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Sample records for histocompatibility complex dqw3beta-chains

  1. Reproductive failure and the major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, K; Ho, H N; Speed, T P; Gill, T J

    1995-06-01

    The association between HLA sharing and recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) was tested in 123 couples and the association between HLA sharing, and the outcome of treatment for unexplained infertility by in vitro fertilization (IVF) was tested in 76 couples, by using a new shared-allele test in order to identify more precisely the region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influencing these reproductive defects. The shared-allele test circumvents the problem of rare alleles at HLA loci and at the same time provides a substantial gain in power over the simple chi 2 test. Two statistical methods, a corrected homogeneity test and a bootstrap approach, were developed to compare the allele frequencies at each of the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DR, and HLA-DQ loci; they were not statistically different among the three patient groups and the control group. There was a significant excess of HLA-DR sharing in couples with RSA and a significant excess of HLA-DQ sharing in couples with unexplained infertility who failed treatment by IVF. These findings indicate that genes located in different parts of the class II region of the MHC affect different aspects of reproduction and strongly suggest that the sharing of HLA antigens per se is not the mechanism involved in the reproductive defects. The segment of the MHC that has genes affecting reproduction also has genes associated with different autoimmune diseases, and this juxtaposition may explain the association between reproductive defects and autoimmune diseases.

  2. Major Histocompatibility complex-DMB allelic diversity in old and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major Histocompatibility complex-DMB allelic diversity in old and new world nonhuman primates: Intraspecies pattern of evolution. ... directing DR molecules towards the endosomal/ lysosomal class II compartment and sending inhibitory signals to cells in order to stop synthesis of unnecessary MHC-DR molecules.

  3. Molecular Genotype Identification of Different Chickens: Major Histocompatibility Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chicken is a main poultry in China. Molecular breeding for disease resistance plays an important role in the control of diseases, especially infectious diseases. Choice of genes for disease resistance is the key technology of molecular breeding. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is of great interest to poultry breeding scientists for its extraordinary polymorphism and close relation with traits of resistance against infectious diseases. The MHC-B haplotype plays an important role in the study of disease resistance in chicken. The traditional chicken MHC-B haplotype is commonly defined by serologic reactions of erythrocytes and the majority of studies have been conducted in Leghorn and broiler but study about other chicken breeds is little. In this study, firstly, the microsatellite marker LEI0258 which is located within the MHC was sequenced by using target sequence capture assay in different chicken breeds, and then according to the number of repeated structures and polymorphic sequences in microsatellite, sequence information for the region defined by LEI0258 was obtained for different haplotypes. Afterwards, we identified the relation between MHC-B haplotypes and disease resistance. Collectively, these observed results provided the reference data for disease-resistant breeding association with blood type and for further study of MHC gene function in poultry.

  4. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... and functioning, MHC-I molecules might be of importance for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis not only within the immune system, but also in the interplay between the immune system and other organ systems....

  5. CD1 and major histocompatibility complex II molecules follow a different course during dendritic cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, Nicole N.; Sugita, Masahiko; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Cao, Xaiochun; Schreibelt, Gerty; Brenner, Michael B.; Peters, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells is accompanied by the redistribution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules from the lysosomal MHC class IT compartment to the plasma membrane to mediate presentation of peptide antigens. Besides MHC molecules, dendritic cells also express CD1

  6. Correlation in chicken between the marker LEI0258 alleles and Major Histocompatibility Complex sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chazara, Olympe; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl; Chang, Chi-Seng

    Background The LEI0258 marker is located within the B region of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), and is surprisingly well associated with serology. Therefore, the correlation between the LEI0258 alleles and the MHC class I and the class II alleles at the level of sequences is w...

  7. Pathogen burden, co-infection and major histocompatibility complex variability in the European badger (Meles meles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Yung Wa; Annavi, Geetha; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Newman, Chris; Burke, Terry; MacDonald, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen-mediated selection is thought to maintain the extreme diversity in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, operating through the heterozygote advantage, rare-allele advantage and fluctuating selection mechanisms. Heterozygote advantage (i.e. recognizing and binding a wider range

  8. Phage display of peptide / major histocompatibility class I complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vest Hansen, N; Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Stryhn, A

    2001-01-01

    and subsequently that ot the T cell receptor for peptide-MHC-I complex), we have fused a single chain peptide-MHC-I complex to the phage minor coat protein, gpIII, and displayed it on filamentous phage. Expression of peptide-MHC-I complexes was shown with relevant conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies and......, more importantly, with a unique "T cell receptor-like" (i. e. peptide-specific, MHC-I-restricted) antibody. Thus, properly assembled and folded peptide-MHC-I complexes can be displayed on filamentous phage. Despite the successful display, interaction with T cells could not be demonstrated....

  9. Restriction fragment polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex of diabetic BB rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastern, W.; Dyrberg, T.; Scholler, J.

    1984-01-01

    DNA isolated from diabetic BB (BB/Hagedorn) rats was examined for restriction fragment length differences within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as compared with nondiabetic (W-subline) BB rats. Polymorphisms were detected using a mouse class I MHC gene as probe. Specifically, a 2-kb Bam......) or a human DC-beta (class II antigen light chain) gene as probes. These results indicate that the BB rat diabetic syndrome may be linked to differences in class I MHC genes....

  10. Delayed hypersensitivity to aminopenicillins is related to major histocompatibility complex genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, A; De Santis, A; Romito, A; Di Fonso, M; Venuti, A; Gasbarrini, G B; Manna, R

    1998-05-01

    Although in some cases delayed hypersensitivity may be observed, beta-lactam antibiotics frequently induce immediate allergic IgE-mediated reactions with the specificity localized in the acyl-side chain structure. Generally, delayed immunologic reactions are related to sensitized T lymphocytes and major histocompatibility complex restricted. To investigate the prevalence of HLA class I and II antigens in patients with delayed hypersensitivity to aminopenicillins in order to evaluate a relationship between major histocompatibility complex immune response genes and aminopenicillins hypersensitivity. We assessed 24 patients with history of delayed hypersensitivity to aminopenicillins using (1) skin test with penicilloyl polylysine, minor determinant mixture, benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, and ampicillin; (2) patch tests with benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, and ampicillin; (3) RAST for penicilloyls G and V; and (4) oral challenges with amoxicillin, ampicillin, and penicillin V in 18/24 patients. All patients were typed by microlymphotoxicity standard test for HLA class I and II antigens. Statistical analysis by chi2 test 2 x 2 contingency tables, according to Svejgaard, were used for comparison between patients and random Italian population (522 subjects). In the patients group we found higher prevalence of HLA A2 (12/24 = 50%, RR = 6.76 P mechanisms involved in adverse reactions to aminopenicillins in vivo are related to genetic markers of immune response and confirms that the presentation of penicillin-hapten determinants to lymphocyte is major histocompatibility complex restricted.

  11. 454 sequencing reveals extreme complexity of the class II Major Histocompatibility Complex in the collared flycatcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Lars

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of their functional significance, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I and II genes have been the subject of continuous interest in the fields of ecology, evolution and conservation. In some vertebrate groups MHC consists of multiple loci with similar alleles; therefore, the multiple loci must be genotyped simultaneously. In such complex systems, understanding of the evolutionary patterns and their causes has been limited due to challenges posed by genotyping. Results Here we used 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize MHC class IIB exon 2 variation in the collared flycatcher, an important organism in evolutionary and immuno-ecological studies. On the basis of over 152,000 sequencing reads we identified 194 putative alleles in 237 individuals. We found an extreme complexity of the MHC class IIB in the collared flycatchers, with our estimates pointing to the presence of at least nine expressed loci and a large, though difficult to estimate precisely, number of pseudogene loci. Many similar alleles occurred in the pseudogenes indicating either a series of recent duplications or extensive concerted evolution. The expressed alleles showed unambiguous signals of historical selection and the occurrence of apparent interlocus exchange of alleles. Placing the collared flycatcher's MHC sequences in the context of passerine diversity revealed transspecific MHC class II evolution within the Muscicapidae family. Conclusions 454 amplicon sequencing is an effective tool for advancing our understanding of the MHC class II structure and evolutionary patterns in Passeriformes. We found a highly dynamic pattern of evolution of MHC class IIB genes with strong signals of selection and pronounced sequence divergence in expressed genes, in contrast to the apparent sequence homogenization in pseudogenes. We show that next generation sequencing offers a universal, affordable method for the characterization and, in perspective

  12. Oriented coupling of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to sensor surfaces using light assisted immobilisation technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snabe, Torben; Røder, Gustav Andreas; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2005-01-01

    histocompatibility complex (MHC class I) to a sensor surface is presented. The coupling was performed using light assisted immobilisation--a novel immobilisation technology which allows specific opening of particular disulphide bridges in proteins which then is used for covalent bonding to thiol-derivatised surfaces...... procedure can be used for covalent immobilisation of MHC class II complexes. The results open for the development of efficient T cell sensors, sensors for recognition of peptides of pathogenic origin, as well as other applications that may benefit from oriented immobilisation of MHC proteins....

  13. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E

    1996-01-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might ...

  14. Passive Immunotherapy for Retroviral Disease: Influence of Major Histocompatibility Complex Type and T-Cell Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Brooks, Diane M.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1995-11-01

    Administration of virus-specific antibodies is known to be an effective early treatment for some viral infections. Such immunotherapy probably acts by antibody-mediated neutralization of viral infectivity and is often thought to function independently of T-cell-mediated immune responses. In the present experiments, we studied passive antibody therapy using Friend murine leukemia virus complex as a model for an immunosuppressive retroviral disease in adult mice. The results showed that antibody therapy could induce recovery from a well-established retroviral infection. However, the success of therapy was dependent on the presence of both CD4^+ and CD8^+ T lymphocytes. Thus, cell-mediated responses were required for recovery from infection even in the presence of therapeutic levels of antibody. The major histocompatibility type of the mice was also an important factor determining the relative success of antibody therapy in this system, but it was less critical for low-dose than for high-dose infections. Our results imply that limited T-cell responsiveness as dictated by major histocompatibility genes and/or stage of disease may have contributed to previous immunotherapy failures in AIDS patients. Possible strategies to improve the efficacy of future therapies are discussed.

  15. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide-MHC c...

  16. Characterisation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I in the Australian Cane Toad, Rhinella marina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Mette; Shine, Richard; Belov, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I is a highly variable gene family that encodes cell-surface receptors vital for recognition of intracellular pathogens and initiation of immune responses. The MHC class I has yet to be characterised in bufonid toads (Order: Anura; Suborder: Neobatrachia; Family: Bufonidae), a large and diverse family of anurans. Here we describe the characterisation of a classical MHC class I gene in the Australian cane toad, Rhinella marina. From 25 individuals sampled from the Australian population, we found only 3 alleles at this classical class I locus. We also found large number of class I alpha 1 alleles, implying an expansion of class I loci in this species. The low classical class I genetic diversity is likely the result of repeated bottleneck events, which arose as a result of the cane toad's complex history of introductions as a biocontrol agent and its subsequent invasion across Australia. PMID:25093458

  17. The major histocompatibility complex: a paradigm for studies of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcock, Richard J N

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6 is one of the most intensively studied regions of the human genome and has many features which make it unique. It is the source of much research interest because of its role in autoimmune and infectious disease susceptibility, and of diagnostic interest because of its role in transplantation and rejection. It is the most gene-dense and SNP-rich region of the genome, with large number of complex haplotypes and other features which must be taken into account when analysing the MHC in the laboratory. This article provides a brief overview of the MHC highlighting some of the issues that must be considered when developing new methods and assays.

  18. Major histocompatibility complex-controlled protective influences on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are peptide specific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Kjellén, P; Olsson, T

    1997-01-01

    The myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide 63-88-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and its associated T cell cytokine profile are influenced by the rat major histocompatibility complex (MHC). There is an allele-specific protective influence of the MHC class I region, whereas...... the MHC class II region display either disease-protective or -promoting effects. To investigate if the MHC-associated protection is dependent on certain combinations of MBP peptide and MHC molecules, we have now used another peptide (MBP 89-101). A broader and different set of rat MHC alleles were......-101 peptide, except in LEW.1N (RT1 pi) rats which were relatively resistant. Only this strain responded with additional Th2-like and transforming growth factor-beta responses to the peptide in vitro. In vivo depletion of CD8+ cells aggravated the disease in this strain. We conclude that both MHC...

  19. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules in oral carcinomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel-Dorrego, Mariana; Speight, Paul M; Barrett, A William

    2005-01-01

    Recognition in the 1980 s that keratinocytes can express class II molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) first raised the possibility that these cells might have an immunological function, and may even act as antigen presenting cells (APC). For effective T lymphocyte activation, APC require, in addition to MHC II, appropriate costimulatory signals. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 in keratinocytes derived from healthy oral mucosa and oral carcinomas. Using flow cytometry, it was confirmed that oral keratinocytes, switch on, expression of MHC class II molecules after stimulation with IFNgamma in vitro. All keratinocyte lines expressed CD40 constitutively; by contrast, CD80 and CD86 were universally absent. Loss of CD80 and CD86 may be one means whereby tumours escape immunological surveillance.

  20. Characterisation of four major histocompatibility complex class II genes of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Quintin; Jobbins, Sarah E; Belov, Katherine; Higgins, Damien P

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules have an integral role in the adaptive immune response, as they bind and present antigenic peptides to T helper lymphocytes. In this study of koalas, species-specific primers were designed to amplify exon 2 of the MHC class II DA and DB genes, which contain much of the peptide-binding regions of the α and β chains. A total of two DA α1 domain variants and eight DA β1 (DAB), three DB α1 and five DB β1 variants were amplified from 20 koalas from two free-living populations from South East Queensland and the Port Macquarie region in northern New South Wales. We detected greater variation in the β1 than in the α1 domains as well as evidence of positive selection in DAB. The present study provides a springboard to future investigation of the role of MHC in disease susceptibility in koalas.

  1. Humans with chimpanzee-like major histocompatibility complex-specificities control HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Kesmir, Can; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Background: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules allow immune surveillance by presenting a snapshot of the intracellular state of a cell to circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The MHC class I alleles of an HIV-1 infected individual strongly influence the level of viremia...... and the progression rate to AIDS. Chimpanzees control HIV-1 viral replication and develop a chronic infection without progressing to AIDS. A similar course of disease is observed in human long-term non-progressors. Objective: To investigate if long-term non-progressors and chimpanzees have functional similarities...... in their MHC class I repertoire. Methods: We compared the specificity of groups of human MHC molecules associated with different levels of viremia in HIV-1 infected individuals with those of chimpanzee. Results and conclusion: We demonstrate that human MHC with control of HIV-1 viral load share binding motifs...

  2. Canine parvovirus enteritis, canine distemper, and major histocompatibility complex genetic variation in Mexican wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Philip W; Lee, Rhonda N; Buchanan, Colleen

    2003-10-01

    The endangered Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) was recently reintroduced into Arizona and New Mexico (USA). In 1999 and 2000, pups from three litters that were part of the reintroduction program died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. Overall, half (seven of 14) of the pups died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. The parents and their litters were analyzed for variation at the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene DRB1. Similar MHC genes are related to disease resistance in other species. All six of the surviving pups genotyped for the MHC gene were heterozygous while five of the pups that died were heterozygous and one was homozygous. Resistance to pathogens is an important aspect of the management and long-term survival of endangered taxa, such as the Mexican wolf.

  3. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are a key element of the cellular immune response. Encoded by the MHC they are a family of highly polymorphic peptide receptors presenting peptide antigens for the surveillance by T cells. We have shown that certain organic compounds can amplify im...

  4. IPD-MHC 2.0 : an improved inter-species database for the study of the major histocompatibility complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Robinson, James; Ballingall, Keith; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Grimholt, Unni; Kaufman, Jim; Ho, Chak-Sum; de Groot, Natasja G; Flicek, Paul; Bontrop, Ronald E; Hammond, John A; Marsh, Steven G E

    2017-01-01

    The IPD-MHC Database project (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/mhc/) collects and expertly curates sequences of the major histocompatibility complex from non-human species and provides the infrastructure and tools to enable accurate analysis. Since the first release of the database in 2003, IPD-MHC has

  5. Subtle conformational changes induced in major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervonsky, A V; Medzhitov, R M; Denzin, L K; Barlow, A K; Rudensky, A Y; Janeway, C A

    1998-08-18

    Intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is characterized by passage through specialized endocytic compartment(s) where antigenic peptides replace invariant chain fragments in the presence of the DM protein. These changes are accompanied by structural transitions of the MHC molecules that can be visualized by formation of compact SDS-resistant dimers, by changes in binding of mAbs, and by changes in T cell responses. We have observed that a mAb (25-9-17) that is capable of staining I-Ab on the surface of normal B cells failed to interact with I-Ab complexes with a peptide derived from the Ealpha chain of the I-E molecule but bound a similar covalent complex of I-Ab with the class II binding fragment (class II-associated invariant chain peptides) of the invariant chain. Moreover, 25-9-17 blocked activation of several I-Ab-reactive T cell hybridomas but failed to block others, suggesting that numerous I-Ab-peptide complexes acquire the 25-9-17(+) or 25-9-17(-) conformation. Alloreactive T cells were also able to discriminate peptide-dependent variants of MHC class II molecules. Thus, peptides impose subtle structural transitions upon MHC class II molecules that affect T cell recognition and may thus be critical for T cell selection and autiommunity.

  6. Allogeneic major histocompatibility complex-mismatched equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are targeted for death by cytotoxic anti-major histocompatibility complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, A K; Schnabel, L V

    2017-07-01

    Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising cell source for treating musculoskeletal injuries in horses. Controversy exists, however, over whether major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched MSCs are recognised by the recipient immune system and targeted for death by a cytotoxic antibody response. To determine if cytotoxic anti-MHC antibodies generated in vivo following MHC-mismatched MSC injections are capable of initiating complement-dependent cytotoxicity of MSCs. Experimental controlled study. Antisera previously collected at Days 0, 7, 14 and 21 post-injection from 4 horses injected with donor MHC-mismatched equine leucocyte antigen (ELA)-A2 haplotype MSCs and one control horse injected with donor MHC-matched ELA-A2 MSCs were utilised in this study. Antisera were incubated with ELA-A2 MSCs before adding complement in microcytotoxicity assays and cell death was analysed via eosin dye exclusion. ELA-A2 peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) were used in the assays as a positive control. Antisera from all 4 horses injected with MHC-mismatched MSCs contained antibodies that caused the death of ELA-A2 haplotype MSCs in the microcytotoxicity assays. In 2 of the 4 horses, antibodies were present as early as Day 7 post-injection. MSC death was consistently equivalent to that of ELA-A2 haplotype PBL death at all time points and antisera dilutions. Antisera from the control horse that was injected with MHC-matched MSCs did not contain cytotoxic ELA-A2 antibodies at any of the time points examined. This study examined MSC death in vitro only and utilized antisera from a small number of horses. The cytotoxic antibody response induced in recipient horses following injection with donor MHC-mismatched MSCs is capable of killing donor MSCs in vitro. These results suggest that the use of allogeneic MHC-mismatched MSCs must be cautioned against, not only for potential adverse events, but also for reduced therapeutic efficacy due to targeted MSC death. © 2016 The

  7. Chicken major histocompatibility complex class II molecules of the B haplotype present self and foreign peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberbatch, J A; Brewer, D; Vidavsky, I; Sharif, S

    2006-08-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC), or B-complex, mediates genetic resistance and susceptibility to infectious disease. For example, the B19 haplotype is associated with susceptibility to Marek's disease. Here, we describe the sequencing and analysis of peptides presented by B19 MHC class II molecules. A B19/B19 B-cell line was used for the immunoaffinity purification of MHC class II molecules, which was followed by acid elution of the bound peptides. The eluted peptides were then analysed using tandem mass spectrometry. Thirty peptide sequences were obtained, ranging from 11 to 25 amino acids in length. Source protein cellular localization included the plasma membrane, cytosol and endosomal pathway. In addition, five peptides from the envelope glycoprotein of chicken syncytial virus (CSV) were identified. Chicken syncytial virus had been used as a helper virus along with reticuloendotheliosis virus strain T for transformation of B19/B19B cells. Alignment and analysis of the peptide sequence pool provided a putative peptide-binding motif for the B19 MHC class II.

  8. Spatial variation and low diversity in the major histocompatibility complex in walrus (Odobenus rosmarus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Fales, Krystal; Jay, Chadwick V.; Sage, George K.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Increased global temperature and associated changes to Arctic habitats will likely result in the northward advance of species, including an influx of pathogens novel to the Arctic. How species respond to these immunological challenges will depend in part on the adaptive potential of their immune response system. We compared levels of genetic diversity at a gene associated with adaptive immune response [Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC), DQB exon 2] between populations of walrus (Odobenus rosmarus), a sea ice-dependent Arctic species. Walrus was represented by only five MHC DQB alleles, with frequency differences observed between Pacific and Atlantic populations. MHC DQB alleles appear to be under balancing selection, and most (80 %; n = 4/5) of the alleles were observed in walruses from both oceans, suggesting broad scale differences in the frequency of exposure and diversity of pathogens may be influencing levels of heterozygosity at DQB in walruses. Limited genetic diversity at MHC, however, suggests that walrus may have a reduced capacity to respond to novel immunological challenges associated with shifts in ecological communities and environmental stressors predicted for changing climates. This is particularly pertinent for walrus, since reductions in summer sea ice may facilitate both northward expansion of marine species and associated pathogens from more temperate regions, and exchange of marine mammals and associated pathogens through the recently opened Northwest Passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in the Canadian high Arctic.

  9. Structure and polymorphisms of the major histocompatibility complex in the Oriental stork, Ciconia boyciana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroki; Taniguchi, Yukio; Ishizuka, Shintaro; Matsuda, Hirokazu; Yamada, Takahisa; Naito, Kazuaki; Iwaisaki, Hiroaki

    2017-02-17

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is highly polymorphic and plays a central role in the vertebrate immune system. Despite its functional consistency, the MHC genomic structure differs substantially among organisms. In birds, the MHCs of Galliformes and the Japanese crested ibis (Pelecaniformes) are well-characterized, but information about other avian MHCs remains scarce. The Oriental stork (Ciconia boyciana, order Ciconiiformes) is a large endangered migrant. The current Japanese population of this bird originates from a few founders; thus, understanding the genetic diversity among them is critical for effective population management. We report the structure and polymorphisms in C. boyciana MHC. One contig (approximately 128 kb) was assembled by screening of lambda phage genomic library and its complete sequence was determined, revealing a gene order of COL11A2, two copies of MHC-IIA/IIB pairs, BRD2, DMA/B1/B2, MHC-I, TAP1/2, and two copies each of pseudo MHC-I and TNXB. This structure was highly similar to that of the Japanese crested ibis, but largely different from that of Galliformes, at both the terminal regions. Genotyping of the MHC-II region detected 10 haplotypes among the six founders. These results provide valuable insights for future studies on the evolution of the avian MHCs and for conservation of C. boyciana.

  10. Major histocompatibility complex genes partly explain early survival in house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasch, B; Westerdahl, H; Strandh, M; Knauer, F; Winkler, H; Moodley, Y; Hoi, H

    2017-07-26

    Environmental factors and genetic incompatibilities between parents have been suggested as important determinants for embryonic mortality and survival. The genetic set-up of the immune system, specifically the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may also influence individual resistance to infections. MHC proteins are important for an appropriate adaptive immune response and enable T-cells to separate 'self' from 'non-self'. Here we investigate the importance of MHC functional diversity for early development in birds, more specifically, if offspring survival and body mass or size depends on number of different functional MHC alleles, specific functional MHC alleles or similarity of MHC alleles in the parents. Unhatched eggs are common in clutches of many bird species. In house sparrows (Passer domesticus), embryo and nestling mortality can exceed 50%. To control for environmental factors, our study was carried out on an aviary population. We found that one specific functional MHC allele was associated with reduced nestling survival, which was additionally supported by lower body mass and a smaller tarsus when nestlings have been 6 days old. Another allele was positively associated with tarsus length at a later nestling stage (nestlings 12 days old). These results indicate that MHC alleles might influence pathogen resistance or susceptibility.

  11. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Jan Ejsmond

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process. Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  12. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejsmond, Maciej Jan; Radwan, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens) of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS) are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process). Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  13. Biological effects of genes in the Grc and EC region of the rat major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X J; McCarthy, B D; Salgar, S K; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1999-07-01

    To study the mechanism of action of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked genes affecting reproduction, growth, and susceptibility to chemical carcinogens. Tumors derived from rat embryonic fibroblasts were transfected with cosmids from the Grc and its linked regions, the unrelated A region, and a nonMHC region, or with genes from the Grc, Grc-linked, and nonMHC regions, to determine whether they could suppress tumor growth as determined by in vitro (soft agar) and in vivo assays. Tumor fibroblasts transfected with cosmids from the Grc or from the EC region decreased tumor growth in both the in vitro and in vivo assays. Transfection with individual genes from the Grc had no effect on tumor growth in either assay. The effects of the Grc on reproduction, growth, and tumorigenesis are mediated by extended genetic effects, i.e., by the conformation of the DNA in this region. Similar effects were seen following transfection with cosmids from the Grc-linked EC region, and this finding strengthens the hypothesis that the conformation of the DNA in this general region is critical for its function. A similar effect has been described for the locus control region (LCR) in the beta-globin gene family in the human.

  14. Orientation of loci within the human major histocompatibility complex by chromosomal in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, C C; Kirsch, I R; Nance, W E; Evans, G A; Korman, A J; Strominger, J L

    1984-05-01

    We have determined the localization and orientation of two genetic probes within the human major histocompatibility complex by chromosomal in situ hybridization. Our data indicate that a cloned genomic probe cross-hybridizing to HLA-A, -B, and -C heavy chain loci is homologous to sequences located on chromosome 6 at band p21.3 while a subclone of the genomic HLA-DR alpha-chain gene corresponding to the nonpolymorphic p34 protein is homologous to sequences in band 6p21.1. Our data suggest that this technique may permit the estimation of map distances between linked gene loci, assuming a uniform frequency of map units in the human genome. The relative positions of these genes was confirmed in a mother and son carrying a chromosome rearrangement involving 6p and 14p in which the sequences hybridizing to a DR alpha-chain genomic clone were found at the distal end of the 6p--chromosome [der(6)] while the sequences hybridizing to the HLA-A, -B, -C alpha-chain probe were found in the 14p+ chromosome [der(14)].

  15. Recombination and selection in the major histocompatibility complex of the endangered forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ruibo; Shafer, Aaron B A; Laguardia, Alice; Lin, Zhenzhen; Liu, Shuqiang; Hu, Defu

    2015-11-25

    The forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii) is a high elevation species distributed across western China and northern Vietnam. Once abundant, habitat loss and poaching has led to a dramatic decrease in population numbers prompting the IUCN to list the species as endangered. Here, we characterized the genetic diversity of a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus and teased apart driving factors shaping its variation. Seven DRB exon 2 alleles were identified among a group of randomly sampled forest musk deer from a captive population in the Sichuan province of China. Compared to other endangered or captive ungulates, forest musk deer have relatively low levels of MHC genetic diversity. Non-synonymous substitutions primarily occurred in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), with analyses suggesting that recombination and selection has shaped the genetic diversity across the locus. Specifically, inter-allelic recombination generated novel allelic combinations, with evidence for both positive selection acting on the PBR and negative selection on the non-PBR. An improved understanding of functional genetic variability of the MHC will facilitate better design and management of captive breeding programs for this endangered species.

  16. Adaptive tolerance to a pathogenic fungus drives major histocompatibility complex evolution in natural amphibian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Anna E; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2016-03-30

    Amphibians have been affected globally by the disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and we are just now beginning to understand how immunogenetic variability contributes to disease susceptibility. Lineages of an expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II locus involved in acquired immunity are associated with chytridiomycosis susceptibility in controlled laboratory challenge assays. Here, we extend these findings to natural populations that vary both in exposure and response to Bd We find that MHC alleles and supertypes associated with Bd survival in the field show a molecular signal of positive selection, while those associated with susceptibility do not, supporting the hypothesis that heritable Bd tolerance is rapidly evolving. We compare MHC supertypes to neutral loci to demonstrate where selection versus demography is shaping MHC variability. One population with Bd tolerance in nature shows a significant signal of directional selection for the same allele (allele Q) that was significantly associated with survival in an earlier laboratory study. Our findings indicate that selective pressure for Bd survival drives rapid immunogenetic adaptation in some natural populations, despite differences in environment and demography. Our field-based analysis of immunogenetic variation confirms that natural amphibian populations have the evolutionary potential to adapt to chytridiomycosis. © 2016 The Authors.

  17. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Beyond the Classical HLA Polymorphism

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    Alice Bertaina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT represents a curative treatment for many patients with hematological malignant or non-malignant disorders. Evaluation of potential donors for HSCT includes a rigorous assessment of the human leukocyte antigens (HLA match status of family members, and the identification of suitable unrelated donors. Genes encoding transplantation antigens are placed both within and outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The human MHC is located on the short arm of chromosome 6 and contains a series of genes encoding two distinct types of highly polymorphic cell surface glycoproteins. Donors for HSCT are routinely selected based on the level of matching for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 loci. However, disease relapse, graft-versus-host-disease, and infection remain significant risk factors of morbidity and mortality. In the same breath, in high-risk patients, graft-versus-leukemia effects inherent in HLA mismatching play a substantial immunological role to limit the recurrence of post-transplant disease. The definition of a suitable donor is ever changing, shaped not only by current typing technology, but also by the specific transplant procedure. Indeed, a more complete understanding of permissible HLA mismatches and the role of Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors’ genes increases the availability of HLA-haploidentical and unrelated donors.

  18. The human Major Histocompatibility Complex as a paradigm in genomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandiedonck, Claire; Knight, Julian C

    2009-09-01

    Since its discovery more than 50 years ago, the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) on chromosome 6p21.3 has been at the forefront of human genetic research. Here, we review from a historical perspective the major advances in our understanding of the nature and consequences of genetic variation which have involved the MHC, as well as highlighting likely future directions. As a consequence of its particular genomic structure, its remarkable polymorphism and its early implication in numerous diseases, the MHC has been considered as a model region for genomics, being the first substantial region to be sequenced and establishing fundamental concepts of linkage disequilibrium, haplotypic structure and meiotic recombination. Recently, the MHC became the first genomic region to be entirely re-sequenced for common haplotypes, while studies mapping gene expression phenotypes across the genome have strongly implicated variation in the MHC. This review shows how the MHC continues to provide new insights and remains in the vanguard of contemporary research in human genomics.

  19. Linkage mapping and physical localization of the major histocompatibility complex region of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, N; Deakin, J E; Miska, K B; Miller, R D; Kammerer, C M; Graves, J A M; VandeBerg, J L; Samollow, P B

    2006-01-01

    We used genetic linkage mapping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to conduct the first analysis of genic organization and chromosome localization of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of a marsupial, the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica. Family based linkage analyses of two M. domestica MHC Class I genes (UA1, UG) and three MHC Class II genes (DAB, DMA, and DMB) revealed that these genes were tightly linked and positioned in the central region of linkage group 3 (LG3). This cluster of MHC genes was physically mapped to the centromeric region of chromosome 2q by FISH using a BAC clone containing the UA1 gene. An interesting finding from the linkage analyses is that sex-specific recombination rates were virtually identical within the MHC region. This stands in stark contrast to the genome-wide situation, wherein males exhibit approximately twice as much recombination as females, and could have evolutionary implications for maintaining equality between males and females in the ability to generate haplotype diversity in this region. These analyses also showed that three non-MHC genes that flank the MHC region on human chromosome 6, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), and prolactin (PRL), are split among two separate linkage groups (chromosomes) in M. domestica. Comparative analysis with eight other vertebrate species suggests strong conservation of the BMP6-PRL synteny among birds and mammals, although the BMP6-PRL-MHC-ME1 synteny is not conserved. 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Genetic variation of major histocompatibility complex genes in the endangered red-crowned crane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Nishida, Chizuko; Onuma, Manabu; Momose, Kunikazu; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2017-07-01

    Populations that have drastically decreased in the past often have low genetic variation, which may increase the risk of extinction. The genes of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play an important role in the adaptive immune response of jawed vertebrates. Maintenance of adaptive genetic diversity such as that of MHC genes is important for wildlife conservation. Here, we determined genotypes of exon 3 of MHC class IA genes (MHCIA) and exon 2 of MHC class IIB genes (MHCIIB) to evaluate genetic variation of the endangered red-crowned crane population on Hokkaido Island, Japan, which experienced severe population decline in the past. We identified 16 and 6 alleles of MHCIA and MHCIIB, respectively, from 152 individuals. We found evidence of a positive selection at the antigen-binding sites in MHCIA exon 3 and MHCIIB exon 2. The phylogenetic analyses indicated evidence of trans-species polymorphism among the crane MHC genes. The genetic variability in both classes of MHC genes at the population level was low. No geographic structure was found based on the genetic diversity of microsatellite and MHC genes. Our study provides useful data for the optimal management of the red-crowned crane population in Hokkaido and can contribute to future studies on MHC genes of the continental populations of the red-crowned crane and other crane species.

  1. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex highlight interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system

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    Barbara Lukasch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background A well-functioning immune defence is crucial for fitness, but our knowledge about the immune system and its complex interactions is still limited. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules are involved in T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses, but MHC is also highly upregulated during the initial innate immune response. The aim of our study was therefore to determine to what extent the highly polymorphic MHC is involved in interactions of the innate and adaptive immune defence and if specific functional MHC alleles (FA or heterozygosity at the MHC are more important. Methods To do this we used captive house sparrows (Passer domesticus to survey MHC diversity and immune function controlling for several environmental factors. MHC class I alleles were identified using parallel amplicon sequencing and to mirror immune function, several immunological tests that correspond to the innate and adaptive immunity were conducted. Results Our results reveal that MHC was linked to all immune tests, highlighting its importance for the immune defence. While all innate responses were associated with one single FA, adaptive responses (cell-mediated and humoral were associated with several different alleles. Discussion We found that repeated injections of an antibody in nestlings and adults were linked to different FA and hence might affect different areas of the immune system. Also, individuals with a higher number of different FA produced a smaller secondary response, indicating a disadvantage of having numerous MHC alleles. These results demonstrate the complexity of the immune system in relation to the MHC and lay the foundation for other studies to further investigate this topic.

  2. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell's own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors-tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II-contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity.

  3. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T.; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell’s own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors—tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II—contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity. PMID:28367149

  4. Cohesin regulates major histocompatibility complex class II genes through interactions with MHC-II insulators1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    Cohesin is a multiprotein ringed complex that is most well known for its role in stabilizing the association of sister chromatids between S phase and M. More recently cohesin was found to be associated with transcriptional insulators, elements that are associated with the organization of chromatin into regulatory domains. The human major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) locuscontains ten intergenic elements, termed MHC-II insulators, which bind the transcriptional insulator protein CCCTC transcription factor (CTCF). MHC-II insulators interact with each other forming a base architecture of discrete loops and potential regulatory domains. When MHC-II genes are expressed, their proximal promoter regulatory regions reorganize to the foci established by the interacting MHC-II insulators. MHC-II insulators also bind cohesin, but the functional role of cohesin in regulating this system is not known. Here we show that the binding of cohesin to MHC-II insulators occurred irrespective of MHC-II expression but was required for optimal expression of the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ genes. In a DNA dependent manner, cohesin subunits interacted with CTCF and the MHC-II specific transcription factors RFX and CIITA. Intriguingly, cohesin subunits were important for DNA looping interactions between the HLA-DRA promoter region and a 5’ MHC-II insulator but were not required for interactions between the MHC-II insulators themselves. This latter observation introduces cohesin as a regulator of MHC-II expression by initiating or stabilizing MHC-II promoter regulatory element interactions with the MHC-II insulator elements; events which are required for maximal MHC-II transcription. PMID:21911605

  5. Stable isotope tagging of epitopes: a highly selective strategy for the identification of major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides induced upon viral infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiring, Hugo D; Soethout, Ernst C; Poelen, Martien C M; Mooibroek, Dennis; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald; Timmermans, Hans; Boog, Claire J; Heck, Albert J R; Jong, Ad P J M de; Els, Cécile A C M van

    2006-01-01

    Identification of peptides presented in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules after viral infection is of strategic importance for vaccine development. Until recently, mass spectrometric identification of virus-induced peptides was based on comparative analysis of peptide pools

  6. Assembly and function of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I peptide-loading complex are conserved across higher vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Andreas; Jedamzick, Johanna; Herbring, Valentina; Fischbach, Hanna; Hartmann, Jessica; Parcej, David; Koch, Joachim; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-28

    Antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes via major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules depends on the heterodimeric transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). For efficient antigen supply to MHC I molecules in the ER, TAP assembles a macromolecular peptide-loading complex (PLC) by recruiting tapasin. In evolution, TAP appeared together with effector cells of adaptive immunity at the transition from jawless to jawed vertebrates and diversified further within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we compared TAP function and interaction with tapasin of a range of species within two classes of jawed vertebrates. We found that avian and mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 form heterodimeric complexes across taxa. Moreover, the extra N-terminal domain TMD0 of mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 as well as avian TAP2 recruits tapasin. Strikingly, however, only TAP1 and TAP2 from the same taxon can form a functional heterodimeric translocation complex. These data demonstrate that the dimerization interface between TAP1 and TAP2 and the tapasin docking sites for PLC assembly are conserved in evolution, whereas elements of antigen translocation diverged later in evolution and are thus taxon specific. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Fine mapping major histocompatibility complex associations in psoriasis and its clinical subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yukinori; Han, Buhm; Tsoi, Lam C; Stuart, Philip E; Ellinghaus, Eva; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Chandran, Vinod; Pellett, Fawnda; Pollock, Remy; Bowcock, Anne M; Krueger, Gerald G; Weichenthal, Michael; Voorhees, John J; Rahman, Proton; Gregersen, Peter K; Franke, Andre; Nair, Rajan P; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Gladman, Dafna D; Elder, James T; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-08-07

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) risk is strongly associated with variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, but its genetic architecture has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we conducted a large-scale fine-mapping study of PsV risk in the MHC region in 9,247 PsV-affected individuals and 13,589 controls of European descent by imputing class I and II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes from SNP genotype data. In addition, we imputed sequence variants for MICA, an MHC HLA-like gene that has been associated with PsV, to evaluate association at that locus as well. We observed that HLA-C(∗)06:02 demonstrated the lowest p value for overall PsV risk (p = 1.7 × 10(-364)). Stepwise analysis revealed multiple HLA-C(∗)06:02-independent risk variants in both class I and class II HLA genes for PsV susceptibility (HLA-C(∗)12:03, HLA-B amino acid positions 67 and 9, HLA-A amino acid position 95, and HLA-DQα1 amino acid position 53; p PsV, psoriatic arthritis (PsA; n = 3,038) and cutaneous psoriasis (PsC; n = 3,098). We found that risk heterogeneity between PsA and PsC might be driven by HLA-B amino acid position 45 (Pomnibus = 2.2 × 10(-11)), indicating that different genetic factors underlie the overall risk of PsV and the risk of specific PsV subphenotypes. Our study illustrates the value of high-resolution HLA and MICA imputation for fine mapping causal variants in the MHC. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Low major histocompatibility complex class II DQA diversity in the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca

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    Ruan Xiang-Dong

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca is one of the most endangered animals due to habitat fragmentation and loss. Although the captive breeding program for this species is now nearly two decades old, researches on the genetic background of such captive populations, especially on adaptive molecular polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC, are still limited. In this study, we characterized adaptive variation of the giant panda's MHC DQA gene by PCR amplification of its antigen-recognizing region (i.e. the exon 2 and subsequent single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP and sequence analyses. Results The results revealed a low level of DQA exon 2 diversity in this rare animal, presenting 6 alleles from 61 giant panda individuals. The observed polymorphism was restricted to 9 amino acid substitutions, all of which occurred at and adjacent to positions forming the functionally important antigen-binding sites. All the samples were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. A significantly higher rate of non-synonymous than synonymous substitutions at the antigen-binding sites indicated positive selection for diversity in the locus. Conclusion The DQA allelic diversity of giant pandas was low relative to other vertebrates. Nonetheless, the pandas exhibited more alleles in DQA than those in DRB, suggesting the alpha chain genes would play a leading role when coping with certain pathogens and thus should be included in conservation genetic investigation. The microsatellite and MHC loci might predict long-term persistence potential and short-term survival ability, respectively. Consequently, it is recommended to utilize multiple suites of microsatellite markers and multiple MHC loci to detect overall genetic variation in order to design unbiased conservation strategies.

  9. Introgression from domestic goat generated variation at the major histocompatibility complex of Alpine ibex.

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    Christine Grossen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a crucial component of the vertebrate immune system and shows extremely high levels of genetic polymorphism. The extraordinary genetic variation is thought to be ancient polymorphisms maintained by balancing selection. However, introgression from related species was recently proposed as an additional mechanism. Here we provide evidence for introgression at the MHC in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex ibex. At a usually very polymorphic MHC exon involved in pathogen recognition (DRB exon 2, Alpine ibex carried only two alleles. We found that one of these DRB alleles is identical to a DRB allele of domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus. We sequenced 2489 bp of the coding and non-coding regions of the DRB gene and found that Alpine ibex homozygous for the goat-type DRB exon 2 allele showed nearly identical sequences (99.8% to a breed of domestic goats. Using Sanger and RAD sequencing, microsatellite and SNP chip data, we show that the chromosomal region containing the goat-type DRB allele has a signature of recent introgression in Alpine ibex. A region of approximately 750 kb including the DRB locus showed high rates of heterozygosity in individuals carrying one copy of the goat-type DRB allele. These individuals shared SNP alleles both with domestic goats and other Alpine ibex. In a survey of four Alpine ibex populations, we found that the region surrounding the DRB allele shows strong linkage disequilibria, strong sequence clustering and low diversity among haplotypes carrying the goat-type allele. Introgression at the MHC is likely adaptive and introgression critically increased MHC DRB diversity in the genetically impoverished Alpine ibex. Our finding contradicts the long-standing view that genetic variability at the MHC is solely a consequence of ancient trans-species polymorphism. Introgression is likely an underappreciated source of genetic diversity at the MHC and other loci under balancing selection.

  10. Physical mapping of the E/C and grc regions of the rat major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X J; Salgar, S K; Hassett, A L; McHugh, K P; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1996-01-01

    Alignment of class I-hybridizing cosmids from an R21 (AlBlDlEugrc+) genomic DNA library gave two contigs: one [150 kilobases (kb)] encompassed the E/C region, or a large part thereof, and the other (110 kb) contained the grc region which has genes influencing resistance to chemical carcinogens (rcc), fertility (ft), and growth (dw-3). Amplification of gene sequences in the four cosmids in the E/C region using Eu-specific and LW2 (RT1.C)-specific primers showed that each cosmid contained both Eu-like and C-like genes. They are clearly different but closely associated, and they show some variation from the prototypic E (Eu) and C (LW2) genes, respectively. Comparison of DNA from grc+ and grc- strains of rats showed that the deletion in the grc- strains was approximately 50 kb, and that it was located on two of the three cosmids in the grc-region contig. The use of specific class I probes showed that the grc region contained tandemly duplicated RT1.O-RT1.N genes and that the RT.BM1 loci lay outside of the grc region. Neither contig reacted with probes specific for class II, TNFA, Hsp70, or RT1.M genes. The data presented here and the previous data in the literature (summarized in Gill et al. 1995) suggest that the gene order in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and MHC-linked region of the rat is: A-E/C-grc-M.

  11. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation in the endangered Mexican wolf and related canids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, P W; Lee, R N; Parker, K M

    2000-12-01

    We have examined in Mexican wolves and related canids the amount of genetic variation for a class II gene in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), thought to be part of the most important genetic basis for pathogen resistance in vertebrates. In Mexican wolves, descended from only seven founders over three lineages, there were five different alleles. These were in three phylogenetic groups, only one of which was shared between lineages. Using single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), we found that in samples of animals from the two polymorphic lineages, the observed heterozygosity was 0.74 and the genotypes were not different statistically from Hardy-Weinberg proportions. The Ghost Ranch lineage of Mexican wolves was monomorphic for the locus, consistent with the lower level of variation found previously for microsatellite loci and predicted from pedigree analysis. Samples of grey wolves, red wolves, and coyotes had 16 additional alleles. One Mexican wolf allele was also found in grey wolves and another allele was shared between grey and red wolves. Most of the nucleotide variation resulted in amino acid variation and there were five different amino acids found at two different positions. Only two of the 21 variable amino acid positions had solely synonymous nucleotide variation. The average heterozygosity for eight individual amino acid positions in the Mexican wolves was greater than 0.4. The estimated rate of nonsynonymous substitution was 2.5 times higher than that for synonymous substitution for the putative antigen binding site positions, indicative of positive selection acting on these positions. Examination of the known dog sequences for this locus showed that one of the Mexican wolf alleles was found in dogs and that the allele found in both grey and red wolves is also found in dogs.

  12. Major histocompatibility complex variation in red wolves: evidence for common ancestry with coyotes and balancing selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, P W; Lee, R N; Garrigan, D

    2002-10-01

    We examined variation at a class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene (DRB1) in the captive red wolf population and samples of coyotes from Texas and North Carolina. We found 4 alleles in the 48 red wolves, 8 alleles in the 10 coyotes from Texas and 15 alleles in the 29 coyotes from North Carolina. Two of the four alleles found in red wolves, Caru-2 and Caru-4, were found in both the Texas and North Carolina coyote samples. Allele Caru-1, previously found in gray wolves, was also found in the North Carolina sample. The most frequent red wolf allele, Caru-3, was not found in any of the coyote samples. However, an allele found in both the Texas and North Carolina coyote samples is only one nucleotide (one amino acid) different from this red wolf allele. Overall, it appears from examination of this MHC gene that red wolves are more closely related to coyotes than to gray wolves. There were a number of different types of evidence supporting the action of balancing selection in red wolves. Namely, there was: (i) an excess of heterozygotes compared with expectations; (ii) a higher rate of nonsynonymous than synonymous substitution for the functionally important antigen-binding site positions; (iii) an eight times higher average heterozygosity of individual amino acids at the positions identified as part of the antigen-binding site than those not associated with it; (iv) the amino acid divergence of four red wolf alleles was greater than that expected from a simulation of genetic drift; and (v) the distribution of alleles, and the distributions of amino acids at many positions were more even than expected from neutrality. Examination of the level and pattern of linkage disequilibria between pairs of sites suggest that the heterozygosity, substitution and frequencies at individual amino acids are not highly dependent upon each other.

  13. The tammar wallaby major histocompatibility complex shows evidence of past genomic instability

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    Harrow Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes with a variety of roles in the innate and adaptive immune responses. MHC genes form a genetically linked cluster in eutherian mammals, an organization that is thought to confer functional and evolutionary advantages to the immune system. The tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii, an Australian marsupial, provides a unique model for understanding MHC gene evolution, as many of its antigen presenting genes are not linked to the MHC, but are scattered around the genome. Results Here we describe the 'core' tammar wallaby MHC region on chromosome 2q by ordering and sequencing 33 BAC clones, covering over 4.5 MB and containing 129 genes. When compared to the MHC region of the South American opossum, eutherian mammals and non-mammals, the wallaby MHC has a novel gene organization. The wallaby has undergone an expansion of MHC class II genes, which are separated into two clusters by the class III genes. The antigen processing genes have undergone duplication, resulting in two copies of TAP1 and three copies of TAP2. Notably, Kangaroo Endogenous Retroviral Elements are present within the region and may have contributed to the genomic instability. Conclusions The wallaby MHC has been extensively remodeled since the American and Australian marsupials last shared a common ancestor. The instability is characterized by the movement of antigen presenting genes away from the core MHC, most likely via the presence and activity of retroviral elements. We propose that the movement of class II genes away from the ancestral class II region has allowed this gene family to expand and diversify in the wallaby. The duplication of TAP genes in the wallaby MHC makes this species a unique model organism for studying the relationship between MHC gene organization and function.

  14. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuduk, Katarzyna; Babik, Wiesław; Bojarska, Katarzyna; Sliwińska, Ewa B; Kindberg, Jonas; Taberlet, Pierre; Swenson, Jon E; Radwan, Jacek

    2012-10-02

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South-north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  15. Gene organization of the quail major histocompatibility complex (MhcCoja) class I gene region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, T; Shimizu, C; Oka, A; Teraoka, Y; Imanishi, T; Gojobori, T; Hanzawa, K; Watanabe, S; Inoko, H

    1999-05-01

    Class I genomic clones of the quail (Coturnix japonica) major histocompatibility complex (MhcCoja) were isolated and characterized. Two clusters spanning the 90.8 kilobase (kb) and 78.2 kb class I gene regions were defined by overlapping cosmid clones and found to contain at least twelve class I loci. However, unlike in the chicken Mhc, no evidence for the existence of any Coja class II gene was obtained in these two clusters. Based on comparative analysis of the genomic sequences with those of the cDNA clones, Coja-A, Coja-B, Coja-C, and Coja-D (Shiina et al. 1999), these twelve loci were assigned to represent one Coja-A gene, two Coja-B genes (Coja-B1 and -B2), four Coja-C genes (Coja-C1-C4), four Coja-D genes (Coja-D1-D4), and one new Coja-E gene. A class I gene-rich segment of 24.6 kb in which five of these genes (Coja-B1, -B2, -D1, -D2 and -E) are densely packed were sequenced by the shotgun strategy. All of these five class I genes are very compact in size [2089 base pairs (bp)-2732 bp] and contain no apparent genetic defect for functional expression. A transporter associated with the antigen processing (TAP) gene was identified in this class I gene-rich segment. These results suggest that the quail class I region is physically separated from the class II region and characterized by a large number of the expressible class I loci (at least seven) in contrast to the chicken Mhc, where the class I and class II regions are not clearly differentiated and only at most three expressed class I loci so far have been recognized.

  16. Major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency complicated by Mycobacterium avium complex in a boy of mixed ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Dimana; Ong, Peck Y; O'Gorman, Maurice R G; Church, Joseph A

    2014-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) deficiency represents a rare form of severe immunodeficiency associated with increased susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens and commonly leads to failure to thrive and early death. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in MHCII transcription regulator genes, resulting in impaired expression of MHCII, and it is usually seen in consanguineous populations. Our patient presented at age 15 months with a history of developmental delay, multiple respiratory infections and skin abscesses, and recently, at 5 years of age, he was found to have disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex. His mother is Mexican-American, and his father is Persian. Laboratory investigations showed hypogammaglobulinemia, modest T-lymphopenia, borderline mitogen responses, absent tetanus toxoid and candida antigen lymphoproliferative assays, and absent tetanus toxoid and Haemophilus influenzae type b antibody levels. Flow cytometry demonstrated absent HLA-DR antigen on monocytes and B-cells, and a diagnosis of MHCII deficiency was made. Genetic analysis yielded a homozygous pathogenic class II transactivator (CIITA) mutation. The same mutation was found in both parents. Coincidently, an Xq28 microduplication was identified and likely was the cause of the patient's developmental delay. This patient demonstrated some of the typical features of MHCII deficiency with the addition of several unique findings: disseminated M. avium complex, homozygosity in a CIITA mutation despite remarkably diverse parental ethnicity, and coincident Xq28 microdeletion with mild intellectual disability.

  17. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-presenting cells. Purpose: The aim of the study was to elucidate the alteration in the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in human dental pulp as carious lesions progressed toward the pulp. Methods: Fifteen third molars with caries at the occlusal site at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted and used in this study. Before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4, all the samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition three-dimensionally. The specimens were then processed for cryosection and immunohistochemistry using an anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibody. Results: Class II MHC antigen-expressing cells were found both in normal and carious specimens. In normal tooth, the class II MHC-immunopositive cells were observed mainly at the periphery of the pulp tissue. In teeth with caries, class II MHC-immunopositive cells were located predominantly subjacent to the carious lesions. As the caries progressed, the number of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells was increased. Conclusion: The depth of carious lesions affects the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp.Latar belakang: Karies merupakan penyakit infeksi bakteri yang mengakibatkan destruksi jaringan keras gigi. Dentin yang terbuka akibat karies akan menginduksi respon imun seluler pada pulpa. Kompleks histokompatibilitas utama (MHC merupakan sekumpulan gen yang mengkode histokompatibilitas

  18. Gene duplication and fragmentation in the zebra finch major histocompatibility complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt David W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to its high polymorphism and importance for disease resistance, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC has been an important focus of many vertebrate genome projects. Avian MHC organization is of particular interest because the chicken Gallus gallus, the avian species with the best characterized MHC, possesses a highly streamlined minimal essential MHC, which is linked to resistance against specific pathogens. It remains unclear the extent to which this organization describes the situation in other birds and whether it represents a derived or ancestral condition. The sequencing of the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata genome, in combination with targeted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC sequencing, has allowed us to characterize an MHC from a highly divergent and diverse avian lineage, the passerines. Results The zebra finch MHC exhibits a complex structure and history involving gene duplication and fragmentation. The zebra finch MHC includes multiple Class I and Class II genes, some of which appear to be pseudogenes, and spans a much more extensive genomic region than the chicken MHC, as evidenced by the presence of MHC genes on each of seven BACs spanning 739 kb. Cytogenetic (FISH evidence and the genome assembly itself place core MHC genes on as many as four chromosomes with TAP and Class I genes mapping to different chromosomes. MHC Class II regions are further characterized by high endogenous retroviral content. Lastly, we find strong evidence of selection acting on sites within passerine MHC Class I and Class II genes. Conclusion The zebra finch MHC differs markedly from that of the chicken, the only other bird species with a complete genome sequence. The apparent lack of synteny between TAP and the expressed MHC Class I locus is in fact reminiscent of a pattern seen in some mammalian lineages and may represent convergent evolution. Our analyses of the zebra finch MHC suggest a complex history involving

  19. Zika Virus Escapes NK Cell Detection by Upregulating Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner, Ariella; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Weisblum, Yiska; Diab, Mohammad; Panet, Amos; Wolf, Dana G; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2017-11-15

    NK cells are innate lymphocytes that participate in many immune processes encompassing cancer, bacterial and fungal infection, autoimmunity, and even pregnancy and that specialize in antiviral defense. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors and kill their targets when activating signals overpower inhibitory signals. The NK cell inhibitory receptors include a uniquely diverse array of proteins named killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), the CD94 family, and the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LIR) family. The NK cell inhibitory receptors recognize mostly major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) proteins. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat due to its association with birth defects and its pandemic potential. How Zika virus interacts with the immune system, and especially with NK cells, is unclear. Here we show that Zika virus infection is barely sensed by NK cells, since little or no increase in the expression of activating NK cell ligands was observed following Zika infection. In contrast, we demonstrate that Zika virus infection leads to the upregulation of MHC class I proteins and consequently to the inhibition of NK cell killing. Mechanistically, we show that MHC class I proteins are upregulated via the RIGI-IRF3 pathway and that this upregulation is mediated via beta interferon (IFN-β). Potentially, countering MHC class I upregulation during Zika virus infection could be used as a prophylactic treatment against Zika virus. IMPORTANCE NK cells are innate lymphocytes that recognize and eliminate various pathogens and are known mostly for their role in controlling viral infections. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors, and they kill or spare their targets based on the integration of inhibitory and activating signals. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat to humans due to its pandemic potential and its association with birth defects. The role of NK cells in Zika virus

  20. The major histocompatibility complex in Old World camelids and low polymorphism of its class II genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasil, Martin; Mohandesan, Elmira; Fitak, Robert R; Musilova, Petra; Kubickova, Svatava; Burger, Pamela A; Horin, Petr

    2016-03-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is a genomic region containing genes with crucial roles in immune responses. MHC class I and class II genes encode antigen-presenting molecules expressed on the cell surface. To counteract the high variability of pathogens, the MHC evolved into a region of considerable heterogeneity in its organization, number and extent of polymorphism. Studies of MHCs in different model species contribute to our understanding of mechanisms of immunity, diseases and their evolution. Camels are economically important domestic animals and interesting biomodels. Three species of Old World camels have been recognized: the dromedary (Camelus dromedarius), Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) and the wild camel (Camelus ferus). Despite their importance, little is known about the MHC genomic region, its organization and diversity in camels. The objectives of this study were to identify, map and characterize the MHC region of Old World camelids, with special attention to genetic variation at selected class MHC II loci. Physical mapping located the MHC region to the chromosome 20 in Camelus dromedarius. Cytogenetic and comparative analyses of whole genome sequences showed that the order of the three major sub-regions is "Centromere - Class II - Class III - Class I". DRA, DRB, DQA and DQB exon 2 sequences encoding the antigen binding site of the corresponding class II antigen presenting molecules showed high degree of sequence similarity and extensive allele sharing across the three species. Unexpectedly low extent of polymorphism with low numbers of alleles and haplotypes was observed in all species, despite different geographic origins of the camels analyzed. The DRA locus was found to be polymorphic, with three alleles shared by all three species. DRA and DQA sequences retrieved from ancient DNA samples of Camelus dromedarius suggested that additional polymorphism might exist. This study provided evidence that camels possess an MHC comparable to

  1. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in the Barn owl (Aves: Tyto alba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Reto; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène; Roulin, Alexandre; Fumagalli, Luca

    2008-09-01

    We isolated major histocompatibility complex class II B (MHCIIB) genes in the Barn owl (Tyto alba). A PCR-based approach combined with primer walking on genomic and complementary DNA as well as Southern blot analyses revealed the presence of two MHCIIB genes, both being expressed in spleen, liver, and blood. Characteristic structural features of MHCIIB genes as well as their expression and high non-synonymous substitution rates in the region involved in antigen binding suggest that both genes are functional. MHC organization in the Barn owl is simple compared to passerine species that show multiple duplications, and resembles the minimal essential MHC of chicken.

  2. Biochemical characterization and crystalization of human Zn-α2-glycoprotein, a soluble class I major histocompatibility complex homolog

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Luis M; López-Otín, Carlos; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    1997-01-01

    Zn-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG) is a 41-kDa soluble protein that is present in most bodily fluids. In addition, ZAG accumulates in fluids from breast cysts and in 40% of breast carcinomas, which suggests that ZAG plays a role in the development of breast diseases. However, the function of ZAG under physiological and cancerous conditions remains unknown. Because ZAG shares 30–40% sequence identity with the heavy chains of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins, we compared the bioche...

  3. Preformed purified peptide/major histocompatibility class I complexes are potent stimulators of class I-restricted T cell hybridomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Ortiz-Navarrete, V

    1994-01-01

    A panel of antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted T cell hybridomas has been generated to examine the capacity of peptide/class I complexes to stimulate T cells at the molecular level. Peptide/class I complexes were generated in detergent solution, purified...... and quantitated. Latex particles were subsequently coated with known amounts of preformed complexes and used to stimulate the T cell hybridomas. Stimulation was specific, i.e. only the appropriate peptide/class I combination were stimulatory, and quite sensitive, i.e. as little as 300 complexes per bead could...... expression, suggesting that antigen-specific stimulation of class I-restricted T cell hybridomas, as assessed by IL-2 release, does not depend on CD8....

  4. DNA methylation profiling of the human major histocompatibility complex: a pilot study for the human epigenome project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardhman K Rakyan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine-guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will significantly improve our understanding of genome biology and our ability to diagnose disease. Here, we report the results of the pilot study for the Human Epigenome Project entailing the methylation analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex. This study involved the development of an integrated pipeline for high-throughput methylation analysis using bisulphite DNA sequencing, discovery of methylation variable positions, epigenotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, and development of an integrated public database available at http://www.epigenome.org. Our analysis of DNA methylation levels within the major histocompatibility complex, including regulatory exonic and intronic regions associated with 90 genes in multiple tissues and individuals, reveals a bimodal distribution of methylation profiles (i.e., the vast majority of the analysed regions were either hypo- or hypermethylated, tissue specificity, inter-individual variation, and correlation with independent gene expression data.

  5. DNA Methylation Profiling of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex: A Pilot Study for the Human Epigenome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hildmann, Thomas; Novik, Karen L; Lewin, Jörn; Tost, Jörg; Cox, Antony V; Andrews, T. Dan; Howe, Kevin L; Otto, Thomas; Olek, Alexander; Fischer, Judith; Gut, Ivo G; Berlin, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine–guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will significantly improve our understanding of genome biology and our ability to diagnose disease. Here, we report the results of the pilot study for the Human Epigenome Project entailing the methylation analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex. This study involved the development of an integrated pipeline for high-throughput methylation analysis using bisulphite DNA sequencing, discovery of methylation variable positions, epigenotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, and development of an integrated public database available at http://www.epigenome.org. Our analysis of DNA methylation levels within the major histocompatibility complex, including regulatory exonic and intronic regions associated with 90 genes in multiple tissues and individuals, reveals a bimodal distribution of methylation profiles (i.e., the vast majority of the analysed regions were either hypo- or hypermethylated), tissue specificity, inter-individual variation, and correlation with independent gene expression data. PMID:15550986

  6. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djidjik Réda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26. Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  7. N-myc suppresses Major Histocompatibility Complex class I gene expression through down-regulation of the p50 subunit of NF-kappaB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, L.J. van 't; Beijersbergen, R.L.; Bernards, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In neuroblastoma, N-myc suppresses the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I antigens by reducing the binding of a nuclear factor to the enhancer-A element in the MHC Class I gene promoter. We show here that the p50 subunit of NF-kappaB is part of this complex and that

  8. A quantitative assay to measure the interaction between immunogenic peptides and purified class I major histocompatibility complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, A C; Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S

    1994-01-01

    A direct and sensitive biochemical assay to measure the interaction in solution between peptides and affinity-purified major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has been generated. Specific binding reflecting the known class I restriction of cytotoxic T cell responses was obtained....... Adding an excess of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) significantly increased the rate of peptide association, but it did not affect the rate of dissociation. Binding was complicated by a rapid and apparently irreversible loss of functional MHC class I at 37 degrees C which might limit the life span...... of empty MHC class I thereby preventing the inadvertent exchange of peptides at the target cell surface. All class I molecules tested bound peptides of the canonical octa- to nona-meric length. However, one class I molecule, Kk, also bound peptides, which were much longer suggesting that the preference...

  9. First report of major histocompatibility complex class II loci from the Amazon pink river dolphin (genus Inia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Agüero, M; Flores-Ramírez, S; Ruiz-García, M

    2006-07-31

    We report the first major histocompatibility complex (MHC) DQB1 sequences for the two species of pink river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis and Inia boliviensis) inhabiting the Amazon and Orinoco River basins. These sequences were found to be polymorphic within the Inia genus and showed shared homology with cetacean DQB-1 sequences, especially, those of the Monodontidae and Phocoenidae. On the other hand, these sequences were shown to be divergent from those described for other riverine dolphin species, such as Lipotes vexillifer, the Chinese river dolphin. Two main conclusions can be drawn from our results: 1) the Mhc DQB1 sequences seem to evolve more rapidly than other nuclear sequences in cetaceans, and 2) differential positive selective pressures acting on these genes cause concomitant divergent evolutionary histories that derive phylogenetic reconstructions that could be inconsistent with widely accepted intertaxa evolutionary relationships elucidated with other molecular markers subjected to a neutral dynamics.

  10. Major histocompatibility complex genes in a Mexican family with deficiency of the second component of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melín-Aldana, H; Reyes, P; Vargas-Alarcón, G; Yamamoto-Furusho, J K; Granados, J

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the second component of the complement system is an uncommon condition that has been reported so far mostly in Caucasians. We describe a Mexican patient with undetectable C2 levels and absence of complement hemolytic activity. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in his family showed that the proband had the MHC haplotypes HLA-A25, B18, DR2, DQ1, SQ042/HLA-A24, B18, DR2, DQ1, SQ042. A strong genetic linkage of the deficiency of the second component of the complement gene and the HLA antigens A25, B18, and DR2, is well established in Caucasian populations. This suggests that the probable origin of the deficiency in our patient was admixture with Caucasian ancestors.

  11. Expression of class II major histocompatibility complex antigens (HLA-DR) and lymphocyte subset immunotyping in chronic pulmonary transplant rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, S; Ockner, D M; Ritter, J H; Patterson, G A; Trulock, E P; Cooper, J D; Wick, M R

    1995-05-01

    Currently, the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) of chronic airway rejection represents the most significant obstacle to the long-term function of isolated pulmonary allografts in humans. Between 20% and 30% of recipients are affected by this condition. To define the possible pathogenetic role of altered expression of class II major histocompatibility complex antigens (ie, HLA-DR) in BOS, the authors studied well-characterized examples of this process immunohistologically. Eleven BOS specimens were compared with seven controls, represented by allografts with no pathologic abnormalities taken from patients with normal posttransplant respiratory function, as well as 14 biopsies showing acute rejection. In addition, immunophenotypic subtyping of lymphocytes in all specimens was undertaken. Control tissues exhibited variable but weak expression of HLA-DR in bronchiolar epithelium and alveolar pneumocytes. In comparison, immunostaining for class II major histocompatibility complex antigens in BOS showed no statistically significant differences, whereas the 14 examples of acute rejection manifested intense HLA-DR expression in epithelia and endothelial cells. The numbers of intrabronchiolar and peribronchiolar lymphocytes were clearly higher in both acute rejection and BOS than in controls, but these cells differed in lineage in the two rejection states. Acute rejection showed an obvious preponderance of CD43-positive T lymphocytes, whereas lymphoid cells in BOS were a relatively equal mixture of CD20-positive B cells and CD43-positive T cells. Moreover, incipient peribronchiolar B-cell follicles were observed in BOS. Natural killer (CD57-positive) lymphocytes were rare in all specimens. These data suggest that alterations in HLA-DR expression probably do not play a central role in the genesis of BOS, as they do in acute rejection. In contrast, the results of lymphocyte immunophenotyping and correlative histologic findings in BOS suggest that both T cells and B

  12. Facial Nerve Recovery in KbDb and C1q Knockout Mice: A Role for Histocompatibility Complex 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdagli, Seden; Williams, Ryan A.; Kim, Hyun J.; Yan, Yuling; Mustapha, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding the mechanisms in nerve damage can lead to better outcomes for neuronal rehabilitation. The purpose of our study was to assess the effect of major histocompatibility complex I deficiency and inhibition of the classical complement pathway (C1q) on functional recovery and cell survival in the facial motor nucleus (FMN) after crush injury in adult and juvenile mice. Methods: A prospective blinded analysis of functional recovery and cell survival in the FMN after a unilateral facial nerve crush injury in juvenile and adult mice was undertaken between wild-type, C1q knockout (C1q−/−), and KbDb knockout (KbDb−/−) groups. Whisker function was quantified to assess functional recovery. Neuron counts were performed to determine neuron survival in the FMN after recovery. Results: After facial nerve injury, all adult wild-type mice fully recovered. Juvenile mice recovered incompletely corresponding to a greater neuron loss in the FMN of juveniles compared with adults. The C1q−/− juvenile and adult groups did not differ from wild type. The KbDb−/− adults demonstrated 50% recovery of whisker movement and decreased cell survival in FMN. The KbDb−/− juvenile group did not demonstrate any difference from control group. Conclusion: Histocompatibility complex I plays a role for neuroprotection and enhanced facial nerve recovery in adult mice. Inhibition of the classical complement pathway alone does not affect functional recovery or neuronal survival. The alternative and mannose binding pathways pose alternative means for activating the final components of the pathway that may lead to acute nerve damage. PMID:28293529

  13. The T-Cell Receptor Can Bind to the Peptide-Bound Major Histocompatibility Complex and Uncomplexed β2-Microglobulin through Distinct Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkle, Patrick S; Irving, Melita; Hongjian, Song

    2017-01-01

    T-Cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of the peptide-bound major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) initiates an adaptive immune response against antigen-presenting target cells. The recognition events take place at the TCR-pMHC interface, and their effects on TCR conformation and dynamics...

  14. The "adjuvant effect" of the polymorphic B-G antigens of the chicken major histocompatibility complex analyzed using purified molecules incorporated in liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Eriksson, H; Skjødt, K

    1991-01-01

    The polymorphic B-G region of the chicken major histocompatibility complex has previously been shown to mediate an "adjuvant effect" on the humoral response to other erythrocyte alloantigens. We demonstrate here that B-G molecules purified with monoclonal antibodies exert this adjuvant effect...... for the generation of B cell diversity, in the immune systems of birds and other animals. Udgivelsesdato: 1991-Mar...

  15. Major Histocompatibility Complex class IIb polymorphism influences gut microbiota composition and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Daniel I; Snowberg, Lisa K; Caporaso, J Gregory; Lauber, Chris; Knight, Rob; Stutz, William E

    2014-10-01

    Animals harbour diverse communities of symbiotic bacteria, which differ dramatically among host individuals. This heterogeneity poses an immunological challenge: distinguishing between mutualistic and pathogenic members of diverse and host-specific microbial communities. We propose that Major Histocompatibility class II (MHC) genotypes contribute to recognition and regulation of gut microbes, and thus, MHC polymorphism contributes to microbial variation among hosts. Here, we show that MHC IIb polymorphism is associated with among-individual variation in gut microbiota within a single wild vertebrate population of a small fish, the threespine stickleback. We sampled stickleback from Cedar Lake, on Vancouver Island, and used next-generation sequencing to genotype the sticklebacks' gut microbiota (16S sequencing) and their MHC class IIb exon 2 sequences. The presence of certain MHC motifs was associated with altered relative abundance (increase or decrease) of some microbial Families. The effect sizes are modest and entail a minority of microbial taxa, but these results represent the first indication that MHC genotype may affect gut microbiota composition in natural populations (MHC-microbe associations have also been found in a few studies of lab mice). Surprisingly, these MHC effects were frequently sex-dependent. Finally, hosts with more diverse MHC motifs had less diverse gut microbiota. One implication is that MHC might influence the efficacy of therapeutic strategies to treat dysbiosis-associated disease, including the outcome of microbial transplants between healthy and diseased patients. We also speculate that macroparasite-driven selection on MHC has the potential to indirectly alter the host gut microbiota, and vice versa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Predicting class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binders using multivariate statistics: comparison of discriminant analysis and multiple linear regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2007-01-01

    The accurate in silico identification of T-cell epitopes is a critical step in the development of peptide-based vaccines, reagents, and diagnostics. It has a direct impact on the success of subsequent experimental work. Epitopes arise as a consequence of complex proteolytic processing within the cell. Prior to being recognized by T cells, an epitope is presented on the cell surface as a complex with a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein. A prerequisite therefore for T-cell recognition is that an epitope is also a good MHC binder. Thus, T-cell epitope prediction overlaps strongly with the prediction of MHC binding. In the present study, we compare discriminant analysis and multiple linear regression as algorithmic engines for the definition of quantitative matrices for binding affinity prediction. We apply these methods to peptides which bind the well-studied human MHC allele HLA-A*0201. A matrix which results from combining results of the two methods proved powerfully predictive under cross-validation. The new matrix was also tested on an external set of 160 binders to HLA-A*0201; it was able to recognize 135 (84%) of them.

  17. Definitions of histocompatibility typing terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eduardo; Heslop, Helen; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Taves, Cynthia; Wagenknecht, Dawn R; Eisenbrey, A Bradley; Fischer, Gottfried; Poulton, Kay; Wacker, Kara; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich; Noreen, Harriet; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2011-12-01

    Histocompatibility testing for stem cell and solid organ transplantation has become increasingly complex as newly discovered HLA alleles are described. HLA typing assignments reported by laboratories are used by physicians and donor registries for matching donors and recipients. To communicate effectively, a common language for histocompatibility terms should be established. In early 2010, representatives from Clinical, Registry, and Histocompatibility organizations joined together as the Harmonization of Histocompatibility Typing Terms Working Group to define a consensual language for laboratories, physicians, and registries to communicate histocompatibility typing information. The Working Group defined terms for HLA typing resolution, HLA matching, and a format for reporting HLA assignments. In addition, definitions of verification typing and extended typing were addressed. The original draft of the Definitions of Histocompatibility Typing Terms was disseminated to colleagues from each organization to gain feedback and create a collaborative document. Commentary gathered during this 90-day review period were discussed and implemented for preparation of this report. Histocompatibility testing continues to evolve; thus, the definitions agreed on today probably will require refinement and perhaps additional terminology in the future.

  18. IPD-MHC 2.0: an improved inter-species database for the study of the major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Robinson, James; Ballingall, Keith; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Grimholt, Unni; Kaufman, Jim; Ho, Chak-Sum; de Groot, Natasja G; Flicek, Paul; Bontrop, Ronald E; Hammond, John A; Marsh, Steven G E

    2017-01-04

    The IPD-MHC Database project (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/mhc/) collects and expertly curates sequences of the major histocompatibility complex from non-human species and provides the infrastructure and tools to enable accurate analysis. Since the first release of the database in 2003, IPD-MHC has grown and currently hosts a number of specific sections, with more than 7000 alleles from 70 species, including non-human primates, canines, felines, equids, ovids, suids, bovins, salmonids and murids. These sequences are expertly curated and made publicly available through an open access website. The IPD-MHC Database is a key resource in its field, and this has led to an average of 1500 unique visitors and more than 5000 viewed pages per month. As the database has grown in size and complexity, it has created a number of challenges in maintaining and organizing information, particularly the need to standardize nomenclature and taxonomic classification, while incorporating new allele submissions. Here, we describe the latest database release, the IPD-MHC 2.0 and discuss planned developments. This release incorporates sequence updates and new tools that enhance database queries and improve the submission procedure by utilizing common tools that are able to handle the varied requirements of each MHC-group. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. A temporal analysis shows major histocompatibility complex loci in the Scandinavian wolf population are consistent with neutral evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, J. M.; Ellegren, H.

    2004-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has an integral role in the immune system, and hence diversity at its genes may be of particular importance for the health of populations. In large populations, balancing selection maintains diversity in MHC genes, but theoretical expectations indicate that this form of selection is absent or inefficient in small populations. We examine the level of diversity at three MHC class II loci in the wolf population of Scandinavia, a population naturally recolonized with a genetic contribution from as few as three founders, and in four neighbouring wolf populations. In the Scandinavian wolf population, two alleles were found for each locus and the distribution of alleles is compatible with their linkage into two haplotypes. Changes in the level of heterozygosity over time since recolonization demonstrate the effects of the proposed arrival of an immigrant wolf. The maintenance of diversity is shown to be compatible with a neutral, random allocation of alleles, in conjunction with crossing between packs. A total of 15 DRB1, seven DQA and 10 DQB1 alleles are found in four neighbouring wolf populations, with substantial sharing across populations. Even in these larger populations, bottlenecks and fragmentation with consequent genetic drift are likely to have resulted in few indicators for balancing selection and significant differentiation of populations. PMID:15539354

  20. Identification and expression analysis of major histocompatibility complex IIB gene in orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D Q; Yi, S B; Yao, M; Li, Y W; Liu, X C; Zhang, Y; Lin, H R

    2012-07-01

    In this study, complementary DNA (cDNA) and DNA sequences of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IIB genes (mhcIIB) were cloned from orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides. The gene structure of E. coioides mhcIIB consists of five exons and four introns, and its deduced amino acid sequence length is 249 amino acids, including a signal peptide, a peptide-binding region, an IGC1 domain, a transmembrane region and a cytoplasmic tail. A phylogenetic study showed that E. coioides mhcIIB shared 32.0-79.1% identity with those of other teleosts and mammals. Real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR was performed to detect the class IIB gene expression in eight different tissues. To characterize the relationship between E. coioides mhcIIB gene and pathogens, in vivo and in vitro studies were performed. Challenge of Cryptocaryon irritans revealed that class IIB genes were down-regulated after 24 and 48 h of challenge, and their expression was later restored at 72 h. Stimulation of isolated E. coioides leukocytes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) significantly increased peripheral blood and spleen mhcIIB expression, while head kidney mhcIIB expression remained constant. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Major histocompatibility complex and other allergy-related candidate genes associated with insect bite hypersensitivity in Icelandic horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumplerova, Marie; Vychodilova, Leona; Bobrova, Olga; Cvanova, Michaela; Futas, Jan; Janova, Eva; Vyskocil, Mirko; Vrtkova, Irena; Putnova, Lenka; Dusek, Ladislav; Marti, Eliane; Horin, Petr

    2013-04-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of horses caused by bites of insects. IBH is a multifactorial disease with contribution of genetic and environmental factors. Candidate gene association analysis of IBH was performed in a group of 89 Icelandic horses all born in Iceland and imported to Europe. Horses were classified in IBH-affected and non-affected based on clinical signs and history of recurrent dermatitis, and on the results of an in vitro sulfidoleukotriene (sLT)-release assay with Culicoides nubeculosus and Simulium vittatum extract. Different genetic markers were tested for association with IBH by the Fisher's exact test. The effect of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene region was studied by genotyping five microsatellites spanning the MHC region (COR112, COR113, COR114, UM011 and UMN-JH34-2), and exon 2 polymorphisms of the class II Eqca-DRA gene. Associations with Eqca-DRA and COR113 were identified (p initial screen, no marker from the panel was significantly (p studies.

  2. A complex alloantigen system in Florida sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis pratensis: Evidence for the major histocompatibility (B) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Gee, G.F.; Miller, M.M.; Briles, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    The B blood group system constitutes the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in birds. The Mhc is a cluster of genes largely devoted to the processing and presentation of antigen. The Mhc is highly polymorphic in many species and, thus, useful in the evaluation of genetic diversity for fitness traits within populations of a variety of animals. Correlations found between particular Mhc haplotypes and resistance to certain diseases emphasize the importance of understanding the functional significance of diversity of the Mhc, particularly in species threatened with extinction. As part of studies focused on genetic diversity in wild birds, serological techniques were used to define a highly polymorphic alloantigen system in seven families of Florida sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pratensis). The results of analyses with antisera produced within the crane families and with chicken Mhc antigen-specific reagents revealed a single major alloantigen system that is likely the Mhc of the Florida sandhill crane. Preliminary experiments indicate that these crane alloantisera will provide a means of defining .the Mhc in other species of cranes.

  3. Genetic diversity in exon 2 of the major histocompatibility complex class II DQB1 locus in Nigerian goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, Abdulmojeed; Salako, Adebowale E; De Donato, Marcos; Takeet, Michael I; Peters, Sunday O; Adefenwa, Mufliat A; Okpeku, Moses; Wheto, Mathew; Agaviezor, Brilliant O; Sanni, Timothy M; Ajayi, Oyeyemi O; Onasanya, Gbolabo O; Ekundayo, Oludotun J; Ilori, Babatunde M; Amusan, Samuel A; Imumorin, Ikhide G

    2013-12-01

    The DQB1 locus is located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region and involved in immune response. We identified 20 polymorphic sites in a 228 bp fragment of exon 2, one of the most critical regions of the MHC DQB1 gene, in 60 Nigerian goats. Four sites are located in the peptide binding region, and 10 amino acid substitutions are peculiar to Nigerian goats, compared with published sequences. A significantly higher ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) suggests that allelic sequence evolution is driven by balancing selection (P < 0.01). In silico functional analysis using PANTHER predicted that substitution P56R, with a subPSEC score of -4.00629 (Pdeleterious = 0.73229), is harmful to protein function. The phylogenetic tree from consensus sequences placed the two northern breeds closer to each other than either was to the southern goats. This first report of sequence diversity at the DQB1 locus for any African goat breed may be useful in the search for disease-resistant genotypes.

  4. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weicai Chen

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae, which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation.

  5. Genetic and epigenetic control of the major histocompatibility complex class Ib gene HLA-G in trophoblast cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holling, Tjadine M; Bergevoet, Marloes W T; Wierda, Rutger J; van Eggermond, Marja C J A; van den Elsen, Peter J

    2009-09-01

    The transcriptional regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) Ib gene HLA-G differs from the classical MHC class I genes. The cis-acting regulatory elements typical for classical MHC class I promoters are divergent in the promoter of HLA-G, rendering this gene unresponsive to NF-kappaB, IRF-1, and class II transactivator (CIITA)-mediated activation pathways. However, as we have previously shown, transactivation of HLA-G is regulated by CREB-1. Because CREB-1 is ubiquitously expressed, this observation does not explain the tissue-restricted expression of HLA-G in extravillous cytotrophoblasts. Using HLA-G-expressing JEG-3 cells and HLA-G-deficient JAR trophoblast-derived choriocarcinoma cells as a model, we have investigated the contribution of DNA methylation and histone acetylation in the transcriptional activation of HLA-G. Despite similar levels of DNA methylation both in JEG3 and JAR cells, we found the levels of histone acetylation in HLA-G promoter chromatin to be significantly enhanced in JEG3 cells coinciding with HLA-G expression.

  6. Evolution of the opossum major histocompatibility complex: evidence for diverse alternative splice patterns and low polymorphism among class I genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michelle L; Melman, Sandra D; Huntley, James; Miller, Robert D

    2009-09-01

    The opossum major histocompatibility complex (MHC) shares a similar organization with that of non-mammals while containing a diverse set of class I genes more like that of eutherian (placental) mammals. There are 11 class I loci in the opossum MHC region, seven of which are known to be transcribed. The previously described Monodelphis domestica (Modo)-UA1 and Modo-UG display characteristics consistent with their being classical and non-classical class I genes, respectively. Here we describe the characteristics of the remaining five transcribed class I loci (Modo-UE, -UK, -UI, -UJ and -UM). All five genes have peptide-binding grooves with low or no polymorphism, contain unpaired cysteines with the potential to produce homodimer formation and display genomic organizational features that would be unusual for classical class I loci. In addition, Modo-UJ and -UM were expressed in alternatively spliced mRNA forms, including a potentially soluble isoform of Modo-UJ. Thus, the MHC region of the opossum contains a single class I gene that is clearly classical and six other class I genes each with its own unique characteristics that probably perform roles other than or in addition to antigen presentation.

  7. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  8. HUBUNGAN ANTARA PERTUMBUHAN DENGAN KEBERADAAN GEN TAHAN PENYAKIT MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX (MHC PADA IKAN MAS (Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erma Primanita Hayuningtyas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wabah penyakit koi herpes virus (KHV di Indonesia yang terjadi sejak tahun 2002 merupakan salah satu faktor yang memicu kemerosotan produksi ikan mas budidaya. Pembentukan strain unggul ikan mas tahan KHV dapat menjadi solusi bagi permasalahan tersebut. Pemilihan genotip ikan mas tahan KHV dengan marka molekuler gen major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II, khususnya pada alel Cyca DAB 1*05 akan membantu dalam kegiatan seleksi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keberadaan gen MHC-II pada populasi dasar G0 ikan mas strain Rajadanu dan hubungannya dengan pertumbuhan (bobot. Metode deteksi keberadaan gen MHC-II pada dua kelompok ikan dengan ukuran berbeda dilakukan dengan teknik PCR. Hubungan antara pertumbuhan ikan mas dengan persentase kemunculan gen MHC-II dianalisis dengan menggunakan program SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, sehingga diperoleh korelasi di antara keduanya. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa hubungan antara pertumbuhan dengan persentase keberadaan gen MHC-II berkorelasi negatif dengan nilai R = -0,742. Hal ini mengindikasikan bahwa semakin cepat pertumbuhan populasi ikan mas maka semakin sedikit persentase individu yang mempunyai gen MHC-II pada setiap populasi ikan mas. Sehingga populasi ikan mas yang pertumbuhannya lambat memiliki tingkat persentase positif MHC-II lebih tinggi (85,71%-100% dibandingkan populasi ikan mas yang pertumbuhannya cepat (42,86%-85,71%.

  9. Identification of I kappa BL as the second major histocompatibility complex-linked susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Koichi; Makino, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Takaki, Asumi; Nagatsuka, Yumie; Ota, Masao; Tamiya, Gen; Kimura, Akinori; Bahram, Seiamak; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2003-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease with a complex etiology in which environmental factors within a genetically susceptible host maneuver the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system toward recognition of autoantigens. This ultimately leads to joint destruction and clinical symptomatology. Despite the identification of a number of disease-susceptibility regions across the genome, RA's major genetic linkage remains with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which contains not only the key immune-response class I and class II genes but also a host of other loci, some with potential immunological relevance. Inside the MHC itself, the sole consistent RA association is that with HLA-DRB1, although this does not encode all MHC-related susceptibility. Indeed, in a set of Japanese patients with RA and a control group, we previously reported the presence of a second RA-susceptibility gene within the telomeric human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class III region. Using microsatellites, we narrowed the susceptibility region to 70 kb telomeric of the TNF cluster, known to harbor four expressed genes (I kappa BL, ATP6G, BAT1, and MICB). Here, using numerous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletion polymorphisms, we identify the second RA-susceptibility locus within the HLA region, as the T allele of SNP 96452 (T/A), in the promoter region (position -62) of the I kappa BL gene (P=.0062). This -62T/A SNP disrupts the putative binding motif for the transcriptional repressor, delta EF1, and hence may influence the transcription of I kappa BL, homologous to I kappa B alpha, the latter being a known inhibitor of NF kappa B, which is central to innate immunity. Therefore, the MHC may harbor RA genetic determinants affecting the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system.

  10. Association between the major histocompatibility complex and clinical response to infliximab therapy in patients with Behçet uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Kana; Sakai, Tsutomu; Kohno, Hideo; Okano, Kiichiro; Akiyama, Goichi; Aoyagi, Ranko; Inaba, Mayumi; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms are associated with response to infliximab therapy in Japanese patients with Behçet uveitis (BU). We retrospectively reviewed 24 patients (17 men and seven women) treated with infliximab for BU. Of them, ten patients were genotyped as HLA A*2601, and nine as HLA B*5101. Therapeutic response levels in the two groups were compared based on ocular attacks and the Behçet disease ocular attack score 24 (BOS24) over 24 months of treatment. Mean frequencies of ocular attacks at 13-18 and 19-24 months after the start of treatment were significantly higher in the HLA A*2601 group (P = 0.0392 and 0.0177, respectively). Mean BOS24-6 M values for months 1-6, 7-12, 13-18, and 19-24 were also significantly higher in the HLA A*2601 group (P = 0.0459, 0.0150, 0.0394, and 0.0178, respectively). Shortening of the infusion interval was required in eight patients in the HLA A*2601 group but in one only in the HLA B*5101 group. Behçet-disease-related adverse events occurred in eight patients in the HLA A*2601 group and two in the HLA B*5101 group. Nonocular adverse events occurred in four patients in the HLA A*2601 group and none in the HLA B*5101 group. Although mean change from baseline in the number of ocular attack scores in the HLA A26 and HLA B51 groups seemed to be similar, the HLA-A26 group had a more severe disease course under infliximab therapy for ocular/extraocular involvement. These data suggest that response to infliximab therapy in Japanese patients with BU is partly due to genetic determinants in the HLA complex.

  11. Structural requirements and biological significance of interactions between peptides and the major histocompatibility complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, H M; Buus, S; Colon, S

    1989-01-01

    that allows a few MHC molecules to serve as restriction elements for a large universe of antigens; and (2) what is the relative contribution of determinant selection (i.e. antigen-MHC complex formation) and T-cell repertoire in determining the capacity of an individual to respond to an antigen? By analysing...... this permissiveness of binding, it is possible to define certain structural features of peptides that are associated with the capacity to bind to a particular MHC specificity. With respect to the question of the relative role of 'determinant selection' and 'holes in the T-cell repertoire' in determining immune...... of binding to Ia (i.e. determinant selection was operative), we found that about 40% of Ia-binding peptides were not immunogenic (i.e. there were also 'holes in the T-cell repertoire')....

  12. Structure and polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Japanese Crested Ibis, Nipponia nippon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Taniguchi

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a highly polymorphic genomic region that plays a central role in the immune system. Despite its functional consistency, the genomic structure of the MHC differs substantially among organisms. In birds, the MHC-B structures of Galliformes, including chickens, have been well characterized, but information about other avian MHCs remains sparse. The Japanese Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon, Pelecaniformes is an internationally conserved, critically threatened species. The current Japanese population of N. nippon originates from only five founders; thus, understanding the genetic diversity among these founders is critical for effective population management. Because of its high polymorphism and importance for disease resistance and other functions, the MHC has been an important focus in the conservation of endangered species. Here, we report the structure and polymorphism of the Japanese Crested Ibis MHC class II region. Screening of genomic libraries allowed the construction of three contigs representing different haplotypes of MHC class II regions. Characterization of genomic clones revealed that the MHC class II genomic structure of N. nippon was largely different from that of chicken. A pair of MHC-IIA and -IIB genes was arranged head-to-head between the COL11A2 and BRD2 genes. Gene order in N. nippon was more similar to that in humans than to that in chicken. The three haplotypes contained one to three copies of MHC-IIA/IIB gene pairs. Genotyping of the MHC class II region detected only three haplotypes among the five founders, suggesting that the genetic diversity of the current Japanese Crested Ibis population is extremely low. The structure of the MHC class II region presented here provides valuable insight for future studies on the evolution of the avian MHC and for conservation of the Japanese Crested Ibis.

  13. Structure and polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex class II region in the Japanese Crested Ibis, Nipponia nippon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yukio; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Matsuda, Hirokazu; Yamada, Takahisa; Sugiyama, Toshie; Homma, Kosuke; Kaneko, Yoshinori; Yamagishi, Satoshi; Iwaisaki, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a highly polymorphic genomic region that plays a central role in the immune system. Despite its functional consistency, the genomic structure of the MHC differs substantially among organisms. In birds, the MHC-B structures of Galliformes, including chickens, have been well characterized, but information about other avian MHCs remains sparse. The Japanese Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon, Pelecaniformes) is an internationally conserved, critically threatened species. The current Japanese population of N. nippon originates from only five founders; thus, understanding the genetic diversity among these founders is critical for effective population management. Because of its high polymorphism and importance for disease resistance and other functions, the MHC has been an important focus in the conservation of endangered species. Here, we report the structure and polymorphism of the Japanese Crested Ibis MHC class II region. Screening of genomic libraries allowed the construction of three contigs representing different haplotypes of MHC class II regions. Characterization of genomic clones revealed that the MHC class II genomic structure of N. nippon was largely different from that of chicken. A pair of MHC-IIA and -IIB genes was arranged head-to-head between the COL11A2 and BRD2 genes. Gene order in N. nippon was more similar to that in humans than to that in chicken. The three haplotypes contained one to three copies of MHC-IIA/IIB gene pairs. Genotyping of the MHC class II region detected only three haplotypes among the five founders, suggesting that the genetic diversity of the current Japanese Crested Ibis population is extremely low. The structure of the MHC class II region presented here provides valuable insight for future studies on the evolution of the avian MHC and for conservation of the Japanese Crested Ibis.

  14. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsena, W.; Sconocchia, G.; Cho, H. S.; Chang, C.-C.; Wang, X.; Klumkrathok, K.; Ferrone, S.; Leelayuwat, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2D (NKG2D), is expressed on stressed cells such as tumor cells. Study of expression of this molecule on tumor cells and patients’ sera is useful to define patients’ stages leading to proper selection of therapy. In this study, mouse anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced by DNA immunization using a gene gun. Screening of anti-MICA-producing mouse and hybridomas were performed by immunoblot and cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against MICA-positive HeLa and -negative Me1386 cell lines. MAbs were characterized against MICA-positive and -negative cell lines by immunoblot, cell ELISA and flow cytometry. The mAbs were also characterized for locus and allele specificities of MICA and MHC class I chain-related gene B (MICB) as well as for their ability to stain formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues by immunohistochemistry. Although all mouse immune sera were positive with MICA-positive cells by both immunoblot and cell ELISA methods, some hybridomas were positive only with one method. The mAbs had diverse specificities to detect MICA and MICB and different abilities to stain formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Thus, DNA immunization by gene gun is an effective method to generate immune mice for the production of mAbs with a variety of specificities against native and denatured forms of MIC proteins. PMID:18937790

  15. Novel full-length major histocompatibility complex class I allele discovery and haplotype definition in pig-tailed macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Matthew R; Wiseman, Roger W; Karl, Julie A; Graham, Michael E; Gieger, Samantha M; O'Connor, David H

    2017-11-13

    Pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina, Mane) are important models for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) studies. Their infectability with minimally modified HIV makes them a uniquely valuable animal model to mimic human infection with HIV and progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, variation in the pig-tailed macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and the impact of individual transcripts on the pathogenesis of HIV and other infectious diseases is understudied compared to that of rhesus and cynomolgus macaques. In this study, we used Pacific Biosciences single-molecule real-time circular consensus sequencing to describe full-length MHC class I (MHC-I) transcripts for 194 pig-tailed macaques from three breeding centers. We then used the full-length sequences to infer Mane-A and Mane-B haplotypes containing groups of MHC-I transcripts that co-segregate due to physical linkage. In total, we characterized full-length open reading frames (ORFs) for 313 Mane-A, Mane-B, and Mane-I sequences that defined 86 Mane-A and 106 Mane-B MHC-I haplotypes. Pacific Biosciences technology allows us to resolve these Mane-A and Mane-B haplotypes to the level of synonymous allelic variants. The newly defined haplotypes and transcript sequences containing full-length ORFs provide an important resource for infectious disease researchers as certain MHC haplotypes have been shown to provide exceptional control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication and prevention of AIDS-like disease in nonhuman primates. The increased allelic resolution provided by Pacific Biosciences sequencing also benefits transplant research by allowing researchers to more specifically match haplotypes between donors and recipients to the level of nonsynonymous allelic variation, thus reducing the risk of graft-versus-host disease.

  16. Genetic wealth, population health: Major histocompatibility complex variation in captive and wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Kathleen E; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P; Drea, Christine M

    2017-10-01

    Across species, diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is critical to individual disease resistance and, hence, to population health; however, MHC diversity can be reduced in small, fragmented, or isolated populations. Given the need for comparative studies of functional genetic diversity, we investigated whether MHC diversity differs between populations which are open, that is experiencing gene flow, versus populations which are closed, that is isolated from other populations. Using the endangered ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) as a model, we compared two populations under long-term study: a relatively "open," wild population (n = 180) derived from Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar (2003-2013) and a "closed," captive population (n = 121) derived from the Duke Lemur Center (DLC, 1980-2013) and from the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Zoos (2012). For all animals, we assessed MHC-DRB diversity and, across populations, we compared the number of unique MHC-DRB alleles and their distributions. Wild individuals possessed more MHC-DRB alleles than did captive individuals, and overall, the wild population had more unique MHC-DRB alleles that were more evenly distributed than did the captive population. Despite management efforts to maintain or increase genetic diversity in the DLC population, MHC diversity remained static from 1980 to 2010. Since 2010, however, captive-breeding efforts resulted in the MHC diversity of offspring increasing to a level commensurate with that found in wild individuals. Therefore, loss of genetic diversity in lemurs, owing to small founder populations or reduced gene flow, can be mitigated by managed breeding efforts. Quantifying MHC diversity within individuals and between populations is the necessary first step to identifying potential improvements to captive management and conservation plans.

  17. Dendritic cells derived from bone marrow cells fail to acquire and present major histocompatibility complex antigens from other dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Penelope A; Burke, Fiona; Stagg, Andrew J; Knight, Stella C

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells stimulate primary T-cell responses and a major activation route is via presentation of antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. This presentation of pre-processed antigens most likely proceeds through transfer of functional major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens through exosomes, ‘live nibbling’ or apoptotic vesicles. We hypothesized that not all dendritic cell populations may both donate MHC antigen to dendritic cells and present antigens acquired from other dendritic cells. All populations tested, including those derived from bone marrow precursor cells stimulated primary, allogeneic T-cell responses and acted as accessory cells for mitogen stimulation. Populations of responder type, splenic dendritic cells promoted allogeneic responses indirectly but those derived from bone marrow cells blocked rather than promoted T-cell proliferation. To identify mechanisms underlying this difference we studied transfer of I-A antigens between cells. Active, two-way transfer of allogeneic I-A occurred between splenic primary antigen presenting cells including CD8α+ lymphoid dendritic cells, CD8α− myeloid dendritic cells and B220+ cells; all these cell types donated as well as acquired MHC molecules. By contrast, the bone marrow-derived dendritic cells donated I-A antigens but acquired negligible amounts. Thus, dendritic cells derived directly from bone marrow cells may stimulate primary T-cell responses through transferring functional MHC to other dendritic cells but may not be able to acquire and present antigens from other dendritic cells. The evidence suggests that T-cell activation may be blocked by the presence of dendritic cells that have not matured through lymphoid tissues which are unable to acquire and present antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. PMID:18266716

  18. Altered Expression of TAP-1 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I in Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Correlation of TAP-1 with Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vambutas, Andrea; Bonagura, Vincent R.; Steinberg, Bettie M.

    2000-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is an insidious disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. It is characterized by a variable clinical course that can include frequent disease recurrence, significant morbidity, and occasional mortality. The mechanisms responsible for the variability in the clinical course and the persistence of latent HPV infection remain unknown. Effective T-cell-mediated clearance of HPV-infected cells may be defective in patients with RRP, leading to recurrent disease and failure to suppress latent HPV reactivation. This study describes the down-regulation of the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP-1) and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I protein expression in laryngeal papilloma tissue biopsies and cell culture of primary explants. There was a statistically significant correlation between reduction of TAP-1 expression in biopsy tissues and rapid recurrence of disease. Patients with RRP had less frequent recurrence if their papillomas expressed TAP-1 at levels close to that of normal tissue, compared with those with very low expression of TAP-1, who had frequent recurrence (32 versus 5 weeks to the next surgical intervention). These findings suggest that HPV may evade immune recognition by down-regulating class I MHC cell surface expression via decreased TAP-1 levels. Expression of TAP-1 could be used for prognostic evaluation of disease severity. Gamma interferon was able to restore class I MHC expression at the surfaces of laryngeal papilloma cells in culture. This up-regulation of class I MHC antigen at the cell surface potentially allows the infected cell to become a target for the immune system again. This finding provides some promise for nonsurgical treatment of laryngeal papillomas. PMID:10618282

  19. Identification and characterization of a new major histocompatibility complex class I gene in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erp, S H; Dixon, B; Figueroa, F; Egberts, E; Stet, R J

    1996-01-01

    In this study we report the finding of three representatives of a new group of major histocompatibility complex class I sequences in carp: Cyca-12 (Cyca-UA1*01), a full-length cDNA; Cyca-SP1 (Cyca-UAW1), a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment from cDNA; and Cyca-G11 (Cyca-UA1*02), a partial genomic clone. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of Cyca-12, Cyca-SP1, and Cyca-G11 with classical and non-classical class I sequences from other species shows considerable conservation in regions that have been shown to be involved in maintaining the structure and function of class I molecules. The genomic organization of Cyca-12 has been elucidated by analysis of a partial genomic clone (Cyca-G11, in combination with PCR amplifications on genomic DNA of a homozygous individual. Although the genomic organization is similar to that found in class I genes from other species, the 3' untranslated region contains an intron which is unprecedented in class I genes, and intron 2 is exceptionally large (+/-14 kilobases). Southern blot analysis indicates the presence of multiple related sequences. In phylogenetic analyses, the Cyca-UA sequences cluster with class I genes from zebrafish and Atlantic salmon, indicating that the ancestral gene arose before the salmonid/cyprinid split, approximately 120-150 million years ago. The previously reported class I Cyca-Z genes from carp and Caau-Z genes from goldfish cluster as a completely separate lineage. A polyclonal antiserum (anti-Cyca12) was raised against a recombinant fusion protein containing most of the extracellular domains of Cyca-12. The antibodies showed substantial reactivity to the recombinant protein and an Mr 45000 protein in membrane lysates of spleen and muscle, as well as to determinants present on leucocytes in fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyses. Erythrocytes and thrombocytes were found to be negative.

  20. Trophoblast Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression Is Associated with Immune-Mediated Rejection of Bovine Fetuses Produced by Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Wilhelm, Amanda; Sessions, Benjamin R; Hicks, Brady A; Schlafer, Donald H; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Trophoblast cells from bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) conceptuses express major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins early in gestation, and this may be one cause of the significant first-trimester embryonic mortality observed in these pregnancies. MHC-I homozygous-compatible (n = 9), homozygous-incompatible (n = 8), and heterozygous-incompatible (n = 5) SCNT pregnancies were established. The control group consisted of eight pregnancies produced by artificial insemination. Uterine and placental samples were collected on Day 35 ± 1 of pregnancy, and expression of MHC-I, leukocyte markers, and cytokines were examined by immunohistochemistry. Trophoblast cells from all SCNT pregnancies expressed MHC-I, while trophoblast cells from age-matched control pregnancies were negative for MHC-I expression. Expression of MHC-I antigens by trophoblast cells from SCNT pregnancies was associated with lymphocytic infiltration in the endometrium. Furthermore, MHC-I-incompatible conceptuses, particularly the heterozygous-incompatible ones, induced a more pronounced lymphocytic infiltration than MHC-I-compatible conceptuses. Cells expressing cluster of differentiation (CD) 3, gamma/deltaTCR, and MHC-II were increased in the endometrium of SCNT pregnancies compared to the control group. CD4(+) lymphocytes were increased in MHC-I-incompatible pregnancies compared to MHC-I-compatible and control pregnancies. CD8(+), FOXP3(+), and natural killer cells were increased in MHC-I heterozygous-incompatible SCNT pregnancies compared to homozygous SCNT and control pregnancies. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  1. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes Map to Two Chromosomes in an Evolutionarily Ancient Reptile, the Tuatara Sphenodon punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Hilary C; O'Meally, Denis; Ezaz, Tariq; Amemiya, Chris; Marshall-Graves, Jennifer A; Edwards, Scott

    2015-05-07

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are a central component of the vertebrate immune system and usually exist in a single genomic region. However, considerable differences in MHC organization and size exist between different vertebrate lineages. Reptiles occupy a key evolutionary position for understanding how variation in MHC structure evolved in vertebrates, but information on the structure of the MHC region in reptiles is limited. In this study, we investigate the organization and cytogenetic location of MHC genes in the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), the sole extant representative of the early-diverging reptilian order Rhynchocephalia. Sequencing and mapping of 12 clones containing class I and II MHC genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library indicated that the core MHC region is located on chromosome 13q. However, duplication and translocation of MHC genes outside of the core region was evident, because additional class I MHC genes were located on chromosome 4p. We found a total of seven class I sequences and 11 class II β sequences, with evidence for duplication and pseudogenization of genes within the tuatara lineage. The tuatara MHC is characterized by high repeat content and low gene density compared with other species and we found no antigen processing or MHC framework genes on the MHC gene-containing clones. Our findings indicate substantial differences in MHC organization in tuatara compared with mammalian and avian MHCs and highlight the dynamic nature of the MHC. Further sequencing and annotation of tuatara and other reptile MHCs will determine if the tuatara MHC is representative of nonavian reptiles in general. Copyright © 2015 Miller et al.

  2. Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major histocompatibility complex class IIβ alleles of New World ranid frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M.; Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play key roles in the vertebrate immune system. However, our understanding of the evolutionary processes and underlying genetic mechanisms shaping these genes is limited in many taxa, including amphibians, a group currently impacted by emerging infectious diseases. To further elucidate the evolution of the MHC in frogs (anurans) and develop tools for population genetics, we surveyed allelic diversity of the MHC class II ??1 domain in both genomic and complementary DNA of seven New World species in the genus Rana (Lithobates). To assign locus affiliation to our alleles, we used a "gene walking" technique to obtain intron 2 sequences that flanked MHC class II?? exon 2. Two distinct intron sequences were recovered, suggesting the presence of at least two class II?? loci in Rana. We designed a primer pair that successfully amplified an orthologous locus from all seven Rana species. In total, we recovered 13 alleles and documented trans-species polymorphism for four of the alleles. We also found quantitative evidence of selection acting on amino acid residues that are putatively involved in peptide binding and structural stability of the ??1 domain of anurans. Our results indicated that primer mismatch can result in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias, which influences the number of alleles that are recovered. Using a single locus may minimize PCR bias caused by primer mismatch, and the gene walking technique was an effective approach for generating single-copy orthologous markers necessary for future studies of MHC allelic variation in natural amphibian populations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Giant panda BAC library construction and assembly of a 650-kb contig spanning major histocompatibility complex class II region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hui-Juan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giant panda is rare and endangered species endemic to China. The low rates of reproductive success and infectious disease resistance have severely hampered the development of captive and wild populations of the giant panda. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC plays important roles in immune response and reproductive system such as mate choice and mother-fetus bio-compatibility. It is thus essential to understand genetic details of the giant panda MHC. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library will provide a new tool for panda genome physical mapping and thus facilitate understanding of panda MHC genes. Results A giant panda BAC library consisting of 205,800 clones has been constructed. The average insert size was calculated to be 97 kb based on the examination of 174 randomly selected clones, indicating that the giant panda library contained 6.8-fold genome equivalents. Screening of the library with 16 giant panda PCR primer pairs revealed 6.4 positive clones per locus, in good agreement with an expected 6.8-fold genomic coverage of the library. Based on this BAC library, we constructed a contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX spanning about 650 kb by a three-step method: (1 PCR-based screening of the BAC library with primers from homologous MHC class II gene loci, end sequences and BAC clone shotgun sequences, (2 DNA sequencing validation of positive clones, and (3 restriction digest fingerprinting verification of inter-clone overlapping. Conclusion The identifications of genes and genomic regions of interest are greatly favored by the availability of this giant panda BAC library. The giant panda BAC library thus provides a useful platform for physical mapping, genome sequencing or complex analysis of targeted genomic regions. The 650 kb sequence-ready BAC contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX, verified by the three-step method, offers a

  4. Superantigen-presentation by rat major histocompatibility complex class II molecules RT1.Bl and RT1.Dl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlaske, Henry; Karaüzüm, Hatice; Monzon-Casanova, Elisa; Rudolf, Ronald; Starick, Lisa; Müller, Ingrid; Wildner, Gerhild; Diedrichs-Möhring, Maria; Koch, Norbert; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Wonigeit, Kurt; Fleischer, Bernhard; Overbeck, Silke; Rink, Lothar; Herrmann, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Rat major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules RT1.B(l) (DQ-like) and RT1.D(l) (DR-like) were cloned from the LEW strain using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and expressed in mouse L929 cells. The transduced lines bound MHC class II-specific monoclonal antibodies in an MHC-isotype-specific manner and presented peptide antigens and superantigens to T-cell hybridomas. The T-cell-hybridomas responded well to all superantigens presented by human MHC class II, whereas the response varied considerably with rat MHC class II-transduced lines as presenters. The T-cell hybridomas responded to the pyrogenic superantigens Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB), SEC1, SEC2 and SEC3 only at high concentrations with RT1.B(l)-transduced and RT1.D(l)-transduced cells as presenters. The same was true for streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (SPEA), but this was presented only by RT1.B(l) and not by RT1.D(l). SPEC was recognized only if presented by human MHC class II. Presentation of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis superantigen (YPM) showed no MHC isotype preference, while Mycoplasma arthritidis superantigen (MAS or MAM) was presented by RT1.D(l) but not by RT1.B(l). Interestingly, and in contrast to RT1.B(l), the RT1.D(l) completely failed to present SEA and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 even after transduction of invariant chain (CD74) or expression in other cell types such as the surface MHC class II-negative mouse B-cell lymphoma (M12.4.1.C3). We discuss the idea that a lack of SEA presentation may not be a general feature of RT1.D molecules but could be a consequence of RT1.D(l)beta-chain allele-specific substitutions (arginine 80 to lysine, asparagine 82 to aspartic acid) in the extremely conserved region flanking the Zn(2+)-binding histidine 81, which is crucial for high-affinity SEA-binding.

  5. SNP Variants in Major Histocompatibility Complex Are Associated with Sarcoidosis Susceptibility—A Joint Analysis in Four European Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Laura Lahtela

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multiorgan inflammatory disorder with heritability estimates up to 66%. Previous studies have shown the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region to be associated with sarcoidosis, suggesting a functional role for antigen-presenting molecules and immune mediators in the disease pathogenesis. To detect variants predisposing to sarcoidosis and to identify genetic differences between patient subgroups, we studied four genes in the MHC Class III region (LTA, TNF, AGER, BTNL2 and HLA-DRA with tag-SNPs and their relation to HLA-DRB1 alleles. We present results from a joint analysis of four study populations (Finnish, Swedish, Dutch, and Czech. Patients with sarcoidosis (n = 805 were further subdivided based on the disease activity and the presence of Löfgren’s syndrome. In a joint analysis, seven SNPs were associated with non-Löfgren sarcoidosis (NL; the strongest association with rs3177928, P = 1.79E−07, OR = 1.9 and eight with Löfgren’s syndrome [Löfgren syndrome (LS; the strongest association with rs3129843, P = 3.44E−12, OR = 3.4] when compared with healthy controls (n = 870. Five SNPs were associated with sarcoidosis disease course (the strongest association with rs3177928, P = 0.003, OR = 1.9. The high linkage disequilibrium (LD between SNPs and an HLA-DRB1 challenged the result interpretation. When the SNPs and HLA-DRB1 alleles were analyzed together, independent association was observed for four SNPs in the HLA-DRA/BTNL2 region: rs3135365 (NL; P = 0.015, rs3177928 (NL; P < 0.001, rs6937545 (LS; P = 0.012, and rs5007259 (disease activity; P = 0.002. These SNPs act as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL for HLA-DRB1 and/or HLA-DRB5. In conclusion, we found novel SNPs in BTNL2 and HLA-DRA regions associating with sarcoidosis. Our finding further establishes that polymorphisms in the HLA-DRA and BTNL2 have a role in sarcoidosis susceptibility. This multi

  6. Ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I) prevents apoptosis induced by Fas or SAPK/JNK activation in T-lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    Early apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells was induced by agonistic anti-Fas Ab or by anisomycin which activates the stress kinases SAPK/JNK. Apoptosis was inhibited by ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I). MHC-I ligation induced upregulation of the anti......-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim). MHC-I ligation also prevented downregulation of Bcl-2 and destabilization of Deltapsim induced by anti-Fas Ab treatment or anisomycin exposure. Studies on three different Jurkat cell mutants deficient for src p56(lck), ZAP...

  7. Chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G antigens are found on many cell types that are important for the immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Dunon, D; Skjødt, K

    1991-01-01

    B-G antigens are a polymorphic multigene family of cell surface molecules encoded by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). They have previously been described only on cells of the erythroid lineage. By using flow cytometry, section staining, and immunoprecipitation with monoclonal...... antibodies and rabbit antisera to B-G molecules and by using Northern blots with B-G cDNA clones, we demonstrate here that B-G molecules and RNA are present in many other cell types: thrombocytes, peripheral B and T lymphocytes, bursal B cells and thymocytes, and stromal cells in the bursa, thymus...

  8. Bone Marrow Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Major Histocompatibility Complex-Matched Murine Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Hemopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Kifah; Mattar, Zamil; Silveira, Pablo; Hsu, Wei-Hsun; Bendall, Linda; Hart, Derek; Bradstock, Kenneth F

    2017-11-01

    Most clinical allogeneic hemopoietic cell transplants (alloHCT) are now performed using reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) instead of myeloablative conditioning (MAC); however, the biology underlying this treatment remains incompletely understood. We investigated a murine model of major histocompatibility complex-matched multiple minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched alloHCT using bone marrow (BM) cells and splenocytes from B6 (H-2) donor mice transplanted into BALB.B (H-2) recipients after RIC with fludarabine of 100 mg/kg per day for 5 days, cyclophosphamide of 60 mg/kg per day for 2 days, and total body irradiation (TBI). The lowest TBI dose capable of achieving complete donor chimerism in this mouse strain combination was 325 cGy given as a single fraction. Mice that underwent RIC had a reduced incidence and delayed onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and significantly prolonged survival compared with MAC-transplanted recipients (TBI of 850 cGy plus cyclophosphamide of 60 mg/kg per day for 2 days). Compared with syngeneic controls, RIC mice with GVHD showed evidence of BM suppression, have anemia, reduced BM cellularity, and showed profound reduction in BM B cell lymphopoiesis associated with damage to the endosteal BM niche. This was associated with an increase in BM CD8 effector T cells in RIC mice and elevated blood and BM plasma levels of T helper1 cytokines. Increasing doses of splenocytes resulted in increased incidence of GVHD in RIC mice. We demonstrate that the BM is a major target organ of GVHD in an informative clinically relevant RIC mouse major histocompatibility complex-matched alloHCT model by a process that seems to be driven by CD8 effector T cells.

  9. Interaction between the CD8 Coreceptor and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Stabilizes T Cell Receptor-Antigen Complexes at the Cell Surface†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Linda; van den Berg, Hugo A.; Glick, Meir; Gostick, Emma; Laugel, Bruno; Hutchinson, Sarah L.; Milicic, Anita; Brenchley, Jason M.; Douek, Daniel C.; Price, David A.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2008-01-01

    The off-rate (koff) of the T cell receptor (TCR)/peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I (pMHCI) interaction, and hence its half-life, is the principal kinetic feature that determines the biological outcome of TCR ligation. However, it is unclear whether the CD8 coreceptor, which binds pMHCI at a distinct site, influences this parameter. Although biophysical studies with soluble proteins show that TCR and CD8 do not bind cooperatively to pMHCI, accumulating evidence suggests that TCR associates with CD8 on the T cell surface. Here, we titrated and quantified the contribution of CD8 to TCR/pMHCI dissociation in membrane-constrained interactions using a panel of engineered pMHCI mutants that retain faithful TCR interactions but exhibit a spectrum of affinities for CD8 of >1,000-fold. Data modeling generates a “stabilization factor” that preferentially increases the predicted TCR triggering rate for low affinity pMHCI ligands, thereby suggesting an important role for CD8 in the phenomenon of T cell cross-reactivity. PMID:15837791

  10. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules Modulate Activation Threshold and Early Signaling of T Cell Antigen Receptor–γ/δ Stimulated by Nonpeptidic Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carena, Ilaria; Shamshiev, Abdijapar; Donda, Alena; Colonna, Marco; Libero, Gennaro De

    1997-01-01

    Killer cell inhibitory receptors and CD94-NKG2-A/B heterodimers are major histocompatibility complex class I–specific inhibitory receptors expressed by natural killer cells, T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-γ/δ cells, and a subset of TCR-α/β cells. We studied the functional interaction between TCR-γ/δ and CD94, this inhibitory receptor being expressed on the majority of γ/δ T cells. When engaged by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen class I molecules, CD94 downmodulates activation of human TCR-γ/δ by phosphorylated ligands. CD94-mediated inhibition is more effective at low than at high doses of TCR ligand, which may focus T cell responses towards antigen-presenting cells presenting high amounts of antigen. CD94 engagement has major effects on TCR signaling cascade. It facilitates recruitment of SHP-1 phosphatase to TCR–CD3 complex and affects phosphorylation of Lck and ZAP-70 kinase, but not of CD3 ζ chain upon TCR triggering. These events may cause abortion of proximal TCR-mediated signaling and set a higher TCR activation threshold. PMID:9362537

  11. T-cell activation. V. Anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody-induced activation and clonal abortion in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Dissing, S; Tscherning, T

    1993-01-01

    respectively, as well as three transfectant clones reconstituted with the appropriate TcR/CD3 cDNA. For activation, the cells were exposed to anti-TcR/CD3, anti-CD2 and anti-major histocompatibility complex (anti-MHC) class I monoclonal antibodies (mAb) respectively. Cellular activation by these mAb leading...... to an increased IL-2 secretion was preceded by a rise in [Ca2+]i and was relatively dependent on the expression of the a TcR/CD3 complex. In contrast, anti-MHC class I mAb-induced clonal abortion in Jurkat T cells may occur without previous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and appeared to be independent of TcR/CD3...... expression. The present observation suggest the existence of different secondary messenger systems operating in Jurkat cells following activation via the TcR/CD3, CD2 and the MHC class I pathways, respectively....

  12. Non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic activity of blood mononuclear cells stimulated with secreted mycobacterial proteins and other mycobacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Pedersen, B K

    1994-01-01

    Several observations indicate that non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity, mediated for example by natural killer cells and lymphokine-activated killer cells, may serve as an important antimicrobial defense mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to investigate......+ cells proliferated and expressed interleukin-2 receptors following stimulation with mycobacterial antigens. Depletion studies after antigen stimulation showed that the cytotoxic effector cells were CD16+ CD56+ and CD4-; the CD4+ cells alone did not mediate non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity. To evaluate...... activity was reduced. This reduction was abolished by interleukin-2 but not by gamma interferon. We conclude that several mycobacterial antigens are able to induce non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity. This study indicates that non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity following stimulation with mycobacterial antigens...

  13. Activation of Stat-3 is involved in the induction of apoptosis after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on human Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Nielsen, M; Bregenholt, S

    1998-01-01

    . In addition, the transcription factor Stat-3 was tyrosine phosphorylated in the cytoplasm and subsequently translocated to the cell nucleus. Data obtained by electrophoretic mobility shift assay suggested that the activated Stat-3 protein associates with the human serum-inducible element (hSIE) DNA......-probe derived from the interferon-gamma activated site (GAS) in the c-fos promoter, a common DNA sequence for Stat protein binding. An association between hSIE and Stat-3 after MHC-I ligation was directly demonstrated by precipitating Stat-3 from nuclear extracts with biotinylated hSIE probe and avidin......Activation of Janus tyrosine kinases (Jak) and Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was explored in Jurkat T cells. Cross-linking of MHC-I mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Tyk2, but not Jak1, Jak2, and Jak3...

  14. A step-by-step overview of the dynamic process of epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II for presentation to helper T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

    2016-01-01

    T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) expressed on cytotoxic or helper T cells can only see their specific target antigen as short sequences of peptides bound to the groove of proteins of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, and class II respectively. In addition to the many steps, several participating proteins, and multiple cellular compartments involved in the processing of antigens, the MHC structure, with its dynamic and flexible groove, has perfectly evolved as the underlying instrument for epitope selection. In this review, I have taken a step-by-step, and rather historical, view to describe antigen processing and determinant selection, as we understand it today, all based on decades of intense research by hundreds of laboratories.

  15. The Recognition of the Nonclassical Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Molecule, T10, by the γδ T Cell, G8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Michael P.; Reich, Ziv; Mavaddat, Nasim; Altman, John D.; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that many nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (class Ib) molecules have distinct antigen-binding capabilities, including the binding of nonpeptide moieties and the binding of peptides that are different from those bound to classical MHC molecules. Here, we show that one of the H-2T region–encoded molecules, T10, when produced in Escherichia coli, can be folded in vitro with β2-microglobulin (β2m) to form a stable heterodimer in the absence of peptide or nonpeptide moieties. This heterodimer can be recognized by specific antibodies and is stimulatory to the γδ T cell clone, G8. Circular dichroism analysis indicates that T10/β2m has structural features distinct from those of classical MHC class I molecules. These results suggest a new way for MHC-like molecules to adopt a peptide-free structure and to function in the immune system. PMID:9104809

  16. A single-chain fusion molecule consisting of peptide, major histocompatibility gene complex class I heavy chain and beta2-microglobulin can fold partially correctly, but binds peptide inefficiently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Buus, S

    1999-01-01

    The function of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules is to sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We have attempted to develop a general approach to produce large amounts of pure and active recombi...

  17. Definitions of histocompatibility typing terms: Harmonization of Histocompatibility Typing Terms Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Eduardo; Heslop, Helen; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Taves, Cynthia; Wagenknecht, Dawn R; Eisenbrey, A Bradley; Fischer, Gottfried; Poulton, Kay; Wacker, Kara; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich; Noreen, Harriet; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2011-12-01

    Histocompatibility testing for stem cell and solid organ transplantation has become increasingly complex as newly discovered human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are described. HLA typing assignments reported by laboratories are used by physicians and donor registries for matching donors and recipients. To communicate effectively, a common language for histocompatibility terms should be established. In early 2010, representatives from clinical, registry, and histocompatibility organizations joined together as the Harmonization of Histocompatibility Typing Terms Working Group to define a consensual language for laboratories, physicians and registries to communicate histocompatibility typing information. The Working Group defined terms for HLA typing resolution, HLA matching and a format for reporting HLA assignments. In addition, definitions of verification typing and extended typing were addressed. The original draft of the Definitions of Histocompatibility Typing Terms was disseminated to colleagues from each organization to gain feedback and create a collaborative document. Commentary gathered during this 90-day review period were discussed and implemented for preparation of this report. Histocompatibility testing continues to evolve thus, the definitions agreed upon today, likely will require refinement and perhaps additional terminology in the future. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression on neurons in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and experimental subacute measles encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogate, N.; Yamabe, Toshio; Verma, L.; Dhib-Jalbut, S. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Lack of major histocompatibility class I antigens on neurons has been implicated as a possible mechanism for viral persistence in the brain since these antigens are required for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition of infected cells. In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), measles virus (MV) persists in neurons, resulting in a fatal chronic infection. MHC class I mRNA expression was examined in formalin-fixed brain tissue from 6 SSPE patients by in situ hybridization. In addition MHC class I protein expression in MV-infected neurons was examined in experimental Subacute Measles Encephalitis (SME) by double immunohistochemistry. MHC class I mRNA expression was found to be upregulated in SSPE tissues studied, and in 5 out of 6 cases the expression was definitively seen on neurons. The percentage of neurons expressing MHC class I mRNA ranged between 20 to 84% in infected areas. There was no correlation between the degree of infection and expression of MHC class I molecules on neurons. Importantly, the number of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens was markedly low, varying between 2 to 8%. Similar results were obtained in SME where 20 to 30% of the neurons expressed MHC class I but < 8% co-expressed MHC class I and MV antigens. Perivascular infiltrating cells in the infected regions in SME expressed IFN{gamma} immunoreactivity. The results suggest that MV may not be directly involved in the induction of MHC class I on neurons and that cytokines such as IFN{gamma} may play an important role. Furthermore, the paucity of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens in SSPE and SME suggests that such cells are either rapidly cleared by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), or, alternatively, lack of co-expression of MHC class I on MV infected neurons favors MV persistence in these cells by escaping CTL recognition. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Pathway of detergent-mediated and peptide ligand-mediated refolding of heterodimeric class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, J; Döring, K; Malotka, J; Jähnig, F; Dornmair, K

    1997-09-15

    We investigated the mechanism of refolding and reassembly of recombinant alpha and beta chains of the class II major histocompatibility molecules (MHC-II) HLA-DRB5*0101. Both chains were expressed in the cytosol of Escherichia coli, purified in urea and SDS, and reassembled to functional heterodimers by replacement of SDS by mild detergents, incubation in a redox-shuffling buffer and finally by oxidation and removal of detergent. Refolding was mediated by mild detergents and by peptide ligands. Early stages of structure formation were characterized by circular dichroism, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay (FAD) spectroscopies. We found that formation of secondary structure was detectable after replacement of SDS by mild detergents. At that stage the alpha and beta chains were still monomeric, the buffer was strongly reducing, and the folding intermediates did not yet interact with peptide ligands. Formation of folding intermediates capable of interacting with peptide ligands was detected after adjusting the redox potential with oxidized glutathione and incubation in mild detergents. We conclude that at that stage a tertiary structure close to the native structure is formed at least locally. The nature and concentration of detergent critically determined the refolding efficiency. We compared detergents with different carbohydrate headgroups, and with aliphatic chains ranging from C6 to C14 in length. For each of the detergents we observed a narrow concentration range for mediating refolding. Surprisingly, detergents with long aliphatic chains had to be used at higher concentrations than short-chain detergents, indicating that increasing the solubility of folding intermediates is not the only function of detergents during a refolding reaction. We discuss structure formation and interactions of detergents with stable folding intermediates. Understanding such interactions will help to develop rational strategies for refolding hydrophobic or

  20. Molecular detection of targeted major histocompatibility complex I-bound peptides using a probabilistic measure and nanospray MS3 on a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Bruce; Keskin, Derin B; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2010-11-01

    A nanospray MS(3) method deployed on a quadrupole linear ion trap hybrid can detect targeted peptides with high dynamic range and high sensitivity from complex mixtures without separations. The method uses a recognition algorithm that is a modification of the relative (Kullback-Leibler, KL) entropy characterization of probabilistic distance to detect if reference MS(3) fragmentation patterns are components of acquired MS(3) spectra. The recognition reflects the probabilistic structure of physical MS measurements unlike the Euclidean or inner product metrics widely used for comparing spectra. It capably handles spectra with a significant chemical ion background in contrast to the Euclidean metric or the direct relative entropy. The full nanospray MS(3) method allows both the detection and quantitation of targets without the need to obtain isotopically labeled standards. By avoiding chromatographic separations and its associated surface losses, the detection can be applied to complex samples on a very limited material scale. The methodology is illustrated by applications to the medically important problem of detecting targeted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I associated peptides extracted from limited cell numbers.

  1. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Upregulates NLRC5 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression through RIG-I Induction in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuancheng; Liu, Taixiang; Shi, Hengfei; Wang, Jingjing; Ji, Ping; Wang, Hongwei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang; Li, Erguang

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute respiratory tract viral infection in infants, causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The host antiviral response to RSV acts via retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We show here that RSV infection upregulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression through the induction of NLRC5, a NOD-like, CARD domain-containing intracellular protein that has recently been identified as a class I MHC transactivator (CITA). RSV infection of A549 cells promotes upregulation of NLRC5 via beta interferon (IFN-β) production, since the NLRC5-inducing activity in a conditioned medium from RSV-infected A549 cells was removed by antibody to IFN-β, but not by antibody to IFN-γ. RSV infection resulted in RIG-I upregulation and induction of NLRC5 and MHC-I. Suppression of RIG-I induction significantly blocked NLRC5, as well as MHC-I, upregulation and diminished IRF3 activation. Importantly, Vero cells deficient in interferon production still upregulated MHC-I following introduction of the RSV genome by infection or transfection, further supporting a key role for RIG-I. A model is therefore proposed in which the host upregulates MHC-I expression during RSV infection directly via the induction of RIG-I and NLRC5 expression. Since elevated expression of MHC-I molecules can sensitize host cells to T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity or immunopathologic damage, the results have significant implications for the modification of immunity in RSV disease. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children worldwide. Infection early in life is linked to persistent wheezing and allergic asthma in later life, possibly related to upregulation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) on the cell surface, which facilitates cytotoxic T cell activation and antiviral immunity. Here, we show that RSV infection of lung epithelial cells induces

  3. SNP association mapping across the extended major histocompatibility complex and risk of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Y Urayama

    Full Text Available The extended major histocompatibility complex (xMHC is the most gene-dense region of the genome and harbors a disproportionately large number of genes involved in immune function. The postulated role of infection in the causation of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL suggests that the xMHC may make an important contribution to the risk of this disease. We conducted association mapping across an approximately 4 megabase region of the xMHC using a validated panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in childhood BCP-ALL cases (n=567 enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (NCCLS compared with population controls (n=892. Logistic regression analyses of 1,145 SNPs, adjusted for age, sex, and Hispanic ethnicity indicated potential associations between several SNPs and childhood BCP-ALL. After accounting for multiple comparisons, one of these included a statistically significant increased risk associated with rs9296068 (OR=1.40, 95% CI=1.19-1.66, corrected p=0.036, located in proximity to HLA-DOA. Sliding window haplotype analysis identified an additional locus located in the extended class I region in proximity to TRIM27 tagged by a haplotype comprising rs1237485, rs3118361, and rs2032502 (corrected global p=0.046. Our findings suggest that susceptibility to childhood BCP-ALL is influenced by genetic variation within the xMHC and indicate at least two important regions for future evaluation.

  4. DM influences the abundance of major histocompatibility complex class II alleles with low affinity for class II-associated invariant chain peptides via multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, Cornelia H; Roh, Sujin; Pashine, Achal; Belmares, Michael P; Patil, Namrata S; Lu, Ning; Truong, Phi; Hou, Tieying; Macaubas, Claudia; Yoon, Taejin; Wang, Nan; Busch, Robert; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2010-09-01

    DM catalyses class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP) release, edits the repertoire of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, affects class II structure, and thereby modulates binding of conformation-sensitive anti-class II antibodies. Here, we investigate the ability of DM to enhance the cell surface binding of monomorphic antibodies. We show that this enhancement reflects increases in cell surface class II expression and total cellular abundance, but notably these effects are selective for particular alleles. Evidence from analysis of cellular class II levels after cycloheximide treatment and from pulse-chase experiments indicates that DM increases the half-life of affected alleles. Unexpectedly, the pulse-chase experiments also revealed an early effect of DM on assembly of these alleles. The allelically variant feature that correlates with susceptibility to these DM effects is low affinity for CLIP; DM-dependent changes in abundance are reduced by invariant chain (CLIP) mutants that enhance CLIP binding to class II. We found evidence that DM mediates rescue of peptide-receptive DR0404 molecules from inactive forms in vitro and evidence suggesting that a similar process occurs in cells. Thus, multiple mechanisms, operating along the biosynthetic pathway of class II molecules, contribute to DM-mediated increases in the abundance of low-CLIP-affinity alleles.

  5. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achara Phumyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8. The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3 of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21 were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins.

  6. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phumyen, Achara; Jumnainsong, Amonrat; Leelayuwat, Chanvit

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8). The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3) of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21) were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins. PMID:23226940

  7. From genome-wide to candidate gene: an investigation of variation at the major histocompatibility complex in common bottlenose dolphins exposed to harmful algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammen, Kristina M; Wilcox, Lynsey A; Rosel, Patricia E; Wells, Randall S; Read, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    The role the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays in response to exposure to environmental toxins is relatively poorly understood, particularly in comparison to its well-described role in pathogen immunity. We investigated associations between MHC diversity and resistance to brevetoxins in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). A previous genome-wide association study investigating an apparent difference in harmful algal bloom (HAB) resistance among dolphin populations in the Gulf of Mexico identified genetic variation associated with survival in close genomic proximity to multiple MHC class II loci. Here, we characterized genetic variation at DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB loci in dolphins from central-west Florida and the Florida Panhandle, including dolphins that died during HABs and dolphins presumed to have survived HAB exposure. We found that DRB and DQB exhibited patterns of genetic differentiation among geographic regions that differed from neutral microsatellite loci. In addition, genetic differentiation at DRB across multiple pairwise comparisons of live and dead dolphins was greater than differentiation observed at neutral loci. Our findings at these MHC loci did not approach the strength of association with survival previously described for a nearby genetic variant. However, the results provide evidence that selective pressures at the MHC vary among dolphin populations that differ in the frequency of HAB exposure and that the overall composition of DRB variants differs between dolphin survivors and non-survivors of HABs. These results may suggest a potential role of MHC diversity in variable survival of bottlenose dolphins exposed to HABs.

  8. CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex II signaling induces B cells to express interleukin 2 receptors and complements help provided through CD40 ligation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    and MHC II in the presence of IL-5 induced expression of a functional IL-2R on small resting B cells. By contrast CD40 ligation, which induced B cell proliferation, did not induce IL-2 responsiveness. These data show that CD40 ligation is necessary but may not be sufficient for B cell differentiation......We have examined signaling roles for CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II as contact ligands during T help for B cell activation. We used a T helper 1 (Th1)-dependent helper system that was previously shown to be contact as well as interleukin 2 (IL-2......) dependent to demonstrate the relative roles of CD54, MHC II, and CD40 signaling in the events leading to the induction of B cell proliferation and responsiveness to IL-2. Paraformaldehyde-fixed activated Th1-induced expression of IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and B7, and upregulated MHC II and CD54 on B cells...

  9. Increased susceptibility to Strongyloides venezuelensis infection is related to the parasite load and absence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosângela Maria; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia Ribeiro; Silva, Neide Maria; Massa, Virgínia; Alves, Ronaldo; Ueta, Marlene Tiduko; Silva, João Santana; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-11-01

    In human and murine models strongyloidiasis induce a Th2 type response. In the current study we investigated the role of different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis in the immune response raised against the parasite and the participation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule in the disease outcome in face of the different parasite burden. The C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MHC II(-/-) mice were individually inoculated by subcutaneous injection with 500 or 3000 S. venezuelensis L3. The MHC II(-/-) mice infected with 3000L3 were more susceptible to S. venezuelensis infection when compared with WT groups, in which the parasite was completely eliminated. The production of Th2 cytokines and specific IgG1 or IgE antibodies against parasite were significantly lowered in MHC II(-/-) infected mice with different larvae inoculums. The infection of MHC II(-/-) mice with S. venezuelensis induced slight inflammatory alterations in the small intestine, and these lesions were lower when compared with WT mice, irrespective of the parasite load utilized to infect animals. Finally, we concluded that MHC class II molecules are essential in the immune response against S. venezuelensis mainly when infection occurs with high parasite inoculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Extensive polymorphism and evidence of selection pressure on major histocompatibility complex DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 class II genes in Croatian grey wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbanasić, H; Huber, Đ; Kusak, J; Gomerčić, T; Hrenović, J; Galov, A

    2013-01-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a key component of the mammalian immune system and have become important molecular markers for measuring fitness-related genetic variation in wildlife populations. Because of human persecution and habitat fragmentation, the grey wolf has become extinct from a large part of Western and Central Europe, and remaining populations have become isolated. In Croatia, the grey wolf population, part of the Dinaric-Balkan population, shrank nearly to extinction during the 20th century, and is now legally protected. Using the cloning-sequencing method, we investigated the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of exon 2 of MHC class II DLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 genes in 77 individuals. We identified 13 DRB1, 7 DQA1 and 11 DQB1 highly divergent alleles, and 13 DLA-DRB1/DQA1/DQB1 haplotypes. Selection analysis comparing the relative rates of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations (d(N)/d(S)) showed evidence of positive selection pressure acting on all three loci. Trans-species polymorphism was found, suggesting the existence of balancing selection. Evolutionary codon models detected considerable difference between alpha and beta chain gene selection patterns: DRB1 and DQB1 appeared to be under stronger selection pressure, while DQA1 showed signs of moderate selection. Our results suggest that, despite the recent contraction of the Croatian wolf population, genetic variability in selectively maintained immune genes has been preserved. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Balancing selection, random genetic drift, and genetic variation at the major histocompatibility complex in two wild populations of guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oosterhout, Cock; Joyce, Domino A; Cummings, Stephen M; Blais, Jonatan; Barson, Nicola J; Ramnarine, Indar W; Mohammed, Ryan S; Persad, Nadia; Cable, Joanne

    2006-12-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is rapidly increasing, but there are still enigmatic questions remaining, particularly regarding the maintenance of high levels of MHC polymorphisms in small, isolated populations. Here, we analyze the genetic variation at eight microsatellite loci and sequence variation at exon 2 of the MHC class IIB (DAB) genes in two wild populations of the Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulata. We compare the genetic variation of a small (Ne, 100) and relatively isolated upland population to that of its much larger (Ne approximately 2400) downstream counterpart. As predicted, microsatellite diversity in the upland population is significantly lower and highly differentiated from the population further downstream. Surprisingly, however, these guppy populations are not differentiated by MHC genetic variation and show very similar levels of allelic richness. Computer simulations indicate that the observed level of genetic variation can be maintained with overdominant selection acting at three DAB loci. The selection coefficients differ dramatically between the upland (s > or = 0.2) and lowland (s guppies in the upland habitat, which has resulted in high levels of MHC diversity being maintained in this population despite considerable genetic drift.

  12. Applicability of major histocompatibility complex DRB1 alleles as markers to detect vertebrate hybridization: a case study from Iberian ibex × domestic goat in southern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasaad Samer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hybridization between closely related wild and domestic species is of great concern because it can alter the evolutionary integrity of the affected populations. The high allelic variability of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC loci usually excludes them from being used in studies to detect hybridization events. However, if a the parental species don’t share alleles, and b one of the parental species possesses an exceptionally low number of alleles (to facilitate analysis, then even MHC loci have the potential to detect hybrids. Results By genotyping the exon2 of the MHC class II DRB1 locus, we were able to detect hybridization between domestic goats (Capra hircus and free-ranging Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica by molecular means. Conclusions This is the first documentation of a Capra pyrenaica × Capra hircus hybridization, which presented us the opportunity to test the applicability of MHC loci as new, simple, cost-effective, and time-saving approach to detect hybridization between wild species and their domesticated relatives, thus adding value to MHC genes role in animal conservation and management.

  13. Induction of Apoptosis and T Helper 2 (Th2) Responses Correlates with Peptide Affinity for the Major Histocompatibility Complex in Self-reactive T Cell Receptor Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, C.I.; van Ewijk, W.; McDevitt, H.O.

    1997-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease thought to be mediated by CD4+ T helper cells (Th). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a rodent model of multiple sclerosis and has been used extensively to explore a variety of immunotherapies using soluble protein or peptide antigens. The underlying mechanisms of such therapy have been attributed to induction of T cell anergy, a switch in Th1 to Th2 responses, or peripheral deletion of autoreactive T cells. In this study, we have developed transgenic mice expressing a T cell receptor (TCR) specific for the NH2-terminal peptide Ac1-11 of the autoantigen myelin basic protein to explore the mechanism of soluble peptide therapy. T cells from these mice are highly skewed toward the CD4 population and have an abnormal thymic architecture, a phenomenon found in other TCR transgenic mice that exhibit a highly skewed CD4/CD8 ratio. Soluble Ac1-11 or the analogues Ac1-11[4A] or Ac1-11[4Y] (which bind to the major histocompatibility complex [MHC] class II molecule I-Au with increasing affinities) given intravenously activates T cells, rendering cells hyperresponsive in vitro for at least two days after injection. Concomitantly, T cells apoptose in the periphery, the degree of which correlates with the affinity of the peptide for the MHC. In addition, a shift in the T helper phenotype of the surviving T cells occurs such that the low affinity peptide, Ac1-11, induces primarily a Th1 response, whereas the highest affinity peptide, Ac1-11[4Y], induces primarily a Th2 type response. These data show that both the nature and the presumed number of the peptide–MHC complexes formed during specific peptide therapy affect both the degree of peripheral programmed cell death as well as the outcome of the T helper subset response in vivo, leading to amelioration of disease. PMID:9034138

  14. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I, and class II DRB loci of captive and wild Indian leopards (Panthera pardus fusca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Drashti R; Mitra, Siuli; Bhadouriya, Snehalata; Rao, Tirupathi; Kunteepuram, Vaishnavi; Gaur, Ajay

    2017-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), in vertebrate animals, is a multi-genic protein complex that encodes various receptors. During a disease, MHC interacts with the antigen and triggers a cascade of adaptive immune responses to overcome a disease outbreak. The MHC is very important region from immunological point of view, but it is poorly characterized among Indian leopards. During this investigation, we examined genetic diversity for MHC class I (MHC-I) and MHC class II-DRB (MHC-II) among wild and captive Indian leopards. This study estimated a pool of 9 and 17 alleles for MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. The wild group of individuals showed higher nucleotide diversity and amino acid polymorphism compared to the captive group. A phylogenetic comparison with other felids revealed a clustering in MHC-I and interspersed presence in MHC-II sequences. A test for selection also revealed a deviation from neutrality at MHC-II DRB loci and higher non-synonymous substitution rate (dN) among the individuals from wild group. Further, the wild individuals showed higher dN for both MHC I and II genes compared to the group that was bred under captive conditions. These findings suggest the role of micro-evolutionary forces, such as pathogen-mediated selection, to cause MHC variations among the two groups of Indian leopards, because the two groups have been bred in two different environments for a substantial period of time. Since, MHC diversity is often linked with the quality of immunological health; the results obtained from this study fill the gap of knowledge on disease predisposition among wild and captive Indian leopards.

  15. Disruption of hydrogen bonds between major histocompatibility complex class II and the peptide N-terminus is not sufficient to form a human leukocyte antigen-DM receptive state of major histocompatibility complex class II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Monika-Sarah E D; Anders, Anne-Kathrin; Sethi, Dhruv K; Call, Melissa J

    2013-01-01

    Peptide presentation by MHC class II is of critical importance to the function of CD4+ T cells. HLA-DM resides in the endosomal pathway and edits the peptide repertoire of newly synthesized MHC class II molecules before they are exported to the cell surface. HLA-DM ensures MHC class II molecules bind high affinity peptides by targeting unstable MHC class II:peptide complexes for peptide exchange. Research over the past decade has implicated the peptide N-terminus in modulating the ability of HLA-DM to target a given MHC class II:peptide combination. In particular, attention has been focused on both the hydrogen bonds between MHC class II and peptide, and the occupancy of the P1 anchor pocket. We sought to solve the crystal structure of a HLA-DR1 molecule containing a truncated hemagglutinin peptide missing three N-terminal residues compared to the full-length sequence (residues 306-318) to determine the nature of the MHC class II:peptide species that binds HLA-DM. Here we present structural evidence that HLA-DR1 that is loaded with a peptide truncated to the P1 anchor residue such that it cannot make select hydrogen bonds with the peptide N-terminus, adopts the same conformation as molecules loaded with full-length peptide. HLA-DR1:peptide combinations that were unable to engage up to four key hydrogen bonds were also unable to bind HLA-DM, while those truncated to the P2 residue bound well. These results indicate that the conformational changes in MHC class II molecules that are recognized by HLA-DM occur after disengagement of the P1 anchor residue.

  16. Histone deacetylase 1/mSin3A disrupts gamma interferon-induced CIITA function and major histocompatibility complex class II enhanceosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika, Eleni; Greer, Susanna F; Zhu, Xin-Sheng; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2003-05-01

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is a master transcriptional regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) promoters. CIITA does not bind DNA, but it interacts with the transcription factors RFX5, NF-Y, and CREB and associated chromatin-modifying enzymes to form an enhanceosome. This report examines the effects of histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1/HDAC2) on MHC-II gene induction by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and CIITA. The results show that an inhibitor of HDACs, trichostatin A, enhances IFN-gamma-induced MHC-II expression, while HDAC1/HDAC2 inhibits IFN-gamma- and CIITA-induced MHC-II gene expression. mSin3A, a corepressor of HDAC1/HDAC2, is important for this inhibition, while NcoR, a corepressor of HDAC3, is not. The effect of this inhibition is directed at CIITA, since HDAC1/HDAC2 reduces transactivation by a GAL4-CIITA fusion protein. CIITA binds to overexpressed and endogenous HDAC1, suggesting that HDAC and CIITA may affect each other by direct or indirect association. Inhibition of HDAC activity dramatically increases the association of NF-YB and RFX5 with CIITA, the assembly of CIITA, NF-YB, and RFX5 enhanceosome, and the extent of H3 acetylation at the MHC-II promoter. These results suggest a model where HDAC1/HDAC2 affect the function of CIITA through a disruption of MHC-II enhanceosome and relevant coactivator-transcription factor association and provide evidence that CIITA may act as a molecular switch to modulate MHC-II transcription by coordinating the functions of both histone acetylases and HDACs.

  17. Clinical significance of SNP (rs2596542 in histocompatibility complex class I-related gene A promoter region among hepatitis C virus related hepatocellular carcinoma cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal A. Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex class I-related gene A (MICA is an antigen induced by stress and performs an integral role in immune responses as an anti-infectious and antitumor agent. This work was designed to investigate whether (SNP rs2596542C/T in MICA promoter region is predictive of liver cirrhosis (LC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC or not. Forty-seven healthy controls and 94 HCV-infected patients, subdivided into 47 LC and 47 HCC subjects were enrolled in this study. SNP association was studied using real time PCR and soluble serum MICA concentration was measured using ELISA. Results showed that heterozygous genotype rs2596542CT was significantly (P = 0.022 distributed between HCC and LC related CHC patients. The sMICA was significantly higher (P = 0.0001 among HCC and LC. No significant association (P = 0.56 between rs2596542CT genotypes and sMICA levels was observed. Studying SNP rs2596542C/T association with HCC and LC susceptibility revealed that statistical significant differences (P = 0.013, P = 0.027 were only observed between SNP rs2596542C/T and each of HCC and LC, respectively, versus healthy controls, indicating that the rs2596542C/T genetic variation is not a significant contributor to HCC development in LC patients. Moreover, the T allele was considered a risk factor for HCC and LC vulnerability in HCV patients (OR = 1.93 and 2.1, respectively, while the C allele contributes to decreasing HCC risk. Therefore, SNP (rs2596542C/T in MICA promoter region and sMICA levels might be potential useful markers in the assessment of liver disease progression to LC and HCC.

  18. Stable isotope tagging of epitopes: a highly selective strategy for the identification of major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides induced upon viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiring, Hugo D; Soethout, Ernst C; Poelen, Martien C M; Mooibroek, Dennis; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald; Timmermans, Hans; Boog, Claire J; Heck, Albert J R; de Jong, Ad P J M; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2006-05-01

    Identification of peptides presented in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules after viral infection is of strategic importance for vaccine development. Until recently, mass spectrometric identification of virus-induced peptides was based on comparative analysis of peptide pools isolated from uninfected and virus-infected cells. Here we report on a powerful strategy aiming at the rapid, unambiguous identification of naturally processed MHC class I-associated peptides, which are induced by viral infection. The methodology, stable isotope tagging of epitopes (SITE), is based on metabolic labeling of endogenously synthesized proteins during infection. This is accomplished by culturing virus-infected cells with stable isotope-labeled amino acids that are expected to be anchor residues (i.e. residues of the peptide that have amino acid side chains that bind into pockets lining the peptide-binding groove of the MHC class I molecule) for the human leukocyte antigen allele of interest. Subsequently these cells are mixed with an equal number of non-infected cells, which are cultured in normal medium. Finally peptides are acid-eluted from immunoprecipitated MHC molecules and subjected to two-dimensional nanoscale LC-MS analysis. Virus-induced peptides are identified through computer-assisted detection of characteristic, binomially distributed ratios of labeled and unlabeled molecules. Using this approach we identified novel measles virus and respiratory syncytial virus epitopes as well as infection-induced self-peptides in several cell types, showing that SITE is a unique and versatile method for unequivocal identification of disease-related MHC class I epitopes.

  19. Evidence of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism, but not of parallel evolution, despite high levels of concerted evolution in the major histocompatibility complex of flamingo species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, M A F; Courtiol, A; Teixeira, M; Galan, M; Bechet, A; Cezilly, F

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cornerstone in the study of adaptive genetic diversity. Intriguingly, highly polymorphic MHC sequences are often not more similar within species than between closely related species. Divergent selection of gene duplicates, balancing selection maintaining trans-species polymorphism (TSP) that predate speciation and parallel evolution of species sharing similar selection pressures can all lead to higher sequence similarity between species. In contrast, high rates of concerted evolution increase sequence similarity of duplicated loci within species. Assessing these evolutionary models remains difficult as relatedness and ecological similarities are often confounded. As sympatric species of flamingos are more distantly related than allopatric species, flamingos represent an ideal model to disentangle these evolutionary models. We characterized MHC Class I exon 3, Class IIB exon 2 and exon 3 of the six extant flamingo species. We found up to six MHC Class I loci and two MHC Class IIB loci. As all six species shared the same number of MHC Class IIB loci, duplication appears to predate flamingo speciation. However, the high rate of concerted evolution has prevented the divergence of duplicated loci. We found high sequence similarity between all species regardless of codon position. The latter is consistent with balancing selection maintaining TSP, as under this mechanism amino acid sites under pathogen-mediated selection should be characterized by fewer synonymous codons (due to their common ancestry) than under parallel evolution. Overall, balancing selection maintaining TSP appears to result in high MHC similarity between species regardless of species relatedness and geographical distribution. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II but not MHC class I molecules are required for efficient control of Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosângela M; Silva, Neide M; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia R; Cardoso, Cristina R; Alves, Ronaldo; Gonçalves, Flávia A; Beletti, Marcelo E; Ueta, Marlene T; Silva, João S; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2009-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode capable of chronic, persistent infection and hyperinfection of the host; this can lead to dissemination, mainly in immunosuppressive states, in which the infection can become severe and result in the death of the host. In this study, we investigated the immune response against Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I or class II deficient mice. We found that MHC II−/− animals were more susceptible to S. venezuelensis infection as a result of the presence of an elevated number of eggs in the faeces and a delay in the elimination of adult worms compared with wild-type (WT) and MHC I−/− mice. Histopathological analysis revealed that MHC II−/− mice had a mild inflammatory infiltration in the small intestine with a reduction in tissue eosinophilia. These mice also presented a significantly lower frequency of eosinophils and mononuclear cells in the blood, together with reduced T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines in small intestine homogenates and sera compared with WT and MHC I−/− animals. Additionally, levels of parasite-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA, IgE, total IgG and IgG1 were also significantly reduced in the sera of MHC II−/− infected mice, while a non-significant increase in the level of IgG2a was found in comparison to WT or MHC I−/− infected mice. Together, these data demonstrate that expression of MHC class II but not class I molecules is required to induce a predominantly Th2 response and to achieve efficient control of S. venezuelensis infection in mice. PMID:19191916

  1. Characterization of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) DRB Exon 2 and DRA Exon 3 Fragments in a Primary Terrestrial Rabies Vector (Procyon lotor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sarrah; Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Meunier, Vanessa; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor). Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus) and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250bp) and DRB exon 2 (228 bp). MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4–15.8% divergence) and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3–27.6% divergence) amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005), indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host. PMID:20706587

  2. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC DRB exon 2 and DRA exon 3 fragments in a primary terrestrial rabies vector (Procyon lotor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarrah Castillo

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor. Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250 bp and DRB exon 2 (228 bp. MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4-15.8% divergence and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3-27.6% divergence amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005, indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host.

  3. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  4. Automated Analysis of Flow Cytometry Data to Reduce Inter-Lab Variation in the Detection of Major Histocompatibility Complex Multimer-Binding T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Natasja Wulff; Chandran, P. Anoop; Qian, Yu; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Hoff, Mathilde Dalsgaard; White, Scott; Lee, Alexandra J.; Stanton, Rick; Halgreen, Charlotte; Jakobsen, Kivin; Mosmann, Tim; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2017-01-01

    Manual analysis of flow cytometry data and subjective gate-border decisions taken by individuals continue to be a source of variation in the assessment of antigen-specific T cells when comparing data across laboratories, and also over time in individual labs. Therefore, strategies to provide automated analysis of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) multimer-binding T cells represent an attractive solution to decrease subjectivity and technical variation. The challenge of using an automated analysis approach is that MHC multimer-binding T cell populations are often rare and therefore difficult to detect. We used a highly heterogeneous dataset from a recent MHC multimer proficiency panel to assess if MHC multimer-binding CD8+ T cells could be analyzed with computational solutions currently available, and if such analyses would reduce the technical variation across different laboratories. We used three different methods, FLOw Clustering without K (FLOCK), Scalable Weighted Iterative Flow-clustering Technique (SWIFT), and ReFlow to analyze flow cytometry data files from 28 laboratories. Each laboratory screened for antigen-responsive T cell populations with frequency ranging from 0.01 to 1.5% of lymphocytes within samples from two donors. Experience from this analysis shows that all three programs can be used for the identification of high to intermediate frequency of MHC multimer-binding T cell populations, with results very similar to that of manual gating. For the less frequent populations (SWIFT outperformed the other tools. As used in this study, none of the algorithms offered a completely automated pipeline for identification of MHC multimer populations, as varying degrees of human interventions were needed to complete the analysis. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis pipelines for assessing and identifying even rare populations of antigen-responsive T cells and discuss the main properties, differences, and advantages of

  5. Automated Analysis of Flow Cytometry Data to Reduce Inter-Lab Variation in the Detection of Major Histocompatibility Complex Multimer-Binding T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasja Wulff Pedersen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Manual analysis of flow cytometry data and subjective gate-border decisions taken by individuals continue to be a source of variation in the assessment of antigen-specific T cells when comparing data across laboratories, and also over time in individual labs. Therefore, strategies to provide automated analysis of major histocompatibility complex (MHC multimer-binding T cells represent an attractive solution to decrease subjectivity and technical variation. The challenge of using an automated analysis approach is that MHC multimer-binding T cell populations are often rare and therefore difficult to detect. We used a highly heterogeneous dataset from a recent MHC multimer proficiency panel to assess if MHC multimer-binding CD8+ T cells could be analyzed with computational solutions currently available, and if such analyses would reduce the technical variation across different laboratories. We used three different methods, FLOw Clustering without K (FLOCK, Scalable Weighted Iterative Flow-clustering Technique (SWIFT, and ReFlow to analyze flow cytometry data files from 28 laboratories. Each laboratory screened for antigen-responsive T cell populations with frequency ranging from 0.01 to 1.5% of lymphocytes within samples from two donors. Experience from this analysis shows that all three programs can be used for the identification of high to intermediate frequency of MHC multimer-binding T cell populations, with results very similar to that of manual gating. For the less frequent populations (<0.1% of live, single lymphocytes, SWIFT outperformed the other tools. As used in this study, none of the algorithms offered a completely automated pipeline for identification of MHC multimer populations, as varying degrees of human interventions were needed to complete the analysis. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis pipelines for assessing and identifying even rare populations of antigen-responsive T cells and discuss

  6. Genetic drift vs. natural selection in a long-term small isolated population: major histocompatibility complex class II variation in the Gulf of California endemic porpoise (Phocoena sinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Esquer-Garrigos, Yareli; Rojas-Bracho, Lorenzo; Vazquez-Juarez, Ricardo; Castro-Prieto, Aines; Flores-Ramirez, Sergio

    2007-10-01

    Although many studies confirm long-term small isolated populations (e.g. island endemics) commonly sustain low neutral genetic variation as a result of genetic drift, it is less clear how selection on adaptive or detrimental genes interplay with random forces. We investigated sequence variation at two major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II loci on a porpoise endemic to the upper Gulf of California, México (Phocoena sinus, or vaquita). Its unique declining population is estimated around 500 individuals. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis revealed one putative functional allele fixed at the locus DQB (n = 25). At the DRB locus, we found two presumed functional alleles (n = 29), differing by a single nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution that could increase the stability at the dimer interface of alphabeta-heterodimers on heterozygous individuals. Identical trans-specific DQB1 and DRB1 alleles were identified between P. sinus and its closest relative, the Burmeister's porpoise (Phocoena spinipinnis). Comparison with studies on four island endemic mammals suggests fixation of one allele, due to genetic drift, commonly occurs at the DQA or DQB loci (effectively neutral). Similarly, deleterious alleles of small effect are also effectively neutral and can become fixed; a high frequency of anatomical malformations on vaquita gave empirical support to this prediction. In contrast, retention of low but functional polymorphism at the DRB locus was consistent with higher selection intensity. These observations indicated natural selection could maintain (and likely also purge) some crucial alleles even in the face of strong and prolonged genetic drift and inbreeding, suggesting long-term small populations should display low inbreeding depression. Low levels of Mhc variation warn about a high susceptibility to novel pathogens and diseases in vaquita.

  7. Physical mapping and structural analysis of new gene families RT1.S and Rps2r in the grc region of the rat major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgar, S K; Yuan, X; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1997-01-01

    Five new genes were identified in the growth and reproduction complex (grc) region: RT1.S1, RT1.S2, Rps2r1, Rps2r2, and Rps2r3. The class Ib RT1.S1 and RT1.S2 genes have five distinct exons (1, 4, 5, 6, 7) similar to other class I major histocompatibility complex genes but the conventional exons 2 and 3 are absent. The genes are 97% similar, have CAAT and TATA boxes much upstream of the conventional position, obey the GT/AG rule in their exon-intron boundaries, and are transcribed at a low level in thymus and testis but not in the liver and spleen. The region between exon 1 and exon 4 was analyzed by obtaining transcripts by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification which revealed the presence of four alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts of RT1.S1: 1) S1-1 (clones 14 and 16) has no exon between exons 1 and 4; 2) S1-2 (clones 7 and 8) has an exon of 45 nucleotides that can translate into 15 amino acids; 3) S1-3 (clone 5) has an exon of 42 nucleotides with a stop codon; and 4) S1-4 (clone 10) has two exons of 42 and 38 nucleotides, respectively, with stop codons. Only one RT1.S2 mRNA transcript was obtained, and it has an exon of 45 nucleotides between exon 1 and exon 4 which can form a peptide identical to the S1-2 isoform for that region. The 45 nucleotide exon between exon 1 and exon 4 was unique for RT1.S1 and RT1.S2 and only matched a sequence in the RT1.O intron region (nucleotides 2905 - 2949). The three ribosomal-protein-S2-related (Rps2r) genes are 94% - 98% similar; they are related to the genes encoding ribosomal protein S2 of the black rat and the LLRep3 genes of the mouse and the human and to the genes encoding Saccharomyces cerevisiae S4, Escherichia coli S5, and other members of prokaryote S5 family. The Rps2r1 gene is located just outside of the grc region. The Rps2r2 and Rps2r3 genes are in the grc and have multiple stop codons in their genomic sequences. The Rps2r1 mRNA transcript was identified by RT-PCR in the thymus

  8. The impact of sex-role reversal on the diversity of the major histocompatibility complex: insights from the seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Angela; Wilson, Anthony B

    2011-05-10

    Both natural and sexual selection are thought to influence genetic diversity, but the study of the relative importance of these two factors on ecologically-relevant traits has traditionally focused on species with conventional sex-roles, with male-male competition and female-based mate choice. With its high variability and significance in both immune function and olfactory-mediated mate choice, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC/MH) is an ideal system in which to evaluate the relative contributions of these two selective forces to genetic diversity. Intrasexual competition and mate choice are both reversed in sex-role reversed species, and sex-related differences in the detection and use of MH-odor cues are expected to influence the intensity of sexual selection in such species. The seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, has an exceptionally highly developed form of male parental care, with female-female competition and male mate choice. Here, we demonstrate that the sex-role reversed seahorse has a single MH class II beta-chain gene and that the diversity of the seahorse MHIIβ locus and its pattern of variation are comparable to those detected in species with conventional sex roles. Despite the presence of only a single gene copy, intralocus MHIIβ allelic diversity in this species exceeds that observed in species with multiple copies of this locus. The MHIIβ locus of the seahorse exhibits a novel expression domain in the male brood pouch. The high variation found at the seahorse MHIIβ gene indicates that sex-role reversed species are capable of maintaining the high MHC diversity typical in most vertebrates.Whether such species have evolved the capacity to use MH-odor cues during mate choice is presently being investigated using mate choice experiments. If this possibility can be rejected, such systems would offer an exceptional opportunity to study the effects of natural selection in isolation, providing powerful comparative models for understanding the

  9. Fine mapping of a major histocompatibility complex in ankylosing spondylitis: association of the HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Peña, Roberto; Aransay, Ana M; Bruges-Armas, Jacome; López-Vázquez, Antonio; Rodríguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Mendibil, Iñaki; Sánchez, Alejandra; Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Bettencourt, Bruno F; Mulero, Juan; Collantes, Eduardo; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the potential association of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) markers other than HLA-B27 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 603 patients with AS and 542 healthy control subjects, all of whom were HLA-B27 positive, were selected for this study based on clinical criteria. First, high-density genotyping across the MHC region (2,360 single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) was performed in a cohort of 191 patients and 241 control subjects. After a fine-mapping study, 5 SNPs from the HLA-DPA1/DPB1 region were validated in a second cohort of 412 patients with AS and 301 healthy control subjects. Seventeen SNPs located within or near the HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 loci showed association with AS (P = 1.38 × 10⁻⁵ to 0.05). In addition, multimarker tests, both linkage disequilibrium and sliding windows, showed association of some groups of adjacent SNPs within the HLA-DPA1/DPB1 region with AS (P = 1.0 × 10⁻⁴ to 3.96 × 10⁻⁷). We validated the association by genotyping 5 SNPs from the DPA1/DPB1 region in an additional cohort and obtained P values from 6.42 × 10⁻⁵ to 0.01 in the analysis of the combined cohorts. Subtyping analysis of HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 showed that HLA-DPA1*01:03, A1*02:01, and B1*13:01 were the subtypes most susceptible to AS. HLA markers and linkage disequilibrium blocks near HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 are statistically associated with AS. We identified a region located around the HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 loci associated with AS, another region within the MHC that is different from HLA-B27. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Varicella-Zoster Virus Downregulates Programmed Death Ligand 1 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I in Human Brain Vascular Adventitial Fibroblasts, Perineurial Cells, and Lung Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dallas; Blackmon, Anna; Neff, C Preston; Palmer, Brent E; Gilden, Don; Badani, Hussain; Nagel, Maria A

    2016-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vasculopathy produces stroke, giant cell arteritis, and granulomatous aortitis, and it develops after virus reactivates from ganglia and spreads transaxonally to arterial adventitia, resulting in persistent inflammation and pathological vascular remodeling. The mechanism(s) by which inflammatory cells persist in VZV-infected arteries is unknown; however, virus-induced dysregulation of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) may play a role. Specifically, PD-L1 can be expressed on virtually all nucleated cells and suppresses the immune system by interacting with the programmed cell death protein receptor 1, found exclusively on immune cells; thus, downregulation of PD-L1 may promote inflammation, as seen in some autoimmune diseases. Both flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analyses to test whether VZV infection of adventitial cells downregulates PD-L1 showed decreased PD-L1 expression in VZV-infected compared to mock-infected human brain vascular adventitial fibroblasts (HBVAFs), perineural cells (HPNCs), and fetal lung fibroblasts (HFLs) at 72 h postinfection. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed no change in PD-L1 transcript levels between mock- and VZV-infected cells, indicating a posttranscriptional mechanism for VZV-mediated downregulation of PD-L1. Flow cytometry analyses showed decreased major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression in VZV-infected cells and adjacent uninfected cells compared to mock-infected cells. These data suggest that reduced PD-L1 expression in VZV-infected adventitial cells contribute to persistent vascular inflammation observed in virus-infected arteries from patients with VZV vasculopathy, while downregulation of MHC-I prevents viral clearance. Here, we provide the first demonstration that VZV downregulates PD-L1 expression in infected HBVAFs, HPNCs, and HFLs, which, together with the noted VZV-mediated downregulation of MHC-I, might foster persistent inflammation in vessels, leading to

  11. Confirmation of HLA class II independent type 1 diabetes associations in the major histocompatibility complex including HLA-B and HLA-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, J. M. M.; Walker, N. M.; Clayton, D.; Todd, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim Until recently, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II-independent associations with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) region were not adequately characterized owing to insufficient map coverage, inadequate statistical approaches and strong linkage disequilibrium spanning the entire MHC. Here we test for HLA class II-independent associations in the MHC using fine mapping data generated by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC). Methods We have applied recursive partitioning to the modelling of the class II loci and used stepwise conditional logistic regression to test ~1534 loci between 29 and 34 Mb on chromosome 6p21, typed in 2240 affected sibpair (ASP) families. Results Preliminary analyses confirm that HLA-B (at 31.4 Mb), HLA-A (at 30.0 Mb) are associated with T1D independently of the class II genes HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 (P = 6.0 × 10−17 and 8.8 × 10−13, respectively). In addition, a second class II region of association containing the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs439121, and the class II locus HLA-DPB1, was identified as a T1D susceptibility effect which is independent of HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-B (P = 9.2 × 10−8). A younger age-at-diagnosis of T1D was found for HLA-B*39 (P = 7.6 × 10−6), and HLA-B*38 was protective for T1D. Conclusions These analyses in the T1DGC families replicate our results obtained previously in ~2000 cases and controls and 850 families. Taking both studies together, there is evidence for four T1D-associated regions at 30.0 Mb (HLA-A), 31.4 Mb (HLA-B), 32.5 Mb (rs9268831/HLA-DRA) and 33.2 Mb (rs439121/HLA-DPB1) that are independent of HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQB1. Neither study found evidence of independent associations at HLA-C, HLA-DQA1 loci nor in the UBD/MAS1L or ITPR3 gene regions. These studies show that to find true class II-independent effects, large, well-powered sample collections are required and be genotyped with a dense map of markers. In addition, a robust

  12. The impact of sex-role reversal on the diversity of the major histocompatibility complex: Insights from the seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Anthony B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both natural and sexual selection are thought to influence genetic diversity, but the study of the relative importance of these two factors on ecologically-relevant traits has traditionally focused on species with conventional sex-roles, with male-male competition and female-based mate choice. With its high variability and significance in both immune function and olfactory-mediated mate choice, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC/MH is an ideal system in which to evaluate the relative contributions of these two selective forces to genetic diversity. Intrasexual competition and mate choice are both reversed in sex-role reversed species, and sex-related differences in the detection and use of MH-odor cues are expected to influence the intensity of sexual selection in such species. The seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, has an exceptionally highly developed form of male parental care, with female-female competition and male mate choice. Results Here, we demonstrate that the sex-role reversed seahorse has a single MH class II beta-chain gene and that the diversity of the seahorse MHIIβ locus and its pattern of variation are comparable to those detected in species with conventional sex roles. Despite the presence of only a single gene copy, intralocus MHIIβ allelic diversity in this species exceeds that observed in species with multiple copies of this locus. The MHIIβ locus of the seahorse exhibits a novel expression domain in the male brood pouch. Conclusions The high variation found at the seahorse MHIIβ gene indicates that sex-role reversed species are capable of maintaining the high MHC diversity typical in most vertebrates. Whether such species have evolved the capacity to use MH-odor cues during mate choice is presently being investigated using mate choice experiments. If this possibility can be rejected, such systems would offer an exceptional opportunity to study the effects of natural selection in isolation

  13. High-density SNP screening of the major histocompatibility complex in systemic lupus erythematosus demonstrates strong evidence for independent susceptibility regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa F Barcellos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial genetic contribution to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE risk is conferred by major histocompatibility complex (MHC gene(s on chromosome 6p21. Previous studies in SLE have lacked statistical power and genetic resolution to fully define MHC influences. We characterized 1,610 Caucasian SLE cases and 1,470 parents for 1,974 MHC SNPs, the highly polymorphic HLA-DRB1 locus, and a panel of ancestry informative markers. Single-marker analyses revealed strong signals for SNPs within several MHC regions, as well as with HLA-DRB1 (global p = 9.99 x 10(-16. The most strongly associated DRB1 alleles were: *0301 (odds ratio, OR = 2.21, p = 2.53 x 10(-12, *1401 (OR = 0.50, p = 0.0002, and *1501 (OR = 1.39, p = 0.0032. The MHC region SNP demonstrating the strongest evidence of association with SLE was rs3117103, with OR = 2.44 and p = 2.80 x 10(-13. Conditional haplotype and stepwise logistic regression analyses identified strong evidence for association between SLE and the extended class I, class I, class III, class II, and the extended class II MHC regions. Sequential removal of SLE-associated DRB1 haplotypes revealed independent effects due to variation within OR2H2 (extended class I, rs362521, p = 0.006, CREBL1 (class III, rs8283, p = 0.01, and DQB2 (class II, rs7769979, p = 0.003, and rs10947345, p = 0.0004. Further, conditional haplotype analyses demonstrated that variation within MICB (class I, rs3828903, p = 0.006 also contributes to SLE risk independent of HLA-DRB1*0301. Our results for the first time delineate with high resolution several MHC regions with independent contributions to SLE risk. We provide a list of candidate variants based on biologic and functional considerations that may be causally related to SLE risk and warrant further investigation.

  14. HIV Controllers Exhibit Enhanced Frequencies of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Tetramer+Gag-Specific CD4+T Cells in Chronic Clade C HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Faatima; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Porichis, Filippos; Mewalal, Nikoshia; Pretorius, Karyn; Ismail, Nasreen; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Carrington, Mary; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Ndhlovu, Zaza M

    2017-04-01

    Immune control of viral infections is heavily dependent on helper CD4 + T cell function. However, the understanding of the contribution of HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses to immune protection against HIV-1, particularly in clade C infection, remains incomplete. Recently, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II tetramers have emerged as a powerful tool for interrogating antigen-specific CD4 + T cells without relying on effector functions. Here, we defined the MHC class II alleles for immunodominant Gag CD4 + T cell epitopes in clade C virus infection, constructed MHC class II tetramers, and then used these to define the magnitude, function, and relation to the viral load of HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses in a cohort of untreated HIV clade C-infected persons. We observed significantly higher frequencies of MHC class II tetramer-positive CD4 + T cells in HIV controllers than progressors ( P = 0.0001), and these expanded Gag-specific CD4 + T cells in HIV controllers showed higher levels of expression of the cytolytic proteins granzymes A and B. Importantly, targeting of the immunodominant Gag41 peptide in the context of HLA class II DRB1*1101 was associated with HIV control ( r = -0.5, P = 0.02). These data identify an association between HIV-specific CD4 + T cell targeting of immunodominant Gag epitopes and immune control, particularly the contribution of a single class II MHC-peptide complex to the immune response against HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, these results highlight the advantage of the use of class II tetramers in evaluating HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses in natural infections. IMPORTANCE Increasing evidence suggests that virus-specific CD4 + T cells contribute to the immune-mediated control of clade B HIV-1 infection, yet there remains a relative paucity of data regarding the role of HIV-specific CD4 + T cells in shaping adaptive immune responses in individuals infected with clade C, which is responsible for the majority of HIV

  15. Linking pig-tailed macaque major histocompatibility complex class I haplotypes and cytotoxic T lymphocyte escape mutations in simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooneratne, Shayarana L; Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Diako; Bohn, Patrick S; Wiseman, Roger W; O'Connor, David H; Davenport, Miles P; Kent, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    The influence of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) alleles on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diversity in humans has been well characterized at the population level. MHC-I alleles likely affect viral diversity in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) model, but this is poorly characterized. We studied the evolution of SIV in pig-tailed macaques with a range of MHC-I haplotypes. SIV(mac251) genomes were amplified from the plasma of 44 pig-tailed macaques infected with SIV(mac251) at 4 to 10 months after infection and characterized by Illumina deep sequencing. MHC-I typing was performed on cellular RNA using Roche/454 pyrosequencing. MHC-I haplotypes and viral sequence polymorphisms at both individual mutations and groups of mutations spanning 10-amino-acid segments were linked using in-house bioinformatics pipelines, since cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape can occur at different amino acids within the same epitope in different animals. The approach successfully identified 6 known CTL escape mutations within 3 Mane-A1*084-restricted epitopes. The approach also identified over 70 new SIV polymorphisms linked to a variety of MHC-I haplotypes. Using functional CD8 T cell assays, we confirmed that one of these associations, a Mane-B028 haplotype-linked mutation in Nef, corresponded to a CTL epitope. We also identified mutations associated with the Mane-B017 haplotype that were previously described to be CTL epitopes restricted by Mamu-B*017:01 in rhesus macaques. This detailed study of pig-tailed macaque MHC-I genetics and SIV polymorphisms will enable a refined level of analysis for future vaccine design and strategies for treatment of HIV infection. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes select for virus escape mutants of HIV and SIV, and this limits the effectiveness of vaccines and immunotherapies against these viruses. Patterns of immune escape variants are similar in HIV type 1-infected human subjects that

  16. HIV controllers exhibit enhanced frequencies of major histocompatibility complex class II tetramer+ Gag-specific CD4+ T cells in chronic clade C HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laher, Faatima; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Porichis, Filippos

    2017-01-01

    = 0.0001), and these expanded Gag-specific CD4+ T cells in HIV controllers showed higher levels of expression of the cytolytic proteins granzymes A and B. Importantly, targeting of the immunodominant Gag41 peptide in the context of HLA class II DRB1*1101 was associated with HIV control (r = -0.5, P......Immune control of viral infections is heavily dependent on helper CD4+ T cell function. However, the understanding of the contribution of HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses to immune protection against HIV-1, particularly in clade C infection, remains incomplete. Recently, major histocompatibility......, and then used these to define the magnitude, function, and relation to the viral load of HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses in a cohort of untreated HIV clade C-infected persons. We observed significantly higher frequencies of MHC class II tetramer-positive CD4+ T cells in HIV controllers than progressors (P...

  17. Histocompatibility testing after fifty years of transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Hooi Sian; Leffell, Mary S

    2011-06-30

    Histocompatibility testing has been used in support of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for over fifty years and transplantation has clearly served as a major stimulus for interest in the human major histocompatibility complex, the HLA system. Until the 1990s, typing and definition of antibodies to HLA antigens was performed primarily by serologic techniques using cell-based assays. Two major technological advances have greatly increased knowledge of HLA alleles and HLA-specific antibodies, namely the introduction of DNA based molecular typing and solid phase immunoassays using purified HLA antigens as targets. By virtue of these advances, the number of recognized HLA alleles has increased from a few hundred to greater than 6000 and definition of the specificities of antibodies to HLA antigens is now possible at the level of individual epitopes. The technological advancements have also raised new challenges. The vast and ever increasing number of HLA alleles has resulted in ambiguities in allele assignments which confound matching for hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Similarly, the ability to detect extremely low levels of HLA-specific antibodies has raised questions about whether such low levels are clinically relevant. Next generation DNA sequencing methods likely will offer the solution to many of the HLA typing ambiguities and future studies on the nature of both HLA and non-HLA-specific antibodies will clarify their impact on transplant outcomes. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*1402 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pravin [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Thielallee 73, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Merino, Elena; López de Castro, José A. [Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Volz, Armin; Ziegler, Andreas [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Thielallee 73, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Saenger, Wolfram, E-mail: saenger@chemie.fu-berlin.de [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara, E-mail: saenger@chemie.fu-berlin.de [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Thielallee 73, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*1402 in complex with two peptides is reported. The product of the human major histocompatibility (HLA) class I allele HLA-B*1402 only differs from that of allele HLA-B*1403 at amino-acid position 156 of the heavy chain (Leu in HLA-B*1402 and Arg in HLA-B*1403). However, both subtypes are known to be differentially associated with the inflammatory rheumatic disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in black populations in Cameroon and Togo. HLA-B*1402 is not associated with AS, in contrast to HLA-B*1403, which is associated with this disease in the Togolese population. The products of these alleles can present peptides with Arg at position 2, a feature shared by a small group of other HLA-B antigens, including HLA-B*2705, the prototypical AS-associated subtype. Complexes of HLA-B*1402 with a viral peptide (RRRWRRLTV, termed pLMP2) and a self-peptide (IRAAPPPLF, termed pCatA) were prepared and were crystallized using polyethylene glycol as precipitant. The complexes crystallized in space groups P2{sub 1} (pLMP2) and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pCatA) and diffracted synchrotron radiation to 2.55 and 1.86 Å resolution, respectively. Unambiguous solutions for both data sets were obtained by molecular replacement using a peptide-complexed HLA-B*2705 molecule (PDB code) as a search model.

  19. Detection of aberrant transcription of major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation genes in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia identifies HLA-DOA mRNA as a prognostic factor for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souwer, Yuri; Chamuleau, Martine E D; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Tolosa, Eva; Jorritsma, Tineke; Muris, Jettie J F; Dinnissen-van Poppel, Marion J; Snel, Sander N; van de Corput, Lisette; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Meijer, Chris J L M; Neefjes, Jacques J; Marieke van Ham, S

    2009-05-01

    In human B cells, effective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-antigen presentation depends not only on MHC class II, but also on the invariant chain (CD74 or Ii), HLA-DM (DM) and HLA-DO (DO), the chaperones regulating the antigen loading process of MHC class II molecules. We analysed immediate ex vivo expression of HLA-DR (DR), CD74, DM and DO in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated a highly significant upregulation of DRA, CD74, DMB, DOA and DOB mRNA in purified malignant cells compared to B cells from healthy donors. The increased mRNA levels were not translated into enhanced protein levels but could reflect aberrant transcriptional regulation. Indeed, upregulation of DRA, DMB, DOA and DOB mRNA correlated with enhanced expression of class II transactivator (CIITA). In-depth analysis of the various CIITA transcripts demonstrated a significant increased activity of the interferon-gamma-inducible promoter CIITA-PIV in B-CLL. Comparison of the aberrant mRNA levels with clinical outcome identified DOA mRNA as a prognostic indicator for survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that the prognostic value of DOA mRNA was independent of the mutational status of the IGHV genes. Thus, aberrant transcription of DOA forms a novel and additional prognostic indicator for survival in B-CLL.

  20. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules with super-enhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and non-specifically activate cytotoxic T lymphocytes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Linda; Clement, Matthew; Lissina, Anna; Edwards, Emily S. J.; Ladell, Kristin; Ekeruche, Julia; Hewitt, Rachel E.; Laugel, Bruno; Gostick, Emma; Cole, David K.; Debets, Reno; Berrevoets, Cor; Miles, John J.; Burrows, Scott R.; Price, David A.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2010-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are essential for effective immune defence against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTL recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Antigen recognition involves the binding of both T cell receptor (TCR) and CD8 co-receptor to a single ligand (pMHCI). The TCR/pMHCI interaction confers antigen specificity, whereas the pMHCI/CD8 interaction mediates enhanced sensitivity to antigen. Striking biophysical differences exist between the TCR/pMHCI and pMHCI/CD8 interactions; indeed, the pMHCI/CD8 interaction can be >100-fold weaker than the cognate TCR/pMHCI interaction. Here, we show that increasing the strength of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction by ~15-fold results in non-specific, cognate antigen-independent pMHCI tetramer binding at the cell surface. Furthermore, pMHCI molecules with super-enhanced affinity for CD8 activate CTL in the absence of a specific TCR/pMHCI interaction to elicit a full range of effector functions, including cytokine/chemokine release, degranulation and proliferation. Thus, the low solution binding affinity of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction is essential for the maintenance of CTL antigen specificity. PMID:20190139

  1. Clinical Differences between Men and Women with Psoriatic Arthritis: Relevance of the Analysis of Genes and Polymorphisms in the Major Histocompatibility Complex Region and of the Age at Onset of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Queiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that males with spondyloarthritis tend to suffer from more severe spinal disease while females are more likely to have peripheral joint involvement. Nevertheless, gender-related differences have not been thoroughly explored in psoriatic arthritis (PsA. In PsA, males accumulate more peripheral and axial joint damage compared to women. However, it is not clear whether these findings are secondary to differences in occupational physical activity, hormonal changes, or other factors. The present study analyzed the differences in clinical expression of PsA between men and women. We have also evaluated the possible existence of gender-linked differences in the distribution of genes and polymorphisms within the major histocompatibility complex and whether patients’ age at the onset of psoriasis established any differences in these aspects. Women suffered more polyarthritis, greater functional impairment, and a larger number of swollen joints during followup. We appreciated a differential expression of certain MHC genes according to gender and age at onset of psoriasis. Our results point to the need to include patient’s age at the onset of psoriasis and gender as key stratification elements in future studies of genetic associations in PsA.

  2. Structure of a SARS coronavirus-derived peptide bound to the human major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-B*1501

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Gustav; Kristensen, Ole; Kastrup, Jette S

    2008-01-01

    , the crystal structure of HLA-B*1501 in complex with a SARS coronavirus-derived nonapeptide (VQQESSFVM) has been determined at high resolution (1.87 A). The peptide is deeply anchored in the B and F pockets, but with the Glu4 residue pointing away from the floor in the peptide-binding groove, making...

  3. The human {alpha}2(XI) collagen gene (COL11A2): Completion of coding information, identification of the promoter sequence, and precise localization within the major histocompatibility complex reveal overlap with the KE5 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lui, V.C.H.; Ng, Ling Jim; Sat, E.W.Y.; Cheah, K.S.E. [Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    1996-03-05

    Type XI collagen, a fibril-forming collagen, is important for the integrity and development of the skeleton because mutations in the genes encoding its consituent {alpha} chains have been found in some osteochondrodysplasias. We provide data that complete information for the coding sequence of human {alpha}2(XI) procollagen, with details of the promoter region and intron-exon organization at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene (COL11A2), including the transcription start and polyadenylation sites. COL11A2 is 30.5 kb with a minimum of 62 exons, differing from other reported fibrillar collagen genes because the amino propeptide is encoded by 14 not 5 to 8 exons. But exon numbers for the carboxy propeptide and 3{prime}-untranslated region are conserved. The promoter region of COL11A2 lacks a TATA box but is GC-rich with two potential SP1 binding sites. Mouse {alpha}2(XI) collagen mRNAs undergo complex alternative splicing involving three amino-terminal propeptide exons but only one of these has been reported for COL11A2. We have located these missing human exons and have identified splice signals that point to additional splice variants. We have precisely mapped COL11A2 within the major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6. The retinoid X receptor {beta} (RXR{beta}) gene is located 1.1 kb upstream of COL11A2. KE5, previously thought to be a distinct transcribed gene sequence, was mapped within COL11A2 in the alternatively spliced region, raising the question whether KE5 and COL11A2 are separate genes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Association of de novo human leukocyte antigen and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene-A antibodies and proteinuria with graft survival 5 years after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L-W; Peng, Z-G; Xian, W-H; Cui, X-Q; Sun, H-B; Li, E-G; Geng, L-N; Zhao, P; Tian, J

    2013-11-01

    Association of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene-A (MICA) antibodies and proteinuria with graft survival 5 years after renal transplantation. De novo presence of HLA and MICA antibodies after renal transplantation is associated with poor graft survival. Proteinuria after transplantation is also considered a risk factor for premature graft loss. In this study, we investigated the association of de novo HLA and MICA antibodies on proteinuria after renal transplantation and the association of proteinuria and de novo antibodies with graft survival. We enrolled 275 patients without preexisting HLA and MICA antibodies followed for >5 years after renal transplantation. All donor organs were from living-related donors or from an organ donation program. HLA and MICA antibodies were detected by the Luminex method. Patients with proteinuria (>150 mg/d) underwent intermittent 24-hour proteinuria examination. The frequencies of de novo HLA and MICA antibody 5 years after transplantation were 25.8% and 12%, respectively. In total, 26.5% of patients had proteinuria at the 5-year follow-up. De novo HLA antibody was associated with increased proteinuria after transplantation (relative risk, 3.12). HLA antibody and proteinuria were both associated with poor 5-year graft survival (P = .027 and P = .006, respectively). De novo HLA and MICA antibodies and proteinuria after renal transplantation are all associated with poor graft survival. De novo HLA antibody is independent risk factor for posttransplant proteinuria, and proteinuria affects the association of de novo antibodies with decreased graft survival after transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B expression in tumor tissue and serum of pancreatic cancer: Role of uric acid accumulation in gemcitabine-induced MICA/B expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaufman Howard L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B are two stress-inducible ligands that bind the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating the cyotoxicity of NK and T cells. In this study, we sought to study MICA/B expression in pancreatic cancer and to determine whether and how genotoxic drugs such as gemcitabine can affect MICA/B expression and natural killer cytotoxity. Methods Seven pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for MICA/B expression by flow cytometry and for their sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing by a 51Cr release assay. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera of pancreatic cancer was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC and ELISA, respectively. Results Two MICA/B-positive cell lines were sensitive to the cytotoxic activity of NK-92 cells. Other two MICA/B-positive cell lines and three MICA/B-negative cell lines were resistant to NK-92 cell killing. MICA/B expression was positive in 17 of 25 (68% pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Serum MICA/B levels were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas but did not correlate with the stage of pancreatic cancer and patient survival. Gemcitabine therapy led to increased serum MICA levels in 6 of 10 patients with detectable serum MICA. Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase that converts xanthine to uric acid, blocked uric acid production, MICA/B expression, and sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing toward a PANC-1 cancer cell line exposed to radiation and two genotoxic drugs, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. Conclusions The levels of MICA/B expression in serum and tissue of pancreatic cancer are elevated. DNA damage-induced MICA/B expression is mediated through increased uric acid production.

  6. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Transactivator CIITA Is a Viral Restriction Factor That Targets Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax-1 Function and Inhibits Viral Replication▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Giovanna; Forlani, Greta; Andresen, Vibeke; Turci, Marco; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Franchini, Genoveffa; Poli, Guido; Accolla, Roberto S.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Since the viral transactivator Tax-1 is a major player in T-cell transformation, targeting Tax-1 protein is regarded as a possible strategy to arrest viral replication and to counteract neoplastic transformation. We demonstrate that CIITA, the master regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II gene transcription, inhibits HTLV-1 replication by blocking the transactivating function of Tax-1 both when exogenously transfected in 293T cells and when endogenously expressed by a subset of U937 promonocytic cells. Tax-1 and CIITA physically interact in vivo via the first 108 amino acids of Tax-1 and two CIITA adjacent regions (amino acids 1 to 252 and 253 to 410). Interestingly, only CIITA 1-252 mediated Tax-1 inhibition, in agreement with the fact that CIITA residues from positions 64 to 124 were required to block Tax-1 transactivation. CIITA inhibitory action on Tax-1 correlated with the nuclear localization of CIITA and was independent of the transcription factor NF-YB, previously involved in CIITA-mediated inhibition of Tax-2 of HTLV-2. Instead, CIITA severely impaired the physical and functional interaction of Tax-1 with the cellular coactivators p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1), which are required for the optimal activation of HTLV-1 promoter. Accordingly, the overexpression of PCAF, CREB, and ATF1 restored Tax-1-dependent transactivation of the viral long-terminal-repeat promoter inhibited by CIITA. These findings strongly support our original observation that CIITA, beside increasing the antigen-presenting function for pathogen antigens, acts as an endogenous restriction factor against human retroviruses by blocking virus replication and spreading. PMID:21813598

  7. Major histocompatibility complex class II transactivator CIITA is a viral restriction factor that targets human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax-1 function and inhibits viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Giovanna; Forlani, Greta; Andresen, Vibeke; Turci, Marco; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Franchini, Genoveffa; Poli, Guido; Accolla, Roberto S

    2011-10-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Since the viral transactivator Tax-1 is a major player in T-cell transformation, targeting Tax-1 protein is regarded as a possible strategy to arrest viral replication and to counteract neoplastic transformation. We demonstrate that CIITA, the master regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II gene transcription, inhibits HTLV-1 replication by blocking the transactivating function of Tax-1 both when exogenously transfected in 293T cells and when endogenously expressed by a subset of U937 promonocytic cells. Tax-1 and CIITA physically interact in vivo via the first 108 amino acids of Tax-1 and two CIITA adjacent regions (amino acids 1 to 252 and 253 to 410). Interestingly, only CIITA 1-252 mediated Tax-1 inhibition, in agreement with the fact that CIITA residues from positions 64 to 124 were required to block Tax-1 transactivation. CIITA inhibitory action on Tax-1 correlated with the nuclear localization of CIITA and was independent of the transcription factor NF-YB, previously involved in CIITA-mediated inhibition of Tax-2 of HTLV-2. Instead, CIITA severely impaired the physical and functional interaction of Tax-1 with the cellular coactivators p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1), which are required for the optimal activation of HTLV-1 promoter. Accordingly, the overexpression of PCAF, CREB, and ATF1 restored Tax-1-dependent transactivation of the viral long-terminal-repeat promoter inhibited by CIITA. These findings strongly support our original observation that CIITA, beside increasing the antigen-presenting function for pathogen antigens, acts as an endogenous restriction factor against human retroviruses by blocking virus replication and spreading.

  8. IFN-τ Mediated Control of Bovine Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression and Function via the Regulation of bta-miR-148b/152 in Bovine Endometrial Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichong Wu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IFN-τ, a type I interferon produced by the trophoblasts of ruminants, has various important immune functions, including effects on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I (MHC-I. A previous study has reported that IFN-τ promotes the expression of MHC-I molecules on endometrial cells. However, the immunological mechanisms by which IFN-τ regulates MHC-I molecules remain unknown. Here, we investigated which microRNA (miRNAs may be involved in the regulation of MHC-I molecule expression and function in bovine endometrial epithelial cells (bEECs. By using TargetScan 6.2 and http://www.microRNA.org, two miRNAs were suggested to target the 3′UTR of the bovine MHC-I heavy chain: bta-miR-148b and bta-miR-152. Dual luciferase reporter and miRNA mimic/inhibitor assays suggested that bta-miR-148b/152 were negatively correlated with bovine MHC-I heavy chain genes. The function of the MHC-I heavy chain was then investigated using qRT-PCR, ELISA, western blotting, immunofluorescence, and RNA interference assays in primary bEECs and an endometrial epithelial cell line (BEND. The results demonstrated that bta-miR-148b/152 could promote TLR4-triggered inflammatory responses by targeting the bovine MHC-I heavy chain, and the MHC-I molecule negatively regulated TLR4-induced inflammatory reactions may through the Fps-SHP-2 pathway. Our discovery offers novel insight into negative regulation of the TLR4 pathway and elucidates the mechanism by which bovine MHC-I molecules control congenital inflammatory reactions.

  9. The simultaneous isolation of multiple high and low frequent T-cell populations from donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells using the major histocompatibility complex I-Streptamer isolation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roex, Marthe C J; Hageman, Lois; Heemskerk, Matthias T; Veld, Sabrina A J; van Liempt, Ellis; Kester, Michel G D; Germeroth, Lothar; Stemberger, Christian; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Jedema, Inge

    2018-02-12

    Adoptive transfer of donor-derived T cells can be applied to improve immune reconstitution in immune-compromised patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The separation of beneficial T cells from potentially harmful T cells can be achieved by using the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-Streptamer isolation technology, which has proven its feasibility for the fast and pure isolation of T-cell populations with a single specificity. We have analyzed the feasibility of the simultaneous isolation of multiple antigen-specific T-cell populations in one procedure by combining different MHC I-Streptamers. First, the effect of combining different amounts of MHC I-Streptamers used in the isolation procedure on the isolation efficacy of target antigen-specific T cells and on the number of off-target co-isolated contaminating cells was assessed. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in large-scale validation procedures targeting both high and low frequent T-cell populations using the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant CliniMACS Plus device. T-cell products targeting up to 24 different T-cell populations could be isolated in one, simultaneous MHC I-Streptamer procedure, by adjusting the amount of MHC I- Streptamers per target antigen-specific T-cell population. Concurrently, the co-isolation of potentially harmful contaminating T cells remained below our safety limit. This technology allows the reproducible isolation of high and low frequent T-cell populations. However, the expected therapeutic relevance of direct clinical application without in vitro expansion of these low frequent T-cell populations is questionable. This study provides a feasible, fast and safe method for the generation of highly personalized MHC I-Streptamer isolated T-cell products for adoptive immunotherapy. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Susceptibility to HLA-DM Protein Is Determined by a Dynamic Conformation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecule Bound with Peptide*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Trenh, Peter; Guce, Abigail; Wieczorek, Marek; Lange, Sascha; Sticht, Jana; Jiang, Wei; Bylsma, Marissa; Mellins, Elizabeth D.; Freund, Christian; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-DM mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules during antigen presentation by a mechanism that remains unclear and controversial. Here, we investigated the sequence and structural determinants of HLA-DM interaction. Peptides interacting nonoptimally in the P1 pocket exhibited low MHCII binding affinity and kinetic instability and were highly susceptible to HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange. These changes were accompanied by conformational alterations detected by surface plasmon resonance, SDS resistance assay, antibody binding assay, gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, small angle x-ray scattering, and NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, all of those changes could be reversed by substitution of the P9 pocket anchor residue. Moreover, MHCII mutations outside the P1 pocket and the HLA-DM interaction site increased HLA-DM susceptibility. These results indicate that a dynamic MHCII conformational determinant rather than P1 pocket occupancy is the key factor determining susceptibility to HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange and provide a molecular mechanism for HLA-DM to efficiently target unstable MHCII-peptide complexes for editing and exchange those for more stable ones. PMID:25002586

  11. Susceptibility to HLA-DM protein is determined by a dynamic conformation of major histocompatibility complex class II molecule bound with peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Trenh, Peter; Guce, Abigail; Wieczorek, Marek; Lange, Sascha; Sticht, Jana; Jiang, Wei; Bylsma, Marissa; Mellins, Elizabeth D; Freund, Christian; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-08-22

    HLA-DM mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules during antigen presentation by a mechanism that remains unclear and controversial. Here, we investigated the sequence and structural determinants of HLA-DM interaction. Peptides interacting nonoptimally in the P1 pocket exhibited low MHCII binding affinity and kinetic instability and were highly susceptible to HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange. These changes were accompanied by conformational alterations detected by surface plasmon resonance, SDS resistance assay, antibody binding assay, gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, small angle x-ray scattering, and NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, all of those changes could be reversed by substitution of the P9 pocket anchor residue. Moreover, MHCII mutations outside the P1 pocket and the HLA-DM interaction site increased HLA-DM susceptibility. These results indicate that a dynamic MHCII conformational determinant rather than P1 pocket occupancy is the key factor determining susceptibility to HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange and provide a molecular mechanism for HLA-DM to efficiently target unstable MHCII-peptide complexes for editing and exchange those for more stable ones. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Major histocompatibility complex of the dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. Vriesendorp (Huibert)

    1973-01-01

    textabstractNowadays everybody has become familair with the procedure of blood transfusion. It is not always appreciated, however, that transfusions are equivalent to transplantations. This latter term is commonly reserved for the more spectacular transplantations of kidney, liver or heart, in which

  13. HLA: The Major Histocompatibility Complex of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    purpura . This susceptibility probably Australia, the haplotype HLA-Bw22, SB45 was found also relates to defective handling of immune com- to be increased...for pathogens. For instance, the Duffy red cell iae and other enteric bacteria (Shigella, Yersinia) antigen acts as a receptor for malarial parasites

  14. Correlation analysis of the HLA-DPB1*05:01 and BTNL2 genes within the histocompatibility complex region with a clinical phenotype of psoriasis vulgaris in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huimin; Huang, Yong; Wu, Juan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ye, Lei; Huang, Hequn; Wang, Wenjun; Zhen, Qi; Wu, Jing; Qian, Wenjun; Cheng, Hui; Fan, Xing; Zhang, Xuejun

    2017-09-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is known to be highly polymorphic and has been identified to be associated with numerous diseases. The HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 genes were associated with psoriasis for the first time. The present study aims to investigate the relevance of the HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 genes with respect to clinical phenotypes of psoriasis vulgaris (PV). To investigate whether the HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 polymorphisms were associated with clinical phenotypes of PV in Chinese Han population, we conducted an analysis in case-controls and case-only subjects (9906 controls and 8744 cases) via MHC targeted sequencing stratified analysis. In cases and controls, analysis showed that the genotype of HLA-DPB1*05:01 was associated with type of guttate [p = 3.914 × 10-2 , odds ratio (OR = 0.9335)] and northern region (p = 1.182 × 10-3 , OR = 0.9108). In the case-only analysis, the genotype of HLA-DPB1*05:01 was significantly correlated with geographical region (p = 1.36 × 10-3 , OR = 1.134). In cases and controls, analysis showed that the genotype of BTNL2 (rs 41355746) was associated with being male (p = 2.563 × 10-2 , OR = 0.8897), early-onset (p = 9.399 × 10-3 , OR = 0.8856), guttate (p = 2.469 × 10-2 , OR = 0.8558) and family history (p = 1.51 × 10-4 , OR = 0.772). In the case-only analysis, the genotype of BTNL2 (rs41355746) was significantly correlated with family history (p = 1.768 × 10-3 , OR = 0.757) and age of onset (p = 3.818 × 10-2 , OR = 1.195). The results of the present study indicate that the HLA-DPB1*05:01 gene was associated with the geographical region of PV and the BTNL2 gene was significantly associated with family history and age of onset of PV. In conclusion, the HLA-DPB1*05:01 and BTNL2 genes might be responsible for the complicacy of clinical features. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci with the B (MHC) and C histocompatibility loci in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachý, J; Korec, E; Hlozánek, I; Zdĕnková, E

    1985-01-01

    Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci and histocompatibility loci B (MHC) and C has been demonstrated serologically in backcross progeny of inbred lines of chickens. The endogenous viral locus linked to the B complex is the first case of the localization of an endogenous viral gene to the microchromosomes in chickens.

  16. Genetics of graft-versus-host disease, I. A locus on chromosome 1 influences development of acute graft-versus-host disease in a major histocompatibility complex mismatched murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R D; Dobkins, J A; Harper, J M; Slayback, D L

    1999-02-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is the major complication occurring after bone marrow transplantation. The severity of GVHD varies widely, with this variation generally being attributed to variation in the degree of disparity between host and donor for minor histocompatibility antigens. However, it is also possible that other forms of polymorphism, such as polymorphisms in immune effector molecules, might play a significant role in determining GVHD severity. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we are studying the genetic factors that influence GVHD development in a murine model. We here report the first results of this analysis, which demonstrate that a locus on Chromosome 1 of the mouse, and possibly also a locus on Chromosome 4, exert considerable influence over the development of one aspect of acute GVHD - splenomegaly - in a parent-->F1 murine model. These results demonstrate that non-MHC genes can exert quite significant effects on the development of GVHD-associated pathology and that gene mapping can be used as a tool to identify these loci. Further analysis of such loci will allow identification of the mechanism whereby they influence GVHD and may lead in the future to improved selection of donors for human bone marrow transplantation.

  17. Participation of L3T4 in T cell activation in the absence of class II major histocompatibility complex antigens. Inhibition by anti-L3T4 antibodies is a function both of epitope density and mode of presentation of anti-receptor antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Fazekas de St Groth, B

    1987-01-01

    The recognition of many class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-associated antigens by T cells requires the participation of the L3T4 molecule. It has been proposed that this molecule acts to stabilize low affinity binding to antigen in association with MHC and thereby increases the avidity...... of T cell/antigen interactions. By using antibodies against the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to activate T cells, thereby circumventing the requirement for antigen presenting cells and MHC-associated antigen, we have been able to study the function of L3T4 in the absence of class II MHC. We have used...... two monoclonal antibodies, KJ16-133.18 and F23.1, that recognize a determinant encoded by the T cell receptor V beta 8 gene family. These antibodies were used to select two clones of T cells with surface phenotype Thy-1.2+, L3T4+, Lyt-2-, KJ16-133.18+, F23.1+, IA-, IE-. One of these clones (E9.D4...

  18. Major histocompatibility (MH) class II ß gene polymorphism influences disease resistance of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakus, K.L.; Wiegertjes, G.F.; Jurecka, P.M.; Walker, P.D.; Pilarczyk, A.; Irnazarow, I.

    2009-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are crucial elements of adaptive immunity. High polymorphism renders the MHC genes highly suitable for studies on association with disease resistance. In common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), there are two paralogous groups of MH class II B genes,

  19. X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals from the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2706 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawacka, Anna [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050 Berlin (Germany); Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie/Kristallographie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ziegler@charite.de [Institut für Immungenetik, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-12-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*2706 in complex with two peptides is reported. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles HLA-B*2704 and HLA-B*2706 show an ethnically restricted distribution and are differentially associated with ankylosing spondylitis, with HLA-B*2706 lacking association with this autoimmune disease. However, the products of the two alleles differ by only two amino acids, at heavy-chain residues 114 (His in HLA-B*2704; Asp in HLA-B*2706) and 116 (Asp in HLA-B*2704; Tyr in HLA-B*2706). Both residues could be involved in contacting amino acids of a bound peptide, suggesting that peptides presented by these subtypes play a role in disease pathogenesis. Two HLA-B*2706–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG as precipitant. Data sets were collected to resolutions of 2.70 Å (viral peptide pLMP2, RRRWRRLTV; space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}) and 1.83 Å (self-peptide pVIPR, RRKWRRWHL; space group P2{sub 1}). Using HLA-B*2705 complexed with the pGR peptide (RRRWHRWRL) as a search model, unambiguous molecular-replacement solutions were found for both HLA-B*2706 complexes.

  20. Identification of IκBL as the Second Major Histocompatibility Complex–Linked Susceptibility Locus for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Koichi; Makino, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Takaki, Asumi; Nagatsuka, Yumie; Ota, Masao; Tamiya, Gen; Kimura, Akinori; Bahram, Seiamak; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2002-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease with a complex etiology in which environmental factors within a genetically susceptible host maneuver the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system toward recognition of autoantigens. This ultimately leads to joint destruction and clinical symptomatology. Despite the identification of a number of disease-susceptibility regions across the genome, RA’s major genetic linkage remains with the major histocompatibility complex (M...

  1. Extremely high major histocompatibility complex class IIb gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Identifying the processes that maintain genetic diversity within and among populations is a central goal of mod- ern evolutionary genetics. So far, the studies on genetic diversity have mainly focussed on neutral DNA markers, such as mtDNA and microsatellites (Xu et al. 2010). While these markers are very informative in ...

  2. Major Histocompatibility complex-DMB allelic diversity in old and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Immunogenetics and Molecular Diagnosis Unit. Centro Nacional de Microbiología. Instituto de Salud. Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. 3Dept. Inmunología Animal .... the acidic pH of the MIIC and facilitating a subsequent loading until a high-stability ... buffer -10 mM Tris pH 8.6, 140 mM NaC1, 1.5 mM MgC12, 0.5% NP-40) with.

  3. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A E; Skov, Svend; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    depending on the fine specificity of the anti-MHC-I antibodies, the context of CD8 ligation, the nature and cell cycle state of the MHC-I-expressing cell and the presence or absence of additional cellular or humoral stimulation. This paper reviews the biochemical, physiological and cellular events...

  4. Pituitary transplantation: cyclosporine enables transplantation across a minor histocompatibility barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipan, N B; Huang, S; Allen, G S

    1986-03-01

    Pituitary glands from neonatal donors were transplanted to the median eminence of hypophysectomized adult rats. Rats with transplants were then treated for 2 weeks with the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine. For 5 weeks thereafter, blood was drawn at regular intervals for determination of serum thyroxine, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone. Cyclosporine-treated recipients of grafts with minor histocompatibility differences had normal levels of thyroxine and prolactin, whereas untreated animals did not. In addition, the treated animals responded to oophorectomy with a marked elevation in serum luteinizing hormone. This evidence indicates that cyclosporine enables successful transplantation across a minor histocompatibility barrier. It also suggests that these grafts interact with the hypothalamus. Transplantation across a major histocompatibility barrier was unsuccessful even in the presence of cyclosporine.

  5. IFN-induced modulation of histocompatibility antigens on human cells. Background, mechanisms and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Basse, P; Justesen, J

    1989-01-01

    IFN proteins are a family of lymphokines with anti-viral effects. Several other effects of IFNs have also been described, including enhancement of natural killer (NK) cell activity, enhancement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity, and enhancement of the expression of major histocompatibility complex...... to the classical anti-viral mechanism. This concept proposes that the MHC-enhancing effect of IFNs is a vital part of the immunological defense against virus infections and an integral part of the anti-viral effects of IFN proteins. Udgivelsesdato: 1988-Nov...

  6. New strategies in identification and quantification of minor histocompatibility antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Chopie

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of Minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) in the graft versus tumor is described about three decades ago. Nowadays, there are many evidences that, after HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) MiHA specific T cells mediate both graft versus leukemia

  7. Cyto- and histocompatibility of multilayered DNA-coatings on titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beucken, J. van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Vos, M.R.J.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA-containing biomaterial coatings offer potential beneficial effects for both soft and hard tissue implants because of the structural properties of DNA. In the current study, the aim was to assess the in vitro cyto- and in vivo histocompatibility of multilayered DNA-coatings generated using the

  8. Cyto- and histocompatibility of multilayered DNA-coatings on titanium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Vos, M.R-J.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA-containing biomaterial coatings offer potential beneficial effects for both soft and hard tissue implants because of the structural properties of DNA. In the current study, the aim was to assess the in vitro cyto- and in vivo histocompatibility of multilayered DNA-coatings generated using the

  9. Evolutionary Analysis of Minor Histocompatibility Genes In Hydra

    KAUST Repository

    Aalismail, Nojood

    2016-05-01

    Hydra is a simple freshwater solitary polyp used as a model system to study evolutionary aspects. The immune response of this organism has not been studied extensively and the immune response genes have not been identified and characterized. On the other hand, immune response has been investigated and genetic analysis has been initiated in other lower invertebrates. In the present study we took initiative to study the self/nonself recognition in hydra and its relation to the immune response. Moreover, performing phylogenetic analysis to look for annotated immune genes in hydra gave us a potential to analyze the expression of minor histocompatibility genes that have been shown to play a major role in grafting and transplantation in mammals. Here we obtained the cDNA library that shows expression of minor histocompatibility genes and confirmed that the annotated sequences in databases are actually present. In addition, grafting experiments suggested, although still preliminary, that homograft showed less rejection response than in heterograft. Involvement of possible minor histocompatibility gene orthologous in immune response was examined by qPCR.

  10. MH(2)c: Characterization of major histocompatibility α-helices - an information criterion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischenhuber, B; Frommlet, F; Schreiner, W; Knapp, B

    2012-07-01

    Toolbox and Statistic Toolbox of Matlab Nature of problem: Major histocompatibility (MH) proteins share a similar overall structure. However, identical MH alleles which present different peptides differ by subtle conformational alterations. One hypothesis is that such conformational differences could be another level of T cell regulation. By this software package we present a reliable and systematic way to compare different MH structures to each other. Solution method: We tested several fitting approaches on all available experimental crystal structures of MH to obtain an overall picture of how to describe MH helices. For this purpose we transformed all complexes into the same space and applied splines and polynomials of several degrees to them. To draw a general conclusion which method fits them best we employed the "corrected Akaike Information Criterion". The software is applicable for all kinds of helices of biomolecules. Running time: Depends on the data, for a single stationary structure the runtime should not exceed a few seconds.

  11. MH2c: Characterization of major histocompatibility α-helices - an information criterion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischenhuber, B.; Frommlet, F.; Schreiner, W.; Knapp, B.

    2012-07-01

    Matlab Nature of problem: Major histocompatibility (MH) proteins share a similar overall structure. However, identical MH alleles which present different peptides differ by subtle conformational alterations. One hypothesis is that such conformational differences could be another level of T cell regulation. By this software package we present a reliable and systematic way to compare different MH structures to each other. Solution method: We tested several fitting approaches on all available experimental crystal structures of MH to obtain an overall picture of how to describe MH helices. For this purpose we transformed all complexes into the same space and applied splines and polynomials of several degrees to them. To draw a general conclusion which method fits them best we employed the “corrected Akaike Information Criterion”. The software is applicable for all kinds of helices of biomolecules. Running time: Depends on the data, for a single stationary structure the runtime should not exceed a few seconds.

  12. Kinetics of antigenic peptide binding to the class II major histocompatibility molecule I-Ad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampé, R; McConnell, H M

    1991-06-01

    Using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy, we investigated the kinetics of fluorescent peptide reactions with detergent-solubilized I-Ad, a class II molecule of the mouse major histocompatibility complex. At pH 7.0 and 37 degrees C the half-time for the binding of a fluorescein-labeled synthetic peptide representing ovalbumin amino acids 323-339 [FOva-(323-339)Y] to I-Ad was 32 hr, independent of added fluorescent peptide concentration in the range 5-200 microM. Peptide exchange experiments were also carried out, where it was found that the half-time of FOva-(323-339)Y binding was equal to the half-time of dissociation of the Texas Red-labeled peptide TROva-(323-339)Y. These experiments show that slow peptide binding to class II major histocompatibility molecules may be limited by the slow dissociation of prebound peptides. Paradoxically, however, this kinetic behavior--a peptide concentration-insensitive on-reaction with a half-time for peptide binding approximately equal to the half-time for dissociation--can be modeled in more than one way. Models involving a kinetic intermediate are particularly attractive. The kinetics were significantly different at pH 5.0. The half-times for peptide binding and dissociation were approximately 7 times shorter than at pH 7.0. In addition the complex of the I-Ad alpha/beta heterodimer with FOva-(323-339)Y was unstable and dissociated into separate alpha and beta chains with a half-time of approximately 7 hr.

  13. Minor Histocompatibility Antigens and the Maternal Immune Response to the Fetus During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscheid, Caitlin; Petroff, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    The tolerance of the semiallogeneic fetus by the maternal immune system is an important area of research for understanding how the maternal and fetal systems interact during pregnancy to ensure a successful outcome. Several lines of research reveal that the maternal immune system can recognize and respond to fetal minor histocompatibility antigens during pregnancy. Reactions to these antigens arise because of allelic differences between the mother and fetus, and have been shown more broadly to play an important role in mediating transplantation outcomes. This review outlines the discovery of minor histocompatibility antigens and their importance in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, maternal T-cell responses to minor histocompatibility antigens during pregnancy, expression of minor histocompatibility antigens in the human placenta, and the potential involvement of minor histocompatibility antigens in the development and manifestation of pregnancy complications. PMID:23398025

  14. Identification of a Novel UTY‐Encoded Minor Histocompatibility Antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B. K.; Rasmussen, A. H.; Larsen, Malene Erup

    2012-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) encoded by the Y‐chromosome (H‐Y‐mHags) are known to play a pivotal role in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) involving female donors and male recipients. We present a new H‐Y‐mHag, YYNAFHWAI (UTY139–147), encoded by the UTY gene...... and presented by HLA‐A*24:02. Briefly, short peptide stretches encompassing multiple putative H‐Y‐mHags were designed using a bioinformatics predictor of peptide‐HLA binding, NetMHCpan. These peptides were used to screen for peptide‐specific HLA‐restricted T cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells...... obtained post‐HCT from male recipients of female donor grafts. In one of these recipients, a CD8+ T cell response was observed against a peptide stretch encoded by the UTY gene. Another bioinformatics tool, HLArestrictor, was used to identify the optimal peptide and HLA‐restriction element. Using peptide...

  15. O papel do complexo principal de histocompatibilidade na fisiologia da gravidez e na patogênese de complicações obstétricas Major histocompatibility complex: its role in the physiology of pregnancy and in the pathogenic mechanisms of obstetric complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem por objetivo discutir a estrutura e função dos Antígenos Leucocitários Humanos (HLA, seus métodos de detecção, nomenclatura e os mecanismos imunopatológicos que o associam com a fisiologia da gestação e morbidades obstétricas. Sabe-se que o equilíbrio imunológico entre mãe e concepto é imprescindível na manutenção da gravidez. Moléculas do HLA - notadamente o HLA-G expresso na interface materno-fetal - exercem função importante na tolerância imunológica materna, evitando rejeição fetal e algumas complicações obstétricas. Além disso, o HLA permeia diversas etapas do desenvolvimento conceptual como clivagem, formação do trofoblasto e implantação. Para revisão, foram pesquisados os bancos de dados MEDLINE e LILACS, utilizando os descritores: "HLA antigens"; "pregnancy"; "embryonic development"; "pregnancy complication"; "abortion, habitual"; "pre-eclampsia". O conhecimento sobre a influência do HLA na gravidez é necessário para melhor manejo da gestação e patologias obstétricas auto-imunes, favorecendo intervenções precoces e terapêutica específica, reduzindo a morbimortalidade materna e perinatal.The aim of this paper is to review Human Histocompatibility Antigens (HLA structure and function, its detection methods, nomenclature and pathogenic mechanisms associated with pregnancy physiology and obstetrics diseases. Immunological equilibrium between mother and conceptus is indispensable for the maintenance of pregnancy. Molecules from the HLA - mainly HLA-G expressed in the mother-fetus interface - fulfill an important function in maternal immune tolerance, contributing to avoid fetal rejection and obstetrical complications. In addition, HLA influences different stages of fetal development, such as embryonic cleavage, trophoblast, formation and implantation. For this review, were surveyed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases, using the following keywords: "HLA antigens", "pregnancy

  16. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L; Leo, Paul J; Pointon, Jenny J; Robinson, Philip C; Weisman, Michael H; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Haroon, Nigil; Mulero, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, C; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; de Bakker, Paul I W; Brown, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in

  17. Schizophrenia risk from complex variation of complement component 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sekar, Aswin; Bialas, Allison R.; de Rivera, Heather; Davis, Avery; Hammond, Timothy R.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Tooley, Katherine; Presumey, Jessy; Baum, Matthew; van Doren, Vanessa; Genovese, Giulio; Rose, Samuel A.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Daly, Mark J.; Carroll, Michael C.; Stevens, Beth; McCarroll, Steven A.; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T. R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Cairns, Murray J.; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C. K.; Chen, Ronald Y. L.; Chen, Eric Y. H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietiläinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Söderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H. M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Børglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable brain illness with unknown pathogenic mechanisms. Schizophrenia's strongest genetic association at a population level involves variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, but the genes and molecular mechanisms accounting for this have been challenging

  18. HapMap scanning of novel human minor histocompatibility antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Michi; Nannya, Yasuhito; Torikai, Hiroki; Kawase, Takakazu; Taura, Kenjiro; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Taro; Yazaki, Makoto; Morishima, Satoko; Tsujimura, Kunio; Miyamura, Koichi; Ito, Tetsuya; Togari, Hajime; Riddell, Stanley R; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Morishima, Yasuo; Takahashi, Toshitada; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Ogawa, Seishi; Akatsuka, Yoshiki

    2009-05-21

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) are molecular targets of allo-immunity associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and involved in graft-versus-host disease, but they also have beneficial antitumor activity. mHags are typically defined by host SNPs that are not shared by the donor and are immunologically recognized by cytotoxic T cells isolated from post-HSCT patients. However, the number of molecularly identified mHags is still too small to allow prospective studies of their clinical importance in transplantation medicine, mostly due to the lack of an efficient method for isolation. Here we show that when combined with conventional immunologic assays, the large data set from the International HapMap Project can be directly used for genetic mapping of novel mHags. Based on the immunologically determined mHag status in HapMap panels, a target mHag locus can be uniquely mapped through whole genome association scanning taking advantage of the unprecedented resolution and power obtained with more than 3 000 000 markers. The feasibility of our approach could be supported by extensive simulations and further confirmed by actually isolating 2 novel mHags as well as 1 previously identified example. The HapMap data set represents an invaluable resource for investigating human variation, with obvious applications in genetic mapping of clinically relevant human traits.

  19. Expressão do complexo de histocompatilidade principal de classe I (MHC I no sistema nervoso central: plasticidade sináptica e regeneração Expresión del complejo principal de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I en el sistema nervioso central: plasticidad sináptica y regeneración Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I in the central nervous system: role in synaptic plasticity and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Graciele Zanon

    2010-06-01

    consecuencia, con la recuperación funcional. Por consiguiente, estos nuevos aspectos sobre la función del MHC I en el SNC orientan nuevas investigaciones con miras a entender el papel del MHC I en las enfermedades neurológicas y a desarrollar nuevas estrategias terapéuticas.It has been recently demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex of class I (MHC I expressed in the central nervous system (CNS does not only function as a molecule of the immune system, but also plays a role in the synaptic plasticity. The expression of MHC I influences the intensity and selectivity of elimination of synapses apposed to neurons that were subjected to lesion, besides influencing the reactivity of neighboring glial cells. MHC I expression and the degree of synaptic rearrangement and glial response after injury correlate with differences in the regenerative potential and functional recovery of isogenic mice strains. In this way, the new aspects regarding MHC I functions in the CNS may guide further studies aiming at searching the involvement of MCH I in neurologic disorders, as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  20. Direct Gene Transfer with DNA-Liposome Complexes in Melanoma: Expression, Biologic Activity, and Lack of Toxicity in Humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gary J. Nabel; Elizabeth G. Nabel; Zhi-Yong Yang; Bernard A. Fox; Gregory E Plautz; Xiang Gao; Leaf Huang; Suyu Shu; David Gordon; Alfred E. Chang

    1993-01-01

    .... The gene encoding a foreign major histocompatibility complex protein, HLA-B7, was introduced into HLA-B7-negative patients with advanced melanoma by injection of DNA-liposome complexes in an effort...

  1. Expression of intercellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules and class II major histocompatibility antigens in human lungs: lack of influence by conditions of organ preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, S; Ritter, J H; Patterson, A; Ockner, D M; Sawa, H; Mohanakumar, T; Cooper, J D; Wick, M R

    1995-01-01

    The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and class II major histocompatibility complex antigens was studied in control lung tissue and preserved human donor lungs. The three controls were represented by wedge biopsy specimens taken from non-neoplastic lung surrounding bronchogenic carcinomas. Nine lungs were harvested from six brain-dead donors, flushed with Euro-Collins solution or low potassium-dextran-glucose solution, and stored at 1 degree C or 10 degrees C. Samples of the latter organs were taken at the time of surgical harvest (baseline) and after 2, 12, 24, and 48 hours of preservation time. Immunostains with monoclonal antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules were performed on all samples, and the relative presence of these determinants was evaluated. In both the controls and preserved lungs, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was intense in the septal capillary endothelium and alveolar pneumocytes, but essentially absent in bronchial epithelium. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 was moderately to strongly labeled in the endothelia of large and small blood vessels of all types, and it was not seen in other cell types. Class II major histocompatibility complex antigens were variably observed in pulmonary epithelial cells, but they were not expressed by endothelia. There appeared to be no significant difference in the immunohistologic density of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 or vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 immunostaining in allografts at the specified time points of preservation; this conclusion was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Similar findings pertained to staining results for human leukocyte DR antigens. There was likewise no significant difference in the expression of the three analytes when donor lungs perfused with Euro-Collins solution versus low potassium

  2. Complex chimerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kimberly K.; Petroff, Margaret G.; Coscia, Lisa A.; Armenti, Vincent T.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of women with organ transplantation have undergone successful pregnancies, however little is known about how the profound immunologic changes associated with pregnancy might influence tolerance or rejection of the allograft. Pregnant women with a solid organ transplant are complex chimeras with multiple foreign cell populations from the donor organ, fetus, and mother of the pregnant woman. We consider the impact of complex chimerism and pregnancy-associated immunologic changes on tolerance of the allograft both during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Mechanisms of allograft tolerance are likely dynamic during pregnancy and affected by the influx of fetal microchimeric cells, HLA relationships (between the fetus, pregnant woman and/or donor), peripheral T cell tolerance to fetal cells, and fetal minor histocompatibility antigens. Further research is necessary to understand the complex immunology during pregnancy and the postpartum period of women with a solid organ transplant. PMID:23974274

  3. Natural selection acts on Atlantic salmon major histocompatibility (MH) variability in the wild

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyto, de E.; McGinnity, P.; Consuegra, S.; Coughlan, J.; Tufto, J.; Farrell, K.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Jordan, W.; Cross, T.; Stet, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Pathogen-driven balancing selection is thought to maintain polymorphism in major histocompatibility (MH) genes. However, there have been few empirical demonstrations of selection acting on MH loci in natural populations. To determine whether natural selection on MH genes has fitness consequences for

  4. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  5. Genetic heterogenicity in the major histocompatibility complex of various BB rat sublines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin; Dyrberg, T.; Kastern, W.

    1986-01-01

    Fragments of cloned rat class I transplantation antigen genes were used to define the polymorphism detected between two lines of closely related BB rats. One line, BB-Hagedorn (BB/H), is prone to diabetes, and the other (BB control) is resistant. A cDNA probe representing part of the second...... extracellular domain of a class I antigen detected several DNA fragments and revealed a 2kb fragment present in resistant, but absent in diabetes-prone, BB/H rat DNA following digestion with BamH1. A 40 by cDNA probe from the same domain showed a further simplified pattern in the DNA hybridization analysis....... Only two fragments, 15 kb and 7 kb, were present in the resistant rats; the diabetes-prone BB/H rats lacked the 7 kb fragment. Several lines of evidence suggest that the gene contained in this 7 kb fragment may be deleted. Analysis of other diabetic BB rats and in the F2 generation of intercross...

  6. Trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules through intracellular compartments containing HLA-DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, N F; Hammond, C; Denzin, L K; Pan, M; Cresswell, P

    1996-01-01

    The endosomal site(s) where MHC class II molecules become competent to bind antigenic peptide has not been completely characterized. We identified endocytic compartments through which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules move prior to their expression on the plasma membrane. The compartments co-sediment with lysosomes in the most dense regions of Percoll gradients. The appearance of proteolytic fragments of the invariant chain (I chain), namely leupeptin-induced proteins (LIPs) and class-II-associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP), in this region of the gradient suggests that the release of MHC class II molecules from I chain association occurs within these vesicles. The formation of SDS-stable alpha beta dimers indicated that MHC class II molecules contained within these compartments are receptive to peptide binding. A majority of the HLA-DM protein was found in the same region of the Percoll gradient, consistent with its established function in MHC class-II-restricted antigen presentation. Immunoelectron micrographs of dense-sedimenting compartments indicated that I chain, MHC class II, and DM molecules are contained within both multivesicular and multilamellar vesicles. The final stages of I chain dissociation from MHC class II molecules and DM-mediated peptide loading probably occur in these compartments.

  7. Major histocompatibility complex class II alleles and haplotypes associated with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in greyhounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiel, R E; Kennedy, L J; Nolan, C M; Mooney, C T; Callanan, J J

    2014-09-01

    Non-suppurative meningoencephalitis is a breed-restricted canine neuroinflammatory disorder affecting young greyhounds in Ireland. A genetic risk factor is suspected because of the development of disease in multiple siblings and an inability to identify a causative infectious agent. The aim of this study was to examine potential associations between dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotype and the presence of the disease. DLA three locus haplotypes were determined in 31 dogs with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis and in 115 healthy control dogs using sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. All dogs were unrelated at the parental level. Two haplotypes (DRB1*01802/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802 and DRB1*01501/DQA1*00601/DQB1*02201) were significantly (P = 0.0099 and 0.037) associated with the presence of meningoencephalitis, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 5.531 (1.168-26.19) and 3.736 (1.446-9.652), respectively. These results confirm that there is an association between DLA class II haplotype and greyhound meningoencephalitis, suggesting an immunogenetic risk factor for the development of the disease. Greyhound meningoencephalitis may be a suitable model for human neuroinflammatory diseases with an immunogenetic component. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Immune Responses to Tissue-Restricted Nonmajor Histocompatibility Complex Antigens in Allograft Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Bharat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases that result in end-stage organ damage cause inflammation, which can reveal sequestered self-antigens (SAgs in that organ and trigger autoimmunity. The thymus gland deletes self-reactive T-cells against ubiquitously expressed SAgs, while regulatory mechanisms in the periphery control immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs. It is now established that T-cells reactive to SAgs present in certain organs (e.g., lungs, pancreas, and intestine are incompletely eliminated, and the dysregulation of peripheral immuneregulation can generate immune responses to SAgs. Therefore, chronic diseases can activate self-reactive lymphocytes, inducing tissue-restricted autoimmunity. During organ transplantation, donor lymphocytes are tested against recipient serum (i.e., cross-matching to detect antibodies (Abs against donor human leukocyte antigens, which has been shown to reduce Ab-mediated hyperacute rejection. However, primary allograft dysfunction and rejection still occur frequently. Because donor lymphocytes do not express tissue-restricted SAgs, preexisting Abs against SAgs are undetectable during conventional cross-matching. Preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs (i.e., autoimmunity play a major role in rejection. In this review, we discuss the evidence that supports autoimmunity as a contributor to rejection. Testing for preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs and treatment based on immune responses after organ transplantation may improve short- and long-term outcomes after transplantation.

  9. Allelic Diversity of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II DRB Gene in Indian Cattle and Buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachinandan De

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to study the diversity of MHC-DRB3 alleles in Indian cattle and buffalo breeds. Previously reported BoLA-DRB exon 2 alleles of Indian Zebu cattle, Bos taurus cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goats were analyzed for the identities and divergence among various allele sequences. Comparison of predicted amino acid residues of DRB3 exon 2 alleles with similar alleles from other ruminants revealed considerable congruence in amino acid substitution pattern. These alleles showed a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid polymorphism at positions forming peptide-binding regions. A higher rate of nonsynonymous substitution was detected at the peptide-binding regions, indicating that BoLA-DRB3 allelic sequence evolution was driven by positive selection.

  10. Expression of Major histocompatibility complex genes in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, P.N.S.

    1996-01-01


    The common carp ( Cyprinus carpio L.) has been the experimental animal of choice because many features of the immune system of this Cyprinid fish have been well characterized. The immune system consists of an integrated set of organs containing

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class I binding predictions as a tool in epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren

    2010-01-01

    , highlighting the most useful and historically important. Selected case stories, where these 'reverse immunology' systems have been used in actual epitope discovery, are briefly reviewed. We conclude that this new generation of epitope discovery systems has become a highly efficient tool for epitope discovery...

  12. Evaluation of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in cranes: applications to conservation efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Miller, M.M.; Goto, R.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    Although there have been heated discussions concerning the relative importance of using Mhc diversity as a basis for selecting breeders in conservation projects, most parties agree that the genetic variability residual in an endangered species should be maintained through genetic management, if at all possible. Substantial evidence exists (particularly in birds) documenting the influences of specific Mhc haplotypes on disease outcome and also that those individuals which are heterozygous for Mhc alleles appear to have an advantage for survival over those that are homozygous. Thus, conservation of genetic variability of the Mhc is likely important for the preservation of fitness, especially in small breeding populations. More than half of the world's crane species are listed as endangered. Members of all 15 known species are represented among breeding animals for captive propagation at the International Crane Foundation (Wisconsin) and the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Maryland). Collaborative multi-organization efforts and the availability of extensive pedigree records have allowed the study of Mhc variability in several species of cranes. We have found, for example, that Mhc diversity in the captive Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) population appears high, whereas in the captive whooping crane (Grus americana), which has undergone a severe 'genetic bottleneck,? both the number of alleles and the levels of heterozygosity appear to be substantially reduced.

  13. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex binding regions of protein antigens by sequence pattern analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Appella, E

    1989-01-01

    to interact with these MHC class II molecules (IAd and IEd). The accuracy of these procedures has been tested on a large panel of synthetic peptides of eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and viral origin, and also on a set of overlapping peptides encompassing the entire staphylococcal nuclease molecule. For both sets...

  14. Clarifying the association of genes within the major histocompatibility complex with narcolepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, R.T.; Watson, B.; Rivers, C. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DR2 and DQwl has been reported to be strongly associated with narcolepsy. The particular phenotype and strength of these associations varies between races. For example DQB*0601 has been reported associated with some African American (AA) narcoleptics while some Caucasian American (CA) narcoleptics do not possess DR2 or DQw1. We have sought to clarify the relationship of MHC genes with narcolepsy in the local CA and AA population. There was no significant difference in the frequency of DR phenotypes in CA or AA narcoleptics compared to race, age, sex and geographic region-matched controls. DR2 was increased in CA cataplexy positive (Cat+) narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.028, odds ratio (OR)=2.4) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=<0.001, OR=8.8). DR11 was increased in AA Cat+ narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.004, OR=11.2) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=0.002). DQB1*0601 was not significantly associated with narcolepsy in our AA population. We have assessed the frequency of the TNFa (13 alleles, 1.1Mb telomeric to DQ{alpha}), D6S105 (13 alleles, 1kb telomeric of HLA-A), and GLP-1R (19 alleles, 18.5 Mb centromeric of DQ{alpha}), dinucleotide repeats in narcoleptics compared to controls. The TNFa allele 117 was increased in CA Cat+ vs. controls (p=0.003). The GLP-1R allele 144 was increased in CA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.02). In AA narcoleptics, the TNFa allele 109 was significantly increased (p=0.04) along with the D6S105 allele 130 (p=0.02) compared to controls. The D6S105 allele 130 was increased in AA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.03). The GLP-1R allele 154 was significantly decreased in AA Cat+ vs. Cat- (p=0.04). These data suggest that DR and/or DQ genes are not responsible for narcolepsy and that cataplexy is associated with different regions around the MHC in various racial groups.

  15. Binding stability of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I proteins: role of entropy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Ahmet; Erman, Burak

    2018-03-01

    Prediction of peptide binding on specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) has long been studied with successful results. We herein describe the effects of entropy and dynamics by investigating the binding stabilities of 10 nanopeptides on various HLA Class I alleles using a theoretical model based on molecular dynamics simulations. The fluctuational entropies of the peptides are estimated over a temperature range of 310–460 K. The estimated entropies correlate well with experimental binding affinities of the peptides: peptides that have higher binding affinities have lower entropies compared to non-binders, which have significantly larger entropies. The computation of the entropies is based on a simple model that requires short molecular dynamics trajectories and allows for approximate but rapid determination. The paper draws attention to the long neglected dynamic aspects of peptide binding, and provides a fast computation scheme that allows for rapid scanning of large numbers of peptides on selected HLA antigens, which may be useful in defining the right peptides for personal immunotherapy.

  16. NetMHCcons: a consensus method for the major histocompatibility complex class I predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    -expert user to choose the most suitable method for predicting binding to a given MHC molecule. In this study, we have therefore made an in-depth analysis of combinations of three state-of-the-art MHC–peptide binding prediction methods (NetMHC, NetMHCpan and PickPocket). We demonstrate that a simple...... combination of NetMHC and NetMHCpan gives the highest performance when the allele in question is included in the training and is characterized by at least 50 data points with at least ten binders. Otherwise, NetMHCpan is the best predictor. When an allele has not been characterized, the performance depends...... on the distance to the training data. NetMHCpan has the highest performance when close neighbours are present in the training set, while the combination of NetMHCpan and PickPocket outperforms either of the two methods for alleles with more remote neighbours. The final method, NetMHCcons, is publicly available...

  17. Natural selection of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Tarr, C.L.; Mcintosh, C.E.; Atkinson, C.T.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    The native Hawaiian honeycreepers represent a classic example of adaptive radiation and speciation, but currently face one the highest extinction rates in the world. Although multiple factors have likely influenced the fate of Hawaiian birds, the relatively recent introduction of avian malaria is thought to be a major factor limiting honeycreeper distribution and abundance. We have initiated genetic analyses of class II ?? chain Mhc genes in four species of honeycreepers using methods that eliminate the possibility of sequencing mosaic variants formed by cloning heteroduplexed polymerase chain reaction products. Phylogenetic analyses group the honeycreeper Mhc sequences into two distinct clusters. Variation within one cluster is high, with dN > d S and levels of diversity similar to other studies of Mhc (B system) genes in birds. The second cluster is nearly invariant and includes sequences from honeycreepers (Fringillidae), a sparrow (Emberizidae) and a blackbird (Emberizidae). This highly conserved cluster appears reminiscent of the independently segregating Rfp-Y system of genes defined in chickens. The notion that balancing selection operates at the Mhc in the honeycreepers is supported by transpecies polymorphism and strikingly high dN/dS ratios at codons putatively involved in peptide interaction. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences were invariant in the i'iwi, but were highly variable in the 'amakihi. By contrast, levels of variability of class II ?? chain Mhc sequence codons that are hypothesized to be directly involved in peptide interactions appear comparable between i'iwi and 'amakihi. In the i'iwi, natural selection may have maintained variation within the Mhc, even in the face of what appears to a genetic bottleneck.

  18. Major histocompatibility complex I upregulation in clear cell renal cell carcinoma is associated with increased survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi R. Sekar

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that high MHCI expression confers improved overall and recurrence free survival in patients with clear cell RCC and could serve as an important prognostic tool in identifying high-risk patients.

  19. “Electronic nose” detects major histocompatibility complex-dependent prerenal and postrenal odor components

    OpenAIRE

    Montag, Stefanie; Frank, Michael; Ulmer, Heiko; Wernet, Dorothee; Göpel, Wolfgang; Rammensee, Hans-Georg

    2001-01-01

    Mice prefer to mate with individuals expressing different MHC genes from their own. Volatile components presenting MHC-dependent odor types are present in urine and can be detected by mice, as shown by extensive behavioral studies. Similar odor types are suspected to influence human behavior as well. Although a recent report indicates that MHC expression influences the ratio of volatile compounds such as phenylacetic acid, so far no other means than studying the behavior of mice or rats has b...

  20. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...... a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These data...

  1. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of T cell response to leishmania antigens by determinants of histocompatibility leukocyte class I and II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacellar O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that HLA class I molecules play a significant role in the regulation of the proliferation of T cells activated by mitogens and antigens. We evaluated the ability of mAb to a framework determinant of HLA class I molecules to regulate T cell proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-g production against leishmania, PPD, C. albicans and tetanus toxoid antigens in patients with tegumentary leishmaniasis and healthy subjects. The anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC mAb (W6/32 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation by 90% in cultures stimulated with aCD3, but the suppression was variable in cultures stimulated with leishmania antigen. This suppression ranged from 30-67% and was observed only in 5 of 11 patients. IFN-g production against leishmania antigen was also suppressed by anti-HLA class I mAb. In 3 patients IFN-g levels were suppressed by more than 60%, while in the other 2 cultures IFN-g levels were 36 and 10% lower than controls. The suppression by HLA class I mAb to the proliferative response in leishmaniasis patients and in healthy controls varied with the antigens and the patients or donors tested. To determine whether the suppression is directed at antigen presenting cells (APCs or at the responding T cells, experiments with antigen-primed non-adherent cells, separately incubated with W6/32, were performed. Suppression of proliferation was only observed when the W6/32 mAb was added in the presence of T cells. These data provide evidence that a mAb directed at HLA class I framework determinants can suppress proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to several antigens.

  3. Female-versus-male alloreactivity as a model for minor histocompatibility antigens in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stern, M.; Brand, R.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Sureda, A.; Rocha, V.; Passweg, J.; Baldomero, H.; Niederwieser, D.; Gratwohl, A.

    2008-01-01

    H-Y encoded gene products were the first to be recognized as clinically relevant minor histocompatibility antigens. Compared to other gender combinations, female donor/male recipient (FDMR) transplants are associated with increased graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), increased transplant-related

  4. 76 FR 22711 - Announcement of the Re-Approval of the American Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... Society of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics (ASHI) as an Accreditation Organization Under the...), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the application of the American Society for... specific and detailed than the CLIA language for requirements for control procedures. Sections 493.1256(c...

  5. Regulation of delayed type hypersensitivity : cellular and genetic requirements, with emphases on the response to histocompatibility antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.T.J. Bianchi (Andre Thomas Johan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe failure of successful exchange of tissues and organs between individuals of the same species is mainly due to the expression of histocompatibility (H) antigens on the cell surface of the transplanted tissues. Every individual has a unique set of genetically determined

  6. Major histocompatibility alleles associated with local resistance to malaria in a passerine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneaud, Camille; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Federici, Pierre; Chastel, Olivier; Sorci, Gabriele

    2006-02-01

    Malaria parasites are a major cause of human mortality in tropical countries and a potential threat for wildlife, as witnessed by the malaria-induced extinction of naive Hawaiian avifauna. Identifying resistance mechanisms is therefore crucial both for human health and wildlife conservation. Patterns of malaria resistance are known to be highly polygenic in both humans and mice, with marked contributions attributed to major histocompatibility (Mhc) genes. Here we show that specific Mhc variants are linked to both increased resistance and susceptibility to malaria infection in a wild passerine species, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). In addition, links between host immunogenetics and resistance to malaria involved population-specific alleles, suggesting local adaptation in this host-parasite interaction. This is the first evidence for a population-specific genetic control of resistance to malaria in a wild species.

  7. Major and minor histocompatibility antigens to NIMA: Prediction of a tolerogenic NIMA effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Masahiro; Azuma, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    The immunologic effects of developmental exposure to non-inherited maternal antigens (NIMA) are heterogeneous, either tolerogenic or immunogenic. The role of minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) in NIMA effects is unknown. We have recently reported that the NIMA effect can be classified into two distinct reactivities, low and high responder, to NIMA in utero and during nursing depending on the degree of maternal microchimerism (MMc) and Foxp3 expression of peripheral blood CD4(+)CD25(+) cells after graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) induction. These reactivities were predictable before transplantation, using an MLR-ELISPOT (mixed lymphocyte reaction; enzyme-linked immunospot) assay by comparing the number of IFNγ-producing cells stimulated with NIMA. Moreover, this assay was also applicable in both major and minor NIMA-mismatched setting. These observations are clinically relevant and suggest that it is possible to predict the immunological tolerance to NIMA.

  8. Chronic spontaneous urticaria: epidemiological characteristics focusing on the histocompatibility profile and presence of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Zamir; Pelá Calamita, Andrea Bronhara

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the etiopathogenesis of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) remains a challenge. The clinical and laboratory characteristics relating to its histocompatibility profile and autoimmunity are constant research topics. To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with CSU by means of a cross-sectional study, focusing on the histocompatibility profile, presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and presence of antithyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). Sixty-seven adults with CSU were analyzed. The autologous serum skin test (ASST), ANA and anti-TPO were performed in all cases and MHC classes I and II (loci A, B and DR) were evaluated in 49 patients. The factors that worsened urticaria included use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, emotional stress and physical stimuli, reported by 27%, 16% and 15% of these patients, respectively. The ASST test was positive in 49 patients (73%) and anti-TPO and ANA were present in 15 (22.4%) and 7 (10.5%), respectively. The OR (with 95% CI) for the association between ANA and anti-TPO was 5.94 (1.16-30.42), and thus statistically significant. There was a favorable association (with statistical significance) between HLA B*50 and patients with CSU, with OR (95% CI) of 2.96 (1.17- 7.48). A significant favorable association was found between these patients and HLA B*50, and between the presence of anti-TPO and ANA. The greater prevalence of HLA B*50 in these patients and the association between ANA and anti-TPO reinforce the possibility that an immunogenic mechanism may be the triggering factor for CSU.

  9. [Histocompatibility of porous hydroxyapatite coating NiTi shape memory alloy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Shuanke; Zhao, Bin

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the histocompatibility of porous hydroxyapatite (HAP) coating NiTi shape memory alloy and to provide a theoretical basis for its clinical application in bone defect repair. Twenty-four Chinchilla rabbits weighing 2.0-2.5 kg were randomized into experimental group and control group (n=12). HAP coating NiTi shape memory alloy was implanted into the distal part of left femur of 12 rabbits in the experimental group, while holes without alloy implantation were performed on the control group. At 7, 14, 28 and 56 days after implantation, the animals were killed (3 rabbits in each group at a time). Gross observation, histology observation, BMP-2 immunohistochemistry observation and image grey scale analysis were performed. And the histology observation was evaluated by GB/T16886.6-1997 in terms of inflammation, capsule wall of fibrous tissue, materials degradation and the response of peripheral tissue. All of the animals survived until being killed. The implants reached a peak embedded in bone tissue wholly, without loosening and bone absorption. The inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrous hyperplasia were at 7 days after implantation, with the formation of cyst wall of fibrous tissue and the implant wrapped by the cyst wall. The response of connective tissue proliferation was still obvious in partial samples of experimental group at 56 days after implantation, which was wrose than the control group but consistent with the in vivo implantation standard of GB/T16886.6-1997. Immunohistochemistry observation displayed the endogenous BMP-2 were in the cytoplasm of MSCs and osteoblast. The result of image analysis showed the expression of BMP-2 were staged in line with the repair of bone defect, two groups witnessed the peak expression of the BMP-2 at 14 days after implantation. There were no significant differences among different time points in the staining gray scale of BMP-2 (P > 0.05). HAP coating NiTi shape memory alloy, as a biomedical material, has

  10. Systemic minor histocompatibility antigen expression in blood endothelial cells prevents T cell-mediated vascular immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviezel-Firner, Sonja; Engeler, Daniel; Bolinger, Beatrice; Onder, Lucas; Scandella, Elke; Yu, Meimei; Kroczek, Richard A; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2013-12-01

    Attenuation of T cell-mediated damage of blood endothelial cells (BECs) in transplanted organs is important to prevent transplant vasculopathy (TV) and chronic rejection. Here, we assessed the importance of minor histocompatibility antigen (mHA) distribution and different coinhibitory molecules for T cell-BEC interaction. A transgenic mHA was directed specifically to BECs using the Tie2 promoter and cellular interactions were assessed in graft-versus-host disease-like and heterotopic heart transplantation settings. We found that cognate CD4(+) T-cell help was critical for the activation of BEC-specific CD8(+) T cells. However, systemic mHA expression on BECs efficiently attenuated adoptively transferred, BEC-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and hence prevented tissue damage, whereas restriction of mHA expression to heart BECs precipitated the development of TV. Importantly, the lack of the coinhibitory molecules programmed death-1 (PD-1) and B and T lymphocyte attenuator fostered the initial activation of BEC-specific CD4(+) T cells, but did not affect development of TV. In contrast, TV was significantly augmented in the absence of PD-1 on BEC-specific CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that antigen distribution in the vascular bed determines the impact of coinhibition and, as a consequence, critically impinges on T cell-mediated vascular immunopathology. © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. High-throughput identification of potential minor histocompatibility antigens by MHC tetramer-based screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hombrink, Pleun; Hadrup, Sine R; Bakker, Arne

    2011-01-01

    T-cell recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) plays an important role in the graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, the number of MiHA identified to date remains limited, making clinical application of MiHA reactive T......-cell infusion difficult. This study represents the first attempt of genome-wide prediction of MiHA, coupled to the isolation of T-cell populations that react with these antigens. In this unbiased high-throughput MiHA screen, both the possibilities and pitfalls of this approach were investigated. First, 973......MHC-tetramer-based enrichment and multi-color flow cytometry. Using this approach, 71 peptide-reactive T-cell populations were generated. The isolation of a T-cell line specifically recognizing target cells expressing the MAP4K1(IMA) antigen demonstrates that identification of MiHA through this approach is in principle...

  12. Evidence against suppressor cell involvement in naturally acquired tolerance of a minor histocompatibility antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.L. (Trudeau Institute, Inc., Saranac Lake, New York (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The hypothesis was investigated that suppressor cells may be responsible for maintenance of immunologic tolerance of a minor H3 antigen in mice that express the antigen naturally. Lymphoid cell populations from B6.C-H-24c (HW54) mice, a congenic-resistant strain histoincompatible with H-24b-expressing C57BL/6 (B6) mice only with respect to the H-24 locus, were examined in cell-transfer experiments to see if they contained naturally arising H-24c-specific suppressor cells. The H-24 antigen was chosen for these studies because, unlike most other minor and major histocompatibility (H) antigens, it is not detectable on mature lymphoid cells by any of several functional criteria. Thus transfer of HW54 lymphoid cells to B6 hosts could be done without the complication of inducing hyporesponsiveness de novo in the host, as occurs with other minor H antigens that are expressed on lymphocytes. B6 hosts were given HW54 skin grafts along with HW54 lymphoid cells to assess their tolerance of the H-24c-encoded antigen. The hosts were either (1) normal, nonimmune B6 mice; (2) B6 mice rendered immunodeficient by thymectomy and irradiation (TxB) and repopulated with H-24c-immune B6 lymphocytes; or (3) TxB B6 hosts repopulated with nonimmune B6 lymphocytes. In each case it was found that the additionally infused HW54 lymphoid cells did not suppress the ability of these hosts to reject HW54 skin grafts. In other words, HW54 lymphoid cells appear not to possess suppressive activity specific for the H-24c antigen that might maintain antigen-specific natural tolerance. Additional experiments were performed to determine whether HW54 lymphoid cells can inhibit the ability of sublethally irradiated B6 mice to regain the capacity to reject HW54 skin.

  13. Marek's Disease Virus Infection in the Brain: Virus Replication, Cellular Infiltration, and Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigen Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimeno, I. M; Witter, R. L; Hunt, H. D; Lee, L. F; Reddy, S. M; Neumann, U

    2001-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) infection in the brain was studied chronologically after inoculating 3-week-old chickens of two genetic lines with two strains of serotype 1 MDV representing two pathotypes (v and vv...

  14. Next-generation detection of antigen-responsive T cells using DNA barcode-labeled peptidemajor histocompatibility complex I multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Identification of antigenic peptides recognized by T cells is important for understanding and treatingimmune related diseases. Current cytometry-based approaches are limited to simultaneous screening of T cell reactivity towards 10-100 distinct peptide specificities, which poorly match the large...... diversity of T cell recognition in humans. Consequently it has been impossible to comprehensively analyze T cell responsiveness in cancer, infectious and autoimmune diseases. We present and validate a novel technology that enables parallel detection of numerous different peptide-MHC responsive T cells...... of T cells. This technology enables true high-throughput detection of antigen-responsive T cells and will advance our understanding of immune recognition from model antigens to genomewide immune assessments on a personalized basis....

  15. Analysis of associations between major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis of dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, N. E.; Østergård, H.

    1995-01-01

    The associations between BoLA class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis were investigated using information on 333 cows from three different breeds and crossbreeds from 14 dairy herds in Denmark. Somatic cell count and bacteriological status were used as markers for subclinical mastitis....... Associations between BoLA class I haplotypes and IMI status were also determined. The association between BoLA class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis was weak. The A10(W50), A11, A12(A30), A16, A19(A6), A21, A26, and A31(A30) alleles were associated with different markers of subclinical mastitis....... Susceptibility or resistance to the two bacteria categories was associated with different alleles. This study indicated that BoLA antigens may be involved in resistance to mastitis and that resistance may be specific for a particular pathogen....

  16. Reproducible association with type 1 diabetes in the extended class I region of the major histocompatibility complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viken, M.K.; Blomhoff, A.; Olsson, M.

    2009-01-01

    )-gene cluster, particularly the BTN3A2 gene, was observed by multilocus analyses. We replicated the associations with SNPs in the PRSS16 region and, albeit weaker, to the BTN3A2 region, in an independent material of 725 families obtained from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium. It is important to note...... that these associations were independent of the HLA-DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 genes, as well as of associations observed at HLA-A, -B and -C. Taken together, our results identify PRSS16 and BTN3A2, two genes thought to play important roles in regulating the immune response, as potentially novel susceptibility genes for T1D...

  17. Definition of an immunologic response using the major histocompatibility complex tetramer and enzyme-linked immunospot assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Gualberto, Antonio; Glaspy, John A; Seja, Elisabeth; Ontiveros, Maribel; Reardon, Deborah L; Renteria, Roberto; Englahner, Brigitte; Economou, James S; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Ribas, Antoni

    2006-01-01

    Define an immunologic response using the tetramer and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. Ten healthy subjects and 21 patients with melanoma (all HLA-A*0201) donated a total of 121 blood samples to determine the lower limit of detection (LLD), analytic coefficient of variation (aCV), and physiologic CV (pCV) of the tetramer and ELISPOT assays. The mean, SD, and reference change value (RCV) were calculated to define changes beyond the assay imprecision, and its application was tested in the monitoring of T-cell expansion after CTLA4 blockade with ticilimumab (CP-675,206). The LLD for the tetramer assay was 0.038% CD8+ cells and seven spots per 10(5) peripheral blood mononuclear cells for the ELISPOT assay. The aCV of the tetramer assay was <10% and was higher for the ELISPOT (24.69-36.32%). There was marked between-subject variability on baseline homeostatic values, which was correlated to prior antigen exposure. An immunologic response was defined as an increase beyond the mean + 3 SD in antigen-specific cells for subjects with baseline levels below the LLD, or beyond the assay RCV for baseline levels above the LLD. In four patients receiving ticilimumab, expansions of antigen-specific T cells beyond the assay variability were noted for EBV and MART1 antigens. A combined approach of change from negative (below the LLD) to positive (above the LLD) and a percentage change beyond the assay variability using the RCV score can be computed to define which change in circulating antigen-specific T cells represents a response to immunotherapy.

  18. Biochemical identification of the bovine blood group M' antigen as a major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønberg, L S; Larsen, B; Koch, C

    1995-01-01

    red and white cells isolated from M'-A16 positive animals, whereas no bands were seen in M'-A16 negative animals in precipitations with the same antibody. Precipitation with a crossreacting human beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m) specific antibody confirmed a class-I-like structure associated with beta...... 2-m on M' positive red cells and the absence of such a structure on M' negative red cells. Sequential precipitations gave analogous results. Proteolytic degradation by papain and V8 protease did not reveal any substantial difference between red and white M'-A16 positive cells, but a slight...... difference in the pI of the immunoprecipitable components of red and white cells was observed. All together, this indicates that either the blood group antigen M' is the BoLA-A16 class I antigen or M' and BoLA-A16 are two different class I polypeptides with the same relative mass, sharing identical epitopes...

  19. Major histocompatibility complex class II DOA sequences from three Antarctic seal species verify stabilizing selection on the DO locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, D J; Stewart, B S; Lehman, N

    2002-12-01

    To provide additional support for the sequence conservation and hence the regulatory role of the MHC class II DOA locus, we obtained the nucleotide sequences of exon 2 and exon 3, along with the intervening intron, of the Ross seal, and sequences from the exon 2 region from the Weddell and leopard seals. These are the first reports of the sequences of this locus from a carnivore species. The results demonstrate strong conservation among mammals for the exon sequence and produce a gene genealogy that is consistent in topology with a species tree.

  20. The combination of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC genes influences murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eyler, Y L; Pfau, C J; Broomhall, K S

    1989-01-01

    Resistance to the acute lethal disease caused by the docile strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) virus varies widely between different mouse strains. In order to study the inheritance of host influence on susceptibility to this strain of LCM virus, we crossed the F1 to the parent...... susceptibility to the disease. When the parental strains carried similar MHC haplotypes but dissimilar background genes (B10.BR; CBA), 78% of the backcross mice succumbed, indicating that at least two non-MHC loci influenced disease susceptibility. It is unlikely, however, that the same two non-MHC loci...

  1. Unusual evolutionary conservation and frequent DNA segment exchange in class I genes of the major histocompatibility complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashida, H; Miyata, T.

    1983-01-01

    From comparisons of homologous DNA sequences for many different genes, it was shown that the silent positions of protein-encoding regions and introns evolve at high and remarkably similar rates for different genes. In addition, both silent positions and introns behave like clocks; they accumulated base substitutions at approximately constant rates with respect to geological time. The rates of evolution were estimated to be 5.5 X 10(-9), 3.7 X 10(-9), and 5.3 X 10(-9) per site per year for sil...

  2. Simulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Structure and Peptide Loading into an MHC Binding Pocket with Teachers’Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Sankian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular understanding of three-dimensional (3D peptide: MHC models require both basic knowledge of computational modeling and skilled visual perception, which are not possessed by all students. The present model aims to simulate MHC molecular structure with the hands and make a profound impression on the students.

  3. Dominant Sequences of Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Conserved Extended Haplotypes from HLA-DQA2 to DAXX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Charles E.; Alford, Dennis R.; Trautwein, Michael R.; Jalloh, Yanoh K.; Tarnacki, Jennifer L.; Kunnenkeri, Sushruta K.; Fici, Dolores A.; Yunis, Edmond J.; Awdeh, Zuheir L.; Alper, Chester A.

    2014-01-01

    We resequenced and phased 27 kb of DNA within 580 kb of the MHC class II region in 158 population chromosomes, most of which were conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs) of European descent or contained their centromeric fragments. We determined the single nucleotide polymorphism and deletion-insertion polymorphism alleles of the dominant sequences from HLA-DQA2 to DAXX for these CEHs. Nine of 13 CEHs remained sufficiently intact to possess a dominant sequence extending at least to DAXX, 230 kb centromeric to HLA-DPB1. We identified the regions centromeric to HLA-DQB1 within which single instances of eight “common” European MHC haplotypes previously sequenced by the MHC Haplotype Project (MHP) were representative of those dominant CEH sequences. Only two MHP haplotypes had a dominant CEH sequence throughout the centromeric and extended class II region and one MHP haplotype did not represent a known European CEH anywhere in the region. We identified the centromeric recombination transition points of other MHP sequences from CEH representation to non-representation. Several CEH pairs or groups shared sequence identity in small blocks but had significantly different (although still conserved for each separate CEH) sequences in surrounding regions. These patterns partly explain strong calculated linkage disequilibrium over only short (tens to hundreds of kilobases) distances in the context of a finite number of observed megabase-length CEHs comprising half a population's haplotypes. Our results provide a clearer picture of European CEH class II allelic structure and population haplotype architecture, improved regional CEH markers, and raise questions concerning regional recombination hotspots. PMID:25299700

  4. Noninvasive estimation of minimun population sizes and variability of the major histocompatibility complex in the andean condor

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaide, Miguel; Cadahía, Luis; Sergio A Lambertucci; Negro, Juan J

    2010-01-01

    Estimating indices of abundance of threatened species is crucial to preserving biodiversity. Over the last few decades, noninvasive genetic sampling has proven to be a more straightforward and less expensive approach than capture–mark–recapture analyses. In particular, molted feathers have become extremely popular for the monitoring of bird populations. Diagnostic molecular markers such as microsatellites, however, are still not available for many avian species of conservation con...

  5. Surfactant protein D augments bacterial association but attenuates major histocompatibility complex class II presentation of bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Lo, Bernice; Evans, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    Development of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with lipid dysregulation and inflammation. As the host defense lectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) has multiple effects in lipid homeostasis and inflammation, the correlation between SP-D concentrations and development of d...

  6. [Uveitis in spondyloarthritis patients and its association with HLA-B27 histocompatibility antigen: prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, I Yu; Godzenko, A A; Vorob'eva, O K; Guseva, I A

    2016-01-01

    to perform a prospective study of clinical presentation and course of uveitis in spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients as well as its association with the HLA-B27 histocompatibility antigen. The study included 219 patients with uveitis, all tested for HLA-B27 antigen and various infections (viral, bacterial, and parasitic) as well as examined for locomotive system involvement. The presence of the HLA-B27 antigen was determined in 142 (64.8%) out of 219 patients, of them 87 were diagnosed with an entity of the SpA group. The remaining 77 (35.2%) patients appeared to be HLA-B27-negative, but 13 were still diagnosed with an entity of the SpA group. There were 10 (4.6%) patients with 2 or more diseases from the SpA group («clinical decussation»). When comparing the two groups of HLA-B27-positive and negative patients having both SpA and uveitis, no statistically significant difference was found as to the age of onset, site, frequency of attacks, and uni- or bilateral involvement (p>0.05). We also performed a comparison of HLA-B27-positive and negative patients with no account to their SpA status and revealed a higher complication rate in those that were «negative» (puveitis of different origin notable for long attacks and short remissions. Assessing the site and course of uveitis as well as HLA-B27 testing of uveitis patients has proved important for etiological diagnosis. Diseases of the SpA group have been shown to be 6.7 times more common in HLA-B27-positive patients as compared to HLA-B27-negative ones. Clinical presentation of uveitis in the presence of SpA in both HLA-B27-positive and negative patients resembles that of idiopathic uveitis - an independent HLA-B27-associated syndrome (р>0.05). Cases of «decussation» between entities of the SpA group are usually more severe in terms of clinical presentation and course of uveitis and are associated with a worse prognosis. Complications of uveitis are more likely to be found in non-SpA HLA-B27-negative patients (

  7. Quantifying the energetics of cooperativity in a ternary protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter S; Schuck, Peter; Sundberg, Eric J

    2002-01-01

    and mathematical modeling to describe the energetics of cooperativity in a trimolecular protein complex. As a model system for quantifying cooperativity, we studied the ternary complex formed by the simultaneous interaction of a superantigen with major histocompatibility complex and T cell receptor, for which...... a structural model is available. This system exhibits positive and negative cooperativity, as well as augmentation of the temperature dependence of binding kinetics upon the cooperative interaction of individual protein components in the complex. Our experimental and theoretical analysis may be applicable...... to other systems involving cooperativity....

  8. Predicting binding affinities of protein ligands from three-dimensional models: application to peptide binding to class I major histocompatibility proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Lauemoller, S L; Holm, A

    1999-01-01

    A simple and fast free energy scoring function (Fresno) has been developed to predict the binding free energy of peptides to class I major histocompatibility (MHC) proteins. It differs from existing scoring functions mainly by the explicit treatment of ligand desolvation and of unfavorable protein...

  9. The interaction of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) with mouse class I major histocompatibility antigens and its ability to support peptide binding. A comparison of human and mouse beta 2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Stryhn, A; Holter, T L

    1995-01-01

    of class I molecules are involved in peptide binding, whereas most of class I molecules are involved in beta 2m binding. We propose that mouse beta 2m interacts with the minor peptide binding (i.e. the "empty") fraction with a lower affinity than human beta 2m does, whereas mouse and human beta 2m interact......The function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to sample peptides derived from intracellular proteins and to present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this paper, biochemical assays addressing MHC class I binding of both peptide and beta 2-microglobulin...... (beta 2m) have been used to examine the assembly of the trimolecular MHC class I/beta 2m/peptide complex. Recombinant human beta 2m and mouse beta 2ma have been generated to compare the binding of the two beta 2m to mouse class I. It is frequently assumed that human beta 2m binds to mouse class I heavy...

  10. Major Histocompatibility Complex–independent Recognition of a Distinctive Pollen Antigen, Most Likely a Carbohydrate, by Human CD8+ α/β T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinti, Silvia; Palma, Raffaele De; Fontana, Angelo; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina; Pini, Carlo; Sallusto, Federica

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated CD8+ α/β T cells from the blood of atopic and healthy individuals which recognize a nonpeptide antigen present in an allergenic extract from Parietaria judaica pollen. This antigen appears to be a carbohydrate because it is resistant to proteinase K and alkaline digestion, is hydrophilic, and is sensitive to trifluoromethane-sulphonic and periodic acids. In addition, on a reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography column the antigen recognized by CD8+ T cells separates in a fraction which contains >80% hexoses (glucose and galactose) and undetectable amounts of proteins. Presentation of this putative carbohydrate antigen (PjCHOAg) to CD8+ T cell clones is dependent on live antigen presenting cells (APCs) pulsed for >1 h at 37°C, suggesting that the antigen has to be internalized and possibly processed. Indeed, fixed APCs or APCs pulsed at 15°C were both unable to induce T cell response. Remarkably, PjCHOAg presentation is independent of the expression of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules or CD1. CD8+ T cells stimulated by PjCHOAg-pulsed APCs undergo a sustained [Ca2+]i increase and downregulate their T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) in an antigen dose– and time-dependent fashion, similar to T cells stimulated by conventional ligands. Analysis of TCR Vβ transcripts shows that six independent PjCHOAg-specific T cell clones carry the Vβ8 segment with a conserved motif in the CDR3 region, indicating a structural requirement for recognition of this antigen. Finally, after activation, the CD8+ clones from the atopic patient express CD40L and produce high levels of interleukins 4 and 5, suggesting that the clones may have undergone a Th2-like polarization in vivo. These results reveal a new class of antigens which triggers T cells in an MHC-independent way, and these antigens appear to be carbohydrates. We suggest that this type of antigen may play a role in the immune response in vivo. PMID:9294144

  11. Mouse histocompatibility-related genes are not conserved in other mammals.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to the genes for classical H-2 antigens, the H-2 complex of the mouse contains numerous homologous genes belonging to several distinct families. It is not known whether they have any functions. To address this question, I have investigated whether these genes are separately conserved in evolution. Subcloned 5' gene segments, encoding the variable domains, were used as hybridisation probes on genomic DNA blots of various mammals. Only the largest gene family, which includes the cla...

  12. Molecular typing for HLA class I using ARMS-PCR: further developments following the 12th International Histocompatibility Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, S; Marsh, S G; Bunce, M; Bodmer, J G

    1999-02-01

    Molecular typing for HLA class I was introduced in the 12th International Histocompatibility Workshop. Following a pilot study using three methods, sequence specific oligotyping (SSO), reverse dot blot and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR, the ARMS-PCR method was selected for use. A great advantage of an ARMS-PCR method is that, unlike the other two methods, it can determine whether sequence motifs are in cis or in trans, as ARMS-PCR detects two cis located motifs per reaction using forward and reverse sequence specific primers. Resolution was designed to be low to medium level for HLA-A, -B and -C alleles. Two hundred and fifty class I kits and 83 HLA-A2 subtyping kits were distributed. The A2 subtyping kit used a two round nested PCR system to identify all of the A2 alleles known at the time. Typing results on control DNA samples distributed with both the kits showed a very satisfactory performance. Since the 12th Workshop, the kits have been developed with the addition of new primers and primer mixes to increase the resolution of the test.

  13. Analysis of the HLA population data (AHPD) submitted to the 15th International Histocompatibility/Immunogenetics Workshop by using the Gene[rate] computer tools accommodating ambiguous data (AHPD project report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J M; Riccio, M E; Buhler, S; Di, D; Currat, M; Ries, F; Almada, A J; Benhamamouch, S; Benitez, O; Canossi, A; Fadhlaoui-Zid, K; Fischer, G; Kervaire, B; Loiseau, P; de Oliveira, D C M; Papasteriades, C; Piancatelli, D; Rahal, M; Richard, L; Romero, M; Rousseau, J; Spiroski, M; Sulcebe, G; Middleton, D; Tiercy, J-M; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2010-07-01

    During the 15th International Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Workshop (IHIWS), 14 human leukocyte antigen (HLA) laboratories participated in the Analysis of HLA Population Data (AHPD) project where 18 new population samples were analyzed statistically and compared with data available from previous workshops. To that aim, an original methodology was developed and used (i) to estimate frequencies by taking into account ambiguous genotypic data, (ii) to test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) by using a nested likelihood ratio test involving a parameter accounting for HWE deviations, (iii) to test for selective neutrality by using a resampling algorithm, and (iv) to provide explicit graphical representations including allele frequencies and basic statistics for each series of data. A total of 66 data series (1-7 loci per population) were analyzed with this standard approach. Frequency estimates were compliant with HWE in all but one population of mixed stem cell donors. Neutrality testing confirmed the observation of heterozygote excess at all HLA loci, although a significant deviation was established in only a few cases. Population comparisons showed that HLA genetic patterns were mostly shaped by geographic and/or linguistic differentiations in Africa and Europe, but not in America where both genetic drift in isolated populations and gene flow in admixed populations led to a more complex genetic structure. Overall, a fruitful collaboration between HLA typing laboratories and population geneticists allowed finding useful solutions to the problem of estimating gene frequencies and testing basic population diversity statistics on highly complex HLA data (high numbers of alleles and ambiguities), with promising applications in either anthropological, epidemiological, or transplantation studies.

  14. Direct visualization of peptide/MHC complexes at the surface and in the intracellular compartments of cells infected in vivo by Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Muraille

    Full Text Available Protozoa and bacteria infect various types of phagocytic cells including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells and eosinophils. However, it is not clear which of these cells process and present microbial antigens in vivo and in which cellular compartments parasite peptides are loaded onto Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules. To address these issues, we have infected susceptible BALB/c (H-2d mice with a recombinant Leishmania major parasite expressing a fluorescent tracer. To directly visualize the antigen presenting cells that present parasite-derived peptides to CD4+ T cells, we have generated a monoclonal antibody that reacts to an antigenic peptide derived from the parasite LACK antigen bound to I-Ad Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecule. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of in vivo infected cells showed that intracellular I-Ad/LACK complexes were present in the membrane of amastigote-containing phagosomes in dendritic cells, eosinophils and macrophages/monocytes. In both dendritic cells and macrophages, these complexes were also present in smaller vesicles that did not contain amastigote. The presence of I-Ad/LACK complexes at the surface of dendritic cells, but neither on the plasma membrane of macrophages nor eosinophils was independently confirmed by flow cytometry and by incubating sorted phagocytes with highly sensitive LACK-specific hybridomas. Altogether, our results suggest that peptides derived from Leishmania proteins are loaded onto Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules in the phagosomes of infected phagocytes. Although these complexes are transported to the cell surface in dendritic cells, therefore allowing the stimulation of parasite-specific CD4+ T cells, this does not occur in other phagocytic cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study in which Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules bound to peptides derived from a parasite protein have been visualized within and

  15. Defining novel parameters for the optimal priming and expansion of minor histocompatibility antigen-specific T cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelle, Valérie; Carli, Cédric; Taillefer, Julie; Orio, Julie; Delisle, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-04-19

    Adoptive transfer of minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA)-specific T cells is a promising therapy for patients with hematological cancers. However, the efficacy of the transferred cells is hampered by the acquisition of terminal effector differentiation and exhaustion features during expansion in vitro thus preventing their function and persistence in vivo. Yet, the factors that induce T-cell differentiation and functional impairment in culture remain poorly defined and are likely to vary depending on the method used for expansion. Using the clinically relevant HLA-A0201-restricted MiHA HA-1 as well as reagents and procedures that are readily transferable to a clinical environment, we designed a novel culture protocol and defined how exhaustion features appeared in function of time. The optimal time points for the expansion of "fit" MiHA-specific T cells were delineated using phenotypic and functional assessments including KLRG-1 and PD-1 surface markers as well as Ki67 staining and cytokine secretion assays. Following a priming phase, an enrichment step and a rapid expansion stage, our method generates MiHA-specific T-cell lines. Evidence of phenotypic and functional dysfunction appear in function of culture duration, but display different characteristics following the extension of the priming or rapid expansion phases. While repeated antigen exposure during the priming phase induced the decline of the antigen-specific population and the expression of PD-1 and KLRG-1 on antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, the prolongation of an antigen-free expansion phase induced proliferation arrest and the relative loss of antigen-specific cells without impairing polyfunctional cytokine secretion or inducing PD-1 and KLRG-1 expression. A similar pattern was also observed after stimulating a virus-specific memory repertoire, except for the more rapid acquisition of exhaustion features upon repeated antigen exposure. Our results offer novel insights on the impact of culture

  16. Novel Non-Histocompatibility Antigen Mismatched Variants Improve the Ability to Predict Antibody-Mediated Rejection Risk in Kidney Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pineda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transplant rejection is the critical clinical end-point limiting indefinite survival after histocompatibility antigen (HLA mismatched organ transplantation. The predominant cause of late graft loss is antibody-mediated rejection (AMR, a process whereby injury to the organ is caused by donor-specific antibodies, which bind to HLA and non-HLA (nHLA antigens. AMR is incompletely diagnosed as donor/recipient (D/R matching is only limited to the HLA locus and critical nHLA immunogenic antigens remain to be identified. We have developed an integrative computational approach leveraging D/R exome sequencing and gene expression to predict clinical post-transplant outcome. We performed a rigorous statistical analysis of 28 highly annotated D/R kidney transplant pairs with biopsy-confirmed clinical outcomes of rejection [either AMR or T-cell-mediated rejection (CMR] and no-rejection (NoRej, identifying a significantly higher number of mismatched nHLA variants in AMR (ANOVA—p-value = 0.02. Using Fisher’s exact test, we identified 123 variants associated mainly with risk of AMR (p-value < 0.001. In addition, we applied a machine-learning technique to circumvent the issue of statistical power and we found a subset of 65 variants using random forest, that are predictive of post-tx AMR showing a very low error rate. These variants are functionally relevant to the rejection process in the kidney and AMR as they relate to genes and/or expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs that are enriched in genes expressed in kidney and vascular endothelium and underlie the immunobiology of graft rejection. In addition to current D/R HLA mismatch evaluation, additional mismatch nHLA D/R variants will enhance the stratification of post-tx AMR risk even before engraftment of the organ. This innovative study design is applicable in all solid organ transplants, where the impact of mitigating AMR on graft survival may be greater, with considerable benefits on

  17. Identification of the major histocompatibility complex class-II DM and DO alleles in a cohort of northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xi-He; Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2017-10-13

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina) has been considered as an independent species from the pig-tailed macaque group. We have previously reported that this species macaque has the potential to be a useful animal model in HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and vaccine studies due to its susceptibility to HIV-1. To develop this animal into a potential HIV/AIDS model, we have studied the classical MHC genes of this animal. In this study, the non-classical MHC genes Malo-DM and Malo-DO alleles were first characterized by sequencing and cloning in 12 unrelated northern pig-tailed macaques. A total of 20 full-length sequences identified include 4 Malo-DMA, 5 Malo-DMB, 7 Malo-DOA, and 4 Malo-DOB alleles. Most of these allele sequences were shared between northern pig-tailed macaque and other macaque species in exon 2. The full-length MHC-DM and MHC-DO sequences provide more comprehensive analysis of immunogenetics of northern pig-tailed macaques and increase the value of the macaques in further biomedical studies.

  18. Depleted genetic variation of the European ground squirrel in Central Europe in both microsatellites and the major histocompatibility complex gene: implications for conservation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčanová, Štěpánka; Bryja, Josef; Cosson, J.-F.; Gedeon, C.; Choleva, Lukáš; Ambros, M.; Sedláček, F.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2011), s. 1115-1129 ISSN 1566-0621 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Grant - others:European Science Foundation(XE) ConGen EX/1141 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Souslik * Endangered species * Habitat fragmentation * DRB * MHC Class II Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2011

  19. The thymus in "bare lymphocyte" syndrome : Significance of expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens on thymic epithelial cells in intrathymic T-cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Wijngaert, Frank P. van de; Huber, Jonne; Schuurman, R.K.B.; Zegers, Ben J.M.; Roord, John J.; Kater, L.

    1985-01-01

    Thymic biopsies from two patients with combined immunodeficiency and defective expression of HLA class I and class II antigens on blood mononuclear cells (“bare lymphocyte” syndrome) were investigated. This made possible an evaluation of the significance of HLA antigen expression in a detailed

  20. Peptide binding specificity of major histocompatibility complex class I resolved into an array of apparently independent subspecificities: quantitation by peptide libraries and improved prediction of binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    size are distributed into positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPL) to develop a highly efficient, universal and unbiased approach to address MHC specificity. The PSCPL approach appeared qualitatively and quantitatively superior to other currently used strategies. The average effect...

  1. Next-generation detection of antigen-responsive T cells using DNA barcode-labeled peptide-major histocompatibility complex I multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    sample using >1000 different peptide-MHC multimers labeled with individual DNA barcodes.After isolation of MHC multimer binding T cells their recognition are revealed by amplification andsequencing of the MHC multimer-associated DNA barcodes. The relative frequency of the sequencedDNA barcodes...... originating from a given peptide-MHC motif relates to the size of the antigenresponsiveT cell population. We have demonstrated the use of large panels of >1000 DNA barcodedMHC multimers for detection of rareT cell populations of virus and cancer-restricted origin in various tissues and compared...

  2. Major histocompatibility complex-linked immune response of young chickens vaccinated with an attenuated live infectious bursal disease virus vaccine followed by an infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, Helle; Nielsen, O.L.; Krogh-Maibom, T.

    2002-01-01

    (mean 5,243), B21 (5,570), and B131 (5,333) at 8 d postinfection, How-ever, a virus-neutralizing antibody test did not reflect this result. Nevertheless, the MHC haplotype-associated protective immunity was further supported by the bursa of Fabricius (bursa) recovery from the disease, as measured...... by histological scorings of the bursa. Chickens carrying the BW1 haplotype had a significantly lower bursa lesion score (1.7) than the haplotypes B19 (mean 3.8), B21 (3.6), and B131 (4.3) 8 d postinfection. Furthermore, multiple line effects were found in other variables when comparing Day 6 with Day 8. Body...... weight, relative weights of the bursa and the spleen, percentage and relative number of MHC II molecules on MHC II-positive lymphocytes, percentage and relative number of CD4 molecules on CD4-positive lymphocytes, and the specific antibody response all differed significantly among lines. Line 1, with Red...

  3. Heritable major histocompatibility complex class II-associated differences in production of tumor necrosis factor. alpha. : Relevance to genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, C.O.; Fronek, Z.; Koo, M.; McDevitt, H.O. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA)); Lewis, G.C. (Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Hansen, J.A. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The authors report on the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and TNF-{beta} by mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes or enriched monocyte subpopulations from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed healthy subjects. The results indicate that HLA-DR2- and DQw1-positive donors frequently exhibit low production of TNF-{alpha}, whereas DR3- and DR4-positive subjects show high levels of TNF-{alpha} production. No correlation between TNF-{alpha} levels and HLA-A, -B, and -C genotype was found. The relevance of this quantitative polymorphism to the genetic predisposition to lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was investigated. DR2, DQw1-positive SLE patients show low levels of TNF-{alpha} inducibility; this genotype is also associated with an increased incidence of lupus nephritis. DR3-positive SLE patients, on the other hand, are not predisposed to nephritis, and these patients have high TNF-{alpha} production. DR4 haplotype is associated with high TNF-{alpha} inducibility and is negatively correlated with lupus nephritis. These data may help explain the strong association between HLA-DR2, DQw1 in SLE patients and their susceptibility to nephritis.

  4. Narcolepsy: Autoimmunity, Effector T Cell Activation Due to Infection, or T Cell Independent, Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Induced Neuronal Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Adriano; Gast, Heidemarie; Reith, Walter; Recher, Mike; Birchler, Thomas; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2010-01-01

    Human narcolepsy with cataplexy is a neurological disorder, which develops due to a deficiency in hypocretin producing neurons in the hypothalamus. There is a strong association with human leucocyte antigens HLA-DR2 and HLA-DQB1*0602. The disease typically starts in adolescence. Recent developments in narcolepsy research support the hypothesis of…

  5. In situ localisation of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II and CD8 positive cells in infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV)-infected Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Dyveke Lem; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Skjødt, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    It is assumed that the mobilisation of a strong cellular immune response is important for the survival of Atlantic salmon infected with infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). In this study, the characterisation of immune cell populations in tissues of non-ISAV infected Atlantic salmon and during...

  6. Automated Analysis of Flow Cytometry Data to Reduce Inter-Lab Variation in the Detection of Major Histocompatibility Complex Multimer-Binding T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Natasja Wulff; Chandran, P. Anoop; Qian, Yu

    2017-01-01

    laboratories. We used three different methods, FLOw Clustering without K (FLOCK), Scalable Weighted Iterative Flow-clustering Technique (SWIFT), and ReFlow to analyze flow cytometry data files from 28 laboratories. Each laboratory screened for antigen-responsive T cell populations with frequency ranging from 0.......01 to 1.5% of lymphocytes within samples from two donors. Experience from this analysis shows that all three programs can be used for the identification of high to intermediate frequency of MHC multimer-binding T cell populations, with results very similar to that of manual gating. For the less frequent...

  7. Non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic activity of blood mononuclear cells stimulated with secreted mycobacterial proteins and other mycobacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Pedersen, B K

    1994-01-01

    with tuberculin purified protein derivative, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), short- and long-term culture filtrates of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and 30-31-kDa secreted mycobacterial protein. These antigens also induced proliferation and production of gamma interferon. The CD4...

  8. N-glycosylation of asparagine 8 regulates surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A (MICA) alleles dependent on threonine 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maiken Mellergaard; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Schneider, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    -glycosylation site. Mutational analysis revealed that a single amino acid (T24) in the extracellular domain of MICA018 was essential for the N-glycosylation dependency, while the intracellular domain was not involved. The HHV7 immunoevasin, U21, was found to inhibit MICA018 surface expression by affecting N......-glycosylation and the retention was rescued by T24A substitution. Our study reveals N-glycosylation as an allele-specific regulatory mechanism important for regulation of surface expression of MICA018 and we pinpoint the residues essential for this N-glycosylation dependency. In addition we show that this regulatory mechanism......NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on several types of human lymphocytes. NKG2D ligands can be induced upon cell stress and are frequently targeted post-translationally in infected or transformed cells, in order to avoid immune recognition. Virus infection and inflammation alter protein N...

  9. Perspective: my 37 year journey through Chlamydia  research: Chlamydia  antigen analysis using monoclonal antibodies and major histocompatibility complex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunham, Robert C

    2017-11-30

    Chlamydia antigen analysis enables understanding of disease pathogenesis, facilitates development of diagnostic immunoassays and is essential to the design of a subunit Chlamydia trachomatis vaccine. Using an autobiographical narrative, I review over three decades of antigen analysis research findings coming from my research laboratory and provide an outlook to the broader field of Chlamydia seroepidemiology and vaccinology. Based on the experiences of my scientific career I conclude with thoughts for young scientists newly entering the Chlamydia research field. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif protein enhances the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and reduces major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ely, Kenneth H; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A; Green, William R; Enelow, Richard I; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-03

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  12. Reference free phasing and representation of complex variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Malte

    2017-01-01

    . Therefore, new methods for detecting variation that reduce reference bias are needed including ways of representing genomes that account for the variability within and between populations. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region is one of the most diverse and complex regions of the human genome......High throughput sequencing has revolutionized our ability to interrogate genomes and entire human genomes are sequenced daily across the world. Mapping of short reads to a reference genome has enhanced our ability to detect genetic variation and is currently the most widely used technology...... to detect and call variation in humans. However, it has become evident that mapping of short reads to a single reference genome is subject to ascertainment bias (reference bias). This bias is especially pronounced in complex regions of the genome and particularly hampers detection of structural variation...

  13. [Histocompatibility of nano-hydroxyapatite/poly-co-glycolic acid tissue engineering bone modified by mesenchymal stem cells with vascular endothelial frowth factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglei; Wang, Dapeng; Yin, Ruofeng

    2015-10-06

    To explorec Histocompatibility of nano-hydroxyapatite/poly-co-glycolic acid tissue engineering bone modified by mesenchymal stem cells with vascular endothelial frowth factor transinfected. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) was separated, using BMSCs as target cells, and then vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene was transfected. Composite bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and cells transfected with nano-hydroxyapatite (HA)/polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). The composition of cell and scaffold was observed. The blank plasmid transfection was 39.1%, 40.1% in VEGF group. The cell adhesion and growth was found on the scaffold pore wall after 5 days, and the number of adherent cells in the nano-HA/PLGA composite scaffold material basically had no significant difference in both. Although the nano-HA/PLGA scaffold material is still not fully meet the requirements of the matrix material for bone tissue engineering, but good biocompatibility, structure is its rich microporous satisfaction in material mechanics, toughening, enhanced obviously. Composition scaffold with BMSCs transfected by VEGF plasmid, the ability of angiogenesis is promoted.

  14. A polymorphism in the splice donor site of ZNF419 results in the novel renal cell carcinoma-associated minor histocompatibility antigen ZAPHIR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Broen

    Full Text Available Nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT can induce remission in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC, but this graft-versus-tumor (GVT effect is often accompanied by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Here, we evaluated minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA-specific T cell responses in two patients with metastatic RCC who were treated with reduced-intensity conditioning SCT followed by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI. One patient had stable disease and emergence of SMCY.A2-specific CD8+ T cells was observed after DLI with the potential of targeting SMCY-expressing RCC tumor cells. The second patient experienced partial regression of lung metastases from whom we isolated a MiHA-specific CTL clone with the capability of targeting RCC cell lines. Whole genome association scanning revealed that this CTL recognizes a novel HLA-B7-restricted MiHA, designated ZAPHIR, resulting from a polymorphism in the splice donor site of the ZNF419 gene. Tetramer analysis showed that emergence of ZAPHIR-specific CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood occurred in the absence of GVHD. Furthermore, the expression of ZAPHIR in solid tumor cell lines indicates the involvement of ZAPHIR-specific CD8+ T cell responses in selective GVT immunity. These findings illustrate that the ZNF419-encoded MiHA ZAPHIR is an attractive target for specific immunotherapy after allogeneic SCT.

  15. Acquired immunologic tolerance in chimeras and histocompatibility factors in cattle and their relationship to those in humans. Final report. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, W.H.

    1976-03-01

    During the course of this project we have studied 35 pairs of chimeric cattle twins. It is now clear that fractionated doses of whole-body /sup 60/Co irradiation can cause marked shifts in the proportions of the two erythrocyte populations that make up the chimeric mixture. However, it has not been possible to eliminate one of the two cell types and thus abrogate the acquired immunologic tolerance. The results of our extensive skin-grafting experiments are remarkable because they show that a chimeric twin may mount a sufficient immune response to reject its cotwin's skin while remaining completely tolerant to erythropoietic elements of its cotwin. In conjunction with these studies, we have acquired sufficient data to define a major histocompatibility locus in cattle using alloimmune anti-lymphocyte typing sera as well as the mixed lymphocyte culture technic. This project has also yielded a considerable number of new immunogenetic parameters for cattle, monkeys and birds. Such parameters are useful for basic and applied studies in immunology.

  16. The interaction between beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) and purified class-I major histocompatibility (MHC) antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S; Olsen, A C

    1994-01-01

    been generated recently and this paper reports on a similar assay for the interaction between beta 2m and class I. As a model system human beta 2m binding to mouse class I was used. The assay is strictly biochemical using purified reagents which interact in solution and complex formation is determined......The function of MHC class-I molecules is to sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present them to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. To understand the molecular details of the assembly (and disassembly) of peptide-beta 2m-class-I complexes a biochemical peptide-class-I binding assay has...... by size separation. It is specific and highly sensitive. The observed affinity of the interaction, KD, is close to 0.4 nM. The rate of association at 37 degrees C is very fast (the ka is around 5 x 10(4)/M/s) whereas the dissociation is slow (the kd is around 8 x 10(-6)/s); the ratio of dissociation...

  17. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  18. Association of disparities in known minor histocompatibility antigens with relapse-free survival and graft-versus-host-disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobo, Willemijn; Broen, Kelly; van der Velden, Walter J.F.M.; Greupink-Draaisma, Annelies; Adisty, Niken; Wouters, Yannick; Kester, Michel; Fredrix, Hanny; Jansen, Joop H.; van der Reijden, Bert; Falkenburg, J.H. Frederik; de Witte, Theo; Preijers, Frank; Schattenberg, Ton; Feuth, Ton; Blijlevens, Nicole M.; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dolstra, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) can induce remission in patients with hematological malignancies due to graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. This immune-mediated anti-tumor effect, however, is often accompanied by detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Both GVT and GVHD are mediated by minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA)-specific T cells recognizing peptide products from polymorphic genes that differ between recipient and donor. In this study, we evaluated whether mismatches in a panel of seventeen MiHA are associated with clinical outcome after partial T cell-depleted allo-SCT. Comprehensive statistical analysis revealed that DNA mismatches for one or more autosomal-encoded MiHA was associated with increased relapse-free survival in sibling transplants, (P =0.04), particularly in patients suffering from multiple myeloma (P =0.02). Moreover, mismatches for the ubiquitous Y chromosome-derived MiHA resulted in a higher incidence of acute GVHD (grade 3–4; P =0.004), while autosomal MiHA mismatches, ubiquitous or restricted to hematopoietic cells, were not associated with severe GVHD. Finally, we demonstrated considerable differences between MiHA in their capability to induce in vivo T cell responses using dual-color tetramer analysis of peripheral blood samples collected post-SCT. Importantly, detection of MiHA-specific T cell responses was associated with improved relapse-free survival in sibling transplants (P =0.01). Our findings provide a rationale to further boost GVT immunity towards autosomal MiHA with a hematopoietic restriction to improve outcome after HLA-matched allo-SCT. PMID:23022467

  19. Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin E in Complex with TCR Defines the Role of TCR Loop Positioning in Superantigen Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin E J Rödström

    Full Text Available T cells are crucial players in cell-mediated immunity. The specificity of their receptor, the T cell receptor (TCR, is central for the immune system to distinguish foreign from host antigens. Superantigens are bacterial toxins capable of inducing a toxic immune response by cross-linking the TCR and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II and circumventing the antigen specificity. Here, we present the structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE in complex with a human T cell receptor, as well as the unligated T cell receptor structure. There are clear structural changes in the TCR loops upon superantigen binding. In particular, the HV4 loop moves to circumvent steric clashes upon complex formation. In addition, a predicted ternary model of SEE in complex with both TCR and MHC class II displays intermolecular contacts between the TCR α-chain and the MHC, suggesting that the TCR α-chain is of importance for complex formation.

  20. Complex Narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.; Buckland, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the opening chapter, "Complex Narratives," Jan Simons brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. He presents an overview of the different concepts - forking path narratives, mind-game films,

  1. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  2. NETMHCSTAB - predicting stability of peptide-MHC-I complexes; impacts for cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kasper W.; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules play an essential role in the cellular immune response, presenting peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) allowing the immune system to scrutinize ongoing intracellular production of proteins. In the early 1990s, immunogenicity...... and stability of the peptide-MHC-I (pMHC-I) complex were shown to be correlated. At that time, measuring stability was cumbersome and time consuming and only small data sets were analysed. Here, we investigate this fairly unexplored area on a large scale compared with earlier studies. A recent small-scale study...... demonstrated that pMHC-I complex stability was a better correlate of CTL immunogenicity than peptide-MHC-I affinity. We here extended this study and analysed a total of 5509 distinct peptide stability measurements covering 10 different HLA class I molecules. Artificial neural networks were used to construct...

  3. The MHC I loading complex: a multitasking machinery in adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulpke, Sabine; Tampé, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Recognition and elimination of virally or malignantly transformed cells are pivotal tasks of the adaptive immune system. For efficient immune detection, snapshots of the cellular proteome are presented as epitopes on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules for recognition by cytotoxic T cells. Knowledge about the track from the equivocal protein to the presentation of antigenic peptides has greatly expanded, leading to an astonishingly elaborate understanding of the MHC I peptide loading pathway. Here, we summarize the current view on this complex process, which involves ABC transporters, proteases, chaperones, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control. The contribution of individual proteins and subcomplexes is discussed, with a focus on the architecture and dynamics of the key player in the pathway, the peptide-loading complex (PLC). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. New recombinants within the MHC (B-complex) of the chicken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, C; Skjødt, K; Toivanen, A

    1983-01-01

    In a search for genetic recombinations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the chicken, the B-complex, the offspring from matings between heterozygous B15/B21 and B4/B6 animals were analysed by red cell agglutination. Among the progeny, 8,912 informative typings were performed...... followed B-F/B-L. The mapping distance between the two loci B-F and B-G is in the range of 0.04 centimorgan. The lack of recombinants separating individual B-F loci in this study and in the studies of others might indicate that chicken MHC is less complex than those of mammalian species, but alternative...

  5. Invariant Chain Complexes and Clusters as Platforms for MIF Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lindner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Invariant chain (Ii/CD74 has been identified as a surface receptor for migration inhibitory factor (MIF. Most cells that express Ii also synthesize major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II molecules, which depend on Ii as a chaperone and a targeting factor. The assembly of nonameric complexes consisting of one Ii trimer and three MHC II molecules (each of which is a heterodimer has been regarded as a prerequisite for efficient delivery to the cell surface. Due to rapid endocytosis, however, only low levels of Ii-MHC II complexes are displayed on the cell surface of professional antigen presenting cells and very little free Ii trimers. The association of Ii and MHC II has been reported to block the interaction with MIF, thus questioning the role of surface Ii as a receptor for MIF on MHC II-expressing cells. Recent work offers a potential solution to this conundrum: Many Ii-complexes at the cell surface appear to be under-saturated with MHC II, leaving unoccupied Ii subunits as potential binding sites for MIF. Some of this work also sheds light on novel aspects of signal transduction by Ii-bound MIF in B-lymphocytes: membrane raft association of Ii-MHC II complexes enables MIF to target Ii-MHC II to antigen-clustered B-cell-receptors (BCR and to foster BCR-driven signaling and intracellular trafficking.

  6. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. carbene complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Reaction of oligomeric Cu(I) complexes [Cu{µ-S-C(=NR)(O–Ar–CH3)}]n with Lewis acids gave Cu(I) carbene complexes, which were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Cu(I) car- bene complexes could be directly generated from RNCS, Cu(I)–OAr and Lewis acids; this method can be used to ...

  8. Computational Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tenreiro Machado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems (CS involve many elements that interact at different scales in time and space. The challenges in modeling CS led to the development of novel computational tools with applications in a wide range of scientific areas. The computational problems posed by CS exhibit intrinsic difficulties that are a major concern in Computational Complexity Theory. [...

  9. Complex narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. It interrogates the different terms - forking-path narratives, mind-game films, modular narratives, multiple-draft films, database narratives,

  10. Communication Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaikumar Radhakrishnan

    Communication complexity. Strategy I. Alice x ∈ {0, 1}n. ⇒. ⇐. Bob y ∈ {0, 1}n. Naive strategy. Alice sends x to Bob. Bob tells Alice if x = y. Cost. Requires n + 1 bits of communication. Jaikumar Radhakrishnan. Communication Complexity ...

  11. Complexity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    A complex system consists of many interacting parts, generates new collective behavior through self organization, and adaptively evolves through time. Many theories have been developed to study complex systems, including chaos, fractals, cellular automata, self organization, stochastic processes, turbulence, and genetic algorithms.

  12. Complex derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  13. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  14. Carney Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least one of the features listed. Major diagnostic features for Carney Complex Spotty skin pigmentation with ... called large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor (LCCST) Thyroid cancer Psammomatous melanotic schwannoma, meaning tumors that grow on ...

  15. Complex Covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Kleefeld

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to some generalized correspondence principle the classical limit of a non-Hermitian quantum theory describing quantum degrees of freedom is expected to be the well known classical mechanics of classical degrees of freedom in the complex phase space, i.e., some phase space spanned by complex-valued space and momentum coordinates. As special relativity was developed by Einstein merely for real-valued space-time and four-momentum, we will try to understand how special relativity and covariance can be extended to complex-valued space-time and four-momentum. Our considerations will lead us not only to some unconventional derivation of Lorentz transformations for complex-valued velocities, but also to the non-Hermitian Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, which are to lay the foundations of a non-Hermitian quantum theory.

  16. Complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The guiding principle of this presentation of ``Classical Complex Analysis'' is to proceed as quickly as possible to the central results while using a small number of notions and concepts from other fields. Thus the prerequisites for understanding this book are minimal; only elementary facts of calculus and algebra are required. The first four chapters cover the essential core of complex analysis: - differentiation in C (including elementary facts about conformal mappings) - integration in C (including complex line integrals, Cauchy's Integral Theorem, and the Integral Formulas) - sequences and series of analytic functions, (isolated) singularities, Laurent series, calculus of residues - construction of analytic functions: the gamma function, Weierstrass' Factorization Theorem, Mittag-Leffler Partial Fraction Decomposition, and -as a particular highlight- the Riemann Mapping Theorem, which characterizes the simply connected domains in C. Further topics included are: - the theory of elliptic functions based on...

  17. Complex Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Elias M

    2009-01-01

    With this second volume, we enter the intriguing world of complex analysis. From the first theorems on, the elegance and sweep of the results is evident. The starting point is the simple idea of extending a function initially given for real values of the argument to one that is defined when the argument is complex. From there, one proceeds to the main properties of holomorphic functions, whose proofs are generally short and quite illuminating: the Cauchy theorems, residues, analytic continuation, the argument principle.With this background, the reader is ready to learn a wealth of additional m

  18. Complex manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Morrow, James

    2006-01-01

    This book, a revision and organization of lectures given by Kodaira at Stanford University in 1965-66, is an excellent, well-written introduction to the study of abstract complex (analytic) manifolds-a subject that began in the late 1940's and early 1950's. It is largely self-contained, except for some standard results about elliptic partial differential equations, for which complete references are given. -D. C. Spencer, MathSciNet The book under review is the faithful reprint of the original edition of one of the most influential textbooks in modern complex analysis and geometry. The classic

  19. Managing Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Vandepitte, Sonia; Minacori, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing project to date- a project involving translation from Danish and Dutch into English and editing into American English alongside a project involving writing, usability testing, and translation from English into Dutch...

  20. phenanthroline complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structural analyses. Mass spectral studies of the complexes indicate both the compounds to produce identical cationic species viz., [Co(phen)2Cl2]+ in methanol solution. ... Cobalt(III); X-ray structure; Catecholase activity; DNA cleavage; Anti-cancer activity. 1. ..... necrotic as judged by the staining, nuclear morphology.

  1. Lecithin Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    China). Lecithin from soya bean was a product of. Sangon (Shanghai, China). Methanol of HPLC grade was purchased from Tedia (USA). Other chemicals used were of analytical grade. Preparation of polydatin-lecithin complex. Polydatin (200 mg) and lecithin (400 mg) were dissolved in 50 mL of tetrahydrofuran and stirred.

  2. Complex Criminality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, D.; Abels, D.; van der Wilt, H.

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a collection of essays on the wide diversity of meanings of complex criminality. These essays were written to commemorate a national gathering of PhD candidates, from criminal law departments of different universities, at the University of Amsterdam on the 6th of June 2014.

  3. Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Evsukoff, Alexandre; González, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade we have seen the emergence of a new inter-disciplinary field focusing on the understanding of networks which are dynamic, large, open, and have a structure sometimes called random-biased. The field of Complex Networks is helping us better understand many complex phenomena such as the spread of  deseases, protein interactions, social relationships, to name but a few. Studies in Complex Networks are gaining attention due to some major scientific breakthroughs proposed by network scientists helping us understand and model interactions contained in large datasets. In fact, if we could point to one event leading to the widespread use of complex network analysis is the availability of online databases. Theories of Random Graphs from Erdös and Rényi from the late 1950s led us to believe that most networks had random characteristics. The work on large online datasets told us otherwise. Starting with the work of Barabási and Albert as well as Watts and Strogatz in the late 1990s, we now know th...

  4. peroxo complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The investigation of dioxygen binding and activation in dinuclear iron complexes has attracted recent interest because of the presence of carboxylate bridged dinuclear iron sites in several biologically important proteins, such as the R2 protein of ribonucleotide reductase, the hydroxylase component of methane ...

  5. carbohydrate complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ferrocene-carbohydrate conjugates38,39 have lead to the design and study of the cytotoxic activity of metal com- plexes containing carbohydrate ligands. Hence, here we present the detailed synthesis and characteriza- tion of the carbohydrate triazole ligands and their Pd- complexes together with the crystal structures of ...

  6. Ntem Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zena

    New ages were obtained from charnockites and tonalites collected in the So'o Group in the Ntem Complex. The rocks were analyzed for their petrography, tectonics and 207Pb/206Pb zircon minimum ages of their zircons as well as .... Owona, Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, P.O. Box.

  7. Complex chemistry with complex compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichler Robert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years gas-phase chemical studies assisted by physical pre-separation allowed for the investigation of fragile single molecular species by gas-phase chromatography. The latest success with the heaviest group 6 transactinide seaborgium is highlighted. The formation of a very volatile hexacarbonyl compound Sg(CO6 was observed similarly to its lighter homologues molybdenum and tungsten. The interactions of these gaseous carbonyl complex compounds with quartz surfaces were investigated by thermochromatography. Second-generation experiments are under way to investigate the intramolecular bond between the central metal atom of the complexes and the ligands addressing the influence of relativistic effects in the heaviest compounds. Our contribution comprises some aspects of the ongoing challenging experiments as well as an outlook towards other interesting compounds related to volatile complex compounds in the gas phase.

  8. Managing Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  9. Complex Questions Promote Complex Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degener, Sophie; Berne, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate-grade teachers often express concerns about meeting the Common Core State Standards for Reading, primarily because of the emphasis on deep understanding of complex texts. No matter how difficult the text, if teachers demand little of the reading, student meaning making is not challenged. This article offers a tool for teachers to…

  10. Cross-presentation of IgG-containing immune complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kristi; Rath, Timo; Lencer, Wayne I.; Fiebiger, Edda

    2012-01-01

    IgG is a molecule that functionally combines facets of both innate and adaptive immunity and therefore bridges both arms of the immune system. On the one hand, IgG is created by adaptive immune cells, but can be generated by B cells independently of T cell help. On the other hand, once secreted, IgG can rapidly deliver antigens into intracellular processing pathways, which enable efficient priming of T cell responses towards epitopes from the cognate antigen initially bound by the IgG. While this process has long been known to participate in CD4+ T cell activation, IgG-mediated delivery of exogenous antigens into a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I processing pathway has received less attention. The coordinated engagement of IgG with IgG receptors expressed on the cell-surface (FcγR) and within the endolysosomal system (FcRn) is a highly potent means to deliver antigen into processing pathways that promote cross-presentation of MHC class I and presentation of MHC class II-restricted epitopes within the same dendritic cell. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which IgG-containing immune complexes mediate such cross-presentation and the implications that this understanding has for manipulation of immune-mediated diseases that depend upon or are due to the activities of CD8+ T cells. PMID:22847331

  11. Deficiency in the regulation of testicular galactolipid sulphotransferase in rats carrying the growth-and-reproduction-complex (grc) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingwood, C; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of the activity of testicular germ-cell galactolipid sulphotransferase was investigated in rats homozygous for the grc (growth and reproductive complex) gene. In the adult grc homozygotes, the activity was elevated relative to that in the wild-type animals, and a concomitant deficiency of a developmentally regulated sulphotransferase inhibitor was found. Spermatogenesis in the grc homozygotes is blocked at a stage that correlates temporally with the earliest detection of this inhibitor in the wild-type animal. In addition, there was a similar increase in the specific activity of the kidney galactolipid sulphotransferase in the grc homozygotes. This biochemical abnormality is the first to be associated with a genetically regulated, developmental defect linked to the major histocompatibility complex, and it is related to the pathogenesis of one of the major lesions controlled by the grc. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3864441

  12. Crystal structure of a TAPBPR–MHC I complex reveals the mechanism of peptide editing in antigen presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiansheng; Natarajan, Kannan; Boyd, Lisa F.; Morozov, Giora I.; Mage, Michael G.; Margulies, David H. (NIH); (Hebrew)

    2017-10-12

    Central to CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity is the recognition of peptide–major histocompatibility complex class I (p–MHC I) proteins displayed by antigen-presenting cells. Chaperone-mediated loading of high-affinity peptides onto MHC I is a key step in the MHC I antigen presentation pathway. However, the structure of MHC I with a chaperone that facilitates peptide loading has not been determined. We report the crystal structure of MHC I in complex with the peptide editor TAPBPR (TAP-binding protein–related), a tapasin homolog. TAPBPR remodels the peptide-binding groove of MHC I, resulting in the release of low-affinity peptide. Changes include groove relaxation, modifications of key binding pockets, and domain adjustments. This structure captures a peptide-receptive state of MHC I and provides insights into the mechanism of peptide editing by TAPBPR and, by analogy, tapasin.

  13. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  14. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Joseph L

    2011-01-01

    The text covers a broad spectrum between basic and advanced complex variables on the one hand and between theoretical and applied or computational material on the other hand. With careful selection of the emphasis put on the various sections, examples, and exercises, the book can be used in a one- or two-semester course for undergraduate mathematics majors, a one-semester course for engineering or physics majors, or a one-semester course for first-year mathematics graduate students. It has been tested in all three settings at the University of Utah. The exposition is clear, concise, and lively

  15. Complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carleson, Lennart

    1993-01-01

    Complex dynamics is today very much a focus of interest. Though several fine expository articles were available, by P. Blanchard and by M. Yu. Lyubich in particular, until recently there was no single source where students could find the material with proofs. For anyone in our position, gathering and organizing the material required a great deal of work going through preprints and papers and in some cases even finding a proof. We hope that the results of our efforts will be of help to others who plan to learn about complex dynamics and perhaps even lecture. Meanwhile books in the field a. re beginning to appear. The Stony Brook course notes of J. Milnor were particularly welcome and useful. Still we hope that our special emphasis on the analytic side will satisfy a need. This book is a revised and expanded version of notes based on lectures of the first author at UCLA over several \\Vinter Quarters, particularly 1986 and 1990. We owe Chris Bishop a great deal of gratitude for supervising the production of cour...

  16. and complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamrin Ken

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular materials have a strange propensity to behave as either a complex media or a simple media depending on the precise question being asked. This review paper offers a summary of granular flow rheologies for well-developed or steady-state motion, and seeks to explain this dichotomy through the vast range of complexity intrinsic to these models. A key observation is that to achieve accuracy in predicting flow fields in general geometries, one requires a model that accounts for a number of subtleties, most notably a nonlocal effect to account for cooperativity in the flow as induced by the finite size of grains. On the other hand, forces and tractions that develop on macro-scale, submerged boundaries appear to be minimally affected by grain size and, barring very rapid motions, are well represented by simple rate-independent frictional plasticity models. A major simplification observed in experiments of granular intrusion, which we refer to as the ‘resistive force hypothesis’ of granular Resistive Force Theory, can be shown to arise directly from rate-independent plasticity. Because such plasticity models have so few parameters, and the major rheological parameter is a dimensionless internal friction coefficient, some of these simplifications can be seen as consequences of scaling.

  17. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  18. The chicken beta 2-microglobulin gene is located on a non-major histocompatibility complex microchromosome: a small, G+C-rich gene with X and Y boxes in the promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riegert, P; Andersen, R; Bumstead, N

    1996-01-01

    a similar genomic organization but smaller introns and higher G+C content than mammalian beta 2-microglobulin genes. The promoter region is particularly G+C-rich and contains, in addition to interferon regulatory elements, potential S/W, X, and Y boxes that were originally described for mammalian class II...

  19. Effects of highly conserved major histocompatibility complex (MHC extended haplotypes on iron and low CD8+ T lymphocyte phenotypes in HFE C282Y homozygous hemochromatosis patients from three geographically distant areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Costa

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH is a recessively inherited disorder of iron overload occurring commonly in subjects homozygous for the C282Y mutation in HFE gene localized on chromosome 6p21.3 in linkage disequilibrium with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A locus. Although its genetic homogeneity, the phenotypic expression is variable suggesting the presence of modifying factors. One such genetic factor, a SNP microhaplotype named A-A-T, was recently found to be associated with a more severe phenotype and also with low CD8(+T-lymphocyte numbers. The present study aimed to test whether the predictive value of the A-A-T microhaplotype remained in other population settings. In this study of 304 HH patients from 3 geographically distant populations (Porto, Portugal 65; Alabama, USA 57; Nord-Trøndelag, Norway 182, the extended haplotypes involving A-A-T were studied in 608 chromosomes and the CD8(+ T-lymphocyte numbers were determined in all subjects. Patients from Porto had a more severe phenotype than those from other settings. Patients with A-A-T seemed on average to have greater iron stores (p = 0.021, but significant differences were not confirmed in the 3 separate populations. Low CD8(+ T-lymphocytes were associated with HLA-A*03-A-A-T in Porto and Alabama patients but not in the greater series from Nord-Trøndelag. Although A-A-T may signal a more severe iron phenotype, this study was unable to prove such an association in all population settings, precluding its use as a universal predictive marker of iron overload in HH. Interestingly, the association between A-A-T and CD8(+ T-lymphocytes, which was confirmed in Porto and Alabama patients, was not observed in Nord-Trøndelag patients, showing that common HLA haplotypes like A*01-B*08 or A*03-B*07 segregating with HFE/C282Y in the three populations may carry different messages. These findings further strengthen the relevance of HH as a good disease model to search for novel candidate loci associated with the genetic transmission of CD8(+ T-lymphocyte numbers.

  20. CD40 Ligand-activated, antigen-specific B cells are comparable to mature dendritic cells in presenting protein antigens and major histocompatibility complex class I- and class II-binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Flies, Amanda; Efebera, Yvonne; Sherr, David H

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are increasingly exploited for cell-based immunotherapy. However, limitations in ex vivo DC growth and DC functional heterogeneity have motivated development of complementary antigen-presenting cell sources. Here, the ability of CD40 ligand (CD40L)-activated B cells to fulfil that role was investigated. We demonstrate for the first time that non-specific or antigen-specific murine B cells can be grown for extended periods of time by stimulation with CD40L. These cells rapidly up-regulate and maintain high levels of co-stimulatory molecules. In a head-to-head comparison with DC, CD40L-expanded B cells were comparable to DC in the presentation of peptides to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. While DC were superior to antigen non-specific CD40L-activated B cells with regard to whole protein (NP-BSA) processing and presentation, CD40L-expanded B cells from NP-BSA-immunized mice were comparable to DC when presenting BSA or NP-BSA to primed primary T cells or when presenting NP linked to an unrelated carrier, CGG, to naïve T cells. Thus, the combination of CD40L activation, which supports B-cell growth and augments intracellular protein processing, and antigen uptake via the B-cell receptor, allows for efficient uptake, processing, and presentation of whole protein antigens in a fashion comparable to that observed with mature DC. Like DC, CD40L-activated B cells efficiently home to secondary lymphoid organs in vivo. This system represents a unique tool for studying primary antigen-specific B cells and the results suggest that the outgrowth of large numbers of highly activated B cells represents a viable and practical complement to DC for cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:18067555

  1. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Processing of the NY-ESO-1 Antigen Is Regulated by Rpn10 and Rpn13 Proteins and Immunoproteasomes following Non-lysine Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Richard; Lehmann, Andrea; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Ebstein, Frédéric

    2016-04-15

    The supply of MHC class I-restricted peptides is primarily ensured by the degradation of intracellular proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Depending on the target and the enzymes involved, ubiquitination is a process that may dramatically vary in terms of linkages, length, and attachment sites. Here we identified the unique lysine residue at position 124 of the NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen as the acceptor site for the formation of canonical Lys-48-linkages. Interestingly, a lysine-less form of NY-ESO-1 was as efficient as its wild-type counterpart in supplying the HLA-A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1157-165 antigenic peptide. In fact, we show that the regulation of NY-ESO-1 processing by the ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 as a well as by the standard and immunoproteasome is governed by non-canonical ubiquitination on non-lysine sites. In summary, our data underscore the significance of atypical ubiquitination in the modulation of MHC class I antigen processing. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Processing of the NY-ESO-1 Antigen Is Regulated by Rpn10 and Rpn13 Proteins and Immunoproteasomes following Non-lysine Ubiquitination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Richard; Lehmann, Andrea; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Ebstein, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The supply of MHC class I-restricted peptides is primarily ensured by the degradation of intracellular proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Depending on the target and the enzymes involved, ubiquitination is a process that may dramatically vary in terms of linkages, length, and attachment sites. Here we identified the unique lysine residue at position 124 of the NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen as the acceptor site for the formation of canonical Lys-48-linkages. Interestingly, a lysine-less form of NY-ESO-1 was as efficient as its wild-type counterpart in supplying the HLA-A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1157–165 antigenic peptide. In fact, we show that the regulation of NY-ESO-1 processing by the ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 as a well as by the standard and immunoproteasome is governed by non-canonical ubiquitination on non-lysine sites. In summary, our data underscore the significance of atypical ubiquitination in the modulation of MHC class I antigen processing. PMID:26903513

  3. Correction of the X-linked immunodeficiency phenotype by transgenic expression of human Bruton tyrosine kinase under the control of the class II major histocompatibility complex Ea locus control region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); S. Raguz (Selina); A.P.M. de Wit (Ton); G.M. Dingjan (Gemma); H.F.J. Savelkoul (Huub); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractBruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for the development of pre-B cells to mature B cell stages. Btk-deficient mice manifest an X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) defect characterized by a reduction of peripheral IgMlow IgDhigh B cells, a lack of peritoneal CD5+ B cells, low serum

  4. Detecting Site-Specific Physicochemical Selective Pressures: Applications to the Class I HLA of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex and the SRK of the Plant Sporophytic Self-Incompatibility System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sainudiin, Raazesh; Wong, Wendy Shuk Wan; Yogeeswaran, Krithika

    2005-01-01

    partitioning the codons on the basis of some property of the encoded amino acids. This partition is used to parametrize the rates of property-conserving and property-altering base substitutions at the codon level by means of finite mixtures of Markov models that also account for codon and transition...

  5. Development of a rapid in vitro protein refolding assay which discriminates between peptide-bound and peptide-free forms of recombinant porcine major histocompatibility class I complex (SLA-I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Kristensen, B.; Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    , by linking them through glycine-rich linkers to peptides representing T-cell epitopes from classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). An in vitro refold assay was developed, using a monoclonal anti-SLA antibody (PT85A) to gauge refolding. The single best-defined, SLA......-I restricted porcine CD8(+) T-cell epitope currently known is a 9-residue peptide from the polyprotein of CSFV (J. Gen. Virol, 76 (1995) 3039). Based on results with the CSFV epitope and two porcine haplotypes (H4 and H7), the in vitro refold assay appeared able to discriminate between peptide-free and peptide...

  6. A Small Peptide (CEL-1000) Derived from the Beta-Chain of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecule Induces Complete Protection Against Malaria in an Antigen-Independent Manner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charoenvit, Yupin; Brice, Gary T; Bacon, David; Majam, Victoria; Williams, Jackie; Abot, Esteban; Ganeshan, Harini; Sedegah, Martha; Doolan, Denise L; Carucci, Daniel J; Zimmerman, Daniel H

    2004-01-01

    .... We report that CEL-1000 confers a high degree of protection against Plasmodium sporozoite challenge in a murine model of malaria, as shown by the total absence of blood stage infection following...

  7. A Small Peptide (CEL-1000) Derived from the Beta-Chain of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecule Induces Complete Protection Against Malaria in an Antigen-Independent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    mortality and morbidity in tropical and subtropical areas of the world, with approximately 300 million people considered at risk of infection. Although...Methods. TABLE 1. Potency of CE1-1000 in A/J micea Expt no. and antigen dose (g) or treatment No. of sporozoites used for challenge No. of mice protected...no. tested % Protection P value b Expt 1 1.25 100 6/10 60 0.0190763 2.5 100 8/10 80 0.0016537 5 100 10/10 100 0.0000523 TiterMax adjuvant (control) 10

  8. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and viral IL-10 strongly reduce antigen-specific human T cell proliferation by diminishing the antigen-presenting capacity of monocytes via downregulation of class II major histocompatibility complex expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal Malefyt, R.; Haanen, J.; Spits, H.; Roncarolo, M. G.; te Velde, Anje; Figdor, C.; Johnson, K.; Kastelein, R.; Yssel, H.; de Vries, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and viral IL-10 (v-IL-10) strongly reduced antigen-specific proliferation of human T cells and CD4+ T cell clones when monocytes were used as antigen-presenting cells. In contrast, IL-10 and v-IL-10 did not affect the proliferative responses to antigens presented by autologous

  9. Complex Mhc-based mate choice in a wild passerine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneaud, Camille; Chastel, Olivier; Federici, Pierre; Westerdahl, Helena; Sorci, Gabriele

    2006-05-07

    The extreme polymorphism of the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) is famous for protecting hosts against constantly evolving pathogens. Mate choice is often evoked as a means of maintaining Mhc variability through avoidance of partners with similar Mhc alleles or preference for heterozygotes. Evidence for these two hypotheses mostly comes from studies on humans and laboratory mice. Here, we tested these hypotheses in a wild outbred population of house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Females were not more or less closely related to the males they paired with when considering neutral genetic variation. However, males failed to form breeding pairs when they had too few Mhc alleles and when they were too dissimilar from females at Mhc loci (i.e. had no common alleles). Furthermore, pairs did not form at random as Mhc diversity positively correlated in mating pairs. These results suggest that mate choice evolves in response to (i) benefits in terms of parasite resistance acquired from allelic diversity, and (ii) costs associated with the disruption of co-adapted genes.

  10. Modeling the interactions of a peptide-major histocompatibility class I ligand with its receptors. I. Recognition by two alpha beta T cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Stryhn, A; Fugger, L

    2000-01-01

    were successfully docked into the Ha255-262/Kk model. We have previously used a systematic and exhaustive panel of 144 single amino acid substituted analogs to analyze both MHC binding and T cell recognition of the parental viral peptide. This large body of experimental data was used to evaluate...... the models. They were found to account well for the experimentally obtained data, lending considerable support to the proposed models and suggesting a universal docking mode for alpha beta TCRs to MHC-peptide complexes. Such models may also be useful in guiding future rational experimentation....

  11. Rats homozygous for the grc complex have defective transport of androgen-binding protein to the epididymis, but normal secretion into the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsalus, G L; Musto, N A; Bardin, C W; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1985-12-01

    Male rats homozygous for the growth and reproduction complex (grc), which is closely linked to the major histocompatibility complex, are sterile due to a uniform arrest of spermatogenesis after formation of primary spermatocytes. The present study was conducted to determine whether grc influenced the secretion of the Sertoli cell product androgen-binding protein (rABP) in two F2 hybrid crosses. One was an F2 hybrid of the R10 and ACP strains and the other was an F2 hybrid population derived from the R16 and BI strains. These crosses were chosen because they allowed examination of the effects of grc on rABP secretion when this gene complex was associated with two different major histocompatibility complex backgrounds. In both crosses the rABP content of testes and epididymides from rats homozygous for grc were markedly reduced whereas heterozygotes were normal. By contrast, the concentration of rABP in plasma was normal or near normal at all ages. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis that grc influences the secretion of rABP from the apical portion of Sertoli cells into the tubular lumen and its subsequent transport to the epididymis, but has little or no effect on rABP secretion from the base of Sertoli cells into the blood. In other studies we have shown that infertile animals that have received prenatal x-ray or that are heterozygous for the Hre gene have patterns of rABP secretion similar to that of grc/grc homozygotes. It is therefore possible that the abnormal rABP secretion into tubular lumen in these animals is secondary to germ cell depletion, which is a factor common to grc/grc, Hre/+, and x-ray-treated rats.

  12. Genome-wide expression profiling of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Heui Jin

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a chronic, progressive, and devastating pain syndrome characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia, altered skin temperature, and motor dysfunction. Although previous gene expression profiling studies have been conducted in animal pain models, there genome-wide expression profiling in the whole blood of CRPS patients has not been reported yet. Here, we successfully identified certain pain-related genes through genome-wide expression profiling in the blood from CRPS patients. We found that 80 genes were differentially expressed between 4 CRPS patients (2 CRPS I and 2 CRPS II and 5 controls (cut-off value: 1.5-fold change and p<0.05. Most of those genes were associated with signal transduction, developmental processes, cell structure and motility, and immunity and defense. The expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I A subtype (HLA-A29.1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, alanine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP, l-histidine decarboxylase (HDC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (G-CSF3R, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 genes selected from the microarray were confirmed in 24 CRPS patients and 18 controls by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. We focused on the MMP9 gene that, by qRT-PCR, showed a statistically significant difference in expression in CRPS patients compared to controls with the highest relative fold change (4.0±1.23 times and p = 1.4×10(-4. The up-regulation of MMP9 gene in the blood may be related to the pain progression in CRPS patients. Our findings, which offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of the differential gene expression in CRPS may help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS pain progression.

  13. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Eun-Heui; Zhang, Enji; Ko, Youngkwon; Sim, Woo Seog; Moon, Dong Eon; Yoon, Keon Jung; Hong, Jang Hee; Lee, Won Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic, progressive, and devastating pain syndrome characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia, altered skin temperature, and motor dysfunction. Although previous gene expression profiling studies have been conducted in animal pain models, there genome-wide expression profiling in the whole blood of CRPS patients has not been reported yet. Here, we successfully identified certain pain-related genes through genome-wide expression profiling in the blood from CRPS patients. We found that 80 genes were differentially expressed between 4 CRPS patients (2 CRPS I and 2 CRPS II) and 5 controls (cut-off value: 1.5-fold change and p<0.05). Most of those genes were associated with signal transduction, developmental processes, cell structure and motility, and immunity and defense. The expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I A subtype (HLA-A29.1), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), alanine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP), l-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (G-CSF3R), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) genes selected from the microarray were confirmed in 24 CRPS patients and 18 controls by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We focused on the MMP9 gene that, by qRT-PCR, showed a statistically significant difference in expression in CRPS patients compared to controls with the highest relative fold change (4.0±1.23 times and p = 1.4×10−4). The up-regulation of MMP9 gene in the blood may be related to the pain progression in CRPS patients. Our findings, which offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of the differential gene expression in CRPS may help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS pain progression. PMID:24244504

  14. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Anderson, Robert P. [Autoimmunity and Transplantation Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); McCluskey, James [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rossjohn, Jamie, E-mail: jamie.rossjohn@med.monash.edu.au [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  15. Expression, refolding, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of MHC H-2Kk complexed with octapeptides and nonapeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, Christine; Porciero, Sophie; Roussel, Alain

    2004-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are heterodimeric cell-surface receptors that play a crucial role in the cellular immune response by presenting epitope peptides to T-cell antigen receptors (TCR). Although the structural basis of the peptide-MHC binding mechanism is becoming better understood, it is still difficult to predict a binding mode for an MHC of unknown structure. Therefore, as the first stage of a TCR-MHC interaction study, the crystal structures of the mouse H-2K(k) molecule in complex with both an octapeptide from Influenza A virus and a nonapeptide from simian virus SV40 were solved. Here, the expression, refolding, purification and crystallization of the two complexes are reported. For the H-2K(k)-HA(259-266) complex, crystals were obtained via an extensive screen using a nanodrop-dispensing robot and diffracted to 2.5 A resolution. For the H-2K(k)-SV40(560-568) complex, microscopic needles were initially obtained and their size was improved by macroseeding and a stepwise increase in precipitant concentration. Diffraction data to a resolution of 3.0 A were collected at a synchrotron facility.

  16. Complex analysis and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this wide-ranging collection report on the results of investigations from a number of linked disciplines, including complex algebraic geometry, complex analytic geometry of manifolds and spaces, and complex differential geometry.

  17. Photocytotoxic lanthanide complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Tb(III) complexes in UV-A light of 350 nm.61 The complexes are thus of importance for therapeutic appli- cations in the treatment of accessible tumours like skin melanoma. 3.3 Photoactive non-macrocyclic lanthanide complexes. Lanthanide complexes of non-macrocyclic ligands have recently been studied mainly by ...

  18. Intermolecular Interactions Between DMα and DMβ Proteins in BuLA-DM Complex of Water Buffalo Bubalus bubalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Leena; Panwar, Deepak; Ali, Sher

    2017-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) with its three classes represents a cluster of tightly linked genes with defined immunological and non-immunological functions. The DM, a MHC class II molecule is formed by the non-covalent association of DMα and DMβ chains. It binds with the processed peptide antigens and presents them to T lymphocytes, thereby triggering the immune responses. Startlingly, the expression pattern and structural organization of DMα and DMβ proteins in buffalo remains undefined. We isolated and purified the DMα and DMβ proteins from Bubalus bubalis using gel filtration chromatography. Employing western blotting and immunohistochemistry, highest expression of these proteins was observed in spleen and were later localized in the cytoplasm. We modelled 3D structures of the proteins and assessed the binding interface of BuLA-DM docked complex. In the process, we uncovered 9 DMα and 8 DMβ specific residues participating in the formation of BuLA-DM complex. Our work demonstrated active participation of the critical amino acid residues engaged in the formation of BuLA-DM complex facilitating deeper understanding on the structure-function relationship of these proteins. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4254-4266, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Structural Model of the Extracellular Assembly of the TCR-CD3 Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Aswin; Nadarajah, Vidushan; Felsovalyi, Klara; Wang, Wenjuan; Jeyachandran, Vivian R; Wasson, Riley A; Cardozo, Timothy; Bracken, Clay; Krogsgaard, Michelle

    2016-03-29

    Antigen recognition of peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHCs) by T cells, a key step in initiating adaptive immune responses, is performed by the T cell receptor (TCR) bound to CD3 heterodimers. However, the biophysical basis of the transmission of TCR-CD3 extracellular interaction into a productive intracellular signaling sequence remains incomplete. Here we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy combined with mutational analysis and computational docking to derive a structural model of the extracellular TCR-CD3 assembly. In the inactivated state, CD3γε interacts with the helix 3 and helix 4-F strand regions of the TCR Cβ subunit, whereas CD3δε interacts with the F and C strand regions of the TCR Cα subunit in this model, placing the CD3 subunits on opposing sides of the TCR. This work identifies the molecular contacts between the TCR and CD3 subunits, identifying a physical basis for transmitting an activating signal through the complex. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An ontology for major histocompatibility restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Randi; Overton, James A; Seymour, Emily; Sidney, John; Kaufman, Jim; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Ellis, Shirley; Hammond, John; Butcher, Geoff W; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    MHC molecules are a highly diverse family of proteins that play a key role in cellular immune recognition. Over time, different techniques and terminologies have been developed to identify the specific type(s) of MHC molecule involved in a specific immune recognition context. No consistent nomenclature exists across different vertebrate species. To correctly represent MHC related data in The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), we built upon a previously established MHC ontology and created an ontology to represent MHC molecules as they relate to immunological experiments. This ontology models MHC protein chains from 16 species, deals with different approaches used to identify MHC, such as direct sequencing verses serotyping, relates engineered MHC molecules to naturally occurring ones, connects genetic loci, alleles, protein chains and multi-chain proteins, and establishes evidence codes for MHC restriction. Where available, this work is based on existing ontologies from the OBO foundry. Overall, representing MHC molecules provides a challenging and practically important test case for ontology building, and could serve as an example of how to integrate other ontology building efforts into web resources.

  1. The histocompatibility antigen in asbestos related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jarad, N; Uthayakumar, S; Buckland, E J; Green, T S; Ord, J; Newland, A C; Rudd, R M

    1992-12-01

    Thirty nine phenotypes of human leucocyte antigens (HLA)-A-B-DR and DQ were obtained from 99 asbestos workers (one woman and 98 men). Presence or absence of antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor was determined in 91 of them. Workers were divided into five groups: asbestos workers with no apparent disease (AW; n = 17), diffuse benign pleural disease (PD; n = 31), asbestosis (AS; n = 24), asbestosis with lung cancer (AS-CA; n = 14), and mesothelioma (M; n = 13). Compared with AW, several trends of differences of HLA antigen prevalence were found in patients with asbestos related disease, but these did not achieve statistical significance when p was corrected (pcorr) by number of analyses undertaken. Analysis of the results obtained in previous studies together with the results of this study showed that compared with AW, AS patients had decreased prevalence of HLA-DR5 (pcorr < 0.02). Reasons for the differences in results of previous studies and statistical methods commonly used to compare prevalences of HLA antigen are discussed.

  2. 42 CFR 493.1278 - Standard: Histocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements: (1) An audible alarm system must be used to monitor the storage temperature of specimens (donor... patient specimens must be easily retrievable. (3) Reagent typing sera inventory prepared in-house must... prepared in-house or commercially. (iii) Ensuring that reagents used for typing are adequate to define all...

  3. Strategies for future histocompatible stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan; Barington, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell therapy based on the safe and unlimited self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells is envisioned for future use in tissue or organ replacement after injury or disease. A gradual decline of regenerative capacity has been documented among the adult stem cell population in some body organs...... a developmental lineage, would facilitate the transplantation of organ/tissue-specific adult stem cells or terminally differentiated somatic cells to improve the function of diseased organs or tissues in an individual. Here, we present an overview of various experimental cell therapy technologies based on the use...... during the aging process. Recent progress in human somatic cell nuclear transfer and inducible pluripotent stem cell technologies has shown that patient-derived nuclei or somatic cells can be reprogrammed in vitro to become pluripotent stem cells, from which the three germ layer lineages can be generated...

  4. Structure of HLA-A*0301 in complex with a peptide of proteolipid protein: insights into the role of HLA-A alleles in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Róisín M. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Friis, Lone [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Siebold, Christian [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Friese, Manuel A. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Falkenried 94, 20251 Hamburg (Germany); Fugger, Lars, E-mail: lars.fugger@imm.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby Sygehus, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 N Aarhus (Denmark); Jones, E. Yvonne, E-mail: lars.fugger@imm.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-01

    The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. HLA-A3 is a predisposing allele for multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The KLIETYFSK peptide is a naturally processed epitope of proteolipid protein, a myelin protein and candidate target for immune-mediated myelin destruction in MS. Comparison of the structure of HLA-A3 with that of HLA-A2, an MHC class I molecule which is protective against MS, indicates that both MHC class I molecules present very similar faces for T-cell receptor recognition whilst differing in the specificity of their peptide-binding grooves. These characteristics may underlie the opposing (predisposing versus protective) associations that they exhibit both in humans and in mouse models of MS-like disease. Furthermore, subtle alterations within the peptide-binding groove of HLA-A3 and other A3-like MHC class I molecules, members of the so-called A3 superfamily, may be sufficient to alter their presentation of autoantigen peptides such as KLIETYFSK. This in turn may modulate their contribution to the associated risk of autoimmune disease.

  5. Complex differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Fangyang

    2002-01-01

    The theory of complex manifolds overlaps with several branches of mathematics, including differential geometry, algebraic geometry, several complex variables, global analysis, topology, algebraic number theory, and mathematical physics. Complex manifolds provide a rich class of geometric objects, for example the (common) zero locus of any generic set of complex polynomials is always a complex manifold. Yet complex manifolds behave differently than generic smooth manifolds; they are more coherent and fragile. The rich yet restrictive character of complex manifolds makes them a special and interesting object of study. This book is a self-contained graduate textbook that discusses the differential geometric aspects of complex manifolds. The first part contains standard materials from general topology, differentiable manifolds, and basic Riemannian geometry. The second part discusses complex manifolds and analytic varieties, sheaves and holomorphic vector bundles, and gives a brief account of the surface classifi...

  6. Complex and symplectic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Medori, Costantino; Tomassini, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    This book arises from the INdAM Meeting "Complex and Symplectic Geometry", which was held in Cortona in June 2016. Several leading specialists, including young researchers, in the field of complex and symplectic geometry, present the state of the art of their research on topics such as the cohomology of complex manifolds; analytic techniques in Kähler and non-Kähler geometry; almost-complex and symplectic structures; special structures on complex manifolds; and deformations of complex objects. The work is intended for researchers in these areas.

  7. Adaptive leadership: fighting complexity with complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Peter

    2014-01-01

    CHDS State/Local Contemporary crises have become increasingly complex and the methods of leading through them have failed to keep pace. If it is assumed that leadership matters—that it has a legitimate effect on the outcome of a crisis, then leaders have a duty to respond to that adaptation with modifications of their own. Using literature sources, the research explores crisis complexity, crisis leadership, and alternative leadership strategies. Specifically, the research evaluates the app...

  8. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  9. Complex carbohydrates (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods such as peas, beans, whole grains, and vegetables. Both simple and complex carbohydrates are turned to ... majority of carbohydrates should come from complex carbohydrates (starches) and naturally occurring sugars, rather than processed or ...

  10. Complex systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    Ma'ayan, Avi

    2017-01-01

    Complex systems theory is concerned with identifying and characterizing common design elements that are observed across diverse natural, technological and social complex systems. Systems biology, a more holistic approach to study molecules and cells in biology, has advanced rapidly in the past two decades. However, not much appreciation has been granted to the realization that the human cell is an exemplary complex system. Here, I outline general design principles identified in many complex s...

  11. The simple complex numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Zalesny, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A new simple geometrical interpretation of complex numbers is presented. It differs from their usual interpretation as points in the complex plane. From the new point of view the complex numbers are rather operations on vectors than points. Moreover, in this approach the real, imaginary and complex numbers have similar interpretation. They are simply some operations on vectors. The presented interpretation is simpler, more natural, and better adjusted to possible applications in geometry and ...

  12. The Visibility Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pocchiola, Michel; Vegter, Gert

    1993-01-01

    We introduce the visibility complex of a collection O of n pairwise disjoint convex objects in the plane. This 2–dimensional cell complex may be considered as a generalization of the tangent visibility graph of O. Its space complexity k is proportional to the size of the tangent visibility graph. We

  13. Cobalt(III) complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    . 2 radicals ... Crystal structure of the complex was determined by X-ray diffraction and is reported elsewhere. 5. The complex is stable towards hydrolysis at least for 10 h as checked by its ..... served in Co(III) aquo-ammonia complexes where.

  14. Complex variables I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables I includes functions of a complex variable, elementary complex functions, integrals of complex functions in the complex plane, sequences and series, and poles and r

  15. Simplicial complexes of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    A graph complex is a finite family of graphs closed under deletion of edges. Graph complexes show up naturally in many different areas of mathematics, including commutative algebra, geometry, and knot theory. Identifying each graph with its edge set, one may view a graph complex as a simplicial complex and hence interpret it as a geometric object. This volume examines topological properties of graph complexes, focusing on homotopy type and homology. Many of the proofs are based on Robin Forman's discrete version of Morse theory. As a byproduct, this volume also provides a loosely defined toolbox for attacking problems in topological combinatorics via discrete Morse theory. In terms of simplicity and power, arguably the most efficient tool is Forman's divide and conquer approach via decision trees; it is successfully applied to a large number of graph and digraph complexes.

  16. Complex Systems and Dependability

    CERN Document Server

    Zamojski, Wojciech; Sugier, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Typical contemporary complex system is a multifaceted amalgamation of technical, information, organization, software and human (users, administrators and management) resources. Complexity of such a system comes not only from its involved technical and organizational structure but mainly from complexity of information processes that must be implemented in the operational environment (data processing, monitoring, management, etc.). In such case traditional methods of reliability analysis focused mainly on technical level are usually insufficient in performance evaluation and more innovative meth

  17. More about inorganic complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Vella, Alfred;

    1980-01-01

    This article is a sequel to the one which appeared earlier in this Journal ("Inorganic Complexes: An Introduction" Hyphen VOil. I, Number 3, Spring 1978, pp. 31 - 39) and which dealt with certain aspects of the chemistry of complexes, notably: their definition, stereochemistry, nomenclature and some of their chemical properties. In this article we shall examine the stability of complexes and review some of the applications of coordination compound" in chemis~ry.

  18. Tuberculosis in complex emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coninx, Rudi

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the key factors and remaining challenges for tuberculosis (TB) control programmes in complex emergencies. A complex emergency is "a humanitarian crisis in a country, region or society where there is total or considerable breakdown of authority resulting from internal or external conflict and which requires an international response that goes beyond the mandate or capacity of any single agency and/or the ongoing United Nations country programme." Some 200 million people are believed to live in countries affected by complex emergencies; almost all of these are developing countries that also bear the main burden of TB. The effects of complex emergencies impact on TB control programmes, interfering with the goals of identifying and curing TB patients and possibly leading to the emergence of MDR-TB. There are many detailed descriptions of aid interventions during complex emergencies; yet TB control programmes are absent from most of these reports. If TB is neglected, it may quickly result in increased morbidity and mortality, as was demonstrated in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Somalia. TB is a major disease in complex emergencies and requires an appropriate public health response. While there is no manual to cover complex emergencies, the interagency manual for TB control in refugee and displaced populations provides valuable guidance. These programmes contribute to the body of evidence needed to compile such a manual, and should ensure that the experiences of TB control in complex emergencies lead to the establishment of evidence-based programmes.

  19. Introductory complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Richard A

    1984-01-01

    A shorter version of A. I. Markushevich's masterly three-volume Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable, this edition is appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in complex analysis. Numerous worked-out examples and more than 300 problems, some with hints and answers, make it suitable for independent study. 1967 edition.

  20. The visibility complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pocchiola, M; Vegter, G

    We introduce the visibility complex (rr 2-dimensional regular cell complex) of a collection of n pairwise disjoint convex obstacles in the plane. It can be considered as a subdivision of the set of free rays (i.e., rays whose origins lie in free space, the complement of the obstacles). Its cells

  1. The Acacia Senegal complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Ross

    1975-11-01

    Full Text Available A brief account of the present slate of knowledge of the species in the  Acacia senegal complex is given. A short description of each species is provided together with a key to the identification of the species. Attention is drawn to the taxonomic difficulties encountered within the complex.

  2. Complexity and valued landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael M. McCarthy

    1979-01-01

    The variable "complexity," or "diversity," has received a great deal of attention in recent research efforts concerned with visual resource management, including the identification of complexity as one of the primary evaluation measures. This paper describes research efforts that support the hypothesis that the landscapes we value are those with...

  3. Is dense codeswitching complex?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorleijn, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the question is raised to what extent dense code switching can be considered complex. Psycholinguistic experiments indicate that code switching involves cognitive costs, both in production and comprehension, a conclusion that could indicate that code switching is indeed complex. In

  4. Conducting metal dithiolate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhill, A. E.; Ahmad, M. M.; Turner, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound...

  5. Visual Complexity: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donderi, Don C.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of visual complexity, the history of its measurement, and its implications for behavior are reviewed, starting with structuralism and Gestalt psychology at the beginning of the 20th century and ending with visual complexity theory, perceptual learning theory, and neural circuit theory at the beginning of the 21st. Evidence is drawn from…

  6. Photocytotoxic lanthanide complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The chemistry of photoactive lanthanide complexes showing biological applications is of recent origin. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive treatment modality of cancer using a photosensitizer drug and light. This review primarily focuses on different aspects of the chemistry of lanthanide complexes showing ...

  7. Thermochemiluminescent Cyclodextrin Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luider, Theo M.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Koek, Johannes N.; Wynberg, Hans

    1990-01-01

    Thermochemiluminescent complexes of an adamantylideneadamantane 1,2-dioxetane and a cyclodextrin are non-volatile at the temperatures used to excite the thermochemiluminescence. The complexes can be encapsulated in immunosensitized microcapsules, e.g., liposomes, to provide a labeled immunoreagent

  8. Cytogenetic localization of the growth and reproduction complex (Grc) in the rat and in the mouse and its position in relation to RT1.EC and other loci in the rat MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, K; Yan, Q; Yuan, X J; Kunz, H W; Levan, G; Gill, T J

    1999-01-01

    The segment of rat chromosome 20 (RNO20p12) that contains the classical loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC; RT1.A-RT1.E) also contains genes affecting growth, reproduction and susceptibility to chemical carcinogens (the Grc) and multiple genes encoding class I MHC antigens (the EC region). The relative positions of the MHC, Grc, and EC region have not been demonstrated explicitly, although they have been postulated from genetic mapping studies. The present study was undertaken to map these regions cytogenetically by several different approaches using cosmids specific for the Rps 18, Hspa1 and Bat1 genes. The order was shown to be: centromere-Rps 18-Hspa1-Bat1-EC-Grc.

  9. A complex legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Cristopher

    2011-11-01

    In his tragically short life, Alan Turing helped define what computing machines are capable of, and where they reach inherent limits. His legacy is still felt every day, in areas ranging from computational complexity theory to cryptography and quantum computing.

  10. Complexity of Economical Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    G. P. Pavlos; A. C. Iliopoulos; L.P. Karakatsanis; M. Xenakis; E. Pavlos

    2015-01-01

    .... In addition a summary of an extended algorithm of nonlinear time series analysis is provided which is applied not only in economical time series but also in other physical complex systems (e.g. [22, 24...

  11. Complex Networks IX

    CERN Document Server

    Coronges, Kate; Gonçalves, Bruno; Sinatra, Roberta; Vespignani, Alessandro; Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Complex Networks; CompleNet 2018

    2018-01-01

    This book aims to bring together researchers and practitioners working across domains and research disciplines to measure, model, and visualize complex networks. It collects the works presented at the 9th International Conference on Complex Networks (CompleNet) 2018 in Boston, MA in March, 2018. With roots in physical, information and social science, the study of complex networks provides a formal set of mathematical methods, computational tools and theories to describe prescribe and predict dynamics and behaviors of complex systems. Despite their diversity, whether the systems are made up of physical, technological, informational, or social networks, they share many common organizing principles and thus can be studied with similar approaches. This book provides a view of the state-of-the-art in this dynamic field and covers topics such as group decision-making, brain and cellular connectivity, network controllability and resiliency, online activism, recommendation systems, and cyber security.

  12. Physical Sciences Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 88,000 square foot complex is used to investigate basic physical science in support of missile technology development. It incorporates office space, dedicated...

  13. Complex Strategic Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen

    . Complex Strategic Choices provides clear principles and methods which can guide and support strategic decision making to face the many current challenges. By considering ways in which planning practices can be renewed and exploring the possibilities for acquiring awareness and tools to add value...... and students in the field of planning and decision analysis as well as practitioners dealing with strategic analysis and decision making. More broadly, Complex Strategic Choices acts as guide for professionals and students involved in complex planning tasks across several fields such as business...... to strategic decision making, Complex Strategic Choices presents a methodology which is further illustrated by a number of case studies and example applications. Dr. Techn. Steen Leleur has adapted previously established research based on feedback and input from various conferences, journals and students...

  14. Pigment-protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  15. Microsolvation in molecular complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquini, M; Schiccheri, N; Piani, G; Pietraperzia, G; Becucci, M; Castellucci, E [European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS), Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)], E-mail: gianni.pietraperzia@unifi.it

    2008-11-15

    In this paper, we report the results of our study of the microsolvation process involving the anisole molecule. We are able to study bimolecular complexes of different compositions. Changing the second partner molecule bound to anisole, we observed complexes of different geometries, because of the large variety of interactions possible for the anisole. High-resolution electronic spectroscopy is the best tool to reveal the correct vibrationally (zero-point) averaged geometry of the complex. That is done by analysing the rovibronic structure of the electronic spectra, which are related to the equilibrium geometry of the complex as well as dynamical processes, both in the ground and in the excited state. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by high-level quantum calculations.

  16. Management recommendations: Tewaukon Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Tewaukon Complex, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and additional comments are...

  17. Complex Strategic Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen

    to strategic decision making, Complex Strategic Choices presents a methodology which is further illustrated by a number of case studies and example applications. Dr. Techn. Steen Leleur has adapted previously established research based on feedback and input from various conferences, journals and students...... and students in the field of planning and decision analysis as well as practitioners dealing with strategic analysis and decision making. More broadly, Complex Strategic Choices acts as guide for professionals and students involved in complex planning tasks across several fields such as business....... Complex Strategic Choices provides clear principles and methods which can guide and support strategic decision making to face the many current challenges. By considering ways in which planning practices can be renewed and exploring the possibilities for acquiring awareness and tools to add value...

  18. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lipid complex is also in combination with another chemotherapy drug to treat multiple myeloma (a type of cancer of the bone marrow) that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other ...

  19. Low complexity MIMO receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Lin; Yu, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems can increase the spectral efficiency in wireless communications. However, the interference becomes the major drawback that leads to high computational complexity at both transmitter and receiver. In particular, the complexity of MIMO receivers can be prohibitively high. As an efficient mathematical tool to devise low complexity approaches that mitigate the interference in MIMO systems, lattice reduction (LR) has been widely studied and employed over the last decade. The co-authors of this book are world's leading experts on MIMO receivers, and here they share the key findings of their research over years. They detail a range of key techniques for receiver design as multiple transmitted and received signals are available. The authors first introduce the principle of signal detection and the LR in mathematical aspects. They then move on to discuss the use of LR in low complexity MIMO receiver design with respect to different aspects, including uncoded MIMO detection...

  20. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks......, is fragmented at best. The workshop addressed the many open research questions: What are the obvious use cases and applications of complex search? What are essential features of work tasks and search tasks to take into account? And how do these evolve over time? With a multitude of information, varying from...... introductory to specialized, and from authoritative to speculative or opinionated, when to show what sources of information? How does the information seeking process evolve and what are relevant differences between different stages? With complex task and search process management, blending searching, browsing...

  1. Beyond complex Langevin equations

    CERN Document Server

    Wosiek, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    A simple integral relation between a complex weight and the corresponding positive distribution is derived by introducing a second complex variable. Together with the positivity and normalizability conditions, this sum rule allows to construct explicitly equivalent pairs of distributions in simple cases. In particular the well known solution for a complex gaussian distribution is generalized to an arbitrary complex slope. This opens a possibility of positive representation of Feynman path integrals directly in the Minkowski time. Such construction is then explicitly carried through in the second part of this presentation. The continuum limit of the new representation exists only if some of the additional couplings tend to infinity and are tuned in a specific way. The approach is then successfully applied to three quantum mechanical examples including a particle in a constant magnetic field -- a simplest prototype of a Wilson line. Further generalizations are shortly discussed and an amusing interpretation of ...

  2. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leg, such as a crush injury, fracture or amputation. Other major and minor traumas — such as surgery, ... diagnose complex regional pain syndrome, but the following procedures may provide important clues: Bone scan. This procedure ...

  3. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  4. On scattered subword complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Kása, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Special scattered subwords, in which the gaps are of length from a given set, are defined. The scattered subword complexity, which is the number of such scattered subwords, is computed for rainbow words.

  5. Provability, complexity, grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Beklemishev, Lev; Vereshchagin, Nikolai

    1999-01-01

    The book contains English translations of three outstanding dissertations in mathematical logic and complexity theory. L. Beklemishev proves that all provability logics must belong to one of the four previously known classes. The dissertation of M. Pentus proves the Chomsky conjecture about the equivalence of two approaches to formal languages: the Chomsky hierarchy and the Lambek calculus. The dissertation of N. Vereshchagin describes a general framework for criteria of reversability in complexity theory.

  6. Complex variable HVPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingbeck, John P [Mathematics Department, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Grosjean, Alain [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon (CNRS, UPRES-A 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Jolicard, Georges [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon (CNRS, UPRES-A 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2004-08-13

    Complex variable hypervirial perturbation theory is applied to the case of oscillator and Coulomb potentials perturbed by a single term potential of the form Vx{sup n} or Vr{sup n}, respectively. The trial calculations reported show that this approach can produce accurate complex energies for resonant states via a simple and speedy calculation and can also be useful in studies of PT symmetry and tunnelling resonance effects. (addendum)

  7. Nitrosyl complexes of Technetium

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, Janine

    2016-01-01

    The presented thesis describes syntheses and characterization of novel technetium nitrosyl compounds with various ligand systems. The main focus is the synthesis of low-valent technetium nitrosyl complexes with cyclopentadienyl ligands. In the first section, nitrosyltechnetium complexes with monodentate ligands and bidentate P,N chelators are discussed. The established synthetic route for the synthesis of [99mTc(NO)Cl4]- was adopted for the synthesis of this important precursor with the long-...

  8. Advances in network complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2013-01-01

    A well-balanced overview of mathematical approaches to describe complex systems, ranging from chemical reactions to gene regulation networks, from ecological systems to examples from social sciences. Matthias Dehmer and Abbe Mowshowitz, a well-known pioneer in the field, co-edit this volume and are careful to include not only classical but also non-classical approaches so as to ensure topicality. Overall, a valuable addition to the literature and a must-have for anyone dealing with complex systems.

  9. Uranium hexakisamido complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, K.; Mindiola, D.J.; Baker, T.A.; Davis, W.M.; Cummins, C.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2000-09-01

    Minimal structural changes accompany the oxidation of the paramagnetic uranium(V) anion [U(dbabh){sub 6}]{sup -} to the neutral, diamagnetic counterpart [U(dbabh){sub 6}] (see structure). These two T{sub h}-stmmetric complexes, which were synthetized starting from 2,3:5,6-dibenzo-7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene (Hdbabh), are the first isolable homoleptic hexakisamido complexes of uranium(V) and (VI). (orig.)

  10. Urban geography and complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pumain

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary approach of complex systems raises common questions that could be handled by a transdisciplinary theory. We demonstrate how the main concepts of urban geography could be integrated in such a theory ofcomplexity. We illustrate the complexity approach by a short presentationof the SIMPOP model that uses a multi-agents formalism for the simulationof the evolutionary properties of systems of cities.

  11. Algorithmic Relative Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Daniele Cerra; Mihai Datcu

    2011-01-01

    Information content and compression are tightly related concepts that can be addressed through both classical and algorithmic information theories, on the basis of Shannon entropy and Kolmogorov complexity, respectively. The definition of several entities in Kolmogorov’s framework relies upon ideas from classical information theory, and these two approaches share many common traits. In this work, we expand the relations between these two frameworks by introducing algorithmic cross-complexity ...

  12. Electrospun complexes - functionalised nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T.; Wolf, M.; Dreyer, B.; Unruh, D.; Krüger, C.; Menze, M. [Leibniz University Hannover, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (Germany); Sindelar, R. [University of Applied Science Hannover, Faculty II (Germany); Klingelhöfer, G. [Gutenberg-University, Institute of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry (Germany); Renz, F., E-mail: renz@acd.uni-hannover.de [Leibniz University Hannover, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Here we present a new approach of using iron-complexes in electro-spun fibres. We modify poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by replacing the methoxy group with Diaminopropane or Ethylenediamine. The complex is bound covalently via an imine-bridge or an amide. The resulting polymer can be used in the electrospinning process without any further modifications in method either as pure reagent or mixed with small amounts of not functionalised polymer resulting in fibres of different qualities (Fig. 1).

  13. Quantum Hamiltonian Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Gharibian, Sevag; Huang, Yichen; Landau, Zeph; Shin, Seung Woo

    2014-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are a central pillar of modern computational complexity theory. This survey provides an introduction to the rapidly growing field of Quantum Hamiltonian Complexity, which includes the study of quantum constraint satisfaction problems. Over the past decade and a half, this field has witnessed fundamental breakthroughs, ranging from the establishment of a "Quantum Cook-Levin Theorem" to deep insights into the structure of 1D low-temperature quantum systems via s...

  14. Complex fate of paralogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snel Berend

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thanks to recent high coverage mass-spectrometry studies and reconstructed protein complexes, we are now in an unprecedented position to study the evolution of biological systems. Gene duplications, known to be a major source of innovation in evolution, can now be readily examined in the context of protein complexes. Results We observe that paralogs operating in the same complex fulfill different roles: mRNA dosage increase for more than a hundred cytosolic ribosomal proteins, mutually exclusive participation of at least 54 paralogs resulting in alternative forms of complexes, and 24 proteins contributing to bona fide structural growth. Inspection of paralogous proteins participating in two independent complexes shows that an ancient, pre-duplication protein functioned in both multi-protein assemblies and a gene duplication event allowed the respective copies to specialize and split their roles. Conclusion Variants with conditionally assembled, paralogous subunits likely have played a role in yeast's adaptation to anaerobic conditions. In a number of cases the gene duplication has given rise to one duplicate that is no longer part of a protein complex and shows an accelerated rate of evolution. Such genes could provide the raw material for the evolution of new functions.

  15. Complex fate of paralogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szklarczyk, Radek; Huynen, Martijn A; Snel, Berend

    2008-12-18

    Thanks to recent high coverage mass-spectrometry studies and reconstructed protein complexes, we are now in an unprecedented position to study the evolution of biological systems. Gene duplications, known to be a major source of innovation in evolution, can now be readily examined in the context of protein complexes. We observe that paralogs operating in the same complex fulfill different roles: mRNA dosage increase for more than a hundred cytosolic ribosomal proteins, mutually exclusive participation of at least 54 paralogs resulting in alternative forms of complexes, and 24 proteins contributing to bona fide structural growth. Inspection of paralogous proteins participating in two independent complexes shows that an ancient, pre-duplication protein functioned in both multi-protein assemblies and a gene duplication event allowed the respective copies to specialize and split their roles. Variants with conditionally assembled, paralogous subunits likely have played a role in yeast's adaptation to anaerobic conditions. In a number of cases the gene duplication has given rise to one duplicate that is no longer part of a protein complex and shows an accelerated rate of evolution. Such genes could provide the raw material for the evolution of new functions.

  16. MANAGEMENT OF SPORT COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian STAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The actuality of the investigated theme. Nowadays, human evolution, including his intellectual development, proves the fact that especially the creation manpower and the employment was the solution of all life’s ambitions in society. So, the fact is that in reality, man is the most important capital of the society. Also, in an individual’s life, the practice of sport plays a significant role and that’s why the initiation, the launch and the management of sports complexes activity reveal the existence of specific management features that we will identify and explain in the current study. The aim of the research refers to the elaboration of a theoretical base of the management of the sport complexes, to the pointing of the factors that influence the efficient existence and function of a sport complex in our country and to the determination of the responsibilities that have a manager who directs successfully the activity of the sport complexes. The investigation is based on theoretical methods, such as: scientific documentation, analysis, synthesis, comparison and on empirical research methods, like: study of researched literature and observation. The results of the research indicate the fact that the profitability of a sport complex must assure a particular structure to avoid the bankruptcy risk and also, that the administration of the sport complexes activity must keep in view the reliable functions of the contemporaneous management.

  17. Genome complexity in the coelacanth is reflected in its adaptive immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Nil Ratan; Ota, Tatsuya; Litman, Gary W.; Hansen, John; Parra, Zuly; Hsu, Ellen; Buonocore, Francesco; Canapa, Adriana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the available genome and transcriptome resources from the coelacanth in order to characterize genes involved in adaptive immunity. Two highly distinctive IgW-encoding loci have been identified that exhibit a unique genomic organization, including a multiplicity of tandemly repeated constant region exons. The overall organization of the IgW loci precludes typical heavy chain class switching. A locus encoding IgM could not be identified either computationally or by using several different experimental strategies. Four distinct sets of genes encoding Ig light chains were identified. This includes a variant sigma-type Ig light chain previously identified only in cartilaginous fishes and which is now provisionally denoted sigma-2. Genes encoding α/β and γ/δ T-cell receptors, and CD3, CD4, and CD8 co-receptors also were characterized. Ig heavy chain variable region genes and TCR components are interspersed within the TCR α/δ locus; this organization previously was reported only in tetrapods and raises questions regarding evolution and functional cooption of genes encoding variable regions. The composition, organization and syntenic conservation of the major histocompatibility complex locus have been characterized. We also identified large numbers of genes encoding cytokines and their receptors, and other genes associated with adaptive immunity. In terms of sequence identity and organization, the adaptive immune genes of the coelacanth more closely resemble orthologous genes in tetrapods than those in teleost fishes, consistent with current phylogenomic interpretations. Overall, the work reported described herein highlights the complexity inherent in the coelacanth genome and provides a rich catalog of immune genes for future investigations.

  18. Cell complexes through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klette, Reinhard

    2000-10-01

    The history of cell complexes is closely related to the birth and development of topology in general. Johann Benedict Listing (1802 - 1882) introduced the term 'topology' into mathematics in a paper published in 1847, and he also defined cell complexes for the first time in a paper published in 1862. Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777 - 1855) is often cited as the one who initiated these ideas, but he did not publish either on topology or on cell complexes. The pioneering work of Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783) on graphs is also often cited as the birth of topology, and Euler's work was cited by Listing in 1862 as a stimulus for his research on cell complexes. There are different branches in topology which have little in common: point set topology, algebraic topology, differential topology etc. Confusion may arise if just 'topology' is specified, without clarifying the used concept. Topological subjects in mathematics are often related to continuous models, and therefore quite irrelevant to computer based solutions in image analysis. Compared to this, only a minority of topology publications in mathematics addresses discrete spaces which are appropriate for computer-based image analysis. In these cases, often the notion of a cell complex plays a crucial role. This paper briefly reports on a few of these publications. This paper is not intended to cover the very lively progress in cell complex studies within the context of image analysis during the last two decades. Basically it stops its historic review at the time when this subject in image analysis research gained speed in 1980 - 1990. As a general point of view, the paper indicates that image analysis contributes to a fusion of topological concepts, the geometric and the abstract cell structure approach and point set topology, which may lead towards new problems for the study of topologies defined on geometric or abstract cell complexes.

  19. Turbulent complex (dusty) plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Sergey; Schwabe, Mierk

    2017-04-01

    As a paradigm of complex system dynamics, solid particles immersed into a weakly ionized plasma, so called complex (dusty) plasmas, were (and continue to be) a subject of many detailed studies. Special types of dynamical activity have been registered, in particular, spontaneous pairing, entanglement and cooperative action of a great number of particles resulting in formation of vortices, self-propelling, tunneling, and turbulent movements. In the size domain of 1-10 mkm normally used in experiments with complex plasmas, the characteristic dynamic time-scale is of the order of 0.01-0.1 s, and these particles can be visualized individually in real time, providing an atomistic (kinetic) level of investigations. The low-R turbulent flow induced either by the instability in a complex plasma cloud or formed behind a projectile passing through the cloud is a typical scenario. Our simulations showed formation of a fully developed system of vortices and demonstrated that the velocity structure functions scale very close to the theoretical predictions. As an important element of self-organization, cooperative and turbulent particle motions are present in many physical, astrophysical, and biological systems. Therefore, experiments with turbulent wakes and turbulent complex plasma oscillations are a promising mean to observe and study in detail the anomalous transport on the level of individual particles.

  20. Complexity: The bigger picture

    CERN Document Server

    Vicsek, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    If a concept is not well defined, there are grounds for its abuse. This is particularly true of complexity, an inherently interdisciplinary concept that has penetrated very different fields of intellectual activity from physics to linguistics, but with no underlying, unified theory. Complexity has become a popular buzzword used in the hope of gaining attention or funding -- institutes and research networks associated with complex systems grow like mushrooms. Why and how did it happen that this vague notion has become a central motif in modern science? Is it only a fashion, a kind of sociological phenomenon, or is it a sign of a changing paradigm of our perception of the laws of nature and of the approaches required to understand them? Because virtually every real system is inherently extremely complicated, to say that a system is complex is almost an empty statement - couldn't an Institute of Complex Systems just as well be called an Institute for Almost Everything? Despite these valid concerns, the world is ...

  1. Controllability of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2011-03-01

    The ultimate proof of our understanding of natural or technological systems is reflected in our ability to control them. While control theory offers mathematical tools to steer engineered systems towards a desired state, we lack a general framework to control complex self-organized systems, like the regulatory network of a cell or the Internet. Here we develop analytical tools to study the controllability of an arbitrary complex directed network, identifying the set of driver nodes whose time-dependent control can guide the system's dynamics. We apply these tools to real and model networks, finding that sparse inhomogeneous networks, which emerge in many real complex systems, are the most difficult to control. In contrast, dense and homogeneous networks can be controlled via a few driver nodes. Counterintuitively, we find that in both model and real systems the driver nodes tend to avoid the hubs. We show that the robustness of control to link failure is determined by a core percolation problem, helping us understand why many complex systems are relatively insensitive to link deletion. The developed approach offers a framework to address the controllability of an arbitrary network, representing a key step towards the eventual control of complex systems.

  2. Algorithmic Relative Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cerra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Information content and compression are tightly related concepts that can be addressed through both classical and algorithmic information theories, on the basis of Shannon entropy and Kolmogorov complexity, respectively. The definition of several entities in Kolmogorov’s framework relies upon ideas from classical information theory, and these two approaches share many common traits. In this work, we expand the relations between these two frameworks by introducing algorithmic cross-complexity and relative complexity, counterparts of the cross-entropy and relative entropy (or Kullback-Leibler divergence found in Shannon’s framework. We define the cross-complexity of an object x with respect to another object y as the amount of computational resources needed to specify x in terms of y, and the complexity of x related to y as the compression power which is lost when adopting such a description for x, compared to the shortest representation of x. Properties of analogous quantities in classical information theory hold for these new concepts. As these notions are incomputable, a suitable approximation based upon data compression is derived to enable the application to real data, yielding a divergence measure applicable to any pair of strings. Example applications are outlined, involving authorship attribution and satellite image classification, as well as a comparison to similar established techniques.

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of the MHC: the evolution of class I duplication blocks, diversity and complexity from shark to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulski, Jerzy K; Shiina, Takashi; Anzai, Tatsuya; Kohara, Sakae; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2002-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genomic region is composed of a group of linked genes involved functionally with the adaptive and innate immune systems. The class I and class II genes are intrinsic features of the MHC and have been found in all the jawed vertebrates studied so far. The MHC genomic regions of the human and the chicken (B locus) have been fully sequenced and mapped, and the mouse MHC sequence is almost finished. Information on the MHC genomic structures (size, complexity, genic and intergenic composition and organization, gene order and number) of other vertebrates is largely limited or nonexistent. Therefore, we are mapping, sequencing and analyzing the MHC genomic regions of different human haplotypes and at least eight nonhuman species. Here, we review our progress with these sequences and compare the human MHC structure with that of the nonhuman primates (chimpanzee and rhesus macaque), other mammals (pigs, mice and rats) and nonmammalian vertebrates such as birds (chicken and quail), bony fish (medaka, pufferfish and zebrafish) and cartilaginous fish (nurse shark). This comparison reveals a complex MHC structure for mammals and a relatively simpler design for nonmammalian animals with a hypothetical prototypic structure for the shark. In the mammalian MHC, there are two to five different class I duplication blocks embedded within a framework of conserved nonclass I and/or nonclass II genes. With a few exceptions, the class I framework genes are absent from the MHC of birds, bony fish and sharks. Comparative genomics of the MHC reveal a highly plastic region with major structural differences between the mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. Additional genomic data are needed on animals of the reptilia, crocodilia and marsupial classes to find the origins of the class I framework genes and examples of structures that may be intermediate between the simple and complex MHC organizations of birds and mammals, respectively.

  4. Tuberous sclerosis complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jerman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder with a characteristic development of a benign tumorous growth in various tissues. Clinical picture is very heterogeneous, resulting in difficult diagnosis and unrecognized patients. In this article, we present pathophysiological basis for understanding the clinical picture and the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex. The skin, central nervous system, kidneys and heart are the most commonly affected sites. The disease course is progressive. Although the great majority of lesions are benign, life expectancy and quality of life are affected by their secondary impact. Until recently, the therapy has been only symptomatic, but nowadays the inhibitors of mTOR complex, such as everolimus, are efficient in reducing the growth of tumors.

  5. Synchronization in complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  6. Large erupted complex odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijeev Vasudevan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are a heterogeneous group of jaw bone lesions, classified as odontogenic tumors which usually include well-diversified dental tissues. Odontoma is a term introduced to the literature by Broca in 1867. Trauma, infection and hereditary factors are the possible causes of forming this kind of lesions. Among odontogenic tumors, they constitute about 2/3 of cases. These lesions usually develop slowly and asymptomatically, and in most cases they do not cross the bone borders. Two types of odontoma are recognized: compound and complex. Complex odontomas are less common than the compound variety in the ratio 1:2.3. Eruption of an odontoma in the oral cavity is rare. We present a case of complex odontoma, in which apparent eruption has occurred in the area of the right maxillary second molar region.

  7. Philosophy of complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The domain of nonlinear dynamical systems and its mathematical underpinnings has been developing exponentially for a century, the last 35 years seeing an outpouring of new ideas and applications and a concomitant confluence with ideas of complex systems and their applications from irreversible thermodynamics. A few examples are in meteorology, ecological dynamics, and social and economic dynamics. These new ideas have profound implications for our understanding and practice in domains involving complexity, predictability and determinism, equilibrium, control, planning, individuality, responsibility and so on. Our intention is to draw together in this volume, we believe for the first time, a comprehensive picture of the manifold philosophically interesting impacts of recent developments in understanding nonlinear systems and the unique aspects of their complexity. The book will focus specifically on the philosophical concepts, principles, judgments and problems distinctly raised by work in the domain of comple...

  8. Modeling Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Boccara, Nino

    2010-01-01

    Modeling Complex Systems, 2nd Edition, explores the process of modeling complex systems, providing examples from such diverse fields as ecology, epidemiology, sociology, seismology, and economics. It illustrates how models of complex systems are built and provides indispensable mathematical tools for studying their dynamics. This vital introductory text is useful for advanced undergraduate students in various scientific disciplines, and serves as an important reference book for graduate students and young researchers. This enhanced second edition includes: . -recent research results and bibliographic references -extra footnotes which provide biographical information on cited scientists who have made significant contributions to the field -new and improved worked-out examples to aid a student’s comprehension of the content -exercises to challenge the reader and complement the material Nino Boccara is also the author of Essentials of Mathematica: With Applications to Mathematics and Physics (Springer, 2007).

  9. Can Complexity be Planned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Koutny

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The long accepted complexity invariance of human languages has become controversial within the last decade. In investigations of the problem, both creole and planned languages have often been neglected. After a presentation of the scope of the invariance problem and the proposition of the natural to planned language continuum, this article will discuss the contribution of planned languages. It will analyze the complexity of Esperanto at the phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic levels, using linguistic data bases. The role of the L2 speech community and development of the language will also be taken into account when discussing the endurance of the same level of simplicity of this planned international language. The author argues that complexity can be variable and to some extent planned and maintained.

  10. Complex Strategic Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen

    to strategic decision making, Complex Strategic Choices presents a methodology which is further illustrated by a number of case studies and example applications. Dr. Techn. Steen Leleur has adapted previously established research based on feedback and input from various conferences, journals and students......Effective decision making requires a clear methodology, particularly in a complex world of globalisation. Institutions and companies in all disciplines and sectors are faced with increasingly multi-faceted areas of uncertainty which cannot always be effectively handled by traditional strategies....... Complex Strategic Choices provides clear principles and methods which can guide and support strategic decision making to face the many current challenges. By considering ways in which planning practices can be renewed and exploring the possibilities for acquiring awareness and tools to add value...

  11. Simulation in Complex Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Tamke, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper will discuss the role of simulation in extended architectural design modelling. As a framing paper, the aim is to present and discuss the role of integrated design simulation and feedback between design and simulation in a series of projects under the Complex Modelling framework. Complex...... performance, engage with high degrees of interdependency and allow the emergence of design agency and feedback between the multiple scales of architectural construction. This paper presents examples for integrated design simulation from a series of projects including Lace Wall, A Bridge Too Far and Inflated...... Restraint developed for the research exhibition Complex Modelling, Meldahls Smedie Gallery, Copenhagen in 2016. Where the direct project aims and outcomes have been reported elsewhere, the aim for this paper is to discuss overarching strategies for working with design integrated simulation....

  12. Modeling Complex Time Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Svatos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze complexity of time limits we can find especially in regulated processes of public administration. First we review the most popular process modeling languages. There is defined an example scenario based on the current Czech legislature which is then captured in discussed process modeling languages. Analysis shows that the contemporary process modeling languages support capturing of the time limit only partially. This causes troubles to analysts and unnecessary complexity of the models. Upon unsatisfying results of the contemporary process modeling languages we analyze the complexity of the time limits in greater detail and outline lifecycles of a time limit using the multiple dynamic generalizations pattern. As an alternative to the popular process modeling languages there is presented PSD process modeling language, which supports the defined lifecycles of a time limit natively and therefore allows keeping the models simple and easy to understand.

  13. Introduction to Complex Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bonitz, Michael; Ludwig, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Complex plasmas differ from traditional plasmas in many ways: these are low-temperature high pressure systems containing nanometer to micrometer size particles which may be highly charged and strongly interacting. The particles may be chemically reacting or be in contact with solid surfaces, and the electrons may show quantum behaviour. These interesting properties have led to many applications of complex plasmas in technology, medicine and science. Yet complex plasmas are extremely complicated, both experimentally and theoretically, and require a variety of new approaches which go beyond standard plasma physics courses. This book fills this gap presenting an introduction to theory, experiment and computer simulation in this field. Based on tutorial lectures at a very successful recent Summer Institute, the presentation is ideally suited for graduate students, plasma physicists and experienced undergraduates.

  14. Complex function theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sarason, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Complex Function Theory is a concise and rigorous introduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable. Written in a classical style, it is in the spirit of the books by Ahlfors and by Saks and Zygmund. Being designed for a one-semester course, it is much shorter than many of the standard texts. Sarason covers the basic material through Cauchy's theorem and applications, plus the Riemann mapping theorem. It is suitable for either an introductory graduate course or an undergraduate course for students with adequate preparation. The first edition was published with the title Notes on Co

  15. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N [Berkeley, CA; Corneillie, Todd M [Campbell, CA; Xu, Jide [Berkeley, CA

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  16. Complex HVPT and hyperasymptotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingbeck, John P [Mathematics Department, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Grosjean, Alain [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon(CNRS, UMR 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Jolicard, Georges [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon(CNRS, UMR 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2006-08-25

    Complex hypervirial perturbation theory (HVPT) is applied to the problem of a harmonic oscillator with a perturbation gx{sup 3}exp(i{psi}), for which the traditional Rayleigh-Schodinger perturbation theory has to be supplemented by hyperasymptotics for obtaining accurate resonance energies in the negative {psi} region. Complex HVPT gives accurate results for positive {psi} and for negative {psi} up to about vertical bar {phi} vertical bar = {pi}/24. The case of a quartic perturbed oscillator is also treated. (letter to the editor)

  17. Complexity, time and music

    OpenAIRE

    JEAN PIERRE BOON

    2009-01-01

    The concept of complexity as considered in terms of its algorithmic definition proposed by G.J. Chaitin and A.N. Kolmogorov is revisited for the dynamical complexity of music. When music pieces are cast in the form of time series of pitch variations, concepts of dynamical systems theory can be used to define new quantities such as the {\\em dimensionality} as a measure of the {\\em global temporal dynamics} of a music piece, and the Shanon {\\em entropy} as an evaluation of its {\\em local dynami...

  18. Complex matrix model duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.W.

    2010-11-15

    The same complex matrix model calculates both tachyon scattering for the c=1 non-critical string at the self-dual radius and certain correlation functions of half-BPS operators in N=4 super- Yang-Mills. It is dual to another complex matrix model where the couplings of the first model are encoded in the Kontsevich-like variables of the second. The duality between the theories is mirrored by the duality of their Feynman diagrams. Analogously to the Hermitian Kontsevich- Penner model, the correlation functions of the second model can be written as sums over discrete points in subspaces of the moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces. (orig.)

  19. Nonlinear dynamics and complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert; Fu, Xilin

    2014-01-01

    This important collection presents recent advances in nonlinear dynamics including analytical solutions, chaos in Hamiltonian systems, time-delay, uncertainty, and bio-network dynamics. Nonlinear Dynamics and Complexity equips readers to appreciate this increasingly main-stream approach to understanding complex phenomena in nonlinear systems as they are examined in a broad array of disciplines. The book facilitates a better understanding of the mechanisms and phenomena in nonlinear dynamics and develops the corresponding mathematical theory to apply nonlinear design to practical engineering.

  20. Complex logistics audit system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Marková

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex logistics audit system is a tool for realization of logistical audit in the company. The current methods for logistics auditare based on “ad hok” analysis of logisticsl system. This paper describes system for complex logistics audit. It is a global diagnosticsof logistics processes and functions of enterprise. The goal of logistics audit is to provide comparative documentation for managementabout state of logistics in company and to show the potential of logistics changes in order to achieve more effective companyperformance.

  1. Theories of computational complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Calude, C

    1988-01-01

    This volume presents four machine-independent theories of computational complexity, which have been chosen for their intrinsic importance and practical relevance. The book includes a wealth of results - classical, recent, and others which have not been published before.In developing the mathematics underlying the size, dynamic and structural complexity measures, various connections with mathematical logic, constructive topology, probability and programming theories are established. The facts are presented in detail. Extensive examples are provided, to help clarify notions and constructions. The lists of exercises and problems include routine exercises, interesting results, as well as some open problems.

  2. Applied complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Dettman, John W

    1965-01-01

    Analytic function theory is a traditional subject going back to Cauchy and Riemann in the 19th century. Once the exclusive province of advanced mathematics students, its applications have proven vital to today's physicists and engineers. In this highly regarded work, Professor John W. Dettman offers a clear, well-organized overview of the subject and various applications - making the often-perplexing study of analytic functions of complex variables more accessible to a wider audience. The first half of Applied Complex Variables, designed for sequential study, is a step-by-step treatment of fun

  3. Introduction to complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Priestley, H A

    2003-01-01

    Complex analysis is a classic and central area of mathematics, which is studied and exploited in a range of important fields, from number theory to engineering. Introduction to Complex Analysis was first published in 1985, and for this much awaited second edition the text has been considerably expanded, while retaining the style of the original. More detailed presentation is given of elementary topics, to reflect the knowledge base of current students. Exercise sets have beensubstantially revised and enlarged, with carefully graded exercises at the end of each chapter.This is the latest additi

  4. Complex variables II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Complex Variables II includes elementary mappings and Mobius transformation, mappings by general functions, conformal mappings and harmonic functions, applying complex functions to a

  5. Entropy, Search, Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Katona, Gyula O H; Tardos, Gábor

    2007-01-01

    The present volume is a collection of survey papers in the fields of entropy, search and complexity. They summarize the latest developments in their respective areas. More than half of the papers belong to search theory which lies on the borderline of mathematics and computer science, information theory and combinatorics, respectively. Search theory has variegated applications, among others in bioinformatics. Some of these papers also have links to linear statistics and communicational complexity. Further works survey the fundamentals of information theory and quantum source coding. The volume is recommended to experienced researchers as well as young scientists and students both in mathematics and computer science

  6. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. It may happen ... move the affected body part The cause of CRPS is unknown. There is no specific diagnostic test. ...

  7. Complex fate of paralogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szklarczyk, R.; Huynen, M.A.; Snel, B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thanks to recent high coverage mass-spectrometry studies and reconstructed protein complexes, we are now in an unprecedented position to study the evolution of biological systems. Gene duplications, known to be a major source of innovation in evolution, can now be readily examined in the

  8. Symmetry in Complex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze a few interrelated concepts about graphs, such as their degree, entropy, or their symmetry/asymmetry levels. These concepts prove useful in the study of different types of Systems, and particularly, in the analysis of Complex Networks. A System can be defined as any set of components functioning together as a whole. A systemic point of view allows us to isolate a part of the world, and so, we can focus on those aspects that interact more closely than others. Network Science analyzes the interconnections among diverse networks from different domains: physics, engineering, biology, semantics, and so on. Current developments in the quantitative analysis of Complex Networks, based on graph theory, have been rapidly translated to studies of brain network organization. The brain's systems have complex network features—such as the small-world topology, highly connected hubs and modularity. These networks are not random. The topology of many different networks shows striking similarities, such as the scale-free structure, with the degree distribution following a Power Law. How can very different systems have the same underlying topological features? Modeling and characterizing these networks, looking for their governing laws, are the current lines of research. So, we will dedicate this Special Issue paper to show measures of symmetry in Complex Networks, and highlight their close relation with measures of information and entropy.

  9. pyridine-carboxamide complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cadmium ions, but in different coordination environments, depending on the counter anion used. In addition, electronic absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements revealed a significant interaction of the four complexes with .... Data collection, data reduction, structure solu- tion/refinement were ...

  10. Surface complexation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption-desorption reactions are important processes that affect the transport of contaminants in the environment. Surface complexation models are chemical models that can account for the effects of variable chemical conditions, such as pH, on adsorption reactions. These models define specific ...

  11. unsymmetrical Schiff base complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The kinetics of thermal decomposition was stud- ied using thermal gravimetric method (TG) and Coats-Redfern equation. According to Coats-Redfern plots, the kinetics of thermal decomposition of the studied complexes is first-order in all stages. Also the kinetics and mechanism of the exchange reaction of the coordinated ...

  12. Life: Complexity and Diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are rewarded by flowering plants with nectar and superabundant pollen for the services of pollination rendered by them. As living organisms have adopted these newer ways of life and invaded an ever greater range of habitats, they have assumed larger sizes and more complex structures (Figure 2). Bacteria subsisting as ...

  13. schiff base complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The complexes of iron (II) and nickel (II) with schiff base derived from benzoin and 2-amino benzoic acid have been prepared. Solubility, melting point, decomposition temperature, conductance measurement, infrared (IR) and UV – Visible spectrophotometric studies were used in characterizing the compounds.

  14. Complexity driven photonics

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Disorder and chaos are ubiquitous phenomena that are mostly unwanted in applications. On the contrary, they can be exploited to create a new technology. In this talk I will summarize my research in this field, discussing chaotic energy harvesting, nonlinear stochastic resonance and complex nanolasers.

  15. Prediction of Biomolecular Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Vangone, Anna

    2017-04-12

    Almost all processes in living organisms occur through specific interactions between biomolecules. Any dysfunction of those interactions can lead to pathological events. Understanding such interactions is therefore a crucial step in the investigation of biological systems and a starting point for drug design. In recent years, experimental studies have been devoted to unravel the principles of biomolecular interactions; however, due to experimental difficulties in solving the three-dimensional (3D) structure of biomolecular complexes, the number of available, high-resolution experimental 3D structures does not fulfill the current needs. Therefore, complementary computational approaches to model such interactions are necessary to assist experimentalists since a full understanding of how biomolecules interact (and consequently how they perform their function) only comes from 3D structures which provide crucial atomic details about binding and recognition processes. In this chapter we review approaches to predict biomolecular complexesBiomolecular complexes, introducing the concept of molecular dockingDocking, a technique which uses a combination of geometric, steric and energetics considerations to predict the 3D structure of a biological complex starting from the individual structures of its constituent parts. We provide a mini-guide about docking concepts, its potential and challenges, along with post-docking analysis and a list of related software.

  16. Conversation, coupling and complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Abney, Drew; Bahrami, Bahador

    We investigate the linguistic co-construction of interpersonal synergies. By applying a measure of coupling between complex systems to an experimentally elicited corpus of joint decision dialogues, we show that interlocutors’ linguistic behavior displays increasing signature of multi-scale coupli...

  17. Automatic Complexity Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mads

    1989-01-01

    One way to analyse programs is to to derive expressions for their computational behaviour. A time bound function (or worst-case complexity) gives an upper bound for the computation time as a function of the size of input. We describe a system to derive such time bounds automatically using abstract...

  18. Debating complexity in modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Randall J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    1999-01-01

    Complexity in modeling would seem to be an issue of universal importance throughout the geosciences, perhaps throughout all science, if the debate last year among groundwater modelers is any indication. During the discussion the following questions and observations made up the heart of the debate.

  19. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Mobs, Esma Anais

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark blue line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  20. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Haffner, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  1. Psychopathology and complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Y. Álvarez R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paradigm of complexity states that reality conveys a chaotic dynamics, ambiguous, blurred, and paradoxical, and that it does not fulfill the values of order, harmony nor perfection. However, such a chaos represents a specific way of organization and order. Human behavior explained by this paradigm vindicates on this way the outstanding role of contradiction and irregularity aside of what is linear and predictable. The purpose of this review has the primary aim to describe some concepts and assumptions that give support to the approach to complexity in behavior, especially concerning the psychopathological behavior of an individual. Some comparisons with concepts associated to complexity in scientific approaches to psychology (contextual and paradigmatical behaviorism and interbehaviorism from its own persepctive are stablished. All these elements are developed underlining the concepts of reciprocal multicausality, complex and hierarchical learning, historical and contextual factors in the comprehension of behavior, and trying to make some extrapolations on the psychopathological behavior. This approach is hence considered appropriate and necessary to understand gnosiological entities and to intervene them in their role of clinical challenges.

  2. The CERN accelerator complex

    CERN Multimedia

    Christiane Lefèvre

    2008-01-01

    The LHC is the last ring (dark grey line) in a complex chain of particle accelerators. The smaller machines are used in a chain to help boost the particles to their final energies and provide beams to a whole set of smaller experiments, which also aim to uncover the mysteries of the Universe.

  3. Tevatron's complex collider cousins

    CERN Multimedia

    Fischer, W

    2004-01-01

    Letter referring to Schwarzschild's story "Disappointing performance and tight budgets confront Fermilab with tough decisions" and contesting that the Tevatron is not the most complex accelerator operating. They use the examples of CERN's SPS collider, HERA at DESY and the RHIC at Brookhaven (1/4 page)

  4. Architecture of Glaciotectonic Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig A. Schack Pedersen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glaciotectonic studies are an integrated part of the Quaternary geological research carried out by the Danish geological survey. Almost all the hilly areas in Denmark were created or affected by glaciotectonic deformations, and the features are included in the mapping of surface near deposits. For the mapping and support of constructing 3D geological models a classification of architecture of glaciotectonic complexes is suggested. The important elements for classification of architecture are the surfaces. Four orders of surfaces are defined for glaciotectonic complexes: first-order surfaces are décollement surfaces and glaciotectonic unconformities; second-order surfaces are ramps and flats—the thrust faults; third-order surfaces are folded beds—anticlines and synclines; and fourth-order surfaces are small scale folds and faults—kink bands, conjugate faults, box folds, etc. The most important first-order surface is the décollement surface. This surface limits the glaciotectonic complex at its base and controls the extent of glaciotectonic disturbances. Below this surface, ordinary flat lying planar bedding occurs, whereas above the surface a number of structures are present characteristic of second- to fourth-order elements in the glaciotectonic architecture. The other first-order surface is the topographic top of the glaciotectonic complex, which eventually may be replaced by a truncating unconformity.

  5. Real and complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Apelian, Christopher; Taft, Earl; Nashed, Zuhair

    2009-01-01

    The Spaces R, Rk, and CThe Real Numbers RThe Real Spaces RkThe Complex Numbers CPoint-Set Topology Bounded SetsClassification of Points Open and Closed SetsNested Intervals and the Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem Compactness and Connectedness Limits and Convergence Definitions and First Properties Convergence Results for SequencesTopological Results for Sequences Properties of Infinite SeriesManipulations of Series in RFunctions: Definitions and Limits DefinitionsFunctions as MappingsSome Elementary Complex FunctionsLimits of FunctionsFunctions: Continuity and Convergence Continuity Uniform Continuity Sequences and Series of FunctionsThe DerivativeThe Derivative for f: D1 → RThe Derivative for f: Dk → RThe Derivative for f: Dk → RpThe Derivative for f: D → CThe Inverse and Implicit Function TheoremsReal IntegrationThe Integral of f: [a, b] → RProperties of the Riemann Integral Further Development of Integration TheoryVector-Valued and Line IntegralsComplex IntegrationIntroduction to Complex Integrals Fu...

  6. Aquaporins in complex tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, S; Zeuthen, T; La Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    Multiple physiological fluid movements are involved in vision. Here we define the cellular and subcellular sites of aquaporin (AQP) water transport proteins in human and rat eyes by immunoblotting, high-resolution immunocytochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. AQP3 is abundant in bulbar......, predicting specific roles for each in the complex network through which water movements occur in the eye....

  7. Optical Complex Systems 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Guillaume

    The Optical Complex Systems are more and more in the heart of various systems that industrial applications bring to everyday life. From environment up to spatial applications, OCS is also relevant in monitoring, transportation, robotics, life sciences, sub-marine, and even for agricultural purposes.

  8. Life Complexity and Diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    like sponges or mushrooms have just a few kinds of cells, more complex organisms like crabs or frogs have tens of different kinds of cells. These cells relate to each other in many different ways; the most advanced of these is through connections of nerve cells. Each nerve cell has many processes which link to other nerve, ...

  9. Accessibility in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travençolo, B. A. N.; da F. Costa, L.

    2008-12-01

    This Letter describes a method for the quantification of the diversity of non-linear dynamics in complex networks as a consequence of self-avoiding random walks. The methodology is analyzed in the context of theoretical models and illustrated with respect to the characterization of the accessibility in urban streets.

  10. Managing complex child law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Idamarie Leth

    2017-01-01

    The article reports the findings of a qualitative study of Danish legal regulation of the public initial assessment of children and young persons and municipal practitioners’ decision-making under this regulation. The regulation mirrors new and complex relations between families and society and t...

  11. The hamstring muscle complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Made, A. D.; Wieldraaijer, T.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Kleipool, R. P.; Engebretsen, L.; van Dijk, C. N.; Golanó, P.

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical appearance of the hamstring muscle complex was studied to provide hypotheses for the hamstring injury pattern and to provide reference values of origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, musculotendinous junction (MTJ) length as well as width and length of a tendinous

  12. Complexity measures of music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, April; Mahmoodi, Korosh; West, Bruce J.

    2018-03-01

    We present a technique to search for the presence of crucial events in music, based on the analysis of the music volume. Earlier work on this issue was based on the assumption that crucial events correspond to the change of music notes, with the interesting result that the complexity index of the crucial events is mu ~ 2, which is the same inverse power-law index of the dynamics of the brain. The search technique analyzes music volume and confirms the results of the earlier work, thereby contributing to the explanation as to why the brain is sensitive to music, through the phenomenon of complexity matching. Complexity matching has recently been interpreted as the transfer of multifractality from one complex network to another. For this reason we also examine the mulifractality of music, with the observation that the multifractal spectrum of a computer performance is significantly narrower than the multifractal spectrum of a human performance of the same musical score. We conjecture that although crucial events are demonstrably important for information transmission, they alone are not suficient to define musicality, which is more adequately measured by the multifractality spectrum.

  13. A Complex Lens for a Complex Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Aaron L; Baucom, Regina S; Cook, Tiffany A; Buschbeck, Elke K

    2017-09-02

    A key innovation for high resolution eyes is a sophisticated lens that precisely focuses light onto photoreceptors. The eyes of holometabolous larvae range from very simple eyes that merely detect light to eyes that are capable of high spatial resolution. Particularly interesting are the bifocal lenses of Thermonectus marmoratus larvae, which differentially focus light on spectrally-distinct retinas. While functional aspects of insect lenses have been relatively well studied, little work has explored their molecular makeup, especially in regard to more complex eye types. To investigate this question, we took a transcriptomic and proteomic approach to identify the major proteins contributing to the principal bifocal lenses of T. marmoratus larvae. Mass spectrometry revealed 10 major lens proteins. Six of these share sequence homology with cuticular proteins, a large class of proteins that are also major components of corneal lenses from adult compound eyes of Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae. Two proteins were identified as house-keeping genes and the final two lack any sequence homologies to known genes. Overall the composition seems to follow a pattern of co-opting transparent and optically dense proteins, similar to what has been described for other animal lenses. To identify cells responsible for the secretion of specific lens proteins, we performed in situ hybridization studies and found some expression differences between distal and proximal corneagenous cells. Since the distal cells likely give rise to the periphery and the proximal cells to the center of the lens, our findings highlight a possible mechanism for establishing structural differences that are in line with the bifocal nature of these lenses. A better understanding of lens composition provides insights into the evolution of proper focusing, which is an important step in the transition between low-resolution and high-resolution eyes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University

  14. PAComplex: a web server to infer peptide antigen families and binding models from TCR-pMHC complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, I-Hsin; Lo, Yu-Shu; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2011-07-01

    One of the most adaptive immune responses is triggered by specific T-cell receptors (TCR) binding to peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). Despite the availability of many prediction servers to identify peptides binding to MHC, these servers are often lacking in peptide-TCR interactions and detailed atomic interacting models. PAComplex is the first web server investigating both pMHC and peptide-TCR interfaces to infer peptide antigens and homologous peptide antigens of a query. This server first identifies significantly similar TCR-pMHC templates (joint Z-value ≥ 4.0) of the query by using antibody-antigen and protein-protein interacting scoring matrices for peptide-TCR and pMHC interfaces, respectively. PAComplex then identifies the homologous peptide antigens of these hit templates from complete pathogen genome databases (≥10(8) peptide candidates from 864,628 protein sequences of 389 pathogens) and experimental peptide databases (80,057 peptides in 2287 species). Finally, the server outputs peptide antigens and homologous peptide antigens of the query and displays detailed interacting models (e.g. hydrogen bonds and steric interactions in two interfaces) of hitTCR-pMHC templates. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed server can achieve high prediction accuracy and offer potential peptide antigens across pathogens. We believe that the server is able to provide valuable insights for the peptide vaccine and MHC restriction. The PAComplex sever is available at http://PAcomplex.life.nctu.edu.tw.

  15. KAMPOR MEMORIAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Krušec

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kampor Memorial Complex, which was built in 1953 to a design by architect Edvard Ravnikar, is situated on the site of a former cemetery, where between 1942 and 1943 the Italians buried the prisoners who died in the concentration camp on the Island of Rab. Along with the description of the architectural design of the Kampor Memorial Complex on the Island of Rab, the purpose of the paper is to show the most significant models and motivations influencing this particular architectural creation by Ravnikar. The analysis of spatial sequences of the memorial complex served as a basis to study the architectural concept of the cemetery, as described in the paper. The layout of the cemetery is longitudinal. The transversal terraces formulating the lines of graves are longitudinally cut in the middle by a paved path representing the central communication axis of the memorial complex. The path is additionally defined by a sequence of three stone obelisks of different heights, situated along the path. Along the path, three major programmatic emphases can be identified: the entrance vestibule, the platform with the great obelisk and a water tank, and the area below the vaulted structure in stone, also called the Museum. The paper describes the models and influences underlying the creation of Ravnikar's architectural design of the Kampor Memorial Complex on the Island of Rab, particularly Le Corbusier's influence on Ravnikar in the 1940's and the 1950's. In many ways, Ravnikar's stay in Paris and work with Le Corbusier in 1938 round off his basic architectural education; nevertheless, he remained rooted in the classical architectural elements that he obtained in his studies, particularly in the seminar by Jože Plečnik.

  16. Catalytic organometallic anticancer complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougan, Sarah J.; Habtemariam, Abraha; McHale, Sarah E.; Parsons, Simon; Sadler, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Organometallic complexes offer chemistry that is not accessible to purely organic molecules and, hence, potentially new mechanisms of drug action. We show here that the presence of both an iodido ligand and a σ-donor/π-acceptor phenylazopyridine ligand confers remarkable inertness toward ligand substitution on the half-sandwich “piano-stool” ruthenium arene complexes [(η6-arene)Ru(azpy)I]+ (where arene = p-cymene or biphenyl, and azpy = N,N-dimethylphenyl- or hydroxyphenyl-azopyridine) in aqueous solution. Surprisingly, despite this inertness, these complexes are highly cytotoxic to human ovarian A2780 and human lung A549 cancer cells. Fluorescence-trapping experiments in A549 cells suggest that the cytotoxicity arises from an increase in reactive oxygen species. Redox activity of these azopyridine RuII complexes was confirmed by electrochemical measurements. The first one-electron reduction step (half-wave potential −0.2 to −0.4 V) is assignable to reduction of the azo group of the ligand. In contrast, the unbound azopyridine ligands are not readily reduced. Intriguingly the ruthenium complex acted as a catalyst in reactions with the tripeptide glutathione (γ-l-Glu-l-Cys-Gly), a strong reducing agent present in cells at millimolar concentrations; millimolar amounts of glutathione were oxidized to glutathione disulfide in the presence of micromolar ruthenium concentrations. A redox cycle involving glutathione attack on the azo bond of coordinated azopyridine is proposed. Such ligand-based redox reactions provide new concepts for the design of catalytic drugs. PMID:18687892

  17. Interdisciplinary Symposium on Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rössler, Otto; Zelinka, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The book you hold in your hands is the outcome of the “2014 Interdisciplinary Symposium on Complex Systems” held in the historical city of Florence. The book consists of 37 chapters from 4 areas of Physical Modeling of Complex Systems, Evolutionary Computations, Complex Biological Systems and Complex Networks. All 4 parts contain contributions that give interesting point of view on complexity in different areas in science and technology. The book starts with a comprehensive overview and classification of complexity problems entitled Physics in the world of ideas: Complexity as Energy”  , followed by chapters about complexity measures and physical principles, its observation, modeling and its applications, to solving various problems including real-life applications. Further chapters contain recent research about evolution, randomness and complexity, as well as complexity in biological systems and complex networks. All selected papers represent innovative ideas, philosophical overviews and state-of-the-...

  18. Crystal structure of the novel complex formed between zinc alpha2-glycoprotein (ZAG) and prolactin-inducible protein (PIP) from human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Bilgrami, Sameeta; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Nagendra; Yadav, Savita; Kaur, Punit; Singh, T P

    2008-12-19

    This is the first report on the formation of a complex between zinc alpha2-glycoprotein (ZAG) and prolactin-inducible protein (PIP). The complex was purified from human seminal plasma and crystallized using 20% polyethylene glycol 9000 and 5% hexaethylene glycol. The structure of the complex has been determined using X-ray crystallographic method and refined to an R(cryst) of 0.199 (R(free)=0.239). The structure of ZAG is broadly similar to the structure of serum ZAG. The scaffolding of PIP consists of seven beta-strands that are organized in the form of two antiparallel beta-pleated sheets, resulting in the formation of a sandwiched beta-sheet. The amino acid sequence of PIP contains one potential N-glycosylation site at Asn77, and the same is found glycosylated with four sugar residues. The structure of the complex shows that the beta-structure of PIP is ideally aligned with the beta-structure of domain alpha3 of ZAG to form a long interface between two proteins. The proximal beta-strands at the long interface are arranged in an antiparallel manner. There are 12 hydrogen bonds and three salt bridges between ZAG and PIP. At the two ends of vertical interface, two salt bridges are formed between pairs of Lys41-Asp233 and Lys68-Glu229. On the perpendicular interface involving alpha1-alpha2 domains of ZAG and a loop of PIP, another salt bridge is formed. The internal space at the corner of the L-shaped structure is filled with solvent molecules including a carbonate ion. The overall buried area in the complex is approximately 914 A(2), which is considerably higher than the 660 A(2) reported for the class I major histocompatibility complex structures.

  19. Complex Feeding Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Miles PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Where swallowing difficulties are chronic or progressive, or a patient is palliative, tube feeding is often not deemed appropriate. Instead, patients continue to eat and drink despite the risks of pneumonia and death. There is currently little evidence to guide clinical practice in this field often termed “risk feeding.” This qualitative study investigated staff, patient, and family member perceptions of risk feeding practices in one New Zealand hospital. Method: Twenty-nine staff members and six patients and/or their family were interviewed. Results: Thematic analysis revealed four global themes: supporting practice, communication, complexity of feeding decisions, and patient and family-centered care. Staff described limited education and organizational policy around risk feeding decisions. Communication was considered a major factor in the success. Conclusion: Feeding decisions are complex in the hospital environment. The themes identified in this study provide a foundation for hospital guideline development and implementation.

  20. Reducing GWAS Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelett, Dennis J; Conti, David V; Han, Ying; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Easton, Doug; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Haiman, Christopher A; Coetzee, Gerhard A

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed numerous genomic 'hits' associated with complex phenotypes. In most cases these hits, along with surrogate genetic variation as measure by numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are in linkage disequilibrium, are not in coding genes making assignment of functionality or causality intractable. Here we propose that fine-mapping along with the matching of risk SNPs at chromatin biofeatures lessen this complexity by reducing the number of candidate functional/causal SNPs. For example, we show here that only on average 2 SNPs per prostate cancer risk locus are likely candidates for functionality/causality; we further propose that this manageable number should be taken forward in mechanistic studies. The candidate SNPs can be looked up for each prostate cancer risk region in 2 recent publications in 2015 (1,2) from our groups.

  1. Complex conductivity of soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revil, A.; Coperey, A.; Shao, Z.

    2017-01-01

    to 45 kHz. The soil samples are saturated with 6 different NaCl brines with conductivities (0.031, 0.53, 1.15, 5.7, 14.7, and 22 S m-1, NaCl, 25°C) in order to determine their intrinsic formation factor and surface conductivity. This dataset is used to test the predictions of the dynamic Stern......The complex conductivity of soil remains poorly known despite the growing importance of this method in hyrogeophysics. In order to fill this gap of knowledge, we investigate the complex conductivity of 71 soils samples (including 4 peat samples) and one clean sand in the frequency range 0.1 Hertz...

  2. Polystochastic Models for Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Iordache, Octavian

    2010-01-01

    This book is devoted to complexity understanding and management, considered as the main source of efficiency and prosperity for the next decades. Divided into six chapters, the book begins with a presentation of basic concepts as complexity, emergence and closure. The second chapter looks to methods and introduces polystochastic models, the wave equation, possibilities and entropy. The third chapter focusing on physical and chemical systems analyzes flow-sheet synthesis, cyclic operations of separation, drug delivery systems and entropy production. Biomimetic systems represent the main objective of the fourth chapter. Case studies refer to bio-inspired calculation methods, to the role of artificial genetic codes, neural networks and neural codes for evolutionary calculus and for evolvable circuits as biomimetic devices. The fifth chapter, taking its inspiration from systems sciences and cognitive sciences looks to engineering design, case base reasoning methods, failure analysis, and multi-agent manufacturing...

  3. Gold Thione Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caddeo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of the ligand Et4todit (4,5,6,7-Tetrathiocino-[1,2-b:3,4-b']-diimidazolyl-1,3,8,10-tetraethyl-2,9-dithione with gold complexes leads to the dinuclear gold(I complexes [{Au(C6F5}2(Et4todit] and [Au(Et4todit]2(OTf2, which do not contain any gold-gold interactions, or to the gold(III derivative [{Au(C6F53}2(Et4todit]. The crystal structures have been established by X-ray diffraction studies and show that the gold centers coordinate to the sulfur atoms of the imidazoline-2-thione groups.

  4. Complexes Tickling the $ubject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Gildersleeve

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article continues my earlier work of reading Jung with Lacan. This article will develop Zizek’s work on Lacan’s concept of objet petit a by relating it to a phenomenological interpretation of Jung. I use a number of different examples, including Zizek’s interpretation of Francis Bacon, Edvard Munch, Hans Holbein and Johann Gottlieb Fichte, to describe the objet petit a and its relationship to a phenomenological interpretation of complexes. By integrating other Lacanian concepts, such as subject, drive, fantasy, jouissance, gaze, desire, and ego as well as the imaginary, symbolic and Real, this work also highlights how Hegel and Heidegger can elucidate the relationship between objet petit a and complexes. Jung’s transcendent function and the Rosarium Philosophorum also elucidate the relationship between Jung and Lacan.

  5. Complex Strategic Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen

    resulting in new material stemming from and focusing on practical application of a systemic approach. The outcome is a coherent and flexible approach named systemic planning. The inclusion of both the theoretical and practical aspects of systemic planning makes this book a key resource for researchers......Effective decision making requires a clear methodology, particularly in a complex world of globalisation. Institutions and companies in all disciplines and sectors are faced with increasingly multi-faceted areas of uncertainty which cannot always be effectively handled by traditional strategies....... Complex Strategic Choices provides clear principles and methods which can guide and support strategic decision making to face the many current challenges. By considering ways in which planning practices can be renewed and exploring the possibilities for acquiring awareness and tools to add value...

  6. Resilience and Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlberg, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores two key concepts: resilience and complexity. The first is understood as an emergent property of the latter, and their inter-relatedness is discussed using a three tier approach. First, by exploring the discourse of each concept, next, by analyzing underlying relationships and......, finally, by presenting the Cynefin Framework for Sense-Making as a tool of explicatory potential that has already shown its usefulness in several contexts. I further emphasize linking the two concepts into a common and, hopefully, useful concept. Furthermore, I argue that a resilient system is not merely...... robust. Robustness is a property of simple or complicated systems characterized by predictable behavior, enabling the system to bounce back to its normal state following a perturbation. Resilience, however, is an emergent property of complex adaptive systems. It is suggested that this distinction...

  7. Minimum Complexity Pursuit

    CERN Document Server

    Jalali, Shirin

    2011-01-01

    The fast growing field of compressed sensing is founded on the fact that if a signal is 'simple' and has some 'structure', then it can be reconstructed accurately with far fewer samples than its ambient dimension. Many different plausible structures have been explored in this field, ranging from sparsity to low-rankness and to finite rate of innovation. However, there are important abstract questions that are yet to be answered. For instance, what are the general abstract meanings of 'structure' and 'simplicity'? Do there exist universal algorithms for recovering such simple structured objects from fewer samples than their ambient dimension? In this paper, we aim to address these two questions. Using algorithmic information theory tools such as Kolmogorov complexity, we provide a unified method of describing 'simplicity' and 'structure'. We then explore the performance of an algorithm motivated by Ocam's Razor (called MCP for minimum complexity pursuit) and show that it requires $O(k\\log n)$ number of samples...

  8. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    The two branches of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions...... or meromorphic (allowing poles as singularities) functions. There already exists a well-developed theory for iterative holomorphic dynamical systems, and successful relations found between iteration theory and flows of vector fields have been one of the main motivations for the recent interest in holomorphic...... vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...

  9. Complexity of the Ephemeral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    This brief article presents the everyday cultural use of the Snapchat instant messaging application for video chats as an exemplary case of the challenges confronting studies of cinematics in an epoch marked by the rise in network societies of ubiquitous mobile and social media and technics....... It proffers and begins to detail the argument that snap video chats cannot be denigrated as mere ‘shorts’ but must be approached as spatiotemporally and experientally complex....

  10. Operational Shock Complexity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-26

    too kind to state that they envisaged complexity theory. The idea of Cognitive Dissonance is accredited to Leon Festinger and is at heart that awful...on psychological elements. 3 This monograph will only touch on a couple of the areas of change and why the concept of operational shock must evolve...attack (and thus was physical in nature), which would lead to a psychological outcome, namely the loss of will to continue fighting.44 This will to

  11. Complex regional pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Koryachkin

    2011-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent mo...

  12. Arithmetic of Complex Manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    It was the aim of the Erlangen meeting in May 1988 to bring together number theoretists and algebraic geometers to discuss problems of common interest, such as moduli problems, complex tori, integral points, rationality questions, automorphic forms. In recent years such problems, which are simultaneously of arithmetic and geometric interest, have become increasingly important. This proceedings volume contains 12 original research papers. Its main topics are theta functions, modular forms, abelian varieties and algebraic three-folds.

  13. Complex Flows by Nanohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alley, E; Covello, P; Alder, B

    2004-03-01

    The study of complex flows by particle simulations is speeded up over molecular dynamics (MD) by more than two orders of magnitude by employing a stochastic collision dynamics method (DSMC) extended to high density (CBA). As a consequence, a picture generated on a single processor shows the typical features of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and is in quantitative agreement with the experimentally found long time behavior.

  14. Control of complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Albertos, Pedro; Blanke, Mogens; Isidori, Alberto; Schaufelberger, Walter; Sanz, Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    The world of artificial systems is reaching complexity levels that es­ cape human understanding. Surface traffic, electricity distribution, air­ planes, mobile communications, etc. , are examples that demonstrate that we are running into problems that are beyond classical scientific or engi­ neering knowledge. There is an ongoing world-wide effort to understand these systems and develop models that can capture its behavior. The reason for this work is clear, if our lack of understanding deepens, we will lose our capability to control these systems and make they behave as we want. Researchers from many different fields are trying to understand and develop theories for complex man-made systems. This book presents re­ search from the perspective of control and systems theory. The book has grown out of activities in the research program Control of Complex Systems (COSY). The program has been sponsored by the Eu­ ropean Science Foundation (ESF) which for 25 years has been one of the leading players in stimula...

  15. Advanced complex trait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A; Stewart, I; Tenesa, A

    2012-12-01

    The Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA) software package can quantify the contribution of genetic variation to phenotypic variation for complex traits. However, as those datasets of interest continue to increase in size, GCTA becomes increasingly computationally prohibitive. We present an adapted version, Advanced Complex Trait Analysis (ACTA), demonstrating dramatically improved performance. We restructure the genetic relationship matrix (GRM) estimation phase of the code and introduce the highly optimized parallel Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) library combined with manual parallelization and optimization. We introduce the Linear Algebra PACKage (LAPACK) library into the restricted maximum likelihood (REML) analysis stage. For a test case with 8999 individuals and 279,435 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we reduce the total runtime, using a compute node with two multi-core Intel Nehalem CPUs, from ∼17 h to ∼11 min. The source code is fully available under the GNU Public License, along with Linux binaries. For more information see http://www.epcc.ed.ac.uk/software-products/acta. a.gray@ed.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. The Emparassment of Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotny, Helga

    My vision of complexity sciences targets their potential to extend the range, precision, and depth in making predictions. While this has always been the ambition and yardstick for the physicalmathematical sciences, complexity sciences now allow to include society and social behavior - to some extent. There is agreement that society is a complex adaptive system, CAS, with a few peculiarities. Ignoring, downplaying, or naturalizing them, i.e. to take them as essential and given, carries the risk to end up with abstractions which are cutoff from the dynamics of societal contexts. One of the peculiarities of society as a CAS is that the models with which we try to make sense of the world are invented and constructed by us. It is humans who make observations and provide the assumptions on which models are based. Humans leave traces that are collected and processed to be transformed into data. Humans decide to which purpose they will be put and how they will be repurposed. Humans are object of research and subject. Coping with these peculiarities requires an inbuilt reflexivity. Practioners must perform a double act and do so repeatedly. They must engage in a focused way with their scientific work and equally distance themselves by critically reflecting their often tacit assumptions. A friend of mine, Yehuda Elkana, called this twotier thinking...

  17. Predictive Surface Complexation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    2016-11-29

    Surface complexation plays an important role in the equilibria and kinetics of processes controlling the compositions of soilwaters and groundwaters, the fate of contaminants in groundwaters, and the subsurface storage of CO2 and nuclear waste. Over the last several decades, many dozens of individual experimental studies have addressed aspects of surface complexation that have contributed to an increased understanding of its role in natural systems. However, there has been no previous attempt to develop a model of surface complexation that can be used to link all the experimental studies in order to place them on a predictive basis. Overall, my research has successfully integrated the results of the work of many experimentalists published over several decades. For the first time in studies of the geochemistry of the mineral-water interface, a practical predictive capability for modeling has become available. The predictive correlations developed in my research now enable extrapolations of experimental studies to provide estimates of surface chemistry for systems not yet studied experimentally and for natural and anthropogenically perturbed systems.

  18. [Complex posttraumatic stress disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Tamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2007-11-01

    The characteristic symptoms resulting from exposure to an extreme trauma include three clusters of symptoms: persistent experience of the traumatic event, persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma and persistent symptoms of increased arousal. Beyond the accepted clusters of symptoms for posttraumatic stress disorder exists a formation of symptoms related to exposure to extreme or prolonged stress e.g. childhood abuse, physical violence, rape, and confinement within a concentration camp. With accumulated evidence of the existence of these symptoms began a trail to classify a more complex syndrome, which included, but was not confined to the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. This review addresses several subjects for study in complex posttraumatic stress disorder, which is a complicated and controversial topic. Firstly, the concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder is presented. Secondly, the professional literature relevant to this disturbance is reviewed and finally, the authors present the polemic being conducted between the researchers of posttraumatic disturbances regarding validity, reliability and the need for separate diagnosis for these symptoms.

  19. Emergent complex network geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-18

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  20. Complexity Leadership: A Theoretical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaci, Ali; Balci, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Complex systems are social networks composed of interactive employees interconnected through collaborative, dynamic ties such as shared goals, perspectives and needs. Complex systems are largely based on "the complex system theory". The complex system theory focuses mainly on finding out and developing strategies and behaviours that…

  1. Copper complexes as chemical nucleases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Copper(II) complexes; nuclease activity; catalytic properties; DNA binding. Abstract. Redox active mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes have been prepared and structurally characterized. ... The cleavage activity of the bis-dpq complex is significantly higher than the bis-phen complex of copper(II).

  2. Transition Complexity of Incomplete DFAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the transition complexity of regular languages based on the incomplete deterministic finite automata. A number of results on Boolean operations have been obtained. It is shown that the transition complexity results for union and complementation are very different from the state complexity results for the same operations. However, for intersection, the transition complexity result is similar to that of state complexity.

  3. The Stigma Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescosolido, Bernice A.; Martin, Jack K.

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, research on stigma has continued. Building on conceptual and empirical work, the recent period clarifies new types of stigmas, expansion of measures, identification of new directions, and increasingly complex levels. Standard beliefs have been challenged, the relationship between stigma research and public debates reconsidered, and new scientific foundations for policy and programs suggested. We begin with a summary of the most recent Annual Review articles on stigma, which reminded sociologists of conceptual tools, informed them of developments from academic neighbors, and claimed findings from the early period of “resurgence.” Continued (even accelerated) progress has also revealed a central problem. Terms and measures are often used interchangeably, leading to confusion and decreasing accumulated knowledge. Drawing from this work but focusing on the past 14 years of stigma research (including mental illness, sexual orientation, HIV/AIDS, and race/ethnicity), we provide a theoretical architecture of concepts (e.g., prejudice, experienced/received discrimination), drawn together through a stigma process (i.e., stigmatization), based on four theoretical premises. Many characteristics of the mark (e.g., discredited, concealable) and variants (i.e., stigma types and targets) become the focus of increasingly specific and multidimensional definitions. Drawing from complex and systems science, we propose a stigma complex, a system of interrelated, heterogeneous parts bringing together insights across disciplines to provide a more realistic and complicated sense of the challenge facing research and change efforts. The Framework Integrating Normative Influences on Stigma (FINIS) offers a multilevel approach that can be tailored to stigmatized statuses. Finally, we outline challenges for the next phase of stigma research, with the goal of continuing scientific activity that enhances our understanding of stigma and builds

  4. Complex Auditory Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    I I!ED REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE AD-A 199 332 b RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS 3. DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILITY OF REPORT A.Proved for pj ." ic release 2b...remarkably little experimental nent complexes. In the first experiment, a single evidence documenting these claims. Viemeister component of a 21-component...deci relts~to a l’rn NI betwen CtMRd tipoe ( 1959 ) and Gabriel and Colburn ( 1981 ) xk Ill be con- ot:ilcl tlope dlcelati ’o nos dids e lceredl .t% h

  5. Computability, complexity, logic

    CERN Document Server

    Börger, Egon

    1989-01-01

    The theme of this book is formed by a pair of concepts: the concept of formal language as carrier of the precise expression of meaning, facts and problems, and the concept of algorithm or calculus, i.e. a formally operating procedure for the solution of precisely described questions and problems. The book is a unified introduction to the modern theory of these concepts, to the way in which they developed first in mathematical logic and computability theory and later in automata theory, and to the theory of formal languages and complexity theory. Apart from considering the fundamental themes an

  6. Complex regional pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep J Sebastin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS previously known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic neurological disorder involving the limbs characterized by disabling pain, swelling, vasomotor instability, sudomotor abnormality, and impairment of motor function. CRPS is not uncommon after hand surgery and may complicate post-operative care. There is no specific diagnostic test for CRPS and the diagnosis is based on history, clinical examination, and supportive laboratory findings. Recent modifications to diagnostic criteria have enabled clinicians to diagnose this disease more consistently. This review gives a synopsis of CRPS and discusses the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment options based on the limited evidence in the literature.

  7. Complex Strategic Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen

    resulting in new material stemming from and focusing on practical application of a systemic approach. The outcome is a coherent and flexible approach named systemic planning. The inclusion of both the theoretical and practical aspects of systemic planning makes this book a key resource for researchers......Effective decision making requires a clear methodology, particularly in a complex world of globalisation. Institutions and companies in all disciplines and sectors are faced with increasingly multi-faceted areas of uncertainty which cannot always be effectively handled by traditional strategies...

  8. Fluorido complexes of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari

    2013-07-04

    Fluorine chemistry has received considerable interest during recent years due to its significant role in the life sciences, especially for drug development. Despite the great nuclear medicinal importance of the radioactive metal technetium in radiopharmaceuticals, its coordination chemistry with the fluorido ligand is by far less explored than that of other ligands. Up to now, only a few technetium fluorides are known. This thesis contains the synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of novel technetium fluorides in the oxidation states ''+1'', ''+2'', ''+4'' and ''+6''. In the oxidation state ''+6'', the fluoridotechnetates were synthesized either from nitridotechnetic(VI) acid or from pertechnetate by using reducing agent and have been isolated as cesium or tetraethylammonium salts. The compounds were characterized spectroscopically and structurally. In the intermediate oxidation state ''+4'', hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) was known for long time and studied spectroscopically. This thesis reports novel and improved syntheses and solved the critical issues of early publications such as the color, some spectroscopic properties and the structure of this key compound. Single crystal analyses of alkali metal, ammonium and tetramethylammonium salts of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) are presented. In aqueous alkaline solutions, the ammonium salt of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) undergoes hydrolysis and forms an oxido-bridged dimeric complex. It is the first step hydrolysis product of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) and was characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic methods. Low-valent technetium fluorides with the metal in the oxidation states of ''+2'' or ''+1'' are almost unknown. A detailed description of the synthesis and characterization of pentafluoridonitrosyltechnetate(II) is presented. The

  9. Complex adaptive systems ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2003-01-01

    In the following, I will analyze two articles called Complex Adaptive Systems EcologyI & II (Molin & Molin, 1997 & 2000). The CASE-articles are some of the more quirkyarticles that have come out of the Molecular Microbial Ecology Group - a groupwhere I am currently making observational studies....... They are the result of acooperation between Søren Molin, professor in the group, and his brother, JanMolin, professor at Department of Organization and Industrial Sociology atCopenhagen Business School. The cooperation arises from the recognition that bothmicrobial ecology and sociology/organization theory works...

  10. Kinetics of complex plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    The presentation in the book is based on charge balance on the dust particles, number and energy balance of the constituents and atom-ion-electron interaction in the gaseous plasma. Size distribution of dust particles, statistical mechanics, Quantum effects in electron emission from and accretion on dust particles and nonlinear interaction of complex plasmas with electric and electromagnetic fields have been discussed in the book. The book introduces the reader to basic concepts and typical applications. The book should be of use to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  11. Exploring complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strogatz, S H

    2001-03-08

    The study of networks pervades all of science, from neurobiology to statistical physics. The most basic issues are structural: how does one characterize the wiring diagram of a food web or the Internet or the metabolic network of the bacterium Escherichia coli? Are there any unifying principles underlying their topology? From the perspective of nonlinear dynamics, we would also like to understand how an enormous network of interacting dynamical systems-be they neurons, power stations or lasers-will behave collectively, given their individual dynamics and coupling architecture. Researchers are only now beginning to unravel the structure and dynamics of complex networks.

  12. Genetics of complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Møller, Gert Lykke; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    A complex disease with an inheritable component is polygenic, meaning that several different changes in DNA are the genetic basis for the disease. Such a disease may also be genetically heterogeneous, meaning that independent changes in DNA, i.e. various genotypes, can be the genetic basis...... for the disease. Each of these genotypes may be characterized by specific combinations of key genetic changes. It is suggested that even if all key changes are found in genes related to the biology of a certain disease, the number of combinations may be so large that the number of different genotypes may be close...

  13. Macroevolution of complex retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J; Tristem, Michael; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Pybus, Oliver G

    2009-09-18

    Retroviruses can leave a "fossil record" in their hosts' genomes in the form of endogenous retroviruses. Foamy viruses, complex retroviruses that infect mammals, have been notably absent from this record. We have found an endogenous foamy virus within the genomes of sloths and show that foamy viruses were infecting mammals more than 100 million years ago and codiverged with their hosts across an entire geological era. Our analysis highlights the role of evolutionary constraint in maintaining viral genome structure and indicates that accessory genes and mammalian mechanisms of innate immunity are the products of macroevolutionary conflict played out over a geological time scale.

  14. Complex performance in construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bougrain, Frédéric; Forman, Marianne; Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    of the industry. The main objective of this project was to understand how the development of integrated solutions in construction led to distinct configuration of actors and structures. Furthermore, the project analyses whether these changes modified project processes and contributed to the delivery of new value...... to the end users. This report summarises the results from work undertaken in the international collaborative project “Procuring and Operating Complex Products and Systems in Construction” (POCOPSC). POCOPSC was carried out in the period 2010-2014. The project was executed in collaboration between CSTB...

  15. Organization of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsak, Maksim

    Many large complex systems can be successfully analyzed using the language of graphs and networks. Interactions between the objects in a network are treated as links connecting nodes. This approach to understanding the structure of networks is an important step toward understanding the way corresponding complex systems function. Using the tools of statistical physics, we analyze the structure of networks as they are found in complex systems such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, and numerous industrial and social networks. In the first chapter we apply the concept of self-similarity to the study of transport properties in complex networks. Self-similar or fractal networks, unlike non-fractal networks, exhibit similarity on a range of scales. We find that these fractal networks have transport properties that differ from those of non-fractal networks. In non-fractal networks, transport flows primarily through the hubs. In fractal networks, the self-similar structure requires any transport to also flow through nodes that have only a few connections. We also study, in models and in real networks, the crossover from fractal to non-fractal networks that occurs when a small number of random interactions are added by means of scaling techniques. In the second chapter we use k-core techniques to study dynamic processes in networks. The k-core of a network is the network's largest component that, within itself, exhibits all nodes with at least k connections. We use this k-core analysis to estimate the relative leadership positions of firms in the Life Science (LS) and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sectors of industry. We study the differences in the k-core structure between the LS and the ICT sectors. We find that the lead segment (highest k-core) of the LS sector, unlike that of the ICT sector, is remarkably stable over time: once a particular firm enters the lead segment, it is likely to remain there for many years. In the third chapter we study how

  16. The Orpheus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, T

    2000-04-01

    This paper examines the possible psychological implications of two adaptations of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, both of which were completed in 1997. The first is by a man: 'Deconstructing Harry', a film by Woody Allen. The second is by a woman: 'Eurydice in the Underworld', a short story written by Kathy Acker in the last year of her life. The paper argues that there are only four 'necessary events' in the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. It defines the sequence of these events as a 'mythic pattern' that represents the experience of loss, unconscious yearning, depression, and psychological inflation. The film is examined as an expression of an 'Orpheus complex', the short story as an expression of an 'Eurydice complex'. The paper suggests a possible reason for the persistence of interest in the myth throughout the twentieth century. Although it notes that women appear to find it easier to free themselves from identification with the mythic pattern, it also provides reasons for thinking that men may be about to do the same.

  17. The authority of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehr, N; Grundmann, R

    2001-06-01

    The assertion about the unique 'complexity' or the peculiarly intricate character of social phenomena has, at least within sociology, a long, venerable and virtually uncontested tradition. At the turn of the last century, classical social theorists, for example, Georg Simmel and Emile Durkheim, made prominent and repeated reference to this attribute of the subject matter of sociology and the degree to which it complicates, even inhibits the develop and application of social scientific knowledge. Our paper explores the origins, the basis and the consequences of this assertion and asks in particular whether the classic complexity assertion still deserves to be invoked in analyses that ask about the production and the utilization of social scientific knowledge in modern society. We present John Maynard Keynes' economic theory and its practical applications as an illustration. We conclude that the practical value of social scientific knowledge is not dependent on a faithful, in the sense of complete, representation of social reality. Instead, social scientific knowledge that wants to optimize its practicality has to attend and attach itself to elements of social situations that can be altered or are actionable.

  18. Bound Exciton Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B. K.

    In the preceding chapter, we concentrated on the properties of free excitons. These free excitons may move through the sample and hit a trap, a nonradiative or a radiative recombination center. At low temperatures, the latter case gives rise to either deep center luminescence, mentioned in Sect. 7.1 and discussed in detail in Chap. 9, or to the luminescence of bound exciton complexes (BE or BEC). The chapter continues with the most prominent of these BECs, namely A-excitons bound to neutral donors. The next aspects are the more weakly BEs at ionized donors. The Sect. 7.4 treats the binding or localization energies of BEC from a theoretical point of view, while Sect. 7.5 is dedicated to excited states of BECs, which contain either holes from deeper valence bands or an envelope function with higher quantum numbers. The last section is devoted to donor-acceptor pair transitions. There is no section devoted specifically to excitons bound to neutral acceptors, because this topic is still partly controversially discussed. Instead, information on these A0X complexes is scattered over the whole chapter, however, with some special emphasis seen in Sects. 7.1, 7.4, and 7.5.

  19. Complexity in language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alexander; Lappin, Shalom

    2013-01-01

    Learning theory has frequently been applied to language acquisition, but discussion has largely focused on information theoretic problems-in particular on the absence of direct negative evidence. Such arguments typically neglect the probabilistic nature of cognition and learning in general. We argue first that these arguments, and analyses based on them, suffer from a major flaw: they systematically conflate the hypothesis class and the learnable concept class. As a result, they do not allow one to draw significant conclusions about the learner. Second, we claim that the real problem for language learning is the computational complexity of constructing a hypothesis from input data. Studying this problem allows for a more direct approach to the object of study--the language acquisition device-rather than the learnable class of languages, which is epiphenomenal and possibly hard to characterize. The learnability results informed by complexity studies are much more insightful. They strongly suggest that target grammars need to be objective, in the sense that the primitive elements of these grammars are based on objectively definable properties of the language itself. These considerations support the view that language acquisition proceeds primarily through data-driven learning of some form. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. Polyhydride complexes for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application in hydrogen storage. Efforts have focused on developing complexes with improved available hydrogen weight percentages. We have explored the possibility that complexes containing aromatic hydrocarbon ligands could store hydrogen at both the metal center and in the ligands. We have synthesized novel indenyl hydride complexes and explored their reactivity with hydrogen. The reversible hydrogenation of [IrH{sub 3}(PPh{sub 3})({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 10}H{sub 7})]{sup +} has been achieved. While attempting to prepare {eta}{sup 6}-tetrahydronaphthalene complexes, we discovered that certain polyhydride complexes catalyze both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalene.