system in Florida sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis pratensis: Evidence for the major histocompatibility (B) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Gee, G.F.; Miller, M.M.; Briles, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    The B blood group system constitutes the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in birds. The Mhc is a cluster of genes largely devoted to the processing and presentation of antigen. The Mhc is highly polymorphic in many species and, thus, useful in the evaluation of genetic diversity for fitness traits within populations of a variety of animals. Correlations found between particular Mhc haplotypes and resistance to certain diseases emphasize the importance of understanding the functional significance of diversity of the Mhc, particularly in species threatened with extinction. As part of studies focused on genetic diversity in wild birds, serological techniques were used to define a highly polymorphic alloantigen system in seven families of Florida sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pratensis). The results of analyses with antisera produced within the crane families and with chicken Mhc antigen-specific reagents revealed a single major alloantigen system that is likely the Mhc of the Florida sandhill crane. Preliminary experiments indicate that these crane alloantisera will provide a means of defining .the Mhc in other species of cranes.

  10. Genetic diversity in exon 2 of the major histocompatibility complex class II DQB1 locus in Nigerian goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, Abdulmojeed; Salako, Adebowale E; De Donato, Marcos; Takeet, Michael I; Peters, Sunday O; Adefenwa, Mufliat A; Okpeku, Moses; Wheto, Mathew; Agaviezor, Brilliant O; Sanni, Timothy M; Ajayi, Oyeyemi O; Onasanya, Gbolabo O; Ekundayo, Oludotun J; Ilori, Babatunde M; Amusan, Samuel A; Imumorin, Ikhide G

    2013-12-01

    The DQB1 locus is located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region and involved in immune response. We identified 20 polymorphic sites in a 228 bp fragment of exon 2, one of the most critical regions of the MHC DQB1 gene, in 60 Nigerian goats. Four sites are located in the peptide binding region, and 10 amino acid substitutions are peculiar to Nigerian goats, compared with published sequences. A significantly higher ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) suggests that allelic sequence evolution is driven by balancing selection (P < 0.01). In silico functional analysis using PANTHER predicted that substitution P56R, with a subPSEC score of -4.00629 (Pdeleterious = 0.73229), is harmful to protein function. The phylogenetic tree from consensus sequences placed the two northern breeds closer to each other than either was to the southern goats. This first report of sequence diversity at the DQB1 locus for any African goat breed may be useful in the search for disease-resistant genotypes.

  11. Molecular typing for HLA class I using ARMS-PCR: further developments following the 12th International Histocompatibility Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, S; Marsh, S G; Bunce, M; Bodmer, J G

    1999-02-01

    Molecular typing for HLA class I was introduced in the 12th International Histocompatibility Workshop. Following a pilot study using three methods, sequence specific oligotyping (SSO), reverse dot blot and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR, the ARMS-PCR method was selected for use. A great advantage of an ARMS-PCR method is that, unlike the other two methods, it can determine whether sequence motifs are in cis or in trans, as ARMS-PCR detects two cis located motifs per reaction using forward and reverse sequence specific primers. Resolution was designed to be low to medium level for HLA-A, -B and -C alleles. Two hundred and fifty class I kits and 83 HLA-A2 subtyping kits were distributed. The A2 subtyping kit used a two round nested PCR system to identify all of the A2 alleles known at the time. Typing results on control DNA samples distributed with both the kits showed a very satisfactory performance. Since the 12th Workshop, the kits have been developed with the addition of new primers and primer mixes to increase the resolution of the test.

  12. Predicting class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binders using multivariate statistics: comparison of discriminant analysis and multiple linear regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2007-01-01

    The accurate in silico identification of T-cell epitopes is a critical step in the development of peptide-based vaccines, reagents, and diagnostics. It has a direct impact on the success of subsequent experimental work. Epitopes arise as a consequence of complex proteolytic processing within the cell. Prior to being recognized by T cells, an epitope is presented on the cell surface as a complex with a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein. A prerequisite therefore for T-cell recognition is that an epitope is also a good MHC binder. Thus, T-cell epitope prediction overlaps strongly with the prediction of MHC binding. In the present study, we compare discriminant analysis and multiple linear regression as algorithmic engines for the definition of quantitative matrices for binding affinity prediction. We apply these methods to peptides which bind the well-studied human MHC allele HLA-A*0201. A matrix which results from combining results of the two methods proved powerfully predictive under cross-validation. The new matrix was also tested on an external set of 160 binders to HLA-A*0201; it was able to recognize 135 (84%) of them.

  13. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weicai Chen

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae, which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation.

  14. Genetic and epigenetic control of the major histocompatibility complex class Ib gene HLA-G in trophoblast cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holling, Tjadine M; Bergevoet, Marloes W T; Wierda, Rutger J; van Eggermond, Marja C J A; van den Elsen, Peter J

    2009-09-01

    The transcriptional regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) Ib gene HLA-G differs from the classical MHC class I genes. The cis-acting regulatory elements typical for classical MHC class I promoters are divergent in the promoter of HLA-G, rendering this gene unresponsive to NF-kappaB, IRF-1, and class II transactivator (CIITA)-mediated activation pathways. However, as we have previously shown, transactivation of HLA-G is regulated by CREB-1. Because CREB-1 is ubiquitously expressed, this observation does not explain the tissue-restricted expression of HLA-G in extravillous cytotrophoblasts. Using HLA-G-expressing JEG-3 cells and HLA-G-deficient JAR trophoblast-derived choriocarcinoma cells as a model, we have investigated the contribution of DNA methylation and histone acetylation in the transcriptional activation of HLA-G. Despite similar levels of DNA methylation both in JEG3 and JAR cells, we found the levels of histone acetylation in HLA-G promoter chromatin to be significantly enhanced in JEG3 cells coinciding with HLA-G expression.

  15. IPD-MHC 2.0: an improved inter-species database for the study of the major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Robinson, James; Ballingall, Keith; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Grimholt, Unni; Kaufman, Jim; Ho, Chak-Sum; de Groot, Natasja G; Flicek, Paul; Bontrop, Ronald E; Hammond, John A; Marsh, Steven G E

    2017-01-04

    The IPD-MHC Database project (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/mhc/) collects and expertly curates sequences of the major histocompatibility complex from non-human species and provides the infrastructure and tools to enable accurate analysis. Since the first release of the database in 2003, IPD-MHC has grown and currently hosts a number of specific sections, with more than 7000 alleles from 70 species, including non-human primates, canines, felines, equids, ovids, suids, bovins, salmonids and murids. These sequences are expertly curated and made publicly available through an open access website. The IPD-MHC Database is a key resource in its field, and this has led to an average of 1500 unique visitors and more than 5000 viewed pages per month. As the database has grown in size and complexity, it has created a number of challenges in maintaining and organizing information, particularly the need to standardize nomenclature and taxonomic classification, while incorporating new allele submissions. Here, we describe the latest database release, the IPD-MHC 2.0 and discuss planned developments. This release incorporates sequence updates and new tools that enhance database queries and improve the submission procedure by utilizing common tools that are able to handle the varied requirements of each MHC-group. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Evolution of the opossum major histocompatibility complex: evidence for diverse alternative splice patterns and low polymorphism among class I genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michelle L; Melman, Sandra D; Huntley, James; Miller, Robert D

    2009-09-01

    The opossum major histocompatibility complex (MHC) shares a similar organization with that of non-mammals while containing a diverse set of class I genes more like that of eutherian (placental) mammals. There are 11 class I loci in the opossum MHC region, seven of which are known to be transcribed. The previously described Monodelphis domestica (Modo)-UA1 and Modo-UG display characteristics consistent with their being classical and non-classical class I genes, respectively. Here we describe the characteristics of the remaining five transcribed class I loci (Modo-UE, -UK, -UI, -UJ and -UM). All five genes have peptide-binding grooves with low or no polymorphism, contain unpaired cysteines with the potential to produce homodimer formation and display genomic organizational features that would be unusual for classical class I loci. In addition, Modo-UJ and -UM were expressed in alternatively spliced mRNA forms, including a potentially soluble isoform of Modo-UJ. Thus, the MHC region of the opossum contains a single class I gene that is clearly classical and six other class I genes each with its own unique characteristics that probably perform roles other than or in addition to antigen presentation.

  17. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

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    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  18. HUBUNGAN ANTARA PERTUMBUHAN DENGAN KEBERADAAN GEN TAHAN PENYAKIT MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX (MHC PADA IKAN MAS (Cyprinus carpio

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    Erma Primanita Hayuningtyas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wabah penyakit koi herpes virus (KHV di Indonesia yang terjadi sejak tahun 2002 merupakan salah satu faktor yang memicu kemerosotan produksi ikan mas budidaya. Pembentukan strain unggul ikan mas tahan KHV dapat menjadi solusi bagi permasalahan tersebut. Pemilihan genotip ikan mas tahan KHV dengan marka molekuler gen major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II, khususnya pada alel Cyca DAB 1*05 akan membantu dalam kegiatan seleksi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keberadaan gen MHC-II pada populasi dasar G0 ikan mas strain Rajadanu dan hubungannya dengan pertumbuhan (bobot. Metode deteksi keberadaan gen MHC-II pada dua kelompok ikan dengan ukuran berbeda dilakukan dengan teknik PCR. Hubungan antara pertumbuhan ikan mas dengan persentase kemunculan gen MHC-II dianalisis dengan menggunakan program SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, sehingga diperoleh korelasi di antara keduanya. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa hubungan antara pertumbuhan dengan persentase keberadaan gen MHC-II berkorelasi negatif dengan nilai R = -0,742. Hal ini mengindikasikan bahwa semakin cepat pertumbuhan populasi ikan mas maka semakin sedikit persentase individu yang mempunyai gen MHC-II pada setiap populasi ikan mas. Sehingga populasi ikan mas yang pertumbuhannya lambat memiliki tingkat persentase positif MHC-II lebih tinggi (85,71%-100% dibandingkan populasi ikan mas yang pertumbuhannya cepat (42,86%-85,71%.

  19. Structure and polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Japanese Crested Ibis, Nipponia nippon.

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    Yukio Taniguchi

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a highly polymorphic genomic region that plays a central role in the immune system. Despite its functional consistency, the genomic structure of the MHC differs substantially among organisms. In birds, the MHC-B structures of Galliformes, including chickens, have been well characterized, but information about other avian MHCs remains sparse. The Japanese Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon, Pelecaniformes is an internationally conserved, critically threatened species. The current Japanese population of N. nippon originates from only five founders; thus, understanding the genetic diversity among these founders is critical for effective population management. Because of its high polymorphism and importance for disease resistance and other functions, the MHC has been an important focus in the conservation of endangered species. Here, we report the structure and polymorphism of the Japanese Crested Ibis MHC class II region. Screening of genomic libraries allowed the construction of three contigs representing different haplotypes of MHC class II regions. Characterization of genomic clones revealed that the MHC class II genomic structure of N. nippon was largely different from that of chicken. A pair of MHC-IIA and -IIB genes was arranged head-to-head between the COL11A2 and BRD2 genes. Gene order in N. nippon was more similar to that in humans than to that in chicken. The three haplotypes contained one to three copies of MHC-IIA/IIB gene pairs. Genotyping of the MHC class II region detected only three haplotypes among the five founders, suggesting that the genetic diversity of the current Japanese Crested Ibis population is extremely low. The structure of the MHC class II region presented here provides valuable insight for future studies on the evolution of the avian MHC and for conservation of the Japanese Crested Ibis.

  20. Structure and polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Japanese Crested Ibis, Nipponia nippon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yukio; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Matsuda, Hirokazu; Yamada, Takahisa; Sugiyama, Toshie; Homma, Kosuke; Kaneko, Yoshinori; Yamagishi, Satoshi; Iwaisaki, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a highly polymorphic genomic region that plays a central role in the immune system. Despite its functional consistency, the genomic structure of the MHC differs substantially among organisms. In birds, the MHC-B structures of Galliformes, including chickens, have been well characterized, but information about other avian MHCs remains sparse. The Japanese Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon, Pelecaniformes) is an internationally conserved, critically threatened species. The current Japanese population of N. nippon originates from only five founders; thus, understanding the genetic diversity among these founders is critical for effective population management. Because of its high polymorphism and importance for disease resistance and other functions, the MHC has been an important focus in the conservation of endangered species. Here, we report the structure and polymorphism of the Japanese Crested Ibis MHC class II region. Screening of genomic libraries allowed the construction of three contigs representing different haplotypes of MHC class II regions. Characterization of genomic clones revealed that the MHC class II genomic structure of N. nippon was largely different from that of chicken. A pair of MHC-IIA and -IIB genes was arranged head-to-head between the COL11A2 and BRD2 genes. Gene order in N. nippon was more similar to that in humans than to that in chicken. The three haplotypes contained one to three copies of MHC-IIA/IIB gene pairs. Genotyping of the MHC class II region detected only three haplotypes among the five founders, suggesting that the genetic diversity of the current Japanese Crested Ibis population is extremely low. The structure of the MHC class II region presented here provides valuable insight for future studies on the evolution of the avian MHC and for conservation of the Japanese Crested Ibis.

  1. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsena, W.; Sconocchia, G.; Cho, H. S.; Chang, C.-C.; Wang, X.; Klumkrathok, K.; Ferrone, S.; Leelayuwat, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2D (NKG2D), is expressed on stressed cells such as tumor cells. Study of expression of this molecule on tumor cells and patients’ sera is useful to define patients’ stages leading to proper selection of therapy. In this study, mouse anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced by DNA immunization using a gene gun. Screening of anti-MICA-producing mouse and hybridomas were performed by immunoblot and cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against MICA-positive HeLa and -negative Me1386 cell lines. MAbs were characterized against MICA-positive and -negative cell lines by immunoblot, cell ELISA and flow cytometry. The mAbs were also characterized for locus and allele specificities of MICA and MHC class I chain-related gene B (MICB) as well as for their ability to stain formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues by immunohistochemistry. Although all mouse immune sera were positive with MICA-positive cells by both immunoblot and cell ELISA methods, some hybridomas were positive only with one method. The mAbs had diverse specificities to detect MICA and MICB and different abilities to stain formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Thus, DNA immunization by gene gun is an effective method to generate immune mice for the production of mAbs with a variety of specificities against native and denatured forms of MIC proteins. PMID:18937790

  2. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of I kappa BL as the second major histocompatibility complex-linked susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Koichi; Makino, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Takaki, Asumi; Nagatsuka, Yumie; Ota, Masao; Tamiya, Gen; Kimura, Akinori; Bahram, Seiamak; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2003-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease with a complex etiology in which environmental factors within a genetically susceptible host maneuver the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system toward recognition of autoantigens. This ultimately leads to joint destruction and clinical symptomatology. Despite the identification of a number of disease-susceptibility regions across the genome, RA's major genetic linkage remains with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which contains not only the key immune-response class I and class II genes but also a host of other loci, some with potential immunological relevance. Inside the MHC itself, the sole consistent RA association is that with HLA-DRB1, although this does not encode all MHC-related susceptibility. Indeed, in a set of Japanese patients with RA and a control group, we previously reported the presence of a second RA-susceptibility gene within the telomeric human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class III region. Using microsatellites, we narrowed the susceptibility region to 70 kb telomeric of the TNF cluster, known to harbor four expressed genes (I kappa BL, ATP6G, BAT1, and MICB). Here, using numerous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletion polymorphisms, we identify the second RA-susceptibility locus within the HLA region, as the T allele of SNP 96452 (T/A), in the promoter region (position -62) of the I kappa BL gene (P=.0062). This -62T/A SNP disrupts the putative binding motif for the transcriptional repressor, delta EF1, and hence may influence the transcription of I kappa BL, homologous to I kappa B alpha, the latter being a known inhibitor of NF kappa B, which is central to innate immunity. Therefore, the MHC may harbor RA genetic determinants affecting the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system.

  4. Novel full-length major histocompatibility complex class I allele discovery and haplotype definition in pig-tailed macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Matthew R; Wiseman, Roger W; Karl, Julie A; Graham, Michael E; Gieger, Samantha M; O'Connor, David H

    2017-11-13

    Pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina, Mane) are important models for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) studies. Their infectability with minimally modified HIV makes them a uniquely valuable animal model to mimic human infection with HIV and progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, variation in the pig-tailed macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and the impact of individual transcripts on the pathogenesis of HIV and other infectious diseases is understudied compared to that of rhesus and cynomolgus macaques. In this study, we used Pacific Biosciences single-molecule real-time circular consensus sequencing to describe full-length MHC class I (MHC-I) transcripts for 194 pig-tailed macaques from three breeding centers. We then used the full-length sequences to infer Mane-A and Mane-B haplotypes containing groups of MHC-I transcripts that co-segregate due to physical linkage. In total, we characterized full-length open reading frames (ORFs) for 313 Mane-A, Mane-B, and Mane-I sequences that defined 86 Mane-A and 106 Mane-B MHC-I haplotypes. Pacific Biosciences technology allows us to resolve these Mane-A and Mane-B haplotypes to the level of synonymous allelic variants. The newly defined haplotypes and transcript sequences containing full-length ORFs provide an important resource for infectious disease researchers as certain MHC haplotypes have been shown to provide exceptional control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication and prevention of AIDS-like disease in nonhuman primates. The increased allelic resolution provided by Pacific Biosciences sequencing also benefits transplant research by allowing researchers to more specifically match haplotypes between donors and recipients to the level of nonsynonymous allelic variation, thus reducing the risk of graft-versus-host disease.

  5. Genetic wealth, population health: Major histocompatibility complex variation in captive and wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Kathleen E; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P; Drea, Christine M

    2017-10-01

    Across species, diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is critical to individual disease resistance and, hence, to population health; however, MHC diversity can be reduced in small, fragmented, or isolated populations. Given the need for comparative studies of functional genetic diversity, we investigated whether MHC diversity differs between populations which are open, that is experiencing gene flow, versus populations which are closed, that is isolated from other populations. Using the endangered ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) as a model, we compared two populations under long-term study: a relatively "open," wild population (n = 180) derived from Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar (2003-2013) and a "closed," captive population (n = 121) derived from the Duke Lemur Center (DLC, 1980-2013) and from the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Zoos (2012). For all animals, we assessed MHC-DRB diversity and, across populations, we compared the number of unique MHC-DRB alleles and their distributions. Wild individuals possessed more MHC-DRB alleles than did captive individuals, and overall, the wild population had more unique MHC-DRB alleles that were more evenly distributed than did the captive population. Despite management efforts to maintain or increase genetic diversity in the DLC population, MHC diversity remained static from 1980 to 2010. Since 2010, however, captive-breeding efforts resulted in the MHC diversity of offspring increasing to a level commensurate with that found in wild individuals. Therefore, loss of genetic diversity in lemurs, owing to small founder populations or reduced gene flow, can be mitigated by managed breeding efforts. Quantifying MHC diversity within individuals and between populations is the necessary first step to identifying potential improvements to captive management and conservation plans.

  6. Dendritic cells derived from bone marrow cells fail to acquire and present major histocompatibility complex antigens from other dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Penelope A; Burke, Fiona; Stagg, Andrew J; Knight, Stella C

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells stimulate primary T-cell responses and a major activation route is via presentation of antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. This presentation of pre-processed antigens most likely proceeds through transfer of functional major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens through exosomes, ‘live nibbling’ or apoptotic vesicles. We hypothesized that not all dendritic cell populations may both donate MHC antigen to dendritic cells and present antigens acquired from other dendritic cells. All populations tested, including those derived from bone marrow precursor cells stimulated primary, allogeneic T-cell responses and acted as accessory cells for mitogen stimulation. Populations of responder type, splenic dendritic cells promoted allogeneic responses indirectly but those derived from bone marrow cells blocked rather than promoted T-cell proliferation. To identify mechanisms underlying this difference we studied transfer of I-A antigens between cells. Active, two-way transfer of allogeneic I-A occurred between splenic primary antigen presenting cells including CD8α+ lymphoid dendritic cells, CD8α− myeloid dendritic cells and B220+ cells; all these cell types donated as well as acquired MHC molecules. By contrast, the bone marrow-derived dendritic cells donated I-A antigens but acquired negligible amounts. Thus, dendritic cells derived directly from bone marrow cells may stimulate primary T-cell responses through transferring functional MHC to other dendritic cells but may not be able to acquire and present antigens from other dendritic cells. The evidence suggests that T-cell activation may be blocked by the presence of dendritic cells that have not matured through lymphoid tissues which are unable to acquire and present antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. PMID:18266716

  7. Altered Expression of TAP-1 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I in Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Correlation of TAP-1 with Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vambutas, Andrea; Bonagura, Vincent R.; Steinberg, Bettie M.

    2000-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is an insidious disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. It is characterized by a variable clinical course that can include frequent disease recurrence, significant morbidity, and occasional mortality. The mechanisms responsible for the variability in the clinical course and the persistence of latent HPV infection remain unknown. Effective T-cell-mediated clearance of HPV-infected cells may be defective in patients with RRP, leading to recurrent disease and failure to suppress latent HPV reactivation. This study describes the down-regulation of the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP-1) and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I protein expression in laryngeal papilloma tissue biopsies and cell culture of primary explants. There was a statistically significant correlation between reduction of TAP-1 expression in biopsy tissues and rapid recurrence of disease. Patients with RRP had less frequent recurrence if their papillomas expressed TAP-1 at levels close to that of normal tissue, compared with those with very low expression of TAP-1, who had frequent recurrence (32 versus 5 weeks to the next surgical intervention). These findings suggest that HPV may evade immune recognition by down-regulating class I MHC cell surface expression via decreased TAP-1 levels. Expression of TAP-1 could be used for prognostic evaluation of disease severity. Gamma interferon was able to restore class I MHC expression at the surfaces of laryngeal papilloma cells in culture. This up-regulation of class I MHC antigen at the cell surface potentially allows the infected cell to become a target for the immune system again. This finding provides some promise for nonsurgical treatment of laryngeal papillomas. PMID:10618282

  8. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression on neurons in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and experimental subacute measles encephalitis

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    Gogate, N.; Yamabe, Toshio; Verma, L.; Dhib-Jalbut, S. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Lack of major histocompatibility class I antigens on neurons has been implicated as a possible mechanism for viral persistence in the brain since these antigens are required for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition of infected cells. In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), measles virus (MV) persists in neurons, resulting in a fatal chronic infection. MHC class I mRNA expression was examined in formalin-fixed brain tissue from 6 SSPE patients by in situ hybridization. In addition MHC class I protein expression in MV-infected neurons was examined in experimental Subacute Measles Encephalitis (SME) by double immunohistochemistry. MHC class I mRNA expression was found to be upregulated in SSPE tissues studied, and in 5 out of 6 cases the expression was definitively seen on neurons. The percentage of neurons expressing MHC class I mRNA ranged between 20 to 84% in infected areas. There was no correlation between the degree of infection and expression of MHC class I molecules on neurons. Importantly, the number of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens was markedly low, varying between 2 to 8%. Similar results were obtained in SME where 20 to 30% of the neurons expressed MHC class I but < 8% co-expressed MHC class I and MV antigens. Perivascular infiltrating cells in the infected regions in SME expressed IFN{gamma} immunoreactivity. The results suggest that MV may not be directly involved in the induction of MHC class I on neurons and that cytokines such as IFN{gamma} may play an important role. Furthermore, the paucity of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens in SSPE and SME suggests that such cells are either rapidly cleared by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), or, alternatively, lack of co-expression of MHC class I on MV infected neurons favors MV persistence in these cells by escaping CTL recognition. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Regulation of T cell response to leishmania antigens by determinants of histocompatibility leukocyte class I and II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacellar O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that HLA class I molecules play a significant role in the regulation of the proliferation of T cells activated by mitogens and antigens. We evaluated the ability of mAb to a framework determinant of HLA class I molecules to regulate T cell proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-g production against leishmania, PPD, C. albicans and tetanus toxoid antigens in patients with tegumentary leishmaniasis and healthy subjects. The anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC mAb (W6/32 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation by 90% in cultures stimulated with aCD3, but the suppression was variable in cultures stimulated with leishmania antigen. This suppression ranged from 30-67% and was observed only in 5 of 11 patients. IFN-g production against leishmania antigen was also suppressed by anti-HLA class I mAb. In 3 patients IFN-g levels were suppressed by more than 60%, while in the other 2 cultures IFN-g levels were 36 and 10% lower than controls. The suppression by HLA class I mAb to the proliferative response in leishmaniasis patients and in healthy controls varied with the antigens and the patients or donors tested. To determine whether the suppression is directed at antigen presenting cells (APCs or at the responding T cells, experiments with antigen-primed non-adherent cells, separately incubated with W6/32, were performed. Suppression of proliferation was only observed when the W6/32 mAb was added in the presence of T cells. These data provide evidence that a mAb directed at HLA class I framework determinants can suppress proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to several antigens.

  10. Pathway of detergent-mediated and peptide ligand-mediated refolding of heterodimeric class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, J; Döring, K; Malotka, J; Jähnig, F; Dornmair, K

    1997-09-15

    We investigated the mechanism of refolding and reassembly of recombinant alpha and beta chains of the class II major histocompatibility molecules (MHC-II) HLA-DRB5*0101. Both chains were expressed in the cytosol of Escherichia coli, purified in urea and SDS, and reassembled to functional heterodimers by replacement of SDS by mild detergents, incubation in a redox-shuffling buffer and finally by oxidation and removal of detergent. Refolding was mediated by mild detergents and by peptide ligands. Early stages of structure formation were characterized by circular dichroism, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay (FAD) spectroscopies. We found that formation of secondary structure was detectable after replacement of SDS by mild detergents. At that stage the alpha and beta chains were still monomeric, the buffer was strongly reducing, and the folding intermediates did not yet interact with peptide ligands. Formation of folding intermediates capable of interacting with peptide ligands was detected after adjusting the redox potential with oxidized glutathione and incubation in mild detergents. We conclude that at that stage a tertiary structure close to the native structure is formed at least locally. The nature and concentration of detergent critically determined the refolding efficiency. We compared detergents with different carbohydrate headgroups, and with aliphatic chains ranging from C6 to C14 in length. For each of the detergents we observed a narrow concentration range for mediating refolding. Surprisingly, detergents with long aliphatic chains had to be used at higher concentrations than short-chain detergents, indicating that increasing the solubility of folding intermediates is not the only function of detergents during a refolding reaction. We discuss structure formation and interactions of detergents with stable folding intermediates. Understanding such interactions will help to develop rational strategies for refolding hydrophobic or

  11. Association between the major histocompatibility complex and clinical response to infliximab therapy in patients with Behçet uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Kana; Sakai, Tsutomu; Kohno, Hideo; Okano, Kiichiro; Akiyama, Goichi; Aoyagi, Ranko; Inaba, Mayumi; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms are associated with response to infliximab therapy in Japanese patients with Behçet uveitis (BU). We retrospectively reviewed 24 patients (17 men and seven women) treated with infliximab for BU. Of them, ten patients were genotyped as HLA A*2601, and nine as HLA B*5101. Therapeutic response levels in the two groups were compared based on ocular attacks and the Behçet disease ocular attack score 24 (BOS24) over 24 months of treatment. Mean frequencies of ocular attacks at 13-18 and 19-24 months after the start of treatment were significantly higher in the HLA A*2601 group (P = 0.0392 and 0.0177, respectively). Mean BOS24-6 M values for months 1-6, 7-12, 13-18, and 19-24 were also significantly higher in the HLA A*2601 group (P = 0.0459, 0.0150, 0.0394, and 0.0178, respectively). Shortening of the infusion interval was required in eight patients in the HLA A*2601 group but in one only in the HLA B*5101 group. Behçet-disease-related adverse events occurred in eight patients in the HLA A*2601 group and two in the HLA B*5101 group. Nonocular adverse events occurred in four patients in the HLA A*2601 group and none in the HLA B*5101 group. Although mean change from baseline in the number of ocular attack scores in the HLA A26 and HLA B51 groups seemed to be similar, the HLA-A26 group had a more severe disease course under infliximab therapy for ocular/extraocular involvement. These data suggest that response to infliximab therapy in Japanese patients with BU is partly due to genetic determinants in the HLA complex.

  12. Identification and characterization of a new major histocompatibility complex class I gene in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erp, S H; Dixon, B; Figueroa, F; Egberts, E; Stet, R J

    1996-01-01

    In this study we report the finding of three representatives of a new group of major histocompatibility complex class I sequences in carp: Cyca-12 (Cyca-UA1*01), a full-length cDNA; Cyca-SP1 (Cyca-UAW1), a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment from cDNA; and Cyca-G11 (Cyca-UA1*02), a partial genomic clone. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of Cyca-12, Cyca-SP1, and Cyca-G11 with classical and non-classical class I sequences from other species shows considerable conservation in regions that have been shown to be involved in maintaining the structure and function of class I molecules. The genomic organization of Cyca-12 has been elucidated by analysis of a partial genomic clone (Cyca-G11, in combination with PCR amplifications on genomic DNA of a homozygous individual. Although the genomic organization is similar to that found in class I genes from other species, the 3' untranslated region contains an intron which is unprecedented in class I genes, and intron 2 is exceptionally large (+/-14 kilobases). Southern blot analysis indicates the presence of multiple related sequences. In phylogenetic analyses, the Cyca-UA sequences cluster with class I genes from zebrafish and Atlantic salmon, indicating that the ancestral gene arose before the salmonid/cyprinid split, approximately 120-150 million years ago. The previously reported class I Cyca-Z genes from carp and Caau-Z genes from goldfish cluster as a completely separate lineage. A polyclonal antiserum (anti-Cyca12) was raised against a recombinant fusion protein containing most of the extracellular domains of Cyca-12. The antibodies showed substantial reactivity to the recombinant protein and an Mr 45000 protein in membrane lysates of spleen and muscle, as well as to determinants present on leucocytes in fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyses. Erythrocytes and thrombocytes were found to be negative.

  13. Trophoblast Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression Is Associated with Immune-Mediated Rejection of Bovine Fetuses Produced by Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Wilhelm, Amanda; Sessions, Benjamin R; Hicks, Brady A; Schlafer, Donald H; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Trophoblast cells from bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) conceptuses express major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins early in gestation, and this may be one cause of the significant first-trimester embryonic mortality observed in these pregnancies. MHC-I homozygous-compatible (n = 9), homozygous-incompatible (n = 8), and heterozygous-incompatible (n = 5) SCNT pregnancies were established. The control group consisted of eight pregnancies produced by artificial insemination. Uterine and placental samples were collected on Day 35 ± 1 of pregnancy, and expression of MHC-I, leukocyte markers, and cytokines were examined by immunohistochemistry. Trophoblast cells from all SCNT pregnancies expressed MHC-I, while trophoblast cells from age-matched control pregnancies were negative for MHC-I expression. Expression of MHC-I antigens by trophoblast cells from SCNT pregnancies was associated with lymphocytic infiltration in the endometrium. Furthermore, MHC-I-incompatible conceptuses, particularly the heterozygous-incompatible ones, induced a more pronounced lymphocytic infiltration than MHC-I-compatible conceptuses. Cells expressing cluster of differentiation (CD) 3, gamma/deltaTCR, and MHC-II were increased in the endometrium of SCNT pregnancies compared to the control group. CD4(+) lymphocytes were increased in MHC-I-incompatible pregnancies compared to MHC-I-compatible and control pregnancies. CD8(+), FOXP3(+), and natural killer cells were increased in MHC-I heterozygous-incompatible SCNT pregnancies compared to homozygous SCNT and control pregnancies. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  14. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Hilary C; O'Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A; Edwards, Scott

    2015-05-07

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general. Copyright © 2015 Miller et al.

  15. Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major histocompatibility complex class IIβ alleles of New World ranid frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M.; Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play key roles in the vertebrate immune system. However, our understanding of the evolutionary processes and underlying genetic mechanisms shaping these genes is limited in many taxa, including amphibians, a group currently impacted by emerging infectious diseases. To further elucidate the evolution of the MHC in frogs (anurans) and develop tools for population genetics, we surveyed allelic diversity of the MHC class II ??1 domain in both genomic and complementary DNA of seven New World species in the genus Rana (Lithobates). To assign locus affiliation to our alleles, we used a "gene walking" technique to obtain intron 2 sequences that flanked MHC class II?? exon 2. Two distinct intron sequences were recovered, suggesting the presence of at least two class II?? loci in Rana. We designed a primer pair that successfully amplified an orthologous locus from all seven Rana species. In total, we recovered 13 alleles and documented trans-species polymorphism for four of the alleles. We also found quantitative evidence of selection acting on amino acid residues that are putatively involved in peptide binding and structural stability of the ??1 domain of anurans. Our results indicated that primer mismatch can result in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias, which influences the number of alleles that are recovered. Using a single locus may minimize PCR bias caused by primer mismatch, and the gene walking technique was an effective approach for generating single-copy orthologous markers necessary for future studies of MHC allelic variation in natural amphibian populations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Bone Marrow Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Major Histocompatibility Complex-Matched Murine Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Hemopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Kifah; Mattar, Zamil; Silveira, Pablo; Hsu, Wei-Hsun; Bendall, Linda; Hart, Derek; Bradstock, Kenneth F

    2017-11-01

    Most clinical allogeneic hemopoietic cell transplants (alloHCT) are now performed using reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) instead of myeloablative conditioning (MAC); however, the biology underlying this treatment remains incompletely understood. We investigated a murine model of major histocompatibility complex-matched multiple minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched alloHCT using bone marrow (BM) cells and splenocytes from B6 (H-2) donor mice transplanted into BALB.B (H-2) recipients after RIC with fludarabine of 100 mg/kg per day for 5 days, cyclophosphamide of 60 mg/kg per day for 2 days, and total body irradiation (TBI). The lowest TBI dose capable of achieving complete donor chimerism in this mouse strain combination was 325 cGy given as a single fraction. Mice that underwent RIC had a reduced incidence and delayed onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and significantly prolonged survival compared with MAC-transplanted recipients (TBI of 850 cGy plus cyclophosphamide of 60 mg/kg per day for 2 days). Compared with syngeneic controls, RIC mice with GVHD showed evidence of BM suppression, have anemia, reduced BM cellularity, and showed profound reduction in BM B cell lymphopoiesis associated with damage to the endosteal BM niche. This was associated with an increase in BM CD8 effector T cells in RIC mice and elevated blood and BM plasma levels of T helper1 cytokines. Increasing doses of splenocytes resulted in increased incidence of GVHD in RIC mice. We demonstrate that the BM is a major target organ of GVHD in an informative clinically relevant RIC mouse major histocompatibility complex-matched alloHCT model by a process that seems to be driven by CD8 effector T cells.

  17. Ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I) prevents apoptosis induced by Fas or SAPK/JNK activation in T-lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    Early apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells was induced by agonistic anti-Fas Ab or by anisomycin which activates the stress kinases SAPK/JNK. Apoptosis was inhibited by ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I). MHC-I ligation induced upregulation of the anti......-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim). MHC-I ligation also prevented downregulation of Bcl-2 and destabilization of Deltapsim induced by anti-Fas Ab treatment or anisomycin exposure. Studies on three different Jurkat cell mutants deficient for src p56(lck), ZAP...

  18. Expression of intercellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules and class II major histocompatibility antigens in human lungs: lack of influence by conditions of organ preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, S; Ritter, J H; Patterson, A; Ockner, D M; Sawa, H; Mohanakumar, T; Cooper, J D; Wick, M R

    1995-01-01

    The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and class II major histocompatibility complex antigens was studied in control lung tissue and preserved human donor lungs. The three controls were represented by wedge biopsy specimens taken from non-neoplastic lung surrounding bronchogenic carcinomas. Nine lungs were harvested from six brain-dead donors, flushed with Euro-Collins solution or low potassium-dextran-glucose solution, and stored at 1 degree C or 10 degrees C. Samples of the latter organs were taken at the time of surgical harvest (baseline) and after 2, 12, 24, and 48 hours of preservation time. Immunostains with monoclonal antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules were performed on all samples, and the relative presence of these determinants was evaluated. In both the controls and preserved lungs, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was intense in the septal capillary endothelium and alveolar pneumocytes, but essentially absent in bronchial epithelium. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 was moderately to strongly labeled in the endothelia of large and small blood vessels of all types, and it was not seen in other cell types. Class II major histocompatibility complex antigens were variably observed in pulmonary epithelial cells, but they were not expressed by endothelia. There appeared to be no significant difference in the immunohistologic density of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 or vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 immunostaining in allografts at the specified time points of preservation; this conclusion was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Similar findings pertained to staining results for human leukocyte DR antigens. There was likewise no significant difference in the expression of the three analytes when donor lungs perfused with Euro-Collins solution versus low potassium

  19. Chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G antigens are found on many cell types that are important for the immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Dunon, D; Skjødt, K

    1991-01-01

    B-G antigens are a polymorphic multigene family of cell surface molecules encoded by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). They have previously been described only on cells of the erythroid lineage. By using flow cytometry, section staining, and immunoprecipitation with monoclonal...... antibodies and rabbit antisera to B-G molecules and by using Northern blots with B-G cDNA clones, we demonstrate here that B-G molecules and RNA are present in many other cell types: thrombocytes, peripheral B and T lymphocytes, bursal B cells and thymocytes, and stromal cells in the bursa, thymus...

  20. Superantigen-presentation by rat major histocompatibility complex class II molecules RT1.Bl and RT1.Dl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlaske, Henry; Karaüzüm, Hatice; Monzon-Casanova, Elisa; Rudolf, Ronald; Starick, Lisa; Müller, Ingrid; Wildner, Gerhild; Diedrichs-Möhring, Maria; Koch, Norbert; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Wonigeit, Kurt; Fleischer, Bernhard; Overbeck, Silke; Rink, Lothar; Herrmann, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Rat major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules RT1.B(l) (DQ-like) and RT1.D(l) (DR-like) were cloned from the LEW strain using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and expressed in mouse L929 cells. The transduced lines bound MHC class II-specific monoclonal antibodies in an MHC-isotype-specific manner and presented peptide antigens and superantigens to T-cell hybridomas. The T-cell-hybridomas responded well to all superantigens presented by human MHC class II, whereas the response varied considerably with rat MHC class II-transduced lines as presenters. The T-cell hybridomas responded to the pyrogenic superantigens Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB), SEC1, SEC2 and SEC3 only at high concentrations with RT1.B(l)-transduced and RT1.D(l)-transduced cells as presenters. The same was true for streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (SPEA), but this was presented only by RT1.B(l) and not by RT1.D(l). SPEC was recognized only if presented by human MHC class II. Presentation of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis superantigen (YPM) showed no MHC isotype preference, while Mycoplasma arthritidis superantigen (MAS or MAM) was presented by RT1.D(l) but not by RT1.B(l). Interestingly, and in contrast to RT1.B(l), the RT1.D(l) completely failed to present SEA and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 even after transduction of invariant chain (CD74) or expression in other cell types such as the surface MHC class II-negative mouse B-cell lymphoma (M12.4.1.C3). We discuss the idea that a lack of SEA presentation may not be a general feature of RT1.D molecules but could be a consequence of RT1.D(l)beta-chain allele-specific substitutions (arginine 80 to lysine, asparagine 82 to aspartic acid) in the extremely conserved region flanking the Zn(2+)-binding histidine 81, which is crucial for high-affinity SEA-binding.

  1. SNP Variants in Major Histocompatibility Complex Are Associated with Sarcoidosis Susceptibility—A Joint Analysis in Four European Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Laura Lahtela

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multiorgan inflammatory disorder with heritability estimates up to 66%. Previous studies have shown the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region to be associated with sarcoidosis, suggesting a functional role for antigen-presenting molecules and immune mediators in the disease pathogenesis. To detect variants predisposing to sarcoidosis and to identify genetic differences between patient subgroups, we studied four genes in the MHC Class III region (LTA, TNF, AGER, BTNL2 and HLA-DRA with tag-SNPs and their relation to HLA-DRB1 alleles. We present results from a joint analysis of four study populations (Finnish, Swedish, Dutch, and Czech. Patients with sarcoidosis (n = 805 were further subdivided based on the disease activity and the presence of Löfgren’s syndrome. In a joint analysis, seven SNPs were associated with non-Löfgren sarcoidosis (NL; the strongest association with rs3177928, P = 1.79E−07, OR = 1.9 and eight with Löfgren’s syndrome [Löfgren syndrome (LS; the strongest association with rs3129843, P = 3.44E−12, OR = 3.4] when compared with healthy controls (n = 870. Five SNPs were associated with sarcoidosis disease course (the strongest association with rs3177928, P = 0.003, OR = 1.9. The high linkage disequilibrium (LD between SNPs and an HLA-DRB1 challenged the result interpretation. When the SNPs and HLA-DRB1 alleles were analyzed together, independent association was observed for four SNPs in the HLA-DRA/BTNL2 region: rs3135365 (NL; P = 0.015, rs3177928 (NL; P < 0.001, rs6937545 (LS; P = 0.012, and rs5007259 (disease activity; P = 0.002. These SNPs act as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL for HLA-DRB1 and/or HLA-DRB5. In conclusion, we found novel SNPs in BTNL2 and HLA-DRA regions associating with sarcoidosis. Our finding further establishes that polymorphisms in the HLA-DRA and BTNL2 have a role in sarcoidosis susceptibility. This multi

  2. Defining novel parameters for the optimal priming and expansion of minor histocompatibility antigen-specific T cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelle, Valérie; Carli, Cédric; Taillefer, Julie; Orio, Julie; Delisle, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-04-19

    Adoptive transfer of minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA)-specific T cells is a promising therapy for patients with hematological cancers. However, the efficacy of the transferred cells is hampered by the acquisition of terminal effector differentiation and exhaustion features during expansion in vitro thus preventing their function and persistence in vivo. Yet, the factors that induce T-cell differentiation and functional impairment in culture remain poorly defined and are likely to vary depending on the method used for expansion. Using the clinically relevant HLA-A0201-restricted MiHA HA-1 as well as reagents and procedures that are readily transferable to a clinical environment, we designed a novel culture protocol and defined how exhaustion features appeared in function of time. The optimal time points for the expansion of "fit" MiHA-specific T cells were delineated using phenotypic and functional assessments including KLRG-1 and PD-1 surface markers as well as Ki67 staining and cytokine secretion assays. Following a priming phase, an enrichment step and a rapid expansion stage, our method generates MiHA-specific T-cell lines. Evidence of phenotypic and functional dysfunction appear in function of culture duration, but display different characteristics following the extension of the priming or rapid expansion phases. While repeated antigen exposure during the priming phase induced the decline of the antigen-specific population and the expression of PD-1 and KLRG-1 on antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, the prolongation of an antigen-free expansion phase induced proliferation arrest and the relative loss of antigen-specific cells without impairing polyfunctional cytokine secretion or inducing PD-1 and KLRG-1 expression. A similar pattern was also observed after stimulating a virus-specific memory repertoire, except for the more rapid acquisition of exhaustion features upon repeated antigen exposure. Our results offer novel insights on the impact of culture

  3. Novel Non-Histocompatibility Antigen Mismatched Variants Improve the Ability to Predict Antibody-Mediated Rejection Risk in Kidney Transplant

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    Silvia Pineda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transplant rejection is the critical clinical end-point limiting indefinite survival after histocompatibility antigen (HLA mismatched organ transplantation. The predominant cause of late graft loss is antibody-mediated rejection (AMR, a process whereby injury to the organ is caused by donor-specific antibodies, which bind to HLA and non-HLA (nHLA antigens. AMR is incompletely diagnosed as donor/recipient (D/R matching is only limited to the HLA locus and critical nHLA immunogenic antigens remain to be identified. We have developed an integrative computational approach leveraging D/R exome sequencing and gene expression to predict clinical post-transplant outcome. We performed a rigorous statistical analysis of 28 highly annotated D/R kidney transplant pairs with biopsy-confirmed clinical outcomes of rejection [either AMR or T-cell-mediated rejection (CMR] and no-rejection (NoRej, identifying a significantly higher number of mismatched nHLA variants in AMR (ANOVA—p-value = 0.02. Using Fisher’s exact test, we identified 123 variants associated mainly with risk of AMR (p-value < 0.001. In addition, we applied a machine-learning technique to circumvent the issue of statistical power and we found a subset of 65 variants using random forest, that are predictive of post-tx AMR showing a very low error rate. These variants are functionally relevant to the rejection process in the kidney and AMR as they relate to genes and/or expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs that are enriched in genes expressed in kidney and vascular endothelium and underlie the immunobiology of graft rejection. In addition to current D/R HLA mismatch evaluation, additional mismatch nHLA D/R variants will enhance the stratification of post-tx AMR risk even before engraftment of the organ. This innovative study design is applicable in all solid organ transplants, where the impact of mitigating AMR on graft survival may be greater, with considerable benefits on

  4. Giant panda BAC library construction and assembly of a 650-kb contig spanning major histocompatibility complex class II region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hui-Juan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giant panda is rare and endangered species endemic to China. The low rates of reproductive success and infectious disease resistance have severely hampered the development of captive and wild populations of the giant panda. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC plays important roles in immune response and reproductive system such as mate choice and mother-fetus bio-compatibility. It is thus essential to understand genetic details of the giant panda MHC. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library will provide a new tool for panda genome physical mapping and thus facilitate understanding of panda MHC genes. Results A giant panda BAC library consisting of 205,800 clones has been constructed. The average insert size was calculated to be 97 kb based on the examination of 174 randomly selected clones, indicating that the giant panda library contained 6.8-fold genome equivalents. Screening of the library with 16 giant panda PCR primer pairs revealed 6.4 positive clones per locus, in good agreement with an expected 6.8-fold genomic coverage of the library. Based on this BAC library, we constructed a contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX spanning about 650 kb by a three-step method: (1 PCR-based screening of the BAC library with primers from homologous MHC class II gene loci, end sequences and BAC clone shotgun sequences, (2 DNA sequencing validation of positive clones, and (3 restriction digest fingerprinting verification of inter-clone overlapping. Conclusion The identifications of genes and genomic regions of interest are greatly favored by the availability of this giant panda BAC library. The giant panda BAC library thus provides a useful platform for physical mapping, genome sequencing or complex analysis of targeted genomic regions. The 650 kb sequence-ready BAC contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX, verified by the three-step method, offers a

  5. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules Modulate Activation Threshold and Early Signaling of T Cell Antigen Receptor–γ/δ Stimulated by Nonpeptidic Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carena, Ilaria; Shamshiev, Abdijapar; Donda, Alena; Colonna, Marco; Libero, Gennaro De

    1997-01-01

    Killer cell inhibitory receptors and CD94-NKG2-A/B heterodimers are major histocompatibility complex class I–specific inhibitory receptors expressed by natural killer cells, T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-γ/δ cells, and a subset of TCR-α/β cells. We studied the functional interaction between TCR-γ/δ and CD94, this inhibitory receptor being expressed on the majority of γ/δ T cells. When engaged by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen class I molecules, CD94 downmodulates activation of human TCR-γ/δ by phosphorylated ligands. CD94-mediated inhibition is more effective at low than at high doses of TCR ligand, which may focus T cell responses towards antigen-presenting cells presenting high amounts of antigen. CD94 engagement has major effects on TCR signaling cascade. It facilitates recruitment of SHP-1 phosphatase to TCR–CD3 complex and affects phosphorylation of Lck and ZAP-70 kinase, but not of CD3 ζ chain upon TCR triggering. These events may cause abortion of proximal TCR-mediated signaling and set a higher TCR activation threshold. PMID:9362537

  6. A single-chain fusion molecule consisting of peptide, major histocompatibility gene complex class I heavy chain and beta2-microglobulin can fold partially correctly, but binds peptide inefficiently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Buus, S

    1999-01-01

    The function of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules is to sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We have attempted to develop a general approach to produce large amounts of pure and active recombi...

  7. Activation of Stat-3 is involved in the induction of apoptosis after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on human Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Nielsen, M; Bregenholt, S

    1998-01-01

    . In addition, the transcription factor Stat-3 was tyrosine phosphorylated in the cytoplasm and subsequently translocated to the cell nucleus. Data obtained by electrophoretic mobility shift assay suggested that the activated Stat-3 protein associates with the human serum-inducible element (hSIE) DNA......-probe derived from the interferon-gamma activated site (GAS) in the c-fos promoter, a common DNA sequence for Stat protein binding. An association between hSIE and Stat-3 after MHC-I ligation was directly demonstrated by precipitating Stat-3 from nuclear extracts with biotinylated hSIE probe and avidin......Activation of Janus tyrosine kinases (Jak) and Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was explored in Jurkat T cells. Cross-linking of MHC-I mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Tyk2, but not Jak1, Jak2, and Jak3...

  8. T-cell activation. V. Anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody-induced activation and clonal abortion in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Dissing, S; Tscherning, T

    1993-01-01

    respectively, as well as three transfectant clones reconstituted with the appropriate TcR/CD3 cDNA. For activation, the cells were exposed to anti-TcR/CD3, anti-CD2 and anti-major histocompatibility complex (anti-MHC) class I monoclonal antibodies (mAb) respectively. Cellular activation by these mAb leading...... to an increased IL-2 secretion was preceded by a rise in [Ca2+]i and was relatively dependent on the expression of the a TcR/CD3 complex. In contrast, anti-MHC class I mAb-induced clonal abortion in Jurkat T cells may occur without previous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and appeared to be independent of TcR/CD3...... expression. The present observation suggest the existence of different secondary messenger systems operating in Jurkat cells following activation via the TcR/CD3, CD2 and the MHC class I pathways, respectively....

  9. A step-by-step overview of the dynamic process of epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II for presentation to helper T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

    2016-01-01

    T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) expressed on cytotoxic or helper T cells can only see their specific target antigen as short sequences of peptides bound to the groove of proteins of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, and class II respectively. In addition to the many steps, several participating proteins, and multiple cellular compartments involved in the processing of antigens, the MHC structure, with its dynamic and flexible groove, has perfectly evolved as the underlying instrument for epitope selection. In this review, I have taken a step-by-step, and rather historical, view to describe antigen processing and determinant selection, as we understand it today, all based on decades of intense research by hundreds of laboratories.

  10. HIV controllers exhibit enhanced frequencies of major histocompatibility complex class II tetramer+ Gag-specific CD4+ T cells in chronic clade C HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laher, Faatima; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Porichis, Filippos

    2017-01-01

    = 0.0001), and these expanded Gag-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV controllers showed higher levels of expression of the cytolytic proteins granzymes A and B. Importantly, targeting of the immunodominant Gag41 peptide in the context of HLA class II DRB1*1101 was associated with HIV control (r = -0.5, P......Immune control of viral infections is heavily dependent on helper CD4+ T cell function. However, the understanding of the contribution of HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses to immune protection against HIV-1, particularly in clade C infection, remains incomplete. Recently, major histocompatibility......, and then used these to define the magnitude, function, and relation to the viral load of HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses in a cohort of untreated HIV clade C-infected persons. We observed significantly higher frequencies of MHC class II tetramer-positive CD4+ T cells in HIV controllers than progressors (P...

  11. The Recognition of the Nonclassical Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Molecule, T10, by the γδ T Cell, G8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Michael P.; Reich, Ziv; Mavaddat, Nasim; Altman, John D.; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that many nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (class Ib) molecules have distinct antigen-binding capabilities, including the binding of nonpeptide moieties and the binding of peptides that are different from those bound to classical MHC molecules. Here, we show that one of the H-2T region–encoded molecules, T10, when produced in Escherichia coli, can be folded in vitro with β2-microglobulin (β2m) to form a stable heterodimer in the absence of peptide or nonpeptide moieties. This heterodimer can be recognized by specific antibodies and is stimulatory to the γδ T cell clone, G8. Circular dichroism analysis indicates that T10/β2m has structural features distinct from those of classical MHC class I molecules. These results suggest a new way for MHC-like molecules to adopt a peptide-free structure and to function in the immune system. PMID:9104809

  12. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Upregulates NLRC5 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression through RIG-I Induction in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuancheng; Liu, Taixiang; Shi, Hengfei; Wang, Jingjing; Ji, Ping; Wang, Hongwei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang; Li, Erguang

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute respiratory tract viral infection in infants, causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The host antiviral response to RSV acts via retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We show here that RSV infection upregulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression through the induction of NLRC5, a NOD-like, CARD domain-containing intracellular protein that has recently been identified as a class I MHC transactivator (CITA). RSV infection of A549 cells promotes upregulation of NLRC5 via beta interferon (IFN-β) production, since the NLRC5-inducing activity in a conditioned medium from RSV-infected A549 cells was removed by antibody to IFN-β, but not by antibody to IFN-γ. RSV infection resulted in RIG-I upregulation and induction of NLRC5 and MHC-I. Suppression of RIG-I induction significantly blocked NLRC5, as well as MHC-I, upregulation and diminished IRF3 activation. Importantly, Vero cells deficient in interferon production still upregulated MHC-I following introduction of the RSV genome by infection or transfection, further supporting a key role for RIG-I. A model is therefore proposed in which the host upregulates MHC-I expression during RSV infection directly via the induction of RIG-I and NLRC5 expression. Since elevated expression of MHC-I molecules can sensitize host cells to T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity or immunopathologic damage, the results have significant implications for the modification of immunity in RSV disease. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children worldwide. Infection early in life is linked to persistent wheezing and allergic asthma in later life, possibly related to upregulation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) on the cell surface, which facilitates cytotoxic T cell activation and antiviral immunity. Here, we show that RSV infection of lung epithelial cells induces

  13. SNP association mapping across the extended major histocompatibility complex and risk of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Y Urayama

    Full Text Available The extended major histocompatibility complex (xMHC is the most gene-dense region of the genome and harbors a disproportionately large number of genes involved in immune function. The postulated role of infection in the causation of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL suggests that the xMHC may make an important contribution to the risk of this disease. We conducted association mapping across an approximately 4 megabase region of the xMHC using a validated panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in childhood BCP-ALL cases (n=567 enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (NCCLS compared with population controls (n=892. Logistic regression analyses of 1,145 SNPs, adjusted for age, sex, and Hispanic ethnicity indicated potential associations between several SNPs and childhood BCP-ALL. After accounting for multiple comparisons, one of these included a statistically significant increased risk associated with rs9296068 (OR=1.40, 95% CI=1.19-1.66, corrected p=0.036, located in proximity to HLA-DOA. Sliding window haplotype analysis identified an additional locus located in the extended class I region in proximity to TRIM27 tagged by a haplotype comprising rs1237485, rs3118361, and rs2032502 (corrected global p=0.046. Our findings suggest that susceptibility to childhood BCP-ALL is influenced by genetic variation within the xMHC and indicate at least two important regions for future evaluation.

  14. DM influences the abundance of major histocompatibility complex class II alleles with low affinity for class II-associated invariant chain peptides via multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, Cornelia H; Roh, Sujin; Pashine, Achal; Belmares, Michael P; Patil, Namrata S; Lu, Ning; Truong, Phi; Hou, Tieying; Macaubas, Claudia; Yoon, Taejin; Wang, Nan; Busch, Robert; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2010-09-01

    DM catalyses class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP) release, edits the repertoire of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, affects class II structure, and thereby modulates binding of conformation-sensitive anti-class II antibodies. Here, we investigate the ability of DM to enhance the cell surface binding of monomorphic antibodies. We show that this enhancement reflects increases in cell surface class II expression and total cellular abundance, but notably these effects are selective for particular alleles. Evidence from analysis of cellular class II levels after cycloheximide treatment and from pulse-chase experiments indicates that DM increases the half-life of affected alleles. Unexpectedly, the pulse-chase experiments also revealed an early effect of DM on assembly of these alleles. The allelically variant feature that correlates with susceptibility to these DM effects is low affinity for CLIP; DM-dependent changes in abundance are reduced by invariant chain (CLIP) mutants that enhance CLIP binding to class II. We found evidence that DM mediates rescue of peptide-receptive DR0404 molecules from inactive forms in vitro and evidence suggesting that a similar process occurs in cells. Thus, multiple mechanisms, operating along the biosynthetic pathway of class II molecules, contribute to DM-mediated increases in the abundance of low-CLIP-affinity alleles.

  15. Interaction between the CD8 Coreceptor and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Stabilizes T Cell Receptor-Antigen Complexes at the Cell Surface†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Linda; van den Berg, Hugo A.; Glick, Meir; Gostick, Emma; Laugel, Bruno; Hutchinson, Sarah L.; Milicic, Anita; Brenchley, Jason M.; Douek, Daniel C.; Price, David A.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2008-01-01

    The off-rate (koff) of the T cell receptor (TCR)/peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I (pMHCI) interaction, and hence its half-life, is the principal kinetic feature that determines the biological outcome of TCR ligation. However, it is unclear whether the CD8 coreceptor, which binds pMHCI at a distinct site, influences this parameter. Although biophysical studies with soluble proteins show that TCR and CD8 do not bind cooperatively to pMHCI, accumulating evidence suggests that TCR associates with CD8 on the T cell surface. Here, we titrated and quantified the contribution of CD8 to TCR/pMHCI dissociation in membrane-constrained interactions using a panel of engineered pMHCI mutants that retain faithful TCR interactions but exhibit a spectrum of affinities for CD8 of >1,000-fold. Data modeling generates a “stabilization factor” that preferentially increases the predicted TCR triggering rate for low affinity pMHCI ligands, thereby suggesting an important role for CD8 in the phenomenon of T cell cross-reactivity. PMID:15837791

  16. [Histocompatibility of nano-hydroxyapatite/poly-co-glycolic acid tissue engineering bone modified by mesenchymal stem cells with vascular endothelial frowth factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglei; Wang, Dapeng; Yin, Ruofeng

    2015-10-06

    To explorec Histocompatibility of nano-hydroxyapatite/poly-co-glycolic acid tissue engineering bone modified by mesenchymal stem cells with vascular endothelial frowth factor transinfected. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) was separated, using BMSCs as target cells, and then vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene was transfected. Composite bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and cells transfected with nano-hydroxyapatite (HA)/polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). The composition of cell and scaffold was observed. The blank plasmid transfection was 39.1%, 40.1% in VEGF group. The cell adhesion and growth was found on the scaffold pore wall after 5 days, and the number of adherent cells in the nano-HA/PLGA composite scaffold material basically had no significant difference in both. Although the nano-HA/PLGA scaffold material is still not fully meet the requirements of the matrix material for bone tissue engineering, but good biocompatibility, structure is its rich microporous satisfaction in material mechanics, toughening, enhanced obviously. Composition scaffold with BMSCs transfected by VEGF plasmid, the ability of angiogenesis is promoted.

  17. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achara Phumyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8. The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3 of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21 were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins.

  18. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phumyen, Achara; Jumnainsong, Amonrat; Leelayuwat, Chanvit

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8). The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3) of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21) were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins. PMID:23226940

  19. A polymorphism in the splice donor site of ZNF419 results in the novel renal cell carcinoma-associated minor histocompatibility antigen ZAPHIR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Broen

    Full Text Available Nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT can induce remission in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC, but this graft-versus-tumor (GVT effect is often accompanied by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Here, we evaluated minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA-specific T cell responses in two patients with metastatic RCC who were treated with reduced-intensity conditioning SCT followed by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI. One patient had stable disease and emergence of SMCY.A2-specific CD8+ T cells was observed after DLI with the potential of targeting SMCY-expressing RCC tumor cells. The second patient experienced partial regression of lung metastases from whom we isolated a MiHA-specific CTL clone with the capability of targeting RCC cell lines. Whole genome association scanning revealed that this CTL recognizes a novel HLA-B7-restricted MiHA, designated ZAPHIR, resulting from a polymorphism in the splice donor site of the ZNF419 gene. Tetramer analysis showed that emergence of ZAPHIR-specific CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood occurred in the absence of GVHD. Furthermore, the expression of ZAPHIR in solid tumor cell lines indicates the involvement of ZAPHIR-specific CD8+ T cell responses in selective GVT immunity. These findings illustrate that the ZNF419-encoded MiHA ZAPHIR is an attractive target for specific immunotherapy after allogeneic SCT.

  20. From genome-wide to candidate gene: an investigation of variation at the major histocompatibility complex in common bottlenose dolphins exposed to harmful algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammen, Kristina M; Wilcox, Lynsey A; Rosel, Patricia E; Wells, Randall S; Read, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    The role the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays in response to exposure to environmental toxins is relatively poorly understood, particularly in comparison to its well-described role in pathogen immunity. We investigated associations between MHC diversity and resistance to brevetoxins in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). A previous genome-wide association study investigating an apparent difference in harmful algal bloom (HAB) resistance among dolphin populations in the Gulf of Mexico identified genetic variation associated with survival in close genomic proximity to multiple MHC class II loci. Here, we characterized genetic variation at DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB loci in dolphins from central-west Florida and the Florida Panhandle, including dolphins that died during HABs and dolphins presumed to have survived HAB exposure. We found that DRB and DQB exhibited patterns of genetic differentiation among geographic regions that differed from neutral microsatellite loci. In addition, genetic differentiation at DRB across multiple pairwise comparisons of live and dead dolphins was greater than differentiation observed at neutral loci. Our findings at these MHC loci did not approach the strength of association with survival previously described for a nearby genetic variant. However, the results provide evidence that selective pressures at the MHC vary among dolphin populations that differ in the frequency of HAB exposure and that the overall composition of DRB variants differs between dolphin survivors and non-survivors of HABs. These results may suggest a potential role of MHC diversity in variable survival of bottlenose dolphins exposed to HABs.

  1. CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex II signaling induces B cells to express interleukin 2 receptors and complements help provided through CD40 ligation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    and MHC II in the presence of IL-5 induced expression of a functional IL-2R on small resting B cells. By contrast CD40 ligation, which induced B cell proliferation, did not induce IL-2 responsiveness. These data show that CD40 ligation is necessary but may not be sufficient for B cell differentiation......We have examined signaling roles for CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II as contact ligands during T help for B cell activation. We used a T helper 1 (Th1)-dependent helper system that was previously shown to be contact as well as interleukin 2 (IL-2......) dependent to demonstrate the relative roles of CD54, MHC II, and CD40 signaling in the events leading to the induction of B cell proliferation and responsiveness to IL-2. Paraformaldehyde-fixed activated Th1-induced expression of IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and B7, and upregulated MHC II and CD54 on B cells...

  2. Increased susceptibility to Strongyloides venezuelensis infection is related to the parasite load and absence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosângela Maria; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia Ribeiro; Silva, Neide Maria; Massa, Virgínia; Alves, Ronaldo; Ueta, Marlene Tiduko; Silva, João Santana; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-11-01

    In human and murine models strongyloidiasis induce a Th2 type response. In the current study we investigated the role of different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis in the immune response raised against the parasite and the participation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule in the disease outcome in face of the different parasite burden. The C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MHC II(-/-) mice were individually inoculated by subcutaneous injection with 500 or 3000 S. venezuelensis L3. The MHC II(-/-) mice infected with 3000L3 were more susceptible to S. venezuelensis infection when compared with WT groups, in which the parasite was completely eliminated. The production of Th2 cytokines and specific IgG1 or IgE antibodies against parasite were significantly lowered in MHC II(-/-) infected mice with different larvae inoculums. The infection of MHC II(-/-) mice with S. venezuelensis induced slight inflammatory alterations in the small intestine, and these lesions were lower when compared with WT mice, irrespective of the parasite load utilized to infect animals. Finally, we concluded that MHC class II molecules are essential in the immune response against S. venezuelensis mainly when infection occurs with high parasite inoculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Extensive polymorphism and evidence of selection pressure on major histocompatibility complex DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 class II genes in Croatian grey wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbanasić, H; Huber, Đ; Kusak, J; Gomerčić, T; Hrenović, J; Galov, A

    2013-01-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a key component of the mammalian immune system and have become important molecular markers for measuring fitness-related genetic variation in wildlife populations. Because of human persecution and habitat fragmentation, the grey wolf has become extinct from a large part of Western and Central Europe, and remaining populations have become isolated. In Croatia, the grey wolf population, part of the Dinaric-Balkan population, shrank nearly to extinction during the 20th century, and is now legally protected. Using the cloning-sequencing method, we investigated the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of exon 2 of MHC class II DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 genes in 77 individuals. We identified 13 DRB1, 7 DQA1 and 11 DQB1 highly divergent alleles, and 13 DLA-DRB1/DQA1/DQB1 haplotypes. Selection analysis comparing the relative rates of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations (d(N)/d(S)) showed evidence of positive selection pressure acting on all three loci. Trans-species polymorphism was found, suggesting the existence of balancing selection. Evolutionary codon models detected considerable difference between alpha and beta chain gene selection patterns: DRB1 and DQB1 appeared to be under stronger selection pressure, while DQA1 showed signs of moderate selection. Our results suggest that, despite the recent contraction of the Croatian wolf population, genetic variability in selectively maintained immune genes has been preserved. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Molecular detection of targeted major histocompatibility complex I-bound peptides using a probabilistic measure and nanospray MS3 on a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Bruce; Keskin, Derin B; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2010-11-01

    A nanospray MS(3) method deployed on a quadrupole linear ion trap hybrid can detect targeted peptides with high dynamic range and high sensitivity from complex mixtures without separations. The method uses a recognition algorithm that is a modification of the relative (Kullback-Leibler, KL) entropy characterization of probabilistic distance to detect if reference MS(3) fragmentation patterns are components of acquired MS(3) spectra. The recognition reflects the probabilistic structure of physical MS measurements unlike the Euclidean or inner product metrics widely used for comparing spectra. It capably handles spectra with a significant chemical ion background in contrast to the Euclidean metric or the direct relative entropy. The full nanospray MS(3) method allows both the detection and quantitation of targets without the need to obtain isotopically labeled standards. By avoiding chromatographic separations and its associated surface losses, the detection can be applied to complex samples on a very limited material scale. The methodology is illustrated by applications to the medically important problem of detecting targeted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I associated peptides extracted from limited cell numbers.

  5. Balancing selection, random genetic drift, and genetic variation at the major histocompatibility complex in two wild populations of guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oosterhout, Cock; Joyce, Domino A; Cummings, Stephen M; Blais, Jonatan; Barson, Nicola J; Ramnarine, Indar W; Mohammed, Ryan S; Persad, Nadia; Cable, Joanne

    2006-12-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is rapidly increasing, but there are still enigmatic questions remaining, particularly regarding the maintenance of high levels of MHC polymorphisms in small, isolated populations. Here, we analyze the genetic variation at eight microsatellite loci and sequence variation at exon 2 of the MHC class IIB (DAB) genes in two wild populations of the Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulata. We compare the genetic variation of a small (Ne, 100) and relatively isolated upland population to that of its much larger (Ne approximately 2400) downstream counterpart. As predicted, microsatellite diversity in the upland population is significantly lower and highly differentiated from the population further downstream. Surprisingly, however, these guppy populations are not differentiated by MHC genetic variation and show very similar levels of allelic richness. Computer simulations indicate that the observed level of genetic variation can be maintained with overdominant selection acting at three DAB loci. The selection coefficients differ dramatically between the upland (s > or = 0.2) and lowland (s guppies in the upland habitat, which has resulted in high levels of MHC diversity being maintained in this population despite considerable genetic drift.

  6. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  7. Acquired immunologic tolerance in chimeras and histocompatibility factors in cattle and their relationship to those in humans. Final report. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, W.H.

    1976-03-01

    During the course of this project we have studied 35 pairs of chimeric cattle twins. It is now clear that fractionated doses of whole-body /sup 60/Co irradiation can cause marked shifts in the proportions of the two erythrocyte populations that make up the chimeric mixture. However, it has not been possible to eliminate one of the two cell types and thus abrogate the acquired immunologic tolerance. The results of our extensive skin-grafting experiments are remarkable because they show that a chimeric twin may mount a sufficient immune response to reject its cotwin's skin while remaining completely tolerant to erythropoietic elements of its cotwin. In conjunction with these studies, we have acquired sufficient data to define a major histocompatibility locus in cattle using alloimmune anti-lymphocyte typing sera as well as the mixed lymphocyte culture technic. This project has also yielded a considerable number of new immunogenetic parameters for cattle, monkeys and birds. Such parameters are useful for basic and applied studies in immunology.

  8. Applicability of major histocompatibility complex DRB1 alleles as markers to detect vertebrate hybridization: a case study from Iberian ibex × domestic goat in southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasaad Samer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hybridization between closely related wild and domestic species is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. The high allelic variability of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC loci usually excludes them from being used in studies to detect hybridization events. However, if a the parental species don’t share alleles, and b one of the parental species possesses an exceptionally low number of alleles (to facilitate analysis, then even MHC loci have the potential to detect hybrids. Results By genotyping the exon2 of the MHC class II DRB1 locus, we were able to detect hybridization between domestic goats (Capra hircus and free-ranging Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica by molecular means. Conclusions This is the first documentation of a Capra pyrenaica × Capra hircus hybridization, which presented us the opportunity to test the applicability of MHC loci as new, simple, cost-effective, and time-saving approach to detect hybridization between wild species and their domesticated relatives, thus adding value to MHC genes role in animal conservation and management.

  9. Is it mine? Hemispheric asymmetries in corporeal self-recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, Francesca; Maini, Manule; Romualdi, Sabrina; Galante, Emanuela; Avanzi, Stefano

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the recognition of "self body parts" is independent from the recognition of other people's body parts. If this is the case, the ability to recognize "self body parts" should be selectively impaired after lesion involving specific brain areas. To verify this hypothesis, patients with lesion of the right (right brain-damaged [RBD]) or left (left brain-damaged [LBD]) hemisphere and healthy subjects were submitted to a visual matching-to-sample task in two experiments. In the first experiment, stimuli depicted their own body parts or other people's body parts. In the second experiment, stimuli depicted parts of three categories: objects, bodies, and faces. In both experiments, participants were required to decide which of two vertically aligned images (the upper or the lower one) matched the central target stimulus. The results showed that the task indirectly tapped into bodily self-processing mechanisms, in that both LBD patients and normal subjects performed the task better when they visually matched their own, as compared to others', body parts. In contrast, RBD patients did not show such an advantage for self body parts. Moreover, they were more impaired than LBD patients and normal subjects when visually matching their own body parts, whereas this difference was not evident in performing the task with other people's body parts. RBD patients' performance for the other stimulus categories (face, body, object), although worse than LBD patients' and normal subjects' performance, was comparable across categories. These findings suggest that the right hemisphere may be involved in the recognition of self body parts, through a fronto-parietal network.

  10. Mirror, mirror on the wall: enhancement in self-recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Nicholas; Whitchurch, Erin

    2008-09-01

    People's inferences about their own traits and abilities are often enhancing. A series of experiments suggests that this enhancement extends to more automatic and perceptual judgments as well, such that people recognize their own faces as being more physically attractive than they actually are. In each experiment, participants' faces were made more or less attractive using a morphing procedure. Participants were more likely to recognize an attractively enhanced version of their own face out of a lineup as their own, and they identified an attractively enhanced version of their face more quickly in a lineup of distractor faces. This enhancement bias occurred for both one's own face and a friend's face but not for a relative stranger's face. Such enhancement was correlated with implicit measures of self-worth but not with explicit measures, consistent with this variety of enhancement being a relatively automatic rather than deliberative process.

  11. Nanostructuring of hybrid silicas through a self-recognition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachart, Guilhem; Creff, Gaëlle; Wadepohl, Hubert; Blanc, Christophe; Bonhomme, Christian; Babonneau, Florence; Alonso, Bruno; Bantignies, Jean-Louis; Carcel, Carole; Moreau, Joël J E; Dieudonné, Philippe; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Massiot, Dominique; Wong Chi Man, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The hydrolysis and condensation of a silylated derivative of ureidopyrimidinone led to nanostructured hybrid silica, such as that depicted, as clearly shown by powder XRD studies. The nanostructuring was directly related to molecular recognition through hydrogen bonding. By combining FTIR, solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopic data, the transcription of the hydrogen-bonding networks from the precursor to the final product was clearly evidenced.

  12. Histone deacetylase 1/mSin3A disrupts gamma interferon-induced CIITA function and major histocompatibility complex class II enhanceosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika, Eleni; Greer, Susanna F; Zhu, Xin-Sheng; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2003-05-01

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is a master transcriptional regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) promoters. CIITA does not bind DNA, but it interacts with the transcription factors RFX5, NF-Y, and CREB and associated chromatin-modifying enzymes to form an enhanceosome. This report examines the effects of histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1/HDAC2) on MHC-II gene induction by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and CIITA. The results show that an inhibitor of HDACs, trichostatin A, enhances IFN-gamma-induced MHC-II expression, while HDAC1/HDAC2 inhibits IFN-gamma- and CIITA-induced MHC-II gene expression. mSin3A, a corepressor of HDAC1/HDAC2, is important for this inhibition, while NcoR, a corepressor of HDAC3, is not. The effect of this inhibition is directed at CIITA, since HDAC1/HDAC2 reduces transactivation by a GAL4-CIITA fusion protein. CIITA binds to overexpressed and endogenous HDAC1, suggesting that HDAC and CIITA may affect each other by direct or indirect association. Inhibition of HDAC activity dramatically increases the association of NF-YB and RFX5 with CIITA, the assembly of CIITA, NF-YB, and RFX5 enhanceosome, and the extent of H3 acetylation at the MHC-II promoter. These results suggest a model where HDAC1/HDAC2 affect the function of CIITA through a disruption of MHC-II enhanceosome and relevant coactivator-transcription factor association and provide evidence that CIITA may act as a molecular switch to modulate MHC-II transcription by coordinating the functions of both histone acetylases and HDACs.

  13. Clinical significance of SNP (rs2596542 in histocompatibility complex class I-related gene A promoter region among hepatitis C virus related hepatocellular carcinoma cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal A. Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex class I-related gene A (MICA is an antigen induced by stress and performs an integral role in immune responses as an anti-infectious and antitumor agent. This work was designed to investigate whether (SNP rs2596542C/T in MICA promoter region is predictive of liver cirrhosis (LC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC or not. Forty-seven healthy controls and 94 HCV-infected patients, subdivided into 47 LC and 47 HCC subjects were enrolled in this study. SNP association was studied using real time PCR and soluble serum MICA concentration was measured using ELISA. Results showed that heterozygous genotype rs2596542CT was significantly (P = 0.022 distributed between HCC and LC related CHC patients. The sMICA was significantly higher (P = 0.0001 among HCC and LC. No significant association (P = 0.56 between rs2596542CT genotypes and sMICA levels was observed. Studying SNP rs2596542C/T association with HCC and LC susceptibility revealed that statistical significant differences (P = 0.013, P = 0.027 were only observed between SNP rs2596542C/T and each of HCC and LC, respectively, versus healthy controls, indicating that the rs2596542C/T genetic variation is not a significant contributor to HCC development in LC patients. Moreover, the T allele was considered a risk factor for HCC and LC vulnerability in HCV patients (OR = 1.93 and 2.1, respectively, while the C allele contributes to decreasing HCC risk. Therefore, SNP (rs2596542C/T in MICA promoter region and sMICA levels might be potential useful markers in the assessment of liver disease progression to LC and HCC.

  14. Induction of Apoptosis and T Helper 2 (Th2) Responses Correlates with Peptide Affinity for the Major Histocompatibility Complex in Self-reactive T Cell Receptor Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, C.I.; van Ewijk, W.; McDevitt, H.O.

    1997-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease thought to be mediated by CD4+ T helper cells (Th). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a rodent model of multiple sclerosis and has been used extensively to explore a variety of immunotherapies using soluble protein or peptide antigens. The underlying mechanisms of such therapy have been attributed to induction of T cell anergy, a switch in Th1 to Th2 responses, or peripheral deletion of autoreactive T cells. In this study, we have developed transgenic mice expressing a T cell receptor (TCR) specific for the NH2-terminal peptide Ac1-11 of the autoantigen myelin basic protein to explore the mechanism of soluble peptide therapy. T cells from these mice are highly skewed toward the CD4 population and have an abnormal thymic architecture, a phenomenon found in other TCR transgenic mice that exhibit a highly skewed CD4/CD8 ratio. Soluble Ac1-11 or the analogues Ac1-11[4A] or Ac1-11[4Y] (which bind to the major histocompatibility complex [MHC] class II molecule I-Au with increasing affinities) given intravenously activates T cells, rendering cells hyperresponsive in vitro for at least two days after injection. Concomitantly, T cells apoptose in the periphery, the degree of which correlates with the affinity of the peptide for the MHC. In addition, a shift in the T helper phenotype of the surviving T cells occurs such that the low affinity peptide, Ac1-11, induces primarily a Th1 response, whereas the highest affinity peptide, Ac1-11[4Y], induces primarily a Th2 type response. These data show that both the nature and the presumed number of the peptide–MHC complexes formed during specific peptide therapy affect both the degree of peripheral programmed cell death as well as the outcome of the T helper subset response in vivo, leading to amelioration of disease. PMID:9034138

  15. Stable isotope tagging of epitopes: a highly selective strategy for the identification of major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides induced upon viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiring, Hugo D; Soethout, Ernst C; Poelen, Martien C M; Mooibroek, Dennis; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald; Timmermans, Hans; Boog, Claire J; Heck, Albert J R; de Jong, Ad P J M; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2006-05-01

    Identification of peptides presented in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules after viral infection is of strategic importance for vaccine development. Until recently, mass spectrometric identification of virus-induced peptides was based on comparative analysis of peptide pools isolated from uninfected and virus-infected cells. Here we report on a powerful strategy aiming at the rapid, unambiguous identification of naturally processed MHC class I-associated peptides, which are induced by viral infection. The methodology, stable isotope tagging of epitopes (SITE), is based on metabolic labeling of endogenously synthesized proteins during infection. This is accomplished by culturing virus-infected cells with stable isotope-labeled amino acids that are expected to be anchor residues (i.e. residues of the peptide that have amino acid side chains that bind into pockets lining the peptide-binding groove of the MHC class I molecule) for the human leukocyte antigen allele of interest. Subsequently these cells are mixed with an equal number of non-infected cells, which are cultured in normal medium. Finally peptides are acid-eluted from immunoprecipitated MHC molecules and subjected to two-dimensional nanoscale LC-MS analysis. Virus-induced peptides are identified through computer-assisted detection of characteristic, binomially distributed ratios of labeled and unlabeled molecules. Using this approach we identified novel measles virus and respiratory syncytial virus epitopes as well as infection-induced self-peptides in several cell types, showing that SITE is a unique and versatile method for unequivocal identification of disease-related MHC class I epitopes.

  16. Evidence of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism, but not of parallel evolution, despite high levels of concerted evolution in the major histocompatibility complex of flamingo species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, M A F; Courtiol, A; Teixeira, M; Galan, M; Bechet, A; Cezilly, F

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cornerstone in the study of adaptive genetic diversity. Intriguingly, highly polymorphic MHC sequences are often not more similar within species than between closely related species. Divergent selection of gene duplicates, balancing selection maintaining trans-species polymorphism (TSP) that predate speciation and parallel evolution of species sharing similar selection pressures can all lead to higher sequence similarity between species. In contrast, high rates of concerted evolution increase sequence similarity of duplicated loci within species. Assessing these evolutionary models remains difficult as relatedness and ecological similarities are often confounded. As sympatric species of flamingos are more distantly related than allopatric species, flamingos represent an ideal model to disentangle these evolutionary models. We characterized MHC Class I exon 3, Class IIB exon 2 and exon 3 of the six extant flamingo species. We found up to six MHC Class I loci and two MHC Class IIB loci. As all six species shared the same number of MHC Class IIB loci, duplication appears to predate flamingo speciation. However, the high rate of concerted evolution has prevented the divergence of duplicated loci. We found high sequence similarity between all species regardless of codon position. The latter is consistent with balancing selection maintaining TSP, as under this mechanism amino acid sites under pathogen-mediated selection should be characterized by fewer synonymous codons (due to their common ancestry) than under parallel evolution. Overall, balancing selection maintaining TSP appears to result in high MHC similarity between species regardless of species relatedness and geographical distribution. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  17. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II but not MHC class I molecules are required for efficient control of Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosângela M; Silva, Neide M; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia R; Cardoso, Cristina R; Alves, Ronaldo; Gonçalves, Flávia A; Beletti, Marcelo E; Ueta, Marlene T; Silva, João S; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2009-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode capable of chronic, persistent infection and hyperinfection of the host; this can lead to dissemination, mainly in immunosuppressive states, in which the infection can become severe and result in the death of the host. In this study, we investigated the immune response against Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I or class II deficient mice. We found that MHC II−/− animals were more susceptible to S. venezuelensis infection as a result of the presence of an elevated number of eggs in the faeces and a delay in the elimination of adult worms compared with wild-type (WT) and MHC I−/− mice. Histopathological analysis revealed that MHC II−/− mice had a mild inflammatory infiltration in the small intestine with a reduction in tissue eosinophilia. These mice also presented a significantly lower frequency of eosinophils and mononuclear cells in the blood, together with reduced T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines in small intestine homogenates and sera compared with WT and MHC I−/− animals. Additionally, levels of parasite-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA, IgE, total IgG and IgG1 were also significantly reduced in the sera of MHC II−/− infected mice, while a non-significant increase in the level of IgG2a was found in comparison to WT or MHC I−/− infected mice. Together, these data demonstrate that expression of MHC class II but not class I molecules is required to induce a predominantly Th2 response and to achieve efficient control of S. venezuelensis infection in mice. PMID:19191916

  18. Characterization of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DRB Exon 2 and DRA Exon 3 Fragments in a Primary Terrestrial Rabies Vector (Procyon lotor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Meunier, Vanessa; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor). Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus) and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250bp) and DRB exon 2 (228 bp). MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4–15.8% divergence) and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3–27.6% divergence) amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005), indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host. PMID:20706587

  19. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC DRB exon 2 and DRA exon 3 fragments in a primary terrestrial rabies vector (Procyon lotor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarrah Castillo

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor. Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250 bp and DRB exon 2 (228 bp. MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4-15.8% divergence and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3-27.6% divergence amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005, indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host.

  20. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  1. Association of disparities in known minor histocompatibility antigens with relapse-free survival and graft-versus-host-disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobo, Willemijn; Broen, Kelly; van der Velden, Walter J.F.M.; Greupink-Draaisma, Annelies; Adisty, Niken; Wouters, Yannick; Kester, Michel; Fredrix, Hanny; Jansen, Joop H.; van der Reijden, Bert; Falkenburg, J.H. Frederik; de Witte, Theo; Preijers, Frank; Schattenberg, Ton; Feuth, Ton; Blijlevens, Nicole M.; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dolstra, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) can induce remission in patients with hematological malignancies due to graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. This immune-mediated anti-tumor effect, however, is often accompanied by detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Both GVT and GVHD are mediated by minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA)-specific T cells recognizing peptide products from polymorphic genes that differ between recipient and donor. In this study, we evaluated whether mismatches in a panel of seventeen MiHA are associated with clinical outcome after partial T cell-depleted allo-SCT. Comprehensive statistical analysis revealed that DNA mismatches for one or more autosomal-encoded MiHA was associated with increased relapse-free survival in sibling transplants, (P =0.04), particularly in patients suffering from multiple myeloma (P =0.02). Moreover, mismatches for the ubiquitous Y chromosome-derived MiHA resulted in a higher incidence of acute GVHD (grade 3–4; P =0.004), while autosomal MiHA mismatches, ubiquitous or restricted to hematopoietic cells, were not associated with severe GVHD. Finally, we demonstrated considerable differences between MiHA in their capability to induce in vivo T cell responses using dual-color tetramer analysis of peripheral blood samples collected post-SCT. Importantly, detection of MiHA-specific T cell responses was associated with improved relapse-free survival in sibling transplants (P =0.01). Our findings provide a rationale to further boost GVT immunity towards autosomal MiHA with a hematopoietic restriction to improve outcome after HLA-matched allo-SCT. PMID:23022467

  2. Automated Analysis of Flow Cytometry Data to Reduce Inter-Lab Variation in the Detection of Major Histocompatibility Complex Multimer-Binding T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Natasja Wulff; Chandran, P. Anoop; Qian, Yu; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Hoff, Mathilde Dalsgaard; White, Scott; Lee, Alexandra J.; Stanton, Rick; Halgreen, Charlotte; Jakobsen, Kivin; Mosmann, Tim; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2017-01-01

    Manual analysis of flow cytometry data and subjective gate-border decisions taken by individuals continue to be a source of variation in the assessment of antigen-specific T cells when comparing data across laboratories, and also over time in individual labs. Therefore, strategies to provide automated analysis of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) multimer-binding T cells represent an attractive solution to decrease subjectivity and technical variation. The challenge of using an automated analysis approach is that MHC multimer-binding T cell populations are often rare and therefore difficult to detect. We used a highly heterogeneous dataset from a recent MHC multimer proficiency panel to assess if MHC multimer-binding CD8+ T cells could be analyzed with computational solutions currently available, and if such analyses would reduce the technical variation across different laboratories. We used three different methods, FLOw Clustering without K (FLOCK), Scalable Weighted Iterative Flow-clustering Technique (SWIFT), and ReFlow to analyze flow cytometry data files from 28 laboratories. Each laboratory screened for antigen-responsive T cell populations with frequency ranging from 0.01 to 1.5% of lymphocytes within samples from two donors. Experience from this analysis shows that all three programs can be used for the identification of high to intermediate frequency of MHC multimer-binding T cell populations, with results very similar to that of manual gating. For the less frequent populations (SWIFT outperformed the other tools. As used in this study, none of the algorithms offered a completely automated pipeline for identification of MHC multimer populations, as varying degrees of human interventions were needed to complete the analysis. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis pipelines for assessing and identifying even rare populations of antigen-responsive T cells and discuss the main properties, differences, and advantages of

  3. Automated Analysis of Flow Cytometry Data to Reduce Inter-Lab Variation in the Detection of Major Histocompatibility Complex Multimer-Binding T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasja Wulff Pedersen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Manual analysis of flow cytometry data and subjective gate-border decisions taken by individuals continue to be a source of variation in the assessment of antigen-specific T cells when comparing data across laboratories, and also over time in individual labs. Therefore, strategies to provide automated analysis of major histocompatibility complex (MHC multimer-binding T cells represent an attractive solution to decrease subjectivity and technical variation. The challenge of using an automated analysis approach is that MHC multimer-binding T cell populations are often rare and therefore difficult to detect. We used a highly heterogeneous dataset from a recent MHC multimer proficiency panel to assess if MHC multimer-binding CD8+ T cells could be analyzed with computational solutions currently available, and if such analyses would reduce the technical variation across different laboratories. We used three different methods, FLOw Clustering without K (FLOCK, Scalable Weighted Iterative Flow-clustering Technique (SWIFT, and ReFlow to analyze flow cytometry data files from 28 laboratories. Each laboratory screened for antigen-responsive T cell populations with frequency ranging from 0.01 to 1.5% of lymphocytes within samples from two donors. Experience from this analysis shows that all three programs can be used for the identification of high to intermediate frequency of MHC multimer-binding T cell populations, with results very similar to that of manual gating. For the less frequent populations (<0.1% of live, single lymphocytes, SWIFT outperformed the other tools. As used in this study, none of the algorithms offered a completely automated pipeline for identification of MHC multimer populations, as varying degrees of human interventions were needed to complete the analysis. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis pipelines for assessing and identifying even rare populations of antigen-responsive T cells and discuss

  4. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I, and class II DRB loci of captive and wild Indian leopards (Panthera pardus fusca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Drashti R; Mitra, Siuli; Bhadouriya, Snehalata; Rao, Tirupathi; Kunteepuram, Vaishnavi; Gaur, Ajay

    2017-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), in vertebrate animals, is a multi-genic protein complex that encodes various receptors. During a disease, MHC interacts with the antigen and triggers a cascade of adaptive immune responses to overcome a disease outbreak. The MHC is very important region from immunological point of view, but it is poorly characterized among Indian leopards. During this investigation, we examined genetic diversity for MHC class I (MHC-I) and MHC class II-DRB (MHC-II) among wild and captive Indian leopards. This study estimated a pool of 9 and 17 alleles for MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. The wild group of individuals showed higher nucleotide diversity and amino acid polymorphism compared to the captive group. A phylogenetic comparison with other felids revealed a clustering in MHC-I and interspersed presence in MHC-II sequences. A test for selection also revealed a deviation from neutrality at MHC-II DRB loci and higher non-synonymous substitution rate (dN) among the individuals from wild group. Further, the wild individuals showed higher dN for both MHC I and II genes compared to the group that was bred under captive conditions. These findings suggest the role of micro-evolutionary forces, such as pathogen-mediated selection, to cause MHC variations among the two groups of Indian leopards, because the two groups have been bred in two different environments for a substantial period of time. Since, MHC diversity is often linked with the quality of immunological health; the results obtained from this study fill the gap of knowledge on disease predisposition among wild and captive Indian leopards.

  5. Genetic drift vs. natural selection in a long-term small isolated population: major histocompatibility complex class II variation in the Gulf of California endemic porpoise (Phocoena sinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Esquer-Garrigos, Yareli; Rojas-Bracho, Lorenzo; Vazquez-Juarez, Ricardo; Castro-Prieto, Aines; Flores-Ramirez, Sergio

    2007-10-01

    Although many studies confirm long-term small isolated populations (e.g. island endemics) commonly sustain low neutral genetic variation as a result of genetic drift, it is less clear how selection on adaptive or detrimental genes interplay with random forces. We investigated sequence variation at two major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II loci on a porpoise endemic to the upper Gulf of California, México (Phocoena sinus, or vaquita). Its unique declining population is estimated around 500 individuals. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis revealed one putative functional allele fixed at the locus DQB (n = 25). At the DRB locus, we found two presumed functional alleles (n = 29), differing by a single nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution that could increase the stability at the dimer interface of alphabeta-heterodimers on heterozygous individuals. Identical trans-specific DQB1 and DRB1 alleles were identified between P. sinus and its closest relative, the Burmeister's porpoise (Phocoena spinipinnis). Comparison with studies on four island endemic mammals suggests fixation of one allele, due to genetic drift, commonly occurs at the DQA or DQB loci (effectively neutral). Similarly, deleterious alleles of small effect are also effectively neutral and can become fixed; a high frequency of anatomical malformations on vaquita gave empirical support to this prediction. In contrast, retention of low but functional polymorphism at the DRB locus was consistent with higher selection intensity. These observations indicated natural selection could maintain (and likely also purge) some crucial alleles even in the face of strong and prolonged genetic drift and inbreeding, suggesting long-term small populations should display low inbreeding depression. Low levels of Mhc variation warn about a high susceptibility to novel pathogens and diseases in vaquita.

  6. The impact of sex-role reversal on the diversity of the major histocompatibility complex: insights from the seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Angela; Wilson, Anthony B

    2011-05-10

    Both natural and sexual selection are thought to influence genetic diversity, but the study of the relative importance of these two factors on ecologically-relevant traits has traditionally focused on species with conventional sex-roles, with male-male competition and female-based mate choice. With its high variability and significance in both immune function and olfactory-mediated mate choice, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC/MH) is an ideal system in which to evaluate the relative contributions of these two selective forces to genetic diversity. Intrasexual competition and mate choice are both reversed in sex-role reversed species, and sex-related differences in the detection and use of MH-odor cues are expected to influence the intensity of sexual selection in such species. The seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, has an exceptionally highly developed form of male parental care, with female-female competition and male mate choice. Here, we demonstrate that the sex-role reversed seahorse has a single MH class II beta-chain gene and that the diversity of the seahorse MHIIβ locus and its pattern of variation are comparable to those detected in species with conventional sex roles. Despite the presence of only a single gene copy, intralocus MHIIβ allelic diversity in this species exceeds that observed in species with multiple copies of this locus. The MHIIβ locus of the seahorse exhibits a novel expression domain in the male brood pouch. The high variation found at the seahorse MHIIβ gene indicates that sex-role reversed species are capable of maintaining the high MHC diversity typical in most vertebrates.Whether such species have evolved the capacity to use MH-odor cues during mate choice is presently being investigated using mate choice experiments. If this possibility can be rejected, such systems would offer an exceptional opportunity to study the effects of natural selection in isolation, providing powerful comparative models for understanding the

  7. Major Histocompatibility Complex–independent Recognition of a Distinctive Pollen Antigen, Most Likely a Carbohydrate, by Human CD8+ α/β T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinti, Silvia; Palma, Raffaele De; Fontana, Angelo; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina; Pini, Carlo; Sallusto, Federica

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated CD8+ α/β T cells from the blood of atopic and healthy individuals which recognize a nonpeptide antigen present in an allergenic extract from Parietaria judaica pollen. This antigen appears to be a carbohydrate because it is resistant to proteinase K and alkaline digestion, is hydrophilic, and is sensitive to trifluoromethane-sulphonic and periodic acids. In addition, on a reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography column the antigen recognized by CD8+ T cells separates in a fraction which contains >80% hexoses (glucose and galactose) and undetectable amounts of proteins. Presentation of this putative carbohydrate antigen (PjCHOAg) to CD8+ T cell clones is dependent on live antigen presenting cells (APCs) pulsed for >1 h at 37°C, suggesting that the antigen has to be internalized and possibly processed. Indeed, fixed APCs or APCs pulsed at 15°C were both unable to induce T cell response. Remarkably, PjCHOAg presentation is independent of the expression of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules or CD1. CD8+ T cells stimulated by PjCHOAg-pulsed APCs undergo a sustained [Ca2+]i increase and downregulate their T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) in an antigen dose– and time-dependent fashion, similar to T cells stimulated by conventional ligands. Analysis of TCR Vβ transcripts shows that six independent PjCHOAg-specific T cell clones carry the Vβ8 segment with a conserved motif in the CDR3 region, indicating a structural requirement for recognition of this antigen. Finally, after activation, the CD8+ clones from the atopic patient express CD40L and produce high levels of interleukins 4 and 5, suggesting that the clones may have undergone a Th2-like polarization in vivo. These results reveal a new class of antigens which triggers T cells in an MHC-independent way, and these antigens appear to be carbohydrates. We suggest that this type of antigen may play a role in the immune response in vivo. PMID:9294144

  8. Physical mapping and structural analysis of new gene families RT1.S and Rps2r in the grc region of the rat major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgar, S K; Yuan, X; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1997-01-01

    Five new genes were identified in the growth and reproduction complex (grc) region: RT1.S1, RT1.S2, Rps2r1, Rps2r2, and Rps2r3. The class Ib RT1.S1 and RT1.S2 genes have five distinct exons (1, 4, 5, 6, 7) similar to other class I major histocompatibility complex genes but the conventional exons 2 and 3 are absent. The genes are 97% similar, have CAAT and TATA boxes much upstream of the conventional position, obey the GT/AG rule in their exon-intron boundaries, and are transcribed at a low level in thymus and testis but not in the liver and spleen. The region between exon 1 and exon 4 was analyzed by obtaining transcripts by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification which revealed the presence of four alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts of RT1.S1: 1) S1-1 (clones 14 and 16) has no exon between exons 1 and 4; 2) S1-2 (clones 7 and 8) has an exon of 45 nucleotides that can translate into 15 amino acids; 3) S1-3 (clone 5) has an exon of 42 nucleotides with a stop codon; and 4) S1-4 (clone 10) has two exons of 42 and 38 nucleotides, respectively, with stop codons. Only one RT1.S2 mRNA transcript was obtained, and it has an exon of 45 nucleotides between exon 1 and exon 4 which can form a peptide identical to the S1-2 isoform for that region. The 45 nucleotide exon between exon 1 and exon 4 was unique for RT1.S1 and RT1.S2 and only matched a sequence in the RT1.O intron region (nucleotides 2905 - 2949). The three ribosomal-protein-S2-related (Rps2r) genes are 94% - 98% similar; they are related to the genes encoding ribosomal protein S2 of the black rat and the LLRep3 genes of the mouse and the human and to the genes encoding Saccharomyces cerevisiae S4, Escherichia coli S5, and other members of prokaryote S5 family. The Rps2r1 gene is located just outside of the grc region. The Rps2r2 and Rps2r3 genes are in the grc and have multiple stop codons in their genomic sequences. The Rps2r1 mRNA transcript was identified by RT-PCR in the thymus

  9. Fine mapping of a major histocompatibility complex in ankylosing spondylitis: association of the HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Peña, Roberto; Aransay, Ana M; Bruges-Armas, Jacome; López-Vázquez, Antonio; Rodríguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Mendibil, Iñaki; Sánchez, Alejandra; Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Bettencourt, Bruno F; Mulero, Juan; Collantes, Eduardo; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the potential association of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) markers other than HLA-B27 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 603 patients with AS and 542 healthy control subjects, all of whom were HLA-B27 positive, were selected for this study based on clinical criteria. First, high-density genotyping across the MHC region (2,360 single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) was performed in a cohort of 191 patients and 241 control subjects. After a fine-mapping study, 5 SNPs from the HLA-DPA1/DPB1 region were validated in a second cohort of 412 patients with AS and 301 healthy control subjects. Seventeen SNPs located within or near the HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 loci showed association with AS (P = 1.38 × 10⁻⁵ to 0.05). In addition, multimarker tests, both linkage disequilibrium and sliding windows, showed association of some groups of adjacent SNPs within the HLA-DPA1/DPB1 region with AS (P = 1.0 × 10⁻⁴ to 3.96 × 10⁻⁷). We validated the association by genotyping 5 SNPs from the DPA1/DPB1 region in an additional cohort and obtained P values from 6.42 × 10⁻⁵ to 0.01 in the analysis of the combined cohorts. Subtyping analysis of HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 showed that HLA-DPA1*01:03, A1*02:01, and B1*13:01 were the subtypes most susceptible to AS. HLA markers and linkage disequilibrium blocks near HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 are statistically associated with AS. We identified a region located around the HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 loci associated with AS, another region within the MHC that is different from HLA-B27. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Varicella-Zoster Virus Downregulates Programmed Death Ligand 1 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I in Human Brain Vascular Adventitial Fibroblasts, Perineurial Cells, and Lung Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dallas; Blackmon, Anna; Neff, C Preston; Palmer, Brent E; Gilden, Don; Badani, Hussain; Nagel, Maria A

    2016-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vasculopathy produces stroke, giant cell arteritis, and granulomatous aortitis, and it develops after virus reactivates from ganglia and spreads transaxonally to arterial adventitia, resulting in persistent inflammation and pathological vascular remodeling. The mechanism(s) by which inflammatory cells persist in VZV-infected arteries is unknown; however, virus-induced dysregulation of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) may play a role. Specifically, PD-L1 can be expressed on virtually all nucleated cells and suppresses the immune system by interacting with the programmed cell death protein receptor 1, found exclusively on immune cells; thus, downregulation of PD-L1 may promote inflammation, as seen in some autoimmune diseases. Both flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analyses to test whether VZV infection of adventitial cells downregulates PD-L1 showed decreased PD-L1 expression in VZV-infected compared to mock-infected human brain vascular adventitial fibroblasts (HBVAFs), perineural cells (HPNCs), and fetal lung fibroblasts (HFLs) at 72 h postinfection. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed no change in PD-L1 transcript levels between mock- and VZV-infected cells, indicating a posttranscriptional mechanism for VZV-mediated downregulation of PD-L1. Flow cytometry analyses showed decreased major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression in VZV-infected cells and adjacent uninfected cells compared to mock-infected cells. These data suggest that reduced PD-L1 expression in VZV-infected adventitial cells contribute to persistent vascular inflammation observed in virus-infected arteries from patients with VZV vasculopathy, while downregulation of MHC-I prevents viral clearance. Here, we provide the first demonstration that VZV downregulates PD-L1 expression in infected HBVAFs, HPNCs, and HFLs, which, together with the noted VZV-mediated downregulation of MHC-I, might foster persistent inflammation in vessels, leading to

  11. Confirmation of HLA class II independent type 1 diabetes associations in the major histocompatibility complex including HLA-B and HLA-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, J. M. M.; Walker, N. M.; Clayton, D.; Todd, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim Until recently, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II-independent associations with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) region were not adequately characterized owing to insufficient map coverage, inadequate statistical approaches and strong linkage disequilibrium spanning the entire MHC. Here we test for HLA class II-independent associations in the MHC using fine mapping data generated by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC). Methods We have applied recursive partitioning to the modelling of the class II loci and used stepwise conditional logistic regression to test ~1534 loci between 29 and 34 Mb on chromosome 6p21, typed in 2240 affected sibpair (ASP) families. Results Preliminary analyses confirm that HLA-B (at 31.4 Mb), HLA-A (at 30.0 Mb) are associated with T1D independently of the class II genes HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 (P = 6.0 × 10−17 and 8.8 × 10−13, respectively). In addition, a second class II region of association containing the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs439121, and the class II locus HLA-DPB1, was identified as a T1D susceptibility effect which is independent of HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-B (P = 9.2 × 10−8). A younger age-at-diagnosis of T1D was found for HLA-B*39 (P = 7.6 × 10−6), and HLA-B*38 was protective for T1D. Conclusions These analyses in the T1DGC families replicate our results obtained previously in ~2000 cases and controls and 850 families. Taking both studies together, there is evidence for four T1D-associated regions at 30.0 Mb (HLA-A), 31.4 Mb (HLA-B), 32.5 Mb (rs9268831/HLA-DRA) and 33.2 Mb (rs439121/HLA-DPB1) that are independent of HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQB1. Neither study found evidence of independent associations at HLA-C, HLA-DQA1 loci nor in the UBD/MAS1L or ITPR3 gene regions. These studies show that to find true class II-independent effects, large, well-powered sample collections are required and be genotyped with a dense map of markers. In addition, a robust

  12. The impact of sex-role reversal on the diversity of the major histocompatibility complex: Insights from the seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis

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    Wilson Anthony B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both natural and sexual selection are thought to influence genetic diversity, but the study of the relative importance of these two factors on ecologically-relevant traits has traditionally focused on species with conventional sex-roles, with male-male competition and female-based mate choice. With its high variability and significance in both immune function and olfactory-mediated mate choice, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC/MH is an ideal system in which to evaluate the relative contributions of these two selective forces to genetic diversity. Intrasexual competition and mate choice are both reversed in sex-role reversed species, and sex-related differences in the detection and use of MH-odor cues are expected to influence the intensity of sexual selection in such species. The seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, has an exceptionally highly developed form of male parental care, with female-female competition and male mate choice. Results Here, we demonstrate that the sex-role reversed seahorse has a single MH class II beta-chain gene and that the diversity of the seahorse MHIIβ locus and its pattern of variation are comparable to those detected in species with conventional sex roles. Despite the presence of only a single gene copy, intralocus MHIIβ allelic diversity in this species exceeds that observed in species with multiple copies of this locus. The MHIIβ locus of the seahorse exhibits a novel expression domain in the male brood pouch. Conclusions The high variation found at the seahorse MHIIβ gene indicates that sex-role reversed species are capable of maintaining the high MHC diversity typical in most vertebrates. Whether such species have evolved the capacity to use MH-odor cues during mate choice is presently being investigated using mate choice experiments. If this possibility can be rejected, such systems would offer an exceptional opportunity to study the effects of natural selection in isolation

  13. High-density SNP screening of the major histocompatibility complex in systemic lupus erythematosus demonstrates strong evidence for independent susceptibility regions.

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    Lisa F Barcellos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial genetic contribution to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE risk is conferred by major histocompatibility complex (MHC gene(s on chromosome 6p21. Previous studies in SLE have lacked statistical power and genetic resolution to fully define MHC influences. We characterized 1,610 Caucasian SLE cases and 1,470 parents for 1,974 MHC SNPs, the highly polymorphic HLA-DRB1 locus, and a panel of ancestry informative markers. Single-marker analyses revealed strong signals for SNPs within several MHC regions, as well as with HLA-DRB1 (global p = 9.99 x 10(-16. The most strongly associated DRB1 alleles were: *0301 (odds ratio, OR = 2.21, p = 2.53 x 10(-12, *1401 (OR = 0.50, p = 0.0002, and *1501 (OR = 1.39, p = 0.0032. The MHC region SNP demonstrating the strongest evidence of association with SLE was rs3117103, with OR = 2.44 and p = 2.80 x 10(-13. Conditional haplotype and stepwise logistic regression analyses identified strong evidence for association between SLE and the extended class I, class I, class III, class II, and the extended class II MHC regions. Sequential removal of SLE-associated DRB1 haplotypes revealed independent effects due to variation within OR2H2 (extended class I, rs362521, p = 0.006, CREBL1 (class III, rs8283, p = 0.01, and DQB2 (class II, rs7769979, p = 0.003, and rs10947345, p = 0.0004. Further, conditional haplotype analyses demonstrated that variation within MICB (class I, rs3828903, p = 0.006 also contributes to SLE risk independent of HLA-DRB1*0301. Our results for the first time delineate with high resolution several MHC regions with independent contributions to SLE risk. We provide a list of candidate variants based on biologic and functional considerations that may be causally related to SLE risk and warrant further investigation.

  14. Linking pig-tailed macaque major histocompatibility complex class I haplotypes and cytotoxic T lymphocyte escape mutations in simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooneratne, Shayarana L; Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Diako; Bohn, Patrick S; Wiseman, Roger W; O'Connor, David H; Davenport, Miles P; Kent, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    The influence of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) alleles on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diversity in humans has been well characterized at the population level. MHC-I alleles likely affect viral diversity in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) model, but this is poorly characterized. We studied the evolution of SIV in pig-tailed macaques with a range of MHC-I haplotypes. SIV(mac251) genomes were amplified from the plasma of 44 pig-tailed macaques infected with SIV(mac251) at 4 to 10 months after infection and characterized by Illumina deep sequencing. MHC-I typing was performed on cellular RNA using Roche/454 pyrosequencing. MHC-I haplotypes and viral sequence polymorphisms at both individual mutations and groups of mutations spanning 10-amino-acid segments were linked using in-house bioinformatics pipelines, since cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape can occur at different amino acids within the same epitope in different animals. The approach successfully identified 6 known CTL escape mutations within 3 Mane-A1*084-restricted epitopes. The approach also identified over 70 new SIV polymorphisms linked to a variety of MHC-I haplotypes. Using functional CD8 T cell assays, we confirmed that one of these associations, a Mane-B028 haplotype-linked mutation in Nef, corresponded to a CTL epitope. We also identified mutations associated with the Mane-B017 haplotype that were previously described to be CTL epitopes restricted by Mamu-B*017:01 in rhesus macaques. This detailed study of pig-tailed macaque MHC-I genetics and SIV polymorphisms will enable a refined level of analysis for future vaccine design and strategies for treatment of HIV infection. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes select for virus escape mutants of HIV and SIV, and this limits the effectiveness of vaccines and immunotherapies against these viruses. Patterns of immune escape variants are similar in HIV type 1-infected human subjects that

  15. HIV Controllers Exhibit Enhanced Frequencies of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Tetramer+Gag-Specific CD4+T Cells in Chronic Clade C HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Faatima; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Porichis, Filippos; Mewalal, Nikoshia; Pretorius, Karyn; Ismail, Nasreen; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Carrington, Mary; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Ndhlovu, Zaza M

    2017-04-01

    Immune control of viral infections is heavily dependent on helper CD4 + T cell function. However, the understanding of the contribution of HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses to immune protection against HIV-1, particularly in clade C infection, remains incomplete. Recently, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II tetramers have emerged as a powerful tool for interrogating antigen-specific CD4 + T cells without relying on effector functions. Here, we defined the MHC class II alleles for immunodominant Gag CD4 + T cell epitopes in clade C virus infection, constructed MHC class II tetramers, and then used these to define the magnitude, function, and relation to the viral load of HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses in a cohort of untreated HIV clade C-infected persons. We observed significantly higher frequencies of MHC class II tetramer-positive CD4 + T cells in HIV controllers than progressors ( P = 0.0001), and these expanded Gag-specific CD4 + T cells in HIV controllers showed higher levels of expression of the cytolytic proteins granzymes A and B. Importantly, targeting of the immunodominant Gag41 peptide in the context of HLA class II DRB1*1101 was associated with HIV control ( r = -0.5, P = 0.02). These data identify an association between HIV-specific CD4 + T cell targeting of immunodominant Gag epitopes and immune control, particularly the contribution of a single class II MHC-peptide complex to the immune response against HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, these results highlight the advantage of the use of class II tetramers in evaluating HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses in natural infections. IMPORTANCE Increasing evidence suggests that virus-specific CD4 + T cells contribute to the immune-mediated control of clade B HIV-1 infection, yet there remains a relative paucity of data regarding the role of HIV-specific CD4 + T cells in shaping adaptive immune responses in individuals infected with clade C, which is responsible for the majority of HIV

  16. The interaction of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) with mouse class I major histocompatibility antigens and its ability to support peptide binding. A comparison of human and mouse beta 2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Stryhn, A; Holter, T L

    1995-01-01

    of class I molecules are involved in peptide binding, whereas most of class I molecules are involved in beta 2m binding. We propose that mouse beta 2m interacts with the minor peptide binding (i.e. the "empty") fraction with a lower affinity than human beta 2m does, whereas mouse and human beta 2m interact......The function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to sample peptides derived from intracellular proteins and to present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this paper, biochemical assays addressing MHC class I binding of both peptide and beta 2-microglobulin...... (beta 2m) have been used to examine the assembly of the trimolecular MHC class I/beta 2m/peptide complex. Recombinant human beta 2m and mouse beta 2ma have been generated to compare the binding of the two beta 2m to mouse class I. It is frequently assumed that human beta 2m binds to mouse class I heavy...

  17. Detection of aberrant transcription of major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation genes in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia identifies HLA-DOA mRNA as a prognostic factor for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souwer, Yuri; Chamuleau, Martine E D; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Tolosa, Eva; Jorritsma, Tineke; Muris, Jettie J F; Dinnissen-van Poppel, Marion J; Snel, Sander N; van de Corput, Lisette; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Meijer, Chris J L M; Neefjes, Jacques J; Marieke van Ham, S

    2009-05-01

    In human B cells, effective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-antigen presentation depends not only on MHC class II, but also on the invariant chain (CD74 or Ii), HLA-DM (DM) and HLA-DO (DO), the chaperones regulating the antigen loading process of MHC class II molecules. We analysed immediate ex vivo expression of HLA-DR (DR), CD74, DM and DO in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated a highly significant upregulation of DRA, CD74, DMB, DOA and DOB mRNA in purified malignant cells compared to B cells from healthy donors. The increased mRNA levels were not translated into enhanced protein levels but could reflect aberrant transcriptional regulation. Indeed, upregulation of DRA, DMB, DOA and DOB mRNA correlated with enhanced expression of class II transactivator (CIITA). In-depth analysis of the various CIITA transcripts demonstrated a significant increased activity of the interferon-gamma-inducible promoter CIITA-PIV in B-CLL. Comparison of the aberrant mRNA levels with clinical outcome identified DOA mRNA as a prognostic indicator for survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that the prognostic value of DOA mRNA was independent of the mutational status of the IGHV genes. Thus, aberrant transcription of DOA forms a novel and additional prognostic indicator for survival in B-CLL.

  18. Genetics of graft-versus-host disease, I. A locus on chromosome 1 influences development of acute graft-versus-host disease in a major histocompatibility complex mismatched murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R D; Dobkins, J A; Harper, J M; Slayback, D L

    1999-02-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is the major complication occurring after bone marrow transplantation. The severity of GVHD varies widely, with this variation generally being attributed to variation in the degree of disparity between host and donor for minor histocompatibility antigens. However, it is also possible that other forms of polymorphism, such as polymorphisms in immune effector molecules, might play a significant role in determining GVHD severity. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we are studying the genetic factors that influence GVHD development in a murine model. We here report the first results of this analysis, which demonstrate that a locus on Chromosome 1 of the mouse, and possibly also a locus on Chromosome 4, exert considerable influence over the development of one aspect of acute GVHD - splenomegaly - in a parent-->F1 murine model. These results demonstrate that non-MHC genes can exert quite significant effects on the development of GVHD-associated pathology and that gene mapping can be used as a tool to identify these loci. Further analysis of such loci will allow identification of the mechanism whereby they influence GVHD and may lead in the future to improved selection of donors for human bone marrow transplantation.

  19. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules with super-enhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and non-specifically activate cytotoxic T lymphocytes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Linda; Clement, Matthew; Lissina, Anna; Edwards, Emily S. J.; Ladell, Kristin; Ekeruche, Julia; Hewitt, Rachel E.; Laugel, Bruno; Gostick, Emma; Cole, David K.; Debets, Reno; Berrevoets, Cor; Miles, John J.; Burrows, Scott R.; Price, David A.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2010-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are essential for effective immune defence against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTL recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Antigen recognition involves the binding of both T cell receptor (TCR) and CD8 co-receptor to a single ligand (pMHCI). The TCR/pMHCI interaction confers antigen specificity, whereas the pMHCI/CD8 interaction mediates enhanced sensitivity to antigen. Striking biophysical differences exist between the TCR/pMHCI and pMHCI/CD8 interactions; indeed, the pMHCI/CD8 interaction can be >100-fold weaker than the cognate TCR/pMHCI interaction. Here, we show that increasing the strength of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction by ~15-fold results in non-specific, cognate antigen-independent pMHCI tetramer binding at the cell surface. Furthermore, pMHCI molecules with super-enhanced affinity for CD8 activate CTL in the absence of a specific TCR/pMHCI interaction to elicit a full range of effector functions, including cytokine/chemokine release, degranulation and proliferation. Thus, the low solution binding affinity of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction is essential for the maintenance of CTL antigen specificity. PMID:20190139

  20. Clinical Differences between Men and Women with Psoriatic Arthritis: Relevance of the Analysis of Genes and Polymorphisms in the Major Histocompatibility Complex Region and of the Age at Onset of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Queiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that males with spondyloarthritis tend to suffer from more severe spinal disease while females are more likely to have peripheral joint involvement. Nevertheless, gender-related differences have not been thoroughly explored in psoriatic arthritis (PsA. In PsA, males accumulate more peripheral and axial joint damage compared to women. However, it is not clear whether these findings are secondary to differences in occupational physical activity, hormonal changes, or other factors. The present study analyzed the differences in clinical expression of PsA between men and women. We have also evaluated the possible existence of gender-linked differences in the distribution of genes and polymorphisms within the major histocompatibility complex and whether patients’ age at the onset of psoriasis established any differences in these aspects. Women suffered more polyarthritis, greater functional impairment, and a larger number of swollen joints during followup. We appreciated a differential expression of certain MHC genes according to gender and age at onset of psoriasis. Our results point to the need to include patient’s age at the onset of psoriasis and gender as key stratification elements in future studies of genetic associations in PsA.

  1. Association of de novo human leukocyte antigen and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene-A antibodies and proteinuria with graft survival 5 years after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L-W; Peng, Z-G; Xian, W-H; Cui, X-Q; Sun, H-B; Li, E-G; Geng, L-N; Zhao, P; Tian, J

    2013-11-01

    Association of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene-A (MICA) antibodies and proteinuria with graft survival 5 years after renal transplantation. De novo presence of HLA and MICA antibodies after renal transplantation is associated with poor graft survival. Proteinuria after transplantation is also considered a risk factor for premature graft loss. In this study, we investigated the association of de novo HLA and MICA antibodies on proteinuria after renal transplantation and the association of proteinuria and de novo antibodies with graft survival. We enrolled 275 patients without preexisting HLA and MICA antibodies followed for >5 years after renal transplantation. All donor organs were from living-related donors or from an organ donation program. HLA and MICA antibodies were detected by the Luminex method. Patients with proteinuria (>150 mg/d) underwent intermittent 24-hour proteinuria examination. The frequencies of de novo HLA and MICA antibody 5 years after transplantation were 25.8% and 12%, respectively. In total, 26.5% of patients had proteinuria at the 5-year follow-up. De novo HLA antibody was associated with increased proteinuria after transplantation (relative risk, 3.12). HLA antibody and proteinuria were both associated with poor 5-year graft survival (P = .027 and P = .006, respectively). De novo HLA and MICA antibodies and proteinuria after renal transplantation are all associated with poor graft survival. De novo HLA antibody is independent risk factor for posttransplant proteinuria, and proteinuria affects the association of de novo antibodies with decreased graft survival after transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of the HLA population data (AHPD) submitted to the 15th International Histocompatibility/Immunogenetics Workshop by using the Gene[rate] computer tools accommodating ambiguous data (AHPD project report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J M; Riccio, M E; Buhler, S; Di, D; Currat, M; Ries, F; Almada, A J; Benhamamouch, S; Benitez, O; Canossi, A; Fadhlaoui-Zid, K; Fischer, G; Kervaire, B; Loiseau, P; de Oliveira, D C M; Papasteriades, C; Piancatelli, D; Rahal, M; Richard, L; Romero, M; Rousseau, J; Spiroski, M; Sulcebe, G; Middleton, D; Tiercy, J-M; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2010-07-01

    During the 15th International Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Workshop (IHIWS), 14 human leukocyte antigen (HLA) laboratories participated in the Analysis of HLA Population Data (AHPD) project where 18 new population samples were analyzed statistically and compared with data available from previous workshops. To that aim, an original methodology was developed and used (i) to estimate frequencies by taking into account ambiguous genotypic data, (ii) to test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) by using a nested likelihood ratio test involving a parameter accounting for HWE deviations, (iii) to test for selective neutrality by using a resampling algorithm, and (iv) to provide explicit graphical representations including allele frequencies and basic statistics for each series of data. A total of 66 data series (1-7 loci per population) were analyzed with this standard approach. Frequency estimates were compliant with HWE in all but one population of mixed stem cell donors. Neutrality testing confirmed the observation of heterozygote excess at all HLA loci, although a significant deviation was established in only a few cases. Population comparisons showed that HLA genetic patterns were mostly shaped by geographic and/or linguistic differentiations in Africa and Europe, but not in America where both genetic drift in isolated populations and gene flow in admixed populations led to a more complex genetic structure. Overall, a fruitful collaboration between HLA typing laboratories and population geneticists allowed finding useful solutions to the problem of estimating gene frequencies and testing basic population diversity statistics on highly complex HLA data (high numbers of alleles and ambiguities), with promising applications in either anthropological, epidemiological, or transplantation studies.

  3. The human {alpha}2(XI) collagen gene (COL11A2): Completion of coding information, identification of the promoter sequence, and precise localization within the major histocompatibility complex reveal overlap with the KE5 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lui, V.C.H.; Ng, Ling Jim; Sat, E.W.Y.; Cheah, K.S.E. [Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    1996-03-05

    Type XI collagen, a fibril-forming collagen, is important for the integrity and development of the skeleton because mutations in the genes encoding its consituent {alpha} chains have been found in some osteochondrodysplasias. We provide data that complete information for the coding sequence of human {alpha}2(XI) procollagen, with details of the promoter region and intron-exon organization at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene (COL11A2), including the transcription start and polyadenylation sites. COL11A2 is 30.5 kb with a minimum of 62 exons, differing from other reported fibrillar collagen genes because the amino propeptide is encoded by 14 not 5 to 8 exons. But exon numbers for the carboxy propeptide and 3{prime}-untranslated region are conserved. The promoter region of COL11A2 lacks a TATA box but is GC-rich with two potential SP1 binding sites. Mouse {alpha}2(XI) collagen mRNAs undergo complex alternative splicing involving three amino-terminal propeptide exons but only one of these has been reported for COL11A2. We have located these missing human exons and have identified splice signals that point to additional splice variants. We have precisely mapped COL11A2 within the major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6. The retinoid X receptor {beta} (RXR{beta}) gene is located 1.1 kb upstream of COL11A2. KE5, previously thought to be a distinct transcribed gene sequence, was mapped within COL11A2 in the alternatively spliced region, raising the question whether KE5 and COL11A2 are separate genes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*1402 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pravin [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Thielallee 73, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Merino, Elena; López de Castro, José A. [Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Volz, Armin; Ziegler, Andreas [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Thielallee 73, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Saenger, Wolfram, E-mail: saenger@chemie.fu-berlin.de [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara, E-mail: saenger@chemie.fu-berlin.de [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Thielallee 73, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*1402 in complex with two peptides is reported. The product of the human major histocompatibility (HLA) class I allele HLA-B*1402 only differs from that of allele HLA-B*1403 at amino-acid position 156 of the heavy chain (Leu in HLA-B*1402 and Arg in HLA-B*1403). However, both subtypes are known to be differentially associated with the inflammatory rheumatic disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in black populations in Cameroon and Togo. HLA-B*1402 is not associated with AS, in contrast to HLA-B*1403, which is associated with this disease in the Togolese population. The products of these alleles can present peptides with Arg at position 2, a feature shared by a small group of other HLA-B antigens, including HLA-B*2705, the prototypical AS-associated subtype. Complexes of HLA-B*1402 with a viral peptide (RRRWRRLTV, termed pLMP2) and a self-peptide (IRAAPPPLF, termed pCatA) were prepared and were crystallized using polyethylene glycol as precipitant. The complexes crystallized in space groups P2{sub 1} (pLMP2) and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pCatA) and diffracted synchrotron radiation to 2.55 and 1.86 Å resolution, respectively. Unambiguous solutions for both data sets were obtained by molecular replacement using a peptide-complexed HLA-B*2705 molecule (PDB code) as a search model.

  5. Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B expression in tumor tissue and serum of pancreatic cancer: Role of uric acid accumulation in gemcitabine-induced MICA/B expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaufman Howard L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B are two stress-inducible ligands that bind the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating the cyotoxicity of NK and T cells. In this study, we sought to study MICA/B expression in pancreatic cancer and to determine whether and how genotoxic drugs such as gemcitabine can affect MICA/B expression and natural killer cytotoxity. Methods Seven pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for MICA/B expression by flow cytometry and for their sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing by a 51Cr release assay. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera of pancreatic cancer was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC and ELISA, respectively. Results Two MICA/B-positive cell lines were sensitive to the cytotoxic activity of NK-92 cells. Other two MICA/B-positive cell lines and three MICA/B-negative cell lines were resistant to NK-92 cell killing. MICA/B expression was positive in 17 of 25 (68% pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Serum MICA/B levels were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas but did not correlate with the stage of pancreatic cancer and patient survival. Gemcitabine therapy led to increased serum MICA levels in 6 of 10 patients with detectable serum MICA. Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase that converts xanthine to uric acid, blocked uric acid production, MICA/B expression, and sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing toward a PANC-1 cancer cell line exposed to radiation and two genotoxic drugs, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. Conclusions The levels of MICA/B expression in serum and tissue of pancreatic cancer are elevated. DNA damage-induced MICA/B expression is mediated through increased uric acid production.

  6. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Transactivator CIITA Is a Viral Restriction Factor That Targets Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax-1 Function and Inhibits Viral Replication▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Giovanna; Forlani, Greta; Andresen, Vibeke; Turci, Marco; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Franchini, Genoveffa; Poli, Guido; Accolla, Roberto S.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Since the viral transactivator Tax-1 is a major player in T-cell transformation, targeting Tax-1 protein is regarded as a possible strategy to arrest viral replication and to counteract neoplastic transformation. We demonstrate that CIITA, the master regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II gene transcription, inhibits HTLV-1 replication by blocking the transactivating function of Tax-1 both when exogenously transfected in 293T cells and when endogenously expressed by a subset of U937 promonocytic cells. Tax-1 and CIITA physically interact in vivo via the first 108 amino acids of Tax-1 and two CIITA adjacent regions (amino acids 1 to 252 and 253 to 410). Interestingly, only CIITA 1-252 mediated Tax-1 inhibition, in agreement with the fact that CIITA residues from positions 64 to 124 were required to block Tax-1 transactivation. CIITA inhibitory action on Tax-1 correlated with the nuclear localization of CIITA and was independent of the transcription factor NF-YB, previously involved in CIITA-mediated inhibition of Tax-2 of HTLV-2. Instead, CIITA severely impaired the physical and functional interaction of Tax-1 with the cellular coactivators p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1), which are required for the optimal activation of HTLV-1 promoter. Accordingly, the overexpression of PCAF, CREB, and ATF1 restored Tax-1-dependent transactivation of the viral long-terminal-repeat promoter inhibited by CIITA. These findings strongly support our original observation that CIITA, beside increasing the antigen-presenting function for pathogen antigens, acts as an endogenous restriction factor against human retroviruses by blocking virus replication and spreading. PMID:21813598

  7. Major histocompatibility complex class II transactivator CIITA is a viral restriction factor that targets human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax-1 function and inhibits viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Giovanna; Forlani, Greta; Andresen, Vibeke; Turci, Marco; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Franchini, Genoveffa; Poli, Guido; Accolla, Roberto S

    2011-10-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Since the viral transactivator Tax-1 is a major player in T-cell transformation, targeting Tax-1 protein is regarded as a possible strategy to arrest viral replication and to counteract neoplastic transformation. We demonstrate that CIITA, the master regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II gene transcription, inhibits HTLV-1 replication by blocking the transactivating function of Tax-1 both when exogenously transfected in 293T cells and when endogenously expressed by a subset of U937 promonocytic cells. Tax-1 and CIITA physically interact in vivo via the first 108 amino acids of Tax-1 and two CIITA adjacent regions (amino acids 1 to 252 and 253 to 410). Interestingly, only CIITA 1-252 mediated Tax-1 inhibition, in agreement with the fact that CIITA residues from positions 64 to 124 were required to block Tax-1 transactivation. CIITA inhibitory action on Tax-1 correlated with the nuclear localization of CIITA and was independent of the transcription factor NF-YB, previously involved in CIITA-mediated inhibition of Tax-2 of HTLV-2. Instead, CIITA severely impaired the physical and functional interaction of Tax-1 with the cellular coactivators p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1), which are required for the optimal activation of HTLV-1 promoter. Accordingly, the overexpression of PCAF, CREB, and ATF1 restored Tax-1-dependent transactivation of the viral long-terminal-repeat promoter inhibited by CIITA. These findings strongly support our original observation that CIITA, beside increasing the antigen-presenting function for pathogen antigens, acts as an endogenous restriction factor against human retroviruses by blocking virus replication and spreading.

  8. IFN-τ Mediated Control of Bovine Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression and Function via the Regulation of bta-miR-148b/152 in Bovine Endometrial Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichong Wu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IFN-τ, a type I interferon produced by the trophoblasts of ruminants, has various important immune functions, including effects on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I (MHC-I. A previous study has reported that IFN-τ promotes the expression of MHC-I molecules on endometrial cells. However, the immunological mechanisms by which IFN-τ regulates MHC-I molecules remain unknown. Here, we investigated which microRNA (miRNAs may be involved in the regulation of MHC-I molecule expression and function in bovine endometrial epithelial cells (bEECs. By using TargetScan 6.2 and http://www.microRNA.org, two miRNAs were suggested to target the 3′UTR of the bovine MHC-I heavy chain: bta-miR-148b and bta-miR-152. Dual luciferase reporter and miRNA mimic/inhibitor assays suggested that bta-miR-148b/152 were negatively correlated with bovine MHC-I heavy chain genes. The function of the MHC-I heavy chain was then investigated using qRT-PCR, ELISA, western blotting, immunofluorescence, and RNA interference assays in primary bEECs and an endometrial epithelial cell line (BEND. The results demonstrated that bta-miR-148b/152 could promote TLR4-triggered inflammatory responses by targeting the bovine MHC-I heavy chain, and the MHC-I molecule negatively regulated TLR4-induced inflammatory reactions may through the Fps-SHP-2 pathway. Our discovery offers novel insight into negative regulation of the TLR4 pathway and elucidates the mechanism by which bovine MHC-I molecules control congenital inflammatory reactions.

  9. The simultaneous isolation of multiple high and low frequent T-cell populations from donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells using the major histocompatibility complex I-Streptamer isolation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roex, Marthe C J; Hageman, Lois; Heemskerk, Matthias T; Veld, Sabrina A J; van Liempt, Ellis; Kester, Michel G D; Germeroth, Lothar; Stemberger, Christian; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Jedema, Inge

    2018-02-12

    Adoptive transfer of donor-derived T cells can be applied to improve immune reconstitution in immune-compromised patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The separation of beneficial T cells from potentially harmful T cells can be achieved by using the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-Streptamer isolation technology, which has proven its feasibility for the fast and pure isolation of T-cell populations with a single specificity. We have analyzed the feasibility of the simultaneous isolation of multiple antigen-specific T-cell populations in one procedure by combining different MHC I-Streptamers. First, the effect of combining different amounts of MHC I-Streptamers used in the isolation procedure on the isolation efficacy of target antigen-specific T cells and on the number of off-target co-isolated contaminating cells was assessed. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in large-scale validation procedures targeting both high and low frequent T-cell populations using the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant CliniMACS Plus device. T-cell products targeting up to 24 different T-cell populations could be isolated in one, simultaneous MHC I-Streptamer procedure, by adjusting the amount of MHC I- Streptamers per target antigen-specific T-cell population. Concurrently, the co-isolation of potentially harmful contaminating T cells remained below our safety limit. This technology allows the reproducible isolation of high and low frequent T-cell populations. However, the expected therapeutic relevance of direct clinical application without in vitro expansion of these low frequent T-cell populations is questionable. This study provides a feasible, fast and safe method for the generation of highly personalized MHC I-Streptamer isolated T-cell products for adoptive immunotherapy. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Advances in immunology. Volume 38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following seven chapters: The Antigen-Specific, Major Histocompatibility Complex-Restricted Receptor on T Cells; Immune Response (Ir) Genes of the Murine Major Histocompatibility Complex; The Molecular Genetics of Components of Complement; Molecular Genetics of Human B Cell Neoplasia; Human Lymphocyte Hybridmomas and Monoclonal Antibodies; Internally Transmitted Antigen; and Phagocytosis of Particulate Activators of the Alternative Complement Pathway: Effects of Fibronectin.

  11. Major histocompatibility complex of the dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. Vriesendorp (Huibert)

    1973-01-01

    textabstractNowadays everybody has become familair with the procedure of blood transfusion. It is not always appreciated, however, that transfusions are equivalent to transplantations. This latter term is commonly reserved for the more spectacular transplantations of kidney, liver or heart, in which

  12. An ontology for major histocompatibility restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Randi; Overton, James A; Seymour, Emily; Sidney, John; Kaufman, Jim; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Ellis, Shirley; Hammond, John; Butcher, Geoff W; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    MHC molecules are a highly diverse family of proteins that play a key role in cellular immune recognition. Over time, different techniques and terminologies have been developed to identify the specific type(s) of MHC molecule involved in a specific immune recognition context. No consistent nomenclature exists across different vertebrate species. To correctly represent MHC related data in The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), we built upon a previously established MHC ontology and created an ontology to represent MHC molecules as they relate to immunological experiments. This ontology models MHC protein chains from 16 species, deals with different approaches used to identify MHC, such as direct sequencing verses serotyping, relates engineered MHC molecules to naturally occurring ones, connects genetic loci, alleles, protein chains and multi-chain proteins, and establishes evidence codes for MHC restriction. Where available, this work is based on existing ontologies from the OBO foundry. Overall, representing MHC molecules provides a challenging and practically important test case for ontology building, and could serve as an example of how to integrate other ontology building efforts into web resources.

  13. The histocompatibility antigen in asbestos related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jarad, N; Uthayakumar, S; Buckland, E J; Green, T S; Ord, J; Newland, A C; Rudd, R M

    1992-12-01

    Thirty nine phenotypes of human leucocyte antigens (HLA)-A-B-DR and DQ were obtained from 99 asbestos workers (one woman and 98 men). Presence or absence of antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor was determined in 91 of them. Workers were divided into five groups: asbestos workers with no apparent disease (AW; n = 17), diffuse benign pleural disease (PD; n = 31), asbestosis (AS; n = 24), asbestosis with lung cancer (AS-CA; n = 14), and mesothelioma (M; n = 13). Compared with AW, several trends of differences of HLA antigen prevalence were found in patients with asbestos related disease, but these did not achieve statistical significance when p was corrected (pcorr) by number of analyses undertaken. Analysis of the results obtained in previous studies together with the results of this study showed that compared with AW, AS patients had decreased prevalence of HLA-DR5 (pcorr < 0.02). Reasons for the differences in results of previous studies and statistical methods commonly used to compare prevalences of HLA antigen are discussed.

  14. 42 CFR 493.1278 - Standard: Histocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) An audible alarm system must be used to monitor the storage temperature of specimens (donor... patient specimens must be easily retrievable. (3) Reagent typing sera inventory prepared in-house must... prepared in-house or commercially. (iii) Ensuring that reagents used for typing are adequate to define all...

  15. HLA: The Major Histocompatibility Complex of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    purpura . This susceptibility probably Australia, the haplotype HLA-Bw22, SB45 was found also relates to defective handling of immune com- to be increased...for pathogens. For instance, the Duffy red cell iae and other enteric bacteria (Shigella, Yersinia) antigen acts as a receptor for malarial parasites

  16. Strategies for future histocompatible stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan; Barington, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell therapy based on the safe and unlimited self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells is envisioned for future use in tissue or organ replacement after injury or disease. A gradual decline of regenerative capacity has been documented among the adult stem cell population in some body organs...... a developmental lineage, would facilitate the transplantation of organ/tissue-specific adult stem cells or terminally differentiated somatic cells to improve the function of diseased organs or tissues in an individual. Here, we present an overview of various experimental cell therapy technologies based on the use...... during the aging process. Recent progress in human somatic cell nuclear transfer and inducible pluripotent stem cell technologies has shown that patient-derived nuclei or somatic cells can be reprogrammed in vitro to become pluripotent stem cells, from which the three germ layer lineages can be generated...

  17. Molecular Logic of Neuronal Self-Recognition through Protocadherin Domain Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubinstein, Rotem; Thu, Chan Aye; Goodman, Kerry Marie

    2015-01-01

    Self-avoidance, a process preventing interactions of axons and dendrites from the same neuron during development, is mediated in vertebrates through the stochastic single-neuron expression of clustered protocadherin protein isoforms. Extracellular cadherin (EC) domains mediate isoform-specific ho...

  18. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of right temporoparietal area inhibits self-recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Sophie; Tsakiris, Manos

    2017-02-01

    Self-other discrimination is a crucial mechanism for social cognition. Neuroimaging and neurostimulation research has pointed to the involvement of the right temporoparietal region in a variety of self-other discrimination tasks. Although repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the right temporoparietal area has been shown to disrupt self-other discrimination in face-recognition tasks, no research has investigated the effect of increasing the cortical excitability in this region on self-other face discrimination. Here we used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to investigate changes in self-other discrimination with a video-morphing task in which the participant's face morphed into, or out of, a familiar other's face. The task was performed before and after 20 min of tDCS targeting the right temporoparietal area (anodal, cathodal, or sham stimulation). Differences in task performance following stimulation were taken to indicate a change in self-other discrimination. Following anodal stimulation only, we observed a significant increase in the amount of self-face needed to distinguish between self and other. The findings are discussed in relation to the control of self and other representations and to domain-general theories of social cognition.

  19. Imitative Learning from a Third-Party Interaction: Relations with Self-Recognition and Perspective Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Katherine H.; Akhtar, Nameera

    2008-01-01

    Young children's ability to learn something new from a third-party interaction may be related to the ability to imagine themselves in the third-party interaction. This imaginative ability presupposes an understanding of self-other equivalence, which is manifested in an objective understanding of the self and an understanding of others' subjective…

  20. What mirror self-recognition can tell us about aspects of self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schilhab, Theresa

    2007-01-01

    approach to self-awareness in nonhuman primates. The ability to direct behaviour to previously unseen parts of the body such as the inside of the mouth, or grooming the eye by aid of mirrors has been interpreted as recognition of self and evidence of a self-concept. Three decades of research has revealed...

  1. Immune selection during tumor checkpoint inhibition therapy paves way for NK-cell "missing self" recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Sohlberg, Ebba; Goodridge, Jodie P; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf

    2017-08-01

    The ability of NK cells to specifically recognize cells lacking expression of self-MHC class I molecules was discovered over 30 years ago. It provided the foundation for the "missing self" hypothesis. Research in the two past decades has contributed to a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms that determine the specificity and strength of NK cell-mediated "missing self" responses to tumor cells. However, in light of the recent remarkable breakthroughs in clinical cancer immunotherapy, the cytolytic potential of NK cells still remains largely untapped in clinical settings. There is abundant evidence demonstrating partial or complete loss of HLA class I expression in a wide spectrum of human tumor types. Such loss may result from immune selection of escape variants by tumor-specific CD8 T cells and has more recently also been linked to acquired resistance to checkpoint inhibition therapy. In the present review, we discuss the early predictions of the "missing self" hypothesis, its molecular basis and outline the potential for NK cell-based adoptive immunotherapy to convert checkpoint inhibitor therapy-resistant patients into clinical responders.

  2. Correlation analysis of the HLA-DPB1*05:01 and BTNL2 genes within the histocompatibility complex region with a clinical phenotype of psoriasis vulgaris in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huimin; Huang, Yong; Wu, Juan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ye, Lei; Huang, Hequn; Wang, Wenjun; Zhen, Qi; Wu, Jing; Qian, Wenjun; Cheng, Hui; Fan, Xing; Zhang, Xuejun

    2017-09-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is known to be highly polymorphic and has been identified to be associated with numerous diseases. The HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 genes were associated with psoriasis for the first time. The present study aims to investigate the relevance of the HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 genes with respect to clinical phenotypes of psoriasis vulgaris (PV). To investigate whether the HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 polymorphisms were associated with clinical phenotypes of PV in Chinese Han population, we conducted an analysis in case-controls and case-only subjects (9906 controls and 8744 cases) via MHC targeted sequencing stratified analysis. In cases and controls, analysis showed that the genotype of HLA-DPB1*05:01 was associated with type of guttate [p = 3.914 × 10-2 , odds ratio (OR = 0.9335)] and northern region (p = 1.182 × 10-3 , OR = 0.9108). In the case-only analysis, the genotype of HLA-DPB1*05:01 was significantly correlated with geographical region (p = 1.36 × 10-3 , OR = 1.134). In cases and controls, analysis showed that the genotype of BTNL2 (rs 41355746) was associated with being male (p = 2.563 × 10-2 , OR = 0.8897), early-onset (p = 9.399 × 10-3 , OR = 0.8856), guttate (p = 2.469 × 10-2 , OR = 0.8558) and family history (p = 1.51 × 10-4 , OR = 0.772). In the case-only analysis, the genotype of BTNL2 (rs41355746) was significantly correlated with family history (p = 1.768 × 10-3 , OR = 0.757) and age of onset (p = 3.818 × 10-2 , OR = 1.195). The results of the present study indicate that the HLA-DPB1*05:01 gene was associated with the geographical region of PV and the BTNL2 gene was significantly associated with family history and age of onset of PV. In conclusion, the HLA-DPB1*05:01 and BTNL2 genes might be responsible for the complicacy of clinical features. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Establishment and characterization of porcine cytolytic cell lines and clones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de M.C.M.; Rooij, van E.M.A.; Voermans, J.L.M.; Visser, de Y.E.; Bianchi, A.T.J.; Kimman, T.G.

    1997-01-01

    Although non-major-histocompatibility-complex-restricted cytolytic cells appear to significantly influence antiviral immunity in pigs, the phenotype and functional characteristics of these cells are not well defined. To allow a detailed analysis of these subsets, we established and characterized

  4. Participation of L3T4 in T cell activation in the absence of class II major histocompatibility complex antigens. Inhibition by anti-L3T4 antibodies is a function both of epitope density and mode of presentation of anti-receptor antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Fazekas de St Groth, B

    1987-01-01

    The recognition of many class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-associated antigens by T cells requires the participation of the L3T4 molecule. It has been proposed that this molecule acts to stabilize low affinity binding to antigen in association with MHC and thereby increases the avidity...... of T cell/antigen interactions. By using antibodies against the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to activate T cells, thereby circumventing the requirement for antigen presenting cells and MHC-associated antigen, we have been able to study the function of L3T4 in the absence of class II MHC. We have used...... two monoclonal antibodies, KJ16-133.18 and F23.1, that recognize a determinant encoded by the T cell receptor V beta 8 gene family. These antibodies were used to select two clones of T cells with surface phenotype Thy-1.2+, L3T4+, Lyt-2-, KJ16-133.18+, F23.1+, IA-, IE-. One of these clones (E9.D4...

  5. Self-recognition Deficits in Schizophrenia Patients With Auditory Hallucinations : A Meta-analysis of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waters, Flavie; Woodward, Todd; Allen, Paul; Aleman, Andre; Sommers, Iris

    Theories about auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia suggest that these experiences occur because patients fail to recognize thoughts and mental events as self-generated. Different theoretical models have been proposed about the cognitive mechanisms underlying auditory hallucinations. Regardless

  6. O papel do complexo principal de histocompatibilidade na fisiologia da gravidez e na patogênese de complicações obstétricas Major histocompatibility complex: its role in the physiology of pregnancy and in the pathogenic mechanisms of obstetric complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem por objetivo discutir a estrutura e função dos Antígenos Leucocitários Humanos (HLA, seus métodos de detecção, nomenclatura e os mecanismos imunopatológicos que o associam com a fisiologia da gestação e morbidades obstétricas. Sabe-se que o equilíbrio imunológico entre mãe e concepto é imprescindível na manutenção da gravidez. Moléculas do HLA - notadamente o HLA-G expresso na interface materno-fetal - exercem função importante na tolerância imunológica materna, evitando rejeição fetal e algumas complicações obstétricas. Além disso, o HLA permeia diversas etapas do desenvolvimento conceptual como clivagem, formação do trofoblasto e implantação. Para revisão, foram pesquisados os bancos de dados MEDLINE e LILACS, utilizando os descritores: "HLA antigens"; "pregnancy"; "embryonic development"; "pregnancy complication"; "abortion, habitual"; "pre-eclampsia". O conhecimento sobre a influência do HLA na gravidez é necessário para melhor manejo da gestação e patologias obstétricas auto-imunes, favorecendo intervenções precoces e terapêutica específica, reduzindo a morbimortalidade materna e perinatal.The aim of this paper is to review Human Histocompatibility Antigens (HLA structure and function, its detection methods, nomenclature and pathogenic mechanisms associated with pregnancy physiology and obstetrics diseases. Immunological equilibrium between mother and conceptus is indispensable for the maintenance of pregnancy. Molecules from the HLA - mainly HLA-G expressed in the mother-fetus interface - fulfill an important function in maternal immune tolerance, contributing to avoid fetal rejection and obstetrical complications. In addition, HLA influences different stages of fetal development, such as embryonic cleavage, trophoblast, formation and implantation. For this review, were surveyed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases, using the following keywords: "HLA antigens", "pregnancy

  7. Identification of genetic variation in the major histocompatibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the Ovine MHC class II DRB1 and DRB3 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction in eight sheep breeds reared in Turkey. Informative restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were obtained with five restriction enzymes for DRB1 and with two restriction enzymes for DRB3. The digestion of ...

  8. Extremely high major histocompatibility complex class IIb gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Identifying the processes that maintain genetic diversity within and among populations is a central goal of mod- ern evolutionary genetics. So far, the studies on genetic diversity have mainly focussed on neutral DNA markers, such as mtDNA and microsatellites (Xu et al. 2010). While these markers are very informative in ...

  9. Major Histocompatibility complex-DMB allelic diversity in old and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Immunogenetics and Molecular Diagnosis Unit. Centro Nacional de Microbiología. Instituto de Salud. Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. 3Dept. Inmunología Animal .... the acidic pH of the MIIC and facilitating a subsequent loading until a high-stability ... buffer -10 mM Tris pH 8.6, 140 mM NaC1, 1.5 mM MgC12, 0.5% NP-40) with.

  10. Histocompatibility matching and preserved nerve allografts in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Singh (Ram)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractLesions of peripheral nerves, especially those serving important motor effectors and sensitive areas, such as those in the upper extremities, can be extremely crippling. Not surprisingly, surgical repair of such lesions has been attempted for many decades, but it was not possible

  11. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A E; Skov, Svend; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    depending on the fine specificity of the anti-MHC-I antibodies, the context of CD8 ligation, the nature and cell cycle state of the MHC-I-expressing cell and the presence or absence of additional cellular or humoral stimulation. This paper reviews the biochemical, physiological and cellular events...

  12. Phage display of peptide / major histocompatibility class I complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vest Hansen, N; Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Stryhn, A

    2001-01-01

    and subsequently that ot the T cell receptor for peptide-MHC-I complex), we have fused a single chain peptide-MHC-I complex to the phage minor coat protein, gpIII, and displayed it on filamentous phage. Expression of peptide-MHC-I complexes was shown with relevant conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies and......, more importantly, with a unique "T cell receptor-like" (i. e. peptide-specific, MHC-I-restricted) antibody. Thus, properly assembled and folded peptide-MHC-I complexes can be displayed on filamentous phage. Despite the successful display, interaction with T cells could not be demonstrated....

  13. Influência dos antígenos de histocompatibilidade humanos na susceptibilidade e expressão clínica de doenças psiquiátricas Influence of human histocompatibility antigens on susceptibility to and clinical expression of psychiatric diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A compreensão da base molecular das doenças é cada vez mais importante para seu diagnóstico, prevenção e tratamento. Localizado no braço curto do cromossomo 6, o sistema de histocompatibilidade humano - human leukocyte antigen (HLA - participa da patogênese de algumas enfermidades psiquiátricas. O surgimento de métodos moleculares para tipificação dos alelos HLA e as recentes atualizações de sua nomenclatura têm contribuído para um melhor entendimento desse sistema. Infelizmente, essas informações não têm sido adequadamente veiculadas na literatura clínica. São objetivos desse trabalho: revisar a estrutura e função dos antígenos HLA, métodos de tipificação e nomenclatura atual e descrever seus mecanismos de associação com esquizofrenia, transtorno bipolar do humor e autismo. Foram pesquisados, através das bases de dados MEDLINE e LILACS, artigos publicados no período de 1995 a 2005, a fim de refletir o conhecimento mais recente sobre o assunto. Conclui-se que os antígenos de histocompatibilidade humanos influenciam o risco, quadro clínico e resposta terapêutica de algumas doenças psiquiátricas, mesmo não sendo eles os únicos atuantes no processo patológico. Embora o HLA tenha sido associado com esquizofrenia (HLA-DRB1*0101, autismo (HLA-DR4 e transtorno bipolar do humor (HLA de classe I, essas associações variam entre diferentes etnias e formas clínicas das doenças. A melhor definição de marcadores genéticos associados a distúrbios psiquiátricos é importante para elucidar possíveis mecanismos envolvidos na sua patogenia, estimar o risco individual de desenvolver essas doenças e contribuir para futuras intervenções profiláticas ou terapêuticas.Understanding the molecular basis of diseases is increasingly more important for their diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Located in the short arm of chromosome 6, the human histocompatibility system - human leukocyte antigens (HLA - participates in

  14. Association between maternal-fetal genetic histocompatibility and maternal undernutrition in mice: influence on intrauterine growth Associação entre histocompatibilidade genética materno-fetal e desnutrição materna em camundongos: influência no crescimento fetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso M. Rebello

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal-fetal genetic histocompatibility and the association of that condition with maternal undernutrition regarding fetal growth and litter size. STUDY DESIGN: Fetuses that were either syngeneic or allogeneic with the mothers were bred, using mice of well-defined syngeneic strains (A/J and Balb/c. Pregnant mice were fed using either unrestricted normal diet with 22% protein, consumed ad libitum, or a diet containing 14% protein, with intake restricted to 70% of that consumed by the unrestricted group. At the end of gestation, the number of fetoplacental units and fetal losses, the fetal and placental weight, and the weights of fetal brain and liver were recorded. RESULTS: Fetuses from undernourished mothers showed a reduction in body, placental, and brain weight (P OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos da histocompatibilidade genética materno-fetal e sua associação com a desnutrição materna em relação ao crescimento fetal e número de fetos. MÉTODOS: Fetos singênicos ou alogênicos em relação às respectivas mães foram obtidos através de cruzamentos de camundongos com linhagens genéticas bem definidas (A/J e Balb/c. As fêmeas grávidas foram alimentadas ad libitum com dieta normal contendo 22% de proteínas ou dieta com restrição, contendo 14% de proteína e aporte máximo de 70% do total consumido pelo grupo em dieta livre. No final da gestação, o número de unidades feto-placentárias e de perdas fetais, o peso da placenta e do feto, assim como o peso do cérebro e do fígado foram anotados. RESULTADOS: Os fetos das mães submetidas à desnutrição mostraram redução no peso corpóreo, placentário e cerebral (p<0.01, sendo que a associação entre a compatibilidade genética materno-fetal resultou em maior restrição ao crescimento fetal (p<0.01. Foi observada uma redução no número de fetos viáveis por fêmea entre os animais do grupo de restri

  15. Analysis of Improvement Factors in Internet Addiction of Junior High School Students -Focusing on the Self-recognition of Internet Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    酒井, 郷平

    2017-01-01

    In recent years’ smartphones and tablets use has increased among children, so Internet addiction has increased. In school education, a lesson program aimed at behavioral changes concerning children’s Internet addiction and contact with the Internet is yet to be well-established. Because, factors of student’s dependence on the Internet are still unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to investigate the factors of behavioral for student’s Internet addiction. Consequently, we condu...

  16. Expressão do complexo de histocompatilidade principal de classe I (MHC I no sistema nervoso central: plasticidade sináptica e regeneração Expresión del complejo principal de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I en el sistema nervioso central: plasticidad sináptica y regeneración Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I in the central nervous system: role in synaptic plasticity and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Graciele Zanon

    2010-06-01

    consecuencia, con la recuperación funcional. Por consiguiente, estos nuevos aspectos sobre la función del MHC I en el SNC orientan nuevas investigaciones con miras a entender el papel del MHC I en las enfermedades neurológicas y a desarrollar nuevas estrategias terapéuticas.It has been recently demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex of class I (MHC I expressed in the central nervous system (CNS does not only function as a molecule of the immune system, but also plays a role in the synaptic plasticity. The expression of MHC I influences the intensity and selectivity of elimination of synapses apposed to neurons that were subjected to lesion, besides influencing the reactivity of neighboring glial cells. MHC I expression and the degree of synaptic rearrangement and glial response after injury correlate with differences in the regenerative potential and functional recovery of isogenic mice strains. In this way, the new aspects regarding MHC I functions in the CNS may guide further studies aiming at searching the involvement of MCH I in neurologic disorders, as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  17. The mouse NKR-P1B:Clr-b recognition system is a negative regulator of innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mir Munir A; Chen, Peter; Mottashed, Amelia N; Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Thomas, Midhun J; Zhu, Qinzhang; Brooks, Colin G; Kartsogiannis, Vicky; Gillespie, Matthew T; Carlyle, James R; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2015-04-02

    NKR-P1B is a homodimeric type II transmembrane C-type lectinlike receptor that inhibits natural killer (NK) cell function upon interaction with its cognate C-type lectin-related ligand, Clr-b. The NKR-P1B:Clr-b interaction represents a major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I)-independent missing-self recognition system that monitors cellular Clr-b levels. We have generated NKR-P1B(B6)-deficient (Nkrp1b(-/-)) mice to study the role of NKR-P1B in NK cell development and function in vivo. NK cell inhibition by Clr-b is abolished in Nkrp1b(-/-) mice, confirming the inhibitory nature of NKR-P1B(B6). Inhibitory receptors also promote NK cell tolerance and responsiveness to stimulation; hence, NK cells expressing NKR-P1B(B6) and Ly49C/I display augmented responsiveness to activating signals vs NK cells expressing either or none of the receptors. In addition, Nkrp1b(-/-) mice are defective in rejecting cells lacking Clr-b, supporting a role for NKR-P1B(B6) in MHC-I-independent missing-self recognition of Clr-b in vivo. In contrast, MHC-I-dependent missing-self recognition is preserved in Nkrp1b(-/-) mice. Interestingly, spontaneous myc-induced B lymphoma cells may selectively use NKR-P1B:Clr-b interactions to escape immune surveillance by wild-type, but not Nkrp1b(-/-), NK cells. These data provide direct genetic evidence of a role for NKR-P1B in NK cell tolerance and MHC-I-independent missing-self recognition. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. Interaction of dendritic cells with antigen-containing liposomes: effect of bilayer composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Arigita, Carmen; Sundblad, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Vaccine efficacy might be improved by exploiting the potent antigen presenting properties of dendrite cells (DCs), since their ability to stimulate specific major histocompatibility complex-restricted immune responses has been well documented during the recent years. In that light, we investigated...... how the interaction of antigen-containing liposomes with DCs was affected by the bilayer composition. Monocyte-derived human DCs and murine bone marrow-derived DCs were analysed and compared upon in vitro incubation with liposomes by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Anionic liposomes...

  19. Genetic heterogenicity in the major histocompatibility complex of various BB rat sublines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin; Dyrberg, T.; Kastern, W.

    1986-01-01

    Fragments of cloned rat class I transplantation antigen genes were used to define the polymorphism detected between two lines of closely related BB rats. One line, BB-Hagedorn (BB/H), is prone to diabetes, and the other (BB control) is resistant. A cDNA probe representing part of the second...... extracellular domain of a class I antigen detected several DNA fragments and revealed a 2kb fragment present in resistant, but absent in diabetes-prone, BB/H rat DNA following digestion with BamH1. A 40 by cDNA probe from the same domain showed a further simplified pattern in the DNA hybridization analysis....... Only two fragments, 15 kb and 7 kb, were present in the resistant rats; the diabetes-prone BB/H rats lacked the 7 kb fragment. Several lines of evidence suggest that the gene contained in this 7 kb fragment may be deleted. Analysis of other diabetic BB rats and in the F2 generation of intercross...

  20. Correlation between histocompatibility antigens and recurrent aphthous stomatitis in the Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Niels Salles Willo; Weber, Raimar; Monteiro, Francisco; Kalil, Jorge; Miziara, Ivan Dieb

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common oral mucosa disorder that affects 20% of the world's population, characterized by recurring painful ulcers in the mouth. The diagnosis is primarily based on the patient's clinical history. Inheritance may pose as a risk factor for the disease; however, the studies available are inconclusive as to the results attained, and they vary according to the population studied. to typify class I and class II HLA molecules and to assess how frequent these molecules are present in the Brazilian population with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis, compared to healthy controls. In this prospective, cross-sectional and investigative study, thirty one patients with diagnostic hypothesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis were seen from February of 2004 to May of 2006. We obtained the DNA from those patients who matched the inclusion criteria and typified their HLA by PCR. In those patients with Recurrent Minor Aphthous Stomatitis we found statistically significant occurrences of HLA-A33 and HLA-B35. HLA-A33 and HLA-B35 may be associated with recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis in the Brazilian's population.

  1. Trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules through intracellular compartments containing HLA-DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, N F; Hammond, C; Denzin, L K; Pan, M; Cresswell, P

    1996-01-01

    The endosomal site(s) where MHC class II molecules become competent to bind antigenic peptide has not been completely characterized. We identified endocytic compartments through which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules move prior to their expression on the plasma membrane. The compartments co-sediment with lysosomes in the most dense regions of Percoll gradients. The appearance of proteolytic fragments of the invariant chain (I chain), namely leupeptin-induced proteins (LIPs) and class-II-associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP), in this region of the gradient suggests that the release of MHC class II molecules from I chain association occurs within these vesicles. The formation of SDS-stable alpha beta dimers indicated that MHC class II molecules contained within these compartments are receptive to peptide binding. A majority of the HLA-DM protein was found in the same region of the Percoll gradient, consistent with its established function in MHC class-II-restricted antigen presentation. Immunoelectron micrographs of dense-sedimenting compartments indicated that I chain, MHC class II, and DM molecules are contained within both multivesicular and multilamellar vesicles. The final stages of I chain dissociation from MHC class II molecules and DM-mediated peptide loading probably occur in these compartments.

  2. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L; Leo, Paul J; Pointon, Jenny J; Robinson, Philip C; Weisman, Michael H; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Haroon, Nigil; Mulero, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, C; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; de Bakker, Paul I W; Brown, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in

  3. Major histocompatibility complex class II alleles and haplotypes associated with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in greyhounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiel, R E; Kennedy, L J; Nolan, C M; Mooney, C T; Callanan, J J

    2014-09-01

    Non-suppurative meningoencephalitis is a breed-restricted canine neuroinflammatory disorder affecting young greyhounds in Ireland. A genetic risk factor is suspected because of the development of disease in multiple siblings and an inability to identify a causative infectious agent. The aim of this study was to examine potential associations between dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotype and the presence of the disease. DLA three locus haplotypes were determined in 31 dogs with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis and in 115 healthy control dogs using sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. All dogs were unrelated at the parental level. Two haplotypes (DRB1*01802/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802 and DRB1*01501/DQA1*00601/DQB1*02201) were significantly (P = 0.0099 and 0.037) associated with the presence of meningoencephalitis, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 5.531 (1.168-26.19) and 3.736 (1.446-9.652), respectively. These results confirm that there is an association between DLA class II haplotype and greyhound meningoencephalitis, suggesting an immunogenetic risk factor for the development of the disease. Greyhound meningoencephalitis may be a suitable model for human neuroinflammatory diseases with an immunogenetic component. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Immune Responses to Tissue-Restricted Nonmajor Histocompatibility Complex Antigens in Allograft Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Bharat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases that result in end-stage organ damage cause inflammation, which can reveal sequestered self-antigens (SAgs in that organ and trigger autoimmunity. The thymus gland deletes self-reactive T-cells against ubiquitously expressed SAgs, while regulatory mechanisms in the periphery control immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs. It is now established that T-cells reactive to SAgs present in certain organs (e.g., lungs, pancreas, and intestine are incompletely eliminated, and the dysregulation of peripheral immuneregulation can generate immune responses to SAgs. Therefore, chronic diseases can activate self-reactive lymphocytes, inducing tissue-restricted autoimmunity. During organ transplantation, donor lymphocytes are tested against recipient serum (i.e., cross-matching to detect antibodies (Abs against donor human leukocyte antigens, which has been shown to reduce Ab-mediated hyperacute rejection. However, primary allograft dysfunction and rejection still occur frequently. Because donor lymphocytes do not express tissue-restricted SAgs, preexisting Abs against SAgs are undetectable during conventional cross-matching. Preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs (i.e., autoimmunity play a major role in rejection. In this review, we discuss the evidence that supports autoimmunity as a contributor to rejection. Testing for preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs and treatment based on immune responses after organ transplantation may improve short- and long-term outcomes after transplantation.

  5. HLA class II restricted minor histocompatibility antigens - identification, processing and biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, Anita Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a potentially curative treatment for many hematological malignancies. The beneficial Graft-versus-Leukemia (GvL) effect is thereby mediated by donor-derived T-cells recognizing the malignant cells of the patient as foreign. However, the same T-cells might also

  6. IL-2 loaded dextran microspheres with attractive histocompatibility properties for local IL-2 cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, JW; Van Luyn, MJA; Cade, JA; Hennink, WE; Bijleveld, C; Den Otter, W

    2003-01-01

    Biodegradable dextran microspheres (MS) were developed as a slow-release system for interleukin-2 (IL-2) to apply them for local IL-2 therapy of cancer. We describe the tissue reactions induced by these MS without or with IL-2 in rats. Dextran MS stain bright red-purple with the periodic acid Schiff

  7. Allelic Diversity of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II DRB Gene in Indian Cattle and Buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachinandan De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to study the diversity of MHC-DRB3 alleles in Indian cattle and buffalo breeds. Previously reported BoLA-DRB exon 2 alleles of Indian Zebu cattle, Bos taurus cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goats were analyzed for the identities and divergence among various allele sequences. Comparison of predicted amino acid residues of DRB3 exon 2 alleles with similar alleles from other ruminants revealed considerable congruence in amino acid substitution pattern. These alleles showed a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid polymorphism at positions forming peptide-binding regions. A higher rate of nonsynonymous substitution was detected at the peptide-binding regions, indicating that BoLA-DRB3 allelic sequence evolution was driven by positive selection.

  8. Expression of Major histocompatibility complex genes in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, P.N.S.

    1996-01-01


    The common carp ( Cyprinus carpio L.) has been the experimental animal of choice because many features of the immune system of this Cyprinid fish have been well characterized. The immune system consists of an integrated set of organs containing

  9. Structural requirements and biological significance of interactions between peptides and the major histocompatibility complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, H M; Buus, S; Colon, S

    1989-01-01

    that allows a few MHC molecules to serve as restriction elements for a large universe of antigens; and (2) what is the relative contribution of determinant selection (i.e. antigen-MHC complex formation) and T-cell repertoire in determining the capacity of an individual to respond to an antigen? By analysing...... this permissiveness of binding, it is possible to define certain structural features of peptides that are associated with the capacity to bind to a particular MHC specificity. With respect to the question of the relative role of 'determinant selection' and 'holes in the T-cell repertoire' in determining immune...... of binding to Ia (i.e. determinant selection was operative), we found that about 40% of Ia-binding peptides were not immunogenic (i.e. there were also 'holes in the T-cell repertoire')....

  10. Major histocompatibility complex class I binding predictions as a tool in epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren

    2010-01-01

    , highlighting the most useful and historically important. Selected case stories, where these 'reverse immunology' systems have been used in actual epitope discovery, are briefly reviewed. We conclude that this new generation of epitope discovery systems has become a highly efficient tool for epitope discovery...

  11. Autoantibodies, histocompatibility antigens and testosterone in males with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Tage-Jensen, Ulrik Viggo; Bahnsen, M

    1981-01-01

    Titres and immunoglobulin classes of autoantibodies were examined in 69 male patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis and the findings were related to particular human leucocyte antigens and serum concentration of testosterone. Both anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and smooth muscle antibodies (SMA...... had higher titres of ANA (n.s.) and SMA (P less than 0.05) than patients without these HLA antigens. Serum concentrations of testosterone were significantly lower in ANA-positive patients than in those negative (P less than 0.05), and a similar tendency was found in SMA-positive patients...

  12. 42 CFR 413.200 - Payment of independent organ procurement organizations and histocompatibility laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST... the principles for determining reasonable cost contained in this part. Services furnished by... specified in paragraphs (a) through (e) of § 413.24. These cost reports must provide a complete accounting...

  13. Increased expression of beta 2-microglobulin and histocompatibility antigens on human lymphoid cells induced by interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Heron, I; Berg, K

    1982-01-01

    Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of interferon for various incubation periods. Subsequently, the amount of beta 2-Microglobulin and HLA-A, B and C surface antigens was estimated by means of quantitative immunofluorescence (flow c...

  14. Evaluation of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in cranes: applications to conservation efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Miller, M.M.; Goto, R.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    Although there have been heated discussions concerning the relative importance of using Mhc diversity as a basis for selecting breeders in conservation projects, most parties agree that the genetic variability residual in an endangered species should be maintained through genetic management, if at all possible. Substantial evidence exists (particularly in birds) documenting the influences of specific Mhc haplotypes on disease outcome and also that those individuals which are heterozygous for Mhc alleles appear to have an advantage for survival over those that are homozygous. Thus, conservation of genetic variability of the Mhc is likely important for the preservation of fitness, especially in small breeding populations. More than half of the world's crane species are listed as endangered. Members of all 15 known species are represented among breeding animals for captive propagation at the International Crane Foundation (Wisconsin) and the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Maryland). Collaborative multi-organization efforts and the availability of extensive pedigree records have allowed the study of Mhc variability in several species of cranes. We have found, for example, that Mhc diversity in the captive Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) population appears high, whereas in the captive whooping crane (Grus americana), which has undergone a severe 'genetic bottleneck,? both the number of alleles and the levels of heterozygosity appear to be substantially reduced.

  15. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex binding regions of protein antigens by sequence pattern analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Appella, E

    1989-01-01

    to interact with these MHC class II molecules (IAd and IEd). The accuracy of these procedures has been tested on a large panel of synthetic peptides of eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and viral origin, and also on a set of overlapping peptides encompassing the entire staphylococcal nuclease molecule. For both sets...

  16. Clarifying the association of genes within the major histocompatibility complex with narcolepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, R.T.; Watson, B.; Rivers, C. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DR2 and DQwl has been reported to be strongly associated with narcolepsy. The particular phenotype and strength of these associations varies between races. For example DQB*0601 has been reported associated with some African American (AA) narcoleptics while some Caucasian American (CA) narcoleptics do not possess DR2 or DQw1. We have sought to clarify the relationship of MHC genes with narcolepsy in the local CA and AA population. There was no significant difference in the frequency of DR phenotypes in CA or AA narcoleptics compared to race, age, sex and geographic region-matched controls. DR2 was increased in CA cataplexy positive (Cat+) narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.028, odds ratio (OR)=2.4) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=<0.001, OR=8.8). DR11 was increased in AA Cat+ narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.004, OR=11.2) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=0.002). DQB1*0601 was not significantly associated with narcolepsy in our AA population. We have assessed the frequency of the TNFa (13 alleles, 1.1Mb telomeric to DQ{alpha}), D6S105 (13 alleles, 1kb telomeric of HLA-A), and GLP-1R (19 alleles, 18.5 Mb centromeric of DQ{alpha}), dinucleotide repeats in narcoleptics compared to controls. The TNFa allele 117 was increased in CA Cat+ vs. controls (p=0.003). The GLP-1R allele 144 was increased in CA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.02). In AA narcoleptics, the TNFa allele 109 was significantly increased (p=0.04) along with the D6S105 allele 130 (p=0.02) compared to controls. The D6S105 allele 130 was increased in AA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.03). The GLP-1R allele 154 was significantly decreased in AA Cat+ vs. Cat- (p=0.04). These data suggest that DR and/or DQ genes are not responsible for narcolepsy and that cataplexy is associated with different regions around the MHC in various racial groups.

  17. Mouse histocompatibility-related genes are not conserved in other mammals.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to the genes for classical H-2 antigens, the H-2 complex of the mouse contains numerous homologous genes belonging to several distinct families. It is not known whether they have any functions. To address this question, I have investigated whether these genes are separately conserved in evolution. Subcloned 5' gene segments, encoding the variable domains, were used as hybridisation probes on genomic DNA blots of various mammals. Only the largest gene family, which includes the cla...

  18. Major histocompatibility (MH) polymorphism of common carp : link with disease resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakus, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    The impact of diseases caused by a wide range of pathogens (viruses, bacteria and parasites) is the most important problem in aquaculture of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). Genetic selection aimed at obtaining population of more resistant common carp is potential and sustainable approach to

  19. Binding stability of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I proteins: role of entropy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Ahmet; Erman, Burak

    2018-03-01

    Prediction of peptide binding on specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) has long been studied with successful results. We herein describe the effects of entropy and dynamics by investigating the binding stabilities of 10 nanopeptides on various HLA Class I alleles using a theoretical model based on molecular dynamics simulations. The fluctuational entropies of the peptides are estimated over a temperature range of 310–460 K. The estimated entropies correlate well with experimental binding affinities of the peptides: peptides that have higher binding affinities have lower entropies compared to non-binders, which have significantly larger entropies. The computation of the entropies is based on a simple model that requires short molecular dynamics trajectories and allows for approximate but rapid determination. The paper draws attention to the long neglected dynamic aspects of peptide binding, and provides a fast computation scheme that allows for rapid scanning of large numbers of peptides on selected HLA antigens, which may be useful in defining the right peptides for personal immunotherapy.

  20. NetMHCcons: a consensus method for the major histocompatibility complex class I predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    -expert user to choose the most suitable method for predicting binding to a given MHC molecule. In this study, we have therefore made an in-depth analysis of combinations of three state-of-the-art MHC–peptide binding prediction methods (NetMHC, NetMHCpan and PickPocket). We demonstrate that a simple...... combination of NetMHC and NetMHCpan gives the highest performance when the allele in question is included in the training and is characterized by at least 50 data points with at least ten binders. Otherwise, NetMHCpan is the best predictor. When an allele has not been characterized, the performance depends...... on the distance to the training data. NetMHCpan has the highest performance when close neighbours are present in the training set, while the combination of NetMHCpan and PickPocket outperforms either of the two methods for alleles with more remote neighbours. The final method, NetMHCcons, is publicly available...

  1. Donor selection in pediatric kidney transplantation using DR and DQ eplet mismatching: A new histocompatibility paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Christopher F; Chadha, Vimal; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-11-01

    It is now appreciated that more HLA-DR mismatching at the time of the first renal transplant is associated with higher degrees of sensitization, lower rates and longer times to retransplantation, and worse graft outcomes in children who are subsequently retransplanted. As such, our pediatric renal transplant program preferentially uses 0 or 1 HLA-DR-mismatched kidneys and reserves 2 DR-mismatched kidneys for recipients with an eminent need for a kidney. Based on a new HLA class II epitope matching strategy that is designed to minimize dnDSA production to DR and DQ antigens, we evaluated the prevalence of DR and DQ eplet mismatching for dd offers made to our pediatric wait-listed candidates. Each candidate/dd pair were HLA-DR (β1 and β3 and/or β5) and DQ (α1 and β1) allele typed by rSSO and were then evaluated for eplet mismatches by the HLAMatchmaker program. We evaluated 78 offers made to 16 children on our UNOS waiting list from 27 consecutive dd from 4/14/14 to 3/23/15. The data show that 40% (8/20) of the 1 DR-mismatched dd offers and 64% (37/58) of the 2 DR-mismatched offers were in the high-risk category for both DR and DQ dnDSA development. Whereas only 15% (3/20) of the 1 DR-mismatched offers and 5% (3/58) of the 2 DR-mismatched offers were in the low-risk category for both DR and DQ dnDSA development, 55% and 33% of the 1 DR- and 2 DR-mismatched offers, respectively, had a favorable DQ eplet mismatch threshold. In summary, HLA class II eplet mismatching is common in potential pediatric transplant recipient/donor pairs. Additional study will be necessary to validate the DR and DQ eplet threshold levels in children and to determine whether eplet mismatching strategies in donor selection result in improved transplant outcome and decreased dnDSA production. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Natural selection of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Tarr, C.L.; Mcintosh, C.E.; Atkinson, C.T.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    The native Hawaiian honeycreepers represent a classic example of adaptive radiation and speciation, but currently face one the highest extinction rates in the world. Although multiple factors have likely influenced the fate of Hawaiian birds, the relatively recent introduction of avian malaria is thought to be a major factor limiting honeycreeper distribution and abundance. We have initiated genetic analyses of class II ?? chain Mhc genes in four species of honeycreepers using methods that eliminate the possibility of sequencing mosaic variants formed by cloning heteroduplexed polymerase chain reaction products. Phylogenetic analyses group the honeycreeper Mhc sequences into two distinct clusters. Variation within one cluster is high, with dN > d S and levels of diversity similar to other studies of Mhc (B system) genes in birds. The second cluster is nearly invariant and includes sequences from honeycreepers (Fringillidae), a sparrow (Emberizidae) and a blackbird (Emberizidae). This highly conserved cluster appears reminiscent of the independently segregating Rfp-Y system of genes defined in chickens. The notion that balancing selection operates at the Mhc in the honeycreepers is supported by transpecies polymorphism and strikingly high dN/dS ratios at codons putatively involved in peptide interaction. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences were invariant in the i'iwi, but were highly variable in the 'amakihi. By contrast, levels of variability of class II ?? chain Mhc sequence codons that are hypothesized to be directly involved in peptide interactions appear comparable between i'iwi and 'amakihi. In the i'iwi, natural selection may have maintained variation within the Mhc, even in the face of what appears to a genetic bottleneck.

  3. [Alleles of the major histocompatibility system associated with susceptibility to the development of Takayasu's arteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Domínguez, C; Hernández-Pacheco, G; Zúñiga, J; Gamboa, R; Granados, J; Reyes, P A; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto

    2002-01-01

    Since 1972, the relationship between HLA alleles and the susceptibility for Takayasu arteritis (TA) has been studied on different populations. Hence the results up to date are heterogeneous, the objective of the present review is to analyze the relationship between the presence of HLA alleles and the susceptibility for the development of TA considering the ethnic origin of the studied populations. We carried out a bibliographic review from clinical articles of case and controls studies on different populations on which the relationship between HLA alleles and the susceptibility for TA was studied, published since 1972 until February 2000. We reviewed articles of studies on Asian, Arab, North-American and Mexican Mestizo populations. On Asian populations TA was associated with HLA-A31, -B52, -B39, -B5 and -DR2, on Arabs with HLA-A2, -A9, -B35 and -DR7, on North-Americans with HLA-DR4 and on Mexican Mestizo with HLA-B5, -B52 and -DR6. On the other hand, recent reports establish that several HLA-B alleles (HLA-B52 and HLA-B39) associated with the disease share some residues important on the antigen presentation. Hence the heterogeneity of the results obtained up to date, it stands out the increase on HLA-B52 and HLA-DR4 reported on ethnically different populations. More recent data point the possible participation of an epitope located on the peptide-binding site of the HLA-B molecule (positions 63 and 67) that seems to be shared by several alleles associated with the disease. These residues might be participating on the presentation of an unknown antigen that would unchain the disease on the genetically susceptible individuals group.

  4. Major histocompatibility complex I upregulation in clear cell renal cell carcinoma is associated with increased survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi R. Sekar

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that high MHCI expression confers improved overall and recurrence free survival in patients with clear cell RCC and could serve as an important prognostic tool in identifying high-risk patients.

  5. “Electronic nose” detects major histocompatibility complex-dependent prerenal and postrenal odor components

    OpenAIRE

    Montag, Stefanie; Frank, Michael; Ulmer, Heiko; Wernet, Dorothee; Göpel, Wolfgang; Rammensee, Hans-Georg

    2001-01-01

    Mice prefer to mate with individuals expressing different MHC genes from their own. Volatile components presenting MHC-dependent odor types are present in urine and can be detected by mice, as shown by extensive behavioral studies. Similar odor types are suspected to influence human behavior as well. Although a recent report indicates that MHC expression influences the ratio of volatile compounds such as phenylacetic acid, so far no other means than studying the behavior of mice or rats has b...

  6. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...... a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These data...

  7. The Smc5/6 Complex Restricts HBV when Localized to ND10 without Inducing an Innate Immune Response and Is Counteracted by the HBV X Protein Shortly after Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffis, Stephane; Ramakrishnan, Dhivya; Burdette, Dara; Peiser, Leanne; Salas, Eduardo; Ramos, Hilario; Yu, Mei; Cheng, Guofeng; Strubin, Michel; Delaney IV, William E.; Fletcher, Simon P.

    2017-01-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosome 5/6 complex (Smc5/6) is a restriction factor that represses hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcription. HBV counters this restriction by expressing HBV X protein (HBx), which targets Smc5/6 for degradation. However, the mechanism by which Smc5/6 suppresses HBV transcription and how HBx is initially expressed is not known. In this study we characterized viral kinetics and the host response during HBV infection of primary human hepatocytes (PHH) to address these unresolved questions. We determined that Smc5/6 localizes with Nuclear Domain 10 (ND10) in PHH. Co-localization has functional implications since depletion of ND10 structural components alters the nuclear distribution of Smc6 and induces HBV gene expression in the absence of HBx. We also found that HBV infection and replication does not induce a prominent global host transcriptional response in PHH, either shortly after infection when Smc5/6 is present, or at later times post-infection when Smc5/6 has been degraded. Notably, HBV and an HBx-negative virus establish high level infection in PHH without inducing expression of interferon-stimulated genes or production of interferons or other cytokines. Our study also revealed that Smc5/6 is degraded in the majority of infected PHH by the time cccDNA transcription could be detected and that HBx RNA is present in cell culture-derived virus preparations as well as HBV patient plasma. Collectively, these data indicate that Smc5/6 is an intrinsic antiviral restriction factor that suppresses HBV transcription when localized to ND10 without inducing a detectable innate immune response. Our data also suggest that HBx protein may be initially expressed by delivery of extracellular HBx RNA into HBV-infected cells. PMID:28095508

  8. Fractionation of T cell subsets on Ig anti-Ig columns: isolation of helper T cells from nonresponder mice, demonstration of antigen-specific T suppressor cells, and selection of CD-3 negative variants of Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, B; Geisler, C; Kuhlmann, J

    1989-01-01

    In the present experiments we have explored the possibilities of a modified immunoadsorbent technique to select for (1) mutagenized T cell receptor (Tcr) negative variants of Jurkat T lymphoma cells and (2) purified CD-4+ or CD-8+ T lymphocytes. The basic principle was to make large numbers...... of immunoglobulin (Ig) negative T cells Ig+ by T cell subset-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb), and to select such cells on Ig anti-Ig columns. Our results demonstrated that Thy-1+, Fc receptor positive, antigen-specific T cells regulate the immune response in mice nonresponders to pork insulin......." The most important finding is the demonstration of antigen-specific Thy-1+, CD-8+, and Fc receptor+ T suppressor cell that apparently react with antigen in a non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted manner....

  9. Characterization of natural killer cells in tamarins: a technical basis for studies of innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki eYoshida

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are capable of regulating viral infection without major histocompatibility complex restriction. Hepatitis C is caused by chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV, and impaired activity of NK cells may contribute to the control of the disease progression, although the involvement of NK cells in vivo remains to be proven. GB virus B (GBV-B, which is genetically most closely related to HCV, induces acute and chronic hepatitis upon experimental infection of tamarins. This non-human primate model seems likely to be useful for unveiling the roles of NK cells in vivo. Here we characterized the biological phenotypes of NK cells in tamarins and found that depletion of the CD16+ subset in vivo by administration of a monoclonal antibody significantly reduced the number and activity of natural killer cells.

  10. Functional Inactivation in the Whole Population of Human Vγ9/Vδ2 T Lymphocytes Induced By a Nonpeptidic Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürk, Martin R.; Carena, Ilaria; Donda, Alena; Mariani, Francesca; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    1997-01-01

    Nonpeptidic compounds stimulate human T cells bearing the TCR-γδ in the absence of major histocompatibility complex restriction. We report that one of these ligands, 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid (DPG), which induces expansion of Vγ9/Vδ T cells ex vivo, antagonizes the same cell population after repetitive activation. Stimulation with DPG results in partial early protein tyrosine phosphorylation and a prolonged, but reversible, state of unresponsiveness to agonist ligands in Vγ9/Vδ2, but not in other T cells. These findings show that TCR antagonism is a general phenomenon of T cells. However, in contrast to the clonal specificity of altered peptides antagonizing αβ T cells, all the tested Vγ9/Vδ2 polyclonal cell lines and clones become unresponsive, a fact that may be relevant for the regulation of their response in vivo. PMID:8996245

  11. Disruption of hydrogen bonds between major histocompatibility complex class II and the peptide N-terminus is not sufficient to form a human leukocyte antigen-DM receptive state of major histocompatibility complex class II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Monika-Sarah E D; Anders, Anne-Kathrin; Sethi, Dhruv K; Call, Melissa J

    2013-01-01

    Peptide presentation by MHC class II is of critical importance to the function of CD4+ T cells. HLA-DM resides in the endosomal pathway and edits the peptide repertoire of newly synthesized MHC class II molecules before they are exported to the cell surface. HLA-DM ensures MHC class II molecules bind high affinity peptides by targeting unstable MHC class II:peptide complexes for peptide exchange. Research over the past decade has implicated the peptide N-terminus in modulating the ability of HLA-DM to target a given MHC class II:peptide combination. In particular, attention has been focused on both the hydrogen bonds between MHC class II and peptide, and the occupancy of the P1 anchor pocket. We sought to solve the crystal structure of a HLA-DR1 molecule containing a truncated hemagglutinin peptide missing three N-terminal residues compared to the full-length sequence (residues 306-318) to determine the nature of the MHC class II:peptide species that binds HLA-DM. Here we present structural evidence that HLA-DR1 that is loaded with a peptide truncated to the P1 anchor residue such that it cannot make select hydrogen bonds with the peptide N-terminus, adopts the same conformation as molecules loaded with full-length peptide. HLA-DR1:peptide combinations that were unable to engage up to four key hydrogen bonds were also unable to bind HLA-DM, while those truncated to the P2 residue bound well. These results indicate that the conformational changes in MHC class II molecules that are recognized by HLA-DM occur after disengagement of the P1 anchor residue.

  12. The interaction between beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) and purified class-I major histocompatibility (MHC) antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S; Olsen, A C

    1994-01-01

    been generated recently and this paper reports on a similar assay for the interaction between beta 2m and class I. As a model system human beta 2m binding to mouse class I was used. The assay is strictly biochemical using purified reagents which interact in solution and complex formation is determined......The function of MHC class-I molecules is to sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present them to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. To understand the molecular details of the assembly (and disassembly) of peptide-beta 2m-class-I complexes a biochemical peptide-class-I binding assay has...... by size separation. It is specific and highly sensitive. The observed affinity of the interaction, KD, is close to 0.4 nM. The rate of association at 37 degrees C is very fast (the ka is around 5 x 10(4)/M/s) whereas the dissociation is slow (the kd is around 8 x 10(-6)/s); the ratio of dissociation...

  13. Complement component C1r mediated cleavage of the heavy chain of the major histocompatibility class I antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1992-01-01

    Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native con......-chain of MHC class I was shown to take place between the alpha 2- and alpha 3- domains as estimated by the Con A-Sepharose precipitation pattern on SDS-PAGE. The alpha 1/alpha 2 fragment was still shown to interact with beta 2-microglobulin as shown by immunoprecipitation.......Apart from cleaving C1s, we demonstrate for the first time that: 1) at concentrations found in serum, the activated forms of the complement components C1r in addition to C1s can cleave the heavy chain of MHC class I antigens, 2) the cleavage by C1r and C1s is seemingly dependent upon a native...... configuration of the MHC class I antigen, since heat denaturation of the HLA antigens reduce the cleavage. The proteolytic fragments following C1 cleavage were characterized by precipitation with Con A-Sepharose, anti-MHC class I and anti-beta 2-microglobulin antibodies. The proteolysis of the alpha...

  14. Marek's Disease Virus Infection in the Brain: Virus Replication, Cellular Infiltration, and Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimeno, I. M; Witter, R. L; Hunt, H. D; Lee, L. F; Reddy, S. M; Neumann, U

    2001-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) infection in the brain was studied chronologically after inoculating 3-week-old chickens of two genetic lines with two strains of serotype 1 MDV representing two pathotypes (v and vv...

  15. Corticosteroids decrease the expression of beta 2-microglobulin and histocompatibility antigens on human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Larsen, B; Heron, I

    1982-01-01

    The in vitro effect of two different glucocorticoids (prednisolone and dexamethasone) on the expression of beta 2-microglobulin and HLA-A-A, -B and -C-antigens on the surface of cultured lymphocytes was measured by quantitative immunofluorescence (flow cytofluorometry) and by a radioimmunoassay. ...

  16. Sp17 Protein Expression and Major Histocompatibility Class I and II Epitope Presentation in Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Ait-Tahar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improved therapies are urgently needed for patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Success using immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor T cell technology has fuelled demand for validated cancer epitopes. Immunogenic cancer testis antigens (CTAs, with their widespread expression in many tumours but highly restricted normal tissue distribution, represent attractive immunotherapeutic targets that may improve treatment options for DLBCL and other malignancies. Sperm protein 17 (Sp17, a CTA reported to be immunogenic in ovarian cancer and myeloma patients, is expressed in DLBCL. The aim of the present study was to investigate Sp17 epitope presentation via the presence of a cytotoxic T cell (CTL and a CD4 T-helper (Th response in DLBCL patients. A significant γ-interferon CTL response was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 13/31 DLBCL patients following short-term cell stimulation with two novel HLA-A⁎0201 peptides and one previously reported HLA-A⁎0101-restricted nine-mer Sp17 peptide. No significant responses were detected in the HLA-A⁎0201-negative DLBCL patients or four healthy subjects. A novel immunogenic 20-mer CD4 Th Sp17 peptide was detected in 8/17 DLBCL patients. This is the first report of a CTL and a CD4 Th response to Sp17 in DLBCL and supports Sp17 as a potential immunotherapeutic target for DLBCL.

  17. Breaking confinement: unconventional peptide presentation by major histocompatibility (MHC) class I allele HLA-A*02:01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remesh, Soumya G.; Andreatta, Massimo; Ying, Ge

    2017-01-01

    known for a while that longer peptides can also bind by either bulging out of the groove in the middle of the peptide or by binding in a zig-zag fashion inside the groove. In a recent study, we identified an alternative binding conformation of naturally occurring peptides from Toxoplasma gondii bound...

  18. Next-generation detection of antigen-responsive T cells using DNA barcode-labeled peptidemajor histocompatibility complex I multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Identification of antigenic peptides recognized by T cells is important for understanding and treatingimmune related diseases. Current cytometry-based approaches are limited to simultaneous screening of T cell reactivity towards 10-100 distinct peptide specificities, which poorly match the large...... diversity of T cell recognition in humans. Consequently it has been impossible to comprehensively analyze T cell responsiveness in cancer, infectious and autoimmune diseases. We present and validate a novel technology that enables parallel detection of numerous different peptide-MHC responsive T cells...... of T cells. This technology enables true high-throughput detection of antigen-responsive T cells and will advance our understanding of immune recognition from model antigens to genomewide immune assessments on a personalized basis....

  19. Analysis of associations between major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis of dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, N. E.; Østergård, H.

    1995-01-01

    The associations between BoLA class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis were investigated using information on 333 cows from three different breeds and crossbreeds from 14 dairy herds in Denmark. Somatic cell count and bacteriological status were used as markers for subclinical mastitis....... Associations between BoLA class I haplotypes and IMI status were also determined. The association between BoLA class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis was weak. The A10(W50), A11, A12(A30), A16, A19(A6), A21, A26, and A31(A30) alleles were associated with different markers of subclinical mastitis....... Susceptibility or resistance to the two bacteria categories was associated with different alleles. This study indicated that BoLA antigens may be involved in resistance to mastitis and that resistance may be specific for a particular pathogen....

  20. Reproducible association with type 1 diabetes in the extended class I region of the major histocompatibility complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viken, M.K.; Blomhoff, A.; Olsson, M.

    2009-01-01

    )-gene cluster, particularly the BTN3A2 gene, was observed by multilocus analyses. We replicated the associations with SNPs in the PRSS16 region and, albeit weaker, to the BTN3A2 region, in an independent material of 725 families obtained from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium. It is important to note...... that these associations were independent of the HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 genes, as well as of associations observed at HLA-A, -B and -C. Taken together, our results identify PRSS16 and BTN3A2, two genes thought to play important roles in regulating the immune response, as potentially novel susceptibility genes for T1D...

  1. Strategies to work with HLA data in human populations for histocompatibility, clinical transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez-Mazas, A; Vidan-Jeras, B; Nunes, J M

    2012-01-01

    HLA-NET (a European COST Action) aims at networking researchers working in bone marrow transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics to improve the molecular characterization of the HLA genetic diversity of human populations, with an expected strong impact on both public health and fundam......HLA-NET (a European COST Action) aims at networking researchers working in bone marrow transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics to improve the molecular characterization of the HLA genetic diversity of human populations, with an expected strong impact on both public health...... and fundamental research. Such improvements involve finding consensual strategies to characterize human populations and samples and report HLA molecular typings and ambiguities; proposing user-friendly access to databases and computer tools and defining minimal requirements related to ethical aspects. The overall...... outcome is the provision of population genetic characterizations and comparisons in a standard way by all interested laboratories. This article reports the recommendations of four working groups (WG1-4) of the HLA-NET network at the mid-term of its activities. WG1 (Population definitions and sampling...

  2. Definition of an immunologic response using the major histocompatibility complex tetramer and enzyme-linked immunospot assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Gualberto, Antonio; Glaspy, John A; Seja, Elisabeth; Ontiveros, Maribel; Reardon, Deborah L; Renteria, Roberto; Englahner, Brigitte; Economou, James S; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Ribas, Antoni

    2006-01-01

    Define an immunologic response using the tetramer and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. Ten healthy subjects and 21 patients with melanoma (all HLA-A*0201) donated a total of 121 blood samples to determine the lower limit of detection (LLD), analytic coefficient of variation (aCV), and physiologic CV (pCV) of the tetramer and ELISPOT assays. The mean, SD, and reference change value (RCV) were calculated to define changes beyond the assay imprecision, and its application was tested in the monitoring of T-cell expansion after CTLA4 blockade with ticilimumab (CP-675,206). The LLD for the tetramer assay was 0.038% CD8+ cells and seven spots per 10(5) peripheral blood mononuclear cells for the ELISPOT assay. The aCV of the tetramer assay was <10% and was higher for the ELISPOT (24.69-36.32%). There was marked between-subject variability on baseline homeostatic values, which was correlated to prior antigen exposure. An immunologic response was defined as an increase beyond the mean + 3 SD in antigen-specific cells for subjects with baseline levels below the LLD, or beyond the assay RCV for baseline levels above the LLD. In four patients receiving ticilimumab, expansions of antigen-specific T cells beyond the assay variability were noted for EBV and MART1 antigens. A combined approach of change from negative (below the LLD) to positive (above the LLD) and a percentage change beyond the assay variability using the RCV score can be computed to define which change in circulating antigen-specific T cells represents a response to immunotherapy.

  3. Biochemical identification of the bovine blood group M' antigen as a major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønberg, L S; Larsen, B; Koch, C

    1995-01-01

    red and white cells isolated from M'-A16 positive animals, whereas no bands were seen in M'-A16 negative animals in precipitations with the same antibody. Precipitation with a crossreacting human beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m) specific antibody confirmed a class-I-like structure associated with beta...... 2-m on M' positive red cells and the absence of such a structure on M' negative red cells. Sequential precipitations gave analogous results. Proteolytic degradation by papain and V8 protease did not reveal any substantial difference between red and white M'-A16 positive cells, but a slight...... difference in the pI of the immunoprecipitable components of red and white cells was observed. All together, this indicates that either the blood group antigen M' is the BoLA-A16 class I antigen or M' and BoLA-A16 are two different class I polypeptides with the same relative mass, sharing identical epitopes...

  4. Major histocompatibility complex class II DOA sequences from three Antarctic seal species verify stabilizing selection on the DO locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, D J; Stewart, B S; Lehman, N

    2002-12-01

    To provide additional support for the sequence conservation and hence the regulatory role of the MHC class II DOA locus, we obtained the nucleotide sequences of exon 2 and exon 3, along with the intervening intron, of the Ross seal, and sequences from the exon 2 region from the Weddell and leopard seals. These are the first reports of the sequences of this locus from a carnivore species. The results demonstrate strong conservation among mammals for the exon sequence and produce a gene genealogy that is consistent in topology with a species tree.

  5. Degree of Predicted Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Mismatch Correlates with Poorer Clinical Outcomes of Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malene Erup; Kornblit, B; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2010-01-01

    In fully HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCT), the main mechanism of the beneficial graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect and of the detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is believed to be caused by donor cytotoxic T cells directed against disparate recipient minor...... HCT (matched related donor, n=70; matched unrelated donor, n=56) for hematologic malignancies. Initially, the cohort was genotyped for 53 nsSNPs in 11 known miHA source proteins. Twenty-three nsSNPs within six miHA source proteins showed variation in the graft-versus-host (GVH) direction...

  6. The combination of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC genes influences murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eyler, Y L; Pfau, C J; Broomhall, K S

    1989-01-01

    Resistance to the acute lethal disease caused by the docile strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) virus varies widely between different mouse strains. In order to study the inheritance of host influence on susceptibility to this strain of LCM virus, we crossed the F1 to the parent...... susceptibility to the disease. When the parental strains carried similar MHC haplotypes but dissimilar background genes (B10.BR; CBA), 78% of the backcross mice succumbed, indicating that at least two non-MHC loci influenced disease susceptibility. It is unlikely, however, that the same two non-MHC loci...

  7. Quantified colocalization reveals heterotypic histocompatibility class I antigen associations on trophoblast cell membranes: relevance for human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Asma; Miranda-Sayago, José Maria; Obara, Boguslaw; Spencer, Patrick Simon; Dealtry, Gill Barbara; Hayrabedyan, Soren; Shaikly, Valerie; Laissue, Pierre Philippe; Fernández, Nelson

    2013-10-01

    Human placental syncytiotrophoblasts lack expression of most types of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II molecules; this is thought to contribute to a successful pregnancy. However, the HLA class Ib antigens HLA-G, -E, and -F and the HLA class Ia antigen HLA-C are selectively expressed on extravillous trophoblast cells, and they are thought to play a major role in controlling feto-maternal tolerance. We have hypothesized that selective expression, coupled with the preferential physical association of pairs of HLA molecules, contribute to the function of HLA at the feto-maternal interface and the maternal recognition of the fetus. We have developed a unique analytical model that allows detection and quantification of the heterotypic physical associations of HLA class I molecules expressed on the membrane of human trophoblast choriocarcinoma cells, ACH-3P and JEG-3. Automated image analysis was used to estimate the degree of overlap of HLA molecules labeled with different fluorochromes. This approach yields an accurate measurement of the degree of colocalization. In both JEG-3 and ACH-3P cells, HLA-C, -E, and -G were detected on the cell membrane, while the expression of HLA-F was restricted to the cytoplasm. Progesterone treatment alone induced a significant increase in the expression level of the HLA-G/HLA-E association, suggesting that this heterotypic association is modulated by this hormone. Our data shows that the cell-surface HLA class I molecules HLA-G, -E, and -C colocalize with each other and have the potential to form preferential heterotypic associations.

  8. Unusual evolutionary conservation and frequent DNA segment exchange in class I genes of the major histocompatibility complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashida, H; Miyata, T.

    1983-01-01

    From comparisons of homologous DNA sequences for many different genes, it was shown that the silent positions of protein-encoding regions and introns evolve at high and remarkably similar rates for different genes. In addition, both silent positions and introns behave like clocks; they accumulated base substitutions at approximately constant rates with respect to geological time. The rates of evolution were estimated to be 5.5 X 10(-9), 3.7 X 10(-9), and 5.3 X 10(-9) per site per year for sil...

  9. Simulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Structure and Peptide Loading into an MHC Binding Pocket with Teachers’Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Sankian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular understanding of three-dimensional (3D peptide: MHC models require both basic knowledge of computational modeling and skilled visual perception, which are not possessed by all students. The present model aims to simulate MHC molecular structure with the hands and make a profound impression on the students.

  10. Dominant Sequences of Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Conserved Extended Haplotypes from HLA-DQA2 to DAXX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Charles E.; Alford, Dennis R.; Trautwein, Michael R.; Jalloh, Yanoh K.; Tarnacki, Jennifer L.; Kunnenkeri, Sushruta K.; Fici, Dolores A.; Yunis, Edmond J.; Awdeh, Zuheir L.; Alper, Chester A.

    2014-01-01

    We resequenced and phased 27 kb of DNA within 580 kb of the MHC class II region in 158 population chromosomes, most of which were conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs) of European descent or contained their centromeric fragments. We determined the single nucleotide polymorphism and deletion-insertion polymorphism alleles of the dominant sequences from HLA-DQA2 to DAXX for these CEHs. Nine of 13 CEHs remained sufficiently intact to possess a dominant sequence extending at least to DAXX, 230 kb centromeric to HLA-DPB1. We identified the regions centromeric to HLA-DQB1 within which single instances of eight “common” European MHC haplotypes previously sequenced by the MHC Haplotype Project (MHP) were representative of those dominant CEH sequences. Only two MHP haplotypes had a dominant CEH sequence throughout the centromeric and extended class II region and one MHP haplotype did not represent a known European CEH anywhere in the region. We identified the centromeric recombination transition points of other MHP sequences from CEH representation to non-representation. Several CEH pairs or groups shared sequence identity in small blocks but had significantly different (although still conserved for each separate CEH) sequences in surrounding regions. These patterns partly explain strong calculated linkage disequilibrium over only short (tens to hundreds of kilobases) distances in the context of a finite number of observed megabase-length CEHs comprising half a population's haplotypes. Our results provide a clearer picture of European CEH class II allelic structure and population haplotype architecture, improved regional CEH markers, and raise questions concerning regional recombination hotspots. PMID:25299700

  11. Noninvasive estimation of minimun population sizes and variability of the major histocompatibility complex in the andean condor

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaide, Miguel; Cadahía, Luis; Sergio A Lambertucci; Negro, Juan J

    2010-01-01

    Estimating indices of abundance of threatened species is crucial to preserving biodiversity. Over the last few decades, noninvasive genetic sampling has proven to be a more straightforward and less expensive approach than capture–mark–recapture analyses. In particular, molted feathers have become extremely popular for the monitoring of bird populations. Diagnostic molecular markers such as microsatellites, however, are still not available for many avian species of conservation con...

  12. Surfactant protein D augments bacterial association but attenuates major histocompatibility complex class II presentation of bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Lo, Bernice; Evans, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    Development of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with lipid dysregulation and inflammation. As the host defense lectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) has multiple effects in lipid homeostasis and inflammation, the correlation between SP-D concentrations and development of d...

  13. The fester locus in Botryllus schlosseri experiences selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nydam Marie L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allorecognition, the ability of an organism to distinguish self from non-self, occurs throughout the entire tree of life. Despite the prevalence and importance of allorecognition systems, the genetic basis of allorecognition has rarely been characterized outside the well-known MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex in vertebrates and SI (Self-Incompatibility in plants. Where loci have been identified, their evolutionary history is an open question. We have previously identified the genes involved in self/non-self recognition in the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, and we can now begin to investigate their evolution. In B. schlosseri, colonies sharing 1 or more alleles of a gene called FuHC (Fusion Histocompatibility will fuse. Protein products of a locus called fester, located ~300 kb from FuHC, have been shown to play multiple roles in the histocompatibility reaction, as activating and/or inhibitory receptors. We test whether the proteins encoded by this locus are evolving neutrally or are experiencing balancing, directional, or purifying selection. Results Nearly all of the variation in the fester locus resides within populations. The 13 housekeeping genes (12 nuclear genes and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I have substantially more structure among populations within groups and among groups than fester. All polymorphism statistics (Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F* are significantly negative for the East Coast A-type alleles, and Fu and Li's F* statistic is significantly negative for the West Coast A-type alleles. These results are likely due to selection rather than demography, given that 10 of the housekeeping loci have no populations with significant values for any of the polymorphism statistics. The majority of codons in the fester proteins have ω values 95% posterior probability of ω values > 1. Conclusion Fester proteins are evolving non-neutrally. The polymorphism statistics are consistent with either

  14. Identification of the major histocompatibility complex class-II DM and DO alleles in a cohort of northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xi-He; Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2017-10-13

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina) has been considered as an independent species from the pig-tailed macaque group. We have previously reported that this species macaque has the potential to be a useful animal model in HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and vaccine studies due to its susceptibility to HIV-1. To develop this animal into a potential HIV/AIDS model, we have studied the classical MHC genes of this animal. In this study, the non-classical MHC genes Malo-DM and Malo-DO alleles were first characterized by sequencing and cloning in 12 unrelated northern pig-tailed macaques. A total of 20 full-length sequences identified include 4 Malo-DMA, 5 Malo-DMB, 7 Malo-DOA, and 4 Malo-DOB alleles. Most of these allele sequences were shared between northern pig-tailed macaque and other macaque species in exon 2. The full-length MHC-DM and MHC-DO sequences provide more comprehensive analysis of immunogenetics of northern pig-tailed macaques and increase the value of the macaques in further biomedical studies.

  15. Susceptibility to HLA-DM Protein Is Determined by a Dynamic Conformation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecule Bound with Peptide*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Trenh, Peter; Guce, Abigail; Wieczorek, Marek; Lange, Sascha; Sticht, Jana; Jiang, Wei; Bylsma, Marissa; Mellins, Elizabeth D.; Freund, Christian; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-DM mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules during antigen presentation by a mechanism that remains unclear and controversial. Here, we investigated the sequence and structural determinants of HLA-DM interaction. Peptides interacting nonoptimally in the P1 pocket exhibited low MHCII binding affinity and kinetic instability and were highly susceptible to HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange. These changes were accompanied by conformational alterations detected by surface plasmon resonance, SDS resistance assay, antibody binding assay, gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, small angle x-ray scattering, and NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, all of those changes could be reversed by substitution of the P9 pocket anchor residue. Moreover, MHCII mutations outside the P1 pocket and the HLA-DM interaction site increased HLA-DM susceptibility. These results indicate that a dynamic MHCII conformational determinant rather than P1 pocket occupancy is the key factor determining susceptibility to HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange and provide a molecular mechanism for HLA-DM to efficiently target unstable MHCII-peptide complexes for editing and exchange those for more stable ones. PMID:25002586

  16. Susceptibility to HLA-DM protein is determined by a dynamic conformation of major histocompatibility complex class II molecule bound with peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Trenh, Peter; Guce, Abigail; Wieczorek, Marek; Lange, Sascha; Sticht, Jana; Jiang, Wei; Bylsma, Marissa; Mellins, Elizabeth D; Freund, Christian; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-08-22

    HLA-DM mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules during antigen presentation by a mechanism that remains unclear and controversial. Here, we investigated the sequence and structural determinants of HLA-DM interaction. Peptides interacting nonoptimally in the P1 pocket exhibited low MHCII binding affinity and kinetic instability and were highly susceptible to HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange. These changes were accompanied by conformational alterations detected by surface plasmon resonance, SDS resistance assay, antibody binding assay, gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, small angle x-ray scattering, and NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, all of those changes could be reversed by substitution of the P9 pocket anchor residue. Moreover, MHCII mutations outside the P1 pocket and the HLA-DM interaction site increased HLA-DM susceptibility. These results indicate that a dynamic MHCII conformational determinant rather than P1 pocket occupancy is the key factor determining susceptibility to HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange and provide a molecular mechanism for HLA-DM to efficiently target unstable MHCII-peptide complexes for editing and exchange those for more stable ones. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Depleted genetic variation of the European ground squirrel in Central Europe in both microsatellites and the major histocompatibility complex gene: implications for conservation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčanová, Štěpánka; Bryja, Josef; Cosson, J.-F.; Gedeon, C.; Choleva, Lukáš; Ambros, M.; Sedláček, F.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2011), s. 1115-1129 ISSN 1566-0621 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Grant - others:European Science Foundation(XE) ConGen EX/1141 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Souslik * Endangered species * Habitat fragmentation * DRB * MHC Class II Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2011

  18. The thymus in "bare lymphocyte" syndrome : Significance of expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens on thymic epithelial cells in intrathymic T-cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Wijngaert, Frank P. van de; Huber, Jonne; Schuurman, R.K.B.; Zegers, Ben J.M.; Roord, John J.; Kater, L.

    1985-01-01

    Thymic biopsies from two patients with combined immunodeficiency and defective expression of HLA class I and class II antigens on blood mononuclear cells (“bare lymphocyte” syndrome) were investigated. This made possible an evaluation of the significance of HLA antigen expression in a detailed

  19. Peptide binding specificity of major histocompatibility complex class I resolved into an array of apparently independent subspecificities: quantitation by peptide libraries and improved prediction of binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    size are distributed into positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPL) to develop a highly efficient, universal and unbiased approach to address MHC specificity. The PSCPL approach appeared qualitatively and quantitatively superior to other currently used strategies. The average effect...

  20. Next-generation detection of antigen-responsive T cells using DNA barcode-labeled peptide-major histocompatibility complex I multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    sample using >1000 different peptide-MHC multimers labeled with individual DNA barcodes.After isolation of MHC multimer binding T cells their recognition are revealed by amplification andsequencing of the MHC multimer-associated DNA barcodes. The relative frequency of the sequencedDNA barcodes...... originating from a given peptide-MHC motif relates to the size of the antigenresponsiveT cell population. We have demonstrated the use of large panels of >1000 DNA barcodedMHC multimers for detection of rareT cell populations of virus and cancer-restricted origin in various tissues and compared...

  1. Major histocompatibility complex-linked immune response of young chickens vaccinated with an attenuated live infectious bursal disease virus vaccine followed by an infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, Helle; Nielsen, O.L.; Krogh-Maibom, T.

    2002-01-01

    (mean 5,243), B21 (5,570), and B131 (5,333) at 8 d postinfection, How-ever, a virus-neutralizing antibody test did not reflect this result. Nevertheless, the MHC haplotype-associated protective immunity was further supported by the bursa of Fabricius (bursa) recovery from the disease, as measured...... by histological scorings of the bursa. Chickens carrying the BW1 haplotype had a significantly lower bursa lesion score (1.7) than the haplotypes B19 (mean 3.8), B21 (3.6), and B131 (4.3) 8 d postinfection. Furthermore, multiple line effects were found in other variables when comparing Day 6 with Day 8. Body...... weight, relative weights of the bursa and the spleen, percentage and relative number of MHC II molecules on MHC II-positive lymphocytes, percentage and relative number of CD4 molecules on CD4-positive lymphocytes, and the specific antibody response all differed significantly among lines. Line 1, with Red...

  2. Heritable major histocompatibility complex class II-associated differences in production of tumor necrosis factor. alpha. : Relevance to genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, C.O.; Fronek, Z.; Koo, M.; McDevitt, H.O. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA)); Lewis, G.C. (Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Hansen, J.A. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The authors report on the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and TNF-{beta} by mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes or enriched monocyte subpopulations from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed healthy subjects. The results indicate that HLA-DR2- and DQw1-positive donors frequently exhibit low production of TNF-{alpha}, whereas DR3- and DR4-positive subjects show high levels of TNF-{alpha} production. No correlation between TNF-{alpha} levels and HLA-A, -B, and -C genotype was found. The relevance of this quantitative polymorphism to the genetic predisposition to lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was investigated. DR2, DQw1-positive SLE patients show low levels of TNF-{alpha} inducibility; this genotype is also associated with an increased incidence of lupus nephritis. DR3-positive SLE patients, on the other hand, are not predisposed to nephritis, and these patients have high TNF-{alpha} production. DR4 haplotype is associated with high TNF-{alpha} inducibility and is negatively correlated with lupus nephritis. These data may help explain the strong association between HLA-DR2, DQw1 in SLE patients and their susceptibility to nephritis.

  3. Narcolepsy: Autoimmunity, Effector T Cell Activation Due to Infection, or T Cell Independent, Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Induced Neuronal Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Adriano; Gast, Heidemarie; Reith, Walter; Recher, Mike; Birchler, Thomas; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2010-01-01

    Human narcolepsy with cataplexy is a neurological disorder, which develops due to a deficiency in hypocretin producing neurons in the hypothalamus. There is a strong association with human leucocyte antigens HLA-DR2 and HLA-DQB1*0602. The disease typically starts in adolescence. Recent developments in narcolepsy research support the hypothesis of…

  4. The human minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1 as target for stem cell based immunotherapy of cancer : pre-clinical and clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hambach, Lothar Wolfgang Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is an established curative treatment for hematopoietic malignancies and an investigative immunotherapeutic approach for solid tumors. The curative effect of allogeneic SCT is based on so called graft versus-tumor (GvT)

  5. In situ localisation of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II and CD8 positive cells in infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV)-infected Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Dyveke Lem; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Skjødt, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    It is assumed that the mobilisation of a strong cellular immune response is important for the survival of Atlantic salmon infected with infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). In this study, the characterisation of immune cell populations in tissues of non-ISAV infected Atlantic salmon and during...

  6. Helper T cell lines to major and to minor histocompatibility antigens are equally effective in the regulation of B cell responses in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, P K; Owens, T

    1984-01-01

    syngeneic B cells in an antibody response to other alloantigens. Linked recognition was required for effective help to occur, this suggests B cell presentation of antigen to Th cells in vivo. Parallel titration experiments performed with long-term cultured Th lines to MHC and to minor-H antigens showed that...

  7. Automated Analysis of Flow Cytometry Data to Reduce Inter-Lab Variation in the Detection of Major Histocompatibility Complex Multimer-Binding T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Natasja Wulff; Chandran, P. Anoop; Qian, Yu

    2017-01-01

    laboratories. We used three different methods, FLOw Clustering without K (FLOCK), Scalable Weighted Iterative Flow-clustering Technique (SWIFT), and ReFlow to analyze flow cytometry data files from 28 laboratories. Each laboratory screened for antigen-responsive T cell populations with frequency ranging from 0.......01 to 1.5% of lymphocytes within samples from two donors. Experience from this analysis shows that all three programs can be used for the identification of high to intermediate frequency of MHC multimer-binding T cell populations, with results very similar to that of manual gating. For the less frequent...

  8. Associação do sistema de histocompatibilidade humano com doenças oftalmológicas Association of human histocompatibility antigens with ophthalmological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Vários estudos têm procurado identificar marcadores genéticos para doenças oftalmológicas. Dentre eles, destaca-se o antígeno de histocompatibilidade humano (Human Leukocyte Antigens. Situado no braço curto do cromossomo 6, o sistema antígeno de histocompatibilidade humano é conhecido por sua capacidade de conferir susceptibilidade ou proteção a diferentes doenças. Em virtude do seu acentuado polimorfismo, o tipo e a força da associação variam a depender da enfermidade e da raça (etnia estudadas. O surgimento de métodos moleculares para tipificação dos alelos antígeno de histocompatibilidade humano e as recentes atualizações de sua nomenclatura têm contribuído para o melhor entendimento desse sistema. O presente trabalho tem por objetivos revisar a estrutura e função do sistema antígeno de histocompatibilidade humano e relatar suas associações com uveíte anterior aguda, penfigóide cicatricial ocular, ceratocone de início na juventude e retinocoroidopatia "birdshot".Many studies have been trying to identify genetic markers for opthalmological diseases, including, among others, the HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigens. Localized on the short arm of chromosome 6, the human leukocyte antigen system is well known for its capacity to confer susceptibility or resistance to different diseases. In view of its accentuated polymorphism, the strength and type of association differs with the disease and sometimes, with the studied ethnic-racial group. The development of molecular methods to typify HLA alleles and recent updates of their nomenclature has contributed to a better understanding of this system. In this review, some aspects of the human leukocyte antigen system are discussed, such as the methods of detection, nomenclature and association with acute anterior uveitis, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, young-onset keratoconus and birdshot retinochoroidopathy.

  9. Strategies to work with HLA data in human populations for histocompatibility, clinical transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics: HLA-NET methodological recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mazas, A; Vidan-Jeras, B; Nunes, J M; Fischer, G; Little, A-M; Bekmane, U; Buhler, S; Buus, S; Claas, F H J; Dormoy, A; Dubois, V; Eglite, E; Eliaou, J F; Gonzalez-Galarza, F; Grubic, Z; Ivanova, M; Lie, B; Ligeiro, D; Lokki, M L; da Silva, B Martins; Martorell, J; Mendonça, D; Middleton, D; Voniatis, D Papioannou; Papasteriades, C; Poli, F; Riccio, M E; Vlachou, M Spyropoulou; Sulcebe, G; Tonks, S; Nevessignsky, M Toungouz; Vangenot, C; van Walraven, A-M; Tiercy, J-M

    2012-01-01

    HLA-NET (a European COST Action) aims at networking researchers working in bone marrow transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics to improve the molecular characterization of the HLA genetic diversity of human populations, with an expected strong impact on both public health and fundamental research. Such improvements involve finding consensual strategies to characterize human populations and samples and report HLA molecular typings and ambiguities; proposing user-friendly access to databases and computer tools and defining minimal requirements related to ethical aspects. The overall outcome is the provision of population genetic characterizations and comparisons in a standard way by all interested laboratories. This article reports the recommendations of four working groups (WG1-4) of the HLA-NET network at the mid-term of its activities. WG1 (Population definitions and sampling strategies for population genetics’ analyses) recommends avoiding outdated racial classifications and population names (e.g. ‘Caucasian’) and using instead geographic and/or cultural (e.g. linguistic) criteria to describe human populations (e.g. ‘pan-European’). A standard ‘HLA-NET POPULATION DATA QUESTIONNAIRE’ has been finalized and is available for the whole HLA community. WG2 (HLA typing standards for population genetics analyses) recommends retaining maximal information when reporting HLA typing results. Rather than using the National Marrow Donor Program coding system, all ambiguities should be provided by listing all allele pairs required to explain each genotype, according to the formats proposed in ‘HLA-NET GUIDELINES FOR REPORTING HLA TYPINGS’. The group also suggests taking into account a preliminary list of alleles defined by polymorphisms outside the peptide-binding sites that may affect population genetic statistics because of significant frequencies. WG3 (Bioinformatic strategies for HLA population data storage and analysis) recommends the use of programs capable of dealing with ambiguous data, such as the ‘gene[rate]’ computer tools to estimate frequencies, test for Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium and selective neutrality on data containing any number and kind of ambiguities. WG4 (Ethical issues) proposes to adopt thorough general principles for any HLA population study to ensure that it conforms to (inter)national legislation or recommendations/guidelines. All HLA-NET guidelines and tools are available through its website http://hla-net.eu. PMID:22533604

  10. Structure of a SARS coronavirus-derived peptide bound to the human major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-B*1501

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Gustav; Kristensen, Ole; Kastrup, Jette S

    2008-01-01

    , the crystal structure of HLA-B*1501 in complex with a SARS coronavirus-derived nonapeptide (VQQESSFVM) has been determined at high resolution (1.87 A). The peptide is deeply anchored in the B and F pockets, but with the Glu4 residue pointing away from the floor in the peptide-binding groove, making...

  11. Strategies to work with HLA data in human populations for histocompatibility, clinical transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics: HLA-NET methodological recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mazas, A; Vidan-Jeras, B; Nunes, J M; Fischer, G; Little, A-M; Bekmane, U; Buhler, S; Buus, S; Claas, F H J; Dormoy, A; Dubois, V; Eglite, E; Eliaou, J F; Gonzalez-Galarza, F; Grubic, Z; Ivanova, M; Lie, B; Ligeiro, D; Lokki, M L; da Silva, B Martins; Martorell, J; Mendonça, D; Middleton, D; Voniatis, D Papioannou; Papasteriades, C; Poli, F; Riccio, M E; Vlachou, M Spyropoulou; Sulcebe, G; Tonks, S; Nevessignsky, M Toungouz; Vangenot, C; van Walraven, A-M; Tiercy, J-M

    2012-12-01

    HLA-NET (a European COST Action) aims at networking researchers working in bone marrow transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics to improve the molecular characterization of the HLA genetic diversity of human populations, with an expected strong impact on both public health and fundamental research. Such improvements involve finding consensual strategies to characterize human populations and samples and report HLA molecular typings and ambiguities; proposing user-friendly access to databases and computer tools and defining minimal requirements related to ethical aspects. The overall outcome is the provision of population genetic characterizations and comparisons in a standard way by all interested laboratories. This article reports the recommendations of four working groups (WG1-4) of the HLA-NET network at the mid-term of its activities. WG1 (Population definitions and sampling strategies for population genetics' analyses) recommends avoiding outdated racial classifications and population names (e.g. 'Caucasian') and using instead geographic and/or cultural (e.g. linguistic) criteria to describe human populations (e.g. 'pan-European'). A standard 'HLA-NET POPULATION DATA QUESTIONNAIRE' has been finalized and is available for the whole HLA community. WG2 (HLA typing standards for population genetics analyses) recommends retaining maximal information when reporting HLA typing results. Rather than using the National Marrow Donor Program coding system, all ambiguities should be provided by listing all allele pairs required to explain each genotype, according to the formats proposed in 'HLA-NET GUIDELINES FOR REPORTING HLA TYPINGS'. The group also suggests taking into account a preliminary list of alleles defined by polymorphisms outside the peptide-binding sites that may affect population genetic statistics because of significant frequencies. WG3 (Bioinformatic strategies for HLA population data storage and analysis) recommends the use of programs capable of dealing with ambiguous data, such as the 'gene[rate]' computer tools to estimate frequencies, test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and selective neutrality on data containing any number and kind of ambiguities. WG4 (Ethical issues) proposes to adopt thorough general principles for any HLA population study to ensure that it conforms to (inter)national legislation or recommendations/guidelines. All HLA-NET guidelines and tools are available through its website http://hla-net.eu. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. N-glycosylation of asparagine 8 regulates surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A (MICA) alleles dependent on threonine 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maiken Mellergaard; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Schneider, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    -glycosylation site. Mutational analysis revealed that a single amino acid (T24) in the extracellular domain of MICA018 was essential for the N-glycosylation dependency, while the intracellular domain was not involved. The HHV7 immunoevasin, U21, was found to inhibit MICA018 surface expression by affecting N......-glycosylation and the retention was rescued by T24A substitution. Our study reveals N-glycosylation as an allele-specific regulatory mechanism important for regulation of surface expression of MICA018 and we pinpoint the residues essential for this N-glycosylation dependency. In addition we show that this regulatory mechanism......NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on several types of human lymphocytes. NKG2D ligands can be induced upon cell stress and are frequently targeted post-translationally in infected or transformed cells, in order to avoid immune recognition. Virus infection and inflammation alter protein N...

  13. Perspective: my 37 year journey through Chlamydia  research: Chlamydia  antigen analysis using monoclonal antibodies and major histocompatibility complex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunham, Robert C

    2017-11-30

    Chlamydia antigen analysis enables understanding of disease pathogenesis, facilitates development of diagnostic immunoassays and is essential to the design of a subunit Chlamydia trachomatis vaccine. Using an autobiographical narrative, I review over three decades of antigen analysis research findings coming from my research laboratory and provide an outlook to the broader field of Chlamydia seroepidemiology and vaccinology. Based on the experiences of my scientific career I conclude with thoughts for young scientists newly entering the Chlamydia research field. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Modeling the interactions of a peptide-major histocompatibility class I ligand with its receptors. I. Recognition by two alpha beta T cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Stryhn, A; Fugger, L

    2000-01-01

    were successfully docked into the Ha255-262/Kk model. We have previously used a systematic and exhaustive panel of 144 single amino acid substituted analogs to analyze both MHC binding and T cell recognition of the parental viral peptide. This large body of experimental data was used to evaluate...... the models. They were found to account well for the experimentally obtained data, lending considerable support to the proposed models and suggesting a universal docking mode for alpha beta TCRs to MHC-peptide complexes. Such models may also be useful in guiding future rational experimentation....

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif protein enhances the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and reduces major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ely, Kenneth H; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A; Green, William R; Enelow, Richard I; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-03

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  17. The Use of the Immune Epitope Database to Study Autoimmune Epitope Data Related to Alopecia Areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sette, Alessandro; Paul, Sinu; Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern

    2015-11-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a repository of published epitope data for infectious diseases, allergy, transplantation and autoimmunity. Herein we provide an introduction to the IEDB search interface, focusing on data related to autoimmune diseases, including alopecia areata (AA). We demonstrate how common questions related can be answered, such as how to search for specific autoantigens, epitope sequences, response types (B- and/or T-cell assays), or host, as well as how to search for epitopes of known major histocompatibility complex restriction and for data related to a specific disease. Our survey of the data found that while as a whole Autoimmunity-specific records represent a significant portion (∼30%); epitopes reported for AA are remarkably few, just 23 epitopes from six antigens. This reveals a significant knowledge gap for AA, and suggests that additional mapping of epitopes and identification of novel AA-associated autoantigens is warranted. Citing recently published examples, we show how bioinformatic, proteomic, and technological advances make it now increasingly feasible to identify epitopes and novel antigens in human disease. The goal herein was to increase awareness of the IEDB as a free resource for the scientific community and to demonstrate its use in finding (existing) and analyzing (prediction) epitope data.

  18. Dendritic cells engineered to express defined allo-HLA peptide complexes induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells efficiently killing tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stronen, E; Abrahamsen, I W; Gaudernack, G

    2009-01-01

    presented by a non-self human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecule and transferred to cancer patients expressing that HLA molecule. Obtaining allo-restricted CTL of high-avidity and low cross-reactivity has, however, proven difficult. Here, we show that dendritic cells transfected with mRNA encoding HLA-A*0201......, efficiently present externally loaded peptides from the antigen, Melan-A/MART-1 to T cells from HLA-A*0201-negative donors. CD8(+) T cells binding HLA-A*0201/MART-1 pentamers were detected already after 12 days of co-culture in 11/11 donors. The majority of cells from pentamer(+) cell lines were CTL......Most tumour-associated antigens (TAA) are non-mutated self-antigens. The peripheral T cell repertoire is devoid of high-avidity TAA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) due to self-tolerance. As tolerance is major histocompatibility complex-restricted, T cells may be immunized against TAA...

  19. Overcoming viral escape with vaccines that generate and display antigen diversity in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Quintanilla Albert

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral diversity is a key problem for the design of effective and universal vaccines. Virtually, a vaccine candidate including most of the diversity for a given epitope would force the virus to create escape mutants above the viability threshold or with a high fitness cost. Presentation of the hypothesis Therefore, I hypothesize that priming the immune system with polyvalent vaccines where each single vehicle generates and displays multiple antigen variants in vivo, will elicit a broad and long-lasting immune response able to avoid viral escape. Testing the hypothesis To this purpose, I propose the use of yeasts that carry virus-like particles designed to pack the antigen-coding RNA inside and replicate it via RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. This would produce diversity in vivo limited to the target of interest and without killing the vaccine vehicle. Implications of the hypothesis This approach is in contrast with peptide cocktails synthesized in vitro and polyvalent strategies where every cell or vector displays a single or definite number of mutants; but similarly to all them, it should be able to overcome original antigenic sin, avoid major histocompatibility complex restriction, and elicit broad cross-reactive immune responses. Here I discuss additional advantages such as minimal global antagonism or those derived from using a yeast vehicle, and potential drawbacks like autoimmunity. Diversity generated by this method could be monitored both genotypically and phenotypically, and therefore selected or discarded before use if needed.

  20. HLAProfiler utilizes k-mer profiles to improve HLA calling accuracy for rare and common alleles in RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchkovich, Martin L; Brown, Chad C; Robasky, Kimberly; Chai, Shengjie; Westfall, Sharon; Vincent, Benjamin G; Weimer, Eric T; Powers, Jason G

    2017-09-27

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is a genomic region involved in regulating the human immune system by encoding cell membrane major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins that are responsible for self-recognition. Understanding the variation in this region provides important insights into autoimmune disorders, disease susceptibility, oncological immunotherapy, regenerative medicine, transplant rejection, and toxicogenomics. Traditional approaches to HLA typing are low throughput, target only a few genes, are labor intensive and costly, or require specialized protocols. RNA sequencing promises a relatively inexpensive, high-throughput solution for HLA calling across all genes, with the bonus of complete transcriptome information and widespread availability of historical data. Existing tools have been limited in their ability to accurately and comprehensively call HLA genes from RNA-seq data. We created HLAProfiler ( https://github.com/ExpressionAnalysis/HLAProfiler ), a k-mer profile-based method for HLA calling in RNA-seq data which can identify rare and common HLA alleles with > 99% accuracy at two-field precision in both biological and simulated data. For 68% of novel alleles not present in the reference database, HLAProfiler can correctly identify the two-field precision or exact coding sequence, a significant advance over existing algorithms. HLAProfiler allows for accurate HLA calls in RNA-seq data, reliably expanding the utility of these data in HLA-related research and enabling advances across a broad range of disciplines. Additionally, by using the observed data to identify potential novel alleles and update partial alleles, HLAProfiler will facilitate further improvements to the existing database of reference HLA alleles. HLAProfiler is available at https://expressionanalysis.github.io/HLAProfiler/ .

  1. Immunotargeting relapsed or refractory precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia – role of blinatumomab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queudeville M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Manon Queudeville, Rupert Handgretinger, Martin Ebinger Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Children’s Hospital, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany Abstract: Patients with refractory or relapsed (R/R acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL have a dismal prognosis of around 5% long-term survival when treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy and allogenic stem cell transplantation. T-cell immunobased strategies open up new therapeutic perspectives. Blinatumomab is the first of a new class of antibody constructs that was labeled bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE: it consists of two single chain variable fragment connected with a flexible linker, one side binding CD3, the other CD19. The tight binding and the close proximity to the CD19-positive B-cells and leukemic cells leads to non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted T-cell activation, polyclonal T-cell expansion and direct target cell killing. Applied by continuous infusion, blinatumomab achieves morphological complete response rates ranging from 39% to 69% in R/R ALL patients (compared to 25% after second-line chemotherapy with prolonged overall survival (blinatumomab median overall survival, 7.7 months vs chemotherapy, 4.0 months. In comparison to conventional cytotoxic second-line protocols blinatumomab has a favorable safety profile. The main adverse event is related to the mode of action of blinatumomab: the induction of a cytokine-release syndrome that can be managed by interruption and/or the application of steroids or tocilizumab. Another typical complication is the occurrence of neurological side effects, such as seizures and encephalopathy. This neurotoxicity is reversible after application of steroids and/or withdrawal of blinatumomab. Blinatumomab has proven to be a powerful therapeutic option in R/R ALL patients both adult and pediatric because of its efficacy and limited toxicity. Keywords: R/R precursor B-cell ALL, blinatumomab, T

  2. Isotype-like suppression of T cell-mediated immunity in vivo. II. Suppression of the early component of contact sensitivity by a Ly-2+ T cell-derived suppressor factor that binds to contact sensitivity-initiating, antigen-specific, Ly-1+ T cell-derived factors that are of different antigen specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, W; Bereta, M; Ptak, M; Askenase, P W

    1986-03-01

    Recognition that delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions, such as contact sensitivity (CS) in mice, are initiated by Ly-1+ T cell-derived, antigen-specific factors has led to identification of a new kind of suppressor T cell that regulates this initiation phase of CS. Regulation by these suppressor T cells is T cell isotype-like in that initiation of DTH of various antigenic specificities is suppressed, whereas, Ly-1+ T cells mediating the antigen/major histocompatibility complex-restricted, classic delayed phase of CS responses are not affected, nor are other T cell activities. This study shows that these isotype-specific suppressor T cells probably act by release of soluble, isotype-specific, suppressor factors. These isotype-specific T cell factors bind to and can be eluted from columns linked with antigen-specific Ly-1+ T cell factors that initiate CS, and are of different antigen specificities. These T cell regulating, anti-isotypic suppressor factors are derived from Lyt-2+ I-J- T cells and suppress CS-initiating T cells, but do not affect the delayed-acting T cells of CS. This is in contrast with antigen-specific T cell suppressor factors that affect the late-acting and not the early-acting T cells of CS. It is suggested that the antigen-binding, CS-initiating, T cell factors, and their regulatory, anti-isotypic T cell factors are, respectively, T cell analogues of immunoglobulin(Ig)E antibody, and IgE-binding factors, that regulate IgE antibody production by IgE+ B cells.

  3. "When Did I Learn and When Shall I Act?": The Developmental Relationship between Episodic Future Thinking and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Mika; Suzuki, Toshiko

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the development of the ability to reflect on one's personal past and future. A total of 64 4- to 6-year-olds received tasks of delayed self-recognition, source memory, delay of gratification, and a newly developed task of future-oriented action timing. Although children's performance on delayed self-recognition, source…

  4. Enhanced expression in vivo of HLA-ABC antigens and beta 2-microglobulin on human lymphoid cells induced by human interferon-alpha in patients with lung cancer. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens prior to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Plesner, T; Larsen, J K

    1985-01-01

    than 0.5, respectively) by day-to-day analysis of an untreated healthy control group. An increased expression of both HLA-ABC (mean 55%, P less than 0.0005) and beta 2m (mean 23%, P less than 0.01) was also observed prior to treatment in the lung cancer patients when compared to a group of age matched...... healthy individuals. Treatment with IFN-alpha caused a significant redistribution of mononuclear cells resulting in both absolute and relative lymphopenia. Pre-treatment lymphocyte counts were 1.09 X 10(9)/1 (range 0.49-1.73), post-treatment counts were 0.55 X 10(9)/1 (range 0.39-1.06)....

  5. Correlation between histocompatibility antigens and recurrent aphthous stomatitis in the brazilian population Estudo da associação entre antígenos de histocompatibilidade e estomatite aftoide recorrente em população brasileira

    OpenAIRE

    Willo Wilhelmsen, Niels Salles; Weber, Raimar; Monteiro, Francisco; Kalil,Jorge; Dieb Miziara, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common oral mucosa disorder that affects 20% of the world's population, characterized by recurring painful ulcers in the mouth. The diagnosis is primarily based on the patient's clinical history. Inheritance may pose as a risk factor for the disease; however, the studies available are inconclusive as to the results attained, and they vary according to the population studied. AIM: to typify class I and class II HLA molecules and to assess how frequent these m...

  6. Correlation between histocompatibility antigens and recurrent aphthous stomatitis in the brazilian population Estudo da associação entre antígenos de histocompatibilidade e estomatite aftoide recorrente em população brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Salles Willo Wilhelmsen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common oral mucosa disorder that affects 20% of the world's population, characterized by recurring painful ulcers in the mouth. The diagnosis is primarily based on the patient's clinical history. Inheritance may pose as a risk factor for the disease; however, the studies available are inconclusive as to the results attained, and they vary according to the population studied. AIM: to typify class I and class II HLA molecules and to assess how frequent these molecules are present in the Brazilian population with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis, compared to healthy controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective, cross-sectional and investigative study, thirty one patients with diagnostic hypothesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis were seen from February of 2004 to May of 2006. We obtained the DNA from those patients who matched the inclusion criteria and typified their HLA by PCR. RESULTS: In those patients with Recurrent Minor Aphthous Stomatitis we found statistically significant occurrences of HLA-A33 and HLA-B35. CONCLUSION: HLA-A33 and HLA-B35 may be associated with recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis in the Brazilian's population.A Estomatite Aftoide Recorrente é uma doença oral com incidência em 20% da população mundial, caracterizada por úlceras mucosas de caráter recidivante. O diagnóstico baseiase principalmente na história clínica do paciente. Hereditariedade pode ser um fator de risco para doença, entretanto, os estudos disponíveis não são conclusivos quanto aos resultados obtidos, variando segundo a população estudada. OBJETIVO: Tipificar moléculas HLA de classe I e de classe II e avaliar a frequência destas moléculas em pacientes brasileiros, portadores de Estomatite Aftoide Recorrente, comparando com grupo controle. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Este trabalho possui um desenho prospectivo, transverso e investigativo. Foram estudados 31 pacientes com suspeita diagnóstica de Estomatite Aftoide Recorrente no período de fevereiro de 2004 a maio de 2006. Os pacientes foram submetidos a protocolo de exames e, daqueles que obedeceram aos critérios de inclusão, foi extraído o DNA e realizada a tipificação HLA por Reação de Polimerização em Cadeia. RESULTADO: Nos pacientes portadores de Estomatite Aftoide Recorrente do tipo minor encontramos as frequências HLA A33 e B35 estatisticamente significantes. CONCLUSÃO: As frequências HLA-A33 e HLA-B35 podem estar associadas à Estomatite Aftoide Recorrente minor na população brasileira.

  7. Modeling the interactions of a peptide-major histocompatibility class I ligand with its receptors. II. Cross-reaction between a monoclonal antibody and two alpha beta T cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Engberg, J; Stryhn, A

    2000-01-01

    The recombinant antibody, pSAN13.4.1, has a unique T cell like specificity; it binds an Influenza Hemagglutinin octapeptide (Ha255-262) in an MHC (H-2Kk)-restricted manner, and a detailed comparison of the fine specificity of pSAN13.4.1 with the fine specificity of two Ha255-262-specific, H-2Kk-r...

  8. The chicken beta 2-microglobulin gene is located on a non-major histocompatibility complex microchromosome: a small, G+C-rich gene with X and Y boxes in the promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riegert, P; Andersen, R; Bumstead, N

    1996-01-01

    a similar genomic organization but smaller introns and higher G+C content than mammalian beta 2-microglobulin genes. The promoter region is particularly G+C-rich and contains, in addition to interferon regulatory elements, potential S/W, X, and Y boxes that were originally described for mammalian class II...

  9. Effects of highly conserved major histocompatibility complex (MHC extended haplotypes on iron and low CD8+ T lymphocyte phenotypes in HFE C282Y homozygous hemochromatosis patients from three geographically distant areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Costa

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH is a recessively inherited disorder of iron overload occurring commonly in subjects homozygous for the C282Y mutation in HFE gene localized on chromosome 6p21.3 in linkage disequilibrium with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A locus. Although its genetic homogeneity, the phenotypic expression is variable suggesting the presence of modifying factors. One such genetic factor, a SNP microhaplotype named A-A-T, was recently found to be associated with a more severe phenotype and also with low CD8(+T-lymphocyte numbers. The present study aimed to test whether the predictive value of the A-A-T microhaplotype remained in other population settings. In this study of 304 HH patients from 3 geographically distant populations (Porto, Portugal 65; Alabama, USA 57; Nord-Trøndelag, Norway 182, the extended haplotypes involving A-A-T were studied in 608 chromosomes and the CD8(+ T-lymphocyte numbers were determined in all subjects. Patients from Porto had a more severe phenotype than those from other settings. Patients with A-A-T seemed on average to have greater iron stores (p = 0.021, but significant differences were not confirmed in the 3 separate populations. Low CD8(+ T-lymphocytes were associated with HLA-A*03-A-A-T in Porto and Alabama patients but not in the greater series from Nord-Trøndelag. Although A-A-T may signal a more severe iron phenotype, this study was unable to prove such an association in all population settings, precluding its use as a universal predictive marker of iron overload in HH. Interestingly, the association between A-A-T and CD8(+ T-lymphocytes, which was confirmed in Porto and Alabama patients, was not observed in Nord-Trøndelag patients, showing that common HLA haplotypes like A*01-B*08 or A*03-B*07 segregating with HFE/C282Y in the three populations may carry different messages. These findings further strengthen the relevance of HH as a good disease model to search for novel candidate loci associated with the genetic transmission of CD8(+ T-lymphocyte numbers.

  10. CD40 Ligand-activated, antigen-specific B cells are comparable to mature dendritic cells in presenting protein antigens and major histocompatibility complex class I- and class II-binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Flies, Amanda; Efebera, Yvonne; Sherr, David H

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are increasingly exploited for cell-based immunotherapy. However, limitations in ex vivo DC growth and DC functional heterogeneity have motivated development of complementary antigen-presenting cell sources. Here, the ability of CD40 ligand (CD40L)-activated B cells to fulfil that role was investigated. We demonstrate for the first time that non-specific or antigen-specific murine B cells can be grown for extended periods of time by stimulation with CD40L. These cells rapidly up-regulate and maintain high levels of co-stimulatory molecules. In a head-to-head comparison with DC, CD40L-expanded B cells were comparable to DC in the presentation of peptides to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. While DC were superior to antigen non-specific CD40L-activated B cells with regard to whole protein (NP-BSA) processing and presentation, CD40L-expanded B cells from NP-BSA-immunized mice were comparable to DC when presenting BSA or NP-BSA to primed primary T cells or when presenting NP linked to an unrelated carrier, CGG, to naïve T cells. Thus, the combination of CD40L activation, which supports B-cell growth and augments intracellular protein processing, and antigen uptake via the B-cell receptor, allows for efficient uptake, processing, and presentation of whole protein antigens in a fashion comparable to that observed with mature DC. Like DC, CD40L-activated B cells efficiently home to secondary lymphoid organs in vivo. This system represents a unique tool for studying primary antigen-specific B cells and the results suggest that the outgrowth of large numbers of highly activated B cells represents a viable and practical complement to DC for cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:18067555

  11. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Processing of the NY-ESO-1 Antigen Is Regulated by Rpn10 and Rpn13 Proteins and Immunoproteasomes following Non-lysine Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Richard; Lehmann, Andrea; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Ebstein, Frédéric

    2016-04-15

    The supply of MHC class I-restricted peptides is primarily ensured by the degradation of intracellular proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Depending on the target and the enzymes involved, ubiquitination is a process that may dramatically vary in terms of linkages, length, and attachment sites. Here we identified the unique lysine residue at position 124 of the NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen as the acceptor site for the formation of canonical Lys-48-linkages. Interestingly, a lysine-less form of NY-ESO-1 was as efficient as its wild-type counterpart in supplying the HLA-A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1157-165 antigenic peptide. In fact, we show that the regulation of NY-ESO-1 processing by the ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 as a well as by the standard and immunoproteasome is governed by non-canonical ubiquitination on non-lysine sites. In summary, our data underscore the significance of atypical ubiquitination in the modulation of MHC class I antigen processing. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Processing of the NY-ESO-1 Antigen Is Regulated by Rpn10 and Rpn13 Proteins and Immunoproteasomes following Non-lysine Ubiquitination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Richard; Lehmann, Andrea; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Ebstein, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The supply of MHC class I-restricted peptides is primarily ensured by the degradation of intracellular proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Depending on the target and the enzymes involved, ubiquitination is a process that may dramatically vary in terms of linkages, length, and attachment sites. Here we identified the unique lysine residue at position 124 of the NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen as the acceptor site for the formation of canonical Lys-48-linkages. Interestingly, a lysine-less form of NY-ESO-1 was as efficient as its wild-type counterpart in supplying the HLA-A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1157–165 antigenic peptide. In fact, we show that the regulation of NY-ESO-1 processing by the ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 as a well as by the standard and immunoproteasome is governed by non-canonical ubiquitination on non-lysine sites. In summary, our data underscore the significance of atypical ubiquitination in the modulation of MHC class I antigen processing. PMID:26903513

  13. Correction of the X-linked immunodeficiency phenotype by transgenic expression of human Bruton tyrosine kinase under the control of the class II major histocompatibility complex Ea locus control region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); S. Raguz (Selina); A.P.M. de Wit (Ton); G.M. Dingjan (Gemma); H.F.J. Savelkoul (Huub); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractBruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for the development of pre-B cells to mature B cell stages. Btk-deficient mice manifest an X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) defect characterized by a reduction of peripheral IgMlow IgDhigh B cells, a lack of peritoneal CD5+ B cells, low serum

  14. Detecting Site-Specific Physicochemical Selective Pressures: Applications to the Class I HLA of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex and the SRK of the Plant Sporophytic Self-Incompatibility System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sainudiin, Raazesh; Wong, Wendy Shuk Wan; Yogeeswaran, Krithika

    2005-01-01

    partitioning the codons on the basis of some property of the encoded amino acids. This partition is used to parametrize the rates of property-conserving and property-altering base substitutions at the codon level by means of finite mixtures of Markov models that also account for codon and transition...

  15. Development of a rapid in vitro protein refolding assay which discriminates between peptide-bound and peptide-free forms of recombinant porcine major histocompatibility class I complex (SLA-I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Kristensen, B.; Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    , by linking them through glycine-rich linkers to peptides representing T-cell epitopes from classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). An in vitro refold assay was developed, using a monoclonal anti-SLA antibody (PT85A) to gauge refolding. The single best-defined, SLA......-I restricted porcine CD8(+) T-cell epitope currently known is a 9-residue peptide from the polyprotein of CSFV (J. Gen. Virol, 76 (1995) 3039). Based on results with the CSFV epitope and two porcine haplotypes (H4 and H7), the in vitro refold assay appeared able to discriminate between peptide-free and peptide...

  16. X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals from the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2706 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawacka, Anna [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050 Berlin (Germany); Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ziegler@charite.de [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-12-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*2706 in complex with two peptides is reported. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles HLA-B*2704 and HLA-B*2706 show an ethnically restricted distribution and are differentially associated with ankylosing spondylitis, with HLA-B*2706 lacking association with this autoimmune disease. However, the products of the two alleles differ by only two amino acids, at heavy-chain residues 114 (His in HLA-B*2704; Asp in HLA-B*2706) and 116 (Asp in HLA-B*2704; Tyr in HLA-B*2706). Both residues could be involved in contacting amino acids of a bound peptide, suggesting that peptides presented by these subtypes play a role in disease pathogenesis. Two HLA-B*2706–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG as precipitant. Data sets were collected to resolutions of 2.70 Å (viral peptide pLMP2, RRRWRRLTV; space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}) and 1.83 Å (self-peptide pVIPR, RRKWRRWHL; space group P2{sub 1}). Using HLA-B*2705 complexed with the pGR peptide (RRRWHRWRL) as a search model, unambiguous molecular-replacement solutions were found for both HLA-B*2706 complexes.

  17. A Small Peptide (CEL-1000) Derived from the Beta-Chain of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecule Induces Complete Protection Against Malaria in an Antigen-Independent Manner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charoenvit, Yupin; Brice, Gary T; Bacon, David; Majam, Victoria; Williams, Jackie; Abot, Esteban; Ganeshan, Harini; Sedegah, Martha; Doolan, Denise L; Carucci, Daniel J; Zimmerman, Daniel H

    2004-01-01

    .... We report that CEL-1000 confers a high degree of protection against Plasmodium sporozoite challenge in a murine model of malaria, as shown by the total absence of blood stage infection following...

  18. A Small Peptide (CEL-1000) Derived from the Beta-Chain of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecule Induces Complete Protection Against Malaria in an Antigen-Independent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    mortality and morbidity in tropical and subtropical areas of the world, with approximately 300 million people considered at risk of infection. Although...Methods. TABLE 1. Potency of CE1-1000 in A/J micea Expt no. and antigen dose (g) or treatment No. of sporozoites used for challenge No. of mice protected...no. tested % Protection P value b Expt 1 1.25 100 6/10 60 0.0190763 2.5 100 8/10 80 0.0016537 5 100 10/10 100 0.0000523 TiterMax adjuvant (control) 10

  19. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and viral IL-10 strongly reduce antigen-specific human T cell proliferation by diminishing the antigen-presenting capacity of monocytes via downregulation of class II major histocompatibility complex expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal Malefyt, R.; Haanen, J.; Spits, H.; Roncarolo, M. G.; te Velde, Anje; Figdor, C.; Johnson, K.; Kastelein, R.; Yssel, H.; de Vries, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and viral IL-10 (v-IL-10) strongly reduced antigen-specific proliferation of human T cells and CD4+ T cell clones when monocytes were used as antigen-presenting cells. In contrast, IL-10 and v-IL-10 did not affect the proliferative responses to antigens presented by autologous

  20. 42 CFR 121.9 - Designated transplant program requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and rehabilitation medicine, histocompatibility, and immunogenetics and, as appropriate, hepatology, pediatrics, nephrology with dialysis capability, and pulmonary medicine with respiratory therapy support; (vi) Has immediate access to microbiology, clinical chemistry, histocompatibility testing, radiology, and...

  1. Elephants know when their bodies are obstacles to success in a novel transfer task

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rachel Dale; Joshua M Plotnik

    2017-01-01

    .... The hallmark empirical assessment, the mirror self-recognition test, focuses on an animal's ability to recognise itself in a mirror and success has thus far been demonstrated in only a small number...

  2. Identification of the het-r vegetative incompatibility gene of Podospora anserina as a member of the fast evolving HNWD gene family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chevanne, D.; Bastiaans, E.; Debets, A.J.M.; Saupe, S.J.; Clave, C.; Paoletti, M.

    2009-01-01

    In fungi, vegetative incompatibility is a conspecific non-self recognition mechanism that restricts formation of viable heterokaryons when incompatible alleles of specific het loci interact. In Podospora anserina, three non-allelic incompatibility systems have been genetically defined involving

  3. Preferential HLA Usage in the Influenza Virus-Specific CTL Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boon, Adrianus C. M; de Mutsert, Gerrie; Fouchier, Ron A. M; Sintnicolaas, Kees; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2004-01-01

    ...; and Sanquin Bloodbank Rotterdam, Laboratory for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics, Dordrecht, The Netherlands To study whether individual HLA class I alleles are used preferentially or equally...

  4. Embryonic chimerism does not induce tolerance in an invertebrate model organism

    OpenAIRE

    Poudyal, Monita; Rosa, Sabrina; Powell, Anahid E.; Moreno, Maria; Stephen L Dellaporta; Buss, Leo W.; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2007-01-01

    In colonial marine invertebrates, allorecognition restricts somatic fusion and thus, chimerism, to histocompatible individuals. Little is understood, however, about how invertebrates respond to chimerism formed across histocompatibility barriers or whether embryonic exposure to histoincompatible cells induces allotolerance. We here evaded natural allorecognition barriers by generating well mixed embryonic chimeras of Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus (Cnidaria:Hydrozoa) and developed molecular ma...

  5. Gender Differences in Compulsory School Pupils' L2 Self-Concepts: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Alastair

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on personality psychology research, Dornyei and his colleagues have recently developed an approach to understanding L2 motivation that positions the learner's self-recognition as a potential communicator in another language at its core, thus marking a break from the established social psychology paradigm. In this article it is argued that,…

  6. Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets by integrating dual-color graphene quantum dot nanoprobes and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhaosheng; Shan, Xiaoyue; Chai, Lujing; Chen, Jianrong; Feng, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets was achieved based on a biocompatible graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) platform through spontaneous assembly between dual-color GQD-based probes and CNTs and subsequently self-recognition between DNA probes and targets. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of the monomers and dimers of N-AcAβ(13–23)NH2: on the effect of pH on the aggregation of the amyloid beta peptide of Alzheimer’s disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Opare, Stanley K.A; Mehrazma, Banafsheh; Rauk, Arvi; Petoyan, Anahit

    2015-01-01

    The region encompassed by residues 13–23 of the amyloid beta peptide (Aβ(13–23)) of Alzheimer’s disease is the self-recognition site that initiates toxic oligomerization and fibrillization and also is the site of interaction of Aβ...

  8. Eicosanoid-mediated immunity in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicosanoid is a collective term for oxygenated metabolites of C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids. As seen in mammals, eicosanoids play crucial roles in mediating various physiological processes, including immune responses, in insects. Upon microbial pathogen infection, non-self recognition signals are ...

  9. Calling Orientations of Junior Doctors and Medical Interns in India: Cultural, Occupational and Relational Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Vandana

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the factors that shape calling orientations within the Indian context. Based on the narratives of 72 junior doctors and medical interns, it is found that participants identify with harbouring a calling both prior and subsequent to occupational entry. Although factors such as self-recognition of talent and sensemaking of work as…

  10. Gene duplication and genetic exchange drive the evolution of S-RNase-based self-incompatibility in Petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Ken-Ichi; Paape, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Masaomi; Entani, Tetsuyuki; Takara, Akie; Kajihara, Kie; Tsukahara, Mai; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Takayama, Seiji

    2015-01-08

    Self-incompatibility (SI) systems in flowering plants distinguish self- and non-self pollen to prevent inbreeding. While other SI systems rely on the self-recognition between specific male- and female-determinants, the Solanaceae family has a non-self recognition system resulting in the detoxification of female-determinants of S-ribonucleases (S-RNases), expressed in pistils, by multiple male-determinants of S-locus F-box proteins (SLFs), expressed in pollen. It is not known how many SLF components of this non-self recognition system there are in Solanaceae species, or how they evolved. We identified 16-20 SLFs in each S-haplotype in SI Petunia, from a total of 168 SLF sequences using large-scale next-generation sequencing and genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. We predicted the target S-RNases of SLFs by assuming that a particular S-allele must not have a conserved SLF that recognizes its own S-RNase, and validated these predictions by transformation experiments. A simple mathematical model confirmed that 16-20 SLF sequences would be adequate to recognize the vast majority of target S-RNases. We found evidence of gene conversion events, which we suggest are essential to the constitution of a non-self recognition system and also contribute to self-compatible mutations.

  11. Development of Body-Part Vocabulary in Toddlers in Relation to Self-Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Whitney E.; Brownell, Celia A.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand young children's ability to communicate about their bodies, toddlers' comprehension and production of 27 common body-part words was assessed using parental report at 20 and 30 months (n?=?64), and self-awareness was assessed using mirror self-recognition. Children at both ages comprehended more body-part words that referred to…

  12. Lack of mirror use by pigs to locate food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieling, Elise T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314411240; Mijdam, Elco; van der Staay, F. Josef|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074262653; Nordquist, Rebecca E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/296303291

    Many mammalian species, as well as birds, are able to use a mirror either in the context of self-recognition, or instrumentally for discovering and manipulating objects that cannot be perceived directly. A noteworthy study by Broom et al. (2009) investigated the ability of pigs (Sus scrofa) to use a

  13. Author Details - African Journals Online

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LH) secretion in fasted prepubertal ewes. Abstract PDF · Vol 11, No 18 (2012) - Articles Sequences polymorphism and variation of major histocompatibility complex DRB exon 2 of black Dahe pig. Abstract PDF · Vol 11, No 20 (2012) - Articles

  14. Author Details - African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LH) secretion in fasted prepubertal ewes. Abstract PDF · Vol 11, No 18 (2012) - Articles Sequences polymorphism and variation of major histocompatibility complex DRB exon 2 of black Dahe pig. Abstract PDF. African Journal of Biotechnology.

  15. Determination of the Crystal Structure of Human Zn-Alpha 2-Gylcoprotein, A Protein Implicated in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bjorkman, Pamela

    2000-01-01

    Zn-alpha 2-glycoprotein (ZAG) is a 41 kDa soluble protein whose sequence and domain organization are surprisingly similar to those of the membrane glycoproteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC...

  16. Cytomegalovirus vectors violate CD8+ T cell epitope recognition paradigms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hansen, Scott G; Sacha, Jonah B; Hughes, Colette M; Ford, Julia C; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Scholz, Isabel; Gilbride, Roxanne M; Lewis, Matthew S; Gilliam, Awbrey N; Ventura, Abigail B; Malouli, Daniel; Xu, Guangwu; Richards, Rebecca; Whizin, Nathan; Reed, Jason S; Hammond, Katherine B; Fischer, Miranda; Turner, John M; Legasse, Alfred W; Axthelm, Michael K; Edlefsen, Paul T; Nelson, Jay A; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Früh, Klaus; Picker, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    ...) vectors elicit SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells that recognize unusual, diverse, and highly promiscuous epitopes, including dominant responses to epitopes restricted by class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules...

  17. Characterization of MHC-Related Volatile Organic Compounds in Heterologous Expression Systems: Role of Infection in Odor Compound Generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in humans plays significant role in mate selection and kin recognition mainly through apparition of organism specific odor recognized by other individuals...

  18. Direct Gene Transfer with DNA-Liposome Complexes in Melanoma: Expression, Biologic Activity, and Lack of Toxicity in Humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gary J. Nabel; Elizabeth G. Nabel; Zhi-Yong Yang; Bernard A. Fox; Gregory E Plautz; Xiang Gao; Leaf Huang; Suyu Shu; David Gordon; Alfred E. Chang

    1993-01-01

    .... The gene encoding a foreign major histocompatibility complex protein, HLA-B7, was introduced into HLA-B7-negative patients with advanced melanoma by injection of DNA-liposome complexes in an effort...

  19. Varying disease-mediated selection at different life-history stages of Atlantic salmon in fresh water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyto, de E.; McGinnity, P.; Huisman, J.; Coughlan, J.; Consuegra, S.; Megens, H.J.W.C.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory studies on associations between disease resistance and susceptibility and major histocompatibility (MH) genes in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar have shown the importance of immunogenetics in understanding the capacity of populations to fight specific diseases. However, the occurrence and

  20. Minor antigen distribution predicts site-specific graft-versus-tumor activity of adoptively transferred, minor antigen-specific CD8 T Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shand, Jessica C; Qin, Haiying; Nasholm, Nicole; Capitini, Christian M; Fry, Terry J

    2014-01-01

    .... Although minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) represent promising targets, broad expression of these antigens has been associated with poor responses and T cell dysfunction that may not be prevented by targeting MiHA with limited expression...

  1. Analysis of the DosR regulon genes to select cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope specific vaccine candidates using a reverse vaccinology approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study has generated several promiscuous antigenic peptides capable of binding to major histocompatibility complex class I with high affinity. These epitopes can become part of a postexposure multivalent subunit vaccine upon experimental validation.

  2. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R.; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Daly, Mark J.; Carroll, Michael C.; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A.; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T. R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Cairns, Murray J.; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C. K.; Chen, Ronald Y. L.; Chen, Eric Y. H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietiläinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Söderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H. M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Børglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia's strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging

  3. The rise and fall of horror autotoxicus and forbidden clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennette, J Charles; Falk, Ronald J

    2010-09-01

    Cui and associates show that healthy individuals have natural autoantibodies (NAAs) specific for myeloperoxidase, proteinase 3, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) with the same specificity as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies that are pathogenic. Although Ehrlich proposed horror autotoxicus and Burnet envisioned elimination of forbidden clones, NAAs are present in all healthy individuals and play beneficial homeostatic roles. Pathogenic autoimmunity is dysregulation of natural homeostatic autoimmunity rather than onset of a previously absent self-recognition.

  4. La participación política de las mujeres de movimientos políticos y activistas feministas en el DMQ en el año 2015 y su relación con la conciencia crítica de género.

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez Fierro, Natalia Carolina

    2017-01-01

    The notion of gender, political ideology, ethnic condition, disability and other subjective experiences are interwoven with female political participation. Gender awareness is a psychosocial process that encompasses the subjectivities of people, articulating this dimension through self-recognition and self-awareness, with the socio-political dimension. As such, it reveals the levels of knowledge people have about the social reality of inequality built between men and women within the patri...

  5. Marine Mammals Enact Individual Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Delfour, Fabienne

    2010-01-01

    Scientific literature describes the various ways that we perceive animals and their contribution to our humanization. Our understanding of “animality” is changing, corresponding to an ever-increasing general knowledge of animals. Scientific studies provide objective descriptions of the complexity of animal worlds. The present article discusses recent findings on socio-spatiality, social cognition, and self-recognition in various marine mammal species, as well as the relevance and coherence of...

  6. Mirror-mark tests performed on jackdaws reveal potential methodological problems in the use of stickers in avian mark-test studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Soler

    Full Text Available Some animals are capable of recognizing themselves in a mirror, which is considered to be demonstrated by passing the mark test. Mirror self-recognition capacity has been found in just a few mammals having very large brains and only in one bird, the magpie (Pica pica. The results obtained in magpies have enormous biological and cognitive implications because the fact that magpies were able to pass the mark test meant that this species is at the same cognitive level with great apes, that mirror self-recognition has evolved independently in the magpie and great apes (which diverged 300 million years ago, and that the neocortex (which is not present in the bird's brains is not a prerequisite for mirror self-recognition as previously believed. Here, we have replicated the experimental design used on magpies to determine whether jackdaws (Corvus monedula are also capable of mirror self-recognition by passing the mark test. We found that our nine jackdaws showed a very high interest towards the mirror and exhibited self-contingent behavior as soon as mirrors were introduced. However, jackdaws were not able to pass the mark test: both sticker-directed actions and sticker removal were performed with a similar frequency in both the cardboard (control and the mirror conditions. We conclude that our jackdaws' behaviour raises non-trivial questions about the methodology used in the avian mark test. Our study suggests that the use of self-adhesive stickers on sensitive throat feathers may open the way to artefactual results because birds might perceive the stickers tactilely.

  7. Neural basis of distorted self-face recognition in social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Kyeong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Patients with SAD have a positive point of view of their own face and experience self-relevance for the attractively transformed self-faces. This distorted cognition may be based on dysfunctions in the frontal and inferior parietal regions. The abnormal engagement of the fronto-parietal attentional network during processing face stimuli in non-social situations may be linked to distorted self-recognition in SAD.

  8. Self/Non-self Discrimination by Toll-like Receptor 9

    OpenAIRE

    Mouchess, Maria Luz

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of nucleic acids as a signature of infection by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 9 exposes the host to potential self-recognition and autoimmunity. It has been proposed that intracellular compartmentalization is largely responsible for reliable self/non-self discrimination by these receptors. Our lab has previously shown that TLR9 and TLR7 require processing prior to activation, which may further restrict TLR9 and TLR7 compartmentalization and reinforce self/non-self discriminat...

  9. Mirror-Mark Tests Performed on Jackdaws Reveal Potential Methodological Problems in the Use of Stickers in Avian Mark-Test Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Manuel; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Peralta-Sánchez, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Some animals are capable of recognizing themselves in a mirror, which is considered to be demonstrated by passing the mark test. Mirror self-recognition capacity has been found in just a few mammals having very large brains and only in one bird, the magpie (Pica pica). The results obtained in magpies have enormous biological and cognitive implications because the fact that magpies were able to pass the mark test meant that this species is at the same cognitive level with great apes, that mirror self-recognition has evolved independently in the magpie and great apes (which diverged 300 million years ago), and that the neocortex (which is not present in the bird's brains) is not a prerequisite for mirror self-recognition as previously believed. Here, we have replicated the experimental design used on magpies to determine whether jackdaws (Corvus monedula) are also capable of mirror self-recognition by passing the mark test. We found that our nine jackdaws showed a very high interest towards the mirror and exhibited self-contingent behavior as soon as mirrors were introduced. However, jackdaws were not able to pass the mark test: both sticker-directed actions and sticker removal were performed with a similar frequency in both the cardboard (control) and the mirror conditions. We conclude that our jackdaws' behaviour raises non-trivial questions about the methodology used in the avian mark test. Our study suggests that the use of self-adhesive stickers on sensitive throat feathers may open the way to artefactual results because birds might perceive the stickers tactilely. PMID:24475085

  10. Self-awareness moderates the relation between maternal mental state language about desires and children's mental state vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taumoepeau, Mele; Ruffman, Ted

    2016-04-01

    In this intervention study, we tested the differential effect of talking about children's desires versus talking about others' thoughts and knowledge on children's acquisition of mental state vocabulary for children who did and did not have mirror self-recognition. In a sample of 96 mother-toddler dyads, each mother was randomly assigned a specially constructed, interactive lift-the-flap book to read to her child three times a week for 4 weeks. In the child desire condition the story elicited comments regarding the child's desires, and in the cognitive condition the story elicited the mother's comments about her own thoughts and knowledge while reading the story. Children's mirror self-recognition and mental state vocabulary were assessed at pre- and post-test. Children in the condition that focused on the child's desires showed a significantly greater increase in their mental state vocabulary; however, this effect was moderated by their levels of self-awareness, with children benefitting more from the intervention if they also showed self-recognition at pre-test. We argue that the combination of specific types of maternal talk and children's prior insights facilitates gains in children's mental state vocabulary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The different faces of one's self: an fMRI study into the recognition of current and past self-facial appearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Matthew A J; Tajadura-Jiménez, Ana; Turley, Grainne; Tsakiris, Manos

    2012-11-15

    Mirror self-recognition is often considered as an index of self-awareness. Neuroimaging studies have identified a neural circuit specialised for the recognition of one's own current facial appearance. However, faces change considerably over a lifespan, highlighting the necessity for representations of one's face to continually be updated. We used fMRI to investigate the different neural circuits involved in the recognition of the childhood and current, adult, faces of one's self. Participants viewed images of either their own face as it currently looks morphed with the face of a familiar other or their childhood face morphed with the childhood face of the familiar other. Activity in areas which have a generalised selectivity for faces, including the inferior occipital gyrus, the superior parietal lobule and the inferior temporal gyrus, varied with the amount of current self in an image. Activity in areas involved in memory encoding and retrieval, including the hippocampus and the posterior cingulate gyrus, and areas involved in creating a sense of body ownership, including the temporo-parietal junction and the inferior parietal lobule, varied with the amount of childhood self in an image. We suggest that the recognition of one's own past or present face is underpinned by different cognitive processes in distinct neural circuits. Current self-recognition engages areas involved in perceptual face processing, whereas childhood self-recognition recruits networks involved in body ownership and memory processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The different faces of one’s self: an fMRI study into the recognition of current and past self-facial appearances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Matthew A. J.; Tajadura-Jiménez, Ana; Turley, Grainne; Tsakiris, Manos

    2013-01-01

    Mirror self-recognition is often considered as an index of self-awareness. Neuroimaging studies have identified a neural circuit specialised for the recognition of one’s own current facial appearance. However, faces change considerably over a lifespan, highlighting the necessity for representations of one’s face to continually be updated. We used fMRI to investigate the different neural circuits involved in the recognition of the childhood and current, adult, faces of one’s self. Participants viewed images of either their own face as it currently looks morphed with the face of a familiar other or their childhood face morphed with the childhood face of the familiar other. Activity in areas which have a generalised selectivity for faces, including the inferior occipital gyrus, the superior parietal lobule and the inferior temporal gyrus, varied with the amount of current self in an image. Activity in areas involved in memory encoding and retrieval, including the hippocampus and the posterior cingulate gyrus, and areas involved in creating a sense of body ownership, including the temporo-parietal junction and the inferior parietal lobule, varied with the amount of childhood self in an image. We suggest that the recognition of one’s own past or present face is underpinned by different cognitive processes in distinct neural circuits. Current self-recognition engages areas involved in perceptual face processing, whereas childhood self-recognition recruits networks involved in body ownership and memory processing. PMID:22940117

  13. Donor SIRP-α polymorphisms: widening the innate-to-adaptive continuum in allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Madhav C; Heeger, Peter S

    2017-12-01

    In the usual paradigm, self:nonself recognition is attributed to calls of the adaptive immune system, owing to variations in specialized genes encoded within the major histocompatibility complex loci. However, an increasing body of data has shown that cells of the innate immune system also have self:nonself recognition functions relevant to organ transplantation, and this trait may derive from genes located outside the major histocompatibility complex loci. A recent publication identifies the donor SIRP-α gene as a non-major histocompatibility complex locus responsible for nonself recognition by monocytes, with variability resulting in changes in the surface interaction of SIRP-α with its ligand CD47. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Trojan horse lymphocytes: a vesicular stomatitis virus-specific T-cell clone lyses target cells by carrying virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hom, R C; Soman, G; Finberg, R

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-specific CD4+ CD8- murine T-cell clone. This clone proliferates only in response to VSV and lyses infected tumor cells bearing class II major histocompatibility antigens in short-term chromium release assays. In addition, the cell has VSV antigens on its surface and is capable of killing uninfected tumor cells without major histocompatibility antigen restriction in a 2-day assay. This latter cytolytic activity is eliminated by anti-VSV antib...

  15. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    still require optimization. An alternative technique for providing antigens to DC consists of the direct fusion of dendritic cells with tumor cells. These resulting hybrid cells may express both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules associated with tumor antigens...... to inducing hybrid formation by expression of viral fusogenic membrane glycoproteins....

  16. Balancing selection and genetic drift create unusual patterns of MHCII variation in Galapagos mockingbirds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, Jakub; Hoeck, P. E. A.; Keller, L. F.; Wayhart, J. P.; Dolinová, I.; Štefka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 19 (2016), s. 4757-4772 ISSN 0962-1083 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP506/12/P529 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : major histocompatibility complex * Mimus * genetic diversity * population size * trans-species polymorphism Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 6.086, year: 2016

  17. STRONG POSITIVE SELECTION AND HABITAT SPECIFIC AMINO ACID SUBSTITUTION PATTERNS IN A MHC FROM AN ESTUARINE FISH UNDER INTENSE POLLUTION STRESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population-level studies using the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) have linked specific alleles with specific diseases, but data requirements are high and power to detect disease association is low. A novel use of Mhc population surveys is that they map allelic substituti...

  18. Short communication Identification of genetic variation in the major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EXPER

    2016-10-31

    Oct 31, 2016 ... DRB1 with Hin1I was more frequent in the Kivircik and White .... evolution of class I duplication blocks, diversity and complexity from shark to man. ... The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in ...

  19. Non HLA genetic markers association with type-1 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The currently available data identified IDDM1 and IDDM2 as 2 susceptibility loci for type 1 diabetes (T1D). The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)/HLA region referred to as IDDM1 contains several 100 genes known to have a great influence on T1D risk. Within IDDM2, a minisatellite variable number of tandem repeats ...

  20. Lack of association of CTLA-4 +49 A/G polymorphism with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic childhood illnesses. Interplay between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors is thought to provide the fundamental element for the disease. Apart from the Major Histocompatibility locus which is the main contributor to risk susceptibility, more than 40 ...

  1. The association of polymorphic sites in some genes with type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed A. El-Kafoury

    2014-06-23

    Jun 23, 2014 ... Abstract Background: The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes have been implicated as the major genetic component in the predisposition to type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Other loci outside the MHC had also been reported to contribute in the susceptibility of T1DM. The aim of this study was ...

  2. Non HLA genetic markers association with type 1-diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soheir S. Abou El-Ella

    Abstract The currently available data identified IDDM1 and IDDM2 as 2 susceptibility loci for type 1 diabetes (T1D). The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)/HLA region referred to as. IDDM1 contains several 100 genes known to have a great influence on T1D risk. Within IDDM2, a minisatellite variable number of ...

  3. The association of polymorphic sites in some genes with type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes have been implicated as the major genetic component in the predisposition to type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Other loci outside the MHC had also been reported to contribute in the susceptibility of T1DM. The aim of this study was to examine the role of ...

  4. Processing of MHC class II in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Broeke, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past years we performed studies to gain more insight into the processing of major histocompatibility class II (MHC class II) in dendritic cells. We focused on the sorting mechanisms of MHC class II, the degradation of its associated Ii and peptide loading at the endosomal system. In addition,

  5. Autologous stem cell transplantation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, T.J.M. de; Suciu, S.; Brand, R.; Muus, P.; Kroger, N.

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the treatment of choice for the majority of young patients with myelodysplasia (MDS) who have a histocompatible donor (sibling or unrelated donor). For some patients lacking a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-compatible donor, chemotherapy followed by

  6. Self-peptides with intermediate capacity to bind and stabilize MHC class I molecules may be immunogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M L M; Ruhwald, Morten; Nissen, M H

    2003-01-01

    Thirty self-peptides were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to H-2b molecules. The binding of peptides was ascertained experimentally by biochemical (KD measurements) and cellular [major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) stabilization] assays. A weak, but significant, corr...

  7. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, J B; Andersen, V; Halberg, P

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, -DPB in 24 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in 102 healthy Danes. A highly significant increase of the frequency of the DR3...

  8. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Genetic Heterogeneity of Sjögren's Syndrome According to Ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Kimberly E; Wong, Quenna; Levine, David M

    2017-01-01

    subphenotype distributions differ by ethnicity, and whether this contributes to the heterogeneity of genetic associations. RESULTS: We observed significant associations in established regions of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), IRF5, and STAT4 (P = 3 × 10(-42) , P = 3 × 10(-14) , and P = 9 × 10...

  9. Suppression of MHC gene expression in cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The class I antigens of the major histocompatibility complex play a crucial part in the recognition of foreign antigens by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Some cancer cells exhibit a reduced expression of these antigens and this may help these cells to escape immune surveillance.

  10. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...

  11. Novel genome-editing tools to model and correct primary immunodeficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott De Bruin, Lisa M.; Volpi, Stefano; Musunuru, Kiran

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other severe non-SCID primary immunodeficiencies (non-SCID PID) can be treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, but when histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-matched donors are lacking, this can be a high-risk procedure.

  12. MHC CLASS-II-RESTRICTED T-CELL HYBRIDOMAS RECOGNIZING THE NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN OF AVIAN CORONAVIUS IBV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOOTS, AMH; VANLIEROP, MJ; KUSTERS, JG; VANKOOTEN, PJS; VANDERZELIST, BAM; HENSEN, EJ; Boots, Annemieke

    Mice were immunized with purified infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), strain M41. Spleen cells, expanded in vitro by stimulation with M41, were immortalized by fusion to obtain T-cell hybridomas, and two major histocompatability complex (MHC) class II (I-E)-restricted T-cell hybridomas were selected

  13. Human leukocyte antigen-G polymorphism in relation to expression, function, and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Margit Hørup; Hviid, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical class Ib molecule belonging to the major histocompatibility complex. HLA-G appears to play a role in the suppression of immune responses and contribute to long-term immune escape or tolerance. The focus of this review is polymorphism in the HLA...

  14. Use of "one-pot, mix-and-read" peptide-MHC class I tetramers and predictive algorithms to improve detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svitek, Nicholas; Hansen, Andreas Martin; Steinaa, Lucilla

    2014-01-01

    Peptide-major histocompatibility complex (p-MHC) class I tetramer complexes have facilitated the early detection and functional characterisation of epitope specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Here, we report on the generation of seven recombinant bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) and re...

  15. Transcriptional enhancers in the HLA-DQ subregion.

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, K E; Peterlin, B M

    1987-01-01

    Using transient expression assays, the HLA-DQ alpha and HLA-DQ beta genes of the human major histocompatibility complex were screened for cis-acting regulatory elements. Two regions in the HLA-DQ alpha gene and one in the HLA-DQ beta gene were identified which fulfilled the criteria for transcriptional enhancers.

  16. prognostic significance of hla-dr antigen in dysplasia, carcinoma in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-11

    Nov 11, 2003 ... The immune attract mechanism by low HLA-DR signalling seems to be of minor importance in the malignant and metastatic potential of the gallbladder, epithelial tumours. INTRODUCTION. The major histocompatibility complex is a series of genes that participate in the regulation of the immune response.

  17. South African Journal of Animal Science - Vol 46, No 4 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex gene region in Turkish sheep breeds · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD ... Mangosteen peel can reduce methane production and rumen biohydrogenation in vitro · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  18. Genetic risk factors for autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feltkamp, T.E.W.; Aarden, L.A.; Lucas, C.J.; Verweij, C.L.; Vries, R.R.P. de

    1999-01-01

    In most autoimmune diseases multigenic factors play a significant role in pathogenesis. Progress in identifying these genetic factors, many of which are located outside the major histocompatibility complex, was the subject of a recent meeting. Chemicals/CAS: Interleukin-10, 130068-27-8; Transforming

  19. Inclusion body myositis : a nationwide study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badrising, Umesh Arvind

    2006-01-01

    The studies reported in this thesis aimed to survey the prevalence of inclusion body myositis (IBM), to describe its clinical features and course, to investigate whether the major histocompatibility complex predisposed subjects to IBM and autoimmune disorders (AID), to investigate the possible

  20. Suppression of a Natural Killer Cell Response by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, Jamie L; Ries, Moritz; Guha, Natasha; Connole, Michelle; Colantonio, Arnaud D; Wiertz, EJ; Wilson, Nancy A; Kaur, Amitinder; Evans, David T

    Natural killer (NK) cell responses in primates are regulated in part through interactions between two highly polymorphic molecules, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells and their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands on target cells. We previously

  1. Quantifying the Protection of Activating and Inhibiting NK Cell Receptors during Infection with a CMV-Like Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Kesmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J.

    2014-01-01

    The responsiveness of natural killer (NK) cells is controlled by balancing signals from activating and inhibitory receptors. The most important ligands of inhibitory NK cell receptors are the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, which allow NK cells to screen

  2. Ontogeny of human natural killer (NK) cells: fetal NK cells mediate cytolytic function and express cytoplasmic CD3 epsilon,delta proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, J. H.; Hori, T.; Nagler, A.; Bhat, N.; Spits, H.; Lanier, L. L.

    1992-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been defined as CD3 epsilon-, CD16+ and/or CD56+ lymphocytes that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytotoxicity against certain tumors and virus-infected cells. Unlike T lymphocytes, NK cells do not rearrange or productively express T cell

  3. Systematic Characterisation of Cellular Localisation and Expression Profiles of Proteins Containing MHC Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Agnieszka; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Weinhold, Nils

    2009-01-01

    Background: Presentation of peptides on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules is the cornerstone in immune system activation and increased knowledge of the characteristics of MHC ligands and their source proteins is highly desirable. Methodology/Principal Finding: In the present large-...

  4. THE EFFECT OF DONOR LYMPHOCYTES-T AND TOTAL-BODY IRRADIATION ON HEMATOPOIETIC ENGRAFTMENT AND PULMONARY TOXICITY FOLLOWING EXPERIMENTAL ALLOGENEIC BONE-MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOWN, JD; MAUCH, P; WARHOL, M; NEBEN, S; FERRARA, JLM

    1992-01-01

    To study the effects of donor T lymphocytes on engraftment and graft-versus-host disease in relation to recipient total-body irradiation, we have returned small numbers of T cells to T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplanted across a minor histocompatibility barrier in mice (B10.BR --> CBA).

  5. MHC class II-dependent basophil-CD4(+) T cell interactions promote T(H)2 cytokine-dependent immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrigoue, J.G.; Saenz, S.A.; Siracusa, M.C.; Allenspach, E.J.; Taylor, B.C.; Giacomin, P.; Nair, M.G.; Du, Y.R.; Zaph, C.; Rooijen, van N.; Comeau, M.R.; Pearce, E.J.; Laufer, T.M.; Artis, D.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells can prime naive CD4(+) T cells; however, here we demonstrate that dendritic cell-mediated priming was insufficient for the development of T helper type 2 cell-dependent immunity. We identify basophils as a dominant cell population that coexpressed major histocompatibility complex

  6. Activated T cells recruit exosomes secreted by dendritic cells via LFA-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte-'t Hoen, E.N.; Buschow, S.I.; Anderton, S.M.; Stoorvogel, W.; Wauben, M.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to secrete exosomes that transfer membrane proteins, like major histocompatibility complex class II, to other DCs. Intercellular transfer of membrane proteins is also observed during cognate interactions between DCs and CD4(+) T cells. The acquired proteins are

  7. MHC class II-associated proteins in B-cell exosomes and potential functional implications for exosome biogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.; Balkom, B.W.M. van; Aalberts, M.; Heck, A.J.R. van; Wauben, M.; Stoorvogel, W.

    2010-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells secrete major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) carrying exosomes with unclear physiological function(s). Exosomes are first generated as the intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) of a specific type of multivesicular body, and are then secreted by fusion of

  8. HuMax-CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Lone; Kragballe, Knud; Zachariae, Claus

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is characterized by infiltration with mononuclear cells. Especially activated memory CD4+ T cells are critical in the pathogenesis. Interaction between the CD4 receptor and the major histocompatibility complex class II molecule is important for T-cell activation. OBJECTIVE...

  9. COMPROMISING EFFECT OF LOW DOSE-RATE TOTAL-BODY IRRADIATION ON ALLOGENEIC BONE-MARROW ENGRAFTMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VAN OS, R; KONINGS, A W T; DOWN, J D

    1993-01-01

    The protraction of total body irradiation (TBI) to a continuous low dose-rate has been investigated for its effect on donor marrow engraftment in murine bone marrow transplant (BMT) models of varying histocompatibility. Three different BMT combinations were used: syngeneic [B6-Gpi-1a --> B6-Gpi-1b],

  10. Variation in MHC class II B genes in marbled murrelets: implications for delineating conservation units

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Vásquez-Carrillo; V. Friesen; L. Hall; M.Z. Peery

    2013-01-01

    Conserving genetic variation is critical for maintaining the evolutionary potential and viability of a species. Genetic studies seeking to delineate conservation units, however, typically focus on characterizing neutral genetic variation and may not identify populations harboring local adaptations. Here, variation at two major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II...

  11. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb...

  12. Disappearance of beta(2)-adrenergic receptors on astrocytes in canine distemper encephalitis : possible implications for the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Wilczak, N; Zurbriggen, A

    2001-01-01

    It has been reported that astrocytes in the white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) lack beta (2)-adrenergic receptors. This abnormality might explain why astrocytes in active MS plaques aberrantly express major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules, which play an important role

  13. Anti-HY Responses in Pregnancy Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole Bjarne; Steffensen, Rudi; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2011-01-01

    Cellular and humoral immune responses against male-specific minor histocompatibility (HY) antigens are important in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host reactions and can be detected in women who have previously given birth to a boy. However, the importance of these responses for pregnancy outcome...

  14. Further observations on the role of the MHC genes and certain hearing disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernstein, JM; Shanahan, TC; Schaffer, FM

    The pathogenetic mechanism of many hearing disorders have not been fully defined. Studies of certain hearing disorders in man have suggested a role for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded genes in disease pathogenesis, In a cohort of unrelated patients with Meniere's Disease,

  15. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). MUMMICHOG AND STRIPED KILLIFISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    REASON FOR INCLUSION IN SERIES cancerous tissues, and the genetics of histocompatability in tissue and organ Although not valued as commercial... pulmonate snail Melampus Fundulus uses all available food items bidentatus (Vince et al. 1976), and the except detritus. She found small soft-shelled clam

  16. Effective graft depletion of MiHAg T-cell specificities and consequences for graft-versus-host disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, Moniek A.; Toebes, Mireille; Song, Ji-Ying; Wolkers, Monika C.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2007-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHAg) differences between donor and recipient in MHC-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) often result in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). While MiHAg-specific T-cell responses can in theory be directed against a large number of

  17. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium and central vein...

  18. REPLACEMENT OF DENDRITIC CELLS IN THE AIRWAYS OF RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    UYAMA, T; Winter, Jobst; SAKIYAMA, S; MONDEN, Y; GROEN, Greetje; PROP, J

    It is unknown whether dendritic cells are able to migrate normally from the recipient into the allogeneic lung graft. Using monoclonal antibodies to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens (OX6 for both donor and recipient types; HIS19 for recipient type), we studied the replacement of

  19. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease the degree of allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium...

  20. 454 screening of individual MHC variation in an endemic island passerine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Phillips, Karl P.; Spurgin, Lewis G.; Richardson, David S.

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) code for receptors that are central to the adaptive immune response of vertebrates. These genes are therefore important genetic markers with which to study adaptive genetic variation in the wild. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has increasingly

  1. Selective transport of internalized antigens to the cytosol for MHC class I presentation in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A; Regnault, A; Kleijmeer, M; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Amigorena, S

    1999-01-01

    In order for cytotoxic T cells to initiate immune responses, peptides derived from internalized antigens must be presented to the cytotoxic T cells on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here we show that dendritic cells, the only antigen-presenting cells that initiate immune

  2. Cellular mechanisms underlying acute graft rejection: time for reassessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Florquin, Sandrine; Goldman, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Rejection of transplanted organs depends on an orchestrated immune response to histocompatibility antigens expressed by the grafted tissue. Effector mechanisms primarily responsible for the rejection process classically involve type 1 helper CD4(+) T cells, cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and antibodies.

  3. Macrophages in the retina of normal Lewis rats and their dynamics after injection of lipopolysaccharide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, P.; de Vos, A. F.; Kijlstra, A.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the density, distribution, and morphology of macrophages (bone marrow-derived microglia) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-positive cells in the retina of Lewis rats and the dynamics of these cells after systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection.

  4. HLA-DO is a negative modulator of HLA-DM-mediated MHC class II peptide loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, S. M.; Tjin, E. P.; Lillemeier, B. F.; Grüneberg, U.; van Meijgaarden, K. E.; Pastoors, L.; Verwoerd, D.; Tulp, A.; Canas, B.; Rahman, D.; Ottenhoff, T. H.; Pappin, D. J.; Trowsdale, J.; Neefjes, J.

    1997-01-01

    Class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex become loaded with antigenic peptides after dissociation of invariant chainderived peptides (CLIP) from the peptide-binding groove. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM is a prerequisite for this process, which takes place in specialised

  5. IMGT unique numbering for immunoglobulin and T cell receptor constant domains and Ig superfamily C-like domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Pommié, Christelle; Kaas, Quentin

    2005-01-01

    IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system (http://imgt.cines.fr) provides a common access to expertly annotated data on the genome, proteome, genetics and structure of immunoglobulins (IG), T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and related proteins...

  6. IMGT unique numbering for MHC groove G-DOMAIN and MHC superfamily (MhcSF) G-LIKE-DOMAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Duprat, E.; Kaas, Quentin

    2005-01-01

    IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system® (http://imgt.cines.fr) provides a common access to expertly annotated data on the genome, proteome, genetics and structure of immunoglobulins (IG), T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and related proteins...

  7. High-density mapping of the MHC identifies a shared role for HLA-DRB1*01:03 in inflammatory bowel diseases and heterozygous advantage in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goyette, Philippe; Boucher, Gabrielle; Mallon, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of the related chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) known as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis have shown strong evidence of association to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). This region encodes a large number of immunological candidates, includi...

  8. Fine mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger for celiac disease, risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and

  9. Heterologous expression of biologically active chicken granulocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-02-07

    Feb 7, 2012 ... inserting the reformed cytokines genes in pPICZαA. The pPICZαA-rchGM-CSF was expressed in ... crucial immune cytokine, the GM-CSF can stimulate leucocyte to express major histocompatibility .... B, The result of western blot; M, marker; 1, eluent passed no column; 2, the second column long eluent.

  10. MHC-based patterns of social and extra-pair mate choice in the Seychelles warbler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, DS; Komdeur, J; Burke, T; von Schantz, T; Richardson, David S.

    2005-01-01

    The existence and nature of indirect genetic benefits to mate choice remain contentious. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, which play a vital role in determining pathogen resistance in vertebrates, may be the link between mate choice and the genetic inheritance of vigour in offspring.

  11. MHC class II-assortative mate choice in European badgers (Meles meles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Yung Wa; Annavi, Geetha; Newman, Chris; Buesching, Christina D.; Burke, Terry; Macdonald, David W.; Dugdale, Hannah

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a crucial role in the immune system, and in some species, it is a target by which individuals choose mates to optimize the fitness of their offspring, potentially mediated by olfactory cues. Under the genetic compatibility hypothesis, individuals are

  12. The clone size of peripheral CD8 T cells is regulated by TCR promiscuity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, Yi; Legrand, Nicolas; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2006-01-01

    Positive selection in the thymus and peripheral T cell survival depend on T cell receptor (TCR)-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) interactions, but it is not yet clear if both events follow exactly the same rules. We studied peripheral T cell survival and clone sizes in conditions of

  13. Ovar-DRB1 haplotypes *2001 and *0301 are associated with sheep growth and ewe lifetime prolificacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an organized cluster of tightly linked vertebrate genes with immunological and non-immunological functions. While the important MHC gene DRB1 has been examined in regard to many sheep infectious disease traits, only one study, based on micros...

  14. Designing bovine T-cell vaccines via reverse immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    T-cell responses contribute to immunity against many intra-cellular infections. There is, for example, strong evidence that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an essential role in mediating immunity to East Coast fever (ECF), a fatal lymphop...

  15. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-05-01

    May 1, 2002 ... Individuals infected with HIV mount and sustain a vigorous immune response to HIV- 1. Cells infected by. HIV-1 are normally recognised and eliminated by the immune system. One key to this phenomenon is the surface presentation of viral peptides by proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) ...

  16. Peripheral nerve injury causes transient expression of MHC class I antigens in rat motor neurons and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maehlen, J; Nennesmo, I; Olsson, A B

    1989-01-01

    After a peripheral nerve lesion (rat facial and sciatic) an induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens class I was detected immunohistochemically in skeletal muscle fibers and motor neurons. This MHC expression was transient after a nerve crush, when regeneration occurred...

  17. Immune tolerance and immunosuppression in solid organ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Organ transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage organ failure. Most of them will require lifelong immunosuppression to prevent both acute and chronic rejection. T-cell recognition of the allograft major histocompatibility complex antigens is the central event initiating cellular rejection of the allograft, ...

  18. De nonklassiske humant leukocyt-antigen (HLA)-vaevstyper--fra implantation til transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2006-01-01

    The classical and extremely polymorphic human leukocyte antigens (HLA) classes Ia and II have been studied in great detail and have significant importance in organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases and presentation of antigen peptides. However, in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC...... of rejection episodes in heart and kidney/liver transplants....

  19. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J. W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M. L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T. Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O'Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F.; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M.; Perlmutter, Aaron M.; Pierce, Michael N.; Pincus, Jonathan M.; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C.; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J.; Rhame, Frank S.; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D.; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E.; Rubin, David S.; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R.; Sanchez, William C.; Sanjana, Veeraf M.; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M.; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N.; Silebi, Vanessa I.; Sizemore, James M.; Skolnik, Paul R.; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M.; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T.; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F. Lisa; Stone, Valerie E.; Stone, David R.; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A.; Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A.; Trinh, Phuong D.; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J.; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M.; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H.; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J.; Warner, Daniel A.; Weber, Robert D.; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A.; White, David J.; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G.; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P.; Yang, Otto O.; Yurdin, David L.; Zabukovic, Brandon W.; Zachary, Kimon C.; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide

  20. The mental health and help-seeking behaviour of resettled Afghan refugees in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slewa-Younan, Shameran; Yaser, Anisa; Guajardo, Maria Gabriela Uribe; Mannan, Haider; Smith, Caroline A; Mond, Jonathan M

    2017-01-01

    Psychological trauma, in particular, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, are highly prevalent among resettled refugees. However, little is known regarding the mental health status and associated help-seeking behaviour of resettled Afghan refugees in Australia. A sample of 150 resettled Afghan refugees (74 males; mean age 32.8 years, SD = 12.2) living in Adelaide, South Australia were recruited. Self-reported measures of PTSD, depression, exposure to traumatic events, functional impairment, self-recognition of PTSD symptomatology and help-seeking behaviours were completed. Multivariate analysis of variables associated with help-seeking was conducted. Forty-four percent of participants met criteria for clinically significant PTSD symptoms and all but one participant reported being exposed to 1 or more traumatic and/or conflict related events, such as 'losing your property and wealth'. Moreover, 14.7% of participants had symptoms suggestive of clinically significant depression. General practitioners were the most common source of help in relation to mental health problems, with very few participants (4.6%) seeking help from specialist trauma and torture mental health services. Self-recognition of having a PTSD related mental health problem and functional impairment levels were both found to be independent predictors of help-seeking ( p  ≤ .05). The findings provide further evidence for high rates of PTSD symptomatology and low uptake of mental care among resettled refugees. Poor self-recognition of the presence and/or adverse impact of PTSD symptoms may need to be targeted in mental health promotion programs designed to improve "mental health literacy" and thereby promote early and appropriate help-seeking where this is needed.

  1. The sense of self is supported by several independent cognitive processes in Alzheimer's disease and self-reported age tracks cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizzi, Marie-Christine; Belin, Catherine; Maillet, Didier; Moroni, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Do patients with Alzheimer's disease loose themselves? The impact of dementia on the sense of self has been extensively studied over the past 15 years. However, most studies investigate only one marker of the self - such as mirror self-recognition or the use of the pronoun "I" - and do not track how this marker evolves in the course of the illness in comparison to other markers. This situation has resulted in fragmented findings rather than converging evidence for a coherent model of the self in dementia. In our two studies, we use a questionnaire to investigate four markers of the self simultaneously (self-knowledge, mirror self-recognition, the bodily distinction between self and other, and self-reported age) in the same 60 patients spread across three stages of Alzheimer's disease. This method allows us to determine whether these markers are impaired independently over the progression of the illness. Our results suggest that the sense of self relies on a complex structure supported by several independent cognitive processes that are impacted differently by the progression of dementia. In particular, despite the early deterioration of self-knowledge, patients at advanced stages of the disease seem to maintain a sense of self, rooted into mirror self-recognition and the bodily self. Furthermore, self-reported age predicts the level of cognitive impairment. We suggest that a better understanding of the stage at which each marker of the self breaks down can help clinicians support their patients better by targeting the preserved dimensions of their identity at any given point in the progression of their condition.

  2. Lautaro en el ciber-espacio: memoria y nuevas practicas identidarias en un contexto Mapuche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Balletta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this text we want to reflect on the complexity and creativity of the recognition and self-recognition path developed by Mapuche young generation born in the marginal urban areas of the city of Bariloche. The group, which defines themselves as mapurbe, builds its multiple identity also from the texts of the mapuche poet David Aniñir, and from the texts produced by them in the fanzine Mapurbe'zine. From these texts, as well as from other cultural practices involving music and theatre, the group negotiate and manage its own memory and culture for the construction of an urban indigenous identity.

  3. Sensation of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sensation of Movement will discuss the role of sensation in the control of action, bodily self-recognition, and sense of agency. Sensing movement is dependent on a range of information received by the brain, from signalling in the peripheral sensory organs to the establishment of higher order goals....... This volume will question whether one type of information is more relevant for the ability to sense and control movements, and demonstrate the importance of integrating neuroscientific knowledge with philosophical perspectives, in order to arrive at new insights into how sensation of movement can be studied...

  4. Autoantibodies and autoimmunity: molecular mechanisms in health and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pollard, K. Michael

    2006-01-01

    ... Close Proximity to the Functional Region or Binding Site of the Antigen 29 The Autoepitope is Composed of Conformation-dependent Discontinuous Sequences of the Antigen 31 Conclusions 32 References 33VI Contents Part 2 Autoimmunity 35 3 Self/Non-self Recognition Alan G. Baxter 37 3.1 3.2 3.2.1 3.2.2 3.2.3 3.2.4 3.3 3.3.1 3.3.2 3.3.3 3.4 3.4.1 3.4....

  5. Theory of mind in nonhuman primates

    OpenAIRE

    Heyes, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    Since the BBS article in which Premack and Woodruff (1978) asked “Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?,” it has been repeatedly claimed that there is observational and experimental evidence that apes have mental state concepts, such as “want” and “know.” Unlike research on the development of theory of mind in childhood, however, no substantial progress has been made through this work with nonhuman primates. A survey of empirical studies of imitation, self-recognition, social relationshi...

  6. Chiral self-discrimination of the enantiomers of alpha-phenylethylamine derivatives in proton NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shao-Hua; Bai, Zheng-Wu; Feng, Ji-Wen

    2009-05-01

    Two types of chiral analytes, the urea and amide derivatives of alpha-phenylethylamine, were prepared. The effect of inter-molecular hydrogen-bonding interaction on self-discrimination of the enantiomers of analytes has been investigated using high-resolution (1)H NMR. It was found that the urea derivatives with double-hydrogen-bonding interaction exhibit not only the stronger hydrogen-bonding interaction but also better self-recognition abilities than the amide derivatives (except for one bearing two NO(2) groups). The present results suggest that double-hydrogen-bonding interaction promotes the self-discrimination ability of the chiral compounds. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Self-assembly of tris(ureidobenzyl)amines: flexible bricks for robust architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajarin, Mateo; Orenes, Raul-Angel; Steed, Jonathan W; Pastor, Aurelia

    2010-03-07

    Despite their high degree of flexibility, tribenzylamine molecules endowed with one ureido group in every arm are avid self-assemblers with a high capacity for self-recognition. Narcissistic self-sorting or chiral self-discrimination events take place when two modules associate giving capsular aggregates. The size of the cavity may be modulated by the relative position of the ureido group and the amino function works as a pH switch of the rupture-reassembly process. When chiral racemic triureas are present the self-assembly is highly diastereoselective.

  8. On the Concept of Culture Goods Sales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Rong

    The article on the consumer psychology, consumer behavior, cultural concepts of the market so their products relating to the concept of corporate culture and business aspects of the image was further explained that the merchandise sold is a commercial act, a cultural transmission consumers to make consumption choices in the same time, he believed that the use of such products with their values and way of life is consistent, for the maintenance of their social status and self-recognition of the need for a sales role in the cultural concept of human group psychology, and affect people's consumption behavior.

  9. The pattern recognition molecule ficolin-1 exhibits differential binding to lymphocyte subsets, providing a novel link between innate and adaptive immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genster, Ninette; Ma, Ying Jie; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2014-01-01

    Ficolin-1 is a soluble pattern recognition molecule synthesized by myeloid cells and capable of activating the lectin pathway of complement on the surface of pathogens. It is tethered to the membranes of monocytes and granulocytes; however, the biological significance of cell-associated ficolin-1...... is unknown. Recognition of healthy host cells by a pattern recognition molecule constitutes a potential hazard to self cells and tissues, emphasizing the importance of further elucidating the reported self-recognition. In the current study we investigated the potential recognition of lymphocytes by ficolin-1...... and point toward additional immune modulating functions of the molecule besides its role in pathogen recognition....

  10. O vídeo como reflexo e uma circunstância para a impossíbilidade do auto-retrato

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuna, Joana Dinis, 1987-

    2012-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Arte e multimédia - Audiovisuais, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Belas Artes, 2012 This theoretical-practical dissertation has as its central theme the videographic self-portrait. Particularly, concerns the question of the possibility to creating a selfportrait without the ability of self-recognition, as it happens with Alzheimer’s patients. To verify how a self-portrait can fail, it is necessary to realize what defines it and what its problems are, as well as...

  11. Effects of an Orientation Based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Nursing Students’ Anxiety about Mental Health Nursing Training

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 史教; 樋口, 日出子

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of an orientation based on cognitive behavioral therapy on nursing students’ anxiety about mental health nursing training. The orientation consists of a lecture on “mental disorders and patients’ understanding of their symptoms,” a group session on “awareness of self-recognition and its amendment,” and role playing on “how to deal with people suffering from mental disorders” using social skills training (SST). In a pretest, an orientation on...

  12. Well-being from the perspective of interior architecture: expected experience about residing in residential care centers

    OpenAIRE

    STEVENS, Ruth; Petermans, Ann; Vanrie, Jan; Van Cleempoel, Koenraad

    2013-01-01

    In architectural practice, residential care centers need to comply with complex restrictions and requirements regarding objective parameters (e.g., measurements due to safety and accessibility). Paradoxically, this may hinder attention for qualitative aspects such as experience or well-being. Nonetheless, the physical environment has been shown to have the potential to increase well-being. It is therefore important for (interior) architects to gain as much insight as possible in how interior ...

  13. Enhanced Patient Serum Immunoreactivity to Recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis CFP32 Produced in the Yeast Pichia pastoris Compared to Escherichia coli and Its Potential for Serodiagnosis of Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Barbouche, M. R.; Benabdesselem, C.; Fathallah, M.D.; Huard, R.C.; Zhu, H.; Jarboui, M.A.; Ho, J. L.; Dellagi, K

    2006-01-01

    CFP32 is a Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex-restricted secreted protein that was previously reported to be present in a majority of sputum samples from patients with active tuberculosis (TB) and to stimulate serum antibody production. CFP32 (originally annotated as Rv0577 and also known as TB27.3) was therefore considered a good candidate target antigen for the rapid serodiagnosis of TB. However, the maximal sensitivity of CFP32 serorecognition may have been limited in earlier studies becau...

  14. A longitudinal study of the emerging self from 9 months to the age of 4 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eKristen-Antonow

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if children’s early responsiveness towards social partners is developmentally related to their growing concept of self, as reflected in their mirror self recognition (MSR and delayed self recognition (DSR. Thus, a longitudinal study assessed infants' responsiveness (e.g., smiling, gaze towards social partners during the still-face task and a social imitation game and related it to their emerging MSR and DSR. Thereby, children were tested at regular time points from 9 months to 4 years of age. Results revealed significant predictive relations between children’s responsiveness towards a social partner in the still-face task at 9 months and their MSR at 24 months. Further, interindividual differences in children’s awareness of and responsiveness towards being imitated in a social imitation game at 12 months proved to be the strongest predictor of children’s DSR at 4 years, while some additional variance was explained by MSR at 24 months and verbal intelligence. Overall, findings suggest a developmental link between children’s early awareness of and responsiveness towards the social world and their later ability to form a concept of self.

  15. Egocentric spatial learning in schizophrenia investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemerkus, Jakob; Irle, Eva; Schmidt-Samoa, Carsten; Dechent, Peter; Weniger, Godehard

    2012-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia are related to disturbed self-recognition and to disturbed experience of agency. Possibly, these impairments contribute to first-person large-scale egocentric learning deficits. Sixteen inpatients with schizophrenia and 16 matched healthy comparison subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while finding their way in a virtual maze. The virtual maze presented a first-person view, lacked any topographical landmarks and afforded egocentric navigation strategies. The participants with schizophrenia showed impaired performance in the virtual maze when compared with controls, and showed a similar but weaker pattern of activity changes during egocentric learning when compared with controls. Especially the activity of task-relevant brain regions (precuneus and posterior cingulate and retrosplenial cortex) differed from that of controls across all trials of the task. Activity increase within the right-sided precuneus was related to worse virtual maze performance and to stronger positive symptoms in participants with schizophrenia. We suggest that psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia are related to aberrant neural activity within the precuneus. Possibly, first-person large-scale egocentric navigation and learning designs may be a feasible tool for the assessment and treatment of cognitive deficits related to self-recognition in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:24179748

  16. Egocentric spatial learning in schizophrenia investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemerkus, Jakob; Irle, Eva; Schmidt-Samoa, Carsten; Dechent, Peter; Weniger, Godehard

    2012-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia are related to disturbed self-recognition and to disturbed experience of agency. Possibly, these impairments contribute to first-person large-scale egocentric learning deficits. Sixteen inpatients with schizophrenia and 16 matched healthy comparison subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while finding their way in a virtual maze. The virtual maze presented a first-person view, lacked any topographical landmarks and afforded egocentric navigation strategies. The participants with schizophrenia showed impaired performance in the virtual maze when compared with controls, and showed a similar but weaker pattern of activity changes during egocentric learning when compared with controls. Especially the activity of task-relevant brain regions (precuneus and posterior cingulate and retrosplenial cortex) differed from that of controls across all trials of the task. Activity increase within the right-sided precuneus was related to worse virtual maze performance and to stronger positive symptoms in participants with schizophrenia. We suggest that psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia are related to aberrant neural activity within the precuneus. Possibly, first-person large-scale egocentric navigation and learning designs may be a feasible tool for the assessment and treatment of cognitive deficits related to self-recognition in patients with schizophrenia.

  17. γ-Protocadherin structural diversity and functional implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Kerry Marie; Rubinstein, Rotem; Thu, Chan Aye; Mannepalli, Seetha; Bahna, Fabiana; Ahlsén, Göran; Rittenhouse, Chelsea; Maniatis, Tom; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-10-26

    Stochastic cell-surface expression of α-, β-, and γ-clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs) provides vertebrate neurons with single-cell identities that underlie neuronal self-recognition. Here we report crystal structures of ectodomain fragments comprising cell-cell recognition regions of mouse γ-Pcdhs γA1, γA8, γB2, and γB7 revealingtrans-homodimers, and of C-terminal ectodomain fragments from γ-Pcdhs γA4 and γB2, which depictcis-interacting regions in monomeric form. Together these structures span the entire γ-Pcdh ectodomain. Thetrans-dimer structures reveal determinants of γ-Pcdh isoform-specific homophilic recognition. We identified and structurally mappedcis-dimerization mutations to the C-terminal ectodomain structures. Biophysical studies showed that Pcdh ectodomains from γB-subfamily isoforms formedcisdimers, whereas γA isoforms did not, but both γA and γB isoforms could interact inciswith α-Pcdhs. Together, these data show how interaction specificity is distributed over all domains of the γ-Pcdhtransinterface, and suggest that subfamily- or isoform-specificcis-interactions may play a role in the Pcdh-mediated neuronal self-recognition code.

  18. Perceiving a stranger's voice as being one's own: a 'rubber voice' illusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zane Z Zheng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe an illusion in which a stranger's voice, when presented as the auditory concomitant of a participant's own speech, is perceived as a modified version of their own voice. When the congruence between utterance and feedback breaks down, the illusion is also broken. Compared to a baseline condition in which participants heard their own voice as feedback, hearing a stranger's voice induced robust changes in the fundamental frequency (F0 of their production. Moreover, the shift in F0 appears to be feedback dependent, since shift patterns depended reliably on the relationship between the participant's own F0 and the stranger-voice F0. The shift in F0 was evident both when the illusion was present and after it was broken, suggesting that auditory feedback from production may be used separately for self-recognition and for vocal motor control. Our findings indicate that self-recognition of voices, like other body attributes, is malleable and context dependent.

  19. High Level Physical Activity and Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data, 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyounghoon; Park, Byung-Joo

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the association between the intensity of physical activity (PA) and prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) using Korean representative data. We analyzed 39 804 participant data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2013. Exposure variable was three levels of PA (low, medium, and high) in a week, and outcome variable was prevalence of CVD based on patient self-recognition and doctor's diagnosis. Complex logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between level of PA and CVD adjusted by body mass index, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, stress recognition, household income, smoking, and current drinking. The indices of association w ere estimated as crude prevalence odds ratio (POR), adjusted POR, and their 95% confidence interval (CI). All statistical analyzes were performed using complex sample analysis procedure of the SPSS version 23.0. When all variables were adjusted, only high level PA in women showed a significant association with stroke (adjusted POR by patient's self-recognition, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.99, adjusted POR by doctor's diagnosis, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.87) and CVD (adjusted POR by doctor's diagnosis, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.96). High level PA in women has a significant reverse association with prevalence of stroke and CVD in Korea. Further study for elucidating the mechanism will be needed.

  20. Experimental study of degradable polylactic acid punctal plugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Wu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To develope a type of absorbable punctal plug.METHODS:To produce punctal plugs with polylactic acid. To model the dry eye rabbits by removing of the main lacrimal gland, the third eyelid and Harder's gland; To record the results of Schirmer test and the pyrogen test before and after the implantation of punctal plugs; Schirmer test and pyrogen test were performed before and after punctal plug implantation. The lacrimal plugs histocompatibility and the degradation time were also observed. RESULTS: It can significantly improve the Schirmer test of dry eye rabbits to implant punctual plugs. No pyrogenic reactions had been discovered. Good histocompatibility was achieved and the plugs would degrade within 2 months. CONCLUSION:The plugs produced by polylactic acid biodegradable material, which is widely used in biomedical fields, have no toxic effects on rabbits. It's safe and inexpensive, so it's valuable for further research and clinical application.